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Florida star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
oclc - 2261130
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00943

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
oclc - 2261130
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00943

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Full Text



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9041768-88~34 to place yoyr ad TO;DAYDDDDDDD~~~~~~~II.
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M. Powell, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Clarissa Davis, Andrea
Franklin, Delores Mainor Woods
Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Esfer Davis, Lucius Gantt, Deanna,
Cv'nthia Ferrell
Distribution and Sakes: Dan Randolph, Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie


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First African Anjerican Inducted Into I
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame I


YOU REALLY WANT TO BUY A HOUSE??

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Got a credit score of 600 or above, been on the job 2 years

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WIN TICKETS to SEE "The COLOR PURPLE"

Opnirig night..3 ways to win

Noebr17, the classic Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Alice Walker, THE COLOR PUR-
PEis performing for one week only at the Times-Union Center Moran Theater. The play
rnon Broadway from Dec. 1, 2005 through Feb. 24, 2006. There were a total of thirty pre-
veswith nine hundred and ten performances. Brenda Russell received a 2006' Tony
Aadthe Best Original Score and Donald Byrd was a nominee for the 2006 Tony Award
frBest Choreography. .
How many Tony Awards did the play receive in 20067 How many nominees? Who in the
play was a student at Raines High School? Who were the original Broadway cast mem-
bes Who is playing "Mvister "in the play? What are some of the songs from the play? What
is your favorite scene?
Teeare 3 ways for you to win a pair of tickets to see the play. Winners will be determined
bythe earliest postmark or e-mail date. Entries must be sent to The Florida Star
Newspaper, 1225 W. Beaver St, Suite 111, Jacksonville, Florida 32204, Attention Dan
Evans or e/mail to Dan@thefloridastar.com. All entries must be in The Florida Star Office
by November 4th, 2009. Winners will be announced on impactt Tues NoviOth and will be
listed in The Florida Star Newspaper November 13, 2009. Entries must include name,
adrs,and a good phone number.


TREWAYS TO WIN
1. The most Color Purple Trivia. (Earliest postmark or e-mail date.)
2.The most Original Broadway Cast Members ( earliest postmark or e-mail date)
3. Describe you favorite scene ( to be drawn at random from all entries


~1-1111__1411 1~ C r II I -----~I~slPII~-~---------llVd


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OCTOBER 24, 2009


THE STAR


PA GE A-2 -


-CLARA FRA\NCES McL.AUGHLIN
PUBLISHERS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
TIAAYELE
MANAGING EDITOR/PREP RAP

DENNIS WADE
ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
MAY FORD
LAYOUT EDITOR
SPECIAL SECTIONS

CHERYL COWARD
liESIGN AND WEB SITE EDITOR
Investigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath


BETTY DAVIS
LIFESTYLE/SOCIETY COLUMNIST

MIIKE BONTS
SPORTS EDITOR
DANIEL EVANS
ADVERTISING AND SALES
LIZ BnLINGSLEA
OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER
JULIA BOWLES
SPECIAL SECTIONS
DISTRIBUTION
JAMES GREEN


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Available from Comme~rcial News Providers


TEL: (904)766-8834
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Serving St J~ohs sC ay,G DuaNassau,
Alachus, Flagler, Marion, Mclntosh,
Camden And Glynn County
TheFloridaStar.com

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaperpulse
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
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with subscription amount to:
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Opinions expressed by columnnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper


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The :Church Directory.
"Come and Worship IIflth Us"

New ]Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208 -
Sunday School .....................................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning
Intercessory Prayer................ ....10:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................... 11:00 a.m. \I
Youth Church
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary)
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.
Bishop Eric Lee, Pastor
Rev. Joe Cal o, Pastor Emeritus'


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service ... .. .. ... .. ... .. ... .. 10:00 a.m.
Church School ......... ........ 8:30 p.m.
Wensday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study ... .. ... .. .. .. .. .10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jirah" Bible Study'. .. .. .. .. :... .. .. .. .. 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thur~sday "Young at Hear Ministry .. ... .. .10:00 a.m.
Joy Explosion Ministry .. .. .. ... .. ... .. ... .. .. 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Curh Whee Eveyod s Somaebo y"
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
c a ling Address: P..Bo 3575 Jackso ville,8 Frida 3 2658

Sunday School 9:30............... a.m.
M omniog W orship........ .......... .................. ....... ... 1:00 a.m.
Tuesday.................. ..,... .......................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday ....Joy............ Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don 't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School -------------------------------- 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ----------------12:00 Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study --------------Tuesday & Friday--- 7:00 p.m.

(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520


Faith In Oulr Commzunity

Schedule ofEvents and Services

MT. OLIVE PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH,
located at 1319 North Myrtle Ave., with Elder Lee
Harris, Pastor ask you to join them as they celebrate
their 127th Church Anniversary. Theme: "A Church
Anointed to Serve." Sunday, October 4th, 11th, 18th,
and 25th at 4:00 p.m. Each Sunday will be blessed with
a guest Preacher to deliver the word of God, and guest
choirs to minister through songs.
THE MILLIONS MORE MOVEMENT-Appeal For
Your Excess Clothes -Jacksonville Local Organizing
Committee Inc., a non-profit organization, is in the
process of gathering clothes and non-perishable can
goods for the fast approaching 'Thanksgiving Basket
Give-A-Way' and 'Clothes Give-A-Way.' If you are in
the process of cleaning out your closets, or just have
clothing items for children, womeir or men of all sizes,
we need them. Requested items include shoes, jackets,
dresses, shorts, dress clothes, etc. Items can be brought
to 916 N. Myrtle Avenue., Monday through Saturday,
from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Items can ~also be picked
up.Visit www~jaxloc.com or call 904-240-9133 for
more information. .
'SECOND MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH, 954
Kings Rd., Jacksonville, FL, will celebrate its 159th
CHURCH ANNIVERSARY AND the 23rd
ANNIVERSARY OF THEIR PASTOR, Rev. Dr.
Odell Smith, Jr. November 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8, 2009 at
11:00 a.m. Sunday and 7:30 p.m. on week rights.
Them: "GOD Answers Prayer." The ptiblic is cordially
invited to come.
THE SENIOR WOMEN MISSIONARY MIN-
ISTRY OF THE ZION HOPE MISSIONARY BAP-
`TIST CHURCH is having their Annual Old-Fashion
Tea Program, Sunday, October 25, at 3:00 p.m.. at the
church located at 2803 Edgewood Ave., West,
Jacksonville, FL. Joining them this year will be special
guests Sister Bessie Brown, Gospel Truth, Sister Sharon
Williams and the Elite Mines. Following the program
they will serve a delicious old fashion dinner.
THE NORTHSIDE CHURCH OF CHRIST, located
at 4736 Avenue B where Charlie McClendon is the
Senior Minister is celebrating its 55th Anniversary and
'32nd Annual Homecoming October 31st November
8th 2009. The festivities include guest speakers, a
songfest featuring eight gospel groups, free food, free
nursery, and free transportation.: This year's theme is
"In God Wte Trust. The celebration begins Saturday,
October 31st at 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. with a community fish
fry; that is fr-ee and open to the public. The activities
include jumpy things, face painting,. and basketball.
Additional treats are cotton candy, popcorn, and honey
drippers.- The Homecoming Gospel/Reviival Meeting
dates are November 1-6. Douglas Perry from Dallas,
TX will speak Sunday, November 4-6 and Alvin
Daniels Miami, FL is speaking Novemb~er 4-6 and also
on the 8th. These powerful ministers will outline scrip-
tural truths that reinforce who, what, where, why and
how to trust God for all your needs. Saturday,
November 7th highlights our annual songfest with
nationally known gospel groups held at the Times
Union Center of the Performing Arts, 300 Waters Street
at 6:00pm. November 8th Homecoming Day the events
and activities include: *An Annual Breakfast/Program
at 7:00 a.m. *Worship Service 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.
*Annual Homecoming Dinner at 12:45 p.m. 2:30 p.m.
*Annual Homecoming Program 2:45 p.m. 4:30 p.m.
*Group Singing at 4:30 p.m. For more information,
please call the Northside Church of Christ at (904) 765-
9830.
GREATER NEW MT. MORIAH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH, 1953 West 9th St., Jacksonville,
FL, Dr. Percy Jackson, Sr., Pastor. We are having a
Gospel Jubilee, Saturday, October 24, 2009 at 6:00 p.m.
For more information call (904) 713-9183.
FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH OF
JACKSONVILLE BEACH, with Rev. Dr. Marvin A.
McQueen, I will be hosting their "2009 HALLELU-
JAH FALL FESTIVAL" on Saturday, October 31st
from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. This free event will be
held at 850 Fifth Avenue South and is open to the pub-
lic. There will be games, refreshments and entertain-
ment provided by the Ritz Voices. Also., there will be
free health screenings and information provided by
Shands Wellness Center, Baptist Women's Health,
Walmart vision Center and the Donna Foundation. for
more information, please contact the church at (904)
246-8120 or Evang. Douglas at (904) 982-8924.
THE SUMMERVILLE MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH located at 690 West 20th St., in Jacksonville
will celebrate their- Church's 109th and Pastor's 17th
Anniversary on Friday, October 23, 2009 at 7:00 p.m.
and Sunday, October 25, 2009 at 4:00 p.m. They are
inviting all of their Brothers and Sisters in Christ to this


IJoin (A s WerAL Studcr th Wobrd of God anb Ennrch Our Souls!


