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Florida star

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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00822

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00822

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news


This item has the following downloads:


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'Cefeba008State.s wardenne.SOME LORID STARHONOR
nc,._p~ d *ate On Of he 66 ifCommunications6mpnie


Thank you for
allowing us to
serve you these


57e
Years


THE


AFLORIDAsw-o

www.thefloridastar.com


LISTEN
TO IMPACT
Tuesday and Thursday
from 8:30 to 9:00 pm
WCGL-AM-1360 -
Tuesday at 6:00 pm
WZNZ-AM-1460
The Florida Star and
Impact Striving to Make
a Difference!


JUY5-JL 1, 00: L0 5 N. 2 0, CNT


AThe Williams
AreameSisters Back

Two Arrested in Murder of at Wimbledon

Teacher, Father of one

Suspect also Arrested
SS Nlyrtle
NlcKinne'. 58M.
a retired
Soheteacher was -
found dead in
her apartment
on Christmas
Gytonia Cheek, 27 Quritus Lowe II, 20 Quritus Lowe Sr. Day 2007. Her
Murder Suspect Murder Suspect Father of Suspect Palatka home
had been ran-
sacked,and on Mother's Day, her family begged for help in locating the
killer or killers. The community heard their plea and last Thursday,
Quritus Lowe II, 20 and Gytonia Cheek, 27 were Venus and Serena Williams
arrested and charged with first degree murder. The women's semifinals will be
Officers said it was a brutal murder and the sus- held Thursday at Wimbledon and the
pects knew Ms. McKinney. mighty Williams sisters, with Venus
Quritus Lowe Sr., father of one of the suspects as the champion and Serena as for-
has also been arrested on a charge of threatening a mer champion, will attempt to pro-
Myrtle McKinney, 5 witness duce a sibling final on Saturday at the
murdered teacher Palatka police said Two Continued on A-7 All England Club. Venus is 28 and
her sister Serena is 26. Serena is.an
Woman Shoots Man in Park After Argument eight-time Grand Slam champ.
T+ ta-qtt *-.dP Intd alm' iinrre.fl i tip u yrh i -i ir C Pk i A linm ni


ita OLasLtU 0a a Iovers q uarreil ni ei ue yprusLUt-A alKn 111 /rilll non onU
Wednesday. The young couple began to argue while in the park.
After leaving the park and going to a nearby neighborhood, the argu-
ment continued, according to reports 'and the woman shot the man,
hitting him several times in his lower body. The victim was taken to
a nearby hospital with non-life-threatening wounds and the woman
was arrested. The names of the victim and the female shooter, were
not released at the time of this writing.
Man Attempts to Set House on Fire
Anthony Florence, 35, was arrested and charged
with two counts of arson of an occupied structure
and two counts of criminal mischief.
Palatka Police said that Florence allegedly tried to
set his ex-girlfriend's residence on fire on May 31.
His ex-girlfriend and another'person were in the
apartment at the time. Neither were hurt and dam-
Anthony age to the living quarters was minor.
Florence, 35
Two Found Dead in Brunswick
On Friday, Charles Y.Owens, 45, of Brunswick, was found on his
back beside a fence. On Saturday, Brunswick Police was called to the
2300 block of Gordon Street where they found Michelle Gasque dead
on the front steps. She did not have identification on her but her son
later identified .her body. Michelle's death is a suspected homicide
since she appeared to have abrasions on her face.

VIore Crime Stories on Page A-7


Missing
George C.
Varnor has not
been seen by
"'- familyor friends
since May 2008.
George lives on
Tyler Street.
George C. Varnor His date of birth
is December 18,
1949. He has a mole on the right side
of his nose. Please help find him.
Call (973)570-3222 or (904) 738-
8427 or JSO-(904) 630-2627.


City Loses 4

"" 7 **


Mama Anna Williams, 108


Oldest


Mama Anna was 108
years of age and was
Jacksonville's oldest
citizen and oldest
active voter. She
-transferred to her
heavenly: home on
June 25, 2008. Read
more on page A-3.


New Laws for Florida and Georgia
Effective July 1, 2008
Georgia Georgia residents with gun permits will
be allowed to take their guns in restaurants, including
those that serve alcohol They will also be allowed to
take guns with them while riding public transportation
and in state parks. .
Regarding alcohol, Georgia restaurants can now
allow their customers to take unfinished bottles of
wine that is ordered with their meals, with them.
They will also be allowed to order up to 12 cases of
wine over the Internet. In addition, limousine drivers
can now sell cocktails to their customers.
New Laws Continued on A-7

Jaxport Gets New Senior Administrator
Kenyatta Y Lee has been
promoted to Senior Director,
Administration, at the
Jacksonville Port Authority
(JAXPORT).: In this new
position, Lee will be respon-
sible for employee services,
corporate performance, risk
management and information
technology.
Rick Ferrin, JAXPORT
Kenyatta Lee Executive Director said, "I
am confident she will add
tremendous value to my senior staff."
Lee joined JAXPORT in 2006 and previously served
as Senior Director of Finance and Administration for
the Port 6f Palm Beach. She is an honor graduate of
Bethune-Cookman University with a degree in
accounting.


Media Images Still Not Liked by Blacks
"Blacks ae not satisfied with how they are portrayed by the media. Only 29 percent agree that
the mainstream media portray Blacks in a positive light compared to 50 percent who do not
relate to the way Blacks are portrayed on most Black TV shows. Two-thirds believe there should
be morp television shows that focus on Blacks. Forty percent think Black TV is reinforcing a
negative stereotype of Blacks."
The information above is from a survey of 3,400 African Americans between 13 and 74, taken
by Yankelovich consumer market research firm for Radio One Inc.
The study also shows that 70 percent of African Americans have a plan for their future and that
54 percent were optimistic about that future. It also states that 60 percent believe 'things are get-
ting better for me."


Scientists Say Watermelon
Yields Viagra-like Effects
Scientists say that men may want to enjoy a larger
slice of water melon on the Fourth of July since it has
effects similar to Viagra.
According to reports, watermelons contain an ingredi-
ent called citrulline that can trigger production of a
-compound that helps relax the body's blood vessels,
similar to when a man takes Viagra. Of course, there
are some problems such as more frequent runs to the
bathroom and the amount of sugar that would spill into
the bloodstream since one would need to eat about six
cups of watermelon to eat enough. More research is
being done.


Arthur Eugene Lundy Passes
Arthur Eugene Lundy was born in
a. Jacksonville on October 5, 1922 and
" graduated at the top of his class from
Risley High School in Brunswick.
S- After marriage, he moved to
A Rochester, New York but kept his
Arthur Lundy, 85 Florida/Georgia ties with family and
friends as brother to Arnetta Jackson of Gainesville and
Mildred B. Williams of Brunswick. Known as the "lit-
tle genius" Arthur had 4 sons and one daughter, grand
and great grand children, nieces and nephews. He
served as a musician, artist, tailor and baker to his
church and his community. He died June 23, 2008.


News Briefs
Citibank ATM breach reveals PIN secu-
rity problems
Hackers broke into Citibank's network of ATMS
inside 7-Eleven stores and stole customers' PIN codes
that revealed a security hole in a banking record,
according to an Associated Press report. The hackers
were able to attack the back-end computers responsi-
ble for approving the cash withdrawals. Court papers
have been filed and customers are not being held
responsible if their bank accounts were affected.
ENJOY YOUR AREA FIREWORKS ON
THIS FOURTH OF JULY, 2008


a 51069'03151 [ N


P B C~X 117007
GA~tINFSL'ILLE FL 32~671.7007


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Loo king .-lor "customi ers' tq-,- patronize, your
usirie, ss -,br-mb I ike' "'you'r, des?, If -you
aris ered o .666dto place- an. ad'
Starl"" 'CALL
'00,4,/,766-8834 to placeyoUr ad TODAYII,.,-
Oe Ciedit Cad,, A cceFted


'


I













PfA1GE., A-2


THE FLOR0 ~ ID~A STA


CLARA FRANCES McLAUGHLIN DENNIS WADE
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Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua,
Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn
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The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$35.00
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Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:.
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MEMBERSHIPS:
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Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame ,


Over a 48-hour peri-
od this Memorial Day
weekend, 21 people
were shot in New York
City, six fatally. A
gunman opened fire
on a crowd in a shop-
ping district in Queens
and wounded five. peo-
ple. A 15-year-old was
killed while leaving a
party in Manhattan. A
13-year-old boy and a
15-year-old girl were
wounded in Harlem.
This spring frenzy
of gun violence has
not been limited to
New York. Other
cities have experi-
enced a similar rash of
shootings.' In one
weekend in June, 14
people were shot to
death in Los Angeles
County. The police
attributed the violence
to gang activity.
During the early
morning hours of May
24, three men were
shot to death in
Philadelphia. Each
was the victim of mul-
tiple bullet wounds. In
the last weekend in


May, seven people
were killed and three
were wounded in the
District. of Columbia
in just nine hours. In a
city where homicides
had been on the
decline in recent
years,' the number of
D.C. murders sur-
passed the previous
year's mark for May. A
rash of shootings ear-
lier this year caused
the District's police
chief to call .a virtual
"all hands on deck"
alert to put as many
officers on street duty
as possible as a deter-
rent to more gun vio-
lence.
Regardless of
whether the shootings
were motivated by a
gang rivalry, revenge
or an unwelcome
glance at .someone
else's girlfriend, the
rampant gun violence
plaguing our nation
must stop. To do
soriething about this
scourge, we have to
address its causes.
There are more than
200 million privately
owned firearms in the
United States. Too
many of, these guns
have ended up in the
wrong hands.
Congress's refusal to
extend the Assault
Weapons Ban didn't
help. Since the bart
expired in 2004, the
number of deaths
among children and
teens from firearms
increased for the first
time since the ban was
enacted in 1994. The
June 26th Supreme
Court ruling to strike
down Washington,
D.C.'s handgun ban
dealt yet another blow
to securing our chil-
dren's safety from gun
violence.
Putting a police offi-
cer on every street
corner is not feasible
and resorting to


We Must Pay Attention to the
Rise of Gun Violence

3 Y MAR-IAN J\JRIr-i T Ef!E LMAN
P* FRasaIDsENT EF THE e IlLDREW, OEFENE FuNDl


I


v i


r-


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com

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The Famous Ed Furbee Garage Sale Show at 6-8 am.


