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Florida star

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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00820

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00820

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Full Text





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Al. I~A1l.Ib A


2008 State Award in
Communications


Thank you for
allowing us to
serve you these



Years


THE


.FLORIDA


www.thefloridastar.com


LISTEN
TO IMPACT
Tuesday and Thursday
from 8:30 to 9:00 pm
WCGL-AM-1360
Tuesday at 7:00
WZNZ-AM-1460
The Florida Star and
Impact Striving to Make
a Difference!


Area cGrime



Stories

Killed Collecting Rent
It was reported that when
Pastor McKissick announced
in church Sunday that Allen
Tukes III, who had been shot
Friday had just passed, 60
new members joined Bethel
Baptist Church.
The shooting occurred at a
rooming house in the living
room in the 3000 block of
Fitzgerald. According to the
victim's mother, he had gone Allen Tukes IIll,murder
to the residence to collect rent. victim, 34 years old
No one has said what hap-
pened but she stated that the shooter was not a tenant.
Tukes was a husband, father, son, brother and
nephew. Funeral services will be held on Friday at
10:00 a.m. at Bethel Baptist Instituitional Church in
the new sanctuary and the burial will be at the
Evergreen Cemetery on Main Street.

Georgia's Second Execution Since
Supreme Court Upheld Lethal
Injection, First on May 6

Man Found Deceased in Front Yard


These and more on Page A-7

Florida Starts State-wide
'Most Wanted' Web Site
The State of Florida has established a new Web site
featuring the state's most wanted fugitives. The site
was launched Monday by the Florida Attorney
General's Office. It offers information about suspected
and convicted criminals that are on the run because of
a law they may have broken. The site tells why the
fugitive is wanted, the convictions and pending
charges. It also includes a picture of the fugitive, the
last known address and all known names used.

Bo Diddley Dies at 79
Bo Diddley is one of
the founding fathers of
rock 'n' roll. He had a
revolutionary approach to
the guitar and was induct-
ed into the Rock and Roll
Hall of Fame, received a
S star on Hollywood's Walk
Bo Diddley and his guitar. of Fame, and received a
lifetime achievement
award in 1999 at the Grammy Awards. He also played
for the first President George Bush as well as for
President Clinton.
After suffering a heart attack in August and three
months later, a stroke, he returned to Archer, Florida
near Gainesville so that he could continue his rehabili-
tation treatment at Shands, the University of Florida.,
Bo Diddley performed throughout the U. S. until he
suffered his heart attack and stroke. He said he worked
as an old man because he did not get paid as a young
man.


_____________________________________________________________________ .1


Historical Victory for the United States
By C. F. Lismore
Baiack CObam, made his-
tor\ Tiuesda.'l\ Oiuht d hen
he recei edi more than the
number of delegates need- i
ed to make him the
Deinocratic iomininee tor
President of the Llnited
States. \hen tile dele-
gates reached the requited
nuimbel, his t\ ife
Nlichelle Obama joined
him on the platform and
the\ shared a "fist-bump


"Copright Material



W" C Blont

Available from Commercial News Providers

that all could see and hear and the world loved it. Mr. Obama said, "Tonight,
we mark the end of one historic journey with the beginning of another a jour-
ney that will bring a new and better day to America."
Immediately. Clinton supporters started an effort for her to be his running
mate and Obama appointed a three-person panel, led by Caroline Kennedy to
help him in his search for a vice president candidate. On Thursday, Mrs.
Hillary Rodman Clinton disavowed efforts by her supporters for the VP position and said that she will endorse
Senator Barack Obania on Saturday and do whatever she can to allow the Democratic party to regain unity and
assure his victory in November.
Thursday marked the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Senator Robert Kennedy. President Kennedy's
daughter and many members of the Kennedy family have said that Obamna is the closest person they have seen
that have the feelings, mind and ability to bring this country back on track to gather the strength and world respect
since President John F. Kennedy and his brother, Senator Robert Kennedy. Senator Edward Kennedy, 76, who is
the last of the Kennedy brothers that is still alive, underwent surgery to treat a brain tumor Monday. It is report-
ed that the surgery went very well and that he is in wonderful spirit. He did not experience any complications.
It is apparent that Senator John McCain also recognizes Senator Obama's talents. In his preparation for the gen-
eral election, he has transformed Barack Obamia's slogan of "Change We Can Believe In" to his slogan, "ALeader
We Can Believe In."
This weekend, Obama supporters will begin voters registration and a 'walk for change.'


Norwood Elementary Closes
After 82 Years
The enrollment at

Elementary near
Gateway Mall is
very low and the
building is aging. Norwood Elementary School near
building is aging, Gateway Mall and Shopping Center
When school
closed this year, there were only 200 students.
The 82-year-old school is now,closed and the proper-
ty will be sold as surplus. On Wednesday, there was "A
Red Carpet Finale" for the school and folks were able
to reminisce about their most precious memories.

Federal Gas Tax Stays
Vice President Dick Chaney said there would be no
suspension of the federal gasoline tax as proposed by
Senators McCain and Clinton. He said, such a cut
would not have much of an impact for consumers.
The gas tax is actually the main source of revenue that
provides grants for highway and bridge construction
and repair and in reality, agreed with Senator Obama's
assessment when his opponents were advocating a fed-
eral gas tax cut.
The Democratic leaders in Congress and the Senate
have not shown interest in the proposal to cut federal
gas taxes.


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FL (1.1.09
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


News Briefs
Black Farmers File New Claims
Over 800 Black farmers filed a new lawsuit against
the Department of Agriculture after Congress
reopened a historic 1999 settlement over past dis-
crimination. The provision allows Black farnners
who missed earlier deadlines to file. About 75,000
fell in that group and could cost the government bil-
lions of dollars. The original settlement was more
than $972 million in payments,
Verizon Wireless to Acquire Alltel
Verizon and Alltel have entered into a definitive
agreement for Verizon Wireless to acquire Alltel.
Alltel will continue to provide the same product and
services, continue to operate as an independent busi-
ness, and have its retail stores. The parties hope to
complete the merger by the end of the year. No
actions is required on the part of the customers, their
rate plan, coverage or contracts.

Walgreen to Pay $35M to settle Claim
Walgreen Co. has agreed to pay $35 million to set-
tle claims that from 2001 to 2005 where patients pre-
scriptions were switched to a different version than
the one prescribed in order to increase its reimburse-
ment from Medicaid. 'The switching was basically
from tablets to capsules which may seem hannlesss
but is out of order when done just to increase profit.


tj ce
k'5


I


I











TI-lIP S'IIR JUNE 7, 2008


P(-1E.--2


MAY E. FORD JULIA BOWLES
LAYOUT EDITOR SPECIAL SECTION EDITOR
SPECIAL SECTIONS
DANIEL EVANS
CHERYL COWARD SALES DIRECTOR
DESIGN EDITOR
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS ACCOUNTS MANAGER
COLUMNIST T
DISTRIBUTION:
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS JAMES GREEN, WILLIAM GREEN
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER ABEYE AYELE, CASSIE WILLIAMS
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
LONZIE LEATH, F. M. POWELL, ESTER DAVIS, LAURENCE GREENE,
MICHAEL PHELTS. RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, VONKESTA ABRAMS,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT. ANDREA FRANKLIN, DELORES MINOR WOODS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS, DANIEL RANDOLPH, PATRICIA RAN-
DOLPH, HAMPjI#CDOWELL


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
(912) 264-6700 Georgia
Searing St Johns, Clay, Du-1l, Nassau, Alachua,
Fligler. Marion. Mclntosh, Camden And Glynn
County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida


SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$35.00
Half Year-$20.00
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsiblefor
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


Health Care Costs Bury Families

by Marian Wright Edelman
President of the Children's Defense Fund


Unpaid medical bills are
piling up on kitchen tables
all over America. In addition
to the rising costs of food,
gas and housing, more and
more working families are
becoming overwhelmed by
skyrocketing health care
costs. Since 2001, average
premiums for family health
insurance coverage have
risen 78 percent and now
stand at more than $12,000
annually, not including out-
of-pocket costs which aver-
age an additional $3,000.
The soaring cost of health
coverage makes seeing a
doctor and getting necessary
care unaffordable and even
impossible for millions of
children and working fami-
lies. One recent study found
that half of all American
families filing for bankrupt-
cy cited medical causes.
More than 47 million in
our nation are uninsured,
including 9.4 million chil-
dren. The majority of these
children live in two-parent
families, and almost 90 per-
cent have a working parent,
but they still cannot afford
to cover their children. This
is not right. The most recent
Census data reveal that the
number of uninsured chil-
dren increased by more than
one million in just two years
alone, and that number
could grow as the economy
continues to weaken.


