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Florida star

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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Creation Date:
November 14, 2009
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00946

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Creation Date:
November 14, 2009
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00946

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Full Text




NOTHAT *LOIA'3 ODST ARGSMS-REDAFIAN3 AMERICA N OWED E3 APE


L i R;-PRr. OF FLORIDA HISTORIC'
:-l ~t.1 UNII OF FL (1.1.10
PO BOA 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007
Winning
Publication,
serving you
since 1951.
Rated "A" by
the Better
Business Bureau


)w orDAst


ww.thefloridastar.com


rau lil eI riUnIIu
and Georgia Star
Newspapers.
Listen to IMPACT
Radio Talk Show.
WWW.thefloridastar.com
We are the people's
choice, striving to
make a difference.


sNOVEMBER 14-NO BR029O5N.


Hanging Out Gang Style?

Somebody's Watching You

13 Charged with Racketeering


ITe men above an nine oters nave been cnargea as members or me
45th Street gang. Because of Florida's recent law, they are actually
charged with violating racketeering and conspiracy laws and can get up
to life in prison. The men have been under watchful eyes for about 18
months. About a month ago, members of the '103rd Street Gang' were
arrested. All were not arrested Thursday as some were already in jail
on other charges. This finding gives them additional charges.
Of the above, many are being held on a million dollars bond and some
are not eligible for bond. Officers said that some had crack cocaine in
the possession.
The 13 charged are: Donnell Carter, 19; Tyrone Gantt, 22; Tyree
Gantt, 19; Oscar Giles III, 21; Justin Green, 26; Edward Haney, 20;
Derrick Kirkland, 23; Bimely West, 19; Terry Smith, 21; Steve Sutton,
19; Freddie Richardson, 20; Deron Johnson, 20, and Raylan Johnson,
22. (The names and pictures are not all matched.)

Supreme Court Reviewing Life in
Prison for Juveniles
Florida is one of 19 states that allows a life sentence without parole for
juveniles tried as adults for crimes where no one is murdered. Over 100
prison inmates in the U.S. are serving life, most in Florida.
This is considered a cruel and unusual punishment, and therefore
unconstitutional by many who are asking the high court to change this.
The U. S. is the only country that allows life sentences for young offend-
ers.

Florida's CFO Empowers Young
Girls to Live Their Dream
by Cheryl Williams


Alex Sink (D) Florida's Chief Financial Officer and Gubernatorial
Candidate was the keynote speaker of a Junior Achievement (JA) fund
raising event Smart Women Make Change, a financial mentoring pro-
gram. The event was held at the Marriott Southpoint in Jacksonville. Ms.
Sink talked with business leaders and young women, who were partici-
pants in the mentoring program. Which focuses on how money manage-
ment can lead to empowerment.
In her speech to a packed room of participants and a Who's Who of
North Florida's financial community. Sink, who has been involved with
JA for 26 years, declared," One of the most important and profitable les-
son we can learn in life is, how to achieve financial security."
Florida Continued on A-7


Jacksonville's Own Performs


Angela Robinson, a Jacksonville native and graduate of Raines High
School plays the part of Shug Avery (red feathers) in The Color
Purple which begins Tuesday. See story on Page A-5.
The World's Most Powerful

People Who is at the Top?
World's Most Powerful Person was announced Wednesday by
Forbes Magazine and would you believe, President Barack Obama
led the list as the most powerful.
Forbes said in compiling their first ranking of the World's Most
Powerful People, they defined power in four dimensions. First, does
the person have influence over lots of others? Second they assessed
the financial resources controlled by these individuals; third it was
determined if they are powerful in multiple spheres.
They determined that that are only 67 slots on their lists and last,
does the person actively use his or her power? In the final rankings,
President Obama unanimously emerged as the world's most power-
ful, by a wide margin. Former President George Bush did not make
the final cut. Former President Clinton came in at 31 and his wife at
17.


The US Census Bureau is
Looking for Job Seekers

The US Census Bureau is testing applicants for
2010 Census jobs. The Bureau offers short-term
jobs with long-term results.
Most positions require citizenship, a driver's
license and use of a vehicle. Each applicant will
undergo a background check and the wages are
competitive with flexible schedules.
They are hiring locally from through the end of
May 2010.
For testing locations and additional information,
call 1-866-861-2010.

Elder Call to Action
National Elder, 91 year old
Dr. Edward W. Robinson, Jr.,
is calling to action those indi-
viduals and organizations that
are ready to step up and help
him implement his solution to
combat the rise in violence
and other social ills that dis-
proportionately affect the
African American community
Dr. Edward Robinson, For 65 years, Dr. Robinson,
Jr., 91, AGMG an author, attorney, activist,
curriculum specialist, film
maker, historian and past president of a Black-
owned insurance company has conducted numerous
experiments to define the causes of, and find the
solutions to, "the problem". This effort has led
Robinson to launch a new company called the
African Genesis Media Group (AGMG). He is call-
ing on all serious minded individuals and groups
who are sick and tired of their community being
plagued by "the problem"; to join him in this effort.


Detective Dies
While on Duty


Jacksonville police detec-
tive, Robert "Bobby" Ford
Robert Ford, an under-
cover detective with the
Jacksonville Sheriff's
Office spent more than 20
year with JSO. The 43
year old officer died
Wednesday of what
appeared to be a heart
attack while driving his
unmarked vehicle across
Hart Bridge. Mr. Ford
was highly respected and
loved. Worshipful
Master Ford was the
Master of Lorenzo Hall
Lodge #458. He was
funeralized on Tuesday,
November 10 at
Abyssinia Baptist
Church.


First Black Female
Master Sergeant
Gloria P Simon
became the first
black female to be
promoted to Chief
Master Sergeant in
the Florida Air
National Guard Nov.
7, 2007. Simon was
pinned at the 125th
Gloria R Simon Fighter Wing's
Florida Air National
Guard Base at Jacksonville International
Airport, Jacksonville, Florida. Simon was
also awarded the Florida Distinguished
Service Medal during the ceremony.
Major Gen. Douglas Burnett, the Adjutant
General of Florida and commander of the
Florida National Guard presented the
award.
Simon is currently serving as the asset
Management Flight Consolidated
Superintendent of Logistics Readiness
Squadron, 125th Fighter Wing. She is an
active guard reservist (AGR) whose pri-
mary duties include the guidance and
management of the fulltime asset man-
agement members and traditional
Guardsmen. She oversees, directs and
supervises the daily operation of distribu-
tion and storage, mobility readiness,
clothing issue, hazardous material phar-
macy and the mission readiness spares
package for the 125th Fighter Wing and
the Florida Air National Guard geograph-
ically separated units.
First Continued A-7


N Lifestyle..... N. -4


L o a. .. .. .. ..
Cou n ........ .. B-21
D S pot s, ..... ........ .... B -


z 51:'69 DEl' 0


anwee YStenyuDee.o laeana
904/766-8834 to place your ad TODAYHlllrll~t~ I
in The Flori a or G eorgia Star! C ALL

Chck Mne Ode; r reitCadsAcepe


Calli r (904)i 766-88L3 orTiSnitto:

j intheflorIidstar

Want to buy an ad.to reach more0peo.le?
Contact us at:H
ad~thefloridastar(com


1 0








NOVEMBER 14, 2009


PAGEA-2THESTA


-CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN
PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
LONZIE LEATH, MANAGING
DENNIS WADE
SALES & MARKETING
MAY FORD, LAYOUT EDITOR
SPECIAL SECTIONS
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN AND WEB SITE EDITOR
BETTY DAVIS
LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNIST
Investigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
info@thefloridastar.com
(912) 264-6700 Georgia
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Alachua, Flagler, Marion, McIntosh,
Camden And Glynn County
TheFloridaStar.com
The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$35.00
Half Year-$20.00
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsiblefor
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts orphotos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITOR
DAVID MILLER
SALES & MARKETING
DANIEL EVANS, SALES EXECUTIVE
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER

TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS

DISTRIBUTION
JAMES GREEN


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association






VERIFICATION
_


By William Jackson and
Nick McClenton

The result of Somer
Thompson's death causes
parents to embrace their
own children closer. Events
are obvious that parents can-
not take for granted that
their children are not in
potential danger when walk-
ing to and from school.
In cities the school bus
routes have changed to save
money on fuel and
resources, if a child lives
within two miles they are
required to walk to school
sometimes through neigh-
borhoods that are question-
able in safety. Parents
begin to question their new
responsibility to teach their
children how to be safe and
recognize dangers when
walking. Because of these
events and others in the
media I encourage parents,
as a parent, mentor and,
teacher to educate th6ir chil-
dren on how to be safe no
matter their color, ethnicity
or economic condition.


Our society has changed;
we need to be diligent in our
parental responsibilities to
protect our children and be
their first teachers of life. No
child should die as Somer
did or be abducted like
Haleigh Cummings, no
child should be taken
against their will. Parents
should not go through the
anguish and emotional trau-
ma that mothers, fathers and
family members are experi-
encing. Parents need to
teach their children how to
be safe and avoid danger
when approached by adults
and by other children.
Teach them to be aware of
their surrounds, everyone
does not have their best
interests at heart, that the
world at times is a danger-
ous place. I see many stu-
dents walking to my school
in the mornings and wish
that I could pick them up
and take them safely to
school, but the reality is this
presents a liability for me
and others that feel the same
way. Already I take several