Dave Siebert interviews local newsmakers, 8-10 a.m.


"Brother Stan the Union Man at 10-noon


Charles Hutcherson at noon-] p.m.


Neal Mace, Ed Brady at 1-2 p.m.


Andy Johnson at 3-6 p.m.


National Geographic at 6-8 p.m.


Americana Saturday Night at 8-10 p.m.


Joe Lyles bashes Limbaugh, 10-midnight


Chris Robetv, Focus on Jacksonville, midnight-2 am.





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AM 1460 WZNZ
Jacksonville's Progessive Talk Station
(also see www.1460.us)
Off-air business phone: 470-4853


I -


repressive measures
would be abhorrent.
But there are things
we can do. Those who
own guns should
remove them from
their homes so they
are out of the reach of
children and irrespon-
sible adults. We don't
need to read any more
newspaper accounts.
like the one on June 9
when a 4-year-old girl
in Columbia, South
Carolina, pulled a gun
from her. grandmoth-
er's handbag and shot
herself in the chest.
We must urge
Congress to impose
common sense restric-
tions on the purchase
and availability of
firearms. Forty per-
cent of all guns in the
United States are pur-
chased without a back-
ground check, includ-
ing those bought at
gun ,shows. Congress
must enact legislation
that closes the gun
show loophole by
requiring criminal
background checks on
those who purchase
guns from unlicensed
dealers.
There are a number
of community-based
models that can be
replicated i\ike the
Boston Ten Point
Coalition, an ecumeni-
cal Christian commu-
nity, which achieved a
30-month moratorium
on juvenile gun vio-
lence in that city. It
focuses on developing
Black and Latino
youth, especially,
those at risk of vio-
lence, drug abuse and
other destructive
behaviors. The organi-
zation provides coun-
seling in schools on
peer conflict and gang
mediation. Much of
the group's work is
done through home
visits. In addition to
faith institutions, the
coalition includes
community organiza-
tions, government
agencies and local
businesses.
The toxic elerhents
of popular culture that


celebrate violent
behavior through the
powerful media of
music, movies and tel-
evision are major con-
tributors to the rise of
gun violence. To
counter the. constant
stream of brutal
images our, children
witness daily, we must
arm them with nonvio-
lence strategies on
how to resolve con-
flicts.
Each of us must do
more to personally
instill in our own chil-
dren the values that
will lead to the cre-
ation of safe. commu-
nities. We need to
,mold them into
healthy adults who are
brought up with love,
self-confidence and a
generous spirit. As
I've mentioned before,
we need to bring back
"Cradle Rolls" 'when a
child born to anyone
in our church commu-
nity was immediately
placed on this special
.list, and members of
the congregation were
responsible for fol-
lowing these children
until they reached the
"age of accountabili-

ty." We need to extend
the Cradle Roll to all
our communities. And
we need to enact com-
mon sense gun control
measures.
The rise of gun vio-
lence in our communi-
ties is serious and dan-
gerous, but we don't
have to stand by as
mere witnesses. We
can do something
about it. We must take
action now to curb the
threat that firearms
pose to our nation.
Too much is at stake.
We cannot allow these
shots to go unheard.


JULY5,2008


THE STAR


nAlrIv A 17


IIC 0 U N' C I Ll




















Faith in Our Community Jacksonville's Oldest Citizen
Schedue of Evet ad and Oldest Active Voter
Schedule of Events and Services Passed at 108 Years Old


HELPING HURTING WOMEN CONFERENCE
2008 "Now Ministering in over 8 cities and 2 states"
The United church for Christ Trinity and to our 2008
Helping Hurting Women Conference as the Spirit of the
Living God will minister to your needs. The host church
and conference site is Mt. Pleasant Missionary Baptist
church located at 1300 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. in
Green Cove Springs, FL., under the leadership of Pastor
Robert Wright. The conference will be Saturday, July
12th at 10:00 a.m. "There is Healing in His Hands,"
powerful anointed preaching and teaching with break-
through session. Woman of God come out and bring a
friend and receive your healing. For more information,
contact Lady Faustina Andrews at (904) 284-0206.
Presented by United Church In Christ, Bishop W. A.
Andrews, Pastor.
GOSPEL EXTRAVAGANZA 2008 Featuring Shirley
Caesar, Yolanda Adams, Juanita Bynum, and more.
Friday, September 19th at the WaMu Theater at Madison
Square Garden on 7th Ave in New York City, NY. Go to
www.ticketmaster.com or call 800-490-1541 for more
information.
NEIGHBORHOOD HEALTH OUTREACH COOP-
ERATIVE -Partners from the Pine Forest community
and the University of North Florida School of Nursing
invite you to participate in a Neighborhood Health
Outreach Cooperative designed to increase access to
care for local residents and thereby decrease health dis-
parities. Pine Forest is a very close-knit neighborhood
where the majority of the residents are at high risk for
heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic dis-
eases and many have no health insurance or are underin-
sured. A task force of local leaders and faculty from the
UNF School of Nursing studied the issue, of access to
care and explored strategies that have the potential to be
successful in this neighborhood. The concept of a
Neighborhood Health Outreach Cooperative emerged
from this effort. The initial plan is to bring a variety of
services together at the Henry T. Jones Community
Center for 4-6 hours bimonthly to provide health risk
assessment, information and referral services, and fami-
ly life education. In order to develop a sustainable pro-
gram, we need to recruit local services interested in par-
ticipating as we develop this model. We hope that you
will be interested in joining us as we pilot this project
over the next year. The first opening will be on July
10th from 4 8 p.m. For more information, contact Dr.
Connie Roush, PhD, RN at 904-652-7607 or Carrie
Davis, Univ. of North FL School of Nursing at 904-307-
0751.
MUSIC FOR A SUNDAY MORNING Unitarian
Universalist Church of Jacksonville; Sunday, July 13,
10:45 a.m., Christine Clark, piano, Bach and Brahms;
Sunday, July 20, 10:45 a.m., Grant Peeples, Leftneck
'Alternative Southern' folk musician, environmental and
socio-political themes; Sunday, July 27, 10:45 a.m.,
Henson Markham, harpsichord, Bach: Well-tempered
Clavier. Go to www.uujax.org for more information.
Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com
I. r


Ask Us About Our


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in your family yesterday,
what would you be doing
today?


Pre-Need


Fore-

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Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
DIRECTORS


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Alphonso West


Jacqueline Y. Bartley


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Church Directory in
The Florida Star / The Georgia Star :
2 column x 2" for only
$10.00 each week
Call (904) 766-8834
SSO 0000*00000000000