There are a number of
myths circulating now sug-
gesting that simple, private
sector fixes can solve our
health care problem. In fact,
the private sector has not
provided adequate solutions.
Businesses are struggling
financially to provide cover-
age for their workers. Since
2000, the percentage of
employers providing health
coverage has dropped from
69 to 60 percent. And as
workers with private or
employer-sponsored health
coverage saw cost increases
that far outpaced the rate of
inflation and the growth in
their wages, many also saw
their benefits shrink. In most
states, health insurers in the
individual market can
charge high premiums,
exclude individuals with
pre-existing' conditions,
offer skimpy benefits, or
deny coverage altogether to
children likely to incur high
health care costs.
Providing health care tax
credits so families can buy
private health insurance, as
some have suggested, is the
wrong approach to covering
uninsured children. The rel-
atively small tax credit of
between $2,500 and $5,000
that has been proposed will
make health coverage
affordable for only a few
families when average annu-
al health costs are close to


THE F LORS]tIIDA STAR,
THEGERGIbSAR


CLARA RFRANCES MclAUGHlIN
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


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DENNIS WADE
ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
DIRECTOR


i513,000. Kegarctess o0 met
amount of the tax credit,
some families cannot obtain
health coverage at any price,
particularly for sick or dis-
abled children.
By contrast, government-
supported health coverage
programs such as Medicaid
and the State Children's
Health Insurance Program
(SCHIP) have substantially
reduced the number of unin-
sured children in our nation.
These successful programs
must be expanded and sim-
plified as part of a consoli-
dated children's health pro-
gram that guarantees every
child in America the com-
prehensive health coverage
they need to grow and
thrive.
All children need access
to primary health care, not
just when they are sick, but
throughout childhood to
ensure their healthy growth
and development. But fre-
quently, uninsured parents
must make the anguished
decision to put off a doctor
visit for a sick child hoping
the child will get better with-
out treatment. In too many
cases, waiting causes an ill-
ness to worsen to the point
where they must take their
child to the emergency room
for much more invasive and
expensive treatment, while
the chances of rapid recov-
ery are reduced.
Providing health coverage
to our children is one of the
most cost-effective invest-
ments our nation can make.
It costs about a third as
much to extend health cov-


erage to a cnna ior a year as
it does for an adult. Access
to timely, quality health care
for children can form the
foundation for well-being
for a lifetime and prevent
costly chronic diseases or
other health problems later
on. For example, every $1
spent on immunizations for
children saves $16 over the
course of their lifetimes in
medical costs.
A child is born uninsured
in the United States every 41
seconds-that's more than
2,100 children every day.
Children simply can't wait
while policymakers argue
over the best way to get
health coverage for every-
one. When children have
health coverage, the-number
of child hospitalizations for
preventable illnesses drops,
school attendance goes up
and academic performance
improves. Healthy children
turn into healthy, educated
adults who will make up
America's work force
tomorrow.
We must step forward
now to ensure that there is a
level playing field for all
children in health care. Each
step we take that improves
the lives of children secures
our nation's health not only
tomorrow but today as well.
We know how to make our
children healthy, and we can
afford it. We must step for-
ward and marshal the will to
make it happen.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.con


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association


JUNE 7, 2008


THE ST4R



















Faith In Our Community
Schedule of Events and Services .

SAINT PAUL AME CHURCH The Rev. Dr. Marvin
C. Zanders, II and the Saint Paul African Methodist
Episcopal Church Family invite the public, friends and
community to share in their Mortgage Burning
Celebration. The celebration is slated to take place
June 8-15, 2008. The official "Burining" will take place
on Saturday, June 14th.The Right Rev. McKinley
Young, presiding Prelate of the AME Church, Eleventh
Episcopal District, will officiate. The service will begin
at 10:00 a.m. Saint Paul is located at 6910 New Kings
Rd. Please contact the church at 764-2755 for trans-
portation and further information.
SUMMERVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH, located at
690 West 20th St., Jacksonville, with Pastor James W.
Henry is having their Vacation Bible School beginning
Sunday, June 8th at 4:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m.; Monday,
June 9th through Friday, June 13th from 6:00 p.m. until
9:00 p.m. A grand time-of Bible Study, crafts, music,
physical fitness and games have been scheduled for all.
Also, THE ANNUAL SUMMERVILLE BAZAAR
will be held Saturday, June 14th. There will be food,
games and treasures to purchase for all ages.
It's VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL at ST.
MATTHEW BAPTIST CHURCH, June 6th through
the 13th, from 6:00.p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Pack your gear,
prepare to set sail for Outrigger Island! Where we will
discover how to live God's unshakeable truth. It will be
a week of nonstop action as we explore five Bible
truths...God is real; Jesus is God's son; Jesus is the only
way; the Bible is God's Word; and my actions show
what I believe. By the end of the week, we will have
learned what it means to know, speak, and live the truth.
In this one-week adventure, children will hear Bible
stories, participate in cool crafts, motivating music, eat
snacks at the Snack Shack, and play games at
Recreation Reef. Also, during the same week, teenagers
can experience Unshakeable with Bible study and spe-
cials activities planned just for them. Adults also will
have the opportunity to participate in a Bible study!
This week of fun, food, and exciting learning opportu-
nities is free of charge and open to everyone. Call 768-
7624 for more information. Transportation is available.
CENTRAL METROPOLITAN CME CHURCH
CHILDREN'S CHOIR ANNUAL MUSICAL CON-
CERT. CELEBRATION Celebrating National
Children's Day, Sunday, June 8, 2008, 4:00 p.m., 4611
Pearl St., in Jacksonville. This concert is free and open
to the public. For contact information and driving direc-
tions, call (904) 354-7426, Rev. John Walker, Pastor,
and Sharon Coon, Children's Choir Director.
FAUST TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST,
located at 3328 Moncrief Rd., in Jacksonville. Will
have their VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL June 9-13th,
from 6:00 8:00 p.m. Ages 3 adult. Bishop R.L.
Dixon, Pastor, Sister Angelina Jenkins, coordination.
For additional information, please call the church at


(904) 353-1418.
ST. LUKE ALPHA &


One and all are welcome to
the spiritual blessing God has
allowed in the anniversary cel-
ebration of Mt. Nebo's
Missionary Baptist Church
37th and the 21st of Reverend
Dr. Will A. Waldrop, Sr., and
the first lady Sister Saundra
Waldrop. The anniversary
theme is "The Church
Commissions for its Mission",
theme scripture John 20:21.
This joyful event takes place
Sunday, June 8th at 4:00 p.m.,
Monday, June 9th at 7:00 p.m.
and concludes on Wednesday,
June llth, at 7:00 p.m. The
church is located at 8778 Lake
Placid Drive, across from the
Martin Luther King
Elementary School.


OMEGA PENTECOSTAL
CHURCH'S PRE-
FATHER'S DAY CON-
CERT, Saturday, June
14th, at 7:30 p.m.
Celebrating Elder James
Wilie Baker's 33rd
Pastoral Anniversary, to
be held at the Willie
Galmore Center, 399 S.
Ribria St., St. Augusting,
FL. Featuring The Mighty
Sons of Solomon, from
Daytona Beach.Donations
are $10 at the door. Also
join us in our FATHER'S
DAY SERVICE, Sunday,
June 15th at 3 p.m.Guest
Speaker: Apostle Julius
Leon Baker, a radio host,
prophet, teacher and
dynamic man of God, to
be held at St. Luke Alpha
& Omega Pentecostal
Church, 19 Spring St., St.
Augustine, FL where
Elder James Willie Baker
is Pastor.


Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com

Place Your
Church Directory in
The Florida Star / The Georgia Star
2 column x 2" for only
$10.00 each week
Call (904) 766-8834
a 000a0a000000 0*0*000


CAROLYN DAVIS-GREEN a




Jacksonville native passed(904) 765-8449.
Sunday, May 25, 2008 in Raleigh,
NC. A, retired educator, also a





gGenesis Baptist Church Rev. Calvin HonSeniors, Pastorigh
School, class of 1949. She was

fSaturday, Juneralized Saturday, June 1,
2008 at CSt. Ambrose Epispica
Church inRaleigh, NC. For infor-
information, contact Faye Davis
Cunmmings at (904) 765-8449.

A Program
In Memory of the Late Bishop William White, Jr.
will be held at
Genesis Baptist Church Rev. Calvin Honors, Pastor
241 South McDuff Ave., Jacksonville, FL
Saturday, June 21, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.
Come on out and have a Holy Ghost good time! Featured
Guest include: Genesis Baptist Church Choir, The Fabulous
White Singers, C.E. Laney Choir, Royal Spirituals, Sisters of
Praise, Rejoice, and many other anointed singers. For more
information, contact Sis. Jessie Mae Wlhite at (404) 468-7553.


-Mb hr .1 E u/ i ll -,- -1h, 1, P L'I fl ,le.11ahl





DE ATH. NOTICES,


ALLEN, Bernice, 88,
died May.31, 2008.
BLAKE, Lottie M., died
May 29, 2008.
BOGERS, Charles W.,
86, died May 28, 2008.
Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
BOWENS, Rudolph,
died May 27, 2008.
BROOKINS, Albert W.,
Jr., died May 24, 2008.
BROWN, Thelia J., 31,
died May 29, 2008.
BROWN, Thelma, died
June 1, 2008.
CLARK, Florence, 78,
died May 27, 2008.
DOUGLAS, Ohnsherra
V., 36, died May 29,
2008.
GARNER, Rev. John,
died May 28, 2008.
GORE, Diaz L., Sr., died
May 26, 21008.
HAROLD, Renee, 49,
died May 2008.
JACKSON, Baby
Azariah, died May 29,
2008.
JACKSON, Dock, died
May 29, 2008.
JOHNSON, Henry, 38,
died May 27, 2008. ,
JORDAN, Harold., Sr.,


'died June 1, 2008.
KELLY, Claudia, died
June 1, 2008.
LEWIS, Elvira, died
May 31, 2008.
MURRAY, Deloris, died
June 1, 2008.
PEOPLES, Master
Johnathan. died May 30,
2008.
RAY, Jordan, 19, died
June 1, 2008.
ROBINSON, Frankie J.,
44, died June 2, 2008.
SCIPIO, Johnathan, died
May 30, 2008.
STANFORD, James, 91,
died May 26, 2008.
STEWART, Johnny W.,
87, died May 29, 2008.
TURNER, Albert, 81,
died May 28, 2008.
WADE, Zelma C., died
June 1, 2008. Alphonso
West Mortuary, Inc.
WILLIAMS, Adlee,
died May 27, 2008.

