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Florida star

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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00829

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00829

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Full Text





Thank you for Back to School I
reading


Fashion
See Page B-1


2008 State Award in
_. -. a---=- Communications


THE


Years. FLORIDA'
Knowledge is 0 DFLORI
Power. Read!
Gain Knowledge! www.thefloridastar.com
* i a i ri 11 1" 1.- Y T .-ll a"1 "i 1 ,-1 .-T -


'.5


The Florida Star
for these



57


Two Arrested for Shooting

Death of Jax's Couple
Arrested Murdered Couple


Derrick
Goldson, 19


Reginald
30


Kelyoda
24, wife


July was a month of terror for Jacksonville as the city witnessed weekly shootings.
One that really got them was when witnesses said they saw the shooter with two
guns. One was a shotgun and he fired it dozens of times. Witnesses described the
shootings as deliberate and brutal. Shot in their Westside townhouse on July 22 was
Reginald Williams, 30, and his wife, Kelyoda Williams, 24. A bullet also grazed
their 3-year-old son who was treated and released, and there were other children in
the house, according to witness.
On Sunday, August 17, Jacksonville's homicide detectives arrested Derrick
Goldson, 19 and Jessica Delancy, 21, for the murders.
Goldson is charged with two counts of murder and one count of aggravated battery
on a pregnant woman and Delancy has been charged with one count of murder.


Georgia Man Dies While in Jail Waiting
for Trial on Stepfather's Murder
When Deacon Kenneth Lewis,
^H ^ 47, of First Jordan Grove
Baptist Church was taken to the
hospital on September 12, 2007
with a deep puncture wound in
his stomach, he reported that he
had fallen on a large piece of
glass. However, the doctor
David Sapp, 42, and the autopsy did not agree
with the story and about a
week later, his step son, David Lamar Sapp, 42, was
arrested for Lewis' murder.
Sapp, who had, according to the community, been
suffering with an illness prior to his arrest and on
August 11, 2008, he was taken to the hospital in criti-
cal condition and died on Monday.
Sapp was scheduled to go to trial in October on one
count of felony murder and one count of aggravated
assault.
All the Answers to Questions
One Day, No Knowledge of
Answers Another Day
Lonzie Leath
We had clear suspicion when Senator Obama and
Senator McCain answered questions at the Saddleback.
Church. McCain, in his effort to show the big differ-
ence in his ability to lead, forgot to remember that per-
sonalities don't change so dramatically. Americans
were so amazed at McCain's quick response, which
was truly unusual, they immediately started contribut-
ing the difference between McCain and Obama to age
and experience.
A few days later, McCain is asked a questions that
should have also been given a quick response, if he was
as alert everyday as he was at Saddleback "How many
houses do you own? What he did not know?
Immediately after the Saddleback event, our discus-
sion group determined that McCain had been tutored
All Continued on A-7
Something to Think About
If you are not happy with the environment that
you are in, you have three options:
1. Love it!
2. Leave it!
3. Change it!


Editorial..'...............A-2
Church................... A-3
Lifestyle...............A-4
State.................A-6
National.....................A-6
entertainments..............A-5
Local ..................... B-1
Prep Rap...................PR
Sports..................B-4
Horoscopes............B-3
Business Network..........B-7


Where


Wealth


Lives


Even in the African-
American community, it
is widely felt that Blacks
in America were slaves
and without knowledge
before and after slavery.
Little is discussed about
the wealth and knowl-
edge that Blacks had

Where-continued A-7


America's Independent Party
[ i Alan Keyes was nominated as the
presidential candidate for the
America's Independent Party
Wednesday at the party's first nation-
al convention. The party is based in
Fenton, Michigan and describes itself
as composed of pro-life, pro-family
Alan Keyes, conservatives "who believe that the
Presidential
Nominee Republican party, with the pending
nomination of John McCain, has
abandoned the principles of Ronald Reagan."
This is Keyes second race against Senator Obama as
he challenged him in his run for U.S. Senator.

'Hush,'Gets an Award
'Hush' a play written and pro-
duced by Stamp Lab: A Theatre
Group, of which Floridian and ,-..
Florida/Georgia Star Newspaper '
staffer, Cheryl Coward, is a found- -
ing collective member, won this "
year's Theater Prize for the play as
part of The ArtSpark Festival Cheryl Coward
sponsored by the HBMG
Foundation.
The play was written within the framework of the jazz
aesthetic, and within the framework, combined concep-
tual performance art, Brechtian theory, traditional the-
atre modalities and multi-media.
Hush now has the opportunity to put on a full length
play at the Long Center in Austin, Texas. Stamp Lab
has been invited to submit a 15-30 minute children's
theatre piece application for First Night Austin, for the
special segment "Theatre Under the Bridge."


News Briefs
Daily Spanish-language Paper Closes
The daily Spanish-language newspaper El Nuevo Dia
Orlando is closing after serving Central Florida for five
years. spokesperson for the company said they have
been consistently losing and cannot continue. The
paper does very well in Puerto Rico and will continue.
MAD DADS Say:
MAD DADS is calling all dads to work with their chil-
dren in the learning process now that school has start-
ed again. They said fathers are needed to
_A iS teach the living and loving skills needed
a" bW for our children to survive in this world;


51069 00151 0


Watching Fay


The entire state of Florida and Southern Georgia has
been watching and listening to see what Fay is going to
do. The weather forecasters have not been able to be
specific. They just say, "it is expected." When
Floridians take a historical look at past storms during
hurricane season, some tend to take precautions and
some feel they will get through it.
Governor Crist and Mayor Peyton both issued state-
ments that we should be concerned. Trees fell and
thousands lost their electricity and we still don't know
what Fay is going to do. Advice: be prepared. Schools
are still closed and the wind and rain are still strong in
Florida and Southern Georgia.

Voter's Limitations in

St. John County
Citizens of St. John County are concerned about the
lack of inclusion for Blacks, American-Indians and
other minorities in the county. They said that there are
six early voting sites and five are in overwhelmingly
caucasian, Republican areas. A request is being made
for another site in the heavy minority area.


Congresswoman
Tubbs-Jones Dies
Rep.
Stephanie
Tubbs s
Jones, (D-
Ohio) one
Congress of Hilliary
woman Clinton's
Stephanie strongest
Tubbs-Jones,
D-Ohio supporters,
d i e d
Wednesday. She was
found Tuesday night
unconscious behind the
wheel of a moving car. It
is reported that she
appeared to have suffered
an aneurysm while driv-
ing. She had planned to
attend the Democratic
Convention as a delegate.


RealSense
Prosperity Gets a
$665.500 Grant
Trustees of the Jessie
Ball duPont Fund award-
ed a $665,500 grant to
United Way of Northeast
Florida, as the lead and
administrative agency for
the RealSense Prosperity
Campaign.
The three-year grant is
the largest ever received
for RealSense and will be
used primarily to institu-
tionalize the VITA, tax
site process and to
strengthen the RealSense
infrastructure.
This will take RealSense
Prosperity Campaign to
its next level.


Dispute Settled with Allstate
Homeowners in Florida who are insured by Allstate
will get an additional 5.6 percent rate cut because of its
settlement with the state. This deduction will bring
total rate cuts to 19.8 percent since June 1, 2007.
Texas School District Receiving Penalties
for Non-returning High School Dropouts
Fort Worth, Texas school districts will have until the
middle of January to re-enroll dropouts without penal-
ty from the state. In Texas, high dropout rates lead to
lower school ratings. The schools are asking business-
es not to allow students to work after 10 pm to encour-
age them to stay in school.
. .. .



LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIU OF FL (1.1.09
PO BoX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


L iSTEN
TO S,-^ACT
Tuesday and Thursday
from 8:30 to 9:00 pm
WCGL-AM-1360
Tuesday at 6:00 pm
WBOB- AM-1320
The Florida Star and
Impact Striving to Make
a Difference!







rf AALTj- /i-Lfl TA AGS 2- 200


DENNIS WADE
ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
DIRECTOR
JULIA BOWLES
SPECIAL SECTION EDITOR
DANIEL EVANS
SALES DIRECTOR
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER


DISTRIBUTION:
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS JAMES GREEN, WILLIAM GREEN
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER ABEYE AYELE, CASSIE WILLIAMS
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
LONZIE LEATH, F. M. POWELL, ESTER DAVIS,, LAURENCE GREENE,
MICHAEL PHELTS, RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, VONKESTAABRAMS,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, ANDREA FRANKLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS, DANIEL RANDOLPH, PATRICIA RAN-
DOLPH, HAMP MCDOWELL


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
(912) 264-6700 Georgia
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassan, Alachuna,
Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn
County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida


SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$35.00
Half Year-$20.00
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


5AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association


CLARA FRANCES McLAUGHLIN
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MAY E. FORD
LAYOUT EDITOR
SPECIAL SECTIONS
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN EDITOR
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


