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Florida star

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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
oclc - 2261130
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00912

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
oclc - 2261130
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00912

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Full Text





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STFPLORII



www.theflorii


Jacksonville Man Stabs
Mother in Anger
Edward Harrell IV, 20,was
arrested Tuesday morning at an
apartment in Arlington after offi-
cers received a call and found his
mother, Barbara Washington, 49,
outside of the apartment seeking
Edward Herrel, 20 help. She told the officers that
her son had stabbed her and that
he was still in the apartment. Harrell was called out-
side where he was arrested and his mother was taken
to Shands Jacksonville Hospital.
Herrell told officers that his mother betrayed him.
She told him she was sending him back to
Philadelphia. He did not wish to leave and voices
inside of him told him to kill her. Ms. Washington's
injuries are life-threatening.

Wheel of Justice


Featured



ft


Captured
, Donte Smith
was wanted for
leaving the
scene of an
accident. He
c heard that he
was wanted and went to the
jail and turned himself in.


s' andra Golden -
The Channel 4 Wheel of Wanted
Justice landed on Sandra
Golden, wanted for battery .
and worthless checks.
Know where she is? Help. t
Call 866-845-TIPS. You may r
be provided up to $1,000 in
Reward money.


Jim King is
wanted for
two burgla-
ries, one in
Georgia and
one in Florida.


Victor Solomon Dies

Suddenly on Monday
By Jessie-Lynne Kerr
Victor Emmanuel
Solomon, president and
owner of Holmes-Glover-
Solomon Funeral Home
and a former Jacksonville
physical education
teacher, died of a heart
S-v attack Monday while
working out at a gym. He
Victor Solomon, of Holmes- was 61.
Glover-Solomon Funeral The funeral will be at 11
Home
a.m. Monday in St.
Thomas Missionary Baptist Church, 5863 Moncrief
Road, followed by burial in Evergreen Cemetery.
The family will greet friends from 4 to 7 p.m.
Sunday at the
church's Family Victor Continued -A-7


First Black Heavy Weight
Champion May Get Pardon
AOw' I Jack Jo


hnson


I III was convicted
in 1913 of vio-
lating the
Mann Act
since he had a
consensual
Jack Johnson was the first black man to relationship
become heavyweight boxing champion, with a white
woman.
On Wednesday Senator John McCain joined
Johnson's niece and others to ask President Obama
to provide a presidential pardon for this racially
motivated conviction. A request for Johnson's par-
don was made in 2004 but was not granted.


Most Factual 2008 State Award,
Media Award Communications


THE


0
- I

o-.

r- U-


dastar.com


Grand Master R


Celebrate
Jackie Robinson
and the 58th
Birthday of
The Florida Star,
April 15, 2009
Baseball Park
Afternoon Game



es


The Honorable Rev. Dr. Michael R. Moore, Most Worshipful Grand Master as he enters the service. The Florida and Georgia Star owner, Clara
McLaughlin congratulates Grand Master
139th Grand Communication in Moore on the outstanding work he per-
formed as leader of the Free and
Jacksonville, Over a Thousand Attend Accepted Masons of Florida, Belize, and
U.S. Virgin Islands.
By Clara, The Florida and Georgia Star Newspapers
When one wakes up in the morning, read and watch the morning news and learn quickly of all of the events that
occurred during the night, one prays for a remedy to 'save our children.' If you are like this writer, you begin to
relax once privileged with the opportunity to observe the Free and Accepted Masons, Prince Hall Affiliated. I had
this opportunity when more than a thousand masons and affiliates met in Jacksonville March 27-31.
As a kid growing up, I would watch the parades and admire the apparel, fancy medals and orderly conduct of the
men and women in the Masons, even without knowing their work. Unfortunately,'many do not know what the
Masons are about and pass along "dreamed ,p" thoughts. It would be rewarding for all, especially the very young,
to observe the God fearing organization and witness the love and sharing that is given throughout.
At the banquet Saturday night, one young man said that he joined the Masons while he was in the military and was
very enthusiastic while overseas. But his enthusiasm faded away until he was able to come to Florida under the lead-
ership of the Honorable Rev. Dr. Michael R. Moore, Most Worshipful 15th Grand Master
,-:^ of the Grand Lodge F & A.M. PHA Incorporated Florida, Belize, Central America and
,,..U. S. Virgin Island, Jurisdiction. Grand Master Moore served as leader of the Florida,
,..-. Belize, Central America and U.S. Virgin Island Jurisdiction for five and one half years.
.. He was elevated in 2003 to Grand Master due to the illness of the 14th Most Worshipful
Grand Master David Wright.
The list of major projects and tasks taken on and completed by Dr. Moore since 2003
... are unbelievable, including the completion and occupancy of the Jacksonville historical
S. Masonic Temple on Broad Street, over $150,000 in scholarship for college students, the
~ 9 installation of up to date furniture and equipment, the growth in membership and an
Lee Carter, New Grand Master ffectve le of Grand Continued on A-7, More on B1, B2, B5, B6


President Obama at G20 Summit


President and Mrs. Obama made their tirst European trip
since moving to the White House in what appeared to be a
very fruitful trip. Along with meeting with 20 world lead-
ers, they were also able to meet with Queen Elizabeth II and
her husband, Prince Philip, at Buckingham Palace. The
queen hosted a reception for leaders attending Thursday's
G-20 summit. The Obama's who are known for being on
time, were two of the first dignitaries to meet the queen.
The leaders of the Group of Twenty issued a statement that
included 29 items, the first acknowledging the world is fac-
ing a great economic challenge and the 29th was a state-
ment to deliver their commitment and work together.
G20 leaders committed to make an additional $1.1 trillion
available to help the world economy through the crisis and
to restore credit, growth and jobs. Prime Minister Gordon
announced the outcome of the G20 Summit.


.1


News in Brief


Six Duval County
Schools Receive
Freedom Award
A total of 38 Duval
County schools, public and
private, technical, colleges
and universities registered
4,144 students to vote in
this year's three-day stu-
dent voter registration
drive. The winners were
broken down into three
categories, according to
their population.


Black Owned Syrup


Michele Hoskins,
CEO/founder of Michele
Foods became the first
African American vendor
with products in Costco.
When you want syrup,
purchase Michele's. The
taste is worth the buy.


Attorney Stabbed 38 Times,
Husband Held
M She had opened her own law firm.
They had been married about 14 1/2
months and now she is dead from 38
stab wounds. Her husband, Greg
Chiquita Tate, 34 Harris is charged with her murder
A and the illegal use of a dangerous
weapon. His bond has been set at
$500,000. Her body was found in
Greg Harris, 37 her law office in Baton Rouge, LA.


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JAKSNILLE* FL
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PAGE A


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
(912) 264-6700 Georgia
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua,
Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn
County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida


SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$35.00
Half Year-$20.00
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


BETTY DAVIS
LIFESTYLE/SOCIETY COLUMNIST


MIKE BONTS
SPORTS EDITOR
DANIEL EVANS
ADVERTISING AND SALES
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
JULIA BOWLES
SPECIAL SECTIONS


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association


CLARA FRANCES McLAUGHLIN
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
TIAAYELE
MANAGING EDITOR
DENNIS WADE
ADVERTISING AND MARKETING


Part II of V
Our community consis-
tently is denied through
manipulation and exclusion
to benefit from our own
labor? The economic crisis
upon our country and the
communities makes it more
necessary than ever for
minority leaders to work
together for the better good
for all.
This unity will bring
added comfort to our com-
munities and families to see
we are working together to
ensure that they indeed
have a voice. If the people
see division among us, it
will add to the fears that
already exist, deeply rooted
in their heart.
Many of the minority
businesses have followed
the procedures (i.e., filing,
certified, and licensed),
with the state and the city,
then attend the meetings
that are required by the city.
They should have an
opportunity to receive a
contract with the city but
from listening to the minor-
ity contractors, it doesn't
matter if they are qualified
or not, they are told that
they can not be a prime con-
tractor in Jacksonville,
unless they are from out of
town. In fact, in 1996, a
contractor was told in the
city's procurement office


L~~~~ I'~llji~~
TEFOIDASA


Is the Willie Lynch Syndrome Alive and
Well in Jacksonville?

by Councilwoman Glorious Johnson


that blacks are not suppose
to get prime contracts. They
can only do the labor, not
the paper work like the
prime contractors, unless
they are from a select and
privileged group. What kind
of mess is that to tell a per-
son who has worked all
his/her life to establish a
credible business and is told
that it doesn't matter.
I remember many years
ago, Jackie Brown would
discuss how the city pro-
curement office is the obsta-
cle that keeps minorities
(Black Americans) out of
the loop in being given an
opportunity to work for the
city unless to friends in high
places who would make
sure that you get a contract
with the city. This is one
reason why she fought until
her death, against as she
called it "the smell of cor-
ruption."
I also remember Jackie
stating that "We need a
Federal Investigation from
the U.S. Justice Department
in Washington of every city
service department in
Jacksonville." She was in
the process of doing this
before she passed. Maybe
it's time for Jackie's wish to
be fulfilled.
Our community needs
market-based economy in
which we can benefit from


our own labor, not make
someone else rich. Yet, we
talk about crime, unemploy-
ment, education, and infant
mortality, just to name a
few. These are symptoms to
the real problems "lost
opportunities. "
Some people have said
that the minority businesses
need to go to private busi-
nesses and leave the city
alone. We must remember
that tax dollars are being
used. Therefore, everyone
should have an opportunity
to fulfill a city contract, not
the select few.
I would like to commend
the Florida Minority
Community Reinvestment
Coalition and its Chair, Mr.
Al Pina for their commit-
ment to help bring change
to Jacksonville and our
communities. Like Mr.
Pina, we must not show fear
in fighting against those
whom wish to keep our
families and communities
down. We must not back
down from what we feel is
right.
We must prepare a future
for our children and our
children's children. We
must lead the solutions to
bring jobs and community
revitalization to our com-
munities, not demolition
and deterioration.
Results of Disproportionate
Reinvestment Dilemma in


As President Obama
states so eloquently, "It's
time for a CHANGE!"


