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Florida star

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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Creation Date:
December 13, 2008
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00845

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Creation Date:
December 13, 2008
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00845

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

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I e :10 AM I* 3ll IAA z-i ;- mT 3 A m g *i lfA, l -A ,1 Ir"A I 1 34ol 17 :4-4


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i 13-D lCM B R1,20l Oi:5 N .3 50 *E S ,


NAACP to File Against JSO

Regarding Police Shootings

Citizen Shootings Continue


d The NAACP State organization
C met with Jacksonville's
Undersheriff Frank Mackesy along
with other organizations in
Jacksonville to discuss police
shootings. The organizations, said
i their desire was to start a dialog
between the police and the Black
community.
M . According to sources at the meet-
ing, Jacksonville has witnessed 46
police shootings in the past two
Florida's NAACP State President, Adora Nweze, years. Of the 46 shot, 38 were
sitting next to Dennis Wade, Executive African American. The Sheriff's
Committee of Jacksonville's NAACP.
osoffice said that 39 of the 46 sus-
pects that had been shot, were armed with weapons. Of the 39, 32 had guns.
Ms. Nweze said that she made the trip to Jacksonville to request a citizen's review
board that would investigate all police shootings. She voiced that the board should
have subpoena power and a budget. She understands that the State Attorney's Office
investigates all police-involved shootings to determine what laws, if any, were bro-
ken by the officer doing the shooting.
The meeting was held on Wednesday, a day that Jacksonville witnessed seven
shootings that were not police related. With such a NAACP -Continued A-7


OJ Simpson Didn't Take Plea Deal
Gets up to 33 Years. All Others
Except One Gets Probation
Four of the men who accom- ,
panied OJ to the hotel in Las
Vegas and charged with rob-
bery-kidnapping, were sen-
tenced to three to eight years
probation. The court heard a
loud protest from a sports mem-
orabilia dealer that they had
held at gunpoint in 2007. The
four had faced the same charges
as OJ and Stewart but 'accepted
a plea deal. OJ and Stewart did
not. Stewart received up to 27 10 J Simpson, 61, for-
years and OJ up to 33 years in mer actor & football
prison. They are appealing. star.


Congressman
Jesse Jackson Jr.
Entangled in
Illinois Governor's
Scandal








Illinois Governor Rod
Blagojevich was arrested
Monday by the FBI after
they had spent much time
listening to tapes. The
tapes showed that Gov.
Blagojevich had planned
to sell the Senate seat
vacated by President-
elect Obama.
According to informa-
tion received from
sources through the
Congressman- See A-7


DTV Road Show
Comes to Jax


The gigantic screen,
known as the "DTV
Trekker," is travelling
throughout the United
States to 'help educate
consumers about'the tran-
sition from analog to dig-
ital TV. There are about
637,410 households in
Florida with over-the-air
television. A change will
be made on February .17,
2009. The show will help
viewers understand the
.change and will be in
Jacksonville on
December 16 from 2 to 7
pm at WJCT-TV, 100
Festival Park Avenue.


Busn Signs Tfor
Commemorative
Civil Rights Coin
President George W.
Bush signed the legisla-
tion to mint a commemo-
rative silver dollar, mark-
ing the 50th anniversary
of the Civil Rights Act.
The measure was spon-
sored by President-elect
Obama and Georgia
Congressman John
Lewis.
The Civil Rights Act
was signed by President
Lyndon Johnson on July
2, 1964 to change the bar-
ring of restaurants, hotels
and other public facilities
from denying services to
Blacks. It also outlawed
employment discrimina-
tion against women and
minorities.
The U.S. Mint will pro-
duce 350,000 of the $1
coins in 2014. Proceeds
will be donated to UNCF.


FAMU 100 At Inauguration
F ORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY MARCHING 100


'1 I 't V II R I i II
The) applied, the) practiced, they are going. The Presidential
Inaugural Committee announced that FAMU Marching 100 is
one of two Florida bands that will participate in the 56th
Inaugural Parade. J.P. Taravella High in Broward County is
the other participate. They must cover their own expenses.
Please help. FAMU-(850) 599-3491, Taravella-(754) 322-2359.

Auto Makers Big Three

Bailout Failed
The House approved $14 billion dollars
to rescue the auto industry. Republicans
in the Senate did not agree and demanded
that the United Auto Workers agree to
steep wage, cuts by 2009 in line with Kevin
Japanese carmakers. The UAW refused to Williams, 47
do so until the current contract expires in 2011. So, the
deal failed.
Kevin Williams was appointed GM's North America
Vice President and General Manager of Service &
Parts Operations, effective December 1, 2008. Is he
now out of a job? His promotion was to help get the
company on track. AUTO See A-7


News Briefs
573,000 Jobless, up from 515,000 last week,
Chicago Workers End Sit-in
The country has seen many jobs lost up to 573,000 from
515,000 in just one week. However, there was a group of
workers at Republic Windows & Doors, Chicago, who
would not leave, but staged a sit-in. They felt that the
American people had provided funds to Bank of America.
The company had always kept a line of credit with the bank.
However, the bank recently closed the line. The workers
said the bank should depart with the government funds to
keep their doors open or to pay the required salaries and
benefits. With the sit-in and an understanding of the law,
Bank of America finally agreed and the funds were dis-
bursed.


Deal Signea ror

$300 Million Facility


An agreement to build a 90-acre, $300 million container com-
pany at Dames Point Terminal by Hanjin Shipping Co. of
Korea was signed Wednesday by Hanjin Sr. V.P. GS. Choi and
JAXPORT Executive Director Rick Ferrin. Hanjin is the sixth
largest ocean carrier in the world.
The facility is scheduled to be completed in 2011 and is expect-
ed to bring more than 5,000 direct or indirect jobs to the area
with an economic growth of $6 billion dollars.
The new company will be near the TraPac terminal which will
open in January, 2009,
Students, Seniors and Soldiers
to Benefit From Wal-Mart's Gift
On Wednesday,
the Wal-Mart
Foundation and The United Services
donated $215,000
to five local non-
profit groups in an
effort to help fill
budgetary gaps as
the worsening economy reduces corporate and govern-
ment donations. The money was distributed to The
Alliance for World Class Education, American Heart
Association, Florida Community College Jacksonville,
The Senior Life Foundation and The United Services
Organization.
The event was held at the Wal-Mart store on San Jose
Boulevard, Jacksonville.


Morgan Freeman Honored,
Reception at the White House


Morgan Freeman was the recipient of the 31st
Kennedy Center Honors event, along with Barbara
Streisand, George Jones, Twyla Tharp, Pete Townshend
and Roger Daltrey. They were all recognized because
of their impact on America's culture through the per-
forming arts.
Secretary Rice hosted a dinner at the State Department.


Gala to Benefit MAD DADS
The D. W. Perkins Bar Foundation, the Jacksonville
NAACP, Brotherhood' of Police and Brotherhood of
Firefighters will hold The First Annual Holiday
Charity Gala to benefit MAD DADS and Mothers of
Slain Children Saturday, December 13 at the Prime
Osborn Convention Center. An evening of live
music, dance, door prizes, silent auction and dinner.
Call 377-2109 or 396-9282 for tickets.
Usher Welcomes 2nd Son,
Naviyd Ely Raymond, born
Wednesday, weighing 5-
pounds, 13 ounces.


Editorial..................A-2
Church...................A-3
Lifestyle................A-4
State..................A-5
National......................A5
entertainment................A6
Local ............B-1
Prep Rap.................PR
Sports. ...............B-4
Police Reports.............B-3
Business Network.......... B-7


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inTeFoidf^ a or G^Weorg'Ti~a Star!CAL
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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
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PG BOX 117007
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THE PEOPLE'S INAUGURATION
4-04' Sponsored by Earl Stafford
He is paying for 1,000 people..
Prayer Breakfast, Dr., King Luncheon,, Parade
from hotel terrace'and aninauguration Ball
Earl Stafford Call the Urban League for More Information


I M..-L. 9-- 1 mmftk 0 0% N -- -- -1 Ar --











DECEMBER 13, 2008


A-2


I,

CLARA FRANCES McLAUGHLIN BETTY DAVIS
PUBLISHER LIFESTYLE/SOCIETY COLUMNIST
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MIKE BONTS
TIAAYELE SPORTS EDITOR
MANAGING EDITOR


DENNIS WADE
ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
MAY FORD
LAYOUT EDITOR
SPECIAL SECTIONS


DANIEL EVANS
ADVERTISING AND SALES
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
JULIA BOWLES
SPECIAL SECTIONS


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
(912) 264-6700 Georgia
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua,
Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn
County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida


SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$35.00
Half Year-$20.00
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsiblefor
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


Dr. Julius Richmond-Creator of
Head Start
Marian Wright Edelman
President of the Children's Defense Fund


