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Florida star

HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Entertainment
 Section A: Main continued
 Prep Rap
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 1, 2007
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00148

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 1, 2007
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00148

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news


This item has the following downloads:


Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: Entertainment
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Prep Rap
        page PR 1
        page PR 2
        page PR 3
        page PR 4
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
        page B 3
    Section B: Sports
        page B 4
    Section B continued
        page B 5
        page B 6
Full Text



siOrioI AON am A a


THANK YOU
FOR

57


YEARS!


%" Re


wFLORIDA-

www.thefloridastar.com


LISTEN
TO IMPACT
Tuesday and Thursday
from 8:30 to 9:00 p.m.
WCGL-AM-1360
The Florida Star and
Impact Striving to
Make a Difference!
www.WCGL1360.com
Listen on the Internet!


I, T-'F--g


Up In Sm ke 5 Goe U? Statewide Violence Causes Concern

Up In Smoke 5 Gone Untilnc Cninue
Five Black Businesses Burned on the Northside Viln C n


The fire on Soutel, as seen above, was seen for quite a distance. The center picture is the owner of the dress shop and one
of her customers. The picture to the right shows the burned site and owners of the shops, discussing their damage.
this week we were awak- Jacksonville Firefighters Reporter, Melanie
By Dan Evans, The Florida en to breaking news. "JP are on the scene and we Lawson, from channel 4
and Georgia Star Sports Bar on Soutel is will have more details as describing the scene and
Jacksonville, FL Earlier burning, they are reported" scrin g tie scene an
0 M i Up in Continued A-7

$30 Million in Winnings Victory


Prominent attorney Willie E. Gary of the Florida-based law
firm of Gary, Williams, et al, and the Gary Legal Group in
Miami, received a jury verdict of "not guilty" in a week-long trial
S over a lottery ticket dispute. The jury decided that Gary's client,
Abraham Shakespeare, is innocent of the charges filed against
him by his co-worker, Michael Ford. Shakespeare was called a
ra "liar and thief' by the co-\v orke, .'.ho publicly accused him of
stealing a $30 million "'winning lottery ticket.
The jury deliberated for more than an hour before they returned
a not-guilty verdict for Mr. Shakespeare. Mr. Gary said, "This lawsuit was about greed.
The plaintiff manufactured a story and a plan to try to take advantage of my client."
Gary is noted for winning a $240 million jury verdict against the Walt Disney Corporation. He was also given
a half billion dollar verdict in Jackson, Mississippi against a large Canadian funeral home chain. He's a winner.

Denise Lee and Glorious Johnson

Black Women Representing Their People

We are looking at two very strong women who wish to serve their con-
SB stituents and their community to the best of their ability. They are City
Councillady Denise Lee and City Councillady Glorious Johnson. When Ms.
Lee took her seat on the City Council in July, she was advised that there
were problems with the lease and other matters concerning the Simonds-
Johnson Parlc. The park is in her district. Ms., Johnson serves the city in an
S at-large position and had worked with the previous city councillady with a
goal of helping the children through education and activities. Johnson did
city Councilwoman City Councilwoman have her office take minutes which were not originally provided Lee. Ms.
Denise Lee Glorious Johnson
Johnson had not reviewed the lease agreement between former Jaguar play-
er and the city regarding his proposal for using the building at the park, it was not her chore, and therefore, a lot
of "noise" ensued which made it appeared that the ladies were at odds. They were not. The issues were different.
Councillady Lee wanted for her constituents, all the rules followed and a complete understanding of the lease.
She too want to give the best to the community and the children. The city is fortunate to have them serve.


Citizens Meet With City Leaders

to Discuss Ways to Stop Violence

About 200 Jacksonville citizens met Monday in an open forum to discuss crime
around the city and specifically,, the northside area, to provide ideas and thoughts on
how to stop the violence and crime in this community. Councilman Kevin Hyde
advised the audience that the City Council and the Sheriff's Office are in position to
serve but do not have all of the answers. He told them that he needed their help to
S change our present situation
.There were points made by citizens regarding the lack ofjobs, and the large num-
ber of black males who are serving time because they made bad choices for income.
However, when they are returned to the society, they are back on the unemployment
list and unable to care for their families. They also stressed the educational gap. A
large number of the audience provided their concerns.
Sheriff Rutherford and other officers were present but were not allowed to par-
ticipate in the discussion. They did take notes. The next meeting for such a forum
will be held on Monday, December 10 at Wayman Ministries, located at 1176 Labelle
Street at 6:00 p.m. ALL citizens are strongly encouraged to attend.