Children's Safety and

Parent's Fears


THEFLOIDASTA


than onoterrai


stations! I IIrl~


The Other Side of Jacksonville
The Florida Star has been asked by some Jacksonville citizens to allow some
views to be presented weekly. We have agreed to do so with the understanding
that the articles written would not promote violence or hate. Let it be known that
the views and opinions expressed are not those of The Florida Star owner or
staff It is being accepted because some writers and readers feel their feelings
and fears are not being heard.
Taking a look at the political climate in Jacksonville, it looks like the
Republicans are lining up for the same old climate we have had for the past 20
years, them and them only. What is really ironic the same Americans of African
descent are lining up also? Yes everyone has a right to support whoever they
desire and Gwen Yates is no exception. What has she done for you lately? By
the way, has anyone followed the money lately on the current democrats in
office? They will tell you they have to get money from whom and where they can
to win the race, even if it is from the Republican side of the isle.
Wasn't that the case when former Sheriff Nat Glover ran for office and former
Senator Betty Holzendorf ran against him for Mayor to split the votes?
Oh no, wait, don't forget that she was a personal friend of the former Republican
party Chairman from Blue Cross and BlueShield, what's his name, oh yea, Mike
Hightower. He seems to get appointed to more positions than the shuttle takes
off to the moon from the Kennedy Space Center. He used to be a Democrat that
turned Republican; no doubt he understands the game called politics. Not this
time around, if you are an independent and/or a democrat voter, consider choos-
ing a candidate for change that is for the people, not corrupt, not bought out and
not put in the race to help defeat others. We need a candidate that provide fair
jobs opportunities, fair housing, health care, recreation facilities, that will provide
safety for our community, un-corrupted and.concerned about all citizens and not
a few.
We should be tired of all of the corruption, mean spirited majority downtown and
above all, Americans of African descent that do not mean the community any
good. This time go sit down and relax and enjoy the ride, everyone of you who
get involved in this Mayor's race will be told up front, pointed out to the people
and your contribution records published with explanation. You will receive a
report card on your past records. Let's run on the facts, not the hype, run on the
compassion, not the corruption. We can look forward to an exciting political
campaign. I just hope we don't get another "who do you want to see represent
our City for the Super Bowl, him or me." Just keeping it real! So let's get ready
to rumble with the truth and not the foolishness. By the way who is this Warren
Lee? Where did he come from? Why is he running? Next week, what happen
to the lies the City Council told us about the Citizen Review Board and ask us
not to march against the Super Bowl and who we got a phone call from asking
for empowerment, hummm...... Even and eight grader can read this and under-
stand, it doesn't look good.


students to school in the
morning and home in the
afternoon so I have accepted
the responsibility to protect
children that are not my
own. Their parents trust me
and my judgment.
Unfortunately in our com-
munity many parents have
no one to trust except their
faith that their children
arrive to school and back
home safely. Parents must
teach their children survival
skills/street smarts even
though this diminishes their
childhood innocence and
childhood behavior.
More parents have pur-
chased cell phones for their
children in kindergarten,
first and second grade so
they can call to make sure
they are safe. It is ironic that
we can watch movies about
young people being abduct-
ed, sawed up, tortured,
ripped apart and murdered
and enjoy this type of enter-
tainment. This is happening
in real life, but life is
stranger and more deadly
than fiction.
The vocation of parenting is
more complicated because
parents must be wary of who
is interacting and watching
their children, who are their
friends and potential ene-


Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Green, F.
M. Powell, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Clarissa Davis, Andrea
Franklin, Delores Mainor Woods
Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt,
Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell
Distribution and Sales: Dan Randolph, Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie
Williams, Angela Beans


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


President Obama asked all Americans]
to help clean up the mess that was in
Washington before January 20, 2009.
Don't just talk about it or complain. He
still need the help of all Americans.
Grab a Mop.


mies. Iviore parents are pray-
ing over and for their chil-
dren, being more selective
of not only their children's
friends, but the adult friends
that parents themselves
have.
We are becoming more cau-
tious of potential relation-
ships when children are
involved.
The past events of Somer
Thompson, Elizabeth Smart,
Michaela Garecht, and
Haleigh Cummings give us
pause to watch our children
closer, examining our rela-
tionship cautiously and ask-
ing more questions. At
schools students are being
instructed not walk alone
and to be cautious. We now
have to tell our students that
if anyone tries to talk to
them to be careful about the
information they provide,
run away if they are fearful
of being touched, fight and
run if someone threatens
them.
This is confusing to chil-
dren who are innocent to
who is dangerous. It is not as
easy as Black or White, Red
or Yellow because no one
knows the color of the face
of evil.





GRAB A


MOP


I


THE STAR


PAGE A-2















Faith In Our Community

Schedule of Events and Services

ST. GABRIEL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH cordially
invites you to celebrate with us at our annual Family
and Friends Day. The Heavenly Angels Youth choir will
be performing and The H. Alvin Green Memorial
Alumni Chorale will be featured. These two dynamic
choirs will be under the direction of Ms. Patricia Black.
Come out and enjoy an evening of praise and worship,
and help us celebrate Family and Friends Day. The pro-
gram will start promptly at 5:00 p.m. on November 15,
2009. The church is located at 5235 Moricrief Road,
West, Jacksonville. For more information, call (904)
765-0964.
"HOW TO SURVIVE AND GROW IN THIS
ECONOMY BY BIBLICAL PRINCIPLES" build
your business on a solid foundation that will not fail.
Learn firsthand from the founder of WISE COUNSEL
how to survive the recession and prosper mentally, spir-
itually or financially knowing God's plan for you in
business or ministry. Who would attend? Entrepreneurs,
Executives, New Business start ups and Ministry
Leaders. This event will be Thursday, November 19th
from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. It is free and open to the
public. Beaver Street Enterprise Center is located at
1225 West Beaver St., in Jacksonville, FL 32204. A
reservation is required. Contact Angelia Redding at
(904) 265-4702 or email to reddinga@bscenter.net.
PHILIP R. COUSIN A.M.E. CHURCH, located at
2625 Orange Picker Rd., Jacksonville, Rev. Eugene E.

Legion Family Raising Funds for
Recovering Heroes

INDIANAPOLIS (November 10, 2009) The
American Legion family is renewing its fundraising
efforts for the holiday season to purchase comfort items
for troops recovering in U.S. military hospitals and war-
rior transition units around the world through its
Operation Comfort Warriors campaign.
"The government does a good job of providing the
necessities," said American Legion National Commander
Clarence E. Hill. "Through Operation Comfort Warriors
we have been able to provide items that usually don't
appear in the budget, such as personal sweat suits, I-
Pods, DVDs, phone calling cards and other comfort
items. The American Legion family is challenging its
members and friends to continue giving to those who
have already given us so much. I am grateful that
American Legion Auxiliary National President Rita
Navarret6 and Sons of The American Legion National
Commander Mark Areson have given their complete
support to this effort."
The American Legion family has already raised more
than $215,000 for Operation Comfort Warriors since its
inception last December. Upon taking office in August,
Commander Hill set a goal to raise an additional
$100,000 by year's end. Donors can make online contri-
butions by visiting www.legion.org/ocw or by sending a
check to Operation Comfort Warriors, PO Box 1055,
Indianapolis, IN 46206. Administrative and promotional
costs for Operation Comfort Warriors are paid by The
American Legion, allowing 100 percent of the donations
to be spent directly on the troops.
"Some people think that expecting $100,000 during
an economic recession is too lofty a goal. I don't," Hill
said. "Americans are generous and what better way is
there to show your holiday spirit than to remember those
who have served and are still serving?"
With a current membership of 2.5-million wartime
veterans, The American Legion was founded in 1919 on
the four pillars of a strong national security, veterans
affairs, Americanism, and youth programs. Legionnaires
work for the betterment of their cominunities through
more than 14,000 posts across the nation.


Ask Us About Our


If there had been a death
in your family yesterday,
what would you be doing
today?


to tell =L


Pre-Need


Fore-

Thought


Funeral

planning
1-_


Program


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED
Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
DIRECTORS


Deborah West


Alphonso West


Jacqueline Y. Bartley


Moseley, Pastor will celebrate its 123rd Church
Anniversary. Worship services will be held (Revival)
November 12th and 13th 2009 at 7:00 p.m. and Sunday,
November 15, 2009 at 4:00 p.m. For additional infor-
mation, please call the church at (904) 262-3083.
TAKE BACK AMERICA AND THE WORLD
ASSEMBLY GOD OF PRAYER FOR ALL. South
McDuffAve., November 14, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. Apostle
L. B. Washington, Pastor B. Washington.
TENT CRUSADE AT TEMPLE OF HOPE MIN-
ISTRIES, located at 1357 Hart St. in Jacksonville on
November 18 20, 2009 at 7:30 p.m. Call 355-2031 or
389-9517 for more information.
EPIPHANY BAPTIST CHURCH 13TH ANNUAL
THANKSGIVING FEAST, Saturday, November 21,
2009 at 663 South McDuffAve. from 12 Noon to 3:00
p.m. Clothes will be given away. For more details, call
384-8129. Free
BETHSAIDA TEMPLE MINISTRIES, 1544 West
22nd St., with Pastor Wayne L. Wilson, Sr. will have
their Annual Thanksgiving Service, Sunday, November
22, 2009 at 11:30 a.m., followed by dinner cooked by
Florida and Georgia's BEST Cooks. The Master Chef
(Pastor Wayne L. Wilson, Sr.) will Feed the Soul with a
WORD from on HIGH. Then, there will be Food for the
Body. Transportation provided. Please call 904-314-
3804 a day in advance.
FRIENDSHIP PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH -
1106 Pearce St., Jacksonville, FL cordially invites
Jacksonville and surrounding to celebrate our Annual
Family/Friends and Homecoming Day Service on
November 15, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. Come help us lift up
the name of Jesus. Elder bobbie Sheffield, Pastor. For
more information, call (904) 353-7734.

Listings are due the Tuesday before.the next issue. Email sub-
missions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com

K. ANTHONY ADKINS
Pastor Lecturer Public Relations
Political Consultant
113 Village Creek Way
St. Simon Island, GA 31522
912-222-9655 Cell 912-634-5895 Home
www.KAADKINS.com
PastorKenneth47@yahoo.com


JeBAILEY, Ms.Glous Chria E, Mortuary, Inc.