Marian Wright EdelmanIn
July 2008, Dr. Julius B.
Richmond passed away at age
91 at his home outside
Boston. Dr. Richmond served
as U.S. Surgeon General
under President Jimmy Carter.
He was a pediatrician, profes-
sor of medicine, a child devel-
opment specialist, and a co-
creator and the first director of
Head Start. He understood
early on how crucial a quality,
comprehensive child develop-
ment program could be for the
physical, emotional and edu-
cational health of all chil-
dren-especially poor and at-
risk children. The millions of
children and families who
have been served by Head
Start since its beginnings owe
him a tremendous debt of
gratitude.
Dr. Richmond received a
medical degree from the
University of Illinois and
served as a flight surgeon in
the U.S. Army Air Corps dur-
ing World War II. After the
war, he returned to teach med-
icine at his alma mater. Long
committed to the well-being
of children, Dr. Richmond,
known to his friends as "Juli"
was 'active in child welfare
organizations from the begin-
ning of his career. In 1953 he
moved to the State University
of New York's Syracuse
College of Medicine as chair
of the department of pedi-


atrics. The Brown v. Board of
Education Supreme Court
decision one year later
inspired him and colleague Dr.
Betty Caldwell to begin study-
ing how poverty affected the
development of infants and
preschoolers. They discovered
that by the time children in
poor families were 18 months
old their intellectual and emo-
tional development, began to
slow down. Drs. Richmond
and Caldwell realized that
poor nutrition, the lack of
proper health care, and other
factors related to growing up
in poverty were already begin-
ning to affect these children's
ability to learn.
The doctors also realized
that exposing children to a
high-quality learning environ-
ment as early as possible
could make a difference in
minimizing and reversing
these losses. The vision began
to take shape as an innovative
early childhood program that
comprised quality education
teaching children letters and
colors but also providing
breakfasts and lunches, access
to health care, workshops for
parents, and all the needed
supports for poor families to
give their children the best
possible start. In 1964, Sargent
Shriver, the head of the then
new federal Office of
Economic Opportunity
(OEO) in Washington, asked


Dr. Kicnmona to join mm at
the agency and to go to
Mississippi to develop two
public health initiatives that
would directly aid local fami-
lies. The first, which Dr.
Richmond began in 1965, was
Project Head Start.
As the first and only Black
woman lawyer in Mississippi
at the time, I experienced what
Dr. Richmond described as the
harsh resistance he and his
colleagues encountered as
OEO began establishing cen-
ters serving primarily poor
Black children. White protes-
tors threatened workers, and
churches and other buildings
that housed the centers were
targeted. But that didn't stop
Dr. Richmond, the Child
Development Group of
Mississippi, or other local
partners in the venture from
doing what they needed to do.
Within its first six months,
Head Start went national and
was serving 500,000 children
at 2,700 sites in Mississippi
and around the country.
A second OEO project Dr.
Richmond coordinated was to
establish a group of
Neighborhood Health Centers
to carry out the mission of
making health care more
accessible to low-income fam-
ilies. He returned to New York
in 1967 after nearly three
years as assistant director for
health affairs at OEO, and in
1971 moved to Harvard
Medical School as a professor
in child psychiatry and human
development and preventive
and social medicine. At
Harvard he also directed the


Judge BaKer Center, a non-
profit Boston organization
focused on children's mental
health needs.
Dr. Richmond continued
promoting the health and
well-being of children and
families when he became
Surgeon General in 1977, and
was responsible for many
other innovative public health
programs including aggres-
sive anti-smoking campaigns
and a focus on disease preven-
tion. After serving as Surgeon
General, he returned to
Harvard and his research on
health policy and education.
In 2006, Harvard launched its
new university-wide Center
on the Developing Child with
a symposium in Dr.
Richmond's honor. The
Center now awards annual
Julius B. Richmond
Fellowships.
Throughout his long com-
mitted life, Julie Richmond
inspired fellow doctors, count-
less students, and so many
others who care about the
healthy development of
America's children and the
advancement of families.
Head Start is just one shining
jewel of his very long legacy. I
am so grateful for all Dr.
Julius Richmond did for chil-
dren and for his personal
inspiration and support of the
Children's Defense Fund.
For more information
about the Children's Defense
Fund, go to http://www.chil-
drensdefense.org/.


CHERYL COWARD DISTRIBUTION
DESIGN AND WEB SITE EDITOR JAMES GREEN
Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Lonzie
Leath, Laurence Green, F. M. Powell, Michael Phelts, Richard
McLaughlin, Clarissa Davis, Andrea Franklin, Delores Mainor
Woods
Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt,
Deanna
Distribution and Sales: Dan Randolph, Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele,
Cassie Williams, Angela Beans, Win Moses


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association
__ ",'1 ,


More brand new live local talk


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stations!


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WHJX FIVI 105.7 Jax-Baldwin

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Some of our local shows include Andy Johnson,

Brother Stan the Union Man, Joe Lyles who

refutes Rush Limbaugh, Famous Democrat

Ramon Day, Truck, Clara McLaughlin, Gorgeous

Troy, Crisack's Focus Jacksonville, Neal Mace,

Ed Brady, Progressive Roots, 1: the Indy Music

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Some of our national shows include

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Call in : (904) 694-1057


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Progressive Talk Radio 24 hours

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Some signs to look for:
No big smiles or other joyful expressions by 6 months.
No babbling by 12 months.
No words by 16 months.

To learn more of the signs of autism,
visit autismspeaks.org



AUTISM SPEAKS"
It's time to listen.

2007 Autism Speaks Inc. "Autism Speaks" and "It's Time To
Listen" & design are trademarks owned by Autism Speaks Inc.
All rights reserved.


THE STAR


' A1


PAGE



















Faith In Our Community
f Schedule of Events and Services


If there had been a death
in your family yesterday.
what would you be doing
today?


Pre-Need


, Fore-

Thought


S Funeral
manning

I, program


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED
Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354


DIRECTORS


Deborah West


Alphonso \Mest


Jacqueline 1. Bartley


Kings Rd., N., Palm Coast, FL. Music Ministry presents
"GLORY EXCELSIS" The reason for the season. The Church Directory
Sunday, December 21, at 10:45 a.m. The combined "Come and Worship With Us"
choirs of First A.M.E. Church will present music from COme and Worship With Us
their traditional repertoire, including Handels' Mesiah
and arrangements that are both contemporary and tradi- New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
tional. There will be a candlelight processional and the 1824 Prospect Street Jacksonvie, FL 32208
event will be a "fanfare" for the season. Please join us
to celebrate the reason for the season with a special Sunday School.....................................9:30 a.m.
message from our pastor, Rev. Gillard S. Glover, "The Sunday Morning Worship .......................11:00 a.m.
Christ of Christmas."For more information, call (386) Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays
446-575(OldSanctuary)....................................11:00a.m.
446-5759 .....i -o ry.. '. n-.-..-5.. ..------- : m


ARMITAGE, Gable died
December 9, 2008.
BRANNON, Mrs. Leona
died December 3, 2008.
BROWN, Willie L., 9-1,
died December 2, 2008.
CAMPBELL, Madie, 81,
died December 5, 2008.
CULLINS, Jimmy Lee
died December 7, 2008.


WESTON'S MORTUARY
"EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE AND PERSONAL CARE IS ABSOLUTE"


It is imperative thai t\e afford to all people a
Service complete in nature and perfecnon
honoring a life that can henceforth be a
PreciousA Memory


Funeral Services Starting at $1,~95 nf0
(EXCLUDING CEMETERY,
Babies up to I year, FREE (No Charge)
SERVING NORTHEAST FLORID A


(94 36995"g07.,M YRTLE AVI


EDWARDS, Elmont, 88,
died December 2, 2008.
EDWARDS, Jacqueline
died December 5, 2008.
FEACHER, Philip S., 91,
died December 8, 2008.
Alphonso West Mortuary,
Inc.
FRAZIER, Sarah Jane
died December 7, 2008.
GIBSON, Vera died
December 5, 2008.
HART, Lucious, 75, died
December 4, 2008.
HAYWOOD, Magalene,
died December 4, 2008.
HITE, Mildred Y., 76,
died December 3, 2008.
JONES, Marvin, died
December 4, 2008.
LACY, Artice, 85, died
December 2, 2008.
Alphonso West Mortuary,
Inc.
LeGREE, Rev. Harold,
died December 6, 2008.
MELTON, Alta B., 37,
died December 8, 2008.
MYERS, Michael D., died
December 3, 2008.
NIXON, Henry E., died
December 8, 2008.
PETTIS, Ashley, died
December 3, 2008.
RANDOLPH, Annie E.,
died December 5, 2008.
RAWLS, James died
December 7, 2008.
RIVERS, Jerome died
December 4, 2008.


2008 REVIVAL FIRE -The Pastor, Bishop and the
family of the Holy Tabernacle Church is inviting all to
this great revival, come experience The Fire that cannot
be quenched! Thursday Saturday, December llth -
13th at 7:30 p.m. each night. The speaker will be
Prophet John A. Williams from Fresh Start Temple,
Inc., E.C. Smith, Overseer. Whose fan is in his hand,
and he will thoroughly purge his floor, and gather his
wheat into the games; but, he will bum up the chaff with
unquenchable fire. Matthews 3:12. Place of service:
6416 Miriam St., Jacksonville, FL. For more informa-
tion, call (904) 764-3754. Let's come and fellow-ship
together.
HANDEL'S MESSIAH (CHRISTMAS PORTION) -
Sunday, December 21st at 5:00 p.m. Shiloh
Metropolitan Baptist Church, 1118 West Beaver St.,
Jacksonville, FL. Featuring The Community Mass
Choir, Michelle Grant, Soprano, Francesca Scott, Alto,
Marty Simmons, Tenor, Eland Wilson, Bass. Michael
Booker, Harpsichord, Henry Mack, Organ, Chamber
Orchestra, Roger D. Sears, Conductor.
GREATER NEW BIRTH MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH Christmas toy, food, and cloth giveaway.
To be held on Saturday, December 20th at the church,
195 Tallulah Ave. on the northside. Start time will be 12
noon til 3:00 p.m. The community is welcome. Rev.
Levi White, III, Pastor. -
GREATER MACEDONIA BAPTIST CHURCH -
located at 1880 West Edgewood Ave., Jacksonville, FL,
Christmas Musical will be Sunday, December 21st at
6:00 p.m.; their Christmas Day Worship will be
Thursday, December 25th at 10:00 a.m.; and their New
Year's Eve Worship will be Wednesday, December
31st at 10:00 p.m. All of these events are free and open
for everyone to attend.
THE GREATER EL-BETH-EL DIVINE HOLI-
NESS CHURCH located at 725 West Fourth St.,
Jacksonville, FL is cooking! Don't feel like baking the
Turkey!!! Let El-Beth-El Kitchen Deep-fry or smoke
your turkey for Christmas (BRING YOUR TURKEY or
HAM) we will HONEY BAKE YOUR HAM. We will
be taking orders December 15th thru 23rd, 2008 from
11:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Call 904- 359-0661 -
Donation $20.00.
THE FIRST A.M.E. CHURCH located at 91 Old