JacksonvilleAs your At-Large
Jacksonville":
*Unemployment rates of Representative, I gay, "It's
over 28% in minority com- time for a CHANGE IN
munities and poverty rates JACKSONVILLE!"


t 4


that range from 30% to 60%
in African-American com-
munities
*More than 70% of
minority families reside in
Low and Moderate Income
communities
*Less than 38% of
minorities graduate from
High School
*More than 65% of
minority families headed by
single mother live in pover-
ty
*Less than 15% of
minority households meet
median income levels
*More than 70% of
minority lack a usual source
of health care
*Over 28% percent


infant mortality
African-American
nity


MAY FORD
LAYOUT EDITOR
SPECIAL SECTIONS


rate in
commu-


CHERYL COWARD DISTRIBUTION
DESIGN AND WEB SITE EDITOR JAMES GREEN
Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Lonzie
Leath, Laurence Green, F. M. Powell, Michael Phelts, Richard
McLaughlin, Clarissa Davis, Andrea Franklin, Delores Mainor
Woods
Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt,
Deanna
Distribution and Sales: Dan Randolph, Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele,
Cassie Williams, Angela Beans, Win Moses


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of FameI


More brand new live local talk


than on other radio


stations!,

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WHJX FIVI 105.7 Jax-Baldwin

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Some of our local shows include Andy Johnson,

Brother Stan the Union Man, Joe Lyles who

refutes Rush Limbaugh, Famous Democrat

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Ed Brady, Progressive Roots, 1: the Indy Music

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Some of our national shows include

Ed Schultz, Thom Hartmann



Call in (904) 694-1057




Online:

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Progressive Talk Radio 24 hours

daily. All, programs will be

streaming on the web


APRIL 4, 2009


THE STA R


1


VERIFICATION
mlgl1 1 !

















Faith In Our Community
Schedule of Events and Services f
"RESURRECTION SUNDAY SERVICE" -You are invit-
ed to fellowship with us on April 13th Resurrection Sunday.
Come and help celebrate the Resurrection of Christ Sunday,
April 12th at 11:00 a.m. at the United Church In Christ,
2050 Emerson St., Jacksonville, FL. Arch Bishop W. A.
Andrews, Presiding Prelate. For more information or direc-
tions, call (904) 284-0206.
ST. PIUS V CATHOLIC CHURCH is holding its annual
"Stations of the Cross in the Neighborhood" on Good Friday,
April 10th at 1:00 p.m. For more information, contact Lucille
Trotter at (904) 354-1501. Come walk with us in a prayerful
remembrance of Jesus' sufferings while also praying for our
neighbors surrounding St. Pius V. All are welcome.
SWEETFIELD MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH,
1365 Harrison St., Dr. Richard Russ, Pastor, is having their
"INSPIRATIONAL WEEK," April 8th through 10th at
7:00 p.m. nightly, with guest speaker Rev. Henry H. Wright
of New Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist Church. We pray
that you come and receive a rich blessing in the name of our
Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. For more information about
this and upcoming events, please contact Sister Nicolla
Mack at (904) 226-6437.
FRIENDSHIP PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH, locat-
ed at 1106 Pearce St., where Elder Bobbie Sheffield is the
Senior Pastor, will be honoring their Assistant Pastor, "Elder
Alvin Smith," with an Appreciation Program on Saturday,
April 25th at 7:00 p.m. The Special Guest will be The Gospel
Cavaliers of Jacksonville; the manager is Brother John
Golden. The public is cordially invited as we honor this awe-
some man of God who gives himself so freely to God and to
the community at large. For more information, please call the
church at (904) 353-7734.
SAINT PAUL A.M.E. CHURCH located at 6910 New
Kings Rd., presents The Palm Sunday Parade on Sunday,
April 5th at 9:15 a.m. on Kings Rd. The members of
Friendship Baptist Church will also participate. Palm Sunday
Services will be held at 7:30 a.m. and 10:55 a.m., and Easter
Worship services on Sunday, April 12th at 5:30, 7:30, and
10:55 a.m. Call 764-2755 for transportation or information.
ANNUAL EASTER EGG HUNTS SCHEDULED TO
BENEFIT LOCAL CHARITIES Adventure Landing
will be hosting Easter Egg Hunts and Charity Raffles on
Saturday, April llth. The Jacksonville Beach and St.
Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com
[1 |


Ask Us About Our


If there had been a death
in your family yesterdayV.
what would you be doing
today?


Pre-Need


Fore-

Thought


Funeral


--1'Program


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED
Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonmille, FL 32208
Tel: (9041 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
DIRECTORS


Deborah 1Vest


Alphonso 1West


Jacqueline 1. Bartley


MT. LEBANON MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
invites you to join us in a 3-
S Night Revival "Preparing
s God's People to Receive
God's Purpose," Monday,
April 6 thru April 8 each
S night at 7:00 p.m. Our Guest
Speaker is Rev. Richard
Curry, St. Joseph Missionary
Baptist Church. God is call-
ing for a healing of the land
through this revival. The
church is located at 9319
Ridge Blvd. (off Soutel Dr.).
For further information,
please call (527-1762. Rev. Lewis N. Yarber, Pastor and
Rev. Freddie Sumner, Interim Pastor.

Augustine locations will have three age groups while the
Blanding location will have two age groups. All parks will
begin the hunts at 9 a.m. and again at 11 a.m. Registration
begins at 8 a.m. There will be a special appearance by the
Easter Bunny and thousands of eggs will be stuffed with
candy and prizes from area retail participants as well as free
Adventure Landing passes. Each participant will also
receive a goodie bag. Registration is only $3 per child, and
the proceeds from the Jacksonville Beach and St. Augustine
location will go to the Boys & Girls Club of Northeast
Florida while the proceeds from the location on Blanding
Blvd. will benefit the Children's Miracle Network. There
will also be a Charity Raffle that will begin after each egg
hunt and participants can purchase tickets for $3 each.
Adventure Landing is also offering a Stay & Play Special
which includes unlimited go-karts, laser tag and mini golf
from 9am-2pm. Price is $10 for children ages 12 and under
and $15 for children ages 13 and up. All Adventure Landing
locations are hosting the hunts: 1944 Beach Blvd., 246-4386,
and 4825 Blanding Blvd., 771-2803, 2760 State Road 16,
827-9400.
: Ir


JIhZ


BIRD, Gloria J., died
March 23, 2009.
BROWN, Tyrhonda G.,
25, died March 23, 2009.
BURNEY, Ms. Nellie, 80,
died March 23,2009.
CHEVALIER, Victor E.,
died March 27, 2009.
CLARK, Joyce, died
March 27, 2009.
COOPER, David L., 56,
died March 27, 2009.
DENNIS, Willie Lee, 70,
died March 25, 2009.
FORD, Boisy died March
23, 2009.
FOSTER, Alberta R., died
March 28, 2009.
HOLMES, Willie died
March 27, 2009.
HUTTON, Thomas J.,
died March 30, 2009.
JACKSON, Peter L., died
March 23, 2009.
JEFFERSON, Henrietta
H., died March 28, 2009.
JOHNSON, Freddie, Jr.,
died March 25, 2009.
JOHNSON, Gloria died
March 28, 2009.
KING, Jacob King, 21,
died March 23, 2009.
LEE, Myra J., died March


29, 2009.
McCORD, Bruce F., died
March 27, 2009.
PHILLIPS, James E.,
died March 24, 2009.
RICHIE, Jesse T., 64,
died March 29, 2009.
Alphonso West Mortuary,
Inc.,
SHACK, Caesar S., II, 55,
died March 29, 2009.
SOLOMON, Victor E.,
died March 30, 2009.
SYKES, Nancy died
March 24, 2009.
THOMAS, Jesse died
March 27, 2009.
WASHINGTON, Arlenda
died March 27, 2009.
WHITE, Ms. Lillian, 81,
died March 30, 2009.
WILCOX, Lydia died
March 25, 2009.
WILKINS, Clarence, 57,
died March 22, 2009.
WILLIAMS, Bertha M.,
83, died March 25, 2009.
WILLIAMS, Larry died
March 24, 2009.
WILLIAMS, Willie Mae,
died March 26, 2009.
WILSON, Robert D., died
March 23, 2009.


STh e C h u r c h D ir e c to ry
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School .....................................9:30 a.m .
Sunday Morning & ..
Intercessory Prayer.................... 10:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m. '
Youth Church
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary) '-
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ............ 7:00 p.m.
Pastor, Eric Lee .'J
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus '
(904) 764-5727 Church

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service . . . . . 10:00 a.m.
Church School .................................... 8:30 p.m .
Wednesday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study .......................... 10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jirah" Bible Study .......................... 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thursday "Young at Heart Ministry .......... .10:00 a.m.
Friday
Joy Explosion M ministry .............................. 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School......................................... ............................. 9:30 a.m .
M orn ing W orship........................................ .................................. 11:00 a.m .
Tuesday............................................ Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday...................................... ... ....... ..................... Joy N ight,7:00 p.m .
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School ------------------------------------------10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship -- -------------12:00 Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study ---------------------Tuesday & Friday----- 7:00 p.m.
(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520

STune In To

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Clara McLaughlin Yvonne Brooks
Host Co-Host

Tuesday and Thursday
from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
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14ddr3?6nU aif, c&

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Wfndell ', o $l f/
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PRE-NEED
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DEATH NOTIS


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Jacksonville, Florida 32209
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E-mail: wpholmesjr@comcast.net


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PAGEA-4 THE STAR APRIL 4. 2009


happy


139
13-b -
Publix
Semi-Boneless
Ham Portion
Or Whole, Fully-Cooked
SAVE UP TO 1.10 LB


We wish


Publix stores will be closed Easter Sunday, April 12.
everyone celebrating this special time of year a joyous holiday.