BAILEY, Ms.Gloria E, Mortuary, Inc.
died November 5, 2009. JOHNSON, Benjamin,
BARCOUS, Sandra Ann, died NOVEMBER 4,
died November 9, 2009. 2009.
BARNES, Rodney C., JONES, Bryan K., 52,
61, died November 4, died November 8, 2009.
2009. LEE, Harold A., died
DANIELS, Ms. November 6, 2009.
Georgianne, died MILLER, Gregory R.,
November 6, 2009. died November 4,2009.
DICKERSON, Ms. Aaron & Burney Bivens
Pennie, died November 9, Funeral Home.
2009. MOBLEY, Larry D.,
ELPS, James I., died November 4, 2009.
November 3,2009. NICHOLAS, Hiram,
FORD, Robert (Bobby), died November 8, 2009.
43, died November 4, PHILLIPS, Mrs. Evelyn
2009. I, 57, died November 5,
HAMMONDS, Boyd, 2009.
died November 9, 2009. SHAW, William T., died
HARRISON, Mrs. November 6, 2009.
Sarah, died November 8, SMITH, Antonio, died
2009. Alphonso West November 5, 2009.
Mortuary, Inc. WALKER, Gerald M.,
HOLLOWAY, Betty L., 37, died November 4,
died November 1, 2009. 2009.
HUGHES, Ronnie L., WAY, Wesley, died
49, died November 10, November 5, 2009.
2009. Alphonso West


The Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School .....................................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning %. k.
Intercessory Prayer.................... 10:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m. ,4,
Youth Church
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary)
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.
Bishop Eric Lee, Pastor.
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus
(904) 764-5727 Church

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service .............. ............... 10:00 a.m.
Church School .................................... 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study ................... .......10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jirah" Bible Study .......................... 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thursday "Young at Heart Ministry ........... 10:00 a.m.
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry ........................... .. 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School ... ................... ........... .............. .............. 9:30 a.m .
M morning W orship........................................... ................................ 11:00 a.m .
Tuesday................................................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday.............................................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m .
"Email: Gospel75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School -------------------------------10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship -------------------------12:00 Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study ---------------------Tuesday & Friday----- 7:00 p.m.
(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520

Paynes ChapelA.M.E. Church
' 2200 Albany Street, PO. Box 759, Brunswick. GA 31520
."': (912)i 26i. 55S
'-L' ev Richard Hui pson, Psto '
Worship Opportinitiens: .
Sunday Church Sch~ol
"A Life han xpence"....... 9:15 10:55:a.mr
R ng WVolipervica ....... .:. 0 110 TO .
S~ CbhurcJat Study (Weekh Bible Study) .'-
SMonday Nights ................... '7!00 8-30 p.m.
Join Us as We, Sitdy the Word of God and Enrich Our Souls!

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Socially Speaking
By Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr.

"There 's Ahvlays Solnethinzg IHappenizg On TIhe First Coast"
Searching for The Invisible
An Art Exhibition Featuring Local Artists
Tiffany Rodriguez and Brenda Adams

"Through all oft tme, people hat e used art to tell their
most important stories: the feats of a hero. the teachings
of a leader, and the struggles of a nation." -George L.
Knox Ill
The Jackson ille NMuseum of Contemporary Art
recently presented the work of two local painters.
Tiffany Rodriguez and Brenda Adams. The works in
the exhibit ranged from Mrs. Adams' abstract representa-
tions of space to Ms. Rodriguez's figurative works. Ms.
Rodriguez's paintings are multi-layered narratives that
visually explore the idea of identity. Her series,
Narratives of the Invisible was inspired by growing up as
a biracial young woman. Rodriguez is a recent graduate Tiffany Rodriguez, Rob Sweeting. Crystal Rodriguez. Gregory
of the Savannah College of Art and Design, and this will Owens
mark her preview showing of these new works.
Tiffany Rodriguez was born in 1985 in Jacksonville,
Florida. Interested in art at a young age, she attended
Douglas Anderson School of the Arts. Upon graduation
she attended the Atlanta College of Art and The
Savannah College of Art & Design, where she received a
B.F.A. in Fine Arts. Her artistic inspirations include:
Friday Kahlo, Kehinde Wiley, Yinka Shonibare, Glen Painting by Tiffany Rodriguez "'Quite Naturally"
Ligon, Larry Jens Anderson and Glendia Cooper.
In addition to art, Ms. Rodriguez has a history of
working with children and local organizations within the
community. In 2005, she received the Bank of America
Local Hero Award and a $5,000 grant to donate to a char-
ity of choice. Ms. Rodriguez is an avid believer that, "Art
is a key to cultural progress and enrichment, by exposing
children to it- they can imagine the unimaginable." h
Ms. Rodriguez states, "I am a woman. I am Black. I -
am Hispanic. I am 23 years old. As much as I wish to -
embrace all these, they are labels I wish to transcend in
my artistic career. I desire to make positive images for

The canvas of my life has been stretched through
many generations. It bears the colorful strokes of my
ancestors and the bold imagery of my individuality. As a Guests, Crstal Rodrigue Pamela Hore, .hto
result, my artwork is part narrative, part abstract- draw- Above: Guests, Horne, & Amber Horne
ing subject matter from personal stories and social com- Danyel Clark, Tiffany
mentary. In my exploration of the narrative, I've found Clark and artist,
that the medium truly feeds the message. Consequently, Tiffany Rodriguez
my works move in between painting and installation.
I explore both physical and emotional space in an
effort to construct alternative means of discussing: socie-
ty, identity, and cultural stereotypes. My paintings,
whether abstract or figurative consist of rich colors and
a multitude of layers. To the right: Artist,
My work is ultimately the visual biography of a bira- Tiffany Rodriguez
within her students
cial artist. As a descendant of many great people- I feel LaRon James atd
obliged to continue their legacies and use art as a catalyst Danrel Clark (from
for cultural enrichment and change. My life is a great sto- the Citr Kids .-Ar
rybook, revealing itself more to me each day. I have Factor )
many stories to tell, and I create because sometimes thereeth Rodriguez, Rob Sweeting, Jennifer ugh,

Ms. Rodriguez's has had several exhibitions that
include: Solo Exhibition-Screaming Silently, 433
Bishop, Atlanta, GA.; Juried Exhibitions-I/We Case "
Studies-The Defoor Center, Atlanta, GA.; Bloodlines: .
Family in Practice and in Name, Swainsboro, GA; and r
Impressions of Modem Urban Living, The Museum of
Design Atlanta; Group Exhibitions-From Surviving to
Thriving, Women's Center of Jax., Jacksonville, FL;
What's Going On?, LaVilla Museum, Jacksonville, FL;
Centaphobia, City of Ink, Atlanta, GA; Digital Sunday,
Woodward Skate Park, Lawrenceville, GA; and Through
Our Eyes, LaVilla Museum, Jacksonville, FL;Curatorial
Exhibitions-Tempting Eve, Gallery 100 inside the
Woodruff Arts Center, Atlanta, GA; Performance t1 l
Exhibitions-Impromptu Collaborations, I Space, Atlanta
GA; and Festivals-Jacksonville Jazz Festival (Award o
Merit), Jacksonville, FL Elizabeth Rodriguez, Rob Sweeting, Jennifer Waugh,
For additional information on the artist, you can visit Tiffany Rodriguez
her website: www.2manycolors.com

Thank you for sharing your events and stories for the
column each week! Because of you, readers are there ,, .. -
with you each week. For column entries you may con-
tact me directly at 904 571-1182, fax 904 285-9777 or Painting by Tiffany Rodriguez "I know there
by e-mail at: badavis@watsonrealtycorp.com. is something more"









I. .

A2


Tiffany Rodriguez (center) with guests Mr. and Mrs.
Rouse


Tiffany Rodriguez


Painting by Tiffany Rodriguez "When the
Heart Fails"


Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events. Contact us at (904) 766-8834; E-mail socially@TheFloridaStar.com or you
may reach me directly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-7008.


NOVEMBER 14, 2009


THE STAR


- ICC~~dlLF~:-Y~I~E%~L~P~i~l I



















ST. JOSEPH REMENISCES THEIR PAST


For The Florida Star
Each year. St. Joseph Missionary Baptist Church. Re\. Dr. H T.
Rhim. Senior Pastor. remembers their blessings their moving from
the one room church building to their new two-story edifice and
multi-purpose building. Again this \ear, the disciples of the church re-
enacted their original march in 1985 from 533 Del drop Street to their
new church home at 485 W. First Street (corner. 1st and Broad
Streets). As in every year past, Rev. Rhim led this year's march last
Sunday, November 7th.
To keep the legacy of Black Bottom alive, St. Joseph observes
"What Meaneth These Stones" Day every year on the second Sunday
in November. The significance of the day is'to commemorate, on an
annual basis, how the Lord answered their prayers and blessed them
to move from their original building to the current location. The day
represents a replica of the Israelites crossing over the Jordan River on
dry land (because of God's intervention, Joshua 3:4-24).
Memorials are to stimulate faith. Modern educators tell us that we
remember only a fraction of what we hear, but retain much more of
what we see. It is just like god to use the most effective means of
impressing. His lessons on the consciousness of the people of His cre-
ation. When the Israelites left the stones, it was God who command-
ed a visible symbol of His mighty act of Providence. This reflects His
concern for the ongoing of His people and indicates His view of the
importance of passing on a Spiritual blessing/heritage St. Joseph
received from the Lord. The building still stands today and is occu-
pied by Golgotha Evangelical Church, Rev. Esperandieu Elbon, a son
of St. Joseph serves as Pastor. The body that meets there are Haitian
and Rev. Elbon ensures the continuation of Christian teaching and
preaching.
In order to keep the building as a memorial to us, the men of St.
Joseph volunteer to perform perpetual maintenance.
Photographs in this issue are of this year's gathering at the origi-
nal worship site before re-enacting the march to the new facility.


Interview bhy Dan Evans
of The Florida Star

The Star: Tell us ho\\
\ou got started and about
\our audition for the Color
Purple?'."
A.R.: I'%e been \itli
the company for almost 5
years. I \\as one of the
original cast members on
Broad\0a\ after I audi-
tioned \ithi thousands of
other people. I had an
appointment with my
agent for the Color Purple
with so many people I said
that didn't sound good to
me. I went to the audition
and ended up getting a call
back. I ended up getting
about six call backs, I had
no idea The Color Purple
would be as huge as it has
become and it was good
that I didn't. Ophra was
not attached at that point to
the Show. It was just
another audition in my life.
After all the auditions, I
ended up with the offer to
be an understudy to Sherry
Dennis. I was very disap-
pointed, but after all, it was
a Broadway show...and
who turns down a
Broadway show?
The Star: Were the
calls backs discouraging?
A.R: Yeah!!!! But as
long as they are calling you
back, you still have your
shot you know. So, I was
excited every time I got the
call. There were new songs
they wanted me to learn or
new scenes they wanted


me to come in and do. You
see. I'm not as outgoing as
SHUlG. I can be a little
niore conservative. So
there \\as some concern I
wouldn't be able to pull off
Aura of Shuc.
The Star: Once gi\en
the part \ou just took off,
huh?
A.R.: Yeah. Yeah, I did
the understudy for about a
year. That as a lot of fun
and gave me time to work
on it. Elizabeth Winters
had the part, and when she
left, they offered it to me
for the tour.
The Star: You are a
product of Raines High,
were you singing in the
chorus?
A.R.: No, you know
what? I didn't...I was in
the band. I loved singing.
My mother was an English
teacher at Douglas
Anderson when it was a
high school. She conduct-
ed a musical of Bye Birdie
and I had to go with her
every day. At Raines I was
in the Band and a Vikette.
Dancing was my love.
The Star: While
attending Raines, who
were some of your favorite
teachers and inspirational
moments?
A.R.: Oh, my good-
ness...Mr. Young, Marcus
Young, was the band direc-
tor at that time. I believe he
is at Stanton now. While at
Raines, he was probably
my biggest inspiration
there. Mr. Young was the