GEORGIA DEATHS

MORRELL, Carlette,
died May 30, 2008.
WATTS, Jacob, Sr., died
May 29, 2008.


iI UI IGl cail

-- planning

program


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED
Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354


Alphonso West


The Church Directory
"Come and. Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School .....................................9:30 a.m .
Sunday Morning Worship .... ...........11:00 a.m. '
Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays
(O ld Sanctuary)....................................11:00 a.m .
Tuesday Prayer Meeting.............. ........ 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ............ 8:00 p.m.
Rev. Eric Lee, Pastor .
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus -
(904) 764-5727 Church

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
W orship Service................................................................ 10:00 a.m .
Church School..................................................................... 8:45 a.m .
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study.............................................. 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday...... ...................10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry....................................................... 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell:.710-1586
Sunday School.......................................... .............................. 9:30 a.m .
M morning W orship..................................... .................................11:00 a.m .
Tuesday............................................ Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday............................................ ......................... Joy N ight,7:00 p.m .
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don 't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School ---------- --------------------10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ------------- 12:00 Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study -------------------Tuesday & Friday---- -7:00 p.m.
(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520


THE FLORIDA / GEORGIA STAR

OFFICE (904) 766-8834
FAX (904) 765-1673



EMAIL:
info@TheFloridaStar.com


Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School.............................9:15 10:15 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary)........................................... 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall......................................10:30 a.m.
Mid- Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer. ................1............................12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service...................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities


Tune in To


IMPACT










Clara McLaughlin 1vonne Brooks










Striving To Make A Difference
IosTo


11























S' here 's Always Something Happening On The First Coast"


2008 EVE Awards Luncheon
Last Friday a host of well wishers arrived at the Regency
Hyatt for the 2008 EVE Awards Luncheon with festive expectan-
cy. "I don't know how the judges made a final decision; each of
you finalists are just outstanding people," stated Jim Currow,
publisher of The Florida Times-Union, after watching a video on
the achievements of the 12 finalists for the EVE Awards the
newspaper sponsors.
Frank Denton, editor of the Times-Union, announced that
philanthropist, community activist and outdoorswoman Mrs.
Betsy Lovett was the recipient of the Arnolta Johnston
"Mama" Williams Lifetime Achievement award. Mrs. Kris
Carr, producer and subject of the documentary Crazy Sexy
Cancer and author of Crazy Sexy Cancer Tips was the speaker
for the annual awards luncheon.
We were especially proud of our own finalists Dr. Barbara
Ann Darby, President, North Campus, Florida Community
College at Jacksonville whose key accomplishments in 2007
were that she used her vision and leadership to increase enroll-
ment by twenty percent in FCCJ's nursing program. The Nursing
graduates outperformed others nationally and at the University
of Florida on the licensing exam. Dr. Darby used her grant skills
to increase the quality of faculty members and to expand the
accelerated program on the Deerwood campus for licensed prac-
tical nurses and paramedics to become registered nurses and to
offer a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. "Her member-
ships are vital; she's not just a member, she serves on boards and
has direct impact on health care, stated the judges; and
Ms. Jacqulyn "Jackie" Perry, Executive Director, Beaver
Street Enterprise Center whose key accomplishment in 2007 was
to develop minority-owned businesses able to relocate in the
city's Northwest quadrant. Ms. Perry partnered with other groups
to create the first export training series, made QuickBooks soft-
ware and training available through the center's Financial
Management Education program and was a national finalist for
the Incubator of the Year award in the manufacturing and serv-
ice category. Because of her efforts and the 800 hours of mentor-
ing and training they have received, three clients have graduated
from the center, and with the twenty resident companies more
than 160 jobs have been created and generated more than $4 mil-
lion in revenue. "She has done a lot for the business community;
an avid supporter of small businesses, particularly the minority-
owned ones", stated the judges.
These Phenomenal Women may not have received the
'golden apple', oh! But they are indeed winners in every way.


St- .-,,

Mesdames Betty Asque Davis, Inez Christopher Asque and
Taylor enjoying the EVE Awards Luncheon outing.


EVE Award Finalist Dr. Barbara Darby with other finalists Mai
Dinah Keisling and Kristine W. Webb in Education.


LI E awards Finalist ,s. JacAie Periy (right) with El E .Awards
winner Ms. Marty Lanahan and another finalist Ms. Diane
Raines.


Ef E. Iwarni Finalit~ Dr. BaIbara Darbv (Education) and i %. t
Jackie Perry (Employment) share a special moment at Awards EVE Aards Finalist Dr. Barbara Darby with hubby John
Luncheon. EVE Awards Finalist Dr. Barbara Darby with hubby John
Darby, her daughter Ms. Tamara Witherspoon, family members
and friends.


(To the left): EVE Awards Finalist Dr. Barbara
Darby with \her Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. sis-
ters.


Du\al CountN Retired Educators Association
\\ ins State Aiards at Contention
Sandra Thompson %ins District 5
Volunteer of the Year Award

Mrs. Sandra Cummings Thompson, Newsletter Editor
and Publicity Chairman for the Duval County Retired Educators
Association won the Volunteer of the Year Award for District 5
at the State Annual Assembly and Convention in Miami, Florida
last weekend. Ms. Thompson received her volunteer hours for
working with Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, West Union Baptist
Church, and the local and state NAACP. Mrs. Lucille Crysell is
chairman of the community service committee for the local unit.
The chapter also received the 2008 Florida Retired
Educators Association Unit Merit Award, the 2008 Membership
Award and a certificate for participating in the Cultural Affairs
Exhibit.
Six members from Duval County attended the convention:
Dr. Norma White, Local President; Ms. Virginia West, State
Director; Ms. Marilyn Keer,, Trustee; Ms. Martha Claire
Beckham, District 5 Director; Mrs. Sandra Thompson,
Newsletter Editor and Ms. Ada Standford, Literacy Committee.
The theme of the convention was "Recipe for the Future".
Activities included general informational sessions, workshops,
exhibits and displays, the country store, awards banquet, memo-
rial service and installation of officers. Ms. Marie Green of
Clearwater was installed as the new State President. The annual
District 5 workshop will be held in St. Augustine on September
19, 2008.


N\


Dr. Norma Solomon White shows off award
Ms. Tracy Austin.


Mrs. Sandra Cummings Thompson with her recent award.
courtesy of Ms. T7)acy Austin,


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JUNE 7, 2008


THE STAR


E4GE A-5


FF-i.











JUNE 7, 2008


1'AGEiA-O


Malcolm-Jamal Warner,

Storybook Past Blazin

Forward!


By Rych McCain
Photo: Copyright 2008
by Mary L. Carter
He is best remem-
bered as Theo
Huxtable on The
mega-hit NBC sitcom,
"The Cosby Show."
He had a second hit
sitcom on the UPN
Network, "Malcolm
and Eddie" and has
since directed numer-
ous TV sitcoms and
music videos as well
as guest starring on
many TV shows
including doing movie
roles with his latest
film being Fool's
Gold. We're speaking
of none other than
Malcolm-Jamal
Warner. He has been
leading his own
j azz/fu sion/funk
ensemble for several
years called "Miles
Long," of which he is
the bassist. Warner
wrote and released his
autobiography titled
Theo and Me;
Growing Up Okay in
1998, and has a music
CD out titled the
Miles Long Mix Tapes.
Last year Warner
completed a success-
fal theatre run of his
one man play "Love &
Other Social Issues,"
.which earned him a
nomination for a 2008
NAACP Theater
Award for "Lead
Actor." The awards
show will take place
on June 30th at the
famed Kodak Theatre


in Hollywood (the
same house for the
Oscars)! Warner was
also a celeb announcer
for this year's NAACP
Theater Awards.
Warner has managed
to maintain his easy
going, cheerful
demeanor throughout
the years without the
effects of a
Hollywood attitude
that many in his posi-
tion put forth. When
asked about the differ-
ence between his
childhood career and
the adult phase he
crack a winning smile,
"It's still a grind man.
When I was younger it
was a grind but I think
back then my biggest
focus was on life after
Cosby. I knew that I
didn't want "The
Cosby Show" to be the
end all, be all, of my
career. So I really
grew up literally with
this maniacal obses-
sion of life after
Cosby and not want-
ing to be part of the
"where-are-they-now"
pages. I spent most of
that time plotting and
planning for my adult
life. Now at 37 man, I
look at my life and it
has gone exactly the
way I planned it. I'm
at a really wonderful
stage of my life. I've
made sure that I never
have to make desper-
ate acting choices so
it's a really beautiful
place to be in."