Robbery
Austin Bennett and Gregory
Fraziei were shown on video, rob-
bing a pawn shop on Normandy
Boulevard last month. Both of the
suspects were recognized because
of the video and arrested.
Killed FSU Fan
Both Antwan Mayes and Okpara
Nelson have been arrested in
Gainesville for the shooting death
of a 22-year old after the Florida-
Florida State game in that city.
Recruit Boys
Rodney Hill, 33 and Dominic
Patton, 40, have been arrested after
breaking into a store in Atlantic
Beach and recruiting two children
to help them steal alcohol and other
items.The boys were 10 and 13
years of age.
Shot by Police
Darrell Paige was chased as a sus-
pect in a sexual battery. During
the chase, it was heard that Paige


Austin Bennett, 19
Gregory Frazier, 19,
Robbery Suspects'





Antwan Maye, 26
Okpara Nelson, 22.
Murder suspects





Rodney Hill, 33
Dominic Patton, 40
Theft Recruiters


Derrell Paige, shot


had a .38. He ran into a tree and- Timothy Walden,26,
attempted to flee when he was shot
in the leg. He is in fair condition.
Timothy Walden, was arrested Tuesday but the per-
son travelling with him during an armed robbery as
shot and killed by Sheriff's officers.
Violence Continued A-7

MAD DADS

JOINS ESSENCE
Susan Taylor of Essence Magazine, launched a
national call to action to the African American commu-
nity for every able black person to help our vulnerable
young people.
With this call, MAD DADS introduced THE FLORI-
DA CRE INITIATIVE to bring together local and state
mentoring organizations, civil rights organizations,
elected officials, faith bases agencies, businesses and
community residents to join in this mentoring process.
They are therefore seeking male and female mentors
throughout the state. Jacksonville has a very active
MAD DADS organization. Elder Staton and Senator
Tony Hill are asking for all to join them in this very
needed effort.


News Briefs

Fomer FBI Agent New Mission is to Find Children
Jacksonville native, Tony Richardson is now retired after
serving thirt years with the FBI. He appeared on Impact radio,
the talk show hosted by The Florida Star, to let the people of his
hometown know he is now dedicating his years of experience to
saving our children by helping to find missing children. Mr.
Richardson's other past time is baseball. He is-a commissioner for the Baseball Junior
League of New Jersey.
Are You The Baby's Daddy?
There is now a do-it-yourself DNA kit on the West Coast and Houston, that
contains three cotton swabs used to take samples from the mother, the child and
the alleged father to see if you are the father. The kit sells for $29.99 and has a
mailer where you can send the swabs, using a credit card or cashier's check to
get your answer. The cost of the paternity test is $119. No more guessing!


8 5' 69 0015' o
4


LIBRARy OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIf OF FL (7.1.08
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


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CLARA FRANCES McLAUGHLIN DENNIS WADE
PUBLISHER ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DIRECTOR
MAY E. FORD JULIA BOWLES
LAYOUT EDITOR SPECIAL SECTION EDITOR
SPECIAL SECTIONS
DANIEL EVANS
CHERYL COWARD SALESDIRECTOR
DESIGN EDITOR
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS ACCOUNTS MANAGER
COLUMNIST
DISTRIBUTION:
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS JAMES GREEN, WILLIAM GREEN
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER ABEYE AYELE, CASSIE WILLIAMS
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
LONZIE LEATH, F. M. POWELL, ESTER DAVIS,, LAURENCE GREENE,
MICHAEL PHELTS, RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, VONKESTAABRAMS,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, ANDREA FRANKLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS, DANIEL RANDOLPH, PATRICIA RAN-
DOLPH, HAMP MCDOWELL
PRINTER: STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
(912) 264-6700 Georgia
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua,
Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn
County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida


SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$35.00
Half Year-$20.00
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National NewspaperAssociation
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


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Young, Black and Locked Up


Child Watch@ Column
By Marian Wright Edelma, President of the Children's Defense Fund


If you were asked where
the United States ranks
among industrialized coun-
tries on low birthweight,
infant mortality or child
poverty, a guess much high-
er than the bottom on any of
these social indicators
would be wrong. But if you
were asked where America
stands on imprisoning its
citizens, you would be cor-
rect to answer that we sur-
pass everyone else. Our
nation incarcerates more
people over 2.3 million
in 2006 than any other
country. Because justice is
not equally administered in
the United States, Black
males are disproportionately
represented among
America's imprisoned popu-
lation, currently numbering
837,000 in state and federal
prisons. Our ranking as the
world's number one jailer
represents a monumental
national failure.
More and more of those
who enter the Prison
Pipeline start with arrest
records as young children.
Earlier this year, a police
officer arrested seven-year-
old Gerard Mungo, Jr., in
East Baltimore, Maryland,
claiming that the child was
riding a dirt bike on the side-
walk. Gerard was hand-


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cheek iil8 : :*:, .' I .I LR: later" '. dulde L: relationship lot
lots of : LMIRL: let's meet in real life LL :'
loud LS MB ': .so ha ard ny a isugh to ... long time, no see long-
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my heart : male or female MOSS: of same sex '" te of sex
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of .. .;.. no :. : NRN: o : :, OLL: online love od mania
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t' go g .t's: up F: ar .. l ady



1 in 5 children is sexually solicited online.