band director at Southside
Jr High %\here I was
attending and got trans-
ferred to Raines at the
same time I got there. I
played the clarinet and
Mr.Young was adamant
about me continuing to
play and dance, but not
gile up clarinet. I thought
he was being mean. but in
the end I'm glad he stayed
on me.You hale to ha\e
dance to do what I do in
musical theatre. But, one
of the main things I have to
have is to be able to hear
music. Had it not been for
Mr. Young staying on me
about my musicianship I
really wouldn't have that
today. He taught me so
much about discipline and
going after what you want.
You have to practice daily
and on your own. Those
qualities were Mr. Young.
Ms. Holly, who was over
the Vikettes at that time..
Ms. Norman, who was the
guidance counselor.
The Star: You men-
tioned a lot of discipline,
how important is education
in the field of acting?
A.R.: I think extremely
important. You know we
live in an age now were
everybody just want to be
famous. Everybody wants
to be on American Idol.
There's something to be
said about honing your
craft and studying. There is
some natural talent you
need, however, education
is very important. I went to


ColrPrpe el kovl sO


FAMU. Ml\ parents w would
not let me malor in theatre.
I could take all the courses
I wanted. dance, singing.
acting, but I had to majom
in something else.
The Star: When ou
are in Jackson\ille, %here
do \ou w worship?
A. R.: I lihe in New%
Jersey: In Jacksontile. I
grew up at First Baptist
Church of Oakland, \\here
Rev. Dailey pastors.When
I came home from college,
I joined Joint Heirs, Pastor
Thomas.
The Star: What do you
like to do to relax when
you come home to
Jacksonville?
A.R.: Hey
out with my
friends, and My
Mom, that's my
best friend, and
my best friends
from High
school.
The Star:
Who was your
best friends in (
High school?
A.R.: Oh,
My Goodness, 0
from high
school Cordia,
her name was
Cordia Daniels.


Now she is
Cordial
Mitchell, her
husband is the
pastor at St.
Stephens.
Adrian Martin,
who has a dance


Saundra Johnson and Curlita Milton are winners of The Florida Star
drawing for The Color Purple promotion. Curlita won Most Trivia,
Evelyn Harmon (not shown) won 2 tickets for 'Most Originals Play
cast members, and Shaundra won 2 tickets for 'Favorite Scene.'
Drawing was done by Angelia Reddings of Beaver St. Winners have
until Monday, November 16th at close of business to pickup tickets.


-.


.J - I







A( A-0 T O B 1


GLAMOUR'S WOMEN OF THE YEAR BASH


Rihanna, Michelle Obama, Serena Williams, Maya
Angelou, and more were honored last night as Glamour
Magazine's Women of the Year. The annual ceremony
celebrates women who have made meaningful contri-
butions to sports, entertainment, business, fashion, sci-
ence and politics. Of course for such a festive occasion,
several well known stars came out in their most fash-
ionable outfits.
Rihanna tearfully accepted her award in a floor length
St6phane Rolland Spring 2009 Couture gown.


Supermodel Iman fluttered on the red carpet in a
peach feathered belted Jason Wu cocktail with match-
ing platform sandals.
Serena Williams looked radiant in a Pamella Roland
one shouldered red dress, as did Tyra Banks in a nude
long sleeved shift.
Liya Kebede went for glam in a black Stella
McCartney cocktail dress and strappy black sandals.,
And Kerry Washington went for ethereal and light in
a Fendi lace maxi dress.
Whose dress was your favorite?


. *a 6


* S


0 --a- mopem- -. -



S - _-Copyrighted Material


...t. Syndicated Content


- Available

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INVITATION FOR BIDS
FACILITY REPAIRS PER '06 & '07 INSPECTIONS -
REPAIR OF BERTHS 20 & 22
AT THE BLOUNT ISLAND MARINE TERMINAL
3AXPORT Project No. B2008-01
3AXPORT Contract No. C-i264

November 2, 2009
Sealed bids will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority until 2:30 PM local time,
December 10, 2009, at which time they shall be opened in the Public Meeting Room of the
Port Central Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida, for Fadlity Repars
Per '06 & '07 Insnections Renair of Berths 20 & 22.
All bids must be submitted In accordance with specifications and drawings for Contract No.
C-1264, which may be examined In, or obtained from the Procurement Department of the
Jacksonville Port Authority, located on the second floor of the Port Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206. (Please telephone 904/357-3018 for
information.)
A MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE AND SITE VISIT WILL BE HELD ON
NOVEMBER 19, 2009 AT 10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC MEETING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR
OF THE PORT CENTRAL OFFICE BUILDING LOCATED AT ADDRESS STATED ABOVE.
ATTENDANCE BY A REPRESENTATIVE OF EACH PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS
REQUIRED. A BID WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT
REPRESENTED AT SUCH CONFERENCE.
31d and contract bonding are required.
The mandatory 3SEB/DBE Participation Goal established for this project is 5%.


NOVEMBER 14, 2009


THE .TA R


VPAGFE A_


4


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NOVEMBER 14, 2009 THE FLORIDA AND GEORGIA STAR PAGE A-7


First Continued from A-1
Chief Master Sergeant Simon enlisted with the 125th Fighter Wing in February 1979. According
to Simon, to be the FIRST you must be: F-Fearless I-Inspiring R-Reputable S-Strong T-Trustworthy
Congratulations Chief Master Sergeant Simon on being the first.

Florida Continued from A-1
The JA Girls mentoring program is an initiative dedicated to increasing knowledge and building
skills in financial literacy, career preparation, and entrepreneurship within an
all -girl setting. The program designed to make a difference in the economic life of a girl
includes understanding the stock market, banking fundamentals, business ethics, success skills,
and job shadowing. The experiences inspires girls and young women to open their minds to new
opportunities, understand the power of their choices, and reach high to achieve their full eco-
nomic potential.
Sink also mentions her platform in her speech, "Part of the answer is personal financial educa-
tion and empowerment. Too few states require that our students are taught these important life
skills and. Florida is not one of them. Just this summer, New Jersey became the first state to
make such education a graduation requirement....Personally; I'd love to see Florida follow their
lead."
The educational empowerment factor in the programs seems to be working. Janae Byrd 13 a


3:0 o :0 pm







0and 110 0 p -ma




NE loidaan0S Gerga'

BsTalkSatios




A ndy'seail:
wwwraioreeaco
AT~ a ~I


SS 00 B so




.06 **


Live in
Georgia?
VOTE
EARLY!
No
Excuse
Needed
Last
Day
Dec. 1,


participant whose goal is to be an Olympic athlete said," We were
taught how to draw up a business plan and implement it to make a
profit. And we did!" Ashley Irvin an articulate 17 year old aspiring
author agrees, "You learned to be intelligent about money."
In a sit down interview, Sink the former President of Florida Bank Of
America talked about her background," Taking personal responsibili-
ty and providing leadership are two core principles that I've stuck by
in my personal and professional life. Before I became Florida's CFO,
I spent 26 years in banking becoming the leader of the largest bank in
our state. I was responsible for 9,000 employees in 800 offices around
this state. I didn't have to worry then about getting votes, but I did
have to worry about getting results to support those 9,000 jobs."
When asked about how her experience will impact Florida, she said,"
We are not a state of corporations. We are a small state of business and
entrepreneurs. A land of new opportunities: That's what made Florida
a land of dreams for me. We need to build our new economy on a
foundation that's rock solid. Florida has always been the sunshine
state with beaches and tourists. And we want tourists. But ... the sun-
shine state can be the health care innovation state. The state that cap-
tures the power of solar and renewable energy. The state that creates
new jobs."
Sink sums up her speech this way, "Florida's greatest resource isn't
sun or sand or water....It's our people. And we cannot build this new
vibrant economy without a strong education system, including person-
al financial literacy education. Smart people do make a change...
together we can make Florida what it always must be -a land of oppor-
tunity."
To learn more about Junior Achievement go to www.jajax.com.

Ir


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I


Talking To A Funeral Director / Attorney
By Burney Bivens, Esq., LFD

At some time in our lives, most of us will have an occasion to work with a funeral director. In
doing so, we must be certain that the funeral director understands the Code of Professional Conduct in
the funeral industry as outlined by the National Funeral Directors Association (NFDA). Funeral direc-
tors must conduct themselves in an ethical and professional manner. Ethics can be defined very sim-
ply as "fair dealing." The Code of Professional Conduct in the funeral industry includes, but is not lim-
ited to the following:

CODE OF PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT IN THE FUNERAL INDUSTRY
SERVICE TO FAMILIES

Ethical Principle: Members have an ethical obligation to serve each family in a professional
and caring manner, being respectful of their wishes and confidences, being honest and fair in all deal-
ings with them, and being considerate of those of lesser means.

CODE OF PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

* Members shall provide funeral services to families without regard to religion, race, color,
national origin, sex, sexual orientation or disability.

S Members shall comply with all applicable federal or state laws or regulations relating to the
prearrangement, prepayment or refinancing of funeral services or merchandise.

* Members shall release deceased persons to the custody of the person or entity who has the legal
right to effect a release without requiring payment prior to the release.

* Members shall not use any funeral merchandise previously used and sold without prior permis-
sion of the person selecting or paying for the use of the merchandise.

* Members shall comply with the Federal Trade Commission's Funeral Industry Practices
Regulation.

* Members shall protect confidential information pertaining to the deceased or the family of the
deceased from disclosure.

* Members shall carry out all aspects of the funeral service in a competent and respectful man-
ner.

* Members shall properly account for and remit any monies, documents, or personal property
that belongs to others that comes into the member's possession.

* Members shall not engage in any unprofessional conduct of a character likely to deceive,
defraud or harm the families they serve in the course of providing professional services.