Asparagus................................2.b.... b
A Good Source of Vitamin C and High in Folate
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


Publix `
Salad Blend ........................... 4 "0
Spring Mix, American, European, Italian,
Hearts of Romaine, or Caesar Salad Kit,
Ready-to-Eat for the Busy Lifestyle, 5 to 14-oz bag
SAVE UP TO 1.98 ON 2


Potato Rolls, 4
12-Count................... .............. 2 49
Baked Fresh Daily, Soft Tasty Rolls,
From the Publix Bakery, 15-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO .50


Dole Pineapple........................99 Land 0 Lakes Kraft or
Assorted Varieties, In 100% 9 SweetCream (2 ,A00 Seven Seas .
S Pineapple Juice No Sugar Added B.. 4uttersg........................ Fo,, '- Dressing .Free
or in Heavy Syrup, 20-oz can A Salted, Light Salted, or Unsalted, Assorted Varieties 16-oz bot. or Good Seasons,
oR in IS p Roz can S c Assorted Varieties, 16-oz bot. or Good Seasons,
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE 4-sticks or Salted 8-half sticks, 14-oz bot. Quantity rights reserved.
ADVANTAGE BUY 16-oz box SAVE UP TO 3.07
SAVE UP TO 3.18.ON 2


Preparing a special holiday dinner doesn't have
to be complicated. Use the recipes and tips we've
provided here or log on to publix.com.





Follow these
easy steps to -
serve a perfect -- i'
fully cooked ham
this Easter. Set the oven temperature to 325F. Remove all -Use a meat thermometer to check the temperature
packaging and then wrap the ham in foil; place the in the center of the ham (not touching bone or fat).
wrapped ham in a shallow baking pan. Allow 20 minutes When the internal temperature of the ham reaches
per pound for an approximate heating time. If ham is over 1400F, remove from the oven.
10 pounds, allow 15-18 minutes per pound.


S VIpSA- u b I


x .com/ad


Prices effective Thursday, April 2 through Saturday, April 11, 2009.
Only in Orange, Seminole, Brevard, Duval, Clay, Nassau, Putnam, Flagler, St. Johns,
Columbia, Volusia, Marion and Alachua Counties in Fla. Quantity rights reserved.


Publix.
WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE.


asns


PAGE A-4


THE STAR


APRIL 4. 2009


l ;


I ~R













APRIL 4, 2009


Ham and
Orange Soda Sauce
Prep and Cook: 30 minutes up to 3 hours
(Makes 12-16 servings)


T Asparagus Amandine
Prep and Cook: 20 minutes (Makes 4 servings)


1 lb fresh asparagus spears (rinsed)
2 tablespoons butter


1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt
1/4 cup sliced almonds


1 fully cooked semi-boneless 1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
ham half (6-8 Ib) 1/8 teaspoon ground
3 cups orange soda allspice
1 (8-oz) can crushed pineapple
in juice (undrained)

1. The ham is fully cooked and ready to serve. It is best
served cold or at room temperature to maintain its natural
juices and tenderness. Remove packaging and transfer ham
to serving platter; let stand no more than 30 minutes to
bring to room temperature.
2. If heating ham is desired, follow package instructions and
food safety guidelines. Use a meat thermometer to check
the temperature in the center of the ham (not touching
bone or fat). When the Internal temperature reaches 1400F,
remove from the oven. Transfer the ham to a carving board.
Let stand 10-20 minutes before slicing. This allows the
juices to redistribute through the ham, resulting in a firmer,
juicier, and easier to carve ham
3. While ham stands, prepare sauce by combining remaining
ingredients in large saute pan on medium-high. Cook
8-10 minutes or until mixture has reduced by about
three-fourths and sauce begins to thicken. Carve ham and
serve with sauce. Promptly refrigerate unused portions.


1. Cut 1 inch from tough root end of asparagus spears and discard. To do this quickly, group half
the spears together, align ends, and slice with sharp knife. Cut into 2-inch pieces and set aside.
2. Preheat large saut6 pan on medium-high 2-3 minutes. Place butter and seasoned salt In pan;
swirl to coat. Add almonds and cook 1-2 minutes, stirring often, or until lightly toasted and brown.
3. Add asparagus; cook 4-5 minutes, stirring often, or until crisp-tender. (For softer asparagus,
cover during cook time.) Serve.


*J5~lXi,


Cheesy Tomato Shells
Prep and Cook: 35 minutes (Makes 8 servings)


8 cups water 1 (14.5-oz) can Italian-style diced
2 tablespoons unsalted butter tomatoes (drained)
1 (12-oz) box pasta shells and cheese dinner 1 cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
8-oz tomato trinity mix (fresh diced tomatoes, 3/4 cup shredded reduced-fat
onions, bell peppers) Colby-Jack cheese

1. Preheat oven to 4000F. Place water in large saucepan. Cover and bring to boil on high for pasta.
Cut butter into small pieces while placing in small bowl to soften.
2. Stir pasta shells into boiling water. Boil 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in tomato trinity;
boil 3 more minutes.
3, Drain pasta mixture; return to pan. Stir in cheese sauce (from packet); then stir in canned tomatoes.
Transfer mixture to 2-quart baking dish.
4. Stir panko and shredded cheese into softened butter; mix, using fingertips, until well blended and
spread evenly over pasta. Bake 15-20 minutes or until top is golden andsauce bubbles around edge
of dish. Serve.


If serving the fully cooked ham at room temperature, allow about 45 minutes to prepare your meal. Prepare the Cheesy
Tomato Shells and begin to bake. Then begin the Ham and Orange Soda Sauce recipe, following steps 1 and 3.
While the ham sauce cooks, prepare the Asparagus Amandine recipe. Toss the fresh salad blend with your favorite dressing.
Carve the ham and serve.

If heating the fully cooked ham, begin the ham recipe about 2 1/2-3 hours before you would like to serve. About 20 minutes
before your ham is finished heating, begin to prepare the Cheesy Tomato Shells recipe for baking.
Remove your ham from the oven when your meat thermometer-inserted into the thickest part (not touching bone or fat)-reaches 140F.
After you've removed your ham, transfer it to a carving board and cover loosely with foil. Let it stand 10-20 minutes before slicing.
Increase the heat of your oven to 4000F and bake the Cheesy Tomato Shells. Meanwhile, prepare the sauce for the ham. While the sauce
cooks, prepare the Asparagus Amandine recipe. Toss the fresh salad blend with your favorite dressing. Carve the ham and serve.


Kendall Jackson 1649_
Vintner's Reserve Wine........
Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon,
or Merlot, 750-ml bot.
SAVE UP TO 3.50


e 8 -L
- oAEufl



t~~~rft _-i1!11^


I


Half Easter Egg Cake............... 899
Vanilla or Chocolate, Moist Cake Covered With Our
Famous Buttercream Icing, Custom Decorated for Easter,
From the Publix Bakery, 24-oz size
SAVE UP TO 1.00


Breyers ... ...Free
Ice Cream............ree
Assorted Varieties, 48-oz ctn.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 5.77


Kraft Deluxe Incredible
Macaroni & ,, Kraft Fresh Dicd 2
Cheese Dinner.... rree Shredded Cheese....@ 5 .F. Tresh tyDiced ...00
Or Kraft Velveeta Shells & Cheese Or Crumbles, Traditional or With Diced Tomatoes,
or Rotini & Cheese, Assorted Varieties, Assorted Varieties, 8-oz pkg. Perfect for Holiday Recipes, 8-oz cont.
9.4 to 14-oz box Quantity rights reserved. SAVE UP TO 3.97 ON 3 SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE
SAVE UP TO 2.67



A. \ Entertaining Made Even Easier

V^ Let Publix help you host a great get-together. We offer a wide variety of
artistically arranged Deli and Seafood platters, scrumptious salads, and decadent
desserts. Pick up our complimentary Start Something party planning guide
and see how successful-and easy-your next gathering can be.

















Transfer the ham to a carving board. Let stand When the ham is ready for slicing, place it on its side Loosen the slices by cutting horizontally along the
10-20 minutes before slicing. This allows the juices to on the carving board. Use a meat fork to hold the ham leg bone. Remove each slice with the fork and
redistribute through the ham, resulting in a firmer, juicier, steady, and make perpendicular slices down to the arrange the ham slices on a serving platter.
and easier to carve ham. leg bone in the desired thickness. Serve with orange soda sauce.


Prices effective Thursday, April 2 through Saturday, April 11, 2009.
Only in Orange, Seminole, Brevard, Duval, Clay, Nassau, Putnam, Flagler, St. Jdhns,
Columbia, Volusia, Marion and Alachua Counties in Fla. Quantity rights reserved.


Publix.
WHERE SHOPPI NG I S A P L E A S U R E.


PAGEA-5


-----------


. I


" -- t ;_'sTL-R : ,, f '


THE STA R


nrr TT A 4 ')ifi


j


.--. .. -- .I ..~ `



















"IThere's Always Something Happening On The First Coast"

F Les Beautillion Militaire 1 1 I


. The University of North Florida's University Center
was the setting for the Eleventh Les Beautillion Militaire.
Beaux presented were: Tyrone Cody Floyd'.B'est All
Around), son of Ms. Tonya M. Austin; Matthew Alan
Hardy (Mr. Dedication 2nd Place), son of MacArthur
and Mrs. Gayle A. Hardy; Philip Charles Johnson, son
of Ronald and Mrs. Rosemary Johnson; Robert K.
McClain, Jr., son of Robert and Mrs. Lettle McClain;
Cameron Turner Venson (Mr. Dedication, lst:Place),
son of Dr. Louis and Mrs. Alice Turner Venson;
Alphonso Kyle Wilson and Christen Alexander
Wilson, sons of Ms. Deirdre D. Kyle and the late Larry
0. Wilson; and Charles iChuck" Antoinie inlfield,
iii son of Charles and ,Mtsi Lois'Wiinieid.'. -
kikLes Beautillion Militaire created- and sponsored
4ieRiaily by .the .-Jcksonwill9 Chapter,. Jack.'& Jill .of
merica Incorporated, is a cultural, social and educa-
ional program. aiuned at recognizing .the. accopplish-
nients of African-Amierican. young m Uenduri-ng herjun
io'i6r senior high school. year. This eleventh presentatio6
*.thte program featured series, of wdrkshodps.di.mmui-
yservice. and.social, acti kates, and Lcu.d ted in the
Pisenetationi.ofthe participates (Beaux)'and their dhtds
lies) at the festive dinner anddance a'th followed.
;iS.Kezia Roue was Choreographeri torfheBau,,x,aind
'-s. Rob Sweeting serV'ed as Master' of Ceremonies
ard.Captain' Wayne Young ,(Rti ) led th. Military
popping Ceremony. ,
i'Jack & Jill of America, Ihc., founded January 24,
.93;in'Phiiladelphia. PA, isa. national .ion-prolfi family
b ga zatioii committed to" dedicafing- its, 'resources
waid improving the quality of life, especially that .of
'6frican-American children. The local 'chapter'organized
Mrs. Alma Daniels and the late Mrs. HelepCGregory
aitch 4ire% in 1968' with. Mesdaiimes Be Asque
4 a .rant, Doris Hallmon, rakxe'
Laurice Runter,'Bkrpi*W-ilk.9


kin, Marian xe.
t.'L.dia Wooden .as c....ie .
Chairperson for the 2 j resentation "ra"MtsS
th Co-Chairersoh. ia
tofiJack & Jill ofM'aenrcatWrporate.ocal