A jail and rehab. What
helped to make that
Happen? Warner
g proudly states, "It was
a loving set. Mr.
Cosby always set a
ec certain tone on the set
ect-
where we had a ball,
, it
hind we had a blast, we
rner played jokes, we had
be, fun but we also knew
ble,
ing. when to get down and
get serious. It's also
is important to know
hit that by the time Cosby
,aks came on, we had
ing, enough lessons to
learn from the young
par-
people who had gone
par-
on before us. So it was
very
life almost to the point
has that when it got to us,
ssed it was almost no
cept excuse for us to be
You jackin' up because we
rob- saw the cats who were
may just before us. and
hit even before them who
)vie, kind of had a bad time
the of it. So we came at a
i a time and with the help
t s of our parents to ,rec-
res- ognize which di'rec-
hap- tion not to go. Check
pmy out Warner's web site
been www.malcolm-jamal-
So warner.com.
bout

vity *


To the unsusp
ing average fan
might be a bit n
blowing that Wa
is so approach
regular and outgo
What kept his fee
the ground and
head rooted in real
Again he br
out laugh
"Definitely my
ents! Both of my
ents were
involved in my
and my mother
always impre,
upon me the con
of longevity.
know part of the p
lem is that you
get a hit show,
record or hit mo
but that's just
beginning. I thin
lot of people ge
caught up in the p
ent and what's h
opening now when
thing has always 1
about longevity.
when you think a
the long haul
think about long
and it kind of k
you on an even
because you rea
it's not about all
(Hollywood). T
are just step
stones and prepa
you for the bigger
ture."
It seems as if
child acting cas
"The Cosby Show
made it through
phase and after'
without the mis
of drug abuse, cri


__ A'J: 1SUi 1 I:N HOi L :YH1] i


7 7" Syndicated Content


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HBFF
Welcome to LA for all
of you who are in town
participating in the 9th
Annual Hollywood Black
Film Festival this week
from June 3 through June
8. This year promises to be
a smash with the screening
of 119 films that includes
shorts, features, documen-
taries, student films and
music videos plus 100
leading industry pros from
all walks of film making
participating in panel dis-
cussions and last but not
least-the parties!
Music
Big Gates/Slip-N-
Slide/Atlantic Records
rap superstar PLIES will
celebrate the release of his
sophomore album
Definition of Real,
Tuesday night, June 10 at
the all new Club 360 in
the Ybor City section of
Tampa, Florida. The punk
rock group Renminbi has
dropped a new album The
Phoenix and is currently
on tour. Pop vocalist
Chani has released her
debut album Here We Are


Again! On the Indy Jean
Rah Records. After being
hospitalized in April with
symptoms of pericarditis,
and inflammation of the
heart lining, six time
Grammy winner Toni
Braxton has to undergo
further tests and has can-
celled the remainder of her
Las Vegas Hotel show that
was scheduled through
August.
Books
The LA Black Book
Expo will take place on
Saturday, June 14. Authors
from around the nation
will participate including
yours truly Rych McCain.
I will be a guest panelist
and sign copies of my
book Black Afrikan Hair
And The Insanity Of The
Black Blonde Psych.
Movies
Sex And The City;
New Line Cinema stars
Sarah Jessica Parker,
Kim Cattrall, Kristin
Davis, Cynthia Nixon,
David Eigenberg, Evan
Handler, Jason Lewis,
Mario Cantone, Lynn
Cohen, Willie Garson,
Jennifer Hudson,


Candice Bergen and
Chris North. It was pro-
duced by Sarah Jessica
Parker, Michael Patrick
King, Darren Star and
John Melfi.
This is definitely a
ladies film. It came out of
the release weekend box
office 50 million dollars
strong in the number one
slot! For those of you who
followed the TV show,
there is really no need to
explain anything. The
script was well written, the
acting superb and the situ-
ations were interesting.
The unofficial stars of the
project were the clothes
that the ladies wore
throughout the film. They
were nothing short of
fashion fabulous! Men, if
you want to score one with
your lady especially if you
are currently in the dog-
house, this is the dinner
and movie flick you need
to do.
Hit me up at feedback-
rych@sbcglobal.net
Maat Hotep!
Rych


riahted Material


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Temst cstlyedcai
Is te on notbegu


$80 Billion. That's how much money Federal Student Aid awards each year in grants,
low-interest loans and work-study to students in colleges, trade schools and professional schools.
You and your family may be eligible. So go online and learn how Federal Student Aid, part of the U.S.
Department of Education, can help you begin to realize your dream of an education after high school.

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THE STAR4


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keel
alize
this
hese
ping
ring
pic-

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/" all
that
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THTA AG -


Crime Stories Continued from A-1
Georgia's Second Execution Since Supreme Court Upheld
Lethal Injection
Charles Osborne, 37, was executed Wednesday for the death of two people. His
execution was the state's second within a month.
Osborne had filed an appeal, claiming that his attorney was racist and did not pro-
vide a strong defense. The U. S. Supreme Court held up his execution for about two
hours while they considered his final appeal. Osborne was sentenced to death for the
fatal shooting of Linda Seaborne and Arthur Jones in 1990.
The Supreme Court had a seven-month halt on capital punishment. Osborne was
the fourth person in the U. S. to be executed since the Supreme Court upheld that
death via lethal injection is constitutional.

Mother in Jail for Making Threats to Principal
Crescentia Cooper, 23, was arrested last month after the
principal at Sadie Tillis Elementary School reported that
lshe had been assaulted by the 23-year-old mother.
According to reports, Cooper took her children to the
: school for them to get enrolled. She apparently assumed
that enrollment would not be difficult and did not return to
pick up the children until around 4:30 p.m. School ended
at 3:00 p.m.
Crescentia Cooper, 23 The school advised her that they did not have enough
information to enroll the children and she got upset and
started throwing things off of the school's counter. In addition, she made threats to
the principal. After she left, she was picked up at a service station and arrested. She
is, still in jail and is looking for a plea bargain which would give her 20 days in jail
and a year of probation. Without a plea deal, she could get more than a year and a
half in jail.


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The Georgia Star

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She will set you up.
Knowledge is Power but only if you use it! S A
Read The Florida/Georgia Star.
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Cash, Check, Money Order
or Credit Card Accepted.


Student, Accused of Attacking Officer
Tyrel Washington is 15-years of age and a student at Landmark
Middle School. According to witness, Tyrel and two other teens
were walking near the school when an officer stopped them. In
Ithe beginning Washington tried to run. The female officer
grabbed him and at that point, he swung at her. The officer then
fell and Washington began to punch her on the left side of her
face and on the left side of her mouth with a closed fist. She fell
on her back and the middle school student came back and really
Tyrel Washington, started swinging and swinging at the officer.
15, charged According to witness, before Tyrel started hitting the officer, he
tried to intimidate her by hitting his hand with his fist and looked
at her and said to her, "I am not afraid of police officers."
Washington was arrested as a juvenile but charged With a third de ree felony. The
officer he attacked was a 45-year-old female. She was taken to the hospital for the
injuries received in the assault.

WANTED


JSO is looking for this suspect wh
Donuts on University Boulevard V
2008 around 10:15 p.m.
The suspect took the entire cash re
bery. Anyone who can identify the
to call 630-0500 or Crime Stoppe
TIPS to remain anonymous.


) robbed Dunkin
Test on April 26,

gister in the rob-
suspect is askedI
*s at 1-866-845-


Brunswick Man Led Police on a High-speed Chase


Dwaine Holland, 36, of Brunswick led Glynn County police on a
Tuesday, going as much as 110 miles per hours on US 17. The chase
10:00 p.m. at the intersection of Altama Connector and Golder
Officer Williams tried to stop Holland after he had been told that
been in Ruby Tuesday Restaurant harassing customers.
The chase stopped on US 17 in McIntosh County where a Stat
apprehended the suspect, using the precision immobilization tech
was arrested.


igh-speed chase
se started around
Isles Parkway.
the suspect had

- Patrol Trooper
aique, where he


Two June 1 Incidents Under Investiga:ion
On June 1 officers responded to the report of someone shot in the 4500 block of W.
45th Street. Upon arrival, two victims were found shot. Both wer transported to a
local hospital. Irwin Williams, 47, was pronounced dead. The other victim sustained
non life threatening injuries.
Later that night, officers responded to a shooting in the 1900 block pfW. 2nd Street.
Upon arrival, the victim, Harold Jordan, 51, was found deceased in a front yard.
Both investigations are continuing.

Teen Charged with Attempted Arson
Investigators were able to reach a strip mall in the nick of time
when they spotted Aaron Richardson, 19, with a red gas can in his
hand Wednesda morning.
According to reports, Richardson was angry about pay. Prior to
their arrival, the 19-year-old had smashed in the wi dows and doors
of the Jacksonville business. His plan was to set ire to the build-
ing. They were able to stop him because some ne was driving
Aaron through the parking lot and saw who was possibly Richardson,
breaking in the business and therefore called the police.
Richardson was angry because he felt his former employer, owed hi m money that he
would not give to him.
When the officers arrived, Richardson had already poured gas throughout the build-
ing and was going to his car to get some matches when they saw him.
Richardson is charged with two counts of burglary, two counts of attempted arson
to a structure and resisting an officer without violence.

Man Wanted for Vandalism

A male suspect is being sought in connection with the vandal-
ism and burglary to five drink machines that occurred at a St.
Johns County High School (Nease) Sunday evening.
The suspect was observed walking in front of a surveillance
camera with a crow bar. He allegedly broke into five vending
machines removing cash and causing an estimated $500 in dam-
age.
The suspect was described as a black or Hispanic male wear-
ing an oversized dark colored short sleeve shirt, and shorts, white so ks and dark low
cut athletic shoes. He was also wearing a dark colored ball cap with stripes on the
bottom of the front and sides.
The suspect also matches the same description of a subject who did the same
criminal mischief to vending machines at the school in February.
Anyone with any information concerning the identity of this; suspect is asked
to contact School Resource Deputy Jeremy Huddleston at 819-8329. You can also
remain anonymous and possibly be eligible for a cash regard by calling
CrimeStoppers of N.E. Florida at 1-(888) 277-TIPS (8477).