Ask Us About Our


Vera Cobb Gibson died on December 5th after a
lengthy illness. A lifelong native of Jacksonville, she was
the youngest of six children born to Randal and Agnes
Lloyd Cobb. In 1942 she became the wartime bride, and
devoted wife of Joseph Gibson until his death on
December 2, 2005. They were honored and blessed with
five wonderful children.
Mrs. Gibson was creative and talented. She will be
remembered for her homemaking skills that were evident
and ever present throughout their Magnolia Gardens
home. As a stay at home wife and mother, Gibson
endeared herself to family and neighbors providing baby
sitting services including early potty training to toddlers
in cloth diapers. Young mothers went to her for the pierc-
ing of their baby girls ears, Gibson did this with a sewing
needle and thread, the common way, prior to the 1960s
era. She mastered the skill of crocheting and needle
works. An outstanding cook, Vera Gibson's savory meals
(breakfast, lunch and dinner) and delicious baked goods
were constantly shared with extended family, friends and
neighbors. Back in the day she could be counted on for
having roasted and boilded peanuts and fresh baked cake
and churned ice cream on Sundays. Over her lifetime she
enjoyed the many opportunities of traveling throughout
the United States and abroad.
For more than 60 years she and her late husband,
Joseph Gibson, Sr. were faithful officers and members of
St. Matthews AME Church, Rev. Marcius King, Pastor.
Mourning her loss are her devoted children: Joseph
(Audrey) Gibson, Jr., and Raymond (Celest) Gibson, of
Philadelphia; and Theodore Gibson, Agness Gibson and
Wendy (Leon) Cambell of Jacksonville. She leaves also
two sisters, Eva Cobb Lamar and Pearlie Cobb
Scarborough as well as numerous grand and great grand
children, sisters and brothers-in-law, nephews, nieces,
cousins and friends.


ON


r i
( i

**-**.. '^i er'fsf^va- ssisss


. .. *. . .


Tune In To

IMPACT










Clara McLaughlin Yvonne Brooks
Host Co-Host

Tuesday and Thursday

from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.


WCGL-AM 1360

The Florida Star and Impact
Striving To Make A Difference!


OFFICE (904) 766-8834
FAX (904) 765-1673


E-MAIL:
info@TheFloridaStar.com


leiCay Frayer meeting .............. ........ / :.u p.m. iS w oll
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 8:00 p.m.
Rev. Eric Lee, Pastor
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus iL
(904) 764-5727 Church

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
W orship Service................................................................. 10:00 a.m .
Church School...................................................................... 8:45 a.m .
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study............................. ................. :30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday....................10:00 a.m.-12:00 Nooh
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry........................................................ 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School........................ ......................................................... 9:30 a.m .
M morning W orship ....................... ................................................. 11:00 a.m .
Tuesday ......... ............................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday .............................................................................. Joy N ight,7:00 p.m .
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School -------------------------------.----------10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ------------------------12:00 .Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study --------------------Tuesday & Friday------ 7:00 p.m.
(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520
IFO D Gis --312w. .A -. T
THE FLORIDA / GEORGIA STAR


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"There s Always Something Happening On The First Coast"
Daytona Beach Chapter, Links, Incorporated
Celebrates Golden Anniversary

We were delighted to be the guests of Daytona
Beach Chapter, Links, Incorporated member Mrs.
Myrtis Mason and her hubby former St. Johns County -
School Superintendent Otis Mason for the 50th -
Anniversary Celebration held recently at the Daytona
Beach Resort and Conference Center. Our being their
guests provided an opportunity to fellowship with not
only the Masons but also Orlando Chapter, Links mem-
ber Mrs. Deidre Mason Billingslea and her hubby Daytona Links president, Mrs. Ann Taylor Green with her hus-
Bethune- Cookman University (BCU) Board Member bandArthur Green.
Robert Billingslea along with Daytona Beach Chapter,
Links members.
We were especially thrilled to see Dr. Rebecca
Walker Steele and her hubby John Steele. Presently
Dr. Steele is choral director at Bethune-Cookman
University. Noted in a press release from Bethune- Daytona Links member Mrs. Myrtis Mason(seated) with her
daughter Orlando Links member Mrs. Deidre Mason Billinglea
Cookman University "As a professor that stands out as and Jacksonville Links member Betty Asque Davis.
an institution unto herself -- Dr. Rebecca Steele. Dr.
Steele's petite size and gentle manner belies the many
roles she plays on campus. She began her B-CU career
29 years ago. Her titles alone seem a bit overwhelming
-- Coordinator of Cultural Affairs for the School of Arts
and Humanities, conductor of the B-CU Concert
Chorale and a professor of music. She takes personal
interest in every student'under her watchful eye and The Otins Masons, The J. Carl Davises and The Robert
nurtures each of them to understand the importance of
giving back:.......Because Steele's work and dedication
has significantly increased the number of unfunded
scholarships for Concert Chorale students and athletes,
Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed, President of B-CU, recently
established the Dr. Rebecca Walker Steele Endowed
Scholarship Fund." I can personally attest to Dr. -.
Steele's dedication and devotion to her choir members. The John Steeles (Day na Links member Dr. Rebecca Walker Steele)
As a member of the Florida A. & M. University
Concert Choir directed by Dr. Rebecca Walker Steele
while a student at FAMU, I have such fond memories
of the positive impact Dr. Steele had on y life and lives
of many, many others. She is one in a million and I amJ
eternally grateful to her.
The Ballroom at the Center was a 'sea' of white
with emerald green accents. The video presentation of
the chapter's past fifty years and the Showtime at the
Gala emceed by Singer/Actor Harry Burney was
absolutely fabulous! Congratulations to all of the mem-
bers of the Daytona Beach Chapter,. Links,
Incorporated!
Daytona Links president Mrs. Ann Taylor Green is
serenaded by Singer/Actor Harry Burney.




I,.






Daytona Links Charter Members after being presented
white roses during 50th Anniversary Celebration.
Dayton Chapter, Links, Inc. at their 50th anniversary Celebration.

Another
l1
Beac Pre-Election Event
SResidents ofAmerican Beach as they prepared fori the big election breakfasted together to discuss election strategies. The event was hosted by Urban Planner/Real Estate
Magnate Carlton Jones. Congresswoman Corrine Brown, State Representative Audrey Gibson and Dr. Johnetta Betsch Cole were among the luminaries at the event.





Af 9
___________________________________________ ________________________.__;








:S


American B
Jones with
Phelts.


,rgan State Representative Audrey Gibson with
hael Congresswoman Corrine Brown in back- Dr. Johnetta Betsch Cole, Congresswoman Corrine Brown and Carlton Jones.
ground. Photo courtesy of Michael Phelts. Photo courtesy of Michael Phelts.


Don't tit .7r9 9 F id .nomo


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lij /,UU AT S R-


Dorothy Hughes: Tireless Beaver Street Welcomes

Activist and Campaigner Peters & Yaffee


Dorothy Hughes was
invited to Jacksonville to
help advance activist
efforts in the Northside
community. She has not
missed a beat. She
opened a bookstore in the
Gateway Mall to help
revitalize the community
and invite young people
to express personal own-
ership in their future as
they gain knowledge
through reading. She
launched a community
advocacy effort on multi-
ple fronts. She worked to
help Barack Obama win
the election, initiated
immediate community
empowerment programs
and set the stage for
future work now poised
and ready to hit the
ground running on day 1
of the Obama presidency.
Her election efforts
'included:

Canvassing door to
door
Production of The
Democratic Rappers who
spent months organizing
college students in
Jacksonville and
Tallahassee, Florida,
South Carolina and
Georgia. Ms. .Hughes
traveled with the
Democratic Rappers. as
leader of the organizing
team with her co-produc-
ers Ruby Harris and
Malcolm Hughes.
Hosted several house
parties for the Obama
campaign
Organized the Women
for Obama group and
held every Tuesday night
meetings in the Gateway
Bookstore in the
Gateway Mall area. This
group was eventually
reorganized into the
Women for Change under
the leadership of Ruth
Cox from the Obama
National Campaign
office.
Served on the
Executive Committee for
Women for Change. Her
work with Women for
Change took her to the
Michelle Obama Rally a
few days before the elec-
tion. Ms. Hughes arrived
three hours before the
event to organize and ful-
fill her volunteer duties.
When the volunteer work
was complete, Ms.
Hughes secured a posi-
tion up close where she


Dorothy Hughes .working with youth (above) and
preparing for the arrival of Mrs. Michelle Obama.


would be able to shake
hands with Michelle. In
essence, the opportunity
to shake Michelle's hand
represented a lifetime ful-
fillment at the end of her
30 years of activism on
behalf of minorities,
women and the poor. It
may have been the
excitement of the event,
the huge crowd heating
up the room, or the need
to stand for hours as a
volunteer, but for the first
time in Dorothy's career
as an activist, she fainted.
Friends, her sister and a
doctor friend moved Ms.
Hughes through the
crowd to lie down. She
missed her opportunity to
shake Michelle Obama's
hand, but there was a
"consolation prize". Her
helpers called for water.
None was at hand. The
only water available was
in the hands of Michelle
Obama who at that
moment was delivering a
moving speech and a call
for change. Michelle
heard the call for water,
looked in the direction of
Ms. Hughes and tossed
her bottle of water to a
security person. The
water was delivered to
Ms. Hughes who recov-
ered well. She later said,
"I'd love to have the
opportunity to thank
Michelle Obama for giv-
ing me her bottle of
water." She didn't meet


Michelle that day, but she
certainly connected as a
kindred spirit, as women
who recognize when
someone is in need and
works to make the world
a better place for those
others.
Dorothy Hughes's
immediate and ongoing
community empower-
ment programs include:
Administration of the
Hire-up Employment
Learning Program
(HELP) whereby partici-
pating businesses hire
youth using a donated
stipend with the goal of
cultivating basic career
skills, building experi-
ence and positioning the
youth for subsequent per-
manent employment.
Hosting of weekly
youth tutoring programs
on-site at the Gateway?
Bookstore
Hosting of weekly
youth economic empow-
erment programs at the
Gateway Bookstore
Partnering with a local
publisher to ,create litera-
cy materials
Partnering with the
Duval County Public
School system to help
ignite the passion for
reading.
Her future plan is
expand all of these pro-
grams.