Beaux in order L to R Top Row (Standing): Philip Charles Belles in order L to R Top Row (Standing): Rachel Applewhite,
Johnson, Charles "Chuck" Antoine Winfield, III, Tyrone Cody Karissa Hall, Keziah Orr, Aminme Smith; Bottom Row (Seated):
Floyd, Robert K. McClain, Jr.; Bottom Row (Seated): Alphonso Ashley Land, Mikyle Crockett, Kaila White, Mikael Gibbs.
Kyle Wilson, Cameron Turner Venson, Christen Alexander
Wilson, Matthew Alan Hardy.


Beaux and Belles in order L to R Top Row (Standing): Philip
Charles Johnson and Kaila White, Alphonso Kyle Wilson and The Holzendorf Family, a Jack & Jill Family.
Rachel Applewhite, Charles "Chuck" Antoine Winfield, III and
Keziah Orr, Robert K. McClain, Jr. and Karissa Hall; Bottom Row
(Kneeling/Seated): Cameron Turner Venson and Ashley Land,
Christen Alexander Wilson and Mikyle Crockett, Matthew Alan
Hardy and Mikael Gibbs, Tyrone Cody Floyd and Amme Smith


Kevin Holzendorf with his children and godparents The J.
Carl Davises, Sr.


I .IIBII 11A


S The Robert Porters. Col. Porter was the mil-
itary director of the Jacksonville Chapter,
Hostesses for the Jack and Jill Les Beautillion Militaire ack & Jill of America, Inc.'s Les
included these four lovely lassies. Jacksonville Chapter, Jack & Jill ofAmerica, Inc. members. Beautillion Militaire.


J furpfnl PT. mcUssiUk, A Mrs. Ja,.eres IaUVqsrayne, g..... Fa Cnrl
ttidReverend Payne, Benty hnd D. Mania Spdights, par- e xhae ons Wa eWtralInstitutionalBaptist Church's Reverend Michael F. Payne, Sr. with his Deacons at Central
'.l kist Lay Pajipe iand. Dt Rudolph, *W. "Mfcisslck, Sr.:". t .a. y gand Pasto "u.iftrus Wallace Rasberry, Jr. ". Institutional Baptist Church.I
HIMswp i
*EA,/. I Ij... "


A4 4


11th Les Beautillion Militaire Co-Chairperson and
Chairperson Mesdames Madeline Scales-Taylor and
Wanda Willis with Jacksonville Chapter, Jack & Jill of
America, Incorporated President Mrs. Felecia
Wimbish.


ara :. .. .?,u,:; i-7 ,,. .o-* *; ,, 7, V; ,-,_;,-, -'r*.-, _..-.. ,- .". -, .. -.'. -*./". -."- "- '










APRIL 4, 2009 THE STAR PAGE A-7
I.


Grand Continued from A-1
communications with city, county
and state government.
In addition to the projects to
enhance the Jurisdiction, he initi-
ated several health and welfare
programs throughout the jurisdic-
tion such as Hurricane relief and
monthly community projects for
the underprivileged.
The Kappa Alpha Psi member is
an attorney, and a Church of God
in Christ pastor with studies
and/or degrees from Florida A &
M University, University of
Florida as a Carnegie Fellow,
John Marshall Law School, the Z.
E. Brown Bible College and a
Certified Public Manager from
Florida State University. He is a
native of Tallahassee and is one
of few Eagle Scouts prior to grad-
uating from high school.
He met his wife, Juanita shortly
after they both enrolled at FAMU
and soon married. They have two
daughters Crystal who is a
MBA graduate of FAMU School
of Business and Industry and is
presently a second-year law stu-
dent at the University of Texas,
Austin. Their other daughter,
Whitney is a second year Doctor
of Pharmacy student at FAMU.
Men and Women in the Masons
are doctors, lawyers, judges, pas-
tors, ministers, nurses, retired and
active military personnel and
many other fields.
So that you can relax and under-
stand the power and sincerity of
the Masons which includes both
men and women, here is a brief
history.
Prince Hall is known as the
Father of Black Masonry. He
made it possible for blacks to be
recognized and enjoy all privi-
leges of Free and accepted


Call and talk.
(904) 694-1057
FM-105.7, 105.5, 92.5
www.radiofreejax.com
(904) 766-9285
WCGL-AM 1360
www.WCGL1360.com


m


Masonry. Black Free masonry
began when Prince Hall and 14
other free black men were initiat-
ed into Lodge No. 441 in Boston.
When the British Army left
Boston in 1776, the Lodge grant-
ed Prince Hall and his brethren
authority to meet as African
Lodge #1. During a nine year
period, 33 masons were listed on
the rolls of African Lodge #1 on
January 14, 1779. On March 2,
1784 Prince Hall petitioned the
Grand Lodge of England for a
warrant or charter.
Today, the Prince Hall fraternity
has over 4,500 lodges worldwide
with a membership of over
300,000 masons. Saturday night,
the Massachusetts Jurisdiction
granted membership to Grand
Master Moore.
The Most Worshipful Union
Grand Lodge, Ancient and
Honorable Fraternity, Free and
Accepted Masons, Prince Hall
Affiliated, Florida and Belize,
Central America, Incorporated,
has existed for 133 years and
counting.
The Concordant and Appendant
Bodies consist of twelve.
There is much hope for our
youth through the existence of
the Masons. There is a growing
number of young men and
women now joining the organiza-
tion and such growth can defi-
nitely make a change in the atti-
tudes and altitudes of our youth
today and tomorrow.
The Florida jurisdiction has
chartered one hundred fifty-eight
lodges and has a membership of
over 3,000. With the road already
paved Grand Master Lee Carter
can continue the trail of success
to encourage our youth.


Victor Continued from A-1
Life Center, 2119 Rowe Ave.
The Jacksonville native grew up in the funeral
business founded by a relative, Rosie Holmes
Walker, in 1904.
Mr. Solomon started working in the business at
age 11, cleaning up, and a year later was digging
graves.
After graduating from New Stanton Senior High
School in 1965, Mr. Solomon earned a bachelor's
degree in physical education from Florida A&M
University in 1969. He received his mortuary
science degree from Miami Dade Community
College in 1988 and earned a master's degree in
education from the University of North Florida.
Mr. Solomon, in addition to running the funeral
home business, was a physical education teacher
for 33 years at Southside, Kirby-Smith and
Northwestern middle schools, where he influ-
enced many young people.
He was a member of St. Thomas Missionary
Baptist Church, Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity,
Alpha Xi Chapter, and Florida's First Coast
Morticians Association.
Mr. Solomon's sister, Shela Smiley, recalled that
her brother's aim was to trust God
and work hard.
"He was such a caring person and
he always felt it was better to give
than to receive," Smiley said. "He
helped people and especially
enjoyed mentoring young men. I
believe his life inspired many in the
community to be all that they could
be so they would make a better life
for themselves and their families."
Smiley said her brother was a great
influence on her life.
"He told me that no matter how
long it takes to achieve a goal, I
should aim for it," Smiley said.
In addition to his sister, Mr.
Solomon is survived by his mother,
Fay Solomon; a son, Victor E.
Solomon Jr., and a daughter, 14 |
Victoria E. Solomon, all of
Jacksonville; and another sister, Ivy
N. Solomon of Atlanta.


Tuesday
Tune in to FM 105.7-WHJX- 5:30 and 11:30 p.n
FM 105.5-WSJX- 5:30 and 11:30 p.r
8:30 p.m., WCGL-AM 1360
FM 92.5-WFJO 1:30 a.m.
with
Clara McLaughlin and
IMPACT
Call and talk: FM 105.7 FM 105.5 (904) 694-1057
Tuesday, from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m.
Call and talk: AM-1360 (904) 766-9285
Tuesday, from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
"The Florida Star, The Georgia Star and Impact -
Striving to Make a Difference."
www.radiofreejax.com
www.WCGL1360.com
The Florida Star Still "The People's Choice"


n.
M.


2325 W. Beaver St Jacksonville. FL 32209
(904) 647 80O
Came eat and eqiyy a f.a Fited

vrn nCh Daily Promotions
Over 3' gaq;r' ato choose fromI


Keno

Alantis


Golden Egg

A=...*r


KNOWLEDGE
IS
POWER.
GAIN
KNOWLEDGE

READ
THE FLORIDA
STAR
AND
THE GEORGIA
STAR
NEWSPAPERS


3 050 m p m


iL- I I M riP==' i .rri-F
DELIVER THE FLORIDA or GEORGIA STAR
TO YOU


I want a One Year Subscription to The Florida or Georgia Star! Please donate 10%
of my paid Subscription to the non-profit organization listed below.