Ian Manuel was 13-years-
old when he participated in a
robbery attempt in Florida,
leaving the victim with a
nonfatal gunshot injury. Ian
turned himself in to police,
and his attorney told him he
would receive a 15-year sen-
tence if he pled guilty.
Instead, .he was sentenced to
life in prison without parole.
Ian's is one of several sto-
ries told in the Equal ,Justice
Initiative's (EJI) new report,
Cruel and Unusual:
Sentencing 13- and 14-Year-
Old Children to Die in Prison
(pdf). The Equal Justice
Initiative of Alabama is a pri-
vate, nonprofit organization
that provides legal represen-
tation to indigent defendants
and prisoners. The EJI study
found 73 cases in the United
States where 13- and 14-
year-olds have been sen-
tenced to life without
parole-in other words, sen-
tenced to die in prison. EJI
. argues that giving this harsh
sentence to young teenagers
violates the U.S.
Constitution's Eighth
Amendment prohibition
against cruel and unusual
punishment and is also
counter to international con-
ventions. The United States
is almost alone in the world
in imposing life sentences
without parole for crimes
committed by children at


tTHE FLORIDA STAR
T EmGORIASR


such a young age. EJI notes
that giving such sentences to
juveniles has been con-
demned in a number of inter-
national agreements, includ-
ing the United Nations
Convention on the Rights of
the Child. This appalling pat-
tern of injustice has prompt-
ed a nationwide litigation
campaign to challenge these
harsh penalties and have the
children considered for
parole-eligible sentences as
soon as possible.
There were many common
threads among the 73 cases.
EJI found: "[M]ost of the
children.. .come from violent
and dysfunctional back-
grounds. They have been
physically and sexually
abused, neglected, and aban-
doned.... They grew up in
lethally violent, extremely
poor areas where health and
safety were luxuries their
families could not afford....
[They] have in common the
disturbing failure of police,
family courts, child protec-
tion agencies, foster systems,
and health care providers to
treat and protect them.[...]
Instead, in the adult criminal
justice system, they are sub-
ject to mandatory sentencing
that ignores the child's cir-
cumstances and those of the
offense in imposing the
harshest available sentence."
They also commonly receive
.poor legal representation by


i~W A 444. ** *' r. 2 -Ut ~.4 tAt we- A ~Ai A


Sentencing Children to Die in Prison

by Marian Wright Edelman
President of the Children's Defense Fund


overworKed, negligent or
incompetent attorneys. EJI
also found that nearly two-
thirds of the youths serving
these sentences were chil-
dren of color.
The EJI report observes
that in other aspects of
American culture, we accept
that most 13- and 14-year-
olds shouldn't be held to the
same level of behavioral
accountability as adults or
older teenagers. In most
states they are still required
to attend school and are
barred from driving or get-
ting married without permis-
sion. EJI cites the scientific
research that has shown the
areas of adolescents' brains
that govern impulse control
regulating emotions, risk
assessment and moral rea-
soning are all still underde-
veloped.
Many of the children EJI
included in its report have
tragic backgrounds. There
are histories of neglect, like
13-year-old Joseph Jones, an
honor roll student whose
crack-addicted parents often
left him to take care of his six
younger siblings in their
Newark housing project for
days at a time before eventu-
ally. dumping Joseph with
relatives in North Carolina.
There, he was forced by his
older teen uncle and an 18-
year-old to take part in the
assault of a neighborhood
girl who was subsequently
killed by the older youths.
Antonio Nufiez was a vic-
tim of violence who was shot
and seriously injured at age


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


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aeft- RuSEimb Sg Fmos DImScrE

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13 wanle riding nis icycle m
his South Central Los
Angeles neighborhood and
whose 14-year-old brother
was shot and killed when he
ran to help him. At 14,
Antonio got into a car with
two men nearly twice his age
who picked him up at a party.
One of the men later claimed
to be a kidnap victim. No one
was injured in the sequence
of events, however. Antonio
was arrested and charged,
along with the 27-year-old
driver, with aggravated kid-
napping. There are also vic-
tims of substance abuse like
Omer Nifiham, from
Wisconsin, who was raised
by his alcoholic parents. He
began drinking daily himself
at age 10 to help dull the pain
of his life.
The EJI study echoes and
reinforces the findings of the
Children's Defense Fund's
Cradle to Prison Pipeline
report, our national call to
action to prevent and divert
children and youth from a
trajectory that leads to mar-
ginalized lives, imprison-
ment and even premature
death. EJI's work to draw
attention to these children
and its nationwide campaign
to challenge and end these
harsh sentences are valuable
contributions to dismantling
the Pipeline to Prison. To
learn more about the Equal
Justice Initiative and their
crucial work, visit
http://www.ehi.org/.


~~'~ga~as~;~


AUGUST 23, 2008


THE STA R


Ar" A 21















Faith In Our Community
SSchedule of Eventsand Services

SUMMERVILLE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH, 690
west 20th Street, Jacksonville, FL with Pastor James W. Henry, is
having their Annual Sunday School Anniversary, Sunday, August
24th beginning at 9:30 a.m. and continuing through the 11:00 a.m.
Worship Service. There will be special guest teachers from various
churches of the city to share in this grand occasion.
SUMMERTIME GOSPEL SHOWCASE SHOWDOWN!
Presented by First Lady Productions, JDG Ministries, and
ERRUPT Studios. Calling all aspiring Gospel and Christian Hip
Hop artist. Now is your chance to compete against the regions best
unsigned artist in an all out SHOWDOWN for the title and grand
prize which includes: a 3 song demo, a photo shoot, album cover
artwork, CD's, Radio Airplay and much much more. So if you're
looking for a way to take your gospel career to 'Another Place' this
showcase is for you. So register now! This event will take place on
Saturday, August 23, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.at One Accord Ministries
International, Inc., 2971 Waller St. in Jacksonville. Call (904) 425-
0806 or go to www.myspace.com/summertimegss, for more infor-
mation. Registration deadline is August 16, 2008.
NEW GENERATION CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP, located at
5606 Ave. B, in Jacksonville with Pastor Sirdelrol Drayton, request
the honor of your presence at the celebration and dedication serv-
ice of their new facility. To help us celebrate Pastor Torin Dailey of
First Baptist Church of Oakland long with his congregation will
preach a one night revival on Tuesday, August 12, 2008, at 7:00
p.m. Also celebrating with us is Bishop Bruce Allen of The church
Fellowship on Monday, August 25th. For information call (904)
631-7134 or 591-6382.
PALM COAST...The mood has been set for women to enjoy
Health & Beauty Pamper Day, featuring vendors in massage ther-
apy, skin and nail care, as well as apparel, hats, jewelry, other
accessories, and designer candles. The Women's- Ministry of
First A.M.E. Church has announced that Health & Beauty
Pamper Day will also provide health screening and a cafe, for
enjoying lunch. Health & Beauty Pamper Day will be held at the

Ii ---


church Saturday, August 30, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is part of the
events leading up to Women's Day, which will be celebrated
Sunday, September 14, during the 10:45 a.m. service. The church,
at 91 Old Kings Road North in Palm Coast, is the pastorate of the
Rev. Gillard S. Glover. For more details, call the church at (386)
446-5759.

Saint Stephen AME Church
913 West 5th Street
to Sponsor 8th Christian Beautillion
Sunday, August 31, 2008 at 4:00 p.m.


2008 Christian Beautillion Class with Pastor Mitchell
and wife Cordelia. (From left to right): Beau Dominique
Butts, Beau ChayVauhn Payne, Beau Sammy Crawford,
Beau Chris turner, Beau Christopher Witherspoon, Beau
Lance Ebron, and Beau Ben Hright
SPONSORED BY:
Catherine Dawson Women's Missionary Society, ;
Sis. Mary Blake-Holley, Pres.
& The Sons of Allen of St. Stephen, Bro. Larry Walter, Pres.
General Chairperson: Sis. JoAnn Christian
Re%. Michael L. Mitchell, Pastor

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to: ilfo@thefloridastar.com


COUNCILWOMAN E. DENISE LEE
&
CPAC NORTH

Invite you to attend a COMMUNITY MEETING to discuss and get rec-
ommendations and input from citizens regarding a Planned Unit
Development (PUD) on Newcomb Road, west of Lem Turner Road and
north of 1-295

Representatives from the City of Jacksonville's Planning and
Development Department, as well as the developers seeking the PUD,
will be in attendance to answer any .questions that you may have
regarding the conversion of 317 acres from low density residential to
light industrial uses.

REMEMBER YOUR INPUT IS NEEDED IN MAKING SURE
THAT YOUR NEIGHBORHOODS REMAIN VITAL!

DATE: Monday, August 25, 2008
TIME: 6:00-8:00pm
LOCATION: FCCJ North Campus Auditorium
Room C-136 4501 Capper Road

NOTE: This relates to the recently approved Land Use Amendment for
the proposed development of warehouses referenced in RESO#2008-
398-A


The Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .......................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays
(Old Sanctuary)................................. 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting.................. 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 8:00 p.m.
Rev. Eric Lee, Pastor
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus
(904) 764-5727 Church


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
W orship Service................................................................1.... 0:00 a.m.
Church School...................................................................... 8:45 a.m .
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study..................................................6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday........................ 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry........................................................ 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School................................................ ... ........................... 9:30 a.m .
M morning W orship........................................... .................................. 11:00 a.m .
Tuesday............................................ Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday.............................. ......... .............................Joy Night,7:00 p.m .
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School ------------ ----10:00 a.m.
Sunday Wdrship -----------------12:00 Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study ------------Tuesday & Friday-- 7:00 p.m.

(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520


THE FLORIDA / GEORGIA STAR

SOFFICE (904),766-8834
SFAX (904) 765-1673



EMAIL:
info@TheFloridaStar.com


Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School.........................9:15 10:15 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary)...........................................10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall.............................1....10:30 a.m.
Mid-Wee:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer.........................................1....12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities


Tune In To


DE4.ATH

NOTICES

ALLEN, Alphonso B., Jr.,
died August 17, 2008.
ANONYE, Archiong Eke,
78, died August 11, 2008.
ARTIMUS, Frank, Jr.,
died August 13, 2008.
BATTEN, Mattie Lue,
died August 13, 2008.
BROOKS, Rose Walsh,
87, died August 16,2008.
DUNSFORD, James H.,
52, died August 19, 2008.
FREEMAN, F. Julian, 73,
died August 19, 2008.
HARRINGTON, Mary
"Michelle," 27, died
August 19, 2008.
HENDERSON, Murray,
Jr., 93, died August 14,
2008.
HOCH, Kenneth Paul, 79,
died August 20, 2008.
HOLMES, Richard T., 82,
died August 19, 2008.
JAKELSKY, Judith, 68,
died August 19, 2008.
JAMES, "Frances Alma,
86, died August 16, 2008.
JENNINGS, Paul, 64,
died August 19, 2008.
KEITH, Michael Wayne,
51, died August 19, 2008.
KOON, Julian Hatchcock,
died August 19, 2008.
McGOWIAN, Jennie
Mae, 75, died August 15,
2008.
McNEIL, Mildred
Higgins, died August 18,
2008.
MILTON, Maggie Lee,
84, died August 20, 2008.
MOORE, Jerry, 61, died
August 20, 2008.
NEAL, Rev. Tony, Jr., 89,
died August 17, 2008.
NEWSOME, Chandler
"Chanee", 32, died August
18, 2008.
SCHUSCHU, Howard,
died August 20, 2008.
SHUFORD, Kenneth
Wayne, "Kenny," 60, died
August 19, 2008.
SMITH, Leonard
"Peanut," 54, died August
19,2008.
WILLIAMS, Larry Al,
died August 15, 2008.
WILLIAMS, Robert
Joseph, 47, died August 17,
2008.