: Subscribe to:

:The Florida Star
It ha Al ofThe

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(9 04) 7 66- 8 83 4
* ** ** ** ** ** ** *


rAlmighty God,Father
ofall mercies and
giver of all
cmout r~Deaal g-aee,
with those who mourn,
that casting every care
on thee, they may
know the consolation
ofthy love, through
Jesus Ch st our








N 0TICES


BLAKE, Ar-thell L., Jr.
died October 18, 2009.
COLEY, Milton, died
October 16, 2009.
COREY, Howard, died
October 20, 2009.
DAVIS, Ms. Kimberly,
died October 20, 2009
Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
DAVIS, Lester .J., 64,
died October 16, 2009.
MCOORE'EPleariR., 81,
died October 14, 2009.
OLIVER, Eddie, Sr.,
died October 18, 2009.
PINCKEY, James R",
died October 19, 2009.
ROYAL, Arbie J., 86,
October 17, 2009.
VAYE, Stephen, died
October 18, 2009.


I I


great occasion. Rev. James W. Henry, Pastor. For more
information, call (904) 598-0510.
MURCHISON TEMPLE CHRISTIAN
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH located at
5817 Catoma Street, Jacksonville, FL, 32244 invites the
community to the "50+ Women's Brunch:
Revitalizing Spirit, Soul & Body"' on Sat., Nov. 7,
2009, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. This event seeks to bring women
together to inspire and motivate them to understand that
it is never too late to fulfill the highest purpose in their
lives. While feasting on a surprising menu of tempting
breakfast and lunch choices we will also have do~or
prize offerings and opportunities to bid in a silent auc-
tion. Featured guest speaker is Dr. Martha Lue Stewart
of Orlando, FL. An active member of the Women's
Missionary Sopiety of which she has also served aS
president, Dr. Stewart is currently a Professor in the
SEducational Studies Department at the~ University of
Central Florida. She has served in several capacities at
the local, state, regional, and national levels for over 40
years in her national public service sorority, Delta
Sigma Theta, Inc. Dr. Stewart, in her own words, "I
seek to insipre, as I have been inspired." Tickets for the
event are $10 and are available from Pastor Mary
McKinney, (904) 619-8342.
FIRST NEW ZION MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH located at 4835 Soutel Dr., Jacksonville, is
preparing to celebrate our beloved Pastor with an
Appreciation Banquet. Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson has
been our spiritual leader for the past 24 years, and we
want to praise God for him and' show him and his fam-
ily how much we love and appreciate them for all they
do. The banquet will take place on Saturday, October
31, 2009 at 6:00 p.m. at the Zion's Fellowship Hall,.
located at 4810 Soutel Dr., Jacksonville. Our theme this
year is "30 Years of Ministering." Tickets ~are only
$50.00. It would be an honor to have you and your fam-
ily shark in this awesome celebration banquet with us.
We are also preparing a very special souvenir message
journal with special salutations, and/or congratulations
to Dr. Sampson, commemorating this momentous occa-
sion. To reserve your banquet tickets) or to place a


message in the souvenir
journal you may call (904)
765-3111. Deadline for
submitting a message is
October 9th.
NEW BETHiLEHEM
MISSIONARY BAP-
TIST CHURCH'S Pastor
and Members will be cele-
brating the 90th Church
Anniversary on
November 8, 2009. It is
our sincere hope that you
will help us commemorate
this auspicious occasion
by purchasing an Ad in
our Souvenir Book. The
cost for the ads range from
$50.00 for a full page ad
to $5.00 for a donation
line. Your support will
aide us in our quest to
continuously impact the
lives of the persons in our
community in~a very pow-
erful and positive way.
Thank you in advance for
you generosity. The
church is located at 1824
Prospect St., in
Jacksonville. For more
information, call (904)
764-5727. Bishop Eric A.
Lee, Pastor.
ST. PHILIP'S EPISCO-
PAL CHURCH celebrat-
ed it's 2nd Annual Edward
Waters College Day in the
main auditorium of the
church at 321 West Union
St. The celebration fea-
tured the renowned
Edward Waters College
Concert Choir, directed by
Mrs. Barbara Bouie and
the H. Alvin Green
Memorial Alumni
Chorale, under the direc-
tion of Mrs.' Patricia A.
Black. 'This celebration
was provided to raise
funds in support of
Jacksonville's HBCU,
Edward Wiaters College,
through 'Love Offering.'


Litnsare due the Iedy
beoethe next issue.EmH
submim notns pe er d. Send


'"


19onne Brooks
Go-Host


Host


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Tfle Florida Star and Impact
Striving .To Make ~ADifference!


















r "Thter-e's A-lwayslv Sonsethzisag Happessingilt~ on The~ Fir-st Coacst"


THE STAR


OCTOBER 24, 2009


Jacksonville Women's Network (JWN) members Dr.
Barbara Darby aind JWN past president Dr. Joan Carver.


ronville Netwvork Member Mrs. Bett?
JWN members thrat included past presl-
eg Chassman and Mary Ahice Barrett


Jacksonville Women's Network (JWN)
pR gao SCom itt Meme Drm. Brenh
include past JWNpresident Mrs. Judy HalL


C~ .
Glover shares a moment with a Jack and Form~er Jacksonzvdle Sherfry1at Glover speakers
rk and Jill Teen Member. to Jack and Jill Workshopr Partscapants.


,\ewly~b Orda~iedn Deaconr at Bethel' Baptist Insetiitrutinl Chrurchl
Mark G; Singleton wuith his fam' yd. anrd pastors Bishop R. W
McKissick, Jr;. ard ReverenrdR. W. McKirssick, Sr.


Jacksonville Women's Network
Celebrates It's 30th
The' Epping Forest Yacht Club was the setting for
the 30th Anniversary. of the Jacksonville Women's Y
Network. Informally referred to as JWN, the oraia
tion had as its theme "Then and Now" for the: 30th. The
members viewed a video presentation coordinated b
JWN Member Dr. Brenda Robinson Simmons fol
10wed by a historical and current perspective ofJW
peetation by the 2009 JWN president Mrs. Geori
Reed and the first JWN president Mrs. Cecilia Bryant
"The Network began with five women,oraie
with 35 charter members, and now has almost40
members in many professions. That number cnim
the acceptance -sometimes grudging of women as par-
ticipants in every venue'. But that success has eliminat-
ed the~ need for an organization to provide: a critical At ~fie right Jacks
mass of professional women that mass now is wonder- Smith Carley with J
fully found in the professions themselves. n dets Mesdames P
Making a difference is one way not to become mar- Phelan.
ginal in your world. Women in this room created
Roseanna Hartw~ell Women's Center, the Women's
Giving Initiative, the Women's Center of Jacksonvil
and other organizations. These are labors of lovean
gifts to the women in our community. But women
thsroom have also become players on the largerstg
of business and politics where power is the means an
teend. To have power in those worlds is to own power.
Adpower protects.
My vision of the future for the Network is clouded.
All I can do is ask: What gifts will your generation leave
to the women who are born today? What assurancesca
you provide these women that their future shall b
intrinsically as bright as your present? Ireomn
thtyou live in the present and that the Jacksonvill
Women's Network serve the future of its daughters.
Good luck!" (Exc~erpts from Ms. Bryant's presenta-
tion)
Drs. Lois Davis Gibson~ and Afesa Adams areboh
patpresidents of the organization. Dr. .Gibson was
elected mn 1996 as the organization's' -first Africa
Aerican president; Dr. Adams became the scn
Arcan American president in 2004. At the 30thl Jacksonville Womei
Aniersary Celebration, Dr. Gibson's sister-in-la members Dr. Barbi
yustruly (Betty Asque Davis) was elected as the State College at J
210 president, becoming the third African America Camcpus President
peiet. G~ibsonr, Past JWN ]

Ja~cksonville Chapter, Jack and Jill of
Amrerican, Incorporated Presents
"'How To Lead ~Your Ship" -
The Jacksonville Chapter of Jack and Jill of
Amrca,' Incorporated is presenting a leadership work-
shop series for students, participating in the AIVID po--
uramn at Andrew Jackson High School and students 8'
evolved iix the Kappa League of Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity. The "How to Lead Your Ship" ]program is
bing funded by the Jacqueline Robinson Regional
Competition Grant, which was -awarded to the
Jacsonile chapter during the- summer. It isben .
fuded by the Jack and Jill Foundation ofth
Souteasernregion of Jack and Jill of America, Inc.
Te grant committee, headed by members Mesdames
Mri Forchion Chapman aind Kim Hollioway, has Jack and Jill Works
sheduled five (5) workshops during the 2009-2010
school year with the following topics: "Leadership",
"ivic Responsibility", "Public Speaking and Dressfo
Success", "College Prep 101 and Career Planning",an
"Sx, Drugs, and Hip Hop Culture." Students will also
pricipate in a community service project and a day-
trpto the state's capital to tour the campuses ofFloid
AMUniversity and Florida State University, as wel
asthe state capitol building in Tallahassee. In addition
toa Character module on "Respect", the first workshop
featured a motivational speech led by Mr. Nthne
Goer, Jr., first African-American sheriff in the state
ofFlorida since the Reconstruction period.
Jack and Jill of America, Incorporated is a natioa
nnprofit African-American organization ofmohr
who nurture future leaders by strengthening cide
aes 2-19 through chapter programming, cmuiy
srvice, le islative advocacy, and philanthropic giving. Former SheriffNat
Jill Mother and Jac
Founded mn 1938, Jack and Jill of America, Inopoae
hsa membership base of over 9,500 farmhles and it is
the oldest and largest African-Amnerican family organi-
zation in the United States.