Ms. Anna Williams
Born Anna Sanders to the late Elouise Sanders & Alex
McDuffie on November 24, 1899 in Allendale South Carolina.
Anna married the love of her life, James "Jim" Williams in S.
Carolina in 1923, they later moved to Jacksonville, "FL in 1925.
In 1927 "Ms. Anna" "Mama Anna" or "Mama Williams," as she
was frequently called, and Mr. Jim moved into their home on the
Eastside of Jacksonville where she lived until her demise. Ms.
Anna Williams has been a widow for over 35 years.
Ms. Anna was the 7th of fourteen children. In her younger
years Ms. Anna was employed by the New York Laundry. She
was a faithful member of Tabernacle Baptist Institutional Church
where she served under the leadership of the late Rev. Willie E.
Young and the current pastor, Rev, Michael C. Edwards where she
has been a member for over 75 years and served faithfully in the
Tabernacle Gospel Choir until her later years.
Ms. Anna hobbies included eating, sewing, talking on the
phone and sleeping; God blessed her with-a hearty and healthy
appetite. She credited long healthy life to serving, trusting, believ-
ing in.God and doing good to others. Ms. Anna loved to read her
Bible. She frequently traveled back to her hometown to visit fam-
ily and friends in Allendale, S.C.
Ms. Anna would rise early every morning to eat her breakfast
and drink her must have "cup of coffee." Ms. Anna turned 108
years young on November 24, 2007 and celebrated the gift of life
everyday by giving thanks to God.
Ms. Anna attended the Mary Singleton Center/Independent
Living Program three times a week for over 11)O years and was cur-
rently attending Peaches-NA-Basket Adult Daycare. Most of all
she enjoyed tlhe friendship, fellowship and the food that came
along with her weekly outings to the malls, movies, and restau-
rants. You could always find a smile on her face and a soft word
of encouragement on her lips.
Ms. Anna was a mother, godmother, aunt & grandmother to
many. Ms. Anna is survived by her dedicated granddaugh-
ter/caregiver Sherry L. Lowman along with numerous nieces,
nephews, godchildren, family members and has been blessed with
many beautiful friends, neighbors and a loving church family.
Ms. Anna slept peacefully away with a smile on her face as
she transformed from earth to Heaven on Wednesday, June 25,
2008 at 4:45 p.m.
The viewing/wake for Ms. Anna was held Thursday, July 3rd
at Marion Graham Mortuaries-Eastside. Her homegoing celebra-
tion services will be Saturday, July 5, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. at the
Tabernacle Baptist Institutional Church, 903 East Union St. Her
final resting place will be in Allendale, S.C. per her request,
Come join in as her family, friends, church and community
celebrate the life, legacy and love of "Ms. Anna."


Almighty God, Father of all mercies and giver of all
comfort: Deal graciously, we pray thee,with
those who mourn, that castin every care on thee,
they may know the consolation of thy love,
through Jesus Christ our LORD.



DEATH NOTICES


BARNEY, Diane, died
June 26, 2008.
BARRINGTON,
Walter, died June 29,
2008.
BOSSARD, Mattie P.,
died June 29, 2008.
BROWN, Roy A., Jr.,
76, died June 28, 2008.
BRYANT, Johnny, 49,
died June 26, 2008.
BIGGEST, Daniel C.,
79,,died June 27, 2008.
CALLAWAY, Marion,
58, died June 25, 2008.
COPELAND, Willis,
90, died June 30, 2008.
COUNCIL, Kimberly,
died June 21, 2008.
CROWDER, Thelma,
died June 28, 2008.
DeBOSE, Artavious,
died June 24, 2008.
FEARING, Mary, died
June 26, 2008.
HARRISON, Baby
Jordan, died June 25,
2008.
HART, Rhea, died June
24, 2008.


HAYES, Alma, died
June 28, 2008.
HEARNE, Johnnie, died
June 26, 2008.
LOCKHART, Retha,
75, died June 25, 2008.
LOTT,' Baby Boy
Braylon, died June 24,
2008.
MARTIN, Pemell, died
June 24, 2008.
PEARSON, Steve, died
June 24, 2008.
RHODES, Charles, 57,
died June 25, 2008.
ROWLS, Emma J., died
June 24, 2008.
SIMMONS, Israel,' died
June 25, 2008.
STANTON, Douglass,
died June 27, 2008.
WILLIAMS, Mrs.,
Anna, 108, died June 25,
2008.
WILLIAMS, Mrs.
Albertha, died June 29,
2008.
WILSON, Ky'Aanh,
died June 20, 2008.


The Church Directory
K "Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School ....................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .......................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays
(Old Sanctuary)..................... ..... 1......11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting.............. ........ 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ............ 8:00 p.m.
Rev. Eric Lee, Pastor -
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus
(904) 764-5727 Church

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
W orship Service................................................................. 10:00 a.m .
Church School...................................................................... 8:45 a.m .
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study.................................................6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday....................10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry........................................................ 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School............................. ........................... 9:30 a.m.
M morning W orship............................................................................ 11:00 a.m .
Tuesday............................................ Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday................................................... .................. Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School ---------------------------- 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship -----------------12:00 Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study -------------------Tuesday & Friday------ 7:00 p.m.
(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520


THE FLORIDA / GEORGIA STAR

^^^ OFFICE (904) 766-8834
FAX (904) 765-1673


EMAIL:
info@TheFloridaStar.com


Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School.........................9:15 10:15 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary)...................10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall.................................. 10:30 a.m.
Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer.........................................1....12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities


Tune In To

~ C, T",,'


Clara McLaughlin
Host

Tuesday


Co-Host


and Thursday


from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.


WCGL-AM 1360

The Florida Star and Impact
Striving To Make A Difference!


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P4GE .4-4








"Th


I


U


by May E. Ford,
Layout Editor/The Florida Star
May "Ebony" Ford, one of The Florida Star.'s own, cruised
the caribbean recently and thought she would share a little of
it with you.
In May of this year I vacationed, along with my brother
Rasco Green, my dear friend from Shreveport, Louisiana
Betty Pratt and her son Johnny Bernard Pratt. We chose the
Western Caribbean Cruise on The Fun Ship of Carnival
Cruise Line.
We left Galveston, Texas on a Sunday afternoon. While at
sea, we had an agenda that kept us busy enough we did not
have time to think about home. There were dancing, broad-
way shows, gambling, shopping, and much, much more on
the ship itself, not counting the many pictures that were taken
by professional photographers throughout the ship daily.
After about two and one half days at sea, we finally land-
ed in Montego Bay, Jamaica, where we enjoyed one full day
of fun...shopping, shopping and more shopping, site seeing
and water falls.
The next stop was the Grand Cayman Islands where there
were white sandy beaches and beautiful clean blue waters that
we swam and waded in until it was almost time to board ship
again, but not.until we tasted the scrumptious rum cake that
the Cayman Islands are known for and starring at the iguanas
that rome the land like cats and dogs here in the states. The
tortoise were a big attraction there also.
On that same cruise was Cozumel, Mexico where we took
pictures, and yes shopped till we dropped, enjoyed some mar-
garitas and dancing before we boarded ship again to head
back home. We really enjoyed our seven day cruise and look
forward to exploring more of God's big earth soon. (Photos
courtesy of May Ford).


'IHAA, TAR JLY5, 00


LIFESTYLE


I I


Socially Speaking I
By Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr.


ere 's Always


Something Happening


'I


On The First Coast"


JI


before going into the hot


'o, it's not upside down. It was taken this way as we waved to
friends on the top deck.


'*1


May Ford as she looks out at a vanishing land mass that she ,
never forget as they sail away from.Jamaica.


er dinner we gathered for a pose. In front: Betty Pratt and
'y Ford; In the back: Rasco Green, and Johnnie B. Pratt.


May in Cozumel, Mexico as she looks for a cool drink before
doing some serious shopping.


.4 reggae band played while we watched,
danced, and ate.


l 'While visiting Cozumel, Mexico, May Ford on the left and Rasco Green on the right sto pped
uby Senior Frow Restaurant and Bar in hopes to find out what all of the weird signs andToud
"" music were aiout Some signs read- "Sorry We Are Open." "No Filming Allowed Inside,"
May Ford trying to get Senior Frog to tell her "From 10 a.m. Till You Drop," "Where Anything Can HIappen, and bodies hanging front Rasco Green tried his luck at the casino aboard
what's in store for her before she goes upstairs. / inner tubes from the ceiling while the escalator carried me to the entrance at the top. the cruise ship. Did he hit? He's not telling.
Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events. Contact us at (904) 766-8834; E-mail socially@TheFloridaStar.com or
you may reach me directly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-7008. SEE YOU IN THE PAPER!


" ,.-Y ./ 7 -.' -, .. .." ".- ."


Cruising The Caribbean


I- I


---------- i


JULY 5, 2008


THE STAR


i









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1H UD


The Federal Fair Housing Act protects your right to live where you want. In fact, In any decision regarding rental, sales,
or lending, it Is against the law to consider race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, or family status.
II you think you've been denied housing, please call us. Fair Housing. It's not an option. It's the law.


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get

history

buff.


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PAGEA-5


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JULY 5 2008


DISCRIMINATION
SAYS THEY
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I THE LAW
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DA tyr' A T-HE TAAJLY-,-00


II Ji 1I:


AL Green Fires Up The '08 BET


Awards!