Man Killed in Drive-by Shooting
Jacksonville Sheriff Officers were called to a shooting about 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
on Kingston Street where witness said they heard dozens of shots fired. When they
arrived, they found a 19-year-old man that was hit and had staggered several blocks
away, lying in the road, where he collapsed.
It appears the victim ran several blocks after he was shot. The officers said there
is evidence that he went about two blocks north of where he was shot.
One witness said when he heard the shooting, he immediately took cover. He saw
the victim covered in blood and dying in his friend's arms.
Police said they do not have a motive for the shooting.
The victim was taken to Shands-Jacksonville Medical Center where he was pro-
nounced dead.
Homicide detectives are asking for support from the community. Anyone with
information that could lead to an arrest are asked to call Crimestoppers at 1-866-845-
TIPS.


mmillsolmoolmolm I 11111 Immumall-millow


THE STAR


PAGE A-7


JUNE 72008








PAGP 4~A? THE STAR JUNE 7,2008


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Prices effective Thursday, June 5 through Wednesday, June 11, 2008. Only in Orange, Seminole, Brevard, Columbia,
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JUNE 7,2008


THE STAR


PA FGE A-8


_#UWE









UT PE 7G 2008B



he FLS/GAStar




LOCAL SECTION B
2008 Summer Revival
Greater New Mt. Moriah Missionary Baptist Church
1953 W9th St., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Rev. Dr Percy Jaekpon, Jr., Senior Pastor
You are invited to join us during our Summer Revival June 25th-June 27th, with Special
Guest, Rev. Hawkins of Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church of Madison, FL; Rev. Antoine
Hittchins of The Sanctuary of Mt. Calvary; Rev. Reggie Edwards of Central Missionary
Baptist Church at 6:30p.m.Come and Be Bless by some of a few of Florida General Baptist
Convention Pastors. FoiDirections, Transportation, Questions, contact the church office at
(904) 354-0145.


(First row right to left): Garrison Washington, Nykeria Love, Andre and Chasty Williams,
Akari Roberts, Second row left to right: Rev. John W. Walker, Jr. (Pastor), Tre' Williams,
Abiyance and Octavia Johnson, and Sharon Coon, Children's Choir Director.
Join! Central Metropolitan CME Church Children's Choir Second Annual
Concert in celebration of National Children's Day, June 8, 2008, 4:00 p.m., 4611
Pearl Street. The concert is free and open to the public. Sharon Coon, Choir Director,
and Rev. John W. Walker, Jr. Pastor. For information or directions to the church, call
904-354-7426.





More imp':.run[nl. v.c jli.ie ,I=. 9 E
iSer, at, Bjrjck (_binu, 'i I.K.r .*.:,',r '" .... r t lr --
a. be clritchL-h the nonuninor Sen H;S'iBS. .1, .. "
B.crack hbanu T ilhnoui. .Tpped ,,
tp ihe Desupcrtic predo ldennal ,

nomination last night, positioning him to become the first person of color in American history to lead a major
party's quest for the White House.
Senator Obama, like many young African American, minorities and women stands on the shoulders of
nameless and faceless African American Baby Boomers and others in victory.
SThe Voting Rights Act, adopted initially in 1965 and extended in 1970, 1975, and 1982, is generally
considered the most successful piece of civil rights legislation ever adopted by the United States Congress.
The Act codifies and effectuates the 15th Amendment's permanent guarantee that, throughout the nation, no
person shall be denied the right to vote on account of race or color. In addition, the Act contains several spe-
cial provisions that impose even more stringent requirements in certain jurisdictions throughout the country.
Adopted at a time when African Americans were substantially disfranchised in many Southern states,
the Act employed measures to restore the right to vote that intruded in matters previously reserved to the
individual states. Section 4 ended the use of literacy requirements for voting in six Southern states (Alabama,
Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, arid Virginia) and in many counties of North Carolina,
where voter registration or turnout in the 1964 presidential election was less than 50 percent of the voting-
age population. Under the terms of Section 5 of the Act, no voting changes were legally enforceable in these
jurisdictions until approved either by a three-judge court in the District of Columbia or by the Attorney
General of the United States. Other sections authorized the Attorney General to appoint federal voting exam-
iners who could be sent into covered jurisdictions to ensure that legally qualified persons were free to reg-
ister for federal, state, and local elections, or to assign federal observers to oversee the conduct of elections.
Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things
are become new. (2 Corinthians 5:17)

904-265-0340



^ Qil dmcca-re, cQ7unc.
Annie Wilson, President
-.. 1225 West Beaver Street Suite 120
S '-' Jacksonville, FL 32204
Fax:904-265-4740
HC228161

k/ t www.anniewilsonhomecare.com
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Meal Preparation and Planning
Light Housekeeping
Grocery Shopping and Light Errands
Companion Service
Respite (Care
New Mothers


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Celebrate Black Music Month

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THE STAR


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Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.


SUMMER READING PROGRAM FOR KIDS AND TEENS, June 1 st through July 31 st,
all Jacksonville Public Library locations will offer a whole, wide world of reading to discov-
er this summer. Duval County residents, aged 12 to 18 can volunteer at any library and par-
ticipate in an essay contest for a chance to earn a $700 college scholarship donated by
George Koury & Associates Insurance. Teens can enter to win prizes after completing sum-
mer reading and also register for the second annual Teen Battle of the Bands happening June
21 at the Main Library (Battle of the Band registration concludes May 31). Kids, aged 6 to
12 are encouraged to attend story times along with unique programs such as, didgeridoo
down under Australian music, curious moon puppet show and art reach paper making. As
books are completed, special passports will be stamped and tracking summer reading will be
fun. After reading five books kids can enter to win a bicycle courtesy of the Jacksonville
Suns. Generous support for these programs has been made by J. Wayne and Delores Barr
Weaver. For more information about summer reading programs, visit your nearest library,
call 630-2408 or log onto jaxpubliclibrary.org for a schedule of events.
THE EARLY LEARNING COALITION OF DUVAL COUNTY has released the 2008
Early Care & Education Guide Summer Camp Issue. The fourth annual edition, produced in
partnership with JK Harris Publications LLC (JKH), includes complete and updated listings
of Northeast Florida Summer programs for children. The Guide is available free of charge.
Information on Early Learning Coalition's programs, services and membership can be
accessed at http://www.elcofduval.org or by calling 904-208-2044. Information on the
Northeast Florida Early Care & Education Guide Summer Camp Issue is available at
http://www.earlycareguide.com
THE WILLIAM RAINES CLASS OF 1973 will be celebrating its 35th Reunion during
the. weekend of June 13 15, 2008 at the Wyndham Riverwalk Hotel- downtown
Jacksonville. The theme for this year is "Still Great In '08!" Events include a dinner cruise,
a banquet, and much more! For more information, contact Mrs. Gail Hammond Haines at
725-2157.
MATTHEW WILLIAM GILBERT HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1968 is having their
40th Reunion, June 20-22, 2008. The Banquet will be held June 21st at 7:00 p.m. at the
Jacksonville Marriott Hotel, 4760 Salisbury Rd. To participate, call James Wright at (904)
303-9897 or Lydia Jackson at (904) 765-9224.
ENCORE WESTERNS AND STARZ IN BLACK CELEBRATE 15TH ANNIVER-
SARY OF MARIO VAN PEEBLES' LANDMARK WESTERN POSSE WITH THE-
ATRICAL FILM AND ORIGINAL SPECIAL -Original Companion Piece Posse Rides
Again features Mario & Melvin Van Peebles, Rapper Big Daddy Kane, Tommy "Tiny"
Lister, Actor/Director Charles Lane & Actor/Director Warrington Hudlin. Englewood, CO.,
May 22, 2008 Director Mario Van Peebles shot wide holes through the myths of the old
wild, Wild West with Posse, his controversial 1993 hip-hop Western. To celebrate the 15th
anniversary of this landmark film, Posse and its companion piece Posse Rides Again will be
showcased on June 6th at 6:00 p.m. on Encore Westerns and June 19th (Juneteenth) at 6:00
p.m. On Starz In Black. Posse Rides Again, a 21-minute original special produced by Encore
Westerns features interviews with Mario and Melvin Van Peebles, Tommy "Tiny" Lister,
rapper Big Daddy Kane, actor/director Charles Lane and Warrington Hudlin. Each offers
insight into the significance of this groundbreaking film, which has been called the untold
story of the West. "I'm a true product of America," says Mario. "My mom is white, my dad
is black and I've got some Native American in me. So, all racial groups that you see in Posse
are in my veins." Adds the director, "Posse is a popcorn movie, not a film. It's a big,trash
talking loud, in-your-face, butt kickin', face slappin' Western."
PUBLIC HEARINGS -You are invited to give us your opinion. "What are the needs of peo-
ple infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns coun-
ties?" To be held at the Behavior and Human Services Division, 1809 Art Museum Dr., Suite
100, in the Conference Rm, Jacksonville. Thursday, June 12th at 11:30 a.m., Tuesday, June
26th at 4:00 p.m., and Thursday, July 24th at 4:00 p.m. Call Yvette Jefferson at (904) 858-
2800, ext. 237 for more information and/or limited transportation.
THE EMERGENCY FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAM COMMODITIES DISTRI-
BUTION FOR JUNE 2008 -The Northeast Florida Community Action Agency, Inc.
announced that a small amount of U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Surplus Food commodities will
be distributed on a first come first served basis until the food is depleted as following:
Thursday, June 12th at the Jacksonville Townhouse, 3465 Philips Highway; Towers of
Jacksonville, 1400 LeBaron Ave.; San Jose Manor, 3630 Galicia Rd; Friday, June 13, 2008,
Lane Wiley Senior Center, 6710 Wiley Road; West Gate Apartments, 5202 La Venture Drive
East; Saturday, June 14, 2008 or Monday, June 16, 2008- Morris Manor, 9050 Norfolk Blvd.,
Senior Village, 801 W. 4th St.; Tuesday, June 17, 2008-Hurley Manor, 3335 University Blvd.
N; Pablo Hamlet, 1600 Shetter Ave., Jacksonville Beach P.R.I.D.E., 123 8th Street South;
Wednesday, June 18, 2008-Sable Palms Apts., 2150 Emerson St., Cathedral Terrace, 701 N.
Ocean St.; Thursday, June 19, 2008-Robert F. Kennedy Center, 1133 lonia St., Emmett Reed
Center, 1093 6th St., Lillian Saunders Community Center, 2759 Bartley Lane. ALL IN
JACKSONVILLE, FL.