This article is submitted by Burney Bivens, Esquire, LFD and the law firm of Bivens, Jones and Associates AND
Aaron and Burney Bivens Funeral Home. During the next several months a series of articles will appear regarding
legal issues and funeral service related issues. Mr. Bivens has practiced law in North Florida for 27 years and has pro-
vided legal representation to the funeral service industry for more than 25 years and is also a licensed funeral director
with his son. For questions on legal issues call the law office at 904-264-3412. For questions regarding funeral serv-
ices call Aaron and Burney Bivens Funeral Home at 904-264-1233


Tuesday, Listen and Talk!
IMPACT Radio Talk Show
FM 105.3-WJSJ- 5:30 and 12:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m., WCGL-AM 1360
with
Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT


Call and talk: FM 105.3 (904) 854-TALK
Tuesday, from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m.
Call and talk: AM-1360 (904) 766-9285
Tuesday, from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
"The Florida Star, The Georgia Star and Impact -
Striving to Make a Difference."
www.radiofreejax.com
www.WCGL1360.com
The Florida Star Still "The People's Choice"
Serving since 1951
LET THE POST OFFICE
DELIVER THE FLORIDA or GEORGIA STAR
TO YOU


I want a One Year Subscription to The Florida or Georgia Star! Please donate
10% of my paid Subscription to the non-profit organization listed below.

Please send my Paid Subscription to:

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Cash, Check, Money Order, Credit Card or PayPal Accepted


o OnI i T y i aSie c. .on ww i ste ie


--~-


PAGE A-7


NOVEMBER 14, 2009


THE FLORIDA AND GEORGIA STAR







NOVEMBER 14, 2009


A .A-T FA


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Saft is one of the world's largest developers and manufacturers ofNi Cd batteries with
operations in 17 countries around the world and is headquartered in Paris, France. We
are seeking the following candidate to join our team of professionals at our Jacksonville,
Florida location:
Senior Buyer

This position is a start up position and is responsible for all facets of purchasing to
include performing all purchasing functions for the site; review, comprehend and
ascertain purchasing situation relative to number of suppliers, terms, alternative sources,
and quality; recommend plans for changes to yield savings and improve deliveries;
ascertain new sourcing needs, source such materials and services in order to grow both
the sales and service aspects of the site; manage the cost of new products, minimizing the
supplier base, identifying suppliers that produce prototype parts; identify high
performance, cost effective suppliers; drafting request for quotations or proposals; and
analysis of quotations and proposals to determine the most prudent alternative;
negotiating the most favorable prices and terms; placement and administration of
purchase orders and implementing mfg/pro purchasing as well as negotiation skills with
senior contacts at domestic and international suppliers.
Requirements: Bachelors degree from an accredited college or university. The position
requires a minimum of four.years of recent progressive purchasing experience in a
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Qualified candidates may apply by email to hliL .lA tihl l!i-' ~n

Saft is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


JACKSONVILLE
NATIONAL CEMETERY
NOW OPEN


Veterans and Spouses are eligible


Call this Veteran for a no cost /
no obligation evaluation


I Find1 Comfort Herek\
Aaron and Burncy Bivens
FUNERAL HOME
N and
CREMATION SERVICES


529 Kingsley Avenue
Orange Park, FL 32073
Phone: (904) 264-1233


Burey Bivens, Esquire, LFD
Veteran: U.S. Navy/U.S. Marines

Attorney at Law
Licensed Funeral Director


,,


THE FLORIDA STAR


PAG E A-8






NOVEMBER 14. 2009 THE STAR PAGE B-1



A The FL/GA StarI


LOCAL SECTION-B


37t Anua Mle ayFesivl Clvry n eo 11


The Florida Star photographer, Frank M. Powell, III
Only about 200 people call Calvary home, but on
the first Saturday of November, every year, Calvary's
population grows to 60,000 to 90,000 (not counting
mules). The reason for this is Calvary Lions Club
Annual Mule Day Festival. Although, they call it Mule
Day, there is no telling what you might cast your eyes
upon.
Proceeds of which, go to Lions International Sight
programs and local charities. Enjoy a big parade with
mules, horses and antique tractors, contests, and all day
entertainment. Over 450 arts & crafts exhibitions, con-
cessions, cane grinding, and syrup making make Mule
Day a time to remember. 360 Days till 38th Annual
Festival first Saturday of November 6, 2010.


The Zanders family and friends from Ouincy,


orgia, Alabama, and Jacksonville, Florida.


Phone
(94551-0381
1O0Fc (904)551-0382
Scimarnur Citizen COLLISIONS* REPAIR SALES (UsD) CUSTOMIZING
DISCOUNT 3333-2 BE BLVD JACKSONVI E, FL 32207
SLavwd &H~Rwiwu alami


Monday OOA.M. 6.00 P.M., Tusday 0OOA.M 6.00PM.
Wednesday 8.00 AM. -6.00P.M., Thn day 800 A.M. -6.0OPM,
Friday 10.OOA.M.- 3.oP.M. Sabday Closed, Sunday Closed-
WEEKENDS BY APPOINTMENT.


Brands: Adlco, AC DeIo Monom Shocks and Strus, Motmraf, Royal
Purpl, MOPAR, AmsoiL Wagner Brakes, CastI U, She, ACDEI
NGK, ETC, Moog Suspnsion


Services: AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER, Car Pars, Auto Parts, Auto
Repair, truck Part, Car Repair







TI ii STARV R 2


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Copyrighted Material :

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Syndicated Content



: Available from Commercial News Providers


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Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonvile and the surrounding area.


CERTIFIED CONCEALED WEAPON LICENSE (Permit) Course Satisfies
Florida State Statute 790.06 for Application to Lawfully Carry a Concealed
Weapon. 1 Hour Course, $35.00 by Appt. in Callahan, Nassau County, FL. Call
Gary Belson (904)491-8358 for information.
FASHION OF OUR FOUNDING YEARS, Jacksonville Historical Society
Program Mary Jo Linnen presents a fashion show of collectible vintage cloth-
ing representing those diverse decades, the 1920's and 1930's. Jacksonville
Historical Society members and friends model the outfits. Wednesday,
November 18th at the society's headquarters Old St. Andrews, 317 A. Philip
Randolph Blvd. Dessert reception and annual holiday gift shop beginning at
1:00 p.m. Fashion show at 2:00 p.m. Fashionable door prizes! Also, see the lat-
est in our collectible Christmas ornament series of Jacksonville land-
marks...new this year, Memorial Park.
RITZ THEATRE AND MUSEUM PRESENTS -THROUGH OUR EYES
2009 "Each One Teach One: The Artist as Mentor." November 19, 2009 July
30, 20.10. Now in its 17th year, Through Our Eyes is Jacksonville's longest run-
ning annual exhibit featuring new works by local African American artists. This
year's theme was designed to provide an opportunity for established artists with
a history of exhibition experience to mentor emerging artists and assist them
through the process of producing work for this year's show. Works produced by
these artists are the end of collaboration, inspiration, partnership, apprentice-
ship, cross-pollination and posing the touch-all variations of relationships,
reflecting the spirit ofmentoring. Lydia P. Stewart, Curator, Through Our Eyes.
Thursday, November 19th from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Each One Teach One
Workshop Series -Second Saturday of each month, beginning January 9, 2010
from 10:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. For more information, call 904-632-5555.
ILP Annual Thanksgiving Luncheon Slated
It' That Time Again!
The Annual Thanksgiving Luncheon to benefit frail and homebound seniors
will be held on Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at the Wyndham Hotel. This year
marks the 23rd year for the event that has been heralded as one of the most pop-
ular and successful events of the year according to Joan Turner, founder. Turner
credits Emily Timmons and Amanda King of Radio Station WCGL for respond-
ing to a challenge Turner extended to the community to "Adopt-A-Senior." The
radio station sponsored the first 15 seniors to a Thanksgiving Luncheon in 1986.
To date, over 20,000 seniors have attended the event.
Holiday seasons are some of the most depressing times for homebound and
institutionalized seniors-many remember being at home with family and friends
and cooking those special meals, laughing and reliving memories of the past.
Some of these same activities occur at the luncheon, except this meal is already
prepared and seniors in attendance have been sponsored by individuals, elected
officials, civic or fraternal groups or faith-based organizations. For almost 8
weeks Turner and her Corp of volunteers get to the air waves on radio station
1360 WCGL and other media to have seniors sponsored to the event that cele-
brate their life and legacy. Everybody gets involved says Turner, the seniors
belongs to us. If we get old, we'd want someone to remember us." Mrs. Turner
is inspired from the sacred writings of David which reminds generations to not
cast aside parents and relatives when they get old and feeble says Rev. Leonard
Dantzler, Chairman of the ILP Advisory Council. Persons wishing to donate or
sponsor a senior should make their checks payable to the Senior Life Foundation
and designate "Seniors Thanksgiving Luncheon" mail to WCGL 3890 Dunn
Avenue, Ste 804, Jacksonville, FL 32218. For more information call 994-1622.
Deadline for receiving sponsorships is November 13, 2009. All donations are
tax-deductible.
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NOVEMBER 14, 2009


THE STAR


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NOVEMBER 14, 2009 THE STAR PAGE B-3


From Actual Police Reports
Did You Hear About?...








DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

An officer was dispatched to 5TH Ave., in reference to a battery with injuries.
Upon arrival, he met the victim who stated the suspect is her husband. The victim
and the suspect do not have any children in common and they are currently living
apart from each other. The victim stated the suspect was drinking inside her residence
when he started arguing with her for no reason. The suspect then grabbed a metal
hammer and struck the victim in the face with the hammer. The suspect then fled the
area on foot. Officer observed the victim's face was swollen between her eyes from
being struck with the hammer. The victim was treated at the scene and was transport-
ed to Shands hospital. The victim's injury was not life threatening. Authority located
the suspect's hammer on the couch inside the victim's living room. Officer placed the
hammer into the property room. He went to Shands hospital to obtain a written state-
ment from the victim and give her all the domestic violence paperwork. He was
informed by the staff at the hospital that the victim did not want to be treated and that
she walked out of the hospital. Officer located the victim outside the hospital. The
victim stated she did not want to wait to be seen at the hospital. The victim stated she
was going to have her daughter transport her to Baptist hospital. He gave the victim
the Evidence Technician Card and told her to call to have them photograph her
injuries when she arrives at Baptist hospital. Patrol efforts are continuing.