Photo courtesy of Black Elliot landed Best on the R&B/Hip Hop and The Creations.
Entertainment Television Female Hip Hop Artist Chart which is Green's Two members of that
The 2008 BET and The Dream roped highest chart position group Curtis Rogers
Awards was another in Best New Artist. since his 1972 classic and Palmer James
smash hit as it is annu- Marvin Sapp not only "Sill In Love With formed the independ-
smash hit as.it is annu-
ally. Taking place turned out the place You," which peaked at ent, Hot Line Music
"live" at the famed with another fiery ren- #4. The new album Journal label. They
Shrine Auditorium in edition of his smash features Corinne renamed The
Shrine Auditorium in 1 T 1 -


Los Angeles on a
warm Tuesday, June
24th night, the glitz
and glamour rein
supreme throughout
the night. This year's
host was
comedian/actor D.L.
Hughley. The night's
big winners included
Kanye West who-took
home two prizes for
Best. Male Hip Hop
Artist and Best
Collaboration for
"Good Life" featuring
T-Pain. UGK was the
other two prize winner
taking home the Best
Group trophy and
Video of the Year hon-
ors. Alicia Keys took
Best Female R&B
Artist; Chris Brown
pocketed Best Male
R&B Artist; Missy


Music
Smooth vocalist Lori
Jenaire has a mellow CD
out titled Fruition out on
NBE Records. The sistah
has the righteous pips and is
fine to boot. Rapper David
Banner will be dropping a
new album The Greatest
Story Ever Told, which will
be in stores Julyl5, 2008.
The first single "Get Like
Me," featuring Chris
Brown and Yung Joc is cur-
rently heating up the air-
waves. Other guest include
Jim Jones, UGK, Snoop
Dogg, Lil Wayne,
Chamillionaire, Sean
Paul, Akon and others to
name a few. spindmister
"DJ Timbo" AKA Tim
Scame has embarked on a
nationwide club tour he
calls "The Go Go Girl
Tour. Check out his website
www.djtimbo.com Watch
'for the latest band from
Sweden to tackle the U.S.,
called "The
Windupdeads." Their self
titled debut album will drop
October 7, 2008 on One
Records. Catch them at
www.myspace.com/thewin
dupdeads..
Awards
Rapper/actor Ludacriss,
R&B crooner Mario and
rapper Bun B were honored
at The 10th Annual
Educating Young Minds
Scholarship Awards Gala
in Los Angeles. Actress
Kenya Moore presented
Ludacriss with the 2008
Chairman's Award; 2007
Miss USA Rachel Smith
presented Mario with the
2008 Young Achievers
Award and Bun B received
the 2008 Artist
Achievement Award pre-
sented by actor Brandon
Fobbs. The UCLA Black
Alumni Association was
presented with the 2008
Golden Apple Award.
Popular LA Club The


gospel hit -Never
Would Have Made It,"
but he took home the
trophy for Best Gospel
Artist. Quincy Jones
won the Humanitarian
Award.
The main event of
the evening was clear-
ly the legendary soul
master The Rt. Rev. Al
Green who won the
BET's Lifetime
Achievement Award.
His stage performance
was clear evidence and
proof positive that this
brotha has not lost a
beat in his long suc-
cessful career. Green's
latest album titled Lay
It Down, on the Blue-
Note Records label
was released in May of
this year and debuted
at #9 on the Billboard
Top 200 Chart and #4


Annual ASCAP Rhythm &
Soul Music Awards was
held at the Beverly Hilton
Hotel in Beverly Hills last
week honoring veteran soul
vocal group 'The New
Edition with The ASCAP
Golden Note Award.
Other ASCAP Award
recipients included:
Timbaland, Songwriter of
the Year; EMI Music
Publishing, Publisher of
the Year; "This is Why I'm
Hot," Ringtone of the Year;
"Lost Without You,"
R&B/Hip Hop Song of the
Year; "Make Me Better,"
Rap Song of the Year and
"Blessed & Highly
Favored," Gospel Song of
the Year. The '08 BET
Awards had a blistering
string of party events lead-
ing up to the awards broad-
cast which included a red
carpet bash thrown by BET
N e t w o r k s
Chairperson/CEO Debra
Lee at the fabulous Vibiana
in Downtown Los Angeles.
Then there was a highly
completive celebrity pool
tournament to help with the
relaxation and networking.
And of course, the grand-
daddy closer of them all, the
awards after party held at
the historic Roosevelt Hotel
in Hollywood.
Birthday
Happy birthday congrats
are in order for teen actress
Raven Goodwin who cele-
brated her sweet 16th with a
bash packed with fellow
celeb teens. Of course
Raven is one of Rych
McCain's Family of
ChildTeen Artists.
Condolences
Our prayers and good
wishes go out to the family,
friends and fans of the late
comedian George Carlin
who died from heart failure.
He was truly one of the
greats and will be missed.
Confusion:
Let's hope that the


Bailey Rae, Anthony
Hamilton and John
Legend and was pro-
duced by Ahmir ?uest-
love Thompson.
Green's illustrious
'career began in his
home town of Forest
City, Arkansas at age 9
where he formed a
gospel quartet with his
siblings called the
Green Brothers and
they toured the South.
The family relocated
to
Grand Rapids,
Michigan continuing
the group but Green's
dad caught him listen-
ing to a Jackie Wilson
record and kicked him
out of the group.
,Green later formed an
R&B Singing group
with some high school
pals called Al Green


confusion AKA (beef)
between elder rapper/actor
Ice-T and young, teen up-
and-coming rapper Soulja
Boy comes to a mutual
understanding. The two
have videos out on
YouTube.com explaining
their side of the feud attar
Soulja Boy responded to
negative comments Ice-T
made about his music. This
generation gap between our
older and younger people in
the hood must close not
only for those in show busi-
ness but for the good of our
community in general.
Movies
Get Smart; Warner
Bros. Pictures in associa-
tion with Village Roadshow
Pictures, A Mosaic Media
G'r o u p / M a d
Chance/Callahan
Filmworks Produion.
Starring Steve Carell, Anne
Hathaway, Alan Arkin,
Dwayne Johnson, Terence
Stamp, Ken Davitian, Terry
Crews, James Caan and
Bill Murray. Directed by
Peter Segal. Written by
Tom J. Astle & Matt
Ember. Produced by
Andrew Lazar, Michael
Ewing, Alex Gartner and
Charles Roven.
If you are old enough to
remember or be a fan of the
original 60'sTV comedy
series, this movie may or
may not live up to the hype.
Steve Carell does a pretty
good job of portraying
Maxwell Smart in the vein
of the original character
played by Don Adams. This
movie somehow is not as
funny as it should have
been. If you've seen the
trailer highlights, you've
seen the only funny parts of
the movie. This looks more
like a rental flick.
Hit me up at feedback-
rych@sbcglobal.net
Maat Hotep!
Rych


Creations to mThe oul
Mates and release a
single "Back Up
Train," which became
a big hit.
Unfortunately, the
company failed to
duplicate that success
and Green eventually
hooked up with band
leader, Hi Records VP
Willie Mitchell whom
he met on, the road at a
,gig in Midland, Texas.
O Green's first Hi
album wasn't a big hit
but it introduced his
.new signature sound
and laid the founda-
tion'for his next album
"AL Green Gets Next
To You." Which'
spawned., the 1970
smash hhitd 'gold single
:T i', Of Being
*'MoQ This ~ as tfol-
Sit6Nvi.d.,-up by the clas-
e ga, my t-hit
album "Let's tay
Together;" ,. :which
began a string of gold
singles starting with
the title song. Hit after
hit ensued such as
"How Can You Mend
A Broken Heart,"
"Here I am," "Look
What You've Done For
Me,' "I'm still In Love


' Wt You" and of
course, his signature
anthem "Love And
IHappiness."
? When asked what
inspires the great
music he has done
over the years, Green
laughs, "Well, I think
that's a lot of making'
babies! I mean in
London they were ask-
ing me do you know
many kids have
born since you
H been making this
music and I'm going
like huh?" Green then
turns serious, "The
music is what'it is. It's
about love, it's about
compassion, affection
and family." What did
Green feel on this


iight
being honored like
this? He answers, "To
me it meant lay it
down, let it go, fall in
love. That's what my
new CD is coming
out."
The BET Awards
will be rebroadcast
Friday, July 4 from 6
p.m. 12 p.m.;
Saturday, July 12 from
7:30 .p.m. 11 p.m.
andThursday, July 17
from 7:30 p.m. 11
p.m.. Check your local
listings. You may also
go to the BET website
for a complete listing
of the winners and
other highlights at
bet.com/betawrds.


In' HA SSU : ~ j IN HOLu: LYHi' OO: [ Isi


Th mostcosly*ductio


$80 Billion. That's how much money Federal Student Aid awards each year in grants,
low-interest loans and work-study to students In colleges, trade schools and professional schools.
You and your family may be eligible. So go online and learn how Federal Student Aid, part of the US.
Department of Education, can help you begin to realize your dream of an education after high school.
-____. ___ _2._
www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov | 1-800-4-FED-AID
..52


START HERE ":'"
GO FURTHER
7 UeoelD


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----------------------------------- --- ------ -- -----


JULY5, 2008


THE STAR


PAf2V A-65


7














JITLTlV fT SA


Crime Stories Continued from A-1
TWO Continued from A-1
that the investigation is continuing since they believe others were involved in the
robbery and murder.
Man Killed in Arlington
Robert Pinkney, 20, was shot to death while attempting to rob a man outside the
Summer Oak apartments in Arlington, located 6n Arlington Expressway.
According to reports, a man who lives in the apartments called 911 stating that
two men attempted to rob him and he was able'to shoot one of them. The second
man left and is still at large.
When officers arrived, they found Robert Pinkney deceased on the parking lot.
After interviewing the victim and several witness, the officers said that the shoot-
ing appears to be a case of self-defense. However. the case is still being investigat-
ed.
New Law Continued from A-1
Sex offenders have new limits; drivers with four drunk driving offense in a 10-year
period will be guilty of a felony; people guilty of driving without a license four or
more times within a five year period will be guilt)' of a felony; DNA collected in
other states will be allowed to be compared; parents of a stillborn child may. obtain
a birth and death certificate; charter schools will be allowed to apply to a new state
panel if they are denied by local officials, employees of charter schools will be eli-
gible for the state health benefit plan and the Department of Education must draw up
a model program to educate students on Internet safety.
FLORIDA Workers and customers are now allowed to keep guns in their cars
while parked on private or government owned lots. In addition, power companies
now have a limit on greenhouse gases and hurricane premiums charged by a state-
backed insurer. There is a cut back on testing in public schools and people who have
been ivrongfully imprisoned must be compensated.

