In ancient times, wise
and experienced travelers
utilized art and science to
put the right information
in the right place on the
right path so that those
who followed would
have an easier journey.
These wise travelers were
called wayfinders. Today,
Civil Engineers like Dow
Peters and Russell Yaffee
are the ultimate wayfmind-
ers and with the recent
launch of Peters &
Yaffee, their
Transportation and
Traffic Engineering
Services and Consulting
Firm, they are now offer-
ing 27 years of engineer-
ing expertise to help trav-
elers of Northeast Florida
navigate more safely,
efficiently and conve-
niently from place to
place.
Formerly with Jacobs,
one of the world's largest
engineering firms, Peters
and Yaffee have provided
engineering design serv-
ices for several of the
largest local roadway
projects in recent years.
Displaying that entrepre-
neurial spirit of legendary
wayfinders in centuries
past, the partners have
located at Beaver Street
Enterprise Center with
the goal of building a
new firm that' provides
high level professional-
ism, excellent value and
100% customer satisfac-
tion.
Founding partner Dow
Peters, P.E., a Roadway
Engineer with over 10
years of experience in all
aspects of roadway
design, roadway
improvement and recon-


Dow Peters and Russell Yaffee


struction projects, from
pavement design to ero-
sion control, is a
Jacksonville native with a
B.S. in Civil Engineering
from the University of
Florida. Mr. Peters has
extensive experience
with construction cost
estimating, project sched-
uling and cost benefit
analysis.
Russell Yaffee, P.E.,
PTOE, is a Traffic
Engineer with 17 years of
experience in traffic
impact studies, pavement
marking design, parking
lot layout and design; and
extensive expertise in
traffic signal design
including proposals,
development of
plans/specifications,
intersection design and
geometric design, intelli-
gent transportation sys-
tems, and project and
construction manage-
ment. Mr. Yaffee is a
member of the National
Committee on Uniform
Traffic Control Devices
(NCUTCD, a registered


Professional Engineer in
six states, and a 1991
Tulane University gradu-
ate with a B.S. in Civil
Engineering.
As a DBE
(Disadvantaged Business
Enterprise) consultant
with offices at Beaver
Street Enterprise Center,
Peters & Yaffee will have
access to prime and sub-
consultant opportunities
on city, state and federal-
ly funded projects seek-
ing minority business
participation. Both family
men with young children,
the entrepreneurial engi-
neers are excited about
the advantages inherent
in launching their new
firm at Florida's only
core-city business incu-
bator. "We've heard that
85% of start-up business-
es in incubators achieve
success," said Peters.
'When we decided to set
our own destiny in this
community, all roads led
us straight to Beaver
Street."


T mo st co stly education
^^^^^^kIs h ne not begunH


$80 Billion. That's how much money Federal Student Aid awards each year in grants,
low-interest loans and work-study to students in colleges, trade schools and professional schools.
You and your family may be eligible. So go online and learn how Federal StudentAid, part of the U.S.
Department of Education, can help you begin to realize your dream of an education after high school


www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov | 1-800-4-FED-AID


START HERE g.
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Advertising Deadline:
TUESDAYS @ 5 p.m.



To place an ad:

CALL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
EMAIL: ad@thefloridastar.com


PAGEA-5


THE STAR


DECEMBER 132008











PA GF 4-6 THE STAR DECEMBER 13, 2008


Savage, Placing South Auckland


On The Rap Map'











-Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content
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Available from Commercial News Providers
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JA oRT
JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY
Post Office Box 3005
2831 Talleyrand Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32206-0005

INVITATION FOR BIDS

BIMT CRANE RAIL DAMAGE REPAIR DAMAGED DOCK
Blount Island Marine Terminal
JAXPORT Project No. 035.6500
JAXPORT Contract No. C-1280A

December 1, 2008
Sealed bids will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority until 2:00 PM, local time,
January 15.2009 at which time they shall be opened in the Public Meeting Room of the Port
Central Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida, for BIMT Crane Rail
Damaae Repair Damaaed Dock.
All bids must be submitted in accordance with specifications and drawings for Contract No.
C-1280A, which may be examined in, or obtained from the Procurement Department of the
Jacksonville Port Authority, located on the second floor of the Port Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206. (Please telephone 904/357-3018 for
Information.)
A MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE AND SITE VISIT WILL BE HELD ON
DECEMBER 11, 2008, AT 10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC MEETING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR
OF THE PORT CENTRAL OFFICE BUILDING LOCATED AT ADDRESS STATED ABOVE.
ATTENDANCE BY A REPRESENTATIVE OF EACH PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS
REQUIRED. A BID WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT
REPRESENTED AT SUCH CONFERENCE.
Bid and contract bonding are required.
The mandatory JSEB / MBE Participation Goal established for this project Is 0%.



Louis Naranjo
Manager of Procurement and Inventory
Jacksonville Port Authority


I


I


DECEMBER 13, 2008


THE STAR


SPAGEA-6


. A









DECEMBER 13, 2008 THE STAR PAGE A-7


NAACP Continued from A-1
large number of citizens shooting each other, it is imperative that the citizens, the
police force, the state attorney, the school board and the leadership organizations get
together so that they can change the present criminal climate.
The meeting was attended by State Attorney Angela Corley, City Councilman Clay
Yarborough. Pastor Samson, President of the Florida Baptist Conference, Eddie
Staton, National President of MAD DADS, and Superintendent Ed Pratt. All felt
that the meeting was a step forward.
Mr. Staton said that he could not understand \ ivh, the Sheriff's office was opposed
to a citizen's review board. He felt that such a board would provide the bridge need-
ed for the community and public officials to learn to trust each other and encourage
the citizens to do the same.
The NAACP 3aid that they ill ill ask the Justice Department to investigate the
police shootings and will ask the U. S. Attorney and the State Attorney to exercise
their authority and oversee police shootings and police conduct.
It has also been suggested that th-i ,C4ir of Jacks6nville form a Citizen Police
Academy such as the one in Jacksonville Beach where they can receive answers and
the knowledge to help. ,
There have been reports from the community about actions taken by members of
JSO that were not in keeping with the understanding of how officers should act.
Many citizens, when questioned, said the\ are concerned with police shootings but
they are equally concern with the minds of the \oini? and the gun stores. A recent
report said that the bulk of illegal guns that .,. .p11ed across state lines for use in
crimes are done so through ten state-.' Thc, states are Georgia, Florida, Texas,
Virginia. California. Ohio. North C.n.a.iiiu. Indiana. Pennsylvania and Alabama.


The Jacksonville Jajuars announced a freeze on ticket
prices for the 2009 season. The Jags said this decision
based upon the suffering economy.


Call and talk.
(904) 694-1057
FM-105.7, 105.5, 92.5
www.radiofreejax.com
(904) 766-9285
WCGL-AM 1360
www.WCGL1360.com


Florida
Lottery Kicks
Off Statewide
Powerball
Tour,
The Powerball
Education tour will be in
Jacksonville on
December 17 from 4 to 9
p.m. at St. John's Center,
In the Park.

Chris Brown
Named Artist
of the Year by
Billboard


is


At 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
Tune in to FM 105.7-WHJX
FM 92.5-WFJO
FM 105.5-WSJX
8:30 p.m., WCGL-AM 1360
with
Clara McLaughlin and
IMPACT
Call and talk: FM 105.7 FM 105.5 FM 92.5 -
(904) 694-1057
Tuesday, from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m.
Call and talk: AM-1360 (904) 766-9285
Tuesday, from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
"The Florida Star, The Georgia Star and Impact -
Striving to Make a Difference."
www.radiofreejax.comr
www.WCGL1360.com
"The People's Choice"


SUBSCRIBE NOW
The Florida Star
The Georgia Star

Call Liz at

(904) 766-8834


She will set you up.
Knowledge is Power but only if you use it! Read The Florida/Georgia Star.
www.thefloridastar.com
www.thegeorgia star.com

info@thefloridastar.com














M tf0iaS h
WekayF '157,W J


Chris Brown has been
named Billboard's top
artist for 2008. Brown
said he was totally sur-
prised. The 18-year-old
said that he is not used to
all the accolades. "I've
had a good year but I still
feel like a little insecure
in those parts. I'm like
"There's little of me get-
ting an award that's
incredible," he said.
The other four artist of
the top five are Lil
Wayne, Rihanna, Alecia
Keys and Taylor Swift.