NINETY'-ONE YEARS















Mlrs. Inre: Chrvistophe~r A~s ne ce lebrating her 91st Bi~rthday wlith her famrils:
Fourr generrationrs together!
Alv Mlother lurs. Inez Christopher A\sque celebrated her ninery-first birth-
day' with a .Girl's Outing' at Biscotti's in Monildale. Enjoying thle 'outmng' wecre
granddaughter Alrs. Mlichelle Da\is Singleton. gre~at- grarnddaughters illaria
and Illoira Singleton along w~ith her daughter oursus truly).
Alamia w~as all smiles whien she discovered the ringing package held the cell
phone she had been hintinlg for. Since her birthday Alamna has become quite pr~o-
13cienlt in Iretiet ine T~et and ARIRS mcssnees. TivLeetina can't be far off,













I Arou nd T he Way A1


'ure Riders Riders Jacksonville


October 24, 2009


PA GE A-5


BIKETOBER

Pictures and Story by FML Powell Ill

Biketoberiest in Daytona Beach, FL is
an international motorcycle festival that
offers participants an extended weekend get-
away brimming with plenty of sun, beaches,
bikes and fun! Thousands of bikes come
from all over, no two alike! Popular annual
activities are to ride and walk down the side
walk. Most walk down Dr. M/ary McLeod
Bethune Boulevard. It runs through
Bethune-Cookman College, a historically
black college in Daytona Beach founded in
1904


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I~IUY~I V
I


OCTOBER 24, 2009


PAGE A-6


THE STAR


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Call or em'ail: Clara McLaughin
Publisher/Editor
(904) 766-8834
(912) 264-3137
clara@thefloridastar.com

The Florida Star
www.thefloridastar.com
Post Office Box 40629
Jacksonville, Florida 32203


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)1


Availab~le-frodm -Commercial b


Economy Got ou Down.


Pick Yourself Up!


Join our staff in marketing and sales
You can work from home, communicate with the potential customer at their office or
through the Internet and come to the office for sales and other staff meetings only.
The Florida Star Newspaper
The Georgia. Star Newspaper
Impact R~adio
Heard on radio stations FIV 105.3, FM 92.5 and AM 1360.

After 58 Years, We are still 'the people's choice.'
Striving to make a difference.





FrLORIDA- ~STARa


I,

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)~IA STIAR








I


PAGE A-7


DATE: Saturday, October 24, 2009

TIME: 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

PLACE: 529 Kingsley Avenue
Orange Park, FL 32073

PHONE: (904) 264-1233

www.bivensfuneralhome.com


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

VI Towing and Recovery, gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on
11/04/09, 9:00 a.m. at 5758-1 Lenox Ave, Jacksonville, FL 32205, pursuant to subsection 713.78
of the Florida Statutes. VI Towing and Recovery reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all
bids, less than lien amount owed. All vehicles sold as is, where is, cash only; no titles guaranteed.


Talking To An attorneys
By Bumney Bivens R!A.
NO FAULT INSURANCE
Many people wonder why does their own automobile insurance pay for an injury caused by some-
one else. The answer is simple. If you had to i-ely on some other drunk and careless driver to cove
yormedical expenses in an accident and if that drnuk and careless driver did not have any insurance
at all, you may never get ill to see a doctor. Therefore, the law requires t-hat you have a minimum
level of coverage (PIP) of $10,000.00. That $10,000.00 can be apportioned to pay medical expenses
at the rate of eighty percent and lost wages at the rate of sixty percent. This provision at least allows
yuto recover something.
When you are involved in any automobile accident your PIP pays. For example, if you are diig
someone else's car; or if you are a passenger in someone else's car; or if you are a pedestrian walk-
ing down the road and you are hit by somebody else; if you are changing a tire and the car falls off
tejack and injures you; or if you get into an argument over a parking space and are injured inth
rsligfight; or if you look under the hood of your car and the battery explodes in your fact. All
of these would be situations where your PIP insurance would cover you.
Incidentally, all of the examples that I have just given would apply whether the injury involvesyor
automobile or someone else's automobile. All of the examples above are decisions that have be
rldon by the courts in the State of Florida where PIP no-fauult benefits were applicable to pay 80%
of medical bills and 60% of loss wages up to a combined maximum of $10,000.00.
In the case of a death resulting from a covered accident, PIP also pays a $5,000.00 death benefit.
Nofault benefits provided by Florida Statutes g 627.736 are very broad and pays for lossessutie
by a person as a result of bodily injury, sickness disease or death arising out of the ownership, main-
tnneor use of a motor vehicle.
Who is covered.
1. If you own an automobile then your PIP coverage on your car would pay the benefits described
above. .
2. If you do not own an automobile then we must consider whether you are a resident relative of
someone else who owns an automobile. Resident relative is broadly defined and covers college stu-
dents living away from home who maintain their parents address as their home address and also mil-
itary service members living away from home in barracks who claim their official address as their
prnshome address (live in girlfriends and boyfriends unrelated to their lover are not afforded PIP
beeisunder their lovers automobile policy.) .In this case the insurance of the resident relative pays.
3. If you do not own a motor vehicle and if you do not live in a household with a relative who on
a motor vehicle, then no-fault benefits are available to you from the vehicle that you were riding in.
4. If you do not own a vehicle and do not live in a household with a relative who owns a vehicle
and you were not riding in the vehicle at the time of the accident, for example if you were a pedes-
trathen no-fault benefits are available to you from the vehicle that struck you.
5. The priorities are set forth above. However, you can only collect no-fault benefits from one veh-
cle and if the vehicle that you are entitled to collect no-fault benefits from is not insured you do nt
go down to the next priority, you are simply not covered. For example, if your own vehicle isno
covered or if your family vehicle for the household where you reside is not covered, then nobeets
are available to you.
The question then arises how do you recover money from the drunk or careless driver who cue
the accident and injured you in the first place. That is the subject for liability insurance poeto
wihwill be discussed at another time.

This article is submitted by Bitrney Bivens, Esq., LFD of the law firmr Bivens, Jonles &~ Associatesan
Arnand Burney Bivenls Funeral Hlome. During the next several months a series of articles will appearread
ing legal issues anldfuneral service related issues. Mr. Bivens has practice law in North Florida for 27yer
and has provided legal representation to the funeral service industry for more than 25 years atnd is also
licensed funeral d~irector- with his son. For questions on legal issues call the law office at 904-264-3412. o
questions regarding funeral services call Aaron and Burney Bivens Funeral Homle at 904-264-1233.

)115




=r II m


Call and talk: FM 105.3 (904) 854-TALK
Tuesday, from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m.
Call and talk: AM-1360 (904) 766-9285
Tuesday, at 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
"The Florida Star, The Georgia Star and Impact -
Striving to Make.a Difference."
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www.WCGL1 360.com
The Florida Star Still "The People's Choice"
Serving since 1951

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THE FLORIDA AND GEORGIA STAR


OCTOBER 24, 2009


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Conte~nt

Available from Commercial News Providers


Aaron and B3urney Bivens
FUNERAL, HOME
& -and
CREMATION SERVICES


..


"...thyv rod anrd thyl staff
they' comfort me
Psalms 23:4


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VIN# UNKNOWN


2001, BLUE, CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY

1980, WHITE, FORD F350 TRUCK

1969, RED, CORVETT

S1966, GOLD, OLDSMOBILE

1996, WHITE, CHEVROLET BERETTA

1993, BLUE, GEO PRISM

1995, GREEN, CHEVROLET TAHOE

2002, WHITE, MERCURY MOUNTAINEER

WHITE, TOW TRUCK BED


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( ) 6 Months $20.00 ( ) One Year $35.00 ( ) 2 Years $67.00
SEND TO: The Florida/Georgia Star
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Cash, Check, Money Order, Credit Card or PayPal Accepted


OPEN HOUSE



AARON AND BURNEY BlVENS
FUNERAL HOME


Tuesday, Listen and Talk!
IMPACT Radio Talk Show
FM 105.3-WJSJ- 5:30 and 11:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m., WCGL-AM 1360
FM 92.5-WFJO 2:30 a.m.
With
Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT








IIIUYII V


OCTOBER 24, 2009


THE STAR


PAGE A-8


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599

Ribeves Steaiks
Bone,,.In- F ut~lh Fr.=miurn~- Ce~rtllled~ Beef, USDA Choice
SArVE UP TOJ -.60 LB


Cil~~~mll


PUBLIC


Georgia-Grown 2i100
Sweet Corn..........~~
White, Yellow, or Bi-Color Varieties,
A Good Source of Vitamin C, each
SAVE UP TO 2.80 ON 8


Decorated Cupcakes, 399 a
6-Count...... .T.. ......_ 3
Assorted Varieties, Your Favorite Cupcakes,
Decorated for the Holidays,
From the Publix Bakery, 12-oz pkg,
SAVE UP TO 1.00
(12-ct. 24-oz pkg. ... 6.99)


Mediumoke Sh99m Publix Deli!on h9
Farm-Raised, Previously Frozen, Roast Beef ............. 41 to 50 per Pound Slow Roasted for Full Flavor,
SAVE UP TO 5.00 LS Ideal for Sandwiches, Platters or Appetizers,
Sliced Fresh in the Publix Deli
SAVE UP TO 2.00 LB


I:-
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Hershey's All Time Greats... ......... ...... Selected Coca-Colam Prdcs.. F r.. ee
Or Hershey's/Reese's Candies or Reese's Lovers' A~ssortment, 2-L bot. Quantity fights reserved.
Snack Size Packages, 26.7 to 32.37-oz bag SAVE UPTO 1.85
(While Quantities Available.) Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 8.99


,
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''


Planters
Mixed Nuts
or Cashews......
Or Cashews & Peanuts,
Assorted. Varieties,
9.25 to 11.5-oz can
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.43


Prices effective Thursday, October 22 through Wednesday, O~ctober 28, 2009.' ..
Only in Orange, Seminole, Brevardi Columbiai Marioid, Flagler, Volusia and Ala'chua Counties, in Fla.
Quantity rights res~rved.


,~ >vyrla:V4;rlhEis AMIMIMMMI


MAPPY HALLOWEEN!