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I I


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JULY 52008


-.saw- w- ***:**


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a a


121: one to one AON: any day now AFAIK: as fWr as I know AFK: away from keyboard AS/L age, sex, location
B4: before B4Al: bye for now BAK: back at the keyboard BBIAB: be back in a bit BBL: be back later BBN: bye
bye now BBS: ie back soon BEG: big evil grin BF: boyfdriend BFN: bye for now BG: big grin BL: belly laughing
BMTIPG: brilliant minds think in parallel gutters BRB: be right back BTA: but then again BTW: by the way
BWL bursting with laughter BWTHDIK: but what the heck do I know C&G: chuckle & grin CIO: crying in
disgrace CNP: continued (in my) next post CP: chat post CRBT: crying real big tears CSG: chuckle, snicker,
grin CU: see you CUL: see you later CYO: see you online DBAU: doing business as usual DIKU: do I know
you? DL dead link DLTBBB: don't let the bed bugs bite DQMOT: don't quote me on this EG: evil grin EMFBI:
excuse me for butting in EMSG: email message EOT: end of thread F2F: face to face FC: fingers crossed
FISH: first in, still here FMTYEWIK: far more than you ever wanted to know FOMCL: falling off my chair
laughing FTBOMH: from the bottom of my heart FUD: fear, uncertainty, and doubt FWIW: for what it's worth
G2G: got to go G: grin GA: go ahead GAL: get a life GD&R: grinning, ducking, and running GF: girlfriend GFN:
gone for now GIWIST: gee, I wish I'd said that GMBO: giggling my butt off GMTA: great minds think alike
GOL: giggling out loud GTRM: going to read mail GTSY: glad to see you H&K: hug and kiss HAGN: have a good
night HDOP: help delete online predators HHIS: hanging head in shame HTH: hope this helps HUB: head up
butt IAC: in any case IANAL: I am not a lawyer (but) IC: I see IDK: I don't know IHA: I hate acronyms IIRC: if I
remember correctly ILU: I love you IM: instant message IMHO: in my humble opinion IMNSHO: in my not
so humble opinion IMO: in my opinion lOW: in other words IPN: I'm posting naked IRL: in real life IWALU: I
will always love you IYSWIM: if you see what I mean JIC: just in case JK: just kidding JMO: just my'opinion
JTLYK:just to let you know K: okay KIT: keep in touch KOC: kiss on cheek KOL: kiss on lips KOTC: kiss on the
cheek KWIM: know what I mean? LOR: later LD: later, dude LOR: long distance relationship LLTA: lots and
lots of thunderous applause LMIRL let's meet in real life LMSO: laughing my socks off LOL: laughing out
loud LSHMBB: laughing so hard my belly is bouncing LTM: laugh to myself LTNS: long time, no see LTR: long-
term relationship LULAB: love you like a brother LULAS: love you like a sister LUWAMH: love you with all
my heart LY: love you M/F: male or female MOSS: member of same sex MOTOS: member of the opposite sex
MSG: message MTF: more to follow MUSM: miss you so much NADT: not a darn thing NIFOC:' naked in front
of computer NP: no problem NRN: no reply necessary OIC: oh I see OLL online love OM: old man OTF: off
the floor OTONH: n the other hand OTTOMH: off the top of my head P2P: peer to peer PDA: public display of
affection PEBCAK: problem exists between chair and keyboard PLZ: please PM: private message PMFJIB:
pardon me for jumping in but POAHF: put on a happy face POS: parent over shoulder PU: that stinks QT:
cutie RL: real life ROTFL: rolling on the floor laughing RPG: role playing games RSN: real soon now S4L:
spam for life SETE: smiling ear to ear SHCOON: shoot hot coffee out of nose SHID: slaps head in disgust SF:
surfer friendly SNERT: snot nosed egotistical rude teenager SO: significant other SOMY: sick of me yet? SOT:
short of time STW: search the web SWAK: sealed with a kiss SWL: screaming with laughter SYS: see you soon
TA: thanks again TCOB: taking care of business TCOY: take care of yourself TIA: thanks in advance TILII: tell
it like it is TMI: too much information TOY: thinking of you TTYL: talk to you later UW: you're welcome WB:
welcome back WFM: works for me WIBNI: wouldn't it be nice if WTGP: want to go private?
WTG: way to go WU: what's up WUF: where are you from? YBS: you'll be sorry YL: young lady YM: young man


.1 in 5 children is sexually solicited online.



S You don't know what your kids are saying online. Or who they are saying it to. A lot of times NATIONAL
CENTERFOR
neither do they. So get involved. To protect your kid's online life or report an incident, call IISSIMG&
1-800-THE LOST orvisit cybertipline.com. HOOP: help delete online predators EXPLOITED
C H I L D R E N'


JULY5, 2008


THE STAR


DPAGE A8


I

















The FL/GA Star




LOCAL SECTION B


Big Duke's Motorcycle Club Annual At Kelly's Ranch
From June 27 through June 29, 2008 over 240 officers from 70 motorcycle clubs stemming from Georgia, Alabama, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina to Tennessee, showed up at
Kelly's Ranch, located on Hwy 64 in Walterboro, S.C. rallying and making plans for next year's celebration where thousands of bikers will show. They had a Friday night fish-fry, Saturday
bar-be-que, and a Saturday night dance. There were also bike competitions such as slow riders, best looking bike, and much much more. They are sure to have a blast at their next annu-
al celebration in 2009.


New Life Communlt.
11100 Wingate Rd.
Jacksonville, Florlda 2a,,.
Featuring: '
WCOL 1360 VICTORY A
GOSPEL 1400 -
Dr. Dontavies Boatwrl
Gospel Hip Hop Sensation T'Jun
Atlanta's Powerful Anointed LP A
Experience American Idol's, "ChoZe
GMWA Mass Choir Jax Chapter
Leslie Nelson "
Datisha Tiki Plckltt
The Ministry of Prince .Rod ..
Pastor Dr. Tawana Estell
Event Host Pastor D~ ght Fpilll
and much moral FLORIDA_
FLORIDA6STAR-


Facilitator Roslyn (Auntie Roz) Burrough, is an original "out of the box" teacher and accomplished
performing artist. She draws upon 40 years of professional experience to weave performance art
into carefully crafted instruction that promote self-esteem, personal growth and responsibility. Her
proven track record has won acclaim and respect from audiences of all ages.
Please visit www.auntieroz.com for more information.
Register Nowl (904) 713-0885 Limited Spots Available
Cost: $375.00 for 15 Sessions + $50 Registration fee


& -5- ^'-'r&^s. 1 2 --ew^


l ost ClaraMcLaughlin
lhuirrida s.:060 0 :30 p.m.
'www 4 60.us .




WCG M

Ik esd ay h di :;'; :, ;" : ', : *
8:30 p. njth
,..Clara, J M c, ,, : .,
onTuesdafand




"The Flo ida Star and Impact.,',"-,, o
Striving to M-ake a Difference -c-
... n i.. 'o .,...ak..e, a'. Dff re.c co,'.,_-Hos-.t .....


,4,~ T~rC %Z~%n9 6uM#er~rpMYenct


Teens,, q t A? UKMOV b i m e'tf, trig ewl... & th& C1=14!

* Enjoy Person to Person Interaction with New York Theatre, Music and Business Professionals
Create Your Own Positive Rhymes with Celebrated Hip Hop Artists
See the Magic that Happens when Teens become Teams
Form Partnerships with Top Local Professionals
Perform in a Culminating Showcase
FIVE-WEEK PROJECT for 7WKE S .'a' ZSf (4S f Iffwo-
Tuesdays Wednesdays- Thursdays
July 8 August 7 3:30 5:00 pm


MOCA
JACKSONVILLE
MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART I JACKSONVILLE
333 North Laura Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202


PAGEB-1


THE STAR


JULY 5 2008















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"True North Summer Academy" now enrolling young men entering grades
seven through 10 for a four-week growth and learning opportunity Camp com-
pleters who reside in Jacksonville Housing Authority-supported housing receive
a $100 gift certificate upon completing the academy.
True North Summer Academy, a collaborative effort among the Community
Engagement Group, the Jacksonville Housing Authority and Florida
Community College's North Campus, is reaching out to provide a free four-
week day camp opportunity for disadvantaged young men from Jacksonville
beginning July 7 and running weekdays through Aug. 1, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
This summer experience will provide a safe, secure environment, free break-
fast, lunch and snacks, and transportation to and from the North Campus.
Activities will include field trips, swimming, service projects, math and reading
instruction, career exploration and guest speakers. These growth, learning and
character-building opportunities help develop leadership, academic and life
skills. Camp completers who reside in Jacksonville Housing Authority-support-
ed housing receive a $100 gift certificate .upon completing the academy.
Parent and student orientation night will be July 7 at 6 p.m. at North Campus,
4501 Capper Road on Jacksonville's Northside. Transportation will be provid-
ed, but students must be registered. To register or for more information, call
904-766-6725 or e-mail jlewis@fccj.edu.