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JUNE 7, 2008


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Saturday, June i4th, 2008
8:30 AM-12:oo PM
The Potter's House Christian Fellowship '
5119 Normandy Blvd f ,

It's Better To Build Children Than To Repair
-Anonymous
Faithi-4sed Mentvr Trainin

Thank you for taking your first step towards becoming a mentor by
attending this Faith-based Mentor Training!

To register:
Contact Dewitt Robinson @ 390-2960 or fax this completed form by
June 5th to 390-2659.

Please Print legibly.
Name of Attendee:
Organization:
Website address:
Mailing Address:
City: State: Zip Code:
Telephone:
Email:






*This free training will include a Continental Breakfast and Lunch*


Presented by:

dcps i
I uvl iiy PulklcSchol;, -E r


Sponsored by:
|"T-!bQia t IN
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VODKA 3/4 FULL and PILLS DID IT -A Trooper
was dispatched to a black Cadillac that was all over the
roadway southbound on 1-95. The first patrolman was
at the 333 mile marker by a driver of a semi-truck. The
Cadillac entered into St. Johns County and pulled into
the rest area t the 331 mile marker. DOT officer
observed the Cadillac and attempted to stop it. the
Cadillac entered onto 1-95 southbound. The Trooper
observed the Cadillac southbound at the 330 mile
marker. The Trooper got behind the Cadillac with his
patrol vehicle's emergency lights and siren activated.
The Cadillac crossed CR-210 and entered 1-95 south-
bound. A semi-truck with its emergency flashers on attempted to help stop the car.
The Trooper was behind the Cadillac and got in the middle lane next to the Cadillac.
The Trooper rolled down the passenger window of his patrol vehicle and yelled at
the driver of the Cadillac to pull over. The Driver yelled back out the driver's side
window that was open at the Trooper, "yah, yah!" The Cadillac passed the semi-
truck on the right shoulder. The Cadillac went sideways fish tailing and passed the
semi. The Trooper followed the Cadillac with emergency lights and siren activated
to the 326 mile marker. The Trooper radioed in to "10-66" cancel the pursuit. The
Trooper turned off his vehicles's emergency lights and siren. The caddy was all over
the road and almost hit numerous cars that went by. The Cadillac had its front
bumper in the pick-up bed of the Cadillac. The Trooper, along with DOT officers
followed the Cadillac onto International Golf Parkway while waiting for St. Johns
Sheriff's Office to again try and stop the Cadillac. The Cadillac exited off of 1-95
onto Intn'l Golf Pkwy and onto North Francis Road, then made a U-turn at a busi-
ness located there. After the Cadillac had hit several patrol units, the officer's had to
keep traffic off of the highway. The suspect exited the
vehicle and began to run away down 1-95 NB towards
the Main St. bridge. K9 unit and dog exited their vehi-
cle and began giving the suspect lawful commands to

run away and the K-9 had to apprehend the suspect. He
was then taken into custody. A search of the vehicle
T) revealed several pills on the floorboard behind the dri-
/' very's seat. A bottle of Vodka 3/4 full was found on the
/ front seat. The suspect was taken to Shands Hospital
and absentee booked.

THEY DIDN'T FOLLOW THE HOUSE RULES -THEY HAD TO GO -
An officer was dispatched to the 2700 block of West Sandusky Ave in refer-
ence to a disturbance. Upon his arrival, he met with the victim, Ms. W. The
victim advised that the suspect, Mr. F and his girlfriend moved to the area
from Wisconsin about two weeks ago. The victim allowed the couple to stay
at her residence temporary until they could gain employment and a residence.
While they were staying with the victim, the couple were not following the
preset house rules and causing disruption in the victim's residence. This past
weekend, the victim confronted the couple about these issues and told them
they needed to leave her residence. Now that they have left her residence, she
said they have been calling her about some items that they had left behind.
The suspect has threatened to cut the victim's vehicle tires and damage her
residence unless she immediately returned the rest of their personal items.
The victim stated that the suspect has been calling her multiple times a day
threatening to damage her personal property. The victim was issued a State
Attorney Case Card and referred to their office to file charges. The suspect
was not available to be interviewed.


Saturday, June 14th, 2008
8:3o AM-12:00 PM
The Potter's House Christian Fellowship
5119 Normandy Blvd

It's Better To Build Children Than To Repair A
-Anonymous
Faith-a4s4( Mentor Trainig

* Are you concerned about the violence in our community?
. Do you feel that youth lack guidance and support?
. Have you wanted to become a mentor/volunteer but lacked the confidence
and steps to do so?
Take your first step in learning how by attending a Faith-based Mentor Train-
ing!
This comprehensive and interactive three-hour training class prepares the vol-
unteer for the mentoring experience by giving the volunteer the skills, knowl-
edge and confidence needed to be a great mentor. This training is designed to
help to ensure mentors have a successful volunteer experience.
Topics covered in mentoring training include:
Diversity
Communication skills
* Youth culture
Positive Youth Development
Ideas for activities
Volunteers must undergo a thorough background screening with live-scan fin-
gerprinting.
To register:
Contact Dewitt Robinson @ 390-2960 or
e-mail robinsonwi@duvalschools.org by June 5th.
*This free training will include a Continental Breakfast and Lunch*


Presented by:


Sponsored by-:


dcps ISO
YCr~l Culyublic Schools Q.TW


-ii


sH From Actual Police Reports

SHH! Did You Hear About?...


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"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content _


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Advertising Deadline:

TUESDAYS @ 5 p.m.
To place an ad:

CAII: (904) 766-8834 or

EMAIL: ad@thefloridastar.com


;W


.qfcq.;.


THE STAR


PAGE B-3


LJ WE 7 2008











r.-i GA B-4,' f.T-_-




SPORTS ,*



The Atlantic Bodybuilding Competition


JUNE 7, 2008


On Saturday, May 17,
2008, Kalvin Brooks competed
in the Pride of The Atlantic
Bodybuilding competition and
placed first in both the Novice
short and open short division.
Kalvin also received his IFPA
professional bodybuilding card.
He also competed in April 24th
2007 and the Jr. USA Nationals,
placing third in the open divi-
sion held in Charleston SC.
Kalvin has been competing for
about 9 years and it was all
worth the hard work because it
finally paid off. Kalvin's next
show appearance will be in
September of 2009 in his first
pro show.
Kevin Simpson competed
at the Eastern Seaboard
Bodybuilding competition on
May 3, 2008. He placed 1st in
the lightweight division, as well
as receiving a special award for


overall best male abs. Kevin
then went to Richmond
Virginia where he competed in
The Pride of the Atlantic
Bodybuilding competition. He
placed first in both the novice
tall and open tall division.
Kevin has committed to himself
to go one step further. He is cur-
rently training to compete in a
super pro bodybuilding compe-
tition to be held in New York
on November 8, 2008.
Shari Duncan competed on
April 19, 2008 in Cape Cod
Mass in the OCB Spirit of
America Super pro qualifier.
She placed 1st in the masters
division and women open,
winning the overall in women
bodybuilding. She also
received a special recognition
as the female "best poser"
award of the event. Shari
Duncan then competed in the


Pride of the Atlantic pro bowl
Bodybuilding show. this was
Shari's first appearance as a
professional bodybuilder. She
obtained her professional card
in Richmond Virginia last year.
She placed 4th at the Pride of
the Atlantic show. There will be
future appearances from Shari
Duncan throughout her profes-
sional career.
Each individual has
worked vicariously at the gym
morning, noon, and night. They
take the sport of Bodybuilding
very seriously and encourages
physical improvement in each
individual 'they communicate
with and on a health and nutri-
tional basis. They would like to
thank all sponsors and the
much needed support that they
receive from Brunswick, Ga.


Kevin Simpson, Shari Duncan, and Kalvin Brooks.


CRIMINAL DEFENSE
PERSONAL INJURY
FAMILY LAW


220 E. FORSYTH STREET, SUITE E
JACKSONVILLE, FL 32202
OFFICE: (904))57-8448
FAX: (904)357-8446


WWW.COBBINLEGAL.COM


THE STAR


D ir 12 1 i










JUNE 7, 2008


F I oji-jt.5 r raI






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To place an ad:


CALL: (904) 766-8834


FAX: (904) 765-1673


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Low tAli4 g


013_ M 1. IItI N S ,Vli' I :
We remove old houses,
mobile homes, sheds &
boarded-up vacant
houses.
Lot Ciuii inij & Mtowinij
FREE ESTIMATES
904-725-8965 or
2;1(-2059

HOUSE FOR RENT
Paxon Area
Townhouse 3/1,5
CHI&A, Washor/Dryer Hook-up
$750 m., $750 sec, dep,
Call: 904-571-1962


A nnonctiicruivi
Rin your lId NTATEgWi)tu Ittin yo r htlslicrtid ad in over 100 I Florida
twspnpis lehing ovo iw MI .(.IONN rcildvi, ('ill lhi newipapero or (806)742-
173 t htir iturE d0,14iil orf v it: wsvwjwi jldl'wt-diaic tlgtit t.