Ctara McLaugniin rvonne arooics
Hosi: Co-Host


Tuesday and Thursday

from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.


WCGL-A M 1360

The Florida Star and Impact
Striving To Make A Difference!


plr~lrrmr~llll~urP~~pj~~h:~p~~~4Krt~?~3







P4 GE 4-4


LIFESTYLE

Socially Speaking
^ By Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr. oeie species)


A Cornucopia of Snippets
As we approach the end of the Summer of 2008 there has been an
abundance of activities that have not been included in the column. As
I await 'Fay' I thought I would write a little on each.7 a .
Congratulations to the Woodlawn Presbyterian Church's Steering
Committee who planned such a lovely 20th Anniversary honoring their
pastor Reverend J.W. Rigsby. This committee did a superb job and we
wanted you to know who they were. Mesdames Gladys Nelson, a "*
Carolyn Alexander, Carolyn Newton, and Linda Andrews; Robert .. '
Freeman, Mesdames Denise Walker, Mary Mickel, Letha lies,
Gail Holley, Valerie Gilbert, and Addie Ford; John and Dr. The Toastons The Mitchells
Barbara Darby. .
The members of The Jacksonville Links met for dinner on two -
different occasions at the Carrabba's Restaurant. Carrabba's is the
sponsor of the group's annual Western Gala and the chapter's members
always dine at the restaurant as individuals. The Social Committee
chaired by Mrs. Marjoria Manning planned the most enjoyable din-
ner events.
Mrs. Madeline Scales-Taylor, president, The Jacksonville Moles '
and Mrs. Frieda McDew-Shorter, president, The Savannah Moles The Steerin Committee or the 20th Anniversary Celebration
planned the First Annual Luncheon Gathering for the two chapters at honoring Reverend J. Rigsby: Front Row: John & Dr. Ms. Kelly Martin, Esq., Mrs. Adrienne
the St. Simon Island's King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort. All Barbara Darby; Middle Row: Mesdames Denise Walker, Mary Mrs. Betty Cody with her nephew and niecea McFparn King and Dr. Geri Williams
reports indicate that this will definitely be an annual event that will Mickel, Letha lies, Gail Holley, Valerie Gilbert, Addie Ford; Smith, president Jacksonville Links.
ep -Back Row: Mesdames Gladys Nelson, Carolyn Alexander,
eventually include their mates. Carolyn Newton, ad Linda ndrews; and Robert Freeman.
******* Photo courtesy of Ms. Tamara Witherspoon.
J. Carl, Sr., and Betty Asque Davis received a surprise photo taken
.by Mr. Lloyd Pearson during the New Stanton High School Gala. The
to gentlemen have a long history dating back to Davis' childhood
"when Mr Pearson always made kites for the neighborhood children. It
iS.a fond memory that they recall each time they are together.
One of the treasures of the Jacksonville Moles attendance at the .i
Charleston Moles 45th Anniversary was sharing the event with Dr....
'George McTeer and his family. Mrs. McTeer is a member of the The Beltons and Ms. Candace
SCharleston Moles and Dr. McTeer practices dentistry in Charleston, .r CT e Thompson. d
SC. It is indeed a small world.
"Alpha Kappa Alpha's Eventful Sisterhood Pilgrimage to
Washington, DC celebrated kts founding one hundred years ago on the -
campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C. Members returned
to the nation's Capitol for the organization's 2008 Centennial Boul6.
During this biennial international meeting, the Sorority celebrated its
founding while working to achieve its business goals. The organization Members of The Jacksonville Moles and Savannah Molesfol-
also focused on mobilizing an informed and educated populace about lowing a luncheon gathering in St Simons Island, GA. The Davises at a summer event. Photo
the significance of the upcoming 2008 elections. courtesy of Mr. Lloyd Pearson
Activities included the Economic Service Partnership Unity
March, Town Hall Society Forums, the Ecumenical Service and Patti
LaBelle Live in Concert. To the rieht: The Alpha
It was a fabulous time for sisterhood and renewal! : To the lef: Dr. and Mrs. George Kappa Alpha Barbie Doll
McTeer with their daughter Mrs. featured during the ...
Sonja McTeer-McGinnis at The Sorority's Centennial BouleP
Charleston Moles 45th in Washington, DC
Anniversary Celebration. Dr.
McTeer is a Jacksonville native.




Vote
I-CM(O R AN1) MAXIMUM IIt iAfiR L (ARL;RUP

King Holzendorf

City Counc1

District 1- 1

King Holzendorf for City Council District 10
Campaign Headquarters
5045 Soutel Drive, Suite 25
Jacksonville, FL 32208
765-3236
765-3932 -- .
765-3929









I enjoyed being your City Council Representative. During my years on the City
Council we accomplished many things for District 10. We started the repairs of .-- --- ---
our drainage system, cleaned up our parks and recreation centers, reduced crime
rate by 19.3% and increased the quality of life for our citizens. THE FLORIDA THEATRE

I fought and brought more than $4 million dollars to our parks. I focused on our 128 East Forsyth Street
public schools. I fought to provide more than $500,000 toward public schools and Jacksonville, FL 32202
provided more than $17 million dollars in streets and drainage projects within
District 10. -

Endorsed by: ? '.
Fraternal order of Police, Lodge 5-30 :"
Jacksonville Association of Firefighters _-
First coast Manufacturers Association
North Florida Central Labor Council : al !Iit' 'i
Northeast Florida Builders' Association .| sI |"
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce (JAXBIZ) ( =l l i| __1
Congresswoman Corrine Brown .", .
P. p. entative Terry Fields "
'..+...rTonyHill ".W I CHARGE BY PHONE
former Representative Willye Dennis
Duval Teachers United (904) 355-2787 or





Paid Poilical Advertisement. Paid for and approved by King Holzendorf, Democrat, for City Council District 10.


S SS dorf on


Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events. Contact us at (904) 766-8834; E-mail socially@TheFloridaStar.com "or
you may reach me directly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-7008. SEE YOU IN THE PAPER! I


PiliYI~pll~ reblua3apr------ -- ---- a










Don't Let Your Teen's



Future Go Up In Smoke

It's simple, marijuana and teens are not a good mix-especially when it comes to learning and
academic success. We know that all young people face challenges as they grow and mature and
that the dangers and temptations of drugs are all around. We also know that as a parent or some
one who cares about young people, you want the very best for them; you want them to do even
better than you did and lead productive lives.

While overall drug use among teens is down in recent years, there are still too many brilliant
young people whose potential is ruined. Don't let drugs destroy their chance of going to college or
landing a good job.




A teenage marijuana user's odds of dropping out are more than twice
that of a non-user.'

The short-term effects of marijuana can include impaired memory and
ability to learn.2

Parents and family are still the most important influence in young peoples' lives so keep the lines
of communication open, set a clear, "no marijuana" rule, stay involved, and continue to discuss the
dangers and consequences of drug use. You make the difference. Knowing that education is the key
to a better tomorrow, you have the power to protect their potential and help lead them on the road
to success.

For more information,
visit The-ru-com or call LSCT 1 .'.2(


Signed,
100 Black Men of America, Inc.
American Council on Education
American School Counselor Association
Boys and Girls Clubs ofAmerica
National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher "
Education (NAFEO)
National Association of Black Social Workers, Inc.
National Association of School Nurses
National Council of Negro Women
National Medical Association
National Urban League
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
PTA
United Negro College Fund (UNCF)


P REN


1. Bray JW.Zarkin GA. Ringwat C, Qi J. The relationship between manjtina mitiation nd dropping out of high school Health econ, 2000 Jm:9T(1):9 8
2. NIDAInfo Facts: Marijuana, Revised. NIDA. September 200.1


I


i~Bd-~~j;;-~agsl~g5~-Eb~n~l~iC~P~a~X~


AUGUST 23, 2008


THE STAR


DPAG A C







PAGEI A-# TH STAR AUUT2,20


Ke Ke Palmer Wins Quarterback


Style in
By Rych McCain
Photos by Tony Cuhjar
In December of
2003, a black eleven
year old named
Jasmine Plummer
became the first girl
in the fifty-five year
history of Pop Warner
football to lead her
team, the Harvey,
Illinois Colts of the
Junior Pee Wee
League, to the nation-
al super bowl champi-
onships as a quarter-
back. She gained
national attention for
this feat because she
was no joke. The girl
could throw a sixty-
five yard spiral dead
on target consistently.
The sports media
jumped on this story
with both feet and
Hollywood came call-
ing. Teen actress Ke
Ke Palmer was select-.
ed to portray Plummer
in the new movie The
Longshots. What was
Palmer's impression
of- the real life
Jasmine when they
met? Palmer responds,


The Longshots


"It was the total oppo-
site of what I expected
you know. For a girl
that. plays football,
you would think she
was really tomboyish,
really buff. You just
wouldn't expect a
small tiny girl to do
such a thing. When I
met her she was just
that. She was just like
me, just like any girly
girl. She was a regular
girl and it was really
cool that she did that.
She was tiny, very,
very tiny; smaller than
I am but she has huge
muscles."
In order to portray a
quarterback as accu-
rate as she did, Palmer
trained extensively for
six weeks in Minden,
Louisiana where the
film was shot with
Pastor Denny Duran, a
high school football,
coach and former pro
quarterback. Duran
put Palmer through
rigorous daily drills
which included throw-
ing the football one
hundred times a day.


Palmer developed a
pretty mean forty-
yard spiral of her own
by filming time. She
adds, "I feel with a
perfect wind pushing
you, you can throw at
anything." Was the
training hard on her?
Palmer laughs, "It
was really fun. I
trained for a month
before we actually did
it. You know practic-.
ing and running the,
mechanics, throwing a
couple of footballs, it
was a lot of fun." Did
she actually get hit or
knocked her on her
rusty dusty during
filming? Palmer gig-,
gles at that one, "No,
they didn't want me to
get hit. I didn't mind
getting hit but they
didn't want me to, so I
had a stunt double."
Could Palmer feel the
difference with her
body being in shape?
She pointed out, "I
definitely felt a little
light on my feet but I
also felt like 'I had
asthma or something


because it was hard
for me to breathe put-
ting on that suit. Once
I put it on, I was in it
all day." Palmer was
also adamant about
portraying Plummer
as a girl first and foot-
ball player second
because it was impor-
tant to the real life
Jasmine. The real life
Plummer wanted to
prove that a girl could
play football with the
boys and still be a girl
and not a tomboy. She
was sensitive to the
teasing she received
in school. She was
even called Jas "man"
by a jealous, hater
classmate. This role
will certainly add to
Palmer's growing
quality of work and
take her a couple of
levels higher. She will
be starring on her own
TV show this fall for
the Nickelodeon
Network.