. ._ U U,- _


HEALTH --
By Ulysses W. Watkins, Jr., M.D.


~ SHOCK ~
GENERAL INFORMATION

DEFINITION: When blood is not circulating throughout the
human body as it should, shock occurs. Injuries such as bums,
wounds, or fractures can bring about shock since shock usually accompanies serious bleeding
and extensive damage to tissues and bones.

SIGNS: Signs of shock are easily observed. The person's skin is pale and moist. Beads of
perspiration may be seen on the forehead, palms, and lips. He may complain of nausea or may
vomit. His pulse is fast and may be impossible to feel. He may breathe faster than he usually
does.

FAINTING: The first-aider should know that there are differences between shock and
fainting. Many persons faint from minor injuries. A person who has fainted is pale and has a
slow pulse.

SHOCK VICTIM: The shock victim should be kept lying down. If he has difficulty in
breathing, his hqad and chest should be elevated. If he has severe loss of blood, that part of the
victim's body in the severe bleeding should be raised. Elevation should not be done if there is
a head injury, if there is breathing difficulty which increases by raising the head, or if pain
occurs with elevation of that part of the body.
A person in shock should retain his body heat, so a blanket should be placed under him if
he is lying on the ground or floor. He should be covered sparingly.
If medical care will be available within a half hour or less, the shock victim should not be
given any, fluids. If medical care is delayed or unavailable, the first-aider can give small
amounts of fluids to the conscious shock victim at about fifteen-minute intervals.
A good fluid to give is water to which is added one-half level teaspoon of table salt and one-
half level teaspoon of baking soda per quart of water. The first-aider must carefully observe the
person while he is drinking a fluid to make sure that he does not vomit.

Dr. Watkidns can be heard live Sundays at 7:05 pm EST on www.KCOHRadio.com. He is
a 33 Mason and Grand Medical DIirector for the United Supreme Council. S. J. and
Imperial Council (Black Shriners Nationwide). 713-433-4536.
Jrl rj Im _-lBrF P prmpPPrOrURr__ P


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JULY 5. 2008


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JULT 3, IVU6AAA,3J'V


ssH!From Actual Police Reports

SHH! Did You Hear About?...






IT'S NOT MINE I'VE CHANGED MY
WAYS An officer conducted a traffic stop on a
vehicle due to no tag displayed on the rear of the
vehicle. Upon contact with the driver (witness),
he asked him where the tag was that belonged to
the vehicle. The witness stated that he should be
getting the tag soon. The officer asked him for
his drivers license and learned that the witness
was operating a motor vehicle on a learner's
license. He asked the witness if there were any
drugs or weapons inside the vehicle and he said
"no, you can search the car." The officer had the
passenger (suspect) get out of the vehicle and
asked her if there were any drugs or weapons in the vehicle and she said, "no." The
suspect stated that she has not smoked any crack in about three weeks. The officer
found crack cocaine under the front passenger seat where the suspect was sitting. He
asked the suspect if she knew of the crack cocaine in the vehicle and she said, "no,
I have changed my ways." The officer detained the suspect and placed her in the rear
of his patrol vehicle. He asked the witness if he knew of the crack cocaine and he
stated that he knows that the suspect smokes crack on occasion. The witness was
issued a citation for operating a motor vehicle on a learners license.

THEY WERE PREPARED FOR THE JOB -While on patrol, an officer observed
two suspicious persons behind a building in the 300 block of W. State St. As he go
closer, he observed two black males moving the copper coils from the air condition-
ing unit from behind the building. He maneu-
vered his patrol car into the rear parking lot.
As he got out of the vehicle, suspect 2, (a
black male about 25-35 years of age fled
towards the eastside of the building then in an
unknown direction. He detained suspect 1,
who was identified as Mr. HRH. The officer
also observed two blue bicycles with milk
crates attached to the front. The crates had
various tools and equipment. He also
observed a shopping cart with a canvass tool
bag full of various tools. He found one open
end wrench, two sockets and a ratchet set and
one flat tip screw driver in suspect l1's right
front pants pocket. Earlier on the officer's
shift, a burglary to a residence was reported that two black men on blue bicycles was
stealing copper from an air condition unit matching these two suspects. The suspect
was transported to the Burglary division and interviewed. Case cleared by arrest.

I WONDER WHY -An officer was dispatched to the 5600 block of Collins Rd., in
reference to a battery in progress complaint. Upon his arrival he met with the vic-
tim, Ms. W. She advised the suspect, who is the father of three of her children, came
over tpday and began banging on her front door. When she knew it was the suspect
banging on the door she opened it and he walked into the apartment. She said he did
not say anything to her at first, but kept pacing the apartment and then put her in a
bear hug. She kept asking him what was wrong with him and he would not answer
her. The suspect accused the victim of her not wanting to be with him. He swung
at her missing her, as she went to grab the telephone he swung at her hitting her on
the right side of her face. The suspect
fled the scene when the victim had .a
neighbor call the police because the
suspect took the cordless phone. The
officer observed no physical injury to
the victim. It should be noted that the \/
victim is five months pregnant and f
refused rescue. The victim advised she
has a permanent injunction for protec- j
tion against the suspect, which was
verified through NCIC. the victim also
stated that the children were in the
room when the incident took place.' '
One of the children stated that the suis-
pect came over and he was mad. He
heard his mother ask the suspect what
was wrong. He heard his mother and the, suspect get into a verbal dispute and then
saw him hit his mother. The suspect was located hiding on a stairwell in an adjacent
building. Post Miranda the suspect advised the victim called him to stop by, so he
did. When he arrived, she was irate so he left. The suspect was arrest and transport-
ed to the PTDF.

TAKE CARE OF YOUR ANIMALS -An officer was dispatched to the 1400 block
of Helena St., in reference to assisting animal control. Upon his arrival, he met with
the complainants, MG and JM. They are both animal control officers with the city.
JM stated that he responded to the resident in reference to animal complaint. Once
at the scene he observed two dogs on the property, one large and one small. Both
dogs were thin. The larger dog was very
thin. He said the larger dog could bare-
ly stand when he approached it. While
looking at the dogs,, the suspect exited
the residence. The officer asked him
who the dogs belong to. At first he said
he didn't know, then owned up to being
the owner of the larger dog. He said he
visited his grandmother for a few days
because she was ill and just plain forgot
about the dogs. He stated that he was


going to feed the dogs in the future. He
was arrested and transported to the
PTDF.


Your Weekly


HOROSCOPE
July 5, 2008 July 11, 2008


*' MrARIES
-1Mar 21st-Apr 19th
Small tasks, little issues and those who
can't see the big picture just aren't as
much of a problemif you're feeling
healthy and centered at the beginning of
the week. Get some exercise, get ground-
ed, laugh it off and move on! The stars
send more expansive, exciting energy
your way on Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday. Got an idea about work or
romance? Now's the time to get it going!
But don't get too carried away; what you
think you want on Friday and Saturday
could be a passing fancy. Sunday's good
for fully feeling it out.

CANCER
June 22nd July 22nd
At the beginning of this week, you've
got your amazing emotional intelli-
gence plus the ability to see patterns
and connections you may have missed
before. How will you use your full-
spectrum smarts at work and in your
love life? Then, on Wednesday, don't
ignore something hoping it'll just go
away. Addressing an issue or a differ-
ence of opinion may be stressful, but
letting it slide will only make matters
stickier. On Friday and over the week-
end, let your actions and words speak
for your heart. When you're true to
yourself, the rest falls into place.

7I LIBRA
Sept 23rd Oct 22nd

On Monday, the more you listen, the
more you'll understand; especially
when it comes to relationships. Don't
forget to listen to your own heart, too!
Then, if you've been feeling off-kilter,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
offer a, more self-confident, positive
frame of mind. Once you're feeling on
top of your game, all the rest just falls
into place! Starting Friday, the change
you're contemplating is definitely
worth consideration, but you may
want to wait until Sunday to bounce it
of a certain someone. Ask them to help
you explore it, and you might get a
better assistant than you expected!