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i~ki-
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.? C .~j .ry,~L~


M&M~v's
Chocolate Cand's
Fun Size ~~Fe
Bg Bag..
Or 3 Musketeers, Snickers, MlyWay, Twix,
Starburst, or Skittles, Assorted Varieties,
18.8 to 22.55-oz bag (While Quantities
Available.) Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 6.59


Tombstone Fe
Pizza.. ................. 10
Assorted Varieties,
18.1 to 29.5-oz pkg.
(Excluding Stuffed Crust
and Brick Oven Varieties.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 5.95


Tortilla oioChips Free
Assorted Varieties,
11.75 to 14.5-oz bag
(Excluding Baked, Light & Natural Chips.)
Quantity rights reserved,
SAVE UP TO 3.99


= re


. VISA "






OCJ'OpfR 24. 2009 THE STAR PAfGE B-1



A The FL Star A


LOCAL SECT ;



The Florida Star urnlFIHl- lslsrsp PruUe u -- -
Phtsby Dan Evans ., TANB~~~9~~llI U~ aarl s

Th Back Expo was in Jacksonville, ~~ Thrdy .~~-;;;; .% voo
October 8 through Saturday, October 10, 2009. The
teme for this year was "Business Focused:
Eduating &5 Empowering thze Family."~; Onp
Thursday, performing at the Tacksonville Yeterans J
MeoralAena was the legendary Earth, Wind & n
Fire. On Saturday, Special Guests: Chef G Garvin, r I ~ ~ ~ ~ I 1 ,,
Celebrity Chef; Mr. Brown of "Meet the Browns;" rs
Lace Gross of House of Payne; and Darrin ~6~
Henson of "Stump the Yard," appeared and per-
fomdthroughout the day.
SThere were over 300~ vendors and a lot of food THE I
and seminars. This year more' than 20,000 people A FLONDA l~ES~ha
ateddand The Florida Star distributed ovr
20,000 free papers. ?ii
Among the sponsors were Win-Dixie ,
MDonalds, JaxPort, BlueCross/BlueShield just t
nameafew.


C f A







111Lj U 1(11~ -



Copyrights~



Syndicate!



Availablffrom Comme
























Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and thie surrounding area.


I


II


,.I~S~St~B~Wd~BI~;laPn"U~APB~P4~h~:I' ::


OCTOBER 24, 2009


THE STAR


PA GE B-2


"CERTIFIED BASIC PISTOL AND~ ADVANCED .DEFENSIVE TACTICS
AND HOW NOT TO GO TO JAIL COURSE" Saturday, October 24, fr-om 7:45
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in Callahan, Nassau County, FL. CWNP Training Certificate-Call
Gary Belson (904) 491-8358 for Information.
CERTIFIED CONCEALED WEAPON LICENSE (Permit) Course Satisfies
Florida State Statute 790.06 for Application to Lawfully Carry a Concealed Weapon.
1 Hour Course, $35.00 by Appt. in Callahan, Nassau County, FL. Call Gary Belson
(904)491-8358 for information.
MR. EPHREN TAYLOR, II SPEAKS AT THE JACKSONVILLE URBAN
LEAGUE 36TH ANNUAL EQUAL, OPPORTUNITY LUNCHEON -Ephren
Taylor is CEO of City Capital Corporation (Other: CCTC) where he is responsible for
the strategic positioning and overall profitability of a multi-million dollar corporation
recognized by the Wall Street Joumlal as one of the "Top 100 Socially Conscious
Corporations ~in the United State." The JUL 36th Annual Equal Opportunity
Luncheon will be held on October 28. 12 Noon at the Hyatt Regency Riverfront
Jacksonville. Contact Linnie Finley ait 366-3461 for additional information.
THE DOUGLAS A-NDERSON A-LlllNI ASSOCIATION is celebrating the
50th Anniversary of the first graduating class of 1959. An application has been filed
with the Florida Heritage Conunission and the Florida Department of State to desig-
nate and name Douglas Anderson High School as a Florida Heritage Site. The appli-
cation has been endorsed by the Duval County School Board and is pending approval.
Once approved, a permanent marker containing the Sear of Florida and a. brief histo-
ry of Douglas Anderson will be erected on the current campus of Douglas Anderson
School of the Arts. Our first objective is to communicate to and rally the support of all
Doglas Anderson students, sporting families and friends, pastors and their church
congregations, to join us in celebrating this historic legacy. Our second objective is to
create two student scholarships: *The Nathaniel S. Washington Scholarship Fund for
Education or The Ministry. *The Sadie Jeffers Memorial Scholarship for Music. If
you have any questions, please contact me ait (904) 744'0387 or (904) 318-8957 or
any Elected Officer for D.A. Alumni Association.
ON VETERANS DAY, No\-eniberl 11, 2009, all of the nearly 2,000 Applebee's
Neighborhood Grill &5 Bar restaurants w\Ill honor Ur.S. veterans and active duty
military with a free meal. All guests with proof of current or former U.S. mili-
tary service will enjoy a free entrge~from a selection of six signature favorites.
This special offer will be available lunchtime through the dinner hours for dine-
in guests at all Applebee's restaurants, nationwide.. For complete details visit
www: applebees. com/veteday.
BEAVER STREET ENTERPRISE CENTER "FREE Taxpayer
Informational Workshop" Wednesday, October 28, 2009 from 11:30 a.m.
1:00 p.m. at the Beaver Street Enterprise Center, located at 1225 W. Beaver St.
in Jacksonville, FL 32204. The cost is FREE.
JACKSONVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY -Libqrary customers began seeing new
changes to their online accounts on October 1. The holds service, which allows
customers to place requests Ifor books to be put on hold for pick up, was updat-
~ed to better serve library customers. Customers are notified via e-mail when their
requested item is available for pick up and check out. Coming soon, the holds
service will include a voice automation message system that will notify cus-
tomers without e-mail accounts by way of a provided telephone number. The
Jacksonville Public Library provides library programs and services and a collec-
tion of more than three million materials to 'Duval County residents at the Main
Library and 20 branch locations. For more information about the Jacksonville
Pub lic Library, call 630O-BOOK or visit j axpubliclibrary. org.


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~~~-VV'~~ -)Y --


SYour Weekly

]H ORO S COPE


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I '~11 ARIES
Sere~rt afftair mla\ be brought
our1 In the open SeL~cr jffirus
imay onli cause comnplicaitions
in sour li1. Olne~l of JOrin
'eot r are It be l

stimulating and suc~cejjful
Your lucky7 day ilus~ week all
be Satuirdaz

CA-NCER
You will get along~ well in
social situations. Your posi-
tive attitude and intellectual
outlook will draw others to
you. Be careful not to get
involved in other people's
personal affairs. Don't bother
complaining, do the work
yourself. Your lucky day this
week will be Thursday.

LIBRA
Take a look at yoilt legal
position. Work quietly behind
the scenes: for best results.
This `will niot be the best day
to make changes or renova-
b'nsl yu rsdene tIook
mto nas to yburrtte ourself
through in rovmn your
dietary habits and duly rou-
unes.



Tempers will mount if you
are too pushy at work. You
will enjoy physical activities
more than you think. Your
energy will be high; however,
if not channeled suitably,
temper tantrums may erupt.
Avoid lovers who already
have a relation ship, even if it
is bad one .Your h1 ky day


TAUrRIS
Obse~ri.ltion- w' Ill beC far mlore
plioduous~. Don't reveal any
proal details. Don't be t
nuc to sign documee so
Contmol yor an aios an

Your lucky day this week will
be Wednesday-


49 LEO
YourI mind is on moneymaking
\ ventures. Yo~u may wrant to put
!our creative thmkmilg cap on.
Don't allow' someone to do a
Job that wras designated specif-
ically for you. This n all not be
the best day to make changes
~or renovations to your~ resi.
dence. Y'our lucky day this
week will be Thursday.

iFY SCORPIO
Epesyour interest if you
want the relationship to
pors.Residential changes,
rnvations, or moves are like-
lyto disrupt your routine. New
loeconnections can be made
truhgroup associations.
Plnyour day carefully;. Your
lcyday this week will be


1~~ AQUARIUS
Call a good friend. Y'our goals
will be in reach if you direct
your energy wisely. You may
fmd yourself in a heated dis-
pute with a fiend ifyou try to
change your mind. You won't
be admired at home if you
haven't been taking care of
your share of the work. Your
lu y~ day this weepk wVill be


October is Domestic Violence

Awareness Mlonth


VIOLENCE BEHIND TH~E WrHEEL

Officer was dispatched to
655 W. 8th St. (Shands) in reference to a
~-~Vh~sdomestic battery. Upon arrival, he met
with Brenda (victim) who is, currently in
,' s~ a .an on and off intimate relationship with
William (suspect). The victim and sus-
pect have currently been dating for
approximately 3 years. The victim and
suspect do not have any children in com-
Smon. They have lived in the same resi-
)i dence for the past year.
'. C" 1' The victim advised that she
/and the suspect were in the same vehi-
cle travelling at approximately the 5100
block of Lenox Ave. when they began to
.OFFIC argue. She said she attempted to exit the
vehicle when the suspect grabbed her
~shirt. The victim said she tried to pull
away from the suspect and he struck her
in the mouth with' a closed back fist. She
said her mouth was cut open and her tooth became loose. The victims said
there was a large amount of blood in the vehicle. The suspect then drove the
victim to the hospital. She said once she got out of the vehicle, the suspect
attempted to flee the scene before being detained by another Officer.The
Suspect was read his rights.
Post Miranda, the suspect advised he and the victim were arguing. He
said she tried to grab the steering wheel and then ~struck him on the left and
right side of the face with closed fists. The suspect said the victim went to
strike him again before he finally put his arm up to defend himself with a
blocking maneuver and inadvertently hit her in tihe mouth, causing it to bleed.
He said he took her to Shands for medical treatment. The suspect said once
at the hospital, the victim's oldest daughter arrived and he attempted to
leave. DCF was notified .Officer observed the cut on the victim's mouth and
the damaged tooth. The victim was given an ET card and advised to call an
ET when she arrived at her residence. The victim was Signed a Signature
Form and completed a Threat Assessment Form. She also gave a written
statement. The suspect was transported to the P~TDF without incident. Case
'cleared by arrest.