A 0m






Restore Justice to Our Community
Vote Angela Corey onAugust 26th


















Jacksonville BtBherhoodof e 'Her support and
T.J. Coxj.. Dxo-Edards, professionalism in
Reginald Lot working on my son s case
was awesome. She is
committed, more than
qualified and has
compassion with
accountability. When she
Sees something that is
not legally e Cy right, she
Rev. Jereilluse hernoRbislege
in doing what is right to

change it."


--Sharon Coon,

Mofiwr efsltn NF StudentJames
Rev. Perry C( Robinson, Sr. L eCwnJr.
Rev. jerepftiu Robinson, Sr.

Pillh ui mhwutimenww p~d fior und approvnad b A gt',h Co, Repanblan fr tale
.itowy. Fourth Judidut Ci'rcit a2


All good things must come to an end.


$100,000 Club $100,000
#727 Hold'em Poker
#690



Golden 7s Golden Goose
#711 #739



On a Roll
#716


Cold Hard Cash
#732


Florida Snowbirds
#725


Fun is
#697


Hot Slots Lucky Diamonds Tripler Lucky for Life
#712 #734 #705



Spring Fling Tripler Super Amazing B's
#742 #731


All these Scratch-Off Games officially end August 29, 2008. So play these great games now
while there are still prizes to win. But remember, any winning tickets must be redeemed by Tuesday.
October 28, 2008. Prizes less than $600 may be redeemed at any Florida Lottery retailer. Prizes $600
and over must be claimed at a Florida Lottery office. (For the office nearest you call 850-487-7777)
Thanks for playing these and the many other games of the Florida Lottery.
(I 2008 Florida Lottery. Must be 18 or older to play Play responsibly.


..

L)O
rricomn


I1, 4


NOTICE
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD
-
Jacksonville residents who have a complaint regarding a property tax assessment or denial of on
exemption hove the right to file a petition for review by the Value Adjustment Board (VA6).
To be considered, obtain a petition from the Property Approiser=s Office (231 E. Forsyth Street). or
you may obtain form DR-486 (Real Property) or DR-486T (Tangible Personal Property) online from the
Florida Department of Revenue. Complete the petition in full, hove it notarized, then file it with the
Clerk of the VAB. along with your filing fee of up to $15.00. Homeowners appealing a homestead
exemption denial, and persons with appropriate certificate or other documentation issued by the
Department of Children and Family Services, will be exempted from paying a filing fee. Location
for filing petitions Monday through Friday. 8:00 a.m. 5:00 pm.. ore as follows:
August 15 St. James Building
September 9 117 West Duvoal Street
I" Floor. City Hallt Comm Room "A"
SJacksonville, FL 32202
The Clerk must receive all Tangible Personal Property petitions, by 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September
9,2008. They can be mailed or delivered in person, but they must be received -- not postmarked --
by September 91" or they cannot be accepted.
The Clerk must receive oil Real Property, Homestead Exemptions 9pd Greenbelt Classification
petitions by 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September 9. 2008. They can be mailed or delivered in person,
but they must be received not postmarked -- by Tuesday. September 9"'. or they cannot be
accepted,
For your convenience, petitioners are urged to file prior to their referenced deadline to ovoid the
long lines that ore typical on the last day of filing.
For additional information contact 630-7370.


IPIIIIIIII~DIIPIWVirrr~~~ I-I II f a -- ~C a -L ---' 111


AUGUST 23, 2008


PAGE A-6


THE STAR








AUGIUS32H S


I, United States Congresswoman
Corrine Brown, for the Third District
of Florida, endorse Virginia Norton
in the race for Circuit Court Judge,


Group 28.


Virginia Norton is a


committed public servant who has
fought tirelessly to protect Northeast
Florida's children. She will be a fair
judge who will respect all people and
treat everyone with dignity.

Sincerely,


Judges protect our community and our
children. Virginia Norton has successfully
protected Jacksonville's Sexual Predator
Ordinance from Jegal challenges,
safeguarding a law that keeps sexual
predators further away from schools,
parks, playgrounds and daycare centers.
Election Day is August 26th. This is a
non-partisan election.


Corrine Brown


0* a a a a
I A eat
II. 1.111 .11 Iax
VHqROCIR~ i Pliicl dvrtseen pidfo ad ppovd y irginia otn o ircit outJugIrup2


Circuit Court Judge


Group 28


CLAY DUVAL NASSAU


Where Continued from A-1
before arriving in America. In fact, many had wealth in their African country and
there were even kings and queens that came to America during the slavery period.
Where Wealth Lives is a documentary that was sponsored by Wachovia and brave-
ly delves into the subject of wealth creation, and lack of, in the African-American
community. It celebrates the economic successes of the 'everyday' African
American from slavery to the present.
Ms. Valarie Udeh, Executive Producer of the documentary joined the Florida Star
and Impact on stations WCGL-1360 and WBOB-1320 last week to discuss the doc-
umentary. The third part of the documentary will air on Sunday, August 24 on TV
One at 2:00. Call The Florida or Georgia Star for more information.


Mos Efiaco' Ik Sho,


Jaksnvll'sBet alkStio

lmnat a4-120


Anyof-i: 56-07I '

'A ndy's ern 0l *

A n~ouins and~ao.


All Continued from A-1
prior to the session. We learned that there was a coin tossing done in the privacy of
the church office between church members. It should have been done at the church
before the live TV and church audience. We further learned that McCain was not in
a sound cone but was in his limousine. Yet when he arrived -and was asked about
being in the cone, he responded as if he had spent the hour there, alone. And if you
did not notice, McCain's answers were so quick that he had to be asked questions
that had not been asked of Obama and at that point, his answers were not so quick.
And when you talk about the excused taxes for the oil companies and there was a
vote for a $13.5 billion tax break for oil companies where there was a need for 60
votes to put some dollars into oil alternatives, McCain did not vote with the 59. He
ducked the vote. Go to the movie this week to see IOUS A and learn about our econ-
omy, how we got to this point and how can we correct this situation.
SUBSCRIBE NOW Join the
The Florida Star Revolution!
The Georgia Star .,


Call Liz at
(904) 766-8834


She will set you up.
Knowledge is Power but only if you use it! Real
The Florida/Georgia Star.
www.thefloridastar.com
www.thegeorgia star.com


Call and talk.
(904) 854-1320
WBOB-AM 1320
(904) 766-9285
WCGL-AM 1360


Set your Clock to Six O'Clock
and Tune in to WBOB-AM 1320
8:30 p.m., WCGL-AM 1360
with
Clara McLaughlin
and
IMPACT

This Week's Guest:
Chairman, Jacksonville Journey

"The Florida Star and Impact -
Striving to Make a Difference."
www.1320WBOB.com
www.WCGL1360.com
"The People's Choice"


a


. '!,E a;i~~n~sa~aa^C C


A UGUST 23, 2008


THE STAR


PAGE A-7


,: ll-








U'S12 tYCT, T1'HfEiP-L--S-PAGE A-S


Porterhouse
or T-Bone Steaks
Publix Premium Ceraiied Beei. USDA Choice
SAVE UP TO 3.00 LB


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Publix
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Rotisserie Chicken.......
Hot or Chilled, Fresh From the Publix Deli, each
SAVE UP TO .50


Brownies, 8-Count .....389
Choice of Walnut Fudge Iced,
Walnut Cream Crheese Iced.
or Plain Without Nuts,
From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz pkg.
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California Plums ....... .791b
Red, Black, Purple, or Green Varieties,
A Good Source of Antioxidants
SAVE UP TO .90 LB


12-Pack Selected 00
Coca-Cola Products ............................................... 11--
12-oz can Limit two deals.
SAVE UP TO 7.36 ON 4


Tostitos F e
T o rtilla C h ip s...................... ...................... .. e e
Assorted Varieties, 15.5 or 19-oz bag (Excluding Baked!, Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.89
(Salsa or Sauce, 15.5 or 16-oz jar ... 2.79)


Bush's Best = A.1. Cheez-It
Baked Beans Free Steak Sauce ... Fee Baked Snack
Or Grillin' Beans, Assorted Varieties, Assorted Varieties, 10-oz bot. Crackers...'..G.e ..C
22 or 28-oz can Quantity rights reserved. Or Party Mix, Assorted Varieties,
Quantity rights reserved. SAVE UP TO 4.09 13 to 16-oz box
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SAVE UP TO 4.31


18-Pack Assorted 1199
Budweiser Beer ........... 11
Or Miller or Coors, 12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.00
(6-Pack Assorted Smirnoff Malt Beverage,
11.2-oz bot. ... 5.99)


Publix
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Prices effective Thursday, August 21 through Wednesday, August 27, 2008. Only in Orange, Seminole, Brevard, Columbia,
Marion, Duval, Leon, Clay, Nassau, Putnam, Flagler, Volusia, St. Johns and Alachua Counties in Fla. Quantity rights reserved.

publix.com/ads B


PAGE A-5


THE STA R


GUST 23 2008










(* The FL/GA Star 7



LOCAL SECTION B


BACK 2 SCHOOL... CLASS IS IN!

Mosaic Model and Talent Management presents Back to School
Basics. From long sleeve knits to a variety of kicks, kids all over the First Coast
are sporting the latest trends for school. Uniforms are cool, wear your choice,
but play by the rules.
BACK TO SCHOOL BASICS I 3 ,
Dress Codes Contact your school in reference to .
the dress code to make sure that your clothes and fash- .
ion complies with the school standards. Choose clothes
that are not only trendy, but also very comfortable.
Shoes Select two pair of school shoes preferably a
pair of basic sneakers and a pair of brown or black easy
wearing shoes. ,
Jackets take a jacket for cool classrooms and -.
change of weather. -
Poncho keep a pre-folded hooded poncho in your
book bag in case of inclement conditions. KA A '
Backpacks Make sure the backpack has two __________
padded straps that are over the shoulder for comfort and
balance. JAKIRA, KHARI, AND KHAMORA
Consider leather or canvas based on your child's
supply needs and wear and tear.
Compartmentalized backpack help to keep school CHRISTOPHER
supplies and notes organized.
Home Computers and Laptops an educational
necessity for teenagers to strengthen creativity, class-
room presentations, creating papers and internet usage.