CAPRICORN
Dec 22nd Jan 19th


~omeOoOy or something tar away St may seem sate so assume you get is You'll be much better able to deal witls


Somebody or sometmng tar away
comes into play on Monday or
Tuesday, so be sure you're not confin-
ing your attention or vision to what's
right in front of your nose. Come
Wednesday, you'll probably be focus-
ing on work, but don't expect any mir-
acles there. In fact, lead your life in
balance so the other things in your life
can reinvigorate and refresh you. Get
outside instead of in; get in front of art
or music instead of the TV. On Friday
and over the weekend, believe in
yourself and know why you're doing
what you do. Power comes from the
heart, now more than ever.


|| TAURUS
-1Apr 20th May 20th
Your powers of persuasion are pretty dam
compelling on Monday and Tuesday! Get
'em on your side at work and in your
personal life. Really, why would they want
to be anywhere else? Then your challenge
over the next several days will be to find
the middle ground. Don't overindulge in
social activities, but don't tether yourself to
a desk, either! Keep things nice and even;
you'll want to be in a pulled-together emo-
tional state for some interesting (read:
challenging, maybe stormy or possibly
great) interpersonal stuff coming on
Friday and over the weekend.

LEO
July 23rd -Aug 22nd
They say that a little time spent alone
each day is time well spent, and it will
be especially true on Monday. You
might even find that with a quiet mind,
a certain decision practically makes
itself -- and Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday are perfect for taking action,
whether on practical work matters or
in the relationship sphere. The stars
smile on your willingness to share
what you're thinking and embrace
change! And be inquisitive on Friday
and over the weekend. A better under-
standing is within reach -- and on
Sunday, love's in the air!

IJ H SCORPIO
SOct 23rd Nov 21st
As the week gets going, you've got perfec-
tionist tendencies that are, well, perfect for
work and getting things in order. When it
comes to people, though, you've got to give
them at least a little leeway. Around
Wednesday, a conflict or opposition oi
some sort is likely to arise, and you'll be
ready to think of all sorts of proactive steps
to take. But what about a simpler way.
What would happen if you just gave in, or
cheerfully compromised? Starting Friday.
you'll be extra smart, super sexy and all
around awesome. Have a great weekend!

SAQUARIUS
ii |Jan 20th Feb 18th


it may seem sale to assume you get it
at the beginning of the week, but
would it really hurt to ask? (Answer:
No, in fact it could really,' really help.)
Around Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday, others will be coming to
you for clarity. Be ready and willing to
help, because you're definitely able.
Then you're liable to be a little more
sensitive than usual on Friday and
Saturday, so surround yourself with
positive people who love you for who
you are. Plan an activity that gives you
joy, and take notice of the good in life.
By Sunday, you'll be in a great groove.


-I


'


W GEMINI
May 21st- June 21st
It may seem like there's a bit of a gulf
between you and what you're trying to do
(or maybe between you and a certain some-
one) as the week begins, but its not so hard
to bridge. Hint Less is very likely more
right now. Don't overcomplicate. And don't
fret the stars are ready to send on over-
abundance of riches your way around
Wednesday, but only ifyou're willing to get
involved instead of getting overwhelmed.
So much to do, so little time! Go on and
bum the candle at both ends a bit you can
play catch-up when mellower energy
arrives on Friday and over the weekend.

VIRGO
Aug 23rd Sept 22nd
Make it look easy! With the stars on
your side as the week gets going, your
work and your personal life are chock-
full ofpossibilities -- all you've got to do
is reach out. But around Wednesday,
you're gonna need. a sounding board.
Think of the person whose values you
respect most, then get in touch and talk
it through. And if you find yourself feel-
ing impatient on Friday or over the
weekend, take it as a sign to stop,
breathe and assess (or reassess, as the
case may be). Focus on what you can
learn in the here and now instead of
wishing you were someplace else.

SAGITTARIUS
Nov 22nd Dec 21st
Issuing an ultimatum might be tempting
on Monday, butimake sure ifs really a
your-way-or-no-way situation, because the
answer may be no way. Ifyou can possibly
wait on it, the stars will offer a different
perspective over the next few days, not to
mention a new way to express yourselfthat
will open possibilities instead of possibly
closing doors. Frame it in terms of your
hopes instead of the problems. On Friday
and Saturday, everyone else will be ready
to party, but you'll want at least a little solo
time to read, think and just be. Sunday,
though, is a fun day plan for it!

PISCES
S Feb 19th Mar 20th


You'll be much better able to deal with
life's myriad (and, in many cases,
mundane and minuscule) demands at
the beginning of the week if you're
proactive about getting centered.
Replenish your inner resources so that
when an opportunity to make life bet-
ter comes knocking on Wednesday or
Thursday, you'll be all gussied up and
waiting at the door instead of bum-
ming around in your mental PJs.
Likewise, on Friday and over the
weekend, watch for a situation where
you can assert what you believe. You'll
earn their respect -- and possibly make
a real connection.


:'~~ .'.'~ .Ssd:~lS~A7 J.ti~J'~ nrA&. -.".:~- -, ." ~ ~ r~i.~ti:: :~


Slavery and The Prison Industrial Complex in America:
The prison industrial complex is a self perpetuating industry based on the subjiga-
tion of an increasing segment of our communities by racial and economic scapegoat-
ing. The economic angle of this is immediate, bottom line, material gain for the corpo-
rations supporting and profiting from the prison industrial complex, which lends itself
to forms of slavery and genocide.
Slavery and the prison industrial complex can be understood only in the context of
a hundred plus years old link between crime and race and class oppression.
Immediately following the civil war, Black Codes created a list of crimes punishable
only when committed by black people. Southern states like Mississippi made it a crime
for African Americans to be unemployed or drunk, or to have run away, neglected chil-
dren, or handled money unwisely. This was the making of the prison industrial com-
plex with most of the incarcerated being black.

Religious, Political, Human, Social and Civic Movement Needed:
A human and civil rights movement, similar to the Civil Rights Movement or the
anti-lynching campaigns, to dismnantle the prison industrial complex that has captured
our nation should be at the top of a modem day movement. Why don't we connect ito
this atrocity as we have with past struggles and offer actions and moratoriums?
Modem day slavery and the conditions that keep African Americans, Hispanics and
the poor in prisons and not in schools and colleges is big business today, costing bil-
lions of dollars.yearly and must become a political, human and civil rights issue as to
end.
The School-to-Prison Pipeline has created a flow of children from failing schools
to jails, with an alarming number of the students being from public schools and African
Americans, Hispanics and poor families. Many of these children face enormous obsta-
cles and are far more likely than other students to wind up in juvenile detention facili-
ties and eventually adult prisons.'
Seven of every 10 children in the juvenile justice system nationwide have some
kind of educational disability. The vast majority are children with Emotional
Disturbance, and from single parent homes and largely children of ex-offenders.
With tax burdens, crime, violence and other social ills escalating, we must imme-
diately charter a new course of action, by calling on political, civic and religious lead-
ers in addressing criminal injustice, racism, disparities and the growth of the prison
industrial complex.
Recent surveys have show, criminal/juvenile justice and corrections funding has
risen but funding for education has decreased over the last decades with many lawmak-
ers supporting this effort. Something is wrong with this picture. Funding for prisons
should not be above that for education, healthcare, social security and other much need-
ed programs and infrastructures.
We must realize, the failed emphasis on tough-on-crime and the war on drugs and
call on congress to take immediate steps to address this most horrific condition.
There is no question prisons and jails are needed, but big expensive ones are not.
The real cost of the prison industrial complex is a great cost to American taxpayers,
with far too many casualties and no end in sight.
"At no time do we condone wrongness on either side of the wall".

PROJECT R.E.A.C.H., INC., Richard P Burton, Sr., Director, P.O. BOX 440248,
Jacksonville, FL 32244, Bus: 904-786-7883
PROJECT R.E.A.C.H, INC., A Non-Profit 501 (c) (3) Organization: To Reach Out To
The "At Risk Community" In Areas Of. Re-enfranchisement, Education, Advancement,
Counseling and Housing. Your Gifts And Donations Are Tax Deductible


tF-Tv


vr--lTl


PAGE B-3


THEF STAR


HITr v;t /nn/













THE STAR


JULY 5, 2008


Business Owner and Mother of
Three Gets Ready for Beijing
SUMNER, WA, June 26,
2008-Last month, with 228.8
pounds pressed over her 5-foot
2-inch, 117-pound frame,
Melanie Roach solidified the
dream of a lifetime. After earn-
ing her place on the women's
U.S. Olympic weightlifting
team in Atlanta, Roach is
poised to take on the world at
the games in Beijing.
As one of the strongest
women on the planet it's no
wonder that Roach has gotten
so far. After suffering the
agony of a serious spine injury
that prevented her from partic-
ipating in 2000 games in
Sydney, her journey to the
Olympics is particularly
astounding.
Roach attributes much of
her success to a sound nitri-
tion and exercise program. Part


Weightlifting Powerhouse Melanie Roach

Achieves Olympic Dream


of her regime includes daily
consumption of ribose.
Bioenergy D-ribose, made by
one of Roach's corporate spon-
sors, stimulates the synthesis
of adenosine triphosphate
(ATP), an essential energy
compound found in every cell
in the body. ATP is critical to
health and maintaining normal
energy-related body functions,,
and ribose is the essential com-
ponent in the making of ATP.
"I find if I do all the little
things right, the big stuff
becomes easier and the weight
feels just a tiny bit lighter," she
says. "Ribose is one of those
things. It helps keep my energy
level up in a healthy, natural
way, both in the gym and in
my real job as a busy mom. It's
an important part of my daily
routine."
Sustaining her energy is a
critical strategy for Melanie.
"My events don't allow much


recovery time and, before I
started using ribose, my sec-
ond lift was always weaker.
Ribose allows my second lift
to be as strong as the first,"
says Roach. "Plus, my muscles
recover much more quickly, so
that I have the sustained ener-
gy I need for peak perform-
ance."
Roach's daily routine
often begins before the sun
comes up with preparing
lunches, serving breakfast, and
getting her kids off to school.
Helping her to juggle it all-
including the energy she needs
to help her son, Drew, who is
autistic-is her husband, Dan, a
Washington state representa-
tive.
"My time in the gym is
hard. But it's also very peace-
ful and actually high quality
'me' time," says Roach. "To a
large extent, it's a luxury and a
dream all rolled into one."