Al ACTION ItO! DISSOIIITION IOF I'AIITNEIStIIIP- SA T'!RDAY. May
Frm r. Ptnd,! (fh7'i-11 t'/). wwwmvve rsricn-moctiotcers-cm Keith Baldwin

SEALED BID A UCTION', 37 331+.- Acre, Shoppintg Ct S-e. (lre--bo.i.
3;C. Wedneday, .1J 4. 2PI Iron Horse Auf- Ion. NCAL33o,. Sil( --S,

GIGANTIC 3-DAY Auction June 4,5,6, 2008 Montgomery, Alabama 118 IS)
"rai Tandem & Tri-Axle Dumps, (55, Are 2008-2005) Mack (5) 2007 Mack
R-e Off TTcks. Truck Tractors, Lo,.sboys, (48) Crawler Loaders & Tractors, (52)
Exc'.ators, (22, Motor Graders & Scrapers. (21) Backhoes, (31) Rubber Tired
Lctaers, Anticulting Dumps, Compactors Grinders. Forklifts, Paving Skidders,
Feier Bunchers, Log Lcaders,. Farm Tractors J.M Wood Auction Co., Inc
(334r2F4-3265 Br, ant Wood AL L1C # 1137.

Business For Sale

WELL POSITIONED SUITE HOTELS FOR SALE BY OWNER: TX-Fort
WnirtDFW :. r : Cap), CA-Ontario/LA/Airport/Mall;
-chernpick tese & others. www.rareearthdev.corn. Pamela/Marc, (602)944-1500,


Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn 5800 in a day? 30 Local Machines
and Candy S9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033. CALL US: We will not be
undersold!

Cars for Sale

Police Impounds for Sale! 94 Honda Accord $750! 94 Toyota Camry S750! For
listings call (800)366-9813 Ext 9271.

Employment Services

Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay S20/hr or $57K/yr Incl. Fed. Ben, OT. Offer
placed by Exam Services, not affw/USPS,which does hiring. Call (866)713-4492.

Health

Do you Experience Anxiety? There are answers in this book. Buy and read Self
Analysis by L. Ron Hubbard. Price $15.00. Hubbard Dianetics Foundation
(813)872-0722 E-mail cofstampa@gmail.com.

Help Wanted

Guaranteed Weekly Settlement Check. Join Wil-Trans Lease Operator Program.
Get the Benefits of Being a Lease Operator without any of the Risk. (866)906-
2982. Must be 23.

Drivers: DON'T MISS THIS Sign-On Bonus 35-42 cpm Earn over $1000 weekly
Excellent Benefits Need CDL-A and 3 mos recent OTR (800)635-8669.

AWESOME FIRST JOB!! Now hiring motivated sharp individuals to work and
travel entire USA. Paid training. Transportation, lodging furnished. Call today,
Start tomorrow. (877)646-5050.
BODYGUARDS COUNTER ASSAULT TEAMS Needed/USA AND
OVERSEAS $119 $220K year. Bodyguards $250 $750 a day 18 or older.
(615)885-8960 ext 300 www.IntemationilExeciitives.net.
HVAC Tech Training! Heat up your career! No Exp needed. Get Nationally
Certified in 3.5wks...Local job placement asst. financing available Classes start
now! (877)994-9904.
BankCard Managers National Processor seeks Experienced Sales professional
to manage team. Ist-yr potential $187,070. 2nd-yr potential $339,576. Lifetime
Vested Residuals. (888)637-2426 x227 CODE A.
Collect up to $250/wk of Unemployment Insurance! If you are unemployed and
haven't filed a claim we can assist you today. Start collecting Unemployment
Insurance by calling (800)582-8761!
HIRING 10 SHARP, GUYS/GALS TO WORK IN A YOUNG FUN CREW,
TRAVEL TO FL, NY & US CITIES. REPRESENT SPORTS, FASItION &
NEWS PUBLICATIONS. TRAVEL TODAY! TRAINING, DAILY AND
WEEKLY BONUSES, TRANS/PROVIDED MONDAY/FRIDAY IO0AM/6PM
(800)339-1293 HTTP://WWW.MYTRAVELJOB.COM.
Land For Sale
Auction! 364 acres divided. Saturday, June 14, 10a.m. Hunting, fishing, pond,
merchantable timber. Great homesites. Rowell Auctions, Inc. (800)323-8388 10%
BP; GAL AU-C002594 RowellAuctions.conm.
Miscellaneous
AIRLINE MECHANIC Rapid training 'or high paying Aviation Career. FAA
predicts severe shortage. Financial aid if qualify lob placement assistance. CALL
Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.


I Idi~I13Y010,J

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:1111114,11I PIC "jg! I I i. AI'). t. I



h1wr Ii $ I1,995/M% 40)4362 8244




www~strel-,isl)aper.com


Palim Gardens
CHILDCARE and *
LEARNING CENTER

*:-I iirillin i'i 6wks 12yrs old:
Vouchers Limited
transportation Before & *
after care 6am 6pm *
Evening hours available
* 2:30pm 1 am
* 0
2526 W. Beaver St.
904 381-1029
* Fax 904 389-8403

email:
palmgardenl@peoplepc.comn


APPRENTICESHIP
*CARPENTRY
*ELECTRICAL
*HEATING, A/C & ref.
*PLUMBING
Must be at least 18 by 7/1/08,
be HS grad or GED by 7/1/08,
have a driver's lic., s.s. card, &
transportation, Apply in person
on MONDAYS, JUNE 2, 9, 16,
23, 30, 2008 at 7:00 P.M.
promptly.
Northeast Florida
Builders Assn.
103 Century 21 Drive,
Suite #100.
EOE
A************-*********************


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers, *Criminal Justice, Job placement assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified. Call (866)858-2121, www.CenturmOnline.com.
NOW AVAILABLE! 2008 POST OFFICE JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO
EXPERIENCE. PAID TRAINING. FED BENEFITS. VACATIONS. CALL
(800)910-9941 TODAY! REF #1l.08.
Real Estate
VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS log cablm hell on 2 priacte acres near very wide trout
stream in tile (Glax area and Neo River State Park. Sl13W.500L O ,ner(866)789-
8535.
NE\V ARIZONA I ANt) RUSHt! Io :-1 "toot,lh.l eld" Sied I ot' SO
Do\\, SO IntlT Si 7-S t'OS [ I i ,lh' \orn.s itak ,u.trant-c' t ,Ot '.45 3" 0

7 ACRE LAKEFRONT & i01. CABIN Kl I nlt>$ SStt>)O. 2 12 st log home
kit & spectacular 7 acre hardwiood suing with deep waterfront! Prnm AL
location-minutes t'rom lnttentale! Gllted community. pa' ed roads, county water.
utilities. The finest in waterfront hi\ ng for the discriminating bucer. Lowest
financing in years! (all now t()00)5t4-5092, ask 'or x 1110.
Grand Opening Sale! Saturday, May 31st! 1I acre lake access just $29.900-
includes FREIE boat slips! On 160,000 acre recreational lake in Kentucky. Save
$5000 GUARANTEED! Prime dockable lakefront available. Lowest financing in
25+ years. Be I st to see! Call now (100)704-3154. \ 1 825.
LAKEFRONT SALE! 3.5 acres S49.900. New to market. Gently sloping
lakefront estate on private bass lake. Gorgeous unspoiled setting -no crowds. no
noise. For the discriminating buyer. Must see. Excellent low rate financing. Call
now (888)792-5253, x.1850.
20+ ACRES & BARN KIT $89,900. New 22x20 country barn kit & 20+
gorgeous acres. Potential to subdivide, Near FLGA border -90 minutes
Jacksonville. Lowest financing ever! Call now (800)898-4409, X 1457


Coastal Georgia- Gated Golf/ Waterfront Community located between
Savannah and St. Simons Island. Fitness Center, nature trails, tennis, boat docks,
SPECIAL PRICING starting at S65k. (877)266-7376.

Steel Buildings

BUILDINGS FOR SALE! "AMERICA'S LEADING MANUFACTURER!"
20x30x12 $4300. 25x40x14 $6890. 30x50x14 $7900. 35x56x16 $11,500.
40x60x16 $14,900. 50x140x19 $41,600. 60x100x18 $32,800. Pioneer since
1980...(800)668-5422.
Skilled Trades/Crafts

JOB CRAFTERS, INC. NOW HIRING!!!!! FIRST CLASS SHIPYARD
CRAFTS LONG TERM WORK FL & AL OVER TIME & PER DIEM UP TO
$24.00+ PER HOUR PHONE: 1-800-371-7504 OR 251-433-1270 FAX: 251-
433-0018 EOE



Advertising Networks of


Florida


To place an ad:
Call: (904) 766-8834
ad@thefloridastar.com


BUSINESS S NE=TW09RK


CAU.. N UW ,f Oft 0.aUS
If you, a deceased spouse or parent currently suffer or suffered from any of
the following ailments as a result of smoking cigarettes with the first
signs of illness occurring before November 1996, you may be eligible to
participate it, r Ta t. i l I ,l Call for a free consult tion
Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Heart Disease .
Kidney Cancer Laryngeal Cancer Bladder Cancer
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Man Pedals Nine Hours For Charity

Wearing White Pumps

BEXAR COUNTY- According to local officials,
after using Thera-Gesic' on his sore back, Tow W.
took only two breaks, while pedaling a small bike
nine hours in white pumps, all for charity. When
asked what charity, he painlessly replied: "None of
your dang business!"