BACK TO SCHOOL GEAR
Christopher sports a red shirt: Walmart, jeans: Gap
Akai is in studded jean capris, white tank, hooded
-cropped jacket. Target
Jakira is seen in jeans, jacket and shirt: House of .
Dereon and City Trends, Dora Book Bag: City Trends,
Shoes: Payless .
Khari's updated cotton khaki's and white shirt are
classics for any young man. A variety of sweaters can ETHAN
DESTINEE
enhance the look and versatility of the basic shirt and -
pants. Color adds fun to any wadrobe. Blue Sneakers:
Nike, Green Sweater: Gap, Yellow watch: Puma,
Khaki cargo pants with ankle zippers: Gap, White
shirt: Polo ,KAILA
Khamora sports gray leggings with a baby embroi- KAELA
dered tunic pink, Old Navy Sneakers: Pink, Green and I N
Gray, Green watch: Hello Kitty, Pink and white socks: Polo
Kaela wears jeans with a splash of color in a green cotton jacket with a
white cotton tee underneath. Jacket from Body Shop, jeans:
Ethan is sporting a turquoise and white striped shirt, jeans: TJ Maxx
Destinee is styling a shirt and sweater: Target, Hat: Limited Too, Boots-
Bass: Dilliards, Tights: Target
Kaila is in a white sweater: JC Penney, multicolored plaid skirt with flower
accents:Dilliards, White Keds: Stride Right '
Mersades styles a gray top, denim skirt, white leggings and black flats: Old
Navy
Amani is styling a cotton corduroy blue two piece pant suit with yellow MERSADES --
shirt. Hair and make-up: Mosaic Model and Talent Management AMANI

Take the H&R Block Income
A..gTax Course and earn extra
income preparing taxes.* W BOB-AM 1320
Whether or not you go on to
become a tax professional, Jacksonville's
You'll be able to complete
l your own return and I Progressive Talk Radio with
.... ,. ^. help others with theirs. I Host Clara McLaughlin
:. Bilingual students
I., ..*; encouraged to .enroll! Tuesday at 6:00 p.m.
I, .... .'-" ';,-;:';,' ,".*: ... For class times and locations, Clara I Cal-in Number (904) 854-1320
visit hrblock.com/taxcourses Clara McLaughlin "
-or call Dawn at,399-1034 .Host
SEnroll now! IPA C T



l sLocations: .WCGL1360.com
3000 Dunn Avenue
9119-7 Merrill Road Tuesday andThursday
IH^ .12692 Main Street T rs
2261 Edgewood Ave 8:30 p.m. with
SClara McLaughlin
H&R BLOCK. on Tuesday and T
.\ = o Yvonne Brooks on
I lt r ^/ Thursday


Enrollment restrictions may apply. "The Florida Star and Impact,
Enrollment in, or completion of, the
H&R Block Income Tax Course is Yvonne Brooks
neither an offer nora guarantee of Striving to Make a Difference'c c .Hos.
Ji .. Employment. 02008 H&R Block Tax
S, Services, Inc. 9DisplayAdE4NOF


J,~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ '"'YAPIp i-fci fALC~-, .


THE STAR


PAGE B-1


7rr1 n







DAf2J7 VB--I TAA


What A Friend We Have In Democrats
This is a column about 2008 politics. Before I write about anything
political, I have to repeat that I intend to vote for Barack Obama.
But Obama or not, I'm still going to tell the truth! What a friend we
have in Democrats! All of our political sins and griefs they bear! With the
political "friends" that African American voters have, who needs enemies!
In 2008, as in every year for the last 50 or so years, Black voters are
certain to put Democratic candidates first while Democrats put Blacks last No, don't run away from the
Democratic political plantation to another political party. No major political party respectfully courts, sup-
ports, recognizes, acknowledges, hires, contracts or patronizes anybody non-white in a meaningful and sig-
nificant political manner.
The Democratic Party is poised for a remarkable leadership comeback in 2008. If Democrats fail to
take back the White House, expand their numbers in Congress and take back numerous state legislatures
and local councils and commissions, the failure will be because of their misuse, abuse, neglect and taking
for granted of the overwhelming, but sometimes blind, support of African American voters.
I say "blind" because more often than not Blacks are encouraged to, and many times do, just vote
Democratic. Black voters have to understand that some Democratic candidates are more evil than we could
ever imagine.
Any Democratic State Attorney, for instance, that would arbitrarily pick and choose which citizens to
prosecute, to over charge, to give extended probation periods to, to jail youth on false violations and to mali-
ciously prosecute based on racial motivations, Democrat or not, those candidates are not good choices for
Black voters to support.
The Democratic National Committee and more than a few State Democratic Parties have decided that
all money, funds contributed by Blacks, Hispanics, whites and others, would mostly go to white television
station owners. Yes, there are Blacks that own broadcast facilities but they are not getting political ad place-
ments.
So, Stevie Wonder could see that campaign expenditures are not based on media type. The "Change
We Can Believe In" doesn't have a damn thing to do with campaigning! There has been no change what-
soever in the way that Black voters are treated that seek diversity in campaign spending transactions.
What a friend we have in Democrats. They tell us they love us, They tell us they want us. They tell us
that they are best for us. Truth is no Democrat no where can get consistently elected without Black voter
support! The Democratic candidate for President can spend his total campaign budget trying to influence
"working class" (white) voters and still get land slid if Black voters don't turn out in huge numbers! Can I
prove it? Yes! If Barack Obama and John McCain are currently running.neck and neck in the presidential
campaign polls, McCain has at least 60% of the white voters polled.
All of the Democratic money spent has done very little to insure that conservative Democrats vote for
their nominee instead of voting for the Republican candidate. Don't forget there are more registered
Democrats in America than there are registered Republicans. When white voters are divided, African-
American black voters decide elections! Yes, what a friend we have. We give them everything we have polit-
ically but they only give us hopes, dreams and when we die, political pie in the sky!
(Gantt's new book "Beast Too: Dead Man Writing" is coming soon and will be illustrated by Lance
Scurvin. Contact Lucius at www.allworldconsultants.net).




Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

THE JACKSONVILLE LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE, INC., for the
Millions More Movement will 'Give-A-Way Clothes and Serve Free Food', Saturday,
August 23rd, 11:00 a.m. til 5:00 p.m., 916 N. Myrtle Ave., between Kings Rd. and Beaver
St. If you would like to donate, have any questions, 6r just want to learn more about the
Millions More Movement, visit our website www.jaxloc.com or call 904-240-9133.
Support the Jacksonville Local Organizing Committee Inc., 'as we work to end the vio-
lence through education, and not more incarceration'.
THE DURKEEVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY invites you to the Annual Fund
Raiser and Music Fest Celebration the Life and Legacy of Charlie "Hoss" Singleton,
September 20th at 7:00 p.m. at the University Club of Jacksonville, 1301 Riverplace
Blvd. $50 per person includes an elegant evening consisting of dinner served with a city
view, live music performed by local musicians and conducted by Mr. Warner Singleton,
the son of Charlie "Hoss" Singleton. Tickets deadline is August 30th. Call the center for
more information at (904) 598-9567.
THE EARLY LEARNING COALITION OF DUVAL COUNTY has released the
2008 Early Care & Education Guide Summer Camp Issue. The fourth annual edition, pro-
duced in partnership with JK Harris Publications LLC (JKH), includes complete and
updated listings of Northeast Florida Summer programs for children. The Guide is avail-
able free of charge. Information on Early Learning Coalition's programs, services and
membership can be accessed at http://www.elcofduval.org or by calling 904-208-2044.
Information on the Northeast Florida Early Care & Education Guide Summer Camp Issue
is available at www.earlycareguide.com.
SIXTH ANNUAL FCCJ FAMILY LITERACY FAIR -August 23 from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. at FCCJ North Campus, Courtyard, 4501 Capper Rd. Books, celebrities, storytelling
and activities encourage a love for reading for all ages. Cost is FREE and open to the pub-
lic. Includes live performances by celebrity readers, storytelling, age-appropriate read-
ing activities and lists, free books, face painting, prizes, surprises and free lunch. For
reservations (appreciated) or more information call 904-766-6553.
ATLANTIC BEACH WOMEN'S CONNECTION, Wednesday, September 3rd, from
9:30 11 a.m., Selva Marina Country Club, 1600 Selva Marina Dr., Atlantic Beach.
Contact Kate at 534-6784. SPEAKERS will be: Jill McGahan from St. Simons, GA
shares how she went from "most dependable" to least dependable" and back again. .
."Going Full Circle the Hard Way" PROGRAMS: A fabulous fashion show featuring
clothing, accessories and the latest looks from Coldwater Creek. All area women are wel-
come and encouraged to attend!!! COST: $12.00 incl. (complementary child care with
reservation.) EMAIL AND/OR WEB SITE ADDRESS TO. PRINT: atlanticbeach-
wc@yahoo.com
NEW POLLING LOCATIONS for August 26th Primary Election .-Jerry Holland,
Duval County Supervisor of Elections, confirms polling location changes for 9 of Duval
County's 284 voting precincts. The new polling locations will appear on the new voter
registration card and on the voter's sample ballot. All voters are encouraged to check their
voter registration card and their sample ballot to confirm their polling location before
going to vote. The Elections Office will staff the previous voting precincts with workers
from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. to supply voters with maps and directions to help voters
locate their new polling location. Voters may locate their new polling locations by visit-
ing the Duval County Supervisor of Elections website at www.duvalelections.com or by
calling the Elections Office at (904) 630-1414.
FREE MONEY -We have all heard the phrase, if something sounds too good to be true,
it usually is. Well in this case there are no tricks. I'm talking about the government stim-
ulus package. A recent articles in the Times Union indicate millions of low-income sen-
iors on fixed incomes, disabled veterans, disabled people receiving Social Security, and
some retired railroad workers, are all eligible for the rebates. The problem is people don't
think they qualify because they do not file tax returns. There is no catch. Simply fill-out
a (1040A) form that asks basic questions like: name, address, social security number, and
your yearly income. Sign the form, and mail it. THAT'S IT. The refunds vary, ut average
about $300. And wouldn't that be helpful with easing the JEA price increase, food bills,
health care, and skyrocketing gas prices. Don't miss out. The filing deadline is October
15, 2008. For information contact the IRA at 1-866-234-2942, or you can go to their web-
site www.irs.gov .
PALM COAST...The mood has been set for women to enjoy Health & Beauty Pamper
Day, featuring vendors in massage therapy, skin and nail care, as well as apparel, hats,
jewelry, other accessories, and designer candles. The Women's Ministry of First A.M.E.
Church has announced that Health & Beauty Pamper Day will also provide health
screening and a cafe, for enjoying lunch. Health & Beauty Pamper Day will be held at
the church Saturday, August 30, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is part of the events leading up to


What's in those



BIG SHIPS


at JAXPORT2

@4' '

'~~~ ^-*''
.*

The big ships at JAXPORT carry more than coffee, computers

and cars. They also bring 50,000 outstanding, well-paying

jobs and an annual $3 billion boost to our area's economy.