HABITUAL TRAFFIC OFFENDER


An observation of the listed suspect, Julian H. driving on Beaver was made.
Two Officers observed that he was not wearing a seatbelt. A traffic stop was conduct-
ed at 700 Melson Ave.
They asked the suspect/driver for his driver's license, and he provided a driv-
ers license belonging to Juvanni H. A check of warrants revealed an outstanding
capiases belonging to Juvanni H. The suspect was detained at that time. The suspect
spent several minutes, several times throughout the incident discussing the charge of
the unlawful use of a temporary tag. He advised he believed all of the court proceed-
ings had been handled and the charge should no longer be valid. The warrant was
confirmed by ID/records..
The suspect was arrested, read his Miranda rights via card, and transported to
the PTDF without incident.
Several hours later, Officer was contacted by Sgt. Smith of ID/records. She advised
a check of the suspect's fingerprints identified him as Julius H., and was not Juvanni
H. (brother).
A check of NCIC revealed the suspect's driver's license is suspended and he
is a Habitual Traffic Offender.
At the time of the original traffic stop, a traffic citation was issued in the name
of Juvanni for the seat belt violation the suspect committed. He was .also placed
under arrest for using Juvanni's name, adding to his arrest record, which would have
caused adverse affects to Juvanni .H. if the suspect's proper identity had not been
determined by corrections officers and ID personnel. The listed citations were issued
in the suspect's name and copies are being placed in his property at the PTDF.
The original citation will be removed from the suspect's property and voided.
Juvanni's driver's license will be removed from the suspect's property and placed in
the property room, along with copies of the original citation. It should be noted the
suspect's four year old child was in the front passenger seat.



NO LICENSE, NEVER HAD ONE

Officer was dispatched to 25th St. to assist Officer Anderson. Officer
Anderson was in the process of completing an investigation, and filing the listed
vehicle stolen at 25th St. The owner of the vehicle approached Officer Anderson and
the other officer telling them her vehicle was down the road with an unknown indi-
vidual inside of it. At that time both Officers drove to the 1400 block of E. 25th St.
where they located the vehicle being driven by the listed suspect.
Officer observed the suspect back the vehicle from the paved roadway onto
an empty lot and place it back into drive pulled up, officer activated his emergency
equipment, and placed the suspect at gunpoint. He gave the suspect loud, verbal com-
mands, telling him to lay flat on the ground, and the suspect complied. Officer
Anderson took the suspect into custody and placed him in the vehicle.
Officer Anderson read the suspect his Constitutional Rights via card and
asked him why he was driving the car. The suspect stated, "Poppy asked me to move
it." Officer then asked him who "Poppy" was, and he stated "I do not know his name,
I just call him Poppy." Officer asked him if he had a Driver's License with the State
of Florida, and he stated, "No." They asked him if he knows he is not supposed to be
driving and he stated, "Yes." Officer also asked the suspect if he knew that the vehi-
cle did not belong to him, and he stated "Yes."
They verified through D.H.S.M.V. the suspect was never issued a Driver's
License from the State of Florida. They placed the suspect under arrest and transport-


ed him to the PTDF for processing.
The listed vehicle was reported Stolen and Recovered, and the suspect was
placed under arrest for trespassing in a stolen vehicle under CCR. Case Cleared by
Arrest.


Your Weekly

HOROSCOPE
\_ENovember 9, 2009 November 15, 2009 /
I-.


cY~I


ARIES


You can surprise members of
your family, which in turn will
bring you a pat on the back.
Trips will be more than adven-
turous. You will have excellent
ideas and you should be able
to help your partner get ahead.
You should put a little extra
effort in at work.

S CANCER
Talk to an older family mem-
ber you have helped in the
past. Your home may be in an
uproar and you are best to
stay out of the line of fire if at
all possible. Be cautious of
making any residential
changes this week. You have
two choices; Get out on your
own, or bend to your mate's
whims.
L LIBRA
You may be emotional and
quick to judge others. Social
gatherings will be conducive
to meeting nev potential
mates. Problems with gas, oil,
or water in your home may
disrupt your routine Don't let
your emotions interfere with
completing your chores.

S CAPRICORN

You can help other people
with their financial prob-
lems by setting up a budg-
et for them. Your intellec-
tual charm will entice new
love interests. Try to get
out and socialize. You
could be quite erratic
regarding your personal
relationship.


- Ul


TAURUS


Try not to make waves.
Opportunities for new and
exciting relationships will be
yours if you get out and join
groups. Keep important infor-
mation to yourself. Minor
fevers-or infections will devel-
op if you're over-stressed.

LEO
Try to avoid serious discus-
sions with loved ones.
Travel will promote new
romantic connections. Take
time to help children with
projects that may be too
hard for them to do on their
own. Children may be diffi-
cult to handle

'; SCORPIO
A passionate party for two
might be just the remedy. Use
your inventiveness to find solu-
tions. Do your best, but don't
make too many promises or you
may exhaust yourself. New
romantic ties can be made;
however, you must make sure
that your motives are not selfish
before you make your move.

SAQUARIUS
Try to ease any disappoint-
ment by making amends
Changes in your home are
apparent., and you must be
willing to bend if you don't
want to find yourself alone.
You can put in some overtime
and make extra cash. You will
find that friends or relatives
may not understand your
needs.


A CHANGE WE MUST MAKE
OVERCOMING A SPEECH HANDICAP
(GHETTO SPELLING BEE)
Author Unknown

Tyreal came home from school disappointed. "I hate English, dem teachers
are always changing stuff'.

Mother: "Tyreal, have you been using bad words and writing dirty notes
again?"

Tyreal: "Naw, momma, I swear I didn't. I used all of my spelling words in a
sentence like the teacher say, but the teacher, she gave me an "F" even
though I know I spelled all dem words right."

1. HOTEL My Momma said that she ain' gon tell her friend Shaqueta
nothing else, cause that HOTEL everthang she know.
2. HONOR ROLL We was playing bidwiz on the stoop the other day
and man, I was HONORROLL.
3. PLANET Leroy got arrested cause he got him some seed to grow
weed, and he PLANET in the backyard.
4. DISMAY I went for a blood test, the doctor pulled out a needle and
said DISMAY hurt a little.
5. OMELETTE I should punch you for what you jes said but
OMELETTE it go dis time.
6. STAIRWAY Getting high is stupid. It makes you STAIRWAY into
space.
7. MOBILE I went to buy some food, I was short on cash, and my
man said gimme one MOBILE.
8. DEFENSE I saw this dude running from the! cops, but he jomped
DEFENSE and got away.
9. AFRO- I got so mad at my girl, AFRO a lamp at her.
10. AFTERMATH I don't feel like being at school today so AFTERMATH
,I'm out.
11. LOCKET I slam the door so hard, I LOCKET
12. DOMINEERING My girl's birthday was yesterday, so I got her a
DOMINEERING.
13 KENYA I needed money for the subway, so I axe a stranger KENYA
spare some change.
14. DERANGE DERANGE is where da deer and da antelope play..
15 DATA At my basketball game, I scored thirty points My coach say
DATA boy.
16. BEWARE I asked the man at the unemployment office, "Is dis
BEWARE I can get a job?"
17. DIMENSION I be tall, dark, handsome and not DIMENSION smart.
18. COATROOM The judge said, "One more outburst, you'll be thrown
out de COATROOM."
19. DECIDE My boy fronting' like he love his girl but eribody know he
got a couple of chicks on DECIDE.
20. FASCINATE Her dress got 10 buttons, but she so big she can't
FASCINATE.


rr GEMINI
Your high enthusiasm will be
sure to inspire anybody around
you. New interests are preoc-
cupying your time. You will
have the getup and go to con
tribute a great deal to groups
of interest. This is a great day
to start that new health regi-
men you've been talking
about.
SVIRGO
You need time to put your
house in order and sort out
what you are going to do
about your personal direction.
Opportunities for new friend-
ships are apparent. Dead end
projects could plague you.
Don't make a move; your con-
fusion has caused this dilem-
ma and you are best to back
away and reassess the situa-
tion.

S iSAGITTARIUS
You need more space for
the whole family. Be care-
ful when using machinery
or electrical equipment Do
things that involve chil-
dren. Tell them to get out
of the mess they are in and
then you'll consider getting
together \\ ith them
| PIECES

Try not to get into disputes
that will lead to estrange-
ment's. You may experi-
ence setbacks due to addi-
tional responsibilities with
loved ones. Real estate
investments could be pros-
perous. You can make new
connections if you play
your cards right.


PAGE B-3


NOVEMBER 14, 2009


THE STAR








I'AUi PFf- 4.E SA NOEMER14.20


SPORTS


The Florida & Georgia Star
Correspondent: Scott Jurrens
Photographer: Joseph Lorentzon

The undefeated and Sturgis
number one ranked good, t
University of Florida 20-3.
Gators sank the visiting The
Vanderbilt Commodores begins
27-3 on Saturday offensi
November 7, 2009. howev
The Commodores and th(
received the opening the bal
kickoff while 90,649 fans with th
from both teams enjoyed ing qu
the night time 67 degree the e:
fall weather. Both team Comm(
offenses struggled in the yet aga
first quarter to score with ever,
the Gator's Caleb Sturgis punter
notching the first points gather
on the scoreboard with a before
27-yard field goal with Per the
just a minute left to play vertent
in the first quarter, stitutes
The second quarter so the
opened with the Gator the bal
offensive on the field. 13-yar
Gator running back Aft
Jeffery Demps rushes for plays
a 25-yard touchdown and two,
with the Sturgis extra Tebow
point good, the Gators waste
now lead 10-0. With 6:08 on a 2
left in the first half, the pass a:
Gators add another three point
points on the scoreboard the G
with a Sturgis 45-yard
field goal. The first half
ends with the score of
Gators 13; Commodores
0.
In the second half, the
Gators receive the open-
ing kickoff but the offen-
sive fails to score on the
opening possession. The
Commodores take advan-
tage and place kicker
Ryan Fowler connects on
a 32-yard field goal to get
the visiting team on the
scoreboard.
With only 1:52 left on
the third quarter game
clock, Gators quarterback
Tim Tebow runs a 1-yard
quarterback keeper for a Gator i
touchdown. With the Vandy


extra point kick
he Gators now lead

e fourth quarter
with the Gator
ve on the field;
er the drive stalls
e Commodores get
1 back. However,
Le Vanderbilt start-
arterback out for
entire game, the
odore offense stalls
in. This time, how-
the Commodore
puts his knee down
ng up the snap
punting it away.
referees, this inad-
kneel down con-
a rush by rule and
Gators take over
1 at the Vanderbilt
d line.
er a couple of
and a penalty or
the Gator's Tim
and David Nelson
no time connecting
:0-yard touchdown
nd with the extra
almost automatic,
ators lead 27-3


which becomes the game
final.
Tebow now is tied
with 51 career touch-
downs with Hershel
Walker for all time SEC
touchdown record. In
addition, with the win, the
Gators will now play in
the SEC Championship in
the Georgia Dome in
Atlanta on December 5,
2009 against the Alabama
Crimson Tide.
The University of
Florida Gators (9-0) travel
Saturday, November 14,
2009 to Columbus, SC to
take on the South
Carolina Gamecocks (6-
4) at 3:30 PM EST and the
game will be televised by
CBS. The Gamecocks are
coached by former UF
Gator head coach Steve
Spurrier, are coming off a
tough road loss (33-16) to
the Arkansas Razorbacks.
With only the
Gamecocks, Florida
International and the
Florida State University
Seminoles left on the
Gator schedule, the poten-
tial exists for the Gators to
have a 13-0 season.