Go nless"' swit Th lh-Geswc`








P4GP R~R THE STAR JUNE 7, 2008


The Station "Where Christ Gets Lifted"

Victoiy'rAMSI O166 W GLE
JACKSONVILLE'S LONG-TIME FRIEND


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is against the law to consider race, color, national origin, religion, sex,
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please call us. Fair Housing. It's not an option. It's the law.


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tAL


THE STAR


JUNE 7, 2008


PAGE .F R-8


? 4". 1 . I .. I., '. ... "... .


c Mmq I





Scott Starks and Rashean Mathis of the

Jacksonville Jaguars speak at Youth Explosion

The Youth Explosion, a risk reduction inter- o
vention conference, was held on May 30th and
31st at Edward Waters College. This special
annual event brings youth, ages 8-18, together
for a twenty-four hour intensive health educa-
tion experience on substance abuse,
HIV/AIDS, violence elimination, and nutrition
and fitness. iP"03s
Scott Starks and Rashean Mathis of the
Jacksonville Jaguars were the closing speak-
Rashean Mathis signed shirts and other items at
ers. "Every decision has a consequence," Youth Explosion
Mathis told the audience. "The right decisions
will lead you down the right path in life."
Scott Starks echoed a similar theme with a
quote from the book of Romans. "Be not con-
formed to this world, but be ye transformed by
the renewing of your mind," he said.
Members of The P.H.A.T. (Pretty, hot, and d h
tempting) Ryders Motorcycle Club escorted
participants of the Youth Explosion as they
walked through the neighborhood near Edward
Waters College. Trice Willis, President of
P.H.A.T. Ryders, said, "These young people Trice Willis of PHAT Ryders with participants of
Youth Explosion.
are getting the information they need about








River Region's Senior Director of Prevention,
said, "Over 150 youth participated in work-
shops that encouraged them to take responsi-

bility for their behavior and to make healthy
Scott Starks (left) and Rashean Mathis field ques-
choices. Scott Starks and Rashean Mathis were
ettions at Youth Explosion e ete
very inspiring. We were thrilled to have them." More photos on PR4































"Teach us to use wisely
all the time we have." Psalm
90:12 CEV
Seniors, the time is wind-
ing down for your anticipated
graduation. Your family's
hopes and dreams, their
excitement building with
great promise for this antici-
pated commencement in cele-
bration of your great accom-
plishments. The accumulation
of not just four years of high
school education, but also the
amassing of 12 years of edu-
cational success designed to
prepare you for the working
world, higher educational
opportunities or a distin-
guished military career. You
have survived "No Child Left
Behind", "FCAT", cafeteria
lunches, field trips, physical
education classes, and prom,
along with personal chal-
lenges that life has thrown at
you. David put it like this:
"Teach us to realize the brevi-


ty ot lite, so that we may
grow in wisdom" (Ps 90:12
NLT). Use your new found
knowledge and wisdom to
elevate yourselves even more
and to be a help to improve
society.
Your parents have expe-
rienced a myrid of emotions
leading up to your day.
Parents have questioned
themselves years before when
you entered into kindergarten;
have I as a parent, prepared
my child for public education,
are the teachers qualified,
how will my child interact
with other children, will their
instructional needs be admin-
istered to and will they pass
FCAT? The initial years of
elementary education were a
foundation that was being
laid, just like the foundation
of a house. A strong house
that will last for years has a
strong foundation, a founda-
tion that is constructed from
concrete and rebar. Your
foundation was built on the
C.O.R.E. academic areas of
Reading, Writing, Arithmetic,
Language Arts and Science.
These are based on State
Standards that are the guide-
lines of classroom instruction
that all teachers adhere to.
Author, Salome Thomas-El (I
Choose to Stay) wrote about
his experiences as an educator
with over two decades in edu-
cation as a teacher and admin-
istrator. He attributed suc-
cessful students stating, "I
think the key is that most of
the time I've never given up,"


he stated. "1 have high expec-
tations for everyone. Every
child, if we believe in them
enough even when they don't
believe in themselves, even-
tually they realize they can be
successful-success breeds'
success". Parents should and
most do understand that con-
cept, despite our children's
challenges whether they are
academic, behavioral or
social, we must never give up
on them and consistently
encourage success and pro-
mote a constant thirst for
learning. As parents we
should be our children's first
teachers and role models,
keeping learning a family
affair that encourages every-
one in the household to gain
knowledge of the importance
of education. This is not a
"white thing", education
enables our young people to
come to the table and com-
pete, not just show up on
"CPT" (colored people time)
to grasp the remaining
crumbs of minimum wage or
possible welfare.
August 2007 was the
beginning for high school
seniors to be serious; serious
in preparation and in prayer to
keep the main thing, the main
thing graduation in 2008.
In today's success orient-
ed world there is the under-
standing that those with
degrees, high school diplo-
mas, undergraduate degrees,
and vocational degrees make
60 percent more than those
without. Those with no


degree who have dropped out
face a grim future of unem-
ployment, lack of marketable
skills and minimum wage
jobs. Graduating from high
school removes the stigma of
failure, potentiality of incar-
ceration and dead-end
employment. According to a
study by the U.S. Census
Bureau (2002) approximately
65 percent of black male high
school dropouts had no jobs,
either because they had no
marketable skills or because
they were in jail. The reality
is: no education, no jobs with
a distinct possibility of incar-
ceration from criminal behav-
ior. Harry Holzer, a professor
of public policy at
Georgetown University
states, "solutions for young
people can be rooted in edu-
cation and employment". We
as a culture (Blacks) have
always supported education
and excellence, but within the
last 4 years many of our
young people have embraced
the negativity that is reflected
on us from the entertainment
industry, this raises the ques-
tion, do we push forward to
inspire our youth to the great-
ness that they are destined to
become or do we accept this
travesty to a generation and
let someone else determine
our children's future through
music videos? Our graduates
are more than gangster rap-
pers, drug dealers or half
naked sexually demeaning
back dancers. This in some
cases is what society portrays


our young people.. Lur gradu-
ates have proven through
their hard work and sacrifice
that they can be successful in
their educational quests.
These graduates and the ones
before once again prove that
not all Black teens are on
drugs, having babies for mul-
tiple partners, incarcerated
and disrespectful to authority.
We should continue to cheer
them on and help them con-
tinue to pursue their career
aspirations. Allow them to
keep striving for success and
never give up on their
dreams.
In Ecclesiastics 5:3
(KJV), "...for a dream
cometh through the multitude
of business (hard work and
perseverance), and a fools
voice is known by a multitude
of words (talk a good talk, but
has not accomplished any-
thing). Moments in time are
an equal-opportunity employ-
er. We all get 24 hours, 1,440
minutes, 86,400 seconds
daily, and we must account
for how we use them. We can
either use them for productive
ways to empower ourselves
with education or waste them
with drugs, meaningless sex-
ual encounters or criminal
behavior. So ask yourself
what is the best way to
improve your life? Education
is the key and our graduates
have established that point.
God Bless all our gradu-
ates. William Jackson, M.ED.
william.jackson@ewc.edu
Duval County Public Schools


GI ** dd E6 *I


June 2, 2008, Florida -
Governor Charlie Crist signed
Senate Bill 610 today in St.
Petersburg. This new law man-


dates one class period of
physical education a day for
one semester a year for
grades 6-8. It also adds to the
Elementary School P.E. bill
that was passed last year, by
mandating that the 30 min-
utes a day be consecutive and
that any elementary schools
including grade 6 meet the
daily requirement.
Senate Bill 610 is also
known as the Don Davis
Physical Fitness Act for the
late Jacksonville lav'maker
who filed it as his last piece
of legislation.
In 2005, one in three
Florida middle school students
did not participate in any phys-


ical education classes.
However, on an average school
day, 49.5 percent of middle
school students watched televi-
sion for three or more hours,
20.5 percent used the computer
for fun for three or more hours,
and 17.1 percent reported play-
ing video games for three or
more hours.
When children do not
begin to get the physical activi-
ty they need on a regular basis,
major health problems can
result. About 60 percent of
overweight children have at
least one risk factor for cardio-
vascular disease such as high
blood pressure or high choles-
terol and about 25 percent have


2 or more risk factors.
Opponents of the bill
feared more time in physical
education classes would affect
students' academic perform-
ance due to less time in the
classroom; however, physical
activity has long been associat-
ed with higher academic
achievement. In 2001, the
Maryland Physical Education
Study Group reported a posi-
tive relationship between phys-
ical activity, brain development
and cognitive performance.
The study demonstrated that
regular aerobic exercise
increased the rate at which oxy-
gen is delivered to the brain and
the rate at which carbon diox-


ide is removed, which maxi-
mizes learning and academic
performance. In a similar
study, when academic class
time was reduced by 240 min-
utes per week to allow for
increased physical activity,
mathematics test scores were
consistently higher than for
those receiving no physical
activity during the school day.
For more information on
the American Heart
Association's childhood obesi-
ty efforts, please visit the
Alliance For A Healthier
Generation website at
www.healthiergeneration.org.






The Star/Prep Rap


CLEAN KID JOKES


Page PR-3/June 7, 2008

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continued from PR1


Scott Starks signed shirts and other items at Youth
Explosion.


5 .


IFaI


DO YOU KNOW A
CHILD WHO LOVES
TO SING?


JACKSONVILLE
CHIMXEN'S CHoWS




We are now scheduling
auditions for grades 2 12.

Call: (904) 346-1636
www.jaxchildrenschorus.com
info@jaxchildrenschorus.com

Need-based scholarships available.
No fee to audition.
Rehearsal sites now in Orange Park,
Downtown Jacksonville, Westside, and Northside.


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Tuesday @ 5 p.m.

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PAGE PR 4/JUNE 7,2008