That's like hosting TEN Super Bowls-each and every year!


And that means those big ships deliver


a brighter future for all of us.




BIG SHIPS. BIG JOBS.


BIG IMPACT.




Sapr.cmJM


IL, -~


one other thing:


SWomen's Day, which will be celebrated Sunday, September 14, during the 10:45 a.m.
service. The church, at 91 Old Kings Road North in Palm Coast, is the pastorate of the
Rev. Gillard S. Glover. For more details, call the church at (386) 446-5759.


~PIIY~B~I~ -~o~a*innrs~ir~Lvaraurus~:~~~


AUGUST 23, 2008


THT STA R


DAFE 2


.1.-. ''








A___ UGST2. 00 HESTRPAE -


From Actual Police Reports
ssSHH!
Did You Hear About?...







THEFT BY EMPLOYEE -an officer
was dispatched to the 8100 block of
Lem Turner Rd., in reference to a theft








the unknown suspect stole over $11,000
Tby con ducting over sixty-eight fraudu-
lent transactions at the business. It is
was meted that Mr. D EF, the complainantve com-





ny.mitted this offense due to his perstonale
c ode being used ovemben all of the trand nosac-w,
tions. Hhe unknoe in s required to sustain allle over $11,000
allentged transactions at a later dates. ItMr. is




EF did rovide the officer with twelve transaction forms that were allegedly
tons. He is required to sustain all



fraudulently done by the subject for cash loans, the total loss via the cash loans
was over $8,000. Ten of the transactions have a finger print on them. The twelve
transactions were taken to the property room and were turned in as evidence. No
evidence technician was required for this incident. The officer will follow-up this
investigation with having the finger prints on the forms processed for identify
purposes. Patrol follow-up.


DUI IS A NO-NO! -two officers were on patrol in a marked patrol vehicle at W.
45th St. and Spring Grove Ave when they observed a vehicle pulling a trailer
without a tag attached. The officers turned on their emergency lights to signal the
vehicle to stop, but it turned west
onto W. 44th St. and refused to
stop. The vehicle began to swerve
from side to side on W. 44th St. and
S continued to drive while the officer
turned on his siren to further signal
the vehicle to stop. The vehicle
then pulled into a vacant lot in the
1900 block of W. 44th St. and came
to a stop. At this time, the officers
observed the driver (suspect), who
was not wearing his seatbelt, throw
an object out the driver's side win-
dow of the vehicle. Both officers
had to remove the suspect from the
vehicle and place him into hand-
cuffs. As they were placing the suspect into handcuffs, they could smell a strong
odor of an alcoholic beverage coming from the suspect as he spoke. The officer
also noticed that the suspect's speech was slurred and his eyes were bloodshot
and watery. One officer located two small baggies of Marijuana on the ground
next to the driver's door of the vehicle. That's when the driver was read his
Miranda Rights via card and asked him about the Marijuana. The suspect denied
any knowledge of the Marijuana. He asked the suspect how much has he had to
drink and he stated at first nothing and then he admitted to having a "few" drinks.
The officer then informed the suspect that he believe that he was DUI and asked
him if he would agree to perform field subriety evaluation. The suspect agreed
and while doing the one leg stand-used arms for balance. Put foot down. After
suspect counted to 4, he refused to finish the test. A check of the attached tag on
the vehicle revealed it belonged on a 1995 CADI and not on the listed vehicle.
the suspect was also unable to produce proof of insurance or registration. A
check of the suspect's license through NCIC revealed they were suspended
indefinite due to failing to pay two traffic fines. The suspect was placed under
arrest and transported to the PTDF.


r------------------------- EU

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H ARIES
Mar 21st Apr 19th
Let technology work for you instead ofvice-
veasa onMonday. (Hint Knowwhentotumu
offthe phone or step away from the screen!)
Home and your emotional center are ofpri-
may importance over the next few days.
You'll need to get sorted out in your sur-
roundings and your heart before you can
turn your energies outward again. And don't
delay you wont want to miss the activity
and adventure that await around Thursday
and Friday! Get outside you don't need a
plan! And this weekend you might feel
picky, but ifyou let it go a little, you'll find a
lot to love.


June 22nd- July 22nd
Beware of the dreaded unintended 'reply
all' and similar foot-in-mouth slip-ups on
Monday. You can get your ideas (and innu-
endos, and invitations) across way better
over the next few days, when your extra
compelling and extra hot! Don't be
seared to leave your shell behind, shed an
inhibition (or two) and go after what you
want But youe a little impaired in the
decision-making department around
Thursday and Friday what seems like a
fantastic idea now could make for prob-
lems later. Get some advice and reassess
this weekend.


You may be ot two minds about some-
thing (or someone) on Monday. Talk it
over, and not just on the surface level'-
how do you really feel? Then things
tend go off track over the next few days,
but stressing isn't gonna help matters.
While you're stuck waiting or wonder-
ing, you can still find fun. And when
you do that, the other stuff seems to sort
itself out! But you can (and should) take
a more active role starting Thursday.
Your life needs guidance now, and
you'll want to especially welcome and
shape what's new. If you want to just
chill out, Sunday's the day.

CAPRICORN
Dec 22nd Jan 19th
Figure out the emotional angle behind
your reactions as the week gets going.
Heart and mind are especially inter-
twined now, even if you think you're
being completely logical! A friend
who really gets you can shed some
light on the situation --providing you
explain it thoroughly. Then someone
may be calling on you for some help
around Thursday and Friday. You
should absolutely engage empatheti-
cally and do what you can, but know
when they're asking too much, too.
And your ideas for this weekend can
turn out even better than you'd hoped.
Get your favorite people on board,
have fun and bond!


TAURUS
Apr 20th May 20th
Build some variety into your day (or
evening) on Monday. The same-old,
same-old is gonna leave you cold now,
but a little spice gives a big mental spark.
If you wanna be a homebody, the next
couple of days are perfect for that Then
seeing eye-to-eye with others could be
tough around Thursday and Friday,
whether at work or in your personal life.
Concerted efforts toward listening- and
understanding are required. Then its
your heart that's sending off sparks when
the weekend comes. Whether you're part
of a couple or looking for summertime
romance, the way to heat things up is to
say what's on your mind!

LEO
July 23rd Aug 22nd
A little more conversation, a little less
action pays off on Monday. Get input
and get ready to make a more informed,
more right-for-you move. And the cos-
mic energy facilitates this over the next
few days, keeping you clear-headed and
creative at the same time. Then your
hottest days in a long time maybe all
summer are Thursday, Friday and
Saturday. Roar! Old favorites, brand-
spanking-new fun anything goes now.
And with you around, everything's
great! Don't overlook the allure of a sim-
ple starlit evening! On Sunday, though, a
practical matter needs your attention.

SCORPIO
Oct 23rd Nov 21st
You'll need those amazing analytical
powers of yours on Monday. Take all
the info into account, then sort it out.
Over the next few days, though, get a
little more touchy-feely- whether figu-
ratively or literally! Things aren't so
concrete now, and if you, can set expec-
tations aside adjust explore, you'll free
up the energy flow. Then while your
spark is hot, you might try fitting in
when it comes to a certain situation
instead of standing out around
Thursday or Friday. Consider it going
undercover! This weekend's perfect for
friends, projects and fun plans and
you don't have to think too big.

i AQUARIUS
40 Jan 20th Feb 18th
- "3 Ft~t


Take full advantage of a cosmic win-
dow of opportunity first thing on
Monday, because it's gonna slam shut
and leave you just looking over the
next couple of days. A hint from the
stars for this stymied time? A little
self-discipline helps a lot. And don't
get too wound up about it all, because
Thursday brings all kinds of possibili-
ties for better things. If you've been
thinking about making a change of the
forward-looking, positive sort, it's all
systems go! When the weekend
comes, though, you'll need to try hard-
er to stay on track -- or just relax by
the wayside.


5 GEMINI
May 21st- June 21st
Talk about dialed in you're at the cen-
ter of it all as the week gets going, and
connecting is your specialty. Just think
through your personal priorities, or
you're liable to fritter away this dynamic
- even electric energy. Then, starting
later on Wednesday, it's time to go into
looking and leading mode. You'll be sur-
prised by what you can find out from
now through the end of the workweek if
you apply yourself And positive rela-
tionships can really flourish this week-
end, but if something's a bit off in your
interpersonal realm, it's gonna need
addressing.


aenu on monday: even you umgui oe a
little disorganized now avoid big flub-
ups. Getting things back in order is easier
over the next few days, and don't neglect
your social calendar now, either. Find the
time for friends and do something new;
it'll all inspire you! At the end of the work-
week, circumstances may be less than
ideal in some area of life, but there's
another way. Entertain lots of options.
And when the weekend comes, the sta
are on your side, you fabulous thing! Its
time to get the most t of life and even
love!