USE OF DEADLY WEAPON

Officer K responded to a report of shots fired at Westmont St. at the
Southside Apartments. Prior to arrival he was advised thiat someone had
been shot. An off duty Officer P broadcasted that he could hear the gunfire
from the 3000 block of Phillips Hwy. Upon arrival, Officer K found Officer P in
the South West corner of the complex. He had four black males on the
ground at gunpoint. The males were identified as, D.D., J.M., J. P., and J.K.
Officer checked the males for warrants. After securing the subjects, Officer K
taped~ off the crime scene and attempted to locate the victim. He was unable
to locate a victim at the scene, however, residents at the apartmentsstated
'that the victim was loaded into a vehicle and taken to the hospital. They locat-
ed him at Memorial hospital. There Officer found the victim, J G. According to
Officer T, the victim suffered a single non life threatening gunshot to his but-
tocks. Officer T stated `that the victim did not know who shot him. Officer T
arrested the victim for possession of crack cocaine. At the scene, Officer K
observed several spent cartridges in a dri~vewajr of the complex. He also saw
two bullet holes in the side of the apartment at Westmont St. Another bullet
hole was found in the kitchen window of the apartment at Willow St., the
home of Persia (Victim #2). Persia stated that she was home during the
shooting; however, she was not hit by the bullet that ~entered her kitchen..
While at the scene, Police was given the phone number of an anonymous
witness. He called the number and spoke to an unidentified female. She stat-
ed that the shooting was retaliation for a robbery that had occurred in the
complex earlier that dlay. She stated that earlier, a black male known as
"Trey" robbed K N during a game of dice. She stated that later K N shot at
Trey; however, he hit a black male known as "Black and Mild" instead. She
stated that the shooter, K N was wearing a grey tee shirt, blue jean shorts at
the tirh~e of the shooting. While at the scene, an unknown black female
brought a bloody cell phone to officer J.C. Officer
J.C. was told that the phone belonged to "Woo Woo." Officer was also
told that "Woo Woo" was inside the apartment at Westmont St. Officers
knocked on the both the front and rear doors of th~e apartment for over thirty ~
minutes, They entered the apartment at Westmont St. in order to perform a
protective search. I searched the apartment for anyone that may have' been
shot. Inside Westmont they found Ms. Persia and Mr. Jo, aka "Woo Woo". Mr.
Jo had blood on his pants and had suffered a recent injury to his nose. Mr.
Jo stated that his bloody nose was the result of a game of "slap-boxing" with
his brother. He stated that the bloody phone found outside Westmont St. was
his; however, he denied any involvement in the shooting.
They made contact with the suspect, J G. He was the victim of the
shooting. When medical staff removed his clothing, a small tube fell o~ut of his
underwear and onto the floor. Officer recognized the tube as one that is used
to conceal drugs. A search of the tube for officer safety revealed crack
cocaine (field tested positive). The tube was observed to have fallen out of
the suspect's underwear and onto the floor. The suspect was arrested. The
suspect was absentee booked at the jail. The crack cocaine and the tube
were placed in the property room.


recipient of false information.
Your ability to charm others
will bring added popularity.
You need to be around friends
and family. Your lucky day
this week will be Monday.


SAGITTARIUS
Take care that arrangements to
spend quality lime togte
are made In advance. Yo
should visit a friend or relause
n o asn't been well.
losincere gestures offredi
nesare likely to occur.Yu
need to reframd fom beingte

g' ur ouck goy hs \ee o
be Thursday.

PISCES

Be careful not to exaggerate
when interacting with your
lover. Sit back and observe,
regardless of how hard that
might be. You can get ahead if
you present your ideas to
superiors. You need to be
inspired and have your spirits
lifted. .You lucky da this
week will be Tuesday.as


WrOMAN BEATS UP A MAN AND FLEES

On a Thursday night, Police Officer was dispatched to Lem Turner Road
(Shell Gas Station) to a complaint of a battery with injuries. Upon arrival, he
met with the victim who reported the following: Victim stated that he was at
a party with the suspect and they were both drinking. He said that they were
told to leave because they began to argue. He stated while he was driving
home from the party the suspect continued to argue to stop at Lem Turner
Road (Burger King parking lot). He stated that they both exited the vehicle
and the suspect grabbed his nose and punched him in the face with a closed
fist. He said while the suspect was grabbing his nose, he bit her on the arm
to get away from her. He said that the suspect walked away irorry the park-
ing lot in an unknown direction. Officer's investigation continued when he
met with the witness who reported the following:~ he stated that he observed
the suspect strike the victim in the face with a closed fist. The witness stat-
ed that he was inside of the vehicle and at the party. Another officer respond-
ed to the scene but the victim refused medical` treatment. The victim stated
that he has a child with the suspect and they reside together. The victim
declined to provide a written statement. During ,the investigation at the
scene, Officer observed a small cut on the left side of the victim's nose. He
also observed a small amount of blood on the victim's nose. He provided the
victim with all of his legal rights and remedies. The viictim was advised of a
"safe location". The victim refused to have an Evidence Technician photo-
graph his injuries. Based on the statements' given and observations, it
appeared that the suspect was the primary aggressor during the altercation.
Officer will attempt to locate the.suspect.

SUSPECT USES' COUN ERFEI~T MONEY TO
PAY. FOR YIZZA
Officer was flagged down by a male in a Dominos Pizza delivery car.
Officer made contact with Jonathan; the listed complainant and witness. He
advised the officer that he made ai pizza delivery to an apartment. A female
answered the door and purchased the pizza with a twenty dollar bill of U.S.
currency. The complainant entered his vehicle and noticed that the twenty
dollar bill was counterfeit.
Police investigation revealed that the twenty dollar bill was counter-
feit. Officer attempted to make contact with the suspect at the listed address.
The suspect refused to answer the door after he identified himself as a.
Police Officer with the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office: She stated," I'm calling
my peoples." Her actions jead him to believe that she had knowledge of the
counterfeit money and had intent to defraud Dominos Pizza. Officer spoke
with the neighbors of this address and they advised him that art elderly
woman lives at the residence. The young female is her granddaughter that
visits on the weekends. Officer will attempt to make contact with the resident
of the apartment to identify the suspect. Case suspended with a future fol-
low-up.
HIN1 Flu Information
The Florida Departmelit~ of Health's toll-free number 877FLAFLU1 (877 352 3581) is available
seven days a w~ek from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. The myflusafety.com Web site will be the official State o
Florida Web site for residents to obtain information. Additional information is also available
through the Duval County Health Department.


lilBIB ~ ~ lr~ Ir'I


PAGE B-3


THE STAR


October 24 2009


sSSHH!


17, 2009 October 24, 2009


October


GEllllNI
Be careful whben deli~lng with
female members of~our fami-
Iv Put tour efforts into mon-
elmaking ve~ntures. Turn lour
parent Meatinshlp a ond o

moves looki beetle and sudden
changes in your life are likely'.


1'IRGO


You will
interests.


attract new love
You may be the


From Actual Police Reports

Did YTrou Hear About?...








PAGE1 B- Ul-


I I II


(II `
r I





[t .I


_ ~


By Mike Bonts
Sports Editor ,
The Florida Star
The Jaguars have a 3-3
record heading into the bye
week for the second consecu-
ther seas-on and are \\inner ~
o~f thlee~ of thleir last four T
games The Jaguals;11 have~ a
records of ..500I or above~ after
sl\ e-ames fo~r the sixthl time ~

iloacLh Jrc~k Del Rio-
The Jag~uars rallied fo~r a
'?-_'il0 o1ertim \\in last
Staliday .ganist Sr. Louils at
hlomel. RB Matuinre Jones-

Diacn~ cl rushed fo 133 \lardS


__


SPORTS NOTEBOOK,-


_ __


1~~ 3__ ~ _


OCTOBER 24, 20019


THE STAR


4A D


,1:I


"M~oJo talked about
wanting1 thec balll and \veL golt it
to h~im plenty." said De~l Rlo
of Jonets-Drew\ alter the winu.
"I thought he \\as~ special
to-dal "
Q;B Dal id G~an aid thren \
for a caree~zr-high 35 Jard~s
andJ Al iker Sims-Wake~rr hand
a caree~r-bestn ine e~eptions

Ramrs W;R Torn Holt totaled
101 r~ceitul tnglas. Holt.
who spent 10 seasons writh
the Rams, became the first
player in NFL history to have
a 100-plus yard receiving
game in his first game
against a team for which he
had 10,000-plus receiving
yards. `
For the se~cond c~onsecu-
th~e season. thle Jaguals
began the season 0)-2 and
dien wonl to straltght dril-
ston games.j The Jagua~s
opened thle season w~ith loss-
es at In~diannpolls and against
.irlzona before: the\ eve~ned
their record w\ithl back-to-
bac~k winms at Houstonl and at
home against Tenne~ssee. The
Jagua1rs lost 1-0Il at Se~artle in
week~I five,. the fust of to


to Sanl F1:uiiso 4chq~iduledJ
onl Not. 29



roald games ainstll~ w;st
coast olPponents Th~e Jag~unls
unri ed~c\ to 7-3 un O\ernmelr
games un franlchisc lulstor\
w~ithi the w~In against St
Louls.. The JagiUuarsO\l 3 3-0:
mark in o7t~lernm i'ames at
hlome andJ hale \\on the coin1
toss in1 all three, of those
games,
Jaguars' CB Rashean
Mathis will likely need sur-
gery to repair a broken left
index finger during the club's
bye week.
"There's potential there
fo~r al Iissue \ ulth Ilus hand."
~oachl Jack Del Rio saild. T~e
injryJU iS noit Seas]On1 uctenC~lr-
ing. but could adve~rse~ll
atreet Manthis' Jbihts to 1dam
receivcrs if' he: need~cs to pla
w\ith a club on thle handi.
JASGUA.RS E ARN
F[FTFH STRAIGHT WI1N
BEFORE Bl'E 11EEK:
Thle Jag~uars havec \\on file
c~onjsecumr e games b~efore. the
open date including a 23-7i0