Please send my Paid Subscription to:

Name
Address
City


State
Name of Organization for Donation:


Zip Code


A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE
( ) 6 Months $20.00 ( ) One Year $35.00 ( ) 2 Years $67.00
SEND TO: The Florida/Georgia Star
Post Office Box 40629
Jacksonville, FL 32203-40629
www.thefloridastar.com
Cash, Check, Money Order, Credit Card or PayPal Accepted


..-.~ -'


i


PAGE A-7


APRIL 4, 2009


THE STAR


4,I-










APRIL4, 209 TH STA


Grand Continued from A-1
communications with city, county
and state government.
In addition to the projects to
enhance the Jurisdiction, he initi-
ated several health and welfare
programs throughout the jurisdic-
tion such as Hurricane relief and
monthly community projects for
the underprivileged.
The Kappa Alpha Psi member is
an attorney, and a Church of God
in Christ pastor with studies
and/or degrees from Florida A &
M University, University of
Florida as a Carnegie Fellow,
John Marshall Law School, the Z.
E. Brown Bible College and a
Certified Public Manager from
Florida State University. He is a
native of Tallahassee and is one
of few Eagle Scouts prior to grad-
uating from high school.
He met his wife, Juanita shortly
after they both enrolled at FAMU
and soon married. They have two
daughters Crystal who is a
MBA graduate of FAMU School
of Business and Industry and is
presently a second-year law stu-
dent at the University of Texas,
Austin. Their other daughter,
Whitney is a second year Doctor
of Pharmacy student at FAMU.
Men and Women in the Masons
are doctors, lawyers, judges, pas-
tors, ministers, nurses, retired and
active military personnel and
many other fields.
So that you can relax and under-
stand the power and sincerity of
the Masons which includes both
men and women, here is a brief
history.
Prince Hall is known as the
Father of Black Masonry. He
made it possible for blacks to be
recognized and enjoy all privi-
leges of Free and accepted


Call and talk.
(904) 694-1057
FM-105.7, 105.5, 92.5
www.radiofreejax.com
(904) 766-9285
WCGL-AM 1360
www.WCGL1360.com


Masonry. Black Free masonry
began when Prince Hall and 14
other free black men were initiat-
ed into Lodge No. 441 in Boston.
When the British Army left
Boston in 1776, the Lodge grant-
ed Prince Hall and his brethren
authority to meet as African
Lodge #1. During a nine year
period, 33 masons were listed on
the rolls of African Lodge #1 on
January 14, 1779. On March 2,
1784 Prince Hall petitioned the
Grand Lodge of England for a
warrant or charter.
Today, the Prince Hall fraternity
has over 4,500 lodges worldwide
with a membership of over
300,000 masons. Saturday night,
the Massachusetts Jurisdiction
granted membership to Grand
Master Moore.
The Most Worshipful Union
Grand Lodge, Ancient and
Honorable Fraternity, Free and
Accepted Masons, Prince Hall
Affiliated, Florida and Belize,
Central America, Incorporated,
has existed for 133 years and
counting.
The Concordant and Appendant
Bodies consist of twelve.
There is much hope for our
youth through the existence of
the Masons. There is a growing
number of young men and
women now joining the organiza-
tion and such growth can defi-
nitely make a change in the atti-
tudes and altitudes of our youth
today and tomorrow.
The Florida jurisdiction has
chartered one hundred fifty-eight
lodges and has a membership of
over 3,000. With the road already
paved Grand Master Lee Carter
can continue the trail of success
to encourage our youth.


Ti


Victor Continued from A-1
Life Center, 2119 Rowe Ave.
The Jacksonville native grew up in the funeral
business founded by a relative, Rosie Holmes
Walker, in 1904.
Mr. Solomon started working in the business at
age 11, cleaning up, and a year later was digging 1 "
graves. 2325 w. e
After graduating from New Stanton Senior High
School in 1965, Mr. Solomon earned a bachelor's Come oa0
degree in physical education from Florida A&M
University in 1969. He received his mortuary wt" cah at
science degree from Miami Dade Community Over 30 g
College in 1988 and earned a master's degree in
education from the University of North Florida. -2, -
Mr. Solomon, in addition to running the funeral itaatis
home business, was a physical education teacher I
for 33 years at Southside, Kirby-Smith and
Northwestern middle schools, where he influ-
enced many young people.
He was a member of St. Thomas Missionary a,
Baptist Church, Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity,
Alpha Xi Chapter, and Florida's First Coast
Morticians Association.
Mr. Solomon's sister, Shela Smiley, recalled that
her brother's aim was to trust God
and work hard.
"He was such a caring person and
he always felt it was better to give
than to receive," Smiley said. "He
helped people and especially
enjoyed mentoring young men. I
believe his life inspired many in the
community to be all that they could
be so they would make a better life
for themselves and their families."
Smiley said her brother was a great -e
influence on her life.
"He told me that no matter how f
long it takes to achieve a goal, I
should aim for it," Smiley said.
In addition to his sister, Mr.
Solomon is survived by his mother,
Fay Solomon; a son, Victor E.
Solomon Jr., and a daughter, .3
Victoria E. Solomon, all of f
Jacksonville; and another sister, Ivy
N. Solomon of Atlanta.


Tuesday
une in to FM 105.7-WHJX- 5:30 and 11:30 p.r
FM 105.5-WSJX- 5:30 and 11:30 p.r
8:30 p.m., WCGL-AM 1360
FM 92.5-WFJO 1:30 a.m.
with
Clara McLaughlin and
IMPACT
Call and talk: FM 105.7 FM 105.5 (904) 694-1057
Tuesday, from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m.
Call and talk: AM-1360 (904) 766-9285
Tuesday, from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
"The Florida Star, The Georgia Star and Impact -
Striving to Make a Difference."
www.radiofreejax.com
www.WCGL1360.com
The Florida Star Still "The People's Choice"


n.
M.


m.


MsEfiaiuTalk S hw
692 -. 0


KNOWLEDGE
IS
POWER.
GAIN
KNOWLEDGE


READ
THE FLORIDA
STAR
AND
THE GEORGIA
STAR
NEWSPAPERS S(0)*002eis ff

LET THE POST OFFICE
DELIVER THE FLORIDA or GEORGIA STAR
TO YOU

I want a One Year Subscription to The Florida or Georgia Star! Please donate 10%
of my paid Subscription to the non-profit organization listed below.

Please send my Paid Subscription to:

Name
Address
City
State Zip Code
Name of Organization for Donation:

A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE
( ) 6 Months $20.00 ( ) One Year $35.00 ( ) 2 Years $67.00
SEND TO: The Florida/Georgia Star
Post Office Box 40629
Jacksonville, FL 32203-40629
www.thefloridastar.com
Cash, Check, Money Order, Credit Card or PayPal Accepted


- ~ .... ~ ~ -~ -


APRIL 4, 2009


THE STAR










rA t A -A A


S1M1=


Jill Scott: Renaissance Entertainer of

Song and Screen


Since Jill Scott hit the
music scene over a decade
ago, the songstress, poet
and actress has parlayed
her talents into several suc-
cessful entertainment proj-
ects.
The multi-talented
native of Philadelphia is
now entering the world of
television again with the
highly anticipated HBO
debut of the series "The
No. 1 Ladies' Detective
Agency."
Last year, Scott
appeared as Precious
Ramotswe in Anthony
Minghella's film adaption
of Alexander McCall
Smith's book of the same
name. She filmed an addi-
tional six-hour series in
Botswana in late 2008, co-
funded by HBO and the
BBC, which will transmit
as a six-part series on
BBC1 in March 2009; and
a 13-part series on HBO at
a later date.
Scott, born April 4,
1972, grew up an only
child in a North
Philadelphia neighborhood
and was raised by her
mother, Joyce Scott, and
her grandmother. She indi-
cated in an interview with
Jet magazine that she had a
happy childhood and was
"very much a loved child"
Prior to her break-
through in the music indus-
try, Scott worked at a vari-
ety of jobs, including a
number of retail positions
and stints at a construction
site and an ice cream par-


lor. She remains close to
her mother and grandmoth-
er, nicknamed Blue Babe,
and currently resides in
Mount Laurel Township,
New Jersey.
Scott began her per-
forming career as a spoken
word artist, appearing at
live poetry readings to per-
form her work. She was
eventually discovered by
Amir "QuestLove"
Thompson of The Roots.
QuestLove invited her to
join the band in the studio,
and the collaboration
resulted in a co-writing
credit for Scott for the
song, "You Got Me." In
2000, Erykah Badu and
The Roots won the
Grammy for best rap per-
formance by a duo or group
for "You Got Me",and
Scott debuted as an artist
during a Roots live show,
filling in for Badu and pro-
viding her own variation on
the song. Subsequently,
Scott collaborated with
Eric Benet, Will Smith, and
Common, and broadened
her performing experience
by touring Canada in a pro-
duction of the Broadway
musical Rent.
Her debut album, Who
Is Jill Scott? Words and
Sounds Vol. 1 was released
in 2000. She experienced
some chart success and
notice with the single "A
Long Walk", which eventu-
ally earned her a Grammy
nomination in early 2003
for Best Female Vocal
Performance. Scott lost that


.. .. L






Jill Scott and cast members of "The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency"
O"ac "t" I" .te""


wednesday

04.08.09

7:30 p.m.

Times-Union Center
for the Performing
Arts, in the Jacoby
Symphony Hall


RIT CHAMBER PLAYERSS




Sprin Concert


Please join us for a captivating concert featuring the works
of Crusell. Perkinson, Piazzolla and Mendelssohn.

SINGLE TICKET PRICE $30
q ..,



Purchase tickets by phone (904) 354-5547
or online www.ritzchamberplayers.org

Kelly Hall-Tompkins and Kyle Lombard Violins
Chauncey Patterson and Amadi Hummings Violas
Kenneth Law Cello
Terrance Patterson Clarinet

VIP reception in the Davis Gallery. during intermission and following
each concert, is open to season ticket holders and to people who
purchased tickets to both the Spring Concert and Season Finale.