Auto Continued from A-1
The fall of the auto industry would be a disaster for
the United States. Majority Leader Harry Reid said
he hopes that President Bush will tap the $700 billion
Wall Street bailout fund as an emergency aid to the
auto industry. The president has already said that in
this weak economy, the country cannot afford for the
automakers to collapse. There is much at stake.
Congressman Continued from A-1
help of media, businessmen with ties to Congressman
Jackson and Gov. Blagojevich did discussed raising
$1 million for the governor to persuade him to support
Jackson to fill the vacant U. S. Senate seat. However,
the Congressman said he is not aware of any of this
and no one has discussed such a matter with him. He
did, however, voice to the businessman, Raghuveer
Nayak, that he is interested in filling that position.
The matter of money to help him reach that goal, was
never brought up.
President-elect Obama said that neither he or staff
are aware of anything regarding these issues.


Cases starting soop tsgisr now
904-744-4491
www.d2,dstumio.com


LI.TIHI IE P" 05DI U lllr"
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TO YOU


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Cash, Check, Money Order, Credit Card or PayPal Accepted


is


DECEMBER 13, 2008


THE STAR


PAGE A-7








PAGE IA-O


DECEMBER 6, 2008


159b
Publix
Semi-Boneless
Portion Ham
Or Whole, Fully-Cooked
SAVE UP TO 1.20 LB


-PU B L IX


Fresh Salmon
F illets......................................... 6 9 9 lb
Never Frozen, Farm-Raised
SAVE P TO 1.00 LB


oo,* -~


Publix
Homestyle Red 69
Potato Salad ...........................
For Fast Service, Grab & Go!, 16-oz cont.
SAVE UP TO .30


Apple A29
P ie ..................................................... -
All American Pie, Choice of Flaky
Double Crust or Dutch Apple
With Streusel Topping, From the
Publix Bakery, 28 or 34-oz size
SAVE UP TO 1.00


Premium
or Plum
Tomatoes.............................. 99b
High in Vitamin C, Large Size
SAVE UP TO 1.50 LB


Duncan Hines Moist Deluxe Cake Mix .................... F ree
Assorted Varieties, 17.52 to 18.5-oz box
(Excluding Angel Food and Decadent Carrot Cake.) Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO1.99


Ruffles Potato Chips.................................................................F ree
Assorted Varieties, 9 to 10-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!, Light, and Natural.) Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.99


Juicy Juice
All Natural
100% Juice....
Assorted Varieties,
8-pk. 6.75-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 299


.... Free


General Mills I r
Cereal ........................ ree
Fiber One, Oatmeal Crisp, Total,
Basic 4, Wheaties, Honey Nut Cfusters,
or Raisin Nut Bran, 14.25 to 18.25-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.29


Kellogg's
Waffles ...................... Free
Assorted Varieties,
9.9 to 12.6-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


Lipton
Tea Bags................ F ree
100-ct. box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.91


Prices effective Thursday, December 11 through Wednesday, December 17, 2008.
Only in Orange, Seminole, Brevard, Columbia, Marion, Duval, Clay, Nassau, Putnam, Flagler,
Volusia, St. Johns and Alachua Counties in Fla. Quantity rights reserved.


THE STAR


DAd- "i A- 0


. VISAS E










DECEMBER 13. 2008 THE STAR PAGE B-1



|- The FL/GAStar


LOCAL


SECTION B


cons and more.
Following the cele-
bration was a former din-
ner where everyone sat
and ate and enjoyed
entertainment. Part of the
entertainment was with
the Macalah Dance
Group who performed an
exciting praise dance.
This was an exciting
night for Rev. Gundy and
his church. They look
forward to many more
exciting and rewarding
years.


MSMBC Pastor H. T Rhim Pastor of St Joseph and son of
Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church and his wife Sister
Rhim, Sister Wallette Gundy and Pastor R. L. Gundy of Mount
Sinai Misionary Baptist Church.


MSMBC Deacon Joe Bailey, Bro Jessie I
flCULefl AF R - Ll., 1l a d Potnr Rf TL.


uDeacon Alvin fuclman, uanu FaSfor jL.I
District 8 Member of the Year with Jessie
standing in for wife Rosa Wilcox, the winner.

, 11 0 :10
R iANI)


MSMBC Deacon Joe Bailey, Sister Evelyn MSMBC Sister Virginia Crimes, Deacon
Kimbrough, Deacon Alvin Buckman Distrct 8 Corneilous Shields and Pastor R. L. Gundy -
Member of the Year. District 7 Member of the Year.

g OA R!bilY p 1


Wilcox, MSMBC Dea James Gordon, Miss. Kimberlee Young,
Gundy Dea. Leroy Burroughs representing District Leader -
Wilcox District 4 member of the Year for our Youth Ministry.


MSMBC Dea. James Gordon, Sis. Velinda Sturgis, Dea. Timothy
MSMBC Deacon James Gordon, Sister Willie Mae McCray, Jones District 5 Leader and Sis. Mary Kimbrough. The'ladies are
Deacon Leonard Wilcox and Deaconess Catherine Wilcox, The co-winers of the District Members of the Yearfor District 5.
ladies are co-winners of the District Members of the Year award
for District 6. .. I R1 .mi.... A


ISMBC Deacon James Gordon, Deacon Ernest Johnson Dist 10
Ldr, Sister Ceola West Dist Member of the Year, Deacon Dewitt
Cooper Dist Ldr 10 and Pastor R. L. Gundy.


MSMBC Dea James Gordon, Sis Virginia Daise
Winner for District 3 Member of the Year, Deacon
Leroy Buroughs District Leader and Pastor R. L.
Gundy.


Gretta McBride, Destinee McBride, Koria Boggs, Jonelle
McDougl, Chelsea Wright, Gladys McDougl, Briana
Robinson, Macalah Dance Group.


MSMBC 5 District of the Year District 3; Left to Right; Bro
Ralph Greene, Patricia Greene, Sister Elois Burroughs,
Sister Ethel Gainer, Dea. Leroy Burroughs District Leader,
Sister Alice Melton, Sister M. Mullins and Sister Virginia.


MSMBC Willing Workers Ministry of the Year
Pastoral Care Ministry Left to Right Miniister Lisa
Lipsey, Sister Helen Mathis, Leola Meyers, Ethel Woods, Linda malpress, Juanita Priester, Henry Vermell White, Cheryl Lance, Raymond Rosetta Ortiz, Henry L Sellers, Carolyn James,
Gainer-One of three mothers of the church, Sister Cue, Charlotte Cue, Patricia Greene, Annie Mae Lance, Rosa Brown. Pastor R. L. Gundy Henrieta A Wolfe, Frank M
Ceola West, and Sister Alice Melton. Cooper, Dewitt Cooper, Esther Bryant. Powell, and Leola Myers.












PAEB- U STR-ECMER13 20


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Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.



SOUTHEASTERN AZUSA REVIVAL CONFERENCE "Reignite the Fire"
-A wonderful and glorious time in the present of the Lord as the Sprit of the Living
God is being continually poured out upon his people. AZUSA Revival now over
fifty days here in Jacksonville, FL. The United Church In Christ located at 2050
Emerson St., Jacksonville, FL, and our presiding Bishop W. A. Andrews are excit-
ed and honored to be the host church for the 2008 Southeastern AZUSA Revival
Conference and invite you to come and witness and experience a great outpouring
of God's anointing Friday, December 19th at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call
Lady Faustina Andrews at (904) 284-0206.
MILLIONS MORE MOVEMENT, Jacksonville Local Organizing Committee
Inc., a non-profit organization is now in the process of collecting, gathering
clothes, shoes for our next 'Clothes Give-A-Way. If you have any clothes, female,
male, children, toys, furniture, or other items, please donate* them. Bring them to
916 N.Myrtle Avenue., from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Friday.
Jacksonville Local Organizing Committee Inc., will also come pick up your your
donation or gifts. Give them to Jacksonville Local Organizing Committee Inc., we
will make them a part of our next scheduled Clothes Give-A-Way. Help us as 'we
work to end the violence in our communities through education,not more incarcer-
ation'. Visit our website: www.jaxloc.com for more information, or contact us at
904-240-9133.
CITY OF JACKSONVILLE NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING TO DIS-
CUSS PROGRAMMING AND MANAGEMENT of the following community
centers: (Note: All at 6:00 p.m.) Sunny Acres Community Center, 2850 Wompi
Dr., Jax, FL 32225, Thursday, December 11th; Fort Caroline Community Center,
4131 Ferber Rd., Jax, FL 32277, Monday, December 15th; Joe James Community
Center, 1631 Hurst St., Jax, FL 32209, Tuesday, December 16th; Lillian Saunders
Community Center, 2750 Bartley Circ., Jax, FL 32207, Tuesday, December 16th;
Beachwood Community Center, 11758 Marina Dr., Jax., FL 32216, Thursday,
December 18th; and Westbrook Community Center, 905 Westbrook St., Jax, FL
32209, Thursday, December 18th.Recreation and Community Services (JaxParks)
will conduct public meetings at the dates and times noted below to discuss the
potential opening and programming of these closed centers.
CHRISTMAS FOR KIDS TOUR BUS SHOW 2008 -The exciting Christmas for
Kids annual event will be held on Monday, December 15th from 5:00 PM to 9:00
PM at the Wal-Mart in Hendersonville. For a small donation, fans will be able to
tour about 50 buses, sent from all over the country by their favorite country music
artists and other celebrities. Each year, various artists have come out to the event
to sign autographs and meet the fans. This year over 30 artists are participating
including The Grascals, Buddy Jewell, Bo Bice, Darryl Worley, The Roys, Chris
Young, Jason Meadows, Jeff Bates, Larry Bagby and TG Sheppard, and more. The
Christmas For Kids Organization has been in existence for over twenty years pro-
viding special children the opportunity to celebrate the holiday season. Each year,
the organization brings the spirit of Christmas to hundreds of children throughout
Middle Tennessee allowing them to participate in festive activities organized
specifically for them. Events such as the Bus Tour raise money and allow folks to
visit the home-away-from-homes of more than fifty stars and celebrities. All of the
proceeds from the. Bus Tour and the benefit concert, which was sold out this past
November at The Ryman Auditorium, is used to escort 400 children from 25 dif-
ferent schools for a day-long excursion. The day consists of a chauffeured trip from
their school aboard a luxury tour bus to a local Wal-Mart where they are accompa-
nied by a volunteer to participate in their own Christmas shopping spree. On the
return trip home, the children will participate in a Christmas carol sing-along.
BORN TO DIE...A CHRISTMAS CUNTATA by Glenn Burleigh performed
by The FCCJ Downtown Campus. Sunday, December 14, 2008 at 4:00 p.m. at the
New Fountain Chapel AME Church, located at 737 Jesse St., Jacksonville, FL.
Open to the public. Call (904) 358-2258
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DECEMBER 13, 2008


THE STAR


PAGE B-2


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TI-U? .VTARPAGE B-3


From Actual Police Reports
Did You Hear About?...