.~ .
P)
C
/


r


Through six fe bevigteoe
weeks. date, the Jaguars will have
"We have to stay hun- three away games and three
gry," said Jones-Drew. "We home games over the next
c~anl't be satisfied with this. six weeks beginning on
victory. I think guys tinder- Sunday, Novr. 1 at Tennessee.
stand it's hard to wmn m this
league."


win last Sunday over the
Rams. The Jaguars own a 10-.
5 mark ir( the game before
the open date in 15 seasons,
including a 5-2 mark under
Del Rio.
DO IT ALL BACK:
Alaunrce Jonles-Drell\ leadIs
the Jagluars in rushets (1081.
nrjlusin y~rds r16),. touch-
low\ns 18, and varuds froml
se~nnlmage 1628) through six
game~s. He rankhs third In1
rreceipnons w\ithl 26. He leads
the NFL in touchdlown-ls andc
tirst dlow\nsi r31 and is tied

rulshingu games. H-e is dile onll
player In thle N-FL to have'r
two thlree-touchldo wn7 games


THE FLORIDAJ STAR
S.C. State and Albany
State Remain Atop
College Football Poll -
South Carolina St. (5-1)
and Albany State (7-0) are
in the number one posi-
tions in this week's
Heritage Sports Radio
Network (HSRN) Division
I-FCS and Division II Top-
10 polls. The Top-10 polls'
are selected each week dur-
ing the season by the
HSRN staff and writers'
ranking Historical Black
College Football
Championship 'Sub-
Division (FCS) Division I
and NCAA Division II &
NAIA Div. I teams '
After winning the clash of
the HSRN top two teams
(SCS~Tr 35, FAMU 20)
Saturday, S.C. State was a
unanimous choice for the
number one position.
Moving up into the number
two position are the '
Panthers of Prairie View
(4-1) who shutout
Mississippi Valley St. 38-0'
while Florida A&M
dropped to number three.
Morgan St. (5-1) and
Grambling St. (4-3) held
on to number four and five
respectively, but Solithem
(4-2) moved up one to
number six after Alabama
A&M (4-3) was shocked
by Alcorn St. 34-16.
Alabam A&M dr ppd t
number nine. Ai-kansas
Pine Bluff (3-2) was idle
Saturday but received the
votes~to move up to numn-
ber seven. Rounding out
the Division I-FCS Top-10
are Norfolk State (3-3) at
nmer ei ht a ter crush
ing arch rival Hampton (3-
3) who was number eight

wo was id dbut rce v
the votes to move in at
number 10. In7 Division II'
Albany State (7-0) is the
unanimous choice again'
after surviving an overtime
thriller against Clark
Atlanta (32-29). Tuskegee
(5-2) was idle, but received
the votes to hold on to the
number two position. Also
holding on to their position
at number three are the
Bulldogs of Bowie St. (6-


2) after k~nocking
off number 10 St.
Paul's 14-0.
Shaw (6-2) moved
up to number four
after their 53-20
win over Chowan Ii
and Fayetteville St. I
(5-3) moved up to
number six with
their 30-12 win I-- 1-
over J.C. Smith. It was
Salem
Morehouse won took a
over Lane~ 55-33 Califpr
(Photo
and moved up to
number six, while Ft.
Valley St.- loss to (D-I)
Southern 55-23 and
dr ped to number seven
Ro ending out the Top-10 is
Langston (6-2) at number
eight, Elizabeth City St. (5_
3) at number nine, and for
the first time this season.
Virginia Union '(5-3) has
joined ~the ranks after their
31-3 win over Virgimia St.

Prairie View A&M Duo
Win Weekly SWAC
Accolades -Prairie View
A&M quarterback K.J.
Black completed the trifec-

tSaout wetearningthlet c
Conference's Offensive
Player of the Week honor
for the third consecutive
week
The junior from Louisville '
Ky., threw three touch-
downs and completed 17 of
23 passes for 235 yards in
Prairie View A&191's 38-0
win over Mississippi
Valley State on Saturday.
In four' games this season,
Black has completed 72.9
percent of his passes while
throwing for 861 yards and
seven touchdowns.
Wide receiver Austin
Nwokobia also made head
lines as he was named the
SWAC's Specialist of the
Week. The 6-5 graduate
student from Sugar Land,
Texas blocked two punts
that led to two scores for
the Panthers. This marks
the second consecutive
weekend Nwokobia has
stood out on special teams
as he blocked ti punt in the
win over Alabama State on
Oct. 10.

Crump, Hall Win CIAA
Football Player of the


a tough night for the Wiston-
State Rams (0U-61 as the team
45-14 loss to the U'nivLr'sity' of
rrria-Davik Aggr~s (3-3). -~
Sby Robert Dwretll
Week Awards -The
Central~ Intercollegiate
Athletic Association
(CIAA) honored defensive
end Marcus -Crump
(Redshirt Sr./Pittsboro,
NC) and outs de line-
backer Mark- jHall
(Sr./Suitland, Md.) of Saint
Augustine's College.
Crump won CIAA defen-
sive linentan of the week
honors for the second week
in a row, and Hall was
named CIAA linebacker of
the week. Crump (6-6, 240
pounds) returned a fumble
seven yards for a touch-
down in a 31-7 win over
Livingstone College on
.Homecoming/Senior Day
this past Saturday (Oct. 17)
at Broughton High School
Stadium. He also recorded
9 total tackles including 3.5
tackles for loss and 2.5
quarterback sacks. Crump,
the Falcons' sacks leader
with seven, has won four
CIAA weekly awards dur-
ing his collegiate football
career.
Hall (5-9, 175 pounds) led
the Falcons with 10 total
tackles against
Livingstone. The total tied
for the most tackles in, the
game. This is the .first
CIAA weekly award for
H ,6,who leads sheFalconsl
Both players will lead the/
Falcons (3-5 overall, 3-2
CIAA) against Weser
Division leader
Fayetteville State
University (5-3 overall, 4-1
CIAA) in a CIAA \show-
down on Saturday (Oct.
24) in Fayetteville, N.C., a
2 p.m. A win would move
the Falcons into a first-
place tie in theWetr
Division.


Th dt wmn capped te In the 4th quarter with
University of Florida's9:0lftopahe
month long homecoming Razorbacks struck back
activities and extended the wt 5yr obfra
Gators current 16-game touchdown and extra point
w -


ftunbles, a missed Gator
field goal attempt and 10
penalties for 92 yards by
the Razorbacks. The total
yards (391-Gators, 346-
Razorbacks) and time of
possession (3 1:20-Gators;
28:31-Razorbacks) were
almost identical. It was the
last 9 seconds that deter-
mined the victor and had
the collective 90,508 fans
holding their breath as the
ball cleared the goalpost.
The wmn extends the
Gv or heres rdokminancl
3-0 at home and winning
the last eight games in a
row.
The Gators face the
Mississippi State
Un versity Saki(MSMUS)

this Soa rdnay, October 24
2009 at 7:30 PM EST and
the game will be televised
on ESPN or EPSN2.
The MSU Bulldogs,
with a record of' 3-4, are
listed as 22 point under-
dogs, yet the Gator versus
Razorback game and other
games show that the Gators
are not a juggernaut thatt
can not be beaten.
MSU and other
remaining Gator opponents
need to bring their "A
game to compete and hope
that Florida commits some
turnovers and other errors
in order to have a chance at
beating the number 1
ranked college team in the
nation,


I~~ 1%

Chris Rainey takes Tebow
defense,
winning streak, which is
the longest in school histo-
ry and mn the nation.
The Razorbacks
opened th'e scoring early in
the 2nd quarter of the ~game
with a 1-yard rushing
touchdown and with the
extra point good, took a 7-
0 lead over the hometown
Gators. The Gators
respond d with 1:40 left in

tCaleb- Sturi 30usarad fiela
goal. With no time left on
tahdedecdl 2thardRazorba k
for a half time score of
Razorbacks 10; Gators 3.
Early in the 3rd quarter,
th Gators ISd gis added a

the Gators to within 6
points of the visiting
Razorbacks. Tim Tebow,
then did his magic with a
11 second, 77-yard pass
play to Deonte Thompson
for a touchdown and with
the extra point good, the
Gators led 13-10. The
Razorbacks fought back
and with 7 seconds left in
the 3rd quarter, nailed a 31-
yard field goal to knot the
score up at the end of the
3r-d quarter: Gators 13; .
Razorbacks 13.


good to lead 20-13. With
7:27 left to play in the
game, Gator running back
JeffreL Dem~ps romped fbr
10-yards to score a touch-
down to again, tie the game
up at 20-20.
.To avoid a sudden
death overtime and with a
perfect season record on
the line, with 9 seconds left
to play, the Gators called
upon their kicker Caleb
Sturgis to win the game
with a 27-yard field go:al
and he delivered, capping, a
14 play, 69-yard scoring
drive.
The melodrama of a
game was caused in part by
four Gator turnovers on


SPORTS


,-j J t ..400' R~t,.00 record Going Into ByeWeek






October 24, 2009
PAGE B 5


II -


Library customers and community members can experience unique pro-
grams that address current social and environmental challenges

-- I


S FASHION SHOW 2009


The Southern Women's Fashion show was held on Friday, October 16, 2009 at the Prime Osborn Convention Center. The Models and Fashions
were directed by Karen Washington & Company. Over 30,000 copies of The Florida Star were distributed at the event. There were over 400 vendors
and special guests such as Bethenny Frankel, Star of Bravo's series, The Real Housewives of New York City, Bob Greene, Oprah's personal trainer and
fitness guru, and many more.