THE S1IIYZED MUSICAL EIGHTH NOTE IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF RITZ CHIAIMER MUSIC SOCIETY. INC


loom a4':*


award, but won a 2005
Grammy for Best
Urban/Alternative R&B
Performance for "Cross My
Mind." The live album,
Experience: Jill Scott
826+, was released
November 2001. Scott's
second full-length album,
Beautifully Human: Words
and Sounds Vol. 2, fol-
lowed in 2004.
Scott continues to write
poetry; a compilation vol-
ume of her poems, The
Moments, The Minutes,
The Hours, was published
and released by St. Martin's
Press in April 2005.
Scott has established the
Blues Babe Foundation, a
program founded to help
young minority students
pay for university expens-
es. The Blues Babe
Foundation offers financial
assistance to students
between the ages of sixteen
to twenty-one, and targets
students residing in
Philadelphia, Camden, and
the greater Delaware
Valley. Scott donated
USD$100,000 to help start
the foundation. The foun-
dation was named after
Scott's grandmother,
known.
In the spring of 2003,
the Blues Babe Foundation
made a donation of more
than $60,000 to the gradu-
ating class of the Creative
Arts School in Camden,
New Jersey.


APRIL 4, 2009


THE ,STA R


PDAGF A_


fIJ


CRIMINAL DEFENSE 220 E. FORSYTH STREET, SUITE E
PERSONAL INJURY JACKSON\V"ILLE, FL 32202
OFFICE: (904)357-8448
FAMILY LAW FAX: (904)357-8446




WW W.COBBIN LEGAL.COM









APRIL 4. 2009 THE STAR PAGE B-1




The FL/GA Star




LOCAL SECTION B







There were so many in attendance at the banquet hon-
oring The Rev. Dr. Michael R. Moore, 33 degree,
K.YC.H. Most Worshipful Grand Master that the audi-
ence flowed outside of the banquet room into the hall
ways, and as Grand Master Moore and his beautiful
wife, Juanita Moore entered the area, all stood on their
feet. The Grand Master was given many accolades and
they thanked Mrs. Moore for her patience and under-
standing as her husband, the 15th Most Worshipful
Grand Master, rebuilt the organization. .


Juanita Moore.


Jacksonville City Councilman Reginald Brown who gave
the welcome to the city address.


Elnora Sampson, Administrative Assistant, who has served
the Jurisdiction since April, 1967 and to the right of the
Grand Master is Ruby Flowers Herndon, who has served
the Jurisdiction as Executive Administrative Secretary,
since1944. Grand Master Rev. Dr. Michael R. Moore hon-
ored both ladies with flowers, a financial blessing and a
plaque. Ms. Herndon said she has seen the Grand Lodge at
high and low peaks but she give special thanks to Dr. Moore
for the unforgettable learning and most cordial experience
he gave her. Ms. Herndon plans to now retire and write a
history book for the Lodge to place in the Broad Street
library.


L to R (Floor) Phillip Robinson, Grand Secretary, Florida, Melvin
Wright, Grand Treasurer, Florida, Sam McDonald, Grand Associate
Patron, Georgia, Walter Gulley, Jr., Grand Warden, Florida, Rev. Dr.
John Giles, Grand Chaplin, Florida, Anthony T Stafford, Senior Grand
Warden, Florida, Douglas Jones, Deputy Grand Master, Georgia, Bruce
James, Senior Grand Warden, Georgia.
(On Stage) Wilbert Curtis, Grand Master, Texas, Jacque Jubernot,
Grand Chancellor, France, Carl Culmer, Grand Master, Bahamas,
Ramsey Davis, Grand Master, Georgia, Cleveland Wesley, Grand Master,
Arkansas, Lee Carter, Deputy Grand Master, Florida, Rev. Dr. Michael
Moore, Grand Master, Florida, Don Roy Moore, Past Grand Master,
Nebraska, Jerome Propley, Past Grand Master, Florida, Paul Smith,
Past Grand Master, Maryland, Leslie Lewis, Past Grand Master,
Massachusetts, Anthony Stafford, Senior Grand Warden, Florida, C. E.
Alexander, Junior Grand Warden, Georgia.
(Person between Grand Master Moore and Deputy Grand Master Lee
Carter: Ernie Daniels, Grand Trice Master, Florida


Past Grand Master Don Moore of Nebraska.


Deputy Bishop Lorenzo Hall, singing the
Grand Master's Tribute Song.


The Rev. Dr. Moore with his wife, Juanita Moore of Tallahassee, (33
years of marriage) and their daughters, Crystal, an MBA graduate of
FAMU School of Business and a second year law student at the
University of Texas at Austin and their youngest daughter, Whitney, a
second year Doctor of Pharmacy student at FAMU.


Jerome Rapelly, Past Grand Master, FL, Don Ray Moore,
MWPGM, Nebraska, Carl Culmer, Grand Master,
Bahamas, Ramsey Davis, Grand Master, Georgia, Rev. Dr.
Michael R. Moore, Most Worshipful Grand Master, Florida,
Wilbert Curtis, Grand Master, Texas, Cleveland Wilson,
Grand Master, Arkansas, Jacque Juburnot, Deputy Grand
Chancellor, France, Leslie Lewis, MWPGM,
Massachusetts, Paul Smith, PGM, Maryland, Bruce James,
Senior Grand Warden, Georgia, Sam McDonald, Grand
Associate Patron, Georgia and C. E. Alexander, Junior
Grand Warden, Georgia.


Grand Chancellor Jacque Jubenot of
France, advising that they will develop a
brotherhood with the Florida Jurisdiction
and make them a part of the France
Jurisdiction.


Members of the Michael R. Moore Lodge of Quincy, Florida


3mBwe'' ,'"I"I;V-' '',", *; ', ; "' 1,," "*1 '*.;" V* .,; .,-" ,', .,,,, '... .








PAOjGE B-2 I ---a--


The FL/GA Star


*


Donald Cobb who was awarded Deputy of the Year.


Grand Master of the Bahamas, giving the painting as a
gift


Family of Princess Dorothy Wilson providing a gift in her
honor.


Honorary membership to GM Moore in the Jurisdiction of
Massachusetts.


-- -- .--,-.-. ----,---- -


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APRIL 4 2009


THES TAR


YDA lV









APR1L 04', 200 (1


ARIES
March 21st thru April 19th


You're prone to gaffes and slips of the
tongue early this week, so it's a great idea for
you to slow down and think things through
before speaking, when possible. Still, you
can recover from almost anything.
Wednesday and Thursday see you returning
home in some way -- maybe visiting your
hometown, maybe working from home part-
time. You feel confident, if not entirely com-
fortable at first. Seize the day this weekend
and try something really daring, like starting
your own business or asking out someone
you find intimidating.

,TAURUS
April 20th thru May 20th
Avoid signing anything binding early this
week -- it may come back to bite you, it
may not, but you will be wondering for a
long, long time, and that's just not worth
it for you. You should get a lot more infor-
mation on Wednesday and Thursday once
you make your feelings known, and that
s huld decide the matter once and for all.
You should spend more time with friends
and family this weekend, though things
are not perfectly comfortable. Attachment
is important for you and for them, so
make it happen!


S GEMINI
l May 21st thru June 21st
Exciting discussions fill up your days early
this week, so you should expect fun and,
'good ideas to flow freely. Bring others into
the fold if they seem to be hanging back --
there's no need to exclude anyone!
Possessions and other physical objects seem
to cause trouble of their own volition on
Wednesday and Thursday, but it's just your
mind filling in weird explanations for every-
day behavior. Try to just get on with it! This
weekend is perfect for trying out new ideas
and taking action in new ways.

i CANCER
June 22nd thru July 22nd
Nobody seems to be telling you what to do
or not to do on Monday or Tuesday, but that
doesn't mean you can literally get away with
anything. You can get a bit of what you
want, but not everything. The spotlight is on
you midweek, but it should be almost over-
whelmingly positive, and you should find
that people are much more willing to talk up
your obvious strengths. Shopping can be fun
this weekend, but when you find something
you love, make sure that you can afford it
before dropping cash or plastic on it.


__ __ __ ,


LEO
July 23rd thru Aug 22nd


You're more thoughtful than usual on
Monday and Tuesday, so see if you can get
yourself to focus on that one big issue that
has been troubling you and your friends for
so long -- you might come up with a hot
idea! The timing couldn't be better, as the
middle of the week is perfect for taking new
action and you are itching to go. Friday
brings great energy your way, whether or not
you managed to pull off your coup earlier,
and you ought to be able to push forward
with any romantic or personal project that
feels right to you.

VIRGO
Aug 23rd thru Sept 22nd
Work is on your mind more than almost anything
else Monday and Tuesday, and even if it is cover-
ing up for something else, the timing is right,
because you can make amazing progress if you
apply yourself. Your social energy is powered up
by the most important people in your life midweek,
and its the perfect time for parties or just mingling
with friends. Your plans this weekend should work
perfectly, and you can also look forward to your
next big adventure, so get to work figuring that one
out


U


LIBIRA
Sept 23rd thru Oct


22nd


The week begins with chatter about changes
or new ideas that popped up over the week-
end, and you may need to lead the conversa-
tion if you want to see people adopt your
point of view. Progress isn't likely on
Wednesday or Thursday, and while that may
upset you a bit inside, try not to let it show
for now. You may delay things even more!
Focus on the long-term this weekend, or you
might miss out on a big social opportunity.
It's not the biggest deal in the world, but you
should be open to almost anything at this
time.

SCORPIO
Oct 23rd thru Nov 21st
Avoid taking risks on Monday and Tuesday
-- they are much less likely to pay off for
you. That's not to say you've got bad luck,
because playing it safe works out quite well.
Use your good energy midweek to discover
some new restaurant or band that you've
never heard of. You're much more likely to
stumble upon cool stuff! The weekend kind
of belongs to other people, so fade into the
background and see if you can just enjoy liv-
ing on the periphery for a while. You're back
in the spotlight soon!

SAGITTARIUS
Nov 22nd thru Dec 21st
You've got to make sure that you're sticking
with your schedule early this week, busy as
it may be. You should have plenty of energy
for it all, so don't worry too much about
exhaustion. Your friends and family are quite
important to you on Wednesday and
Thursday -- more so than usual, even! Let
them know what they mean to you and
include them in as much as you can. Your
less obvious advantages pop up this weekend
and help you to win over almost anyone to
your side. Don't be shy about showing off!