Brandon James runs for tough yards against I


I -


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'U


r"ti
rIis


Tebow 1-yd plunge for record tying to


Gator Jeffrey Demps sells play action fake in 4th quarter

JAGUARS SCHEDULED GAMES
Nov. 8 Kansas City Chiefs Jax Municipal Stadium W 24-21
Nov. 15 at N.Y. Jets Meadowlands 1:00pm CBS
Nov. 22 Buffalo Bills Jax Municipal Stadium 1:00pm CBS
Nov. 29 at San Francisco 49ers Candlestick Park 4:05pm CBS
Dec. 6 Houston Texans Jax Municipal Stadium 1:00pm CBS
Dec. 13 Miami Dolphins Jax Municipal Stadium 1:00pm CBS
Dec. 17 Indianapolis Colts Jax Municipal Stadium 8:20pm FLN
Dec. 27 at New England Patriots Gillette Stadium 1:00pm CBS
Jan. 3 at Cleveland Browns Cleveland Browns Stad.1:00pm CBS


'" i. '; .,..1 -;,' J ., ', 't: 'J. ,,., 7. i '.' ; *,,..., .., :. *' . '"1 .
', . ---'. ,' .it', '.
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'" .': ; ,, "'. .* . 2 " "


THE FLORIDA. STAR
Headed to face a Jets
team that is reeling, the
Jaguars are a viable playoff
contender at 4-4, one game
out of the final wild card
spot if the season ended
today.
Two three-point home
wins over the one-win St.
Louis Rams (23-20 in over-
time) and the Kansas City
Chiefs (24-21). A home-
and-home split with the
last-place Titans, including
a 30-13 loss that handed
Tennessee its first win of
the season just two weeks
ago. Blowout losses to the
Cardinals (31-17) and
Seahawks (41-0), and a rea-
sonably impressive win at
Houston (31-24) that seems
like it took place eons ago.
"We've left ourselves in
a spot where we can contin-
ue to fight," said coach
Jack Del Rio. "We had
tremendous [offseason ros-
ter] turnover. This is a
group of men who are will-
ing to work at it. I believe

4'
GC~ bk


,e a\ ill iinpio'.c. Being at
4-4, we are still alive."
The upcoming five-
game stretch begins with a
trip to meet the Jets (4-4)
this Sunday, and continues
with the Bills (3-5), 49ers
(3-5), Texans (5-4), and
Dolphins (3-5). Win
enough of those, and an
ensuing two-game stretch
against the Colts and
Patriots becomes meaning-
ful, for a Jacksonville team
that is not widely being
described as such in league
circles.
"I said [to the team
that] the Jets are 4-4 and in
their bye week waiting for
us, so let's get a win, get to
4-4 and go visit them," Del
Rio said. "We expect to win
when we go out there.
We're not settling."
The Jaguars added
fourth-year safety Anthony
Smith off waivers from the
St. Louis Rams.
Cornerback Scott Starks
was placed on injured
reserve with a hamstring


IrJiUr)
Smith, 6-0, 200, has
played in 48 games with 14
starts for the Pittsburgh
Steelers and St. Louis, with
career totals of 99 tackles,
four interceptions and 23
special teams tackles.
Smith played in two games
for the Rams this season
after being claimed off
waivers, finishing with five
tackles.
Headed to New York to
face the struggling Jets, Del
Rio looked ahead to the
second half of the season.
Through the generosity
of Jaguars fans, more than
110 tickets have been
donated to charitable
organizations this season.
The cash and in-kind ticket
gifts valued at over $4,500
came as a result of the
Jacksonville Chamber
Cornerstone Luncheon on
September 4th. Wayne and
Delores Barr Weaver,
Jaguars owners, along with
Del Rio, Jaguars players,
coaches, the ROAR cheer-
leaders and JAXSON de
Ville were special guests.


Fans keeping a close eye on the game


Mrs. \Vea;'\er, \\lio is nent, and f
also Chair/CEO of the HabiJax in
Jaguars Foundation, noted recognition
at the luncheon that many of their ."
families and business own- volunteers, .,
ers who are loyal Jaguars and other ift
fans are struggling in this charitable
economy and that under- seating
standably impacts ticket programs, O .
sales. She also noted that they can
some avid Jaguars fans not meet
cannot afford to buy tickets the need of
and suggested that individ- all of the
uals and businesses could area's wor- Several of our s
buy tickets and donate thy groups.
them to charities that would One couple, U.S. Navy
allow some of these folks Admiral (retired) Kevin
to be able to attend a game Delaney and Pat Delaney,
this year. wrote in a note to Delores,
That started the "ball "Since Day One, when all
rolling." Although the of the seats could have
Jaguars Foundation and been sold out, you became
team provide a significant the only NFL franchise to
number of tickets to chari- offer discounted tickets
table organizations through through the USO and give
the Honor Rows, where- tickets to the family mem-
by youth earn their seat bers of our deployed mili-
through a goal setting pro- tary members (through
gram, Sailors Aweigh for Sailors Aweigh)." Admiral
U.S. Navy Delaney continued,
fa m i e s "We have been sea-
with a par- son ticket holders
ent(s) on since before Day
deplo y-- One, but I was
moved by your
words at the
b C chamber r
Cornerstone
Luncheon and want
to send you a check
,-'' to buy some seats
A'. for children
through the Jaguars
Foundation."
SAs a result of
Rashad Jennings cele- the ticket donations
rating his touchdown by Jaguars fans,


three organizations
received blocks of 30 seats
for Jaguars home games:
Barnabas International, a
senior citizen volunteer
organization, Starlight
Children's Foundation,
which supports families
with children with illnesses
and disabilities, and ARC
Jacksonville which sup-
ports disabled adults. Other
recipient charitable organi-
zations include The Bridge
of Northeast Florida and
Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Northeast Florida. Joanne
Hickox, founder and exec-
utive director of Barnabas
explained, "This is a bless-
ing for the senior volun-
teers who were selected to
go to the game in recogni-
tion of the hundreds of
hours they donate to chil-
dren's programs and other
non-profits throughout
Jacksonville, providing in-
kind support to these
organizations with a value
of thousands of dollars."


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NOVEMBER 14, 2009


THE STAR


PA Gf R_A


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NOVEMBER 14, 2009


_Ii;- Y iii


James Hunt enjoys the festive meal


Carmary S
the Lions
rendition c


Currency, Member ot
of Judah Youth Gro
of Michael Jackson


On November 7th, marked the Clara White Mission 105 years of
services to the community. To celebrate this community milestone, the
Clara White Mission, 93.3/101.5, Citi, Dignity-U- Wear and Sam's Club
sponsored the 14th Annual "Feed The City" Luncheon and kick-off of their
Community Thanksgiving Food Drive for the homeless and low-income
families.
Over 200 community volunteers including local fraternities and


sororities, served lunch to over 900 homeless and low-income
families in recognition of this auspicious occasion.
Ju'Coby Pittman-Peele, said their efforts are to ensure families are
f served this Thanksgiving, by providing food baskets this holiday sea-
)up, son to needy families. We are soliciting the HELP of businesses, civic
organizations, schools and faith-based organizations to participate by
sponsoring a food drive or pledging a contribution for Thanksgiving.
Drop-off for food donations/contributions are accepted until November
24th at the Clara White Mission, located at 613 W. Ashley Street.
The Mission is a one-stop community development center that
restores lives through job training, housing initiatives, literacy programs,
daily meals and cultural awareness. Last year, the Mission served over
185,000 meals to the homeless and at-risk individuals.
For more information, please call the Clara White Mission at 354-
4162 or visit our web site at www.clarawhitemission.org.


DRAGSTER -THE FEMALE TEEN

DRAG RACER


At nine years old, she started racing because of her brother
Calvin Johnson. He started when he was looking at Disney with the
kids racing and having fun.
Her future goals are to one day be like Antron Brown, who won
the Top Fuel title at NHRA Northwest Nationals against Tony
Schumacher, or to be a doctor.


Photo and Story by Clarissa Davis
Courtney Alisha Johnson, al0th grader that attends Brunswick
High School, tied in second place at the Douglas Motorsports Park.
The car that she races is a 1998 PNB with number 2245 on its side and
with a speed of 85 miles down a 1/8 of a mile track.
She qualified to race at the advanced junior's dragster at the
South Georgia Motorsports Park in North Valdosta, Georgia. This
young lady has also traveled to Texas, Colorado, and other parts of the
United Stated to be in the Junior Nationals Races.