Washington, DC A new report by the National League of Cities
(NLC), The State of City Leadership For Children and Families in 2009, rec-
ognizes Jacksonville, Fla., for its cutting-edge early childhood initiatives,
including The Jacksonville Public Library will be offering two very unique
programs to its customers and the community that will explore and discuss
current social and environmental challenges.
The library is the recipient of two prestigious national grants for which
it will implement programs for during the next three years. The first, which
awarded JPL $9,000 from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, will
,bring life to the topic of humanities to libraries through storytelling; and a
second grant, which awarded the library more than $300,000 in program-
ming funding through in-kind and cost share funds from the Institute of
Museum and Library Services, in partnership with Poets House and the
Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens, will shed light on the importance of conser-
vation using poetry and creative language.
"These two programs will be some of the most exciting JPL has
offered," Pam McClellan; resource development coordinator for the library,
said. "Planning has already begun and staff and committees are looking for-
ward to being a part of such unique projects."
Prime Time is a six-week program of reading, discussion and story-
telling held in public libraries. The program features award-winning chil-
dren's books to stimulate discussion about humanities themes and problems
encountered in everyday life that include situations dealing with fairness,
greed, honor and deceit.
The Language of Conservation program will bring the transformative
power of poetry to the service of wildlife conservation. The program will
explore the use of poetic language at the Zoo's animal exhibits to increase
the visitor's experience and deepen their understanding of conservation of
some of nature's most important wildlife.
"JPL is looking forward to offering these unique program opportunities'
to our community," Keith McLaughlin said, assistant director, Partnerships
and Communications.
The Jacksonville Public Library provides library programs and servic-
es to Duval County residents at the Main Library and 20 branch locations.
For more information about the Jacksonville Public Library, call 630-BOOK
(2665) or visit jaxpubliclibrary.org.


YOU R TIC KET TOE:


;i L'' I
i:
I II
r'


,t,~J


From Beetholvenr to Be~yoncB--there is a wea th of-
m usic julst waiting to be dis co'vered at your ccal Ilbrary
or on i ine at jaxpu bliclibrary.org.


j~.

-


. .B.


. 1,- x .


The Star


SOUTHERN WOMEN'







_..___ _I _
I I


I


Kennedy Space Center, FL "Star Trek: The Next
Generation" cast will teleport to the already stellar line-up of
celebrity astronauts at the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation's
(ASF) Astronaut Autograph and- Memorabilia Show at Kennedy
Space~ Center Visitor Complex~, FL on November 7 8, 2009.
Joining the autograph show's roster of more than 25
hero astronauts, such as Apollo 11's Buzz Aldrin and Apollo
13's Jim Lovell, are Starfleet Officers LeVar Burton (Lt.
Commander Geordi La Forge), Michael Dorn (Lieutenant Worf)
and Marina Sirtis (Counselo~r Deanna Troi).
Never before have this many astronauts and Sci-Fi.fig-
ures gathered in one place for an autograph show! The week-
end promises guests photo opportunities, autograph sessions,
space simulator rides with astronauts and celebrities, as well
as special dining opportunities and much more!
Show-goers may bring their own items to be signed or
may purchase items at the show. Ticket packages range from
$100 to $1,000 and are now available by visiting
www.AstronautScholarship.org or calling 3.21-455-7014.
Autographs are an additional fee. SPACE ~is limited!
Ticket proceeds benefit the Astronaut Scholarship
Foundation, a'non-profit organization which provides scholar-
ships to college students who exhibit motivation, imagination
and ~exceptional performance in the science or engineering
field of their major.~ The Foundation funds nineteen $10,000
scholarships annually and has awarded $2.8 million nation-
wide. For more information, visit
www.AstronautScholarship.org or call 321-455-7012.



Jacksonville Public Library Presents First
Notable Author Series Featuring
Award-winning Cuban-American Author
Gustavo Pi~rez-Firmat

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.- In honor of Hispanic Heritage
Month, the Jacksonville Public Library will be hitting the books
with Gustavo P~rez-Firmat at their first Notable Author' Series
event Oct. 24, 2009, at the University Park Branch at 11 a.m.
The Notable Author Series is free to the public and is sched-
uled to take place twice a year.
Jorge Febles, Chair of the World Languages
Department at the University of North Florida, will moderate a
question and answer session with award-winnirig Cuban-
American poet, fiction writer and scholar P~rez-Firmat about
Perez-Firmat's literature and life experiences.
"This is a great opportunity for the library to reach out to
the community and to help engage the public with notable
authors like Gustavo P~rez-Firmat in a way that would other-
wise be very difficult" says Keith McLaughlin, Assistant Director
of Partnerships and Communication.
Known as the "terminator of cultural certainties,"
P~rez-Firmat has written ten novels including, Life on the
Hyphen, for which he was awarded the Eugene M. Kayden
University Press National Book Award in 1994 for his study of
Cuban-American culture.
P~rez-Firmat was also included among "100 Americans
to watch for the next century" by. Newsweek in 1997 and
Hispanic Business Magazine selected him as one of the "100
most influential Hispanics." Currently, he is a Professor of
Humanities at Columbia University.
P~rez-Firmat was born in -Cuba and raised in Miami. He
attended Miami-Dade community college and the University of
Miami where he earned his Bachelor's and Master's degrees
and later went on to earn his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature
from the University of Michigan. Currently, P~rez-Firmat
divides his time between New York City and Chapel Hill, North
Carolina where he resides with his wife Mary Anne. He is the
father of two grown children, David and Miriam.


slP~P~B$BP~g~


TH-E STAR


October 24, 2009


PAGE B-6


Leon Williams Joins The Jacksonville

Children's Chorus In A Benefit Concert

ORANGE PARK/JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-
Baritone Leon Williams will join The
Jacksonville Children's Chorus in a benefit
concert, sponsored by Jac'ksonville
Greyhound Racing, on Sunday, November 8
at 6:00 p.m. Location: St. Johns Country
Dal School Performing Arts Center, 3100
Doctors Lake Drive, Orange Park.
The performance will include songs from
Broadway hit musicals like State fair, The
King and I, The Sound of Music, Sweet
Charity, The Music man, Hello, Dolly, Rent,
Dreamgirls, Man of La Mancha, Lion King
and Ragtime, in which Leon Williams was
an oi-iginal cast~ member.
Baritone, Leon Williarris, .has performed
around the world in opera, concert and
musical theater for over 25 years. Born in
Brooklyn, NY, Leon graduated from the
world renowned Boys Choir of Harlem,
earned a Bachelor of Music degree from
Westminster Choir College in Princeton,
New Jersey and a Masters degree from the
Juilliard School of Music in New York City.
"We are honored to have Leon Williams
share the stage wiith us this year." said Darren Dailey, Artistic and Executive Director of The
Jacksonville Children's Chorus.
Tickets are $15.
Call 904-353-1636 or visit www.jaxchildrenschorus.com to purchase tickets.


The mission of the
Jacksonville Children's
Chorus is to provide a
high-quality choral
music education for
children of diverse
backgrouhds, fostering
teamwork, self-disci-
pline, accomplishment
and pride while filling an
important cultural need
in the community and
sharing the beautyr of
the choral art 'form
through artistically
excellent performances.



SCHOOL BULLYING COMMON VIA COMPUTER


lee.Internet technology has taken the age-old problem of bullying to a new and troubling
Long gone are the days when the school bully was just the kid who calls a bespec-
tacled student "four eyes" or annoyingly tugs on a girl's pigtails during class.
"It used to be what happened in your school, stayed in your school," says pediatrician Dr.
Gwen Mclntosh. "But with electronic media such as Facebook and E-mail, something that
happened at school can be splashed across the Internet, giving it national publicity. Bullying
has taken on a different role, and victims are more vulnerable to a much bigger population."~
Mclntosh, a pediatrician at American Family Children's Hospital and associate pro-
fessor of pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
says this broader exposure not only opens up more opportunities for bullies, but canl ampli-
fy the damage done to the victim by embarrassing him or her in front of a virtually unlimit-
ed audience.
According to a survey by the National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center,
13 percent of students in grades six through 1 0 admitted they had bullied others; 11 percent
said they were the target of bullies; and six percent said they had been both bully and vic-
tim. Mclntosh says often, both the bullies and their victims end up in trouble with the law.
"We have some pretty good data that shows kids who are bullies or were bullied in school
are more likely to end up in prison," says Mclntosh. "The perception is that their voice is not
being heard, and they feel they are being victimized with no one to help them or go to bat
for them. They view it as their own problem and they have to find their own way to deal with
it."
That kind of outlook has been cited in tragic events such as the 1999 massacre at
Columbine High School in Colorado, where 12 students were gunned down by two students
who reportedly felt harassed by bullies.
Mclntosh says schools should make it clear that bullying among students will not be
tolerated, and those who report it should not fear backlash.
"They should explain to kids what behaviors are acceptable and which ones are
'going to get you a trip to the principal's office or sent home from school," she says.
"Teachers and principals need to create an atmosphere where kids should be comfortable
expressing their concerns about violence, aggression or threats by students."
Mclntosh also encourages parents to be vigilant and monitor their children for possi-
ble signs that they are being bullied or turning into bullies.
"If parents are getting reports from the school about a child's aggressive or violent
behavior, they should take that seriously," she says. "A sudden change in peer group and
a marked withdrawal from activities in which they normally participate could be a sign of dif-
ficulty or conflict that might manifest in a violent way. Oftentimes, adults are the last to know
of these problems, and friends and peers are more aware of them early on."


PR EP RAF


Star Trek's Next Generation
Cast Embarks on Astrobnaut
Autograph Show
--Sci-Fi Meets Reality--








~ il -l


: ::"EWOR Members saved
(Fllti. an average of
*VOLUNTEER(Ceolild 3

,' s, every 6 months on their
d, r auto insurance!
r~ -; 1') II.., ...ings wil vary)
orecios Fire Rescure,
Ini Law Enforcement


STAR SHIEL~iAU HOMEM
ISurance Exchange, Member-Owned. StarAndShield.com
Ca lOr FREE quote today! (866) 942-9822

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SSERVICES I


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--- --


cUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
* scREEN ROOMS
* GLASS AND VINYL ENCLOSURES
*ALUMINUM AWNINGS
* PATIO COVERS
* CARPORTS AND CANOPIES74

generalmetalsandplastics.com
email:
generalmetalsandplastics
@comcast.net






THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

HANDYMAN
*Minor Home Repairs
*Painting interior/exterior
*Pressure Washing
*'Exp. & Reasonable Rates
Call: 904.768.7671


NOtiCe Of Termination of practice of Alexander Milanick, DDS.