You don't know what your kids are saying online. Or who they are saying it to. A lot of times NATIONAL
WA U CENTER FOR rM -
neither do they. So get involved. To protect your kid's online life or report an incident, call MISSING &
o l 1-800-THE LOST or visit cybertipline.com. HOOP: help delete online predators EXPLOITED
C H I L D R E N'


cuffed and taken to a police
station where officers took
his fingerprints and mug
shot.
Incarceration is extreme-
ly costly. In California, state
detention centers for young
people cost $216,000 a year
per child; county facilities
cost about $117,000. States
spend on average nearly
three times as much per
prisoner as they do per pub-
lic school pupil. In some
states, the growth in prison
costs also exceeds the
growth in higher education
spending. When it costs
more to detain a child than
to provide him a Head Start,
we need to seriously
reassess our nation's values
and priorities. While there
seems to be no: cap on
prison spending; Head Start
funding serves only half of
those eligible.
We need to refocus what
we do with the children we
detain. Too much cruelty
permeates our youth deten-
tion culture where the focus
is often on control and pun-
ishment instead of rehabili-
tation. A 2003 U.S.
Department of Justice
investigation, into condi-
tions at Oakley and
Columbia Juvenile Training
Schools in Mississippi
found that juveniles there
were being hog-tied with
chains, physically assaulted
by guards, sprayed with
chemicals during military
exercises, forced to eat their


own vomit and put in dark,
solitary confinement cells
after being stripped naked.
Mississippi's juvenile jus-
tice system is now under a
federal judicial decree
because of these and other
violations found by the
Department of Justice.
'For some young people,
being sent to a youth deten-
tion facility can be a death
sentence. In January 2006,
14-year-old Martin Lee
Anderson died of suffoca-
tion at a state-run boot camp
in Florida after seven
guards beat and restrained
him. His death occurred the
day after he arrived at the
camp after violating parole
for taking his grandmother's
car for a joy ride.
One state that has gotten
it right on juvenile justice is
Missouri. Under the caring
youth-focused leadership of
Mark Steward, its former
Youth Services Director, in
1983 Missouri closed all of
its youth prisons and divid-
ed the state into five regions
so that confined youths
would be within driving
distance of their homes.
Each region has two facili-
ties housing no more than
40 young people. This
Department of Youth
Services focuses on inten-
sive individual counseling,
academic and vocational
education, and positive
behavior modification. Key
features of the Missouri
model are its integration of
mental health into all of its
rehabilitation components
and its comprehensive
approach to treatment,
which includes family ther-
apy and counseling.


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I


Each confined youth is
brought together with nine
other teens who eat, study
and live together as a team.
Each team of ten is under
the supervision of two
trained youth specialists.
When a young person has a
problem, s/he can call a
meeting of the team to work
out a solution. Academic
success is emphasized and a
high percentage of young
people in Missouri's
Department of Youth
Services facilities earn their
GEDs. Missouri has dra-
matically reduced youth
recidivism to seven percent,
at a cost of nearly one-third
less per youth than the cost
of systems in Louisiana and
Florida, which have much
higher recidivism rates.
Sadly, Missouri is an
exception to the bumper-
sticker thinking of too many
state leaders who pursue
"Tough on crime," "Zero
tolerance," "Lock 'em up"
approaches to punish rather
than address the problems
of troubled youths.
Increasing investments in
health care, quality early
.childhood education, better
schools and positive youth
development in out-of-
school time would not only
increase the number of chil-
dren reaching successful
adulthood but increase pub-
lic safety. The last thing a
young person needs is les-
sons in how to become a
hardened criminal by expo-
sure to adult criminal men-
tors in adult prisons or cal-
lous adults in juvenile "jus-
tice" systems. It's time for a
change for our children and
our nation's sake.


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I -866-NO-ATTACKS
&EPA WWW.NOATTACKS.ORG
S DON'T LET YOUR CHILD FEEL LIKE A FISH WITHOUT WATER


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PAGE A-3


VLtLMIILI( 1, 2(1(1/ THE SIAR


The Potters House Christian Fellowship was the set-
ting for the Jacksonville Branch, NAACP's Reception
in honor of Edward Waters College's new president Dr.
Claudette Williams. The Potters House Complex was
an ideal place to be. Walking through the facilities give
such a strong sense of pride for what we as a people can
accomplish when we put our heart and minds to it!
Attended by both youth and adult NAACP members
it was quite a delightful evening that included a brief
program with Reverend Ernest Griffin, First vice-
President, Jacksonville Branch NAACP; Jacksonville
Branch NAAP's Education Committee Chairperson
Mrs. Elnora Goldsmith Atkins, Anthony Rodgers,
Jr., Third Vice-{resident, Jacksonville Branch NAACP,
Dr. Claudette Williams, Jacksonville Branch NAACP
president Isaiah Rumlin