PA GE R-5


- I -








PCty TETNM BR1,2


PREP RAP *


RARE BONOBO BORN


AT JACKSONVILLE ZOO AND

GARDENS
Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens announced its fourth bonobo
born at the Zoo-the first in five and one-half years. The female
infant was born on the 6th of November to Kuni, a 24 -year-old
female bonobo who came to the Jacksonville Zoo from the San
Diego Zoo in 2003. The sire of the baby is unknown, but could be
either Akili or Mabruki, resident males that are both recommended
by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums' Species Survival Plan
(SSP) to breed with Kuni. DNA tests will be done when the infant
is older to determine paternity.
Kuni, born at the Wilhelma Zoo in Germany on February 24,
1985, is important to the Bonobo SSP population because she is
unrelated to all other U.S. bonobos, except her daughter Johari.
Johari is non-reproductive, making Kuni and this new infant that
much more valuable to the population for increasing genetic diver-
sity. Both Kuni and her infant will be monitored closely to make
sure that they are healthy.
"The mother has wonderful maternal skills," said the Zoo's
Director of Animal Programs, Delfi Messinger. "She seems so
proud, and shows her baby to the 'aunties' in the group, as well as
to her human caretakers. The pair will be on exhibit intermittently
beginning this weekend depending on social grouping and the
weather."
For over 90 years, the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens has
been dedicated to inspiring the discovery and appreciation of
wildlife through innovative experience in a caring environment.
From the beginning in 1914, with an animal collection that consist-
ed of only one red deer fawn, the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens
has become one of the top zoos in the nation, now with more than
1,400 rare and exotic animals and over 1,000 unique plant species.
The Zoo is a non-profit organization and an accredited member of
the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and the World Association
of Zoos and Aquariums. It is open year-round, seven days a week,
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is located on Jacksonville's north side at
370 Zoo Parkway, one-half mile east from 1-95. For more informa-
tion, go to jacksonvillezoo.org.
The Willie Gary FOOTBALL Classic
College Fair at Raines High School
The Willie Gary Classic Presents its 7th Annual College Fair
at Raines High School on Saturday, November 14, 2009 from 11am
- 3pm. Admission is free. College recruiters will represent their
schools and answer student inquiries.
Workshops will include:
*Representatives from the Florida Department of Education will
present financial aid information and will discuss Bright Futures
Scholarships
*Representatives from the Jacksonville Commitment will discuss
their program
*Current and recent college graduates will highlight their strategies
in preparing for college
*Students should come prepared with three transcripts in hand.
Following the college fair, Edward Waters College will play
the University of New Orleans at 4pm at the William Raines High
School Stadium. Tickets for the game are $5 for Students (with ID)
and $10 for Adults.
The Willie Gary Football Classic is more than a game; it is
about the game of life. The organization is dedicated to helping
close the education gap, empowering students with tools,
resources, and inspiration to seek a higher education. For more
information, please visit www.williegaryfootballclassic.com.




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Call 904 657-9068 _



-
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BREAKING THE CYCLE EMBRACING

THE MANTLE OF FATHERHOOD

by William Jackson
Edited by Cheryl Williams

The recent E3 Focus Forum centered around the topic that has been touched
on by such notable people as Bill Cosby, Bill Clinton and even President Barak
Obama. There have been many dialogues about the urgency to get fathers more
involved in their children's lives even after divorce or non-marital breakups, with chil-
dren the results of these relationships.
JCCI Study
The JCCI study here in Jacksonville shows the affects of absence fathers in
children's lives and it's impact on infant mortality and poverty levels of children. Too
many households reflect the statistical evidence that the absence of responsible and
mature fathers contributes to continued poverty of children, increase involvement of
juveniles in criminal behavior, increased dropout rates among schools age youth,
mothers working 2 to 3 jobs to support their children and infant mortality rates similar
to that of third world nations.
The Panelists
The panelists guided a dialogue that created an emotionally charged atmos-
phere as the channel of communication revealed even into adulthood how a father's
absence in the lives of their children transcends time and distance. When fathers are
not present physically, emotionally and psychologically it changes the stability of chil-
dren growing into mature and self-confident adults. Moderated by
Anthony Butler, Exe. Dir. E3 Business Group, Inc (Jacksonville Chapter) this Focus
Forum "Breaking the Cycle" is not just a controversial and poignant topic in
Jacksonville, but throughout the country and in multiple cultures. This extends beyond
Caucasian, African American, Latino, and Asian cultures, but into other cultures that
are not typically thought of because of perceived cultural stereotypes.
Key Points
The dialogue focused on points that should be obvious; there is no excuse for
fathers not to be involved and money cannot buy being a good father, every male is
not a mature or responsible man to be a father. Instead of telling children the right way
to go fathers should show their children by their actions, women sometimes do make
it difficult for fathers to be in their children's lives, fathers need to financially support
their children and don't be selfish in denying their children a healthy existence.
Continuation of the discussion expanded into setting priorities by both the man and
woman and keeping open and honest communication in the relationship. If marriage
is in the future there should be work towards this goal, but if not arrangements should
be made for moving on in separate lives. Women are learning that they cannot make
a man marry them even or support them even when there is a pregnancy and a future
child does create unintended stresses and challenges.
Marriage Facts
The fact that Florida marriages, 50% to 70% end in divorce should prompt more
men and women to talk about their goals in life and if they are mature and financially
ready to support a child. Knowing this ahead of time prompts the use of birth control
methods that protect from accidental pregnancies. Forty percent of births in Duval
County are to unwed mothers that struggle even without a child who find themselves
at or below the poverty level.
Conclusion
A philosophy for success for fathers as the forum worked to establish is to
Educate, Encourage and Empower fathers to maintain a passion for their children.
Fathers need to understand that they are important to their children and mothers need
to make sure children have the opportunities to see their fathers despite emotional
past hurts or challenges. Fathers that are not involved go back and get involved in your
kids lives. It is never too late; it may be challenging in the beginning, but worthwhile
for them and you when you reconnect and establish a relationship.
Next Forum:
"Parent Involvement":
November 14th, 2009 at the MOCA Museum next to the Jacksonville Main Library.
www.e3businessgroup.org for more information.
Focusing on Infant Mortality and Absentee Fathers
http://e3businessgroup.orgl
Educate Encourage Empower


In July we scratched the surface on the key
Issues Now we are diving deeper into the
issues raised by Real Talk Real Change.

SA-TURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2009
ABSENTEE FATHERS
10AM-NOON
Join us aas .e discuss ways fathers can bre3h the cycle of
being a bsent in lhe hes of their children
"'Ever, wher the marriage has broken up. children need a
elaioonship ,ith their fathers A good father can help provide
the firm direction that leads tD better self-esteem "


Florida Times Union Editorial-July 11 2009


STrui Nur, NOVEMBER 14, 2009
PARENT INVOLVEMENT (IT TAKES TWO!)
S10AM-NOON
Join us as we discuss what true parent 'nvokement looks like
and methods for developing a mindset for joint parenting
"...parents must keep reminding their children about how ,
important they are."
Archie Talley-Real Talk... Real Change Panelist-July 7, 2009
Seating Limited-Register Todayll


Hosted B :

MOCA

useumnl o 'Contnleporrn Art
.iacksonm ille
1 C'1it1 l :LP ,., .. 1 ,4 I ..'1,F
333 Norlh Laura Slreel
Jacksonville, FL 32202
'- r -.n.i. .. .'J II
i' i' .'I m .''i.i L k._.:'n in le ,:,rg

Presented By:





The Jacksonville Chapter
E3 Business Group, Inc.
888-525-2299
www.e3businessgroup.org


"Evenbody bktos the problem. It's TIME to deal with lte issues!"
RSVP to events@e3businessgroup.us or 904-735-8627
Membership Info-members@e3businessgroup.us
Sponsorship Opportunities-info@e3businessgroup.us


-I


THE STAR


NOVEMBER 14, 2009


PAIC R-6/


~-"*14~:~,,-
- '"t-'l-Yi~llPli~b








F/IAE D- /


NOVEMBER 14, 2009


EMPLOYMENT
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Announcements

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Advertising Networks of Florida, Put us to work for You!
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Apartment for Rent

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only $199/mo! Won't Last! 5% dw, 15 yrs @ 8% apr For
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Auctions

ALAPAHA RIVER RANCH AUCTION: 500
ACRES ABSOLUTE! 4,600 Acres offered in 14
parcels- on the Alapaha River, Willachoochee, Georgia.
11AM, Saturday, November 21. Excellent Timber
Investment, Recreation or Farming Opportunity!
Preview: 10AM 4PM, November 13, 14 and 20.
Higgenbotham Auctioneers: (800)257-4161. Mike
Lofton, GREL#16478 GAL#168

Goshen, AL. (near Troy), 2197 Co. Rd. 2242. Excellent
for retirement or relocation nice house, fenced pasture
on 61+ acres. AUCTION Nov 17, 2009 at 11am (or ear-
lier upon price agreement) at Pike County Courthouse.
Contact Attorney Joe W. Adams (334)774-5533

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING TAX CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty.
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Cars for Sale

Police Impounds! Honda 1999 Civic $200! Nissan 2001
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ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical,
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Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179,
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Proposal Number: 10-06
LIABILITY INSURANCE BROKERAGE SERVICES
FOR THE
JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY
Proposals will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority (JAX-
PORT) until 2:00 PM (EST), on Monday, November 30, 2009, at which
time they will be opened in the First Floor Conference Room, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206.
All Proposals must be submitted in accordance with the Specifications
of Proposal Number 10-06;!which may be obtained on November 10,
2009, from the bidding opportunities website:
http://www.jaxport.comlaboutt/projects.cfm.
Procurment & Contract Services Department
P. O. Box 3005
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
(904) 357-3017
Sundale Manor
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
for
Affordable Apartment Homes
CALL OR STOP BY TODAY
(904) 381-4877 TTY
3505 Corby Street, Jacksonville, Fl 32205
Income & Age Restrictions Apply


LEGAL NOTICE

Notice of Termination of practice of Alexander Milanick,
DDS. Copies of records may be obtained in this county( Duvol}
by written request to his father, Mr. Milanick, P. O. Box 1724,
Flagler Beach, FL 32136-1724 (904) 347-3473. You may be
billed for the actual cost of copying, mailing, or delivering
records that shall be available at and within reasonable times.


BUSINESSES NTWORaal


1


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THE STAR


nAf'r7 D 7


L 3 1 5=n iArtsta OffeJrd O t i Hihast S!idT\
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Nuwly-urnLr UL:L.Id, .six--budrourn idinr honlleL GuI.I,[
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-- -- MIIM--


CASESSE5.


- i







NOVEMBER 14, 2009


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'-,I .-' J I

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-| -U.,ALL
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94&I W yI


Unfortunately, more than 70% of homeowners in foreclosure proceed with-
out seeking any visible assistance. When it comes to your home and your
financial future, it's important to get the truth about your particular situa-
tion. So, I've prepared a free report debunkLin the seven most common
short sales myths, lust tor yonu I


The right information leads to the best solution. As a Certified Distressed
Property Expert, I've been trained to inform and assist homeowners with
financial troubles. If you or someone you know is c rr .u-i iri.- I can provide
real solutions, not myths.


THE STAR


PAGE B-8