S VIOLATION OF INJUNCTION AND
REPEATED VIOLENCE -An officer \\as dis-
Sr patched to the 6000 block of Kinnon Dri\e
regarding the suspect violatingg an injunction for
protection. When the officer arriw ed. the suspect
awas in the front yard. When asked \\ho called
the police, he stated. "Yeah I called, I need to go
*to jail. I'm violating an injunction." The % ictimn
approached the officer with her three children
and advised him that she and the suspect were
married but separated, pending ad diorce. She
confirmed the injunction and stated that suhen
she arrived home, she obser ed the suspect's
truck and sa%% through the rear diindodn that her
house was in disarray. The suspect said. "I'm an
idiot. I did something stupid. I just Landalized
my own house." The officer went into the house
and discovered extreme damage to the interior of the house and the front burglar bar.
The suspect had smashed the large fish tank and water was running all over the floor,
leaving the fish exposed; he had smashed the microwave, the big screen TV, bed,
headboard, master bedroom and had left the water running in an attempt to flood the
house. The damage made the house uninhabitable. The officer turned off the water
to prevent further damage, had the victim to fill out paper work and arrested the sus-
pect. UNLAWFUL USE OF ID -The officer
observed two women engaging in a dispute in
the 2000 block of Yulee Street. He separated
the women and questioned why they were
having this dispute. One of the women pre-
sented a driver's license that did not match ,
her face. When questioned about the differ- /
ence in look; the suspect stated that she was ,:
the person on the license. The officer ran a .
check and found that the suspect matched
another female that had three outstanding .
warrants. The face of the person with the
warrants also matched the suspect that was
talking with the officer. The suspect was then fingerprinted and it was discovered
that her fingerprints matched the fingerprints of the person with the outstanding war-
rants also. ID & records confirmed that the suspect was in fact the person with the
warrant, not the person she clairfied-to be. Had the suspect successfully.used the vic-
tim's ID, the victim would have been listed erroneously as the second suspect in the
dispute originally observed which would have resulted in an adverse affect of the
real owner. The suspect was read her rights and arrested.


ARIES
(Mar. 21- April 20)
You should put your
efforts into creative projects.
Be careful not to reveal private
information. Direct your ener-
gy wisely. Changes in your
home may be alarming at
first.Your lucky day this week
will be Monday,
TAURUS
(Apr.21- may 21)
Don't be afraid to con-
front situations concerning
loved ones in order to solve any
problems that may exist. You
will have opportunities to
advance, but you may have to
be willing to make some
changes and possibly a residen-
tial move. Think twice before
you volunteer information.
Your lover may be annoyed if
you have been flirtatious or not
attentive to their needs.Your
lucky day this week will be
Tuesday.
GEMINI
(May 22-June 21)
Your ability to communi-
cate with ease will win the
hearts of those you are in touch
with this week. Get out and
have some fun. Take a break;
you can finally mend any dis-
putes on the home front. Your
diplomatic approach and rather
outgoing nature will enhance
your reputation and bring you
the support you need.Your
lucky day this week will be
Wednesday.
CANCER
(June 22-July 22)
You will be able to make
changes regarding your living
arrangements. Don't offer to
pay for others. Take your time.
You will be confused about the
intentions of someone you
work with.Your lucky day this


week will be Monday..
LEO
(July 23-Aug 22)
Make money using your
ingenuity and creative talent.
Your charm will attract some-
one special. There might be one
who is quite willing to take the
credit for your work. Your
lover may be annoyed if you
have been flirtatious or not
attentive to their needs. Your
lucky day this week will be
Tuesday.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 -Sept. 23)
You can make new
friends and experience new
things if you do a bit of travel-
ing. You can win points with
children if you take the time to
show interest in their accom-
plishments. Don't let your part-
ner get away with spending too
much of your money. It might
be time for you to take a quan-
tum leap from one career to
another. Your lucky day this
week will be Saturday.
LIBRA
(Sept. 24 -Oct. 23)
Don't overindulge in any-
way. You can discuss your find-
ings behind closed doors with
your boss. If you haven't
already, don't be afraid to start
your own small business on the
side. Older relatives may make
unreasonable demands. Your
lucky day this week will be
Sunday.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 24 Nov. 22)
Focus your efforts on
your work. You can accomplish
a great deal. Your lover may
disappoint you in such a way
that estrangement will follow.
Focus on forming business
partnerships. Your lucky day


Your Weekly

HOROSCOPE
December 6, 2008 December 13, 2008


Stage Aurora PESDas


BlackzNativity

A gospel song-play by Langston Hughes


December 5-7 & 12-14, 2008
Fri. 8:00 p.m., Sat. 2:00 p.m. & 8:00 p.m., Sun. 3:00 p.m.

Executive Director Darryl Reuben Hall
Directed by Noble Lee Lester
Choreographed by La'Farrah Davis


Langston Hughes's Black Nativity ushers the audience into the Black Church,
where sanctuary is offered and one discovers the wonderful talents of the cast
as actors, choir members, dancers and musical performers during this roof-raising
Holiday Celebration about the birth of Christ.
"Lifts the soul and gets the feet tapping"
The Austin Chronicle


Adults $15 advance/$18 at door
Seniors/Youth S10 advance/$13 at door
for tickets call 765-7372 or 765-7373
Or visit:
Gospel World, 300 Dunn Ave. 764-7679
Family Christian Stores, 9310 Arlington Expressway 723-3662




STAGE AURORA
THEATRICAL COMPANY, INC.
"Theatre That Enlightens
5164-A Norwood Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32208
www.stageaurora.org

0" v


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Nv-


this week will be Monday.

SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 23 -Dec. 21)
Passion is about the best
way for you to relieve tension.
Don't allow colleagues to put
unreasonable pressure on you.
You could be drawn to events
that concern children. Do not
be surprised if your partner
doesn't understand your needs.
Your lucky day this week will
be Sunday.
CAPRICORN
(Dec 22.- Jan. 20)
You may be sensitive
concerning friends and their
situations. Problems with your
partner are apparent.
Misunderstandings could cause
confusion and upset. You will
reap the benefits if you put
money into upgrading your res-
idence. Your lucky day this
week will be Thursday.

AQUARIUS
(Jan. 21 -Feb. 19)
Your ability to stand out
in a crowd will bring you the
recognition you desire. Your
high energy and discipline will
enable you to complete any
seemingly insurmountable
tasks. Try not to overspend on
friends or family. Children or
friends may try to talk you into
lending them money. Your
lucky day this week will be
Saturday.
PISCES
(Feb. 20-Mar. 20)
You can bet that you'll
draw attention to yourself. Get
back to the comforts of cottage
or'home. Try to bend but by no
means should you give in com-
pletely. You may want to look
into warm vacation spots. Your
lucky day this week will be
Saturday.


PAGE B-3


THE STAR


DECEMBER 132008











D AAA ESDE-R...0


. SPORTS *


FAMU/BC-U BASKETBALL

Rattlers fall to Wildcats in Tallahassee


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By Michael Bonts,
Sports Writer

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Bethune-Cookman led 35-14 at halftime and went on
to record its third straight win with a victory over Florida A&M, the first win since
2004 at FAMU.
"I'm elated with the win," said B-CU Head Coach Clifford Reed Jr. "The first
half our 2-2-1 was effective and everybody was contributing and it was the best half
of basketball we have played to this point. This was a huge win for us to open the
conference 1-0 and win on the road at a tough place to play. It will be great for us
and for the players entering finals this week."
Freshman guard C. J. Reed led all scorers in the game with 16 points and sophomore
co-captain Alexander Starling totaled a game-high 10 rebounds and eight points for
the Wildcats.
"When you miss a wide-open layup we're starting the game out wrong," said
FAMU coach Eugene Harris said, after dropping his second straight season-opener
in a lopsided loss to B-CU. "Take nothing from Bethune-Cookman; they came in
here and just outplayed us."
Yannick Crowder and Brandon Bryant each scored 11 points for the Rattlers, who
connected on 18 of 46 field goal attempts.
Wildcats' seniors John Holmes (9 points, 6 rebounds) and Tobias Mahone (made 3-
three-pointers in the first half, 9 points) came off the bench to bolster the starting
five (Reed, Starling, Stanley Elliott, Kene Anusionwu, Jerry Jones) as B-CU limit-
ed the Rattlers to 24 percent shooting in the first 20 minutes and mounted the huge
lead at halftime.
"We made a couple adjustments (in our 2-2-1 press) and were better in adjusting
and defending than they were in solving the adjustments and we had guys come in
and pick us up... (Kene) Anusionwu in blocking shots, we had timely shooting and
Tobias Mahone hitting three big threes I was definitely pleased with the first half,"
Reed said.
In the second half, FAMU made a couple runs but got no closer than 13 points.
And it was the final B-CU game at the 63-year old Gaither Center (FAMU will be
playing basketball in a new arena in 2009-2010).
"This was a big game, going into the conference on the road. The seniors made
big plays for us and made shots for us. It is good to be on top in the conference and
going into the new year, conference season (in January) we will have that momen-
tum," Reed said.
B-CU, now 4-4, is on the road next Sunday at St. John's University of the Big
East Conference, 4 p.m., Dec. 14 playing in Queens, N.Y. Also on the East Coast trip
will be a game at Long Island University, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 17 in Brooklyn, N.Y.