*CAPRICORN
Dec 22nd thru Jan 19th
You're feeling the need to exercise your
brain somewhat on Monday and Tuesday --
but not so much that you end up exhausted!
Walk that fine line until you see what you
need to do next. Your good social energy
makes the middle part of the week fun and a
lot more inviting to those you know well, so
it's a good time for a dinner party or some
other small gathering. You just aren't sure
what's going on this weekend, though, as it
seems that you've been exchanged for some-
one else in the cosmic lottery. Whether it's
good luck or bad, it doesn't feel like yours.


ssSHH!


From Actual Police Reports

Did You Hear About?...


wA' AQUARIUS

-I O i Jan 20th thru Feb 18th


Romantic energy fills you up early this
week, so you should take time out to be with
your sweetie or make sure that you're as
available as can be to the singles in your
neck of the woods. You can make any
moment sizzle! Wednesday and Thursday
bring you back down to earth, and you
should find several mundane problems fac-
ing you at home and at work -- fix them up
and move on to the next in assembly line
fashion. You need to watch out for possible
contradictions or paradoxes this weekend, as
they trip you up far more than usual.

PISCES
I Feb 19th thru March 20th


Communication is somewhat more difficult
than usual for you on Monday and Tuesday,
but if you can avoid getting into technical
details and focus instead on feelings and
impressions, than you should be able to get
your ideas across. Enjoy the mystery that
comes your way midweek -- it's more inter-
esting than all the boring certainties you've
been dealing with recently. You may never
get the answer, but you don't mind. Work
issues may pop up on Friday and follow you
into the weekend -- one coworker in partic-
ular is causing problems.


F
4. I


. . . . . . . . . . i..,',^ a s


' ,, t#' ,';',, ,,_ '..:",,,-. ,


Your Weekly


HOROSCOPE

March 30, 2009 April 05, 2009

S /I MF


PAGE B-3


EDITOR'S NOTE:
:All suspects are. de( med innocent unless proven guiltv in a court oflaw. The
SherifI "s Of oj'public record. The Star seeks to edu-
.fice reports are a matter
cate the community in the hope ofleeping our communi)., saji,.
TI,


M,


I


I


l


THEFf STAR


AP rn^'i A. MA


Cocaine Found In The Sole
Of A Man's Shoe --On a
Thursday afternoon three officers
were observing on foot. Two drug-
possession arrests had been made
that month on persons leaving in
the nearby location. A suspect was
observed walking to the rear of a
building and knocking on the door.
Afterwards, they entered the build-
ing and stayed for approximately
three minutes. After they exited the
rear, the first Officer signaled to the
reminder two that they were leaving
the premises. Officers made con-
tact with the suspect and the sub-
ject at the front of the property. As
they approached the suspect, the
suspect slipped out of his left shoe.
On the sole of the left shoe, in plain
view, was the listed baggie of
cocaine. Officer took custody of the
suspect and the baggie of cocaine.
They read the suspect his
Constitutional Rights via card. Post-
Miranda, he told them he gave ten
dollars to the subject and she in
turn bought the cocaine while inside
the house. He repeatedly told them
the cocaine did not belong to him
and said he does not use drugs.
The suspect was transported to the
jail. Man beats Girlfriend out
of Jealousy-- Officer was dis-
patched to Crestwood Street in ref-
erence to a battery. Upon his arrival
he met with the victim. She reported
the suspect slapped her on the left
side of her face with his right hand.
The victim reported that she was in
bed when the suspect walked into
her bedroom. The victim reported
the suspect became irate when she
told him that another man had taken
her and the baby to the doctor. The


victim and suspect have a baby in
common. Officer's investigation
revealed redness and swelling on
the left side of the victim's face. The
victim wrote a written statement.
The victim reported the suspect
entered her bedroom and took her
cellular phone. The victim stated
the suspect then pulled her hair.
The victim reported when she
attempted to get her cellular phone
from the suspect he then slapped
her face. The suspect fled the
scene prior to police arrival. Officer
explained a safe place option to the
victim but she declined. An evi-
dence technician was assigned by
dispatch. The state attorney office
was contacted and a request for an
arrest warrant was issued for the
suspect. Patrol efforts continuing.
Woman Finally Has Enough
Of Physical Abuse-- A dispute
occurred on Hartridge Street.
Officer met Becky (Victim) upon
arrival. Miss Becky stated she had
been assaulted by Ronald
(Suspect). She stated that while
she was sitting in a chair the sus-
pect became angry with her and
began to hit her. Miss Becky also
stated she began to scream and the
suspect grabbed her out of the
chair by her arm and threw her
across the room. She said they had
been living together and the sus-
pect gets violent with her every now
and then. Mr. Ronald stated he and
the victim were arguing but he
never physically touched her. He
stated while they were arguing she
got up from the chair and called a
cab to leave the house. No one else
in the residence saw or heard any-
thing. Officer observed no visible
signs of injury to the victim.










PAGE B-4
njflf n ATUS' VTAI


APRIL 4. 2009


SPORTS


Sports Editor
The 45th annual Bob Hayes Invitational track
and field meet honored the late "Bullet Bob"
Hayes as thousands of athletes representing more
than 200 schools throughout the Southeast met at
Earl Kitchings Stadium Saturday to compete in
what has been hailed as the largest one-day track
meet in the country.
In the girls' competition Miami Northwestern
(111 points) bested host school Raines (62).
Rounding out the Top 12 were Oak Ridge, Pine
Forest, Osceola (Kissimmee), Buchholz, Lake
Wales, Episcopal, Terry Parker, Femandina Beach,
South Dade, Wolfson and Bishop Kenny.
Miami Northwestern also won the boys' title
edging out Flagler Palm Coast. Miami Carol City,
St. Thomas Aquinas Belen Jesuit Prep,
Countryside, Monsignor Pace, South Lake, Lake
Brantley, Tampa Jesuit, Bishop Kenny, Orange
Park and Mandarin followed them in the Top 12.
Gainesville's Adana Thompson ofP.K. Yonge
was one of the standouts in Friday's middle school
meet. The eighth-grader won the 400-meter dash
in a time of 1:00, placed first in the long jump with
a distance of 16-09 and finished second in the 100-
meter
Complete team and individual results from
the 45 Annual Bob Hayes Invitational are available
at www.jacksonvillesportsday.com including
Friday's middle school meet.
Raines star .Brianna Frazier shined on her
home track, winning the 400 in 54.76, the TJ with
a leap of 38-02.75 and anchoring the Raines'
4x400 to a 3:56.13 victory. Miami Northwestern's
Brianna Rollins turns the hurdles double, running
14.75 (-3.1w) in the 100H and 44.97 in the 300H.
Rollins is also runner-up to Frazier in the TJ with a
leap of 37-02.50. Octavious Freeman of Lake
Wales completed the girls' short sprint double, run-
ning 12.24 (-3.4w) to win the 100, and 25.53
(3.9w) in the 200.
Flagler Palm Coast's C.J. Lockhart, a senior
sprinter, was part of three championship teams.
Lockhart won the 400 in 48.06, was the anchor leg
on the 4x800-winning relay (8:10), and was the
anchor leg on the state-best 4x400 relay, helping
FPC win in 3:17, four seconds ahead of second
place. Lockhart has four state titles in his career.
Pentathlon champ Neamen Wise of Lake
Brantley turned in a strong performance in the hur-
dles, taking the 11 OH in 14.68 (-4.3) and the 300H
in 38.51. John Little of Eastside edged Mandarin's
Kevin Bell in the 100, 11.06 to 11.09 (-2.5).


Gainesville Buchholz had a strong showing
on Saturday. Senior Simone Durden finished third
in the 800-meter run (2:19.56) as the Bobcats
placed sixth. The Florida A&M basketball com-
mitment also won the high jump (5-02), placed
first in the 800-meter run (2:25.22) and anchored
the winning 4x400 meter relay team (4:04.67).
Senior Wilamena Hopkins placed first in the shot
put (41-03) and sixth in the discus (111-02).
Marquis Noble placed third in the long jump
(23-00.50). The sophomore was part of the second-
place 4x100 relay team (43.38) and part of the
eighth-place 4x400 meter relay team (3:32.71).
Junior Marla Collins of Gainesville High
placed second in the high jump (5-00), finished
second in the 400-meter dash (59.99), anchored the
second-place 4x400 meter relay team (4:04.75)
and was fifth in the 800-meter run (2:34).
The Tampa Bay area was well represented
with first-place finishes by Jesuit's Jordan Schilit in
the 3,200 (9:44.25) and Freedom's Trent Wiseman
in the pole vault (13 feet). Jesuit's foursome of
Logan Trimble, Mike McEnany, Blake Lopez and
Schilit also earned a second in the 3,200 relay
(8:17.41) and Freedom's Perri Rothenberg was the
silver medalist in the girls vault (9-0). Taking thirds
at Bob Hayes were Sickles' Bianca Morrison
(triple jump, 36-5) and Jesuit's Blake Lopez
(1,600, 4:46.30). Lake Brantley standout Neamen
Wise won both the 110-meter high hurdles in
14.68 seconds and the 300 hurdles in 38.51.
Spruce Creek's Chris Lickfield won the boys
discus throw with a fling of 175-feet, 9-inches and
placed second in the shot put (52-6/2) Oak Ridge's
girls won the 4x100 relay in a time of 47.21 sec-
onds and also got a first place from Denae Fluellen
in the long jump (18-feet, 1%3-inches). Ashley
Evans of Winter Springs won the girls discus with
a state-leading throw of 130-2). Osceola sprinter
Tynia Gaither placed second in both the 100
(12.37) and 200 (25.79).
In other girls events Oak Ridge's Martisha
Hart was second in the 300 hurdles (45.46),
Seminole was second in the 4x400 relay in
4:00.46; Julie Nunn of South Lake was third in the
400 (57.23), Spruce Creek was third in the 4x800
relay, and Rachel Boggs of Dr. Phillips was third in
the 1,600 (5:19.93). South Lake's boys 4x800 relay
foursome took third in a time of 8:23.24.
The Battery Creek (South Carolina) boys
track team finished 18th in the 46-team meet held
this weekend in Jacksonville, FL. Martin Jenkins
led the Dolphins, claiming first place in the triple


jump with a distance of 47 feet, 9 1/2 inches. He
also had a fifth-place mark in the high jump (6-2)
and was 12th in the long jump (21-7 1/2). Norman
Jenkins took sixth in the triple jump (44-11 1/4),
Rhakeem Brown was 10th in the 1,600-meter run
(4:55.21) and Jonathan Brown was 14th in the shot
put (46-5 1/2).
Hayes was selected to the Class of 2009 Pro
Football Hall of Fame enshrines. A gold medalist
track star in the 1964 Summer Olympics combined
his world-class speed with great hands. The
Jacksonville native was a three-time All-Pro pick Sc
with the Dallas Cowboys, caught 371 career pass- Scl
es for 7,414 yards and 71 touchdowns. Hayes died
Sept. 18, 2002, at age of 59.