Copies of records may be obtained in this county( Duvol} by writ-
ten request to his father, Mr. Milanick, P. O. Box 1724, Flagler

Beach, FL 32136-1724 (904) 347-3473. You may be billed for the
actual cost of copying, mailing, or delivering records that shall be
available at and within reasonable times.

LEGAL NOTICE
Maria Perez of Lyons, GA is hiring 70 Temporary Farms Workers
needed from 10/31/09 through 3/12/10, 40 hrs. per week. Duties
include the harvesting and gathering of Vidalia Onions, also load-
ing and unloading of crates and field maintenance. Wage is
$7.25/hr. for 40 hr. work wk. or the prevailing wage rates.
Minimum guarantee 3/4 of total hrs. offered. Employer will furnish
work tools, supplies & equipment at no cost to workers. Free
housing provided for worker's ,who can't reasonably retum home
dally. Transportation and subsistence upon completion of 50% of
work contract. Interested workers should apply at the local Dept.
Of Labor office and refer to: Job Order GA #7799301.


Ephinay Manor


62 + income eligible
Studios & One-bedrooms
386-767-2556
TTY: 1-800-955-9771






Advertise in over 100 papers


One Call- One Order One Payment


WWW.Mational~cdassifiedsF.om


.in0o0@88$ Onal-clsriassifedsco


A\ND THEIR FAMILIES


STAll i-aSHIELIDo".OE
Insurance Exchange. Member-Owned. StarAndShield.com
Call for FREE quote today! (8616) 942-9822
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OCTOBER 24, 2009


THE STAR


PAGE B7


.tr vou Members saved


Smoky~ M\'oun~tain- s Tennessee
Water Front / Mountain Vista Views
25 HWomesites / 3 Bedroom Home
Boat Slios Walkina Trails Affordable Startina Homes


EMPLOYMENT
Change Your Life.
Your Future.
You have the power to
change your future. And
you can do it right hereat
Florida State College at
Jacksonvile. To learn
about employment oppor-
tnities that are available
please visit our websiteat
JosFCCJ.edu
ROOMS
New CH&A, Cable,
Cooking Facilities
Nears Kings &r Myrtle
$95 & up wkly.
904-3(17-4628

I Need acar?
S*Bad Credit*No I
SCredit*Bumper to Bumper I
Warranty* Free Oil Change
for Life
S$700 down I
SCall: (904) 352-0189 1
S($100 off downpayment a
with AD
L .... .. .... &
Deadline for Ads:
Tuesday @ 5 p.m-
Call: (904) 766-8834
ad@thefloridastar~com


"wol swon~r Me ber saved
- E TIFIIEDP an aVerag Of


every 6 rnonths on their
:C ~autO IOSurance!
SItnc tual uvings winlvary>


i AnND THEIR FA~MILIE


S'I~A, dS I..ITIT "lAUT
Insurance Exchange. Member-Owned. StarAndShield.com
Call for FREE quote today! (866) 942-9822

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. a [~II J l gar,-n llt nre 9 ,,-,r-r,-s: I I -g -a ...


r-rrouy -:- nuowanpsS, u -.- Iv vv uarm.
One of South Georgla's Finest Plantations
offered for the nort nme in over as years
Pm r ofs rnal Mnged World Renowned *Trphy Mage MWldlife Deer'
* Fantastle Devel nment Potentia Exellent Fishing
ilsof Flt ver Fmng Sd lan t Rvo~nbl
- Frontage on Stocks Dairy & Flowing W~el Roads Extensive Road System
Titrughout Property
Rowell Auctions, Inc. Forostpais


LEGAL NOTICE


an average ol


every 6 months on their
aUtO insurance!
(.,4illd ,,, ,,ng y l.Y


*RETIRED
*VOLUNTEER
(crea~...-rIalso


Announcements

Advertise in Over 100 Papers! One Call One Order -
One Payment The Advertising Networks of Florida -
Put UTs to work for You-! (866)742-1373 www.national-
classifieds.com, info~,national-classifieds.com

Antiques/Collectibles

COINS & Gold Jewelry Top prices paid (90% to U)
for scrap gold jewehry, UTS coins, Paper Money & Silver.
Weekends Only Ralph (800) 210-2606

Apartment for Rent

HUD HOMES! 4bjr 3ba $217/mo! 3 bdrm only
$199/mo! Stop Renting! 5% dw, 15 yrs @ 8% apr'For
Listings (800)366-9783 ext 5669

Auctions

VIRGINIA MOL~LTAIN LAND Auption, 15 Acreage
Tracts, Absolute/Reserve Lots, Cove Creek Community,
Tazewell County, VA, October 17, 2009. Iron Horse
Auction, VAAL580, (800)997-2248.
www. ironhorseauction. com

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING TAX CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty.
Direct frolm manufacturer. 30 colors in stock Quick
turnaround. Delivery available. Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing, (888)393-0335

w w w g u f c o s tB u i n e s os mO p p o r t u n i t i e s


ALL CASH VENDING! Do you earn $800 in a day?
25 Local Machines and Candy $9,995. (888)629-9968
BO2000033 CALL US: We will not be undersold!

Cars for Sale

Acura Integra 98 $500! Honda Civic 00 $800'! Nissan
Altima 99 $500! Toyota Corolla 02 $1000! Police
Impounds! For listings call (800)366-9813 ext 9275.

Help Wanted

Heating/Air Tech Training. 3 week accelerated pro-
gram. Hands on environment. State of Art Lab.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement
Assistance! CALL NOW: (877)994-9904.

Homes For Rent

A Bank Repo! 5bdr 4ba $317/mo! 3 br Foreclosure!
$199/mo!! 5% dw, 15 yrs @ 8% ajpr For Listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5853

4Br 2Ba Foreclosure! $11,500! Only $217/Mo! 5%
down 15 years @ 8% a r. Buy 3 Br $199/Mo! for list-
ings (800)366-9783 ext 5798


Investors

Oak Ridge, TN. Condotel Owner or Investor, NO Mgmt.
Responsibility Fully Maintained & Furnished, No Rental
;Commissions for Owner Efficiency to 2 Bedrooms,
$69,000 to $109,000 Participating with Brokers (561)702-
3757 www.westg~ateor.com

Lots & Acreage

Owner Must Sell. 4+ acres- $57,300 Nice oak trees, pri-
vate access to lake. All utilities in. Ready to build when you
are! Financing avail. Call now (866)352-2249'
www.fllandoffer.com

Miscellaneous

A BLESSED CHURCH 4 SALE -9000 + sq ft Sanctuary,
Banquet Hall, Offices & Classrooms. Great, for Growing
Ministry. 2808 Buckman St. Call (904) 401-8979

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call- (888)203-3179,
www. CenturaOnline.com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA~ approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

Real Estate

NC MOUNTAINS CLOSEOUT SALE! Cabin Shell, 2+
acres with great view, very private, big trees, waterfalls &
large public lake nearby, $99,500 Bank Financing.
(866)275-0442.

HUNTING BARGAIN 48 AC/ POND- $79,794 Timber
Co liquidating rugged, unspoiled & untamed WV~i wilder-
ness loaded w/ wildlife & 4 season recreation! Wooded
/pasture, wildlife pond site, stream, trails, views & privacy
galore. Perfect for hurting lodge! Excellent financing. Call
now (877)526-3764, x 680 wvtimberland.com.
Participating with Cabela's Trophy Properties.

LOG CABIN ON 5 ACRES with Dockable Lakefront
only $69,900. 1791 sf log cabin kit on 5 acres with dock-
able lake frontage on 12,000 acre recreational lake. Boat to
Gulf of Mexico. ALL amenities completed! Excellent
financing. Call now (866)952-5339, x1586

Sporting Goods

Gun Show! Sept. 26-27. Sat 9-5 & Sun 10-5. Atlanta, GA
Expo Center. (3650 Jonesboro Rd SE). Buy-Sell-Trade.
Over 1000 Tables! Info: (563)927-8176. The National
Arms Show


Put USto Work



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WVCGL CELEBRATES 30 YEARS OF -SERVICE
TO JACKSONVILLE


JACKSONVILLE, FL -- Victory AM 1~360 WCGL, became
Jacksonville's first full-time radio station with an all-gospel music for-
mat in 1979.wiith the commitment to present the word of God to the
;Jacksonville: community. While the local radio industry has encoun-
tered hundreds. of ownership, format and personnel changes during
this period, WCGL has remained "Jacksonville's Longtime Friend"
with the same management teamn for 20 of the past~ 30 years.

"I have been blessed to lead this great organization over the past 20
years," said Deborah Maiden, owner and general manager of
WCGL. "Our mission has remained intact since 1989 and I am
extremely proud that we have not wavered in our desire to serve this
community with great gospel music while presenting the word of
God through the various ministries that air on our radio station daily.
That is why we have no problem with our trademark, Victory AM
1360 WCGL, Where Christ Gets Lifted."

This year, WCGL will commemorate its 30th anniversary with a
gospel celebration concert on Saturday, November 7th at the 5,000-
seat Paxon Revival Center, 5461 Commonwealth Avenue. Gospel
recording artists scheduled to appear will be the legendary Canton
Spirituals, Vickie Yohe, The Nevels Sisters, Keith "Wonderboy"
Johnson, and James Fortune & FIYA. Vendor space is available
inside the church's atrium.

For more information, call WCGL Radio at 904.766.9955.


OCTOBER 24, 2009


THE STAR


P4GE B-8


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