WILDCATS BASEBALL
Largest early recruiting class ever for Bethune-Cookman


By Michael Bonts,
Sports Writer


Bethune-Cookman
University Head Baseball
Coach Mervyl Melendez has
announced 13 early signees
to play baseball for the
Wildcats in 2009-2010.
"We addressed many of
the needs we will have in the
future for our baseball pro-
gram," said Melendez of his
2009-2010 recruiting class.
"This is our biggest recruit-
ing class ever (previous high
was 11 signees). We are very
satisfied with the recruiting
efforts of our coaching staff.
And pleased in the quality of
student-athletes that we
have signed."


Spencer Johnson a 6-2,
right-handed pitcher out of
Ed White High School -and
Paxon's David Lee, an out-
fielder were among the
signees.
"Spencer is ranked
among the top 150 Florida
High School prospects
according to
Prospectwire.com. Spencer
will be able to come out of
the bullpen and give us
some quality innings,"
Melendez said.
Others included: Raul
David Rivera: 6-2 195 *
RHP San Juan, PR
/Colegio San Vicente de
Paul, Gabriel Hernandez:
6-0 180 RHP Toa Baja,
PR /PRBAHS, Luis Cintron:
6-0 160 LHP Las Piedras,
PR /Darton College, Julio


Morales: 6-1 170 RHP San
Juan, PR /Wabash Valley
CC, Keith Doby: 6-1 205
RHP Palm Beach Gardens,
FL/ William T. Dwyer High
School, Brandon Turner: 5-9
160 OF/LHP Deland, FL/
Deland High School,
Joseph Sharkey: 5-10 180
C/RHP Royal Palm Beach,
FL/ Royal Palm Beach High
School, DJ Leonard: 5-11
180 OF Wellington, FL/
Palm Beach Community
College, Ozzie Perez: 5-9
155 MIF Baja, PR/, Las
Cumbres School, Juan
Perez: 5-11 190 RHP/3B
Orlando, FL/ Central
Florida Community College
and Jordan Dailey: 6-0 160
RHP Orlando, FL/Cypress
Creek High School.


Cohuk accpt ivitatio to play
Cornhuskers accept invitation to play Tigers


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By Michael Bonts,
Sports Writer

The Gator Bowl offi-
cially selected Nebraska
to participate in its game
on Jan. 1 at Jacksonville
Municipal Stadium.
"We are excited about
having a chance to play
on New Year's Day in a
game like the Gator
Bowl," Nebraska Head
Coach Bo Pelini said. "We
are excited about how far
we have come as a foot-
ball team and this is a
great reward."
The 8-4 Cornhuskers,
winners of five of their
final six games, will take
on Atlantic Coast
Conference representa-
-tive Clemson. Like
Nebraska, the 7-5 Tigers
finished strong, winning
four of their final five
games, including victories
over Duke, Virginia and
South Carolina to close
the season.
The meeting will be
the second all-time
between Nebraska and
Clemson. The first meet-
ing took place in the 1982
Orange Bowl with
Clemson posting a 22-15
victory to cap an unde-
feated season and win the
national championship.
"Nebraska and
Clemson are truly among


the greatest of football tra-
ditions in the nation. The
Cornhuskers and Tigers
have had exciting sea-
sons and we are looking
forward to a truly great
Bowl match up in
Jacksonville on New
Year's Day," said Brian
Goin, chairman of the
Gator Bowl Association.
This will mark
Nebraska's first-ever trip
to the Konica Minolta
Gator Bowl, the 14th dif-
ferent bowl game in which
Nebraska has participat-
ed. This year's bowl
appearance marks
Nebraska's 45th all-time
bowl appearance, the fifth
highest total nationally.
The Gator Bowl will also
mark Nebraska's 32nd
-bowl game on or after
New Year's Day.
The appearance in the
game will also mark the
18th Nebraska bowl game
in Florida, including 16
Orange Bowls and, one
appearance in the Florida
Citrus Bowl. However, this
is the first trip to Florida
for a bowl game for the
Huskers since the 1998
Orange Bowl, when
Nebraska captured its fifth
national championship
with a victory over
Tennessee.
Nebraska stood 3-3 at
mid-season, but won five


of its final six games with
its only loss in that stretch
coming at the hands of
Big 12 Champion
Oklahoma. Nebraska
capped the regular sea-
son with three straight vic-
tories for the first time
since 1999. A victory in
the Gator Bowl would give
Nebraska just its second
nine-win season since
2003, but the 43rd overall
nine-win campaign in
school history.
Clemson boasts one
of the nation's top defens-,
es entering the Gator
Bowl. The Tigers rank
17th nationally .in total
defense, allowing just
294.8 yards per game and
are 10th in passing yards
allowed at 167.3 yards
per game. Clemson has
allowed just 16.6 points
per game to rank 10th
nationally, and has;limited
six opponents to 14 points
or less including each of
the final three games of
the season. The Tigers
are coached by Dabo
Swiriney who served as
the interim coach for the
final six games of the sea-
son, before being named
head coach last week.
The game will kick off
at 1 p.m. EST on New
Year's Day, and will be tel-
evised nationally on CBS.


ORLANDO MAGIC
Players Visit Children At Florida Hospital


By Michael Bonts,
Sports Writer

ORLANDO, Fla.-11-year-old
Jamal Willis wasn't too excited
to learn that his 14-day stay at
Disney's Children's Hospital at
Florida Hospital would most
likely include Christmas Day.
Willis, who is battling cystic
Sfibrosis, had come down with a
Case obf pneumonia. He was
tired and slouched in a wheel-
chair when Howard stepped off
the elevator onto the sixth floor.
Upon hearing Howard's voice, the fifth grader was suddenly filled with excitement
and nearly leaped out of his chair.
"What's up big homee" was Howard's greeting to Willis, who was one of numerous
children awaiting the Olympian's arrival.
In an instant, Jamal's mood was exponentially elevated. Any hint of discomfort was
wiped away by his gleaming smile.
"It was so cool, it was awesome," said an ecstatic Willis of meeting Howard, who
donned a blue Santa hat and had even "borrowed" a stethoscope from a doctor on the
elevator ride up to the children's floor. "Dwight is my favorite player and I watch the
Magic on TV at night."
The 4-foot-1-inch fifth grader proceeded to lead the 6-foot-11-inch Hord around to
meet the other children on the floor, who became visibly elated as the Magic's AII-Star
center took time to pass out gifts and sign autographs for all who requested.
"It's just a blessing," said Jamal's mother, Tonya Willis. "I'm just glad the players
had time to come out and give the kids some love."Howard, along with teammates
Keith Bogans and J.J. Redick, spent their afternoon visiting children at the hospital
"Whenever I get a chance to do something like this, I run to it," said Howard. "It means
more to me than anything to see the kids smile, and touch their life."


qL i


I


DECEMBER 13. 2008


THE STAR


PA R_-4











PAGE 8-7 THE STAR DECEMBER 13, 2008


EMPLOYMENT
Change Your Life.
Your Future.
You have the power to change
your future. And you can do it
right here at Florida
Community College at
Jacksonvile. To learn about
employment opportunities that
are available please visit our
website at Jobs.FCCJ.edu.
FAMILY SERVICE SPECIALIST -
Duval County
Temporary position not to
exceed 12 months. Applicant
must possess college credits in
pursuit of Sociology or
Psychology degree, or related
fields with a minimum of three
years experience in social serv-
ice or an acceptable combina-
tion of education and experi-
ence; must have knowledge of
various computer software
packages and their operation.
Apps/Resumes may be mailed
or faxed to NFCAA Attn: HR
Dept., P.O. Box 52025,
Jacksonville, FL 32201 or fax:
(904) 398-7480. Phone (904)
398-7472. Closing date of appli-
cation is 12/17/08.
INNOVATION STYLES
LOOKING FOR
Licensed Stylists, Barbers
& Nail Techs
For info call:
904-881-3392 or
904-781-9810

THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852


I SERVICES


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
* SCREEN ROOMS
* GLASS AND VINYL ENCLOSURES
* ALUMINUM AWNINGS
* PATIO COVERS
* CARPORTS AND CANOPIES
#SCC 055764
Web site:
generalmetalsandplastlcs.com
email:
generalmetalsandplastics
@comcast.net

HPLASTISInc.