Biy Vaugln Wilson
Courtesy Capital Outlook
Tiger Woods started the final round of the 2009 Arnold
Palmer Invitational five strokes behind the leader Sean O'Hair,
but put together one of his best closing rounds to win at the
final hole. Woods hit a 16-foot birdie on the 72nd hole to fin-
ish one ahead of O'Hair.
In the words of the great Yogi Berra, "It's like d6jA vu all
over again." Last year Woods hit a 25-foot putt to make birdie
to beat Bart Bryant at the final hole for a come-from-behind
victory there as well.
With a fierce storm that passed through Orlando at 6 a.m.,
play was suspended until nearly 1 p.m. Tournament organizers
sent pairings off both the first and 10th tees and grouped them
in threesomes in order to get the round in ahead of the dark-
ness.
Even with the adjustments, it was nearly dark when
Woods' final rotation found the bottom of the cup at the 18th
hole. The delay didn't hurt attendance as the day was clearly
the largest in attendance of the four day tournament. The
cheers at the final hole replicated that of a football game with
tens of thousands of spectators within 50-100 feet of the green.
Woods had major surgeries just nine months ago to repair
a broken leg as well as reconstruct his ailing knee. The surgery
was just days after he had won the U.S. Open playing through
the obvious pain of the leg.
SAdditionally, Woods added a member to his family in the
off-season. His son Charlie Axel Woods, named for golfing
great Charlie Sifford, was born. Sportcasters wondered if these
events would distract Woods or make him less-dedicated.
Now they have their answer. Woods looks like the Tiger of
old. That's good and bad news for the PGA Tour.
The good news is the television ratings when Tiger is in
the hunt like Sunday are usually off the charts, no matter what
other event is taking place. The "Elite 8" of the NCAA tourna-
ment was going on at the time of the golf tournament on
Sunday. Tiger's appeal has caused programming adjustments
Sby other sports such as the NBA as not to conflict with a
Sunday run by Woods.
Woods never misses a must-make putt. Sure he misses
putts, but he never misses one with the tournament on the line.
Everyone had a feeling he was going to make the 16-foot putt.
As he started the putt rolling, you could feel and hear the
groundswell of energy. With every roll of his signature Nike
One golf ball, they crowd got louder. While the putt was on the
way, Woods backed-off gathering energy for a monumental
celebration. When the putt creeped in the left side, Woods let
out a roar worthy of the king of the jungle. In this game, he
truly is.
Arnold Palmer, the tournaments namesake and host greeted Tiger with an awesome
comment. "Your dad would be proud," Palmer uttered. He was referring to Woods late
father Earl who groomed him for the game mentally and physically.
This victory comes just two weeks ahead of the first major tournament of 2009, The
Masters. Woods has won four times there and will certainly be the favorite with this per-
formance.
For those naysayers who said he wouldn't be the same, he delivered a resounding "I'm
back," with his play at Bay Hill.


DOLPHINS NOTEBOOK

athletics Sweeps JU 'Women of the Year" Honors
Special to The Florida Star
Senior track & field
athlete Natasha Harvey,
NCAA athletic faculty
representative Dr. Kim
Capriotti and Board of
Trustees member Carolyn
Munro Wilson have all
made an impact on
Jacksonville University
athletics and for their
unique efforts, each was
honored as Jacksonville
University's "Woman of
the Year" on Tuesday.
Harvey will earn
"Student of the Year" hon- Jacksonville UniversityBoard of Trustees member Carolyn
ors, while Capriotti is pre- Munro Wilson, (left)NCAA athletic faculty representative
sented with "Woman of Dr. Kim Capriotti and Dolphins' senior track and field ath-
the Year" accolades. lete Natasha Harvey..
Wilson rounds out the group with the JU "Community Woman of the Year" award.
"The contributions of Carolyn, Kim and Natasha to this athletic department are truly
remarkable," said director of athletics Alan Verlander. "These women continue to posi-
tively shape the department in ways that will'be felt for years to come."
'Harvey has been the corner stone of success for the JU track & field team in the last
four years. She has helped the Dolphins to seven conference championships, earned four
All-America honors in the long jump, owns seven school records, competed for Team
USA twice and has participated in the 2008 USA Olympic Trials.
Off the track, she has been on the JU Student-Athlete Advisory Committee for the
last three years, including serving as President in 2008. Harvey has also spent time
working in the community with PACE, Big Brother Big Sister, and Girls on the Run
organizations.
"Natasha is an exceptional athlete and her athletic accomplishments speak for them-
selves," said JU head coach Ron Grigg. "But what makes Natasha so special is the way
she leads off the track. If she never won a race, she would still be deserving of this award
for all of the lives she positively affects with her determined and motivational spirit."
Capriotti is an associate professor of finance and accounting in the Davis College of
Business and JU's faculty athletic representative. She is also active in the Atlantic Sun
Conference and is a member of the NCAA Division I academic cabinet.
Along with Verlander, Capriotti helped created "Dolphin Talk" where members of
the faulty, athletic personal and the student-athletes meet to discuss ways to deal with
the challenges of balancing academics and athletics in the college setting.
"I was unaware I was nominated," said Capriotti. "I was surprised and absolutely
honored when I learned I got the award. This University is so great and I love helping
this school anyway I can."
Wilson is a JU alumni and a member of the Board of Trustees. She is Chair of the
Board's committee on Student Life and was instrumental with the opening of the Davis
Commons, a new state-of-the-art student union on campus.
In an effort to increase attendance it fine arts events and support JU athletics, Wilson
created the "Fine Arts vs. Athletics" challenge. The campaign was intended to broaden
the student-athletes experience and give fine arts a case to show its skills, while also get-
ting a chance to see the athletics side of JU.
"It's exciting to be associated with Natasha and Dr. Kim Capriotti," said Wilson.
"The future is bright for each of them. I know in the years to come that both of them will
be awarded with many more honors."


I r A 4a~ sre~~~~~l ~*~~'


holarship Winners


I


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THE S.TAR


D A tf-T- v D


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ti















THE MASONS EDUCATE

Photos by: FM Powell


Everv year the Florida & Belize. Central America
Jurisdiction gives scholarships.
This year, they continued their support for Catina Denise
Lovince of Leesburg. Florida who will be graduating
from FAMU on May 3, 2009. Catina's GPA for the past
semester was 3.8. She is a health science major. Catina
plans to attend graduate school at FA\IU to pursue a
doctor of physical therapy, a three-year program. Her
desire is to specialize in pediatric physical therapy and
she wishes to remain in Florida after she graduates. The
C.H. Henry Memorial Foundation Scholarship in the
amount of S4,500.00 has been her best supporter, said
Catine.
The Lodge has provided more than $50,000 in scholar-
ships for students. Presently there are nine students at
FAMU and one at Bethune Cookman. sponsored by this
jurisdiction.


ITHIE LADIES GIVE GREETINGS


APRIL 04, 2009


PA/G -


II C PAMP'n- dF.W x' 71' i -.-7_'. %2 `:: '











The Star



MASONS MEMORIAL SERVICE

PAST & PRESENT GRANDMASTERS
Photo's bN: FNlIPo ell

The Memorial Serx ice of the Most \Vorshipful Union Grand Lodge F ij
& A. NI PHA~ Incorporated Florida, Belize, Cenital AXmerica and
U S.\l. Jurisdiciion x% as held SundaN at die Second NMissionar\ Baptist .j
h e1 H on ofnlo; f t e i
Church. Jacksonville. i n lo in memory of those of the Grand
Juisdiction who departed this life during the past ,ear

Report: Grand Lodge. 38
Jerusalem Grand Chapter.
Order of Eastern Star, 3
Royal Arch Masons, 4
Heroines of Jericho, 33
Royal & Select Masters. 0 ...
Circle of Perfection, 3
Knight Templar Masons, q
Heroine Templar Crusaders, 5 cF F "
Priorv. 0
Scottish Rite Masons. 6
Order of the Golden Circle, 1
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 4
Daughters of Isis. 4
Knights of Pythagoras. 0


Re% erend Tons D. Hansberrv. Pastor. Greater Grant Memorial A.M.E.
Church, \\as the speaker. He was introduced b\ Reverend Mark L.
Griffin. Pastor of a\ mon Ministnries.


W l -


APRIL 04, 2009


PAGE B-6









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NEED AN APARTMENT?
Now Accepting Applications!

Hilltop Village Apartments, a privately owned
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I-


""1


THE STAR


PAiGEf B-7


j


F1:







THE STAR APRIL 4, 2009


PAGE B-8


You work hard to make ends meet. But, sometimes your paycheck just doesn't stretch far enough to meet basic needs,
The Eamed Income Tax Credit was made for people like you who make less than $42,000. It could mean up to $4,800
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607 ALHAMBRA LANE N
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This lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath home won't
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Watson Realty Corp. REALTORS'
Watson Realty Corp.


I Jzil
1 If your louse iMs Wscuently listed this is not Inlatended as a solciatimo An Equal Housing Oppotunity Broke.
S 1 01"c 5-2009 Pm fs'tUS'


- .- p--.-. --7YYr~2C~('~r


APRIL 4, 2009


THE STAR