SAGITTARIUS
Nov 22nd -Dec 21st
Seeing things as they are instead of
according to preconceptions or others'
projections keeps you plenty busy on
Monday. This vision, though, gives you
a real advantage with the questions
coming up over the next few days. Get
someone else in on looking for answers
to make it more interesting, funnier and
more fun. Then around Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, make the most of
what life has to give and thafs a lot
right now! Don't waste these beautiful
days and hot nights. There's plenty of
time starting Sunday for tidying up and
chilling out.

SPISCES
Feb 19th Mar 20th


Practical stuff isn't where your head's
at as the week gets going, not to men-
tion your heart! Good thing you're so
persuasive you can get help with the
concrete stuff in exchange for your
creative thinking or sheer entertain-
ment value. With the right partner
right now, there's really nothing you
can't do! Follow your ideals until
sometime Thursday, when, if you don't
get in touch with reality, it's gonna
give you a major wake-up call.
Everything's interconnected, and if
you'll only look from now through the
weekend, the stars give you insight


Cash, Check, Money Order
or Credit Card Accepted
L ---1----=-----a----J


Your Weekly


HOROSCOPE
August 23, 2008 August 29, 2008


I \


II


I


.. . I I III I I I I U


THE STAR


PAGE B-3


AUGUST 23, 2008







PAC1k yR THE S-'TA AUGUST23. 2008


By MICHAEL BONTS
Sports Writer
Photos by Nancy Beecher
Four field goals by Dan
Carpenter helped Miami win
for the first time this NFL pre-
season, 19-14 over
Jacksonville, before 63,927 at
Jacksonville Municipal
Stadium.
The undrafted rookie from
Montana connected from 31,
46, 44 and 37 yards. Carpenter
replaced veteran Jay Feely, who
was released on Aug. 12.
Jacksonville avoided the
shutout with 6:15 to play. The
big play was a 53-yard pass
from the Jaguars' third QB
Todd Bouman to Ryan Hoag for
a first and goal at the three.
Chris Brown then scored on a
three-yard run.
Bouman, 10-year veteran
fighting for a back up role on
the Jaguars, added a 12-yard
pass TD to tight end Charles
Davis.
Jacksonville's best chance
in the first half came with 6:52
to play. After an interference
call against Patrick Cobbs on a
punt, the Jaguars drove to the


Miami two with the help of
another Dolphins' penalty. A
roughing the passer call against
former Florida Gator Channing
Crowder gave the Jags' the ball
at the visitors 31.
Facing a fourth and one,
quarterback David Garrard
found Maurice Jones-Drew in
the flat for a 9-yard completion.
But running up the middle from
the two, Jones-Drew was hit by
Paul Solaila and lost the ball
through the end zone for a
touchback.
"Sloppy half. We didn't
move the ball. We got totally
stuffed offensively. Defensively
we never really slowed them
down. Special teams never won"
the field position. It was an ugly
half to be honest," said
Jacksonville coach Jack Del
Rio of the first half.
Garrard finished the game
7 of 14 for 63 yards and one run
for 10 yards.
The game was quarterback
Chad Pennigton's first in a
Dolphins' uniform. He was 5 of
6 for 55 yards. He also rushed
twice for 18 yards. Pennington
signed with Miami on Aug. 9


after being cut by the New York
Jets. Miami opens the regular
season against the Jets at
Dolphins Stadium
"It was really nice to see
him get the ball in the middle of
the field and run with it. I
thought Chad did a good job of
managing the game all around,"
said Miami first-year coach
Tony Sparano.
The Dolphins scored first
on a four-yard run by Ricky
Williams with 6:39 to play in
the opening quarter.
Former Dolphins' quarter-
back Cleo Lemon was looking
to solidify his back up role
against his old'team when he
started the third quarter. He was
picked off by at the Joey
Thomas inside the Miami red
zone" ending a threat. Lemon
finished 5 of 12 for 69 yards.
Jacksonville's Josh Scobee
missed a 51-yard field goal
with 4:19 to play in the first
quarter.
The Jaguars (1-1) continue
their preseason schedule in
Tampa Bay next Saturday. The
Dolphins (1-1) host Kansas
City.


BI wI'E O ~im


B .RUICE*

S. .. ..I ..(", .




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.... -i' C


ENDORSED BY:
V The Florida Times-Union


I I
ILk UYIVI .Vkr!/JAqr (/~,,.. (T)'


/ Fraternal Orders of Police
.(Duval, Clay and Nassau counties)
V Jacksonville Association of Fire Fighters
V Duval Teachers United
V Sherriff Nat Glover, (Ret.)
V Florida Rep. Audrey Gibson

THE ONLY CANDIDATE WITH EXPERIENCE...
* In trying numerous cases before juries;
* As a criminal prosecutor;
" As an Assistant State Attorney in Duval and
Nassau counties:
In service as a Bar Association president;
In running a private family and business law
practice.

Rick has prosecuted criminals,
represented crime victims and worked
hard to make our streets safe.


*


li 1' 11 I'- Cl \ I.U 1 \ \\' I\ I : I kl )-. k?17.i
WX"W. RICKBUTTNER.COMN


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.~*

,. .
__________________'_____"* -"*'^'


SPORTS


JACKSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL
PUBLIC HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE
COMMUNITY MEETINGS
SHARE YOUR CONCERNS & POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
Thursday, August 21, 2008, 6:30 8:30 P.M.
Clanzel Brown Community Center
4415 Moncrief Road
Thursday, August 28, 2008, 6:30 8:30 P.M.
Webb-Wesconnett Library
6887 103rd Street
Thursday, September 11, 2008, 6:30 8:30 P.M.
Twin Lakes Academy Middle School
8050 Point Meadows Drive

The City Council's Public Health & Safety Committee is hosting
community meetings to listen to your concerns on the following
topics: Public Safety and Jacksonville Journey's impact on the
City budget. You and your neighbors are requested to share your
ideas and suggest possible solutions on any issue pertaining to
the City of Jacksonville. City and JSO staff will be present to
answer questions on public safety and proposed safety initiatives.
For further information contact Cheryl L. Brown, Director, at 630-1377 or
Councilman Clay Yarborough, Chair of Public Health & Safety at 630-1389.


THE STA R


AUGUST 23, 2008


PAGF B-4


.:


::~::


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ner







PAT JE D-/


EMPLOYMENT
Change Your Life.
Your Future.
You have the power to change
your future. And you can do it
right here at Florida
Community College at
Jacksonvile. To learn about
employment opportunities that
are available please visit our
website at Jobs.FCCJ.edu.
DRIVERS
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Lots of Miles!
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BUSINESS NETWOR


Announcements

Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your classified ad in
over 100 Florida newspapers reaching over 4 MILLION
readers. Call this newspaper or (866)742-1373 for
more details or visit: www.florida-classifieds.com.

Auctions

AUCTION 1000 Islands area waterfront
properties, Lake Ontario waterfront estates, mansions
on the St. Lawrence River and duck hunting retreats.
Auction is Saturday, August 30 in Clayton, New York.
Get property details at www.woltz.com/newyork/ or call
(800)551-3588 for a brochure. Woltz & Schrader Real
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Building Supplies

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THE STAR I


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Local Man Travels Backwards

Through Cafeteria
BEXAR COUNTY- Tom W., after using Thera-Gesic*
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Go painless with Thera-Gesicu


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"Jacksonville Housing Authority Vouchers Accepted"







PAGE BS THE TARRAGUSTE2,T200
**^**^^^^^^^***iM^gp~giiita~a~iia~aaB~gaB~ij^ ^^^*^^----^*J^^FTT^^^^- A A^^--


The Station "Where Christ Gets Lifted"

Victony;AMA13601WCGL
JACKSONVILLE' LONG-TIME FRIEND


NEW AND READY TO GO

5560 .fames C. Johnson

Offered At $239,900


Betty Asque Davis. GRI
Agent
Watson Realty Corp
615 Highway AIA
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Office: 9(" 295-6301)
Office: 9U4 47,3-1.02
Lmail UBADa.vs(i WatsonRcaltyCorp.cmni


This Newly Contructed 3BR/2BA
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t rp. KUM,%,


Thf ria rrn us bied lr t 1, =k Tf Oul M net i


As your State Representative for District 14, the results I seek to produce for you include:


Reduced Crime

Senior Citizen Support Services

*. improved Access to Healthcare

0'T oFETV LADESI


* Stronger Public Education

* Economic Development Promotion


* 1'<~2~.


THE STAR


AUGUST 23, 2008


PAGE B-8







American Idol Auditions Held in

Jacksonville
by Yvonne brooks
Auditions for the next American Idol were
held in Jacksonville August 11 August 13,
2008 at the Jacksonville Arena. Idol hopefuls
came from all over. I had the opportunity to
meet two idol hopefuls from Orlando, Fl.
Childhood friends, Jasmine Hampton -a
freshmen at Valencia Community College in
Orlando, FI and Marvin White a sophomore at
Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, FI
were just two out of thousands in town for the
auditions.
Jasmine and Marvin along with Jasmine's
mom Trish and Jasmine's aunt Valerie arrived
"American Idol" hopeful Jasmine Hampton
in Jacksonville on Sunday afternoon. They "American Idol" hopeful Jasmine Hampton
spent the night at the arena so that they would
be able to get in line early Monday morning
for registration and get the required wrist- "
bands.
On Tuesday they enjoyed sight seeing in
and around Jacksonville and some Jenkins B-
B Que, which they had heard so much about,
and let's not forget the hot lemon tea to soothe
their throats. On Tuesday evening they were
interviewed on the community talk show
Impact, broadcast on WCGL and then it was
off to the Arena to spend the night again on
the parking lot.
Unfortunately, neither contestants will go If you are a fan of joy, then you are
on to the next round, but both Jasmine and already a fan of Special Olympics.
Marvin are so thankful and feel blessed that so Why not make it official?
Volunteer, support, coach or compete.
many family and friends encouraged and sup- Visit specialolympicsflorida.org.
Call 800-322-HERO.
ported them throughout the auditions.
As they return to school this fall they will
have stories to share regarding this experience -
and since they are both under 21 (max age is spean Oympis -
Florida
28 to audition) they will have other opportuni- Be a fan
Be a fan-
ties to audition for American Idol.
More photos on PR4


