ASSET ENHANCEMENT &
UTILIZATION SPECIALIST -
Duval County
Applicant must possess col-
lege credits in pursuit of a
Business degree or related
fields with a minimum of five
years experience in Business
or an acceptable combination
of education and experience,
must have knowledge of vari-
ous computer software pack-
ages and their operation.
Apps/Resumes may be
mailed or faxed to NFCAA
Attn: HR Dept., P.O. Box
52025, Jacksonville, FL
32201 or fax (904) 398-7480.
Phone (904) 398-7472.
Closing date of application is
12/17/08.


I W Si l' Visit Jacksonville and cruise out on Carnimval Cruise Lines.
o when- Flva'h gBm. Book sour cruise out of Jacksonville and make more of your
.. ,>,tkc.,I.... trip. Here woull be able to spend your pre-crulse days dining at
exquisite restaurants, exploring the Zoo and Gardens or strolling through one of our distinctive
museums. With so much to do here, you're sure to love the land as much as the sea


Ai L

canl dour local uvel agen at nd begin uour slay In mcksonvitr e D rising
wwwvlattJlcksonvlle.camlcrule for great value packages and acr Mnea


PIPEFITTERS
EARN WHILE YOU LEARN
FLORIDA AUTOMATED SPRINKLER TRAINING, NE FL, CH, QNJ
APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM IS NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FROM QUALIFIED APPLICANTS FOR
4-YEAR STATE CERT. PROG.
JOURNEYMAN CERTIFICATION UPON COMPLETION
904-268-4831 WWW.FASTAPP.US


HANDYMAN
*Minor Home Repairs
*Painting interior/exterior
*Pressure Washing
*'Exp. & Reasonable Rates
Call: 904.768.7671

FOR RENT Eastside
1 BR $325 or
Rooms for Rent $75/wkly
766-1084


Jacksonville/Springfield
Motivated Owner Must Sell
Below Wholesale Price. Will
Consider All Offers. Potential
Creative Financing. Call
George at 1-866-880-4003

To place an ad:
CALL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
ad@thefloridastar.com


Announcements


Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your classified ad in over
100 Florida
newspapers reaching over 4 MILLION readers for $475. Call
this newspaper or (866)742-1373 for more details or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.com.

Auctions

FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION FLORIDA
STATEWIDE 1000 Homes MUST BE SOLD! Free Catalog
(800)678-0517 USHomeAuction.com

Auto Donations

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY
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-..j


DECEMBER 13, 2008


THE STAR


PAGE B-7








PAGE B-8 THE STAR DECEMBER 13, 2008


10 FF.
MEASURING TAPE
HAN9Y TO I
HAVEAROUND^
THE HOUSE. 99


THERE IS NOTHING
LIKE IT... ANYWHEREi


at i W


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DVDs I
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Office 904 285c
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6


e C P P (-' r- e I f ro, j & W


i


THE STAR


DECEMBER 13, 2008


PAGE B-8


I '









^a TPhe FL/GA Star D

A SPECIAL MAN IN A SPECIAL TIME


-By:Auntie Roz
CHICAGO President-elect Barrack Obama and his
wife took their daughters to work at a food bank on the
day before Thanksgiving, saying they wanted to show
the girls the meaning of the holiday, especially when
so many people are struggling.


The Obama family's activities in the courtyard quickly
drew the attention of schoolchildren whose windows
overlooked the courtyard. They put up a sign against the
glass that read: "We love our prez" and screamed when
the president-elect waved to them.


I=- L .... - I
Ten-year-old Malia and 7-year-old Sasha joined their
parents to shake hands and give holiday wishes to
hundreds of people who had been lined up for hours
at the food bank on Chicago 's south side.


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Sasha wore a pink stocking hat over her pigtails and
Malia had on a purple striped hat as the family hand-
ed out wrapped chickens to the needy in the chilly
outdoor courtyard. Those seeking food on
Wednesday at St. Columbanus also received boxes
with potatoes, oranges, fresh bread, peanut butter,
canned goods, oatmeal, spaghetti and coffee.
The president-elect, dressed casually in a leather
jacket, black scarf and khaki pants, was in a jovial
mood, calling out "happy thanksgiving" and telling
everyone "you can call me Barack." He told reporters
that he wants the girls "to learn the importance of how
fortunate they are, and to make sure they're giving
back." The soon-to-be first lady said the Obamas
wanted to give their children "an understanding of
what giving and Thanksgiving is all about."


"I just wanted to come by and wish everybody a happy
Thanksgiving," he said. He then asked the children what
they would be eating for Thanksgiving dinner.


Obama then turned to his wife and suggested they go
visit the kids. Secret Service agents, looking surprised,
disappeared inside the building to accommodate his
request. Minutes later, hundreds of children were brought
down to the school auditorium, and Obama hoped
onstage as they screamed and cheered.


__________ JI


Page PR-1


December 13, 2008


The Star











Happy Holidays


Caution: Teen Drivers Ahead

As holiday parties are in full swing, it's important to reinforce the rules
of the road with your teen. Too often teens drive while under the influ-
ence, but that influence extends beyond alcohol. Thirteen percent of
high school seniors reported driving under the influence of marijuana,
a number nearly equivalent to those who reported drinking and driving
(14%).
Talk to your teen about other driver distractions that can impair their
driving abilities, like texting and talking on the phone while behind the
wheel. In a recent survey, nearly 61% of 16- and 17-year-olds said they
send text messages while driving, and 51% reported talking on the
phone while driving. Let your teen know that these risky driving behav-
iors are more likely to cause crashes.


Signs & Symptoms of Teen Drinking and Drug Use

How can you tell if your child is using drugs or alcohol? It is difficult
because changes in mood or attitudes, unusual temper outbursts,
changes in sleeping habits and changes in hobbies or other interests are
common in teens. What should you look for?
You can also look for signs of depression, withdrawal, carelessness
with grooming or hostility. Also ask yourself, is your child doing well in
school, getting along with friends, taking part in sports or other activi-
ties?

Watch List for Parents

Changes in friends
Negative changes in schoolwork, m"issmig
grades
Increased secrecy about possessions oracH
Use of incense, room deodorant, or peui
chemical odors --
Subtle changes in conversations with frienfie.g '
tive, using "coded" language 'co.;
Change in clothing choices: new fascinatio-rith
highlight drug use
Increase in borrowing money :
Evidence of drug paraphernalia such as pipes, ro i.6'
pers. etc. -.
Evidence of use of inhalant products (such-ashamsoray
polish, correction fluid, common householdpro-ucts)
and paper bags are sometimes used as accessories .Btt
eye drops, which may be used to mask blobdshot' -'-*
eyes or dilated pupils .
New use of mouthwash or breath mints tocover; esie
of alcohol
Missing prescription drugs-especially .naiabtia-t -
stabilizers .,-. :"-

These changes often signal that something harmful is going on-and
often that involves alcohol or drugs. You may want to take your
child to the doctor and ask him or her about screening your child for
drugs and alcohol. This may involve the health professional asking
your child a simple question, or it may involve a urine or blood drug
screen. However, some of these signs also indicate there may be a
deeper problem with depression, gang involvement, or suicide. Be
on the watch for these signs so that you can spot trouble before it
goes too far.


.Student Registration Open for

Black Engineer of the Year
Conference


-Pursue career and Internship opportunIal&iswlth
major corporations and government orgni o nations
-Build a better resume
-Learn the fundamentals of career management by attending
professional development seminars
-Leam from TOP STEM (science, technology. engineering, and math) professionals
-Meet recruiters from leading graduate schools
-Receive a DIEL certificate upon completion of program
-Make Connections
S-Find a mentor .
-' Ne'twvorwith peers from across the country
-Bullc a' network of professional andcoporate contacts
'-Win-rties and Scholarships and Receive Giveaways
a.artlcipate in coapetitionsd ontests

S..... rERE for more
in ormation and
to register











KIDS CORNER


r*--------------------------------------------------------- '
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KNOCK! KNOCK!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Clara!
Clara who?
Clara space on the table!
Knock Knock
Who's there?
Clarence!
Clarence who?
Clarence sale!
Knock Knock
Who's there?
Cliff!
Cliff who?
Cliff the hedges!
Knock Knock
Who's there?
Colleen!
Colleen who?
Colleen up this mess!
Knock Knock
Who's there?
Colin!
Colin who?
Colin all cars, Colin all cars!


Color This


Word Search Puzzle

RO E T L O T K L F EGRP I H P
T EGN PN P I A L I H I SOR I
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PLAYSTATION


Page PR-3/December 13, 2008


The Star/Prep Rap






Page PR-4 The Star DECEMBER 13, 2008
- El


Celebrities Across the Nation Support Ford's 2008 Road Trip


Ford Roadies Chelsea Wells, Winston Robinson and The Roadies with BET's/106th & Park's Rocsi and
Tom Joyner Terrence J


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The Roadies with Vivica A. Fox


local Food Banks, to name a few.
The Roadies received an opportunity
that not many individuals will ever experi-
ence...to take the Road Trip of a lifetime
and chronicle their travels for the nation.
From Orlando,FL-to Birmingham, AL- to
Jackson, MI, the Roadies teamed with
celebrities from all over including, Tom
Joyner, Vivica Fox, Atlanta Braves, All
Star, Brian Jordan, BET's Terrence J of
106th and Park, amongst other notables.


Kerry Washington, The Roadies and Hill Harper


Eeach year Ford chooses two recent
HBCU (Historical Black Colleges and
Universities) graduates to travel more than
18,000 miles, in just 13 short weeks. This
year's Ford "Roadies", Chelsea Wells and
Winston Robinson, drove a 2009 cus-
tomized Ford Flex across the country, visit-
ing more than 30 schools, volunteering in
over 20 markets and partnering with count-
less community organizations including
Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation,
Meals on Wheels, Boys & Girls Club and


-U


The Star


DECEMBER 13, 2008


Page PR-4