CHICAGO WHITE SOX TO PAY TRIBUTE TO
NEGRO LEAGUE EAST-WEST GAME
.- High School Shou case Honors "5ih .4nniv san 01 First \eyv Lea ue
All-Star Game, Special Fonimn 111 .-lddress Issue oq (Minorities in

iCHICAGO June 30. 2008 On Monday. Jul\ 7. the Chicago W\ite
Sox will host the first-e'er Double DutN Classic an ewent celebrating the
S- history, and tradinon of Negro League baseball m Chicago and promoting
the next generanon of inner-city baseball players
This year marks the 75th anniversary of the first Negro League East-
A RC West All-Star Game, which was played at Old Comiskey Park in Chicago.
The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum (NLBM) will collaborate with the
White Sox on the event, which includes a special forum on the history of
the Negro Leagues and African-Americans in
the game of baseball.
The special forum to be held at U.S. Cellular Field's Conference & Learning Center will begin at 11:00
a.m. and feature discussion panels moderated by Michael Smith of ESPN. The panels will include: Sharon
Robinson (daughter of Jackie Robinson), Negro League historians Eddie Beford, Adrian Burgos and Larry
Lester, along with White Sox general manager Ken Williams, outfielder Jermaine Dye and first base coach
Harold Baines.
"This event, the Double Duty Classic, is about honoring the legacy of those many great players who
worked and sacrificed so that we all could enjoy this game," said Ken Williams White Sox general manager.
"By the same token, the event is about teaching that legacy to the next generation of players and ensuring they
carry-on that heritage as they develop as players and people."
The game, which will be played at U.S. Cellular Field, begins at 2:30 p.m. and will feature inner-city high
school players from across the Midwest (Chicago, Detroit, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Milwaukee and St.
Louis). The White Sox Amateur City Elite (ACE) high school travel team will represent Chicago in the All-
Star showcase. The players will dress in uniforms honoring Negro Leagues' East-West All-Star teams. Each
team will carry a roster of players from both the ACE team and players from across the Midwest.
Ted "Double Duty" Radcliffe was
born on July 7, 1902 in Mobile, Ala.
and played for the Chicago American
Giants of the Negro Leagues. At the
age of 41, Radcliffe earned MVP
honors for his performance during the
1943 season with the American
Giants. Nicknamed "Double Duty" (
because he would regularly pitch the
first game of a doubleheader and
catch the second game, Radcliffe was
one of the most dynamic players in
the Negro Leagues and all of baseball.
Beginning in 2002, until the year of
his death in Chicago in 2005,
Radcliffe threw a ceremonial first .
pitch prior to a White Sox game. s
Chicago White Sox Charities
(CWSC), on behalf of the Double Duty Classic, will make a $10,000 donation to the Negro Leagues Baseball
Museum.
Below is a full listing of the players participating in the Double Duty Classic, along with their high school
affiliation in parentheses:
White Sox Amateur City Elite (ACE), Esteban Abbey (Lane Tech), Jamell Blue (Harlan), Samuel
Bumpers (Kenwood), Angelo Burrage (St. Rita), Nick Collins (Simeon), Jonathan Dorsey (Simeon), Kevin
Finney (Curie), Frank Gowder (Whitney Young), Christian Hickman (Simeon), Blake Hickman (Simeon),
Kyle Huber (Lane Tech), Ronquis Jefferson (Harlan), Nicholas Johnson (Simeon), Isaac Lewis (Kenwood),
Brendan McElhaney (Lane Tech), Adrian Perez (Clemente), Kendall Radcliffe (Hyde Park), Quintin
Richardson (Simeon), Christopher Rogers (Morgan Park), Samuel Smith (Hyde Park), Marchus White (Jones
College Prep), and Jesse Wiggins (Harlan)
Midwest All-Stars: Nick Cunningham (Indianapolis, Ind.), Daniel Fields (Detroit, Mich.), Malcolm
Frazier (Milwaukee, Wis.), Tim Garvin (Ballwin, Mo.), Antoine Hendricks (East St. Louis, MIl.), Vince
Howard (Sikeston, Mo), Micah Johnson (Indianapolis, Ind.), Vincent Knox (Milwaukee, Wis.), Keenen
Maddox (Ballwin, Mo.), Trey Massenberg (St. Louis, Mo.), Kevin Phillips (St. Louis, Mo.), and Blair
Springfield (Decatur, Ill.)


I OBAMA


She also attributes her suc-
cess to a comprehensive sup-
port network, including her
family, coach, her faith, and a
cadre of people cheering her
on to the 2008 Olympic games.
Roach also knows how impor-
tant it is to maintain her ener-
gy. "I do whatever I can to
sustain my energy," she says.
"Since August, when I
first started using ribose, I
haven't noticed a drop in ener-
gy. This is critical for an
Olympic weightlifter, especial-
ly with the 35-45 minute lag in
between competitive lifts."
Bioenergy D-ribose is a
product of Bioenergy Life
Science, Inc.
(http://www.bioenergy.com), a
privately held, Minneapolis-
based life sciences company
whose core technology lies in
the development and commer-
cialization of products based
on the physiological benefits
of D-ribose in health and well-
ness.


; Suns Fans Ticketed For Wearing.Their Seat Belts i
FDOT Safety Office joins Suns in Seat Belt Promotion f

JACKSONVILLE, FL -The Florida Department of Transportation Safety Offic_.
partnered with the Jacksonville Suns'_to encourage Suns fans to,buckle'.~uipEolu
enforcement will be "ticketing" -rotorists and their passengers for wearing theu-seat t1
in the'Y.Wou have been ticketed" promotion. -. .. ,.
..The Suns have provided a locallaw enforcement agency with tickets to.. iej, ar
August 16 game versus Montgomery'Biscuits and to the Saturday, August 23: gam er esu
the Birmingham Barons to be distribute to Suns fans who are caught wearing their 'aelt
by participating law enforcement .ffibu ls. ..
; ,In addition on Saturday, Aug t,!'6, the first 1,000 fans who. pledge oweai .ei'
belt every trip, .every time, day "d igbht will, receive a Suns buckle uplgo.6;baseb4
The game starts at 1:05 PM and .h._gates open at 11:30 AM.' ': ..- f'
..-!.As an additional reminder forteeifans the Suns have hung ban ,ers'at the stadiumxit
reminding their'fans.to','buckle u.aA.d are making public-address announcemtent'retn
fans the importance of wearing a sat.eit every trip, every time, day and night be.as.;.at
belts save lives. ..
The Suns are currently home through Thursday, July 3, facing the Carolina Mudcats.
Tickets for the remainder of this homestand and all Suns home games are currently'on sale
through. the Suns Box Office at (904) 358-2846, or online at www.jaxsuhs.com.
Tickets are $6.00 for general admission, $9.00 for reserved seating and $12.00 fo'
Homeplate Box seating.


FOR MORE INFORMATIONGOTO EVERYDAYCHOICES.OR OR UST CALL 866.399.6789.

FOR MORE INFORMATION,GOTO EVERYDAYCHOICES.ORG OR JUST CALL 866.399.6789.


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FAX: (904) 765-1673


I


INVITATION TO SUBMIT RESPONSES TO
THE ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

TE -fl vN5NG 2EJARao DF T1E E)JSTRICT REIsJET15 THAT INTE RaBs5T PAR
IEs R PEfIN r Trl THE SlLicirATiraN(s5) a ELOn a Y 2:I1I pIV, T".'uasoAY,
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BID NUMBER 25050
Annual Security Services for District Lands

PRoFES SIrlNAL, ARMED, CERTIPFIE LAN eNFRErcEMENT 5ECURIITY FrlR PAT'RIE
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GflVgRNiN 3FiABO. ,

AjNlJN-INMA\NDATri.y PFsE-so a "jNFEENE s sE i F1B iJI:rM
AM., YNJEr0N-j"O AY, JUILY 1i, 201ii, AT OIwrizeRtr JeAflARTERs,
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_TAff'S REErMMENDAiN ,LLF a L3 s PRs-e o 'i THE rflVERNiNE a3R!A
ATf1S TUESDAY, siPrEMa_ 3, 20lli3i, MEreIN
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C o g


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*


















PAGE B-8 THE STAR


JULY 5, 2008


REAL SAT


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