By Liza Barnes, Health
Educator
If I close my eyes and con-
centrate, I can still remember
how it tasted: The snack that
my best friend introduced me to
in the 10th grade. So delicious,
it soon became part of an every-
day after-school ritual. We'd
each cut a plain white bagel
down the middle, spread a thick
layer of salty tub margarine on
each half, pop it in the
microwave until the margarine
was liquefied and the bagel was
piping hot and soft, and devour
it while sitting cross-legged on
her scratchy bedroom carpet,
reading magazines and confid-
ing secrets. Often we'd go back
for seconds.
Those were the days.
Thankfully, for my arteries'
sake, I soon became far better
informed about nutrition.
During my first after-school job
at a health-food store, I learned


aoout me wonaerru worta or
whole grains, healthy fats, and
fresh produce. I also learned
that these foods can taste just as
good as the "junk foods" (and
buttered white bagels) I once
revered. And yes, there's more
to healthy snacking than rice
cakes and celery sticks. I've
compiled a list of some of my
favorite healthy indulgences
that are quick and easy to make.
As a parent, you can whip up
these easy-to-prepare snacks
for your kids, or teach them
how to make the recipes them-
selves. They are full of nutrition
and flavor, so everyone will be
happy between school and din-
ner!
When you want some-
thing sweet, try...
Strawberry Smoothie: Add
1 handful of fresh :or frozen
strawberries, 1 fresh or frozen
banana (peeled and broken into
chunks), and 1 cup of low-fat
yogurt (any flavor you like) to a
blender. Blend until smooth.
TIP The texture of this smooth-
ie is enhanced if at least one of
the fruit ingredients is frozen.
PBO Smoothie: Add 1
frozen banana (broken into
chunks), 1 handful oats (instant
or old-fashioned), and 1 heap-
ing Tablespoon of peanut butter
to a blender. Sweeten with
honey and add enough soy, rice
or dairy milk to reach desired
thickness. Blend until smooth.


i ir frozen oananas are me Key
ingredient, for a milkshake-like
consistency.
Peanut Butter Banana
Sandwich: Toast 1 slice of
whole grain bread. Top it with 2
Tablespoons natural peanut but-
ter, 1 Tablespoon honey and
half of a banana thinly sliced.
TIP For a heartier dish, add
another slice of bread and cook
this sandwich on a warm skillet
like you would make grilled
cheese.
Yogurt Parfait: In a tall
glass or sundae cup, spoon
alternating layers of low-fat
yogurt, granola and sliced fruit
of your choice. TIP Try fresh or
canned fruit such as berries,
peaches and bananas.
When you want some-
thing salty, try...
Nachos: Spray a cookie
sheet with non-stick cooking
spray and preheat the oven to
450 degrees Fahrenheit. Spread
out a handful of low-fat or
baked tortilla chips onto pan.
Top with salsa, black beans
(canned and rinsed), and a
small amount of shredded
cheese. Bake for 15 minutes or
until cheese on top is melted.
TIP You can also heat nachos
on high in the microwave for
about a minute.
Nut Butter Dip: Combine
1/4 cup of your favorite nut but-
ter (such as peanut butter,
almond butter or cashew butter)


with 1/4 cup water. Whip with a
fork until smooth. Cut up car-
rots, celery, cucumbers, apples,
bananas or other fresh product
into spears and dip into the nut
butter. TIP You might have so
melt the nut butter slightly to
achieve desired consistency.
Bean Burritos: Top a
whole wheat tortilla with
canned fat-free refried beans,
salsa and ,shredded low-fat
cheese. Microwave until warm,
then add chopped lettuce and
plain low-fat yogurt for garnish.
Roll up and enjoy! TIP If you
don't have refried beans on
hand, open a can of black or
pinto beans, rinse, drain and
then mash with a fork.
Personal Veggie Pizza:
Preheat oven or toaster oven to
450 degrees Fahrenheit. Spread.
tomato sauce onto a piece of
whole wheat pita bread. Top
with your favorite veggies, such
as frozen peas, com, diced pep-
pers or onions, olives, broccoli
or sliced tomatoes. Sprinkle
cheese over vegetables and
bake for 15 minutes or until
cheese is melted. TIP If you
don't have pizza sauce on hand,
you can skip the sauce. For
added flavor, sprinkle your
pizza with garlic powder, dried
basil and/or dried oregano.
When you'd rather head
to the store, remember...
If you don't have the time
to make any of the recipes


above but still want to snack*
healthy, there are some great
packaged snacks available.
Take a cruise down the natural-
food aisle the next time you're-
at the supermarket. There are
plenty of low-fat, healthy and
natural versions of your kids'
favorites.

Healthy snacks that
don't need any prep work
include:
Low-fat yogurt
Trail mix
Mixed nuts
Dried fruit
Fruit leather
Granola bars
Protein or energy bars
Fresh fruit
Low-fat string cheese
Whole grain cereal w/ low-fat
milk
Whole grain crackers with
sliced low-fat cheese
Cottage cheese
Baby carrots with hummus
Air-popped popcorn
Whole wheat pita with black
bean dip
Celery sticks with peanut butter
Canned tuna salad kits

It's good for kids and teens
to snack, especially if they're
eating the right foods. Providing
their growing bodies with a
steady supply of nutrients is the
key to staying healthy and ener-
gized. So snack on!


Healthy Kidhu per dayurally


(Family Features)
Keeping kids and teens
healthy can be a challenge
during the busy school year. In
fact, the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
(CDC) say that nearly 22 mil-
lion school days are lost annu-
ally due to the common cold


alone.
Fortunately, there are
some simple, and natural,
things parents can do to help
kids stay healthy and ener-
gized for all their activities.
Hygiene. The CDC says
that the single most important
thing you can do to keep from
getting sick is to wash your
hands. When there's not sink
and soap around, use natural
hand sanitizers-wipes or gel-
with 100 percent pure essen-
tial oils.
Nutrition. Growing bod-
ies and brains need fiber and
nutrients to stay healthy. A
child's health can suffer from
too few of these good things
and too many sugary, highly
processed foods.
The USDA Food Guide
Pyramid recommends nine
servings of fruits and vegeta-
bles a day. One serving size of
fruits and veggies for children


equals one of the following:
1/2 cup juice
1 cup raw leafy salad
greens
1/2 cup chopped raw,
canned or cooked fruit or other
vegetable
Essential fatty acids, par-
ticularly omega-3s, are crucial
for development and health of
the brain, heart, nervous sys-
tem, tissues, skin and immune
system, especially for school-
age children. DHA can be
found in fatty cold-water fish
like salmon, mackerel and
tuna, and in DHA-enriched
products like eggs and milk.
What about nutritional
supplements? If kids and teens
are actually eating nine serv-
ings of colorful fruits and veg-
gies-plus foods containing all
the other recommended daily
nutrients-every day, then they
probably don't need them. But
with picky eaters, tight sched-


ules, food allergies and more,
they don't often get what they
need. In these cases, supple-
ments might be a good idea.
But be careful. While it's easy
to find a fun and fruity multi-
vitamin that kids don't mind
taking each day, its the nutri-
ents they need, not loads of
sugar or artificial colors and
flavors.
Rest. Rest, relaxation and
sleep are key for handling
stress. While moderate stress
is normal, the demands of
school life can cause stress
overload for youngsters and
adolescents-and their parents
and teachers! Be sure to
schedule in downtime and
allow for adequate sleep when
you're planning the week.
Kids need more sleep
than you might think.
3-6 years old: 10 3/4-12
hours per day
7-12 years old: 10-11


hours per day
12-18 years old: 81/4-
91/2 hours per day
Stomachaches, nervous-
ness, trouble sleeping, anger
flares or infections may be
signs of stress. Fortunately,
there are plenty of safe, effec-
tive ways to handle it.
Breathing deep, exercising,
stretching, physical play and
homeopathic remedies may
help.
If you would like to know
more about natural ways to
help your kids stay healthy, the
Whole Body Team Members
at Whole Foods Market are
well educated about all of the
products they offer and are
appy to answer questions.
You can also visit
WholeFoodsMarket.com for
educational podcasts and
more information.
Courtesy of Family
Features






The Star/Prep Rap


C_


CLEAN KID JOKE S

Silly Jokes!
What is the best day of the week to sleep?
Snooze-day!

How many rotten eggs does it take to make a stink
bomb?
A phew!

What do cannibals eat for breakfast?
Buttered host!

What holds the sun up in the sky?
Sunbeams!

What does "Maximum" mean?
A very big mother!

What is full of holes but can still hold water?
A sponge!

Why is perfume obedient?
Because it is scent wherever it goes!

Why do you keep doing the backstroke?
I've just had lunch and don't want to swim on a full
stomach!


Page PR-3/August 23, 2008


KNOCK! KNOCK!


Knock Knock
Who's there?
Tyrone!
Tyrone who?
Tyrone shoelaces!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Tyson!
Tyson who?
Tyson of this on for size!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Uganda!
Uganda who?
Uganda get away with this!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Uriah!
Uriah who?
Keep Uriah on the ball!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Uruguay! Uruguay who?
You go Uruguay and I'll go r

Color This


K U t I I- t
MMSAGVA
T F U M J B Q
PHOSFN.U
C PM TO X B
OA A E T A S
N J T RR N D
C'O C K A T I
WDGKH KT
P O E L H L E
H C N I FUN
F NOXMAR
TL I B R REG


BUDGIE
CANARY
CAT
COCKATIEL
DOG
FERRET
FINCH
FISH
GERBIL


K R t I N I
QMTCA C
T I OR O A
BOWL GN
D K R J V A
XGGRWR
OG I I A Y
E L G E J P
YU L L D J
A K H T X D
E D S RD N
F T I U Y G
L R F T F A


HAMSTER
IGUANA
MOUSE
PARAKEET
PARROT
RABBIT
RAT
SNAKE
TURTLE


Knock Knock
Who's there?
Texas!
Texas who?
Texas are getting higher
every year!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Thaddeus!
Thaddeus who?
To be or not to be, thad-
deus the question!


FARM





PAGE PR 4/AUGUST 23, 2008
Idol photos cont'd


Marvin White, "American Idol"
contestant


Contestants and their families at the
WCGL studio.


Deadline for Ads:

Tuesday @ 5 p.m.

Call: (904) 766-8834


ad@thefloridastar.com


4







Earth Shar'e
One environment
One simple way to care for it.

www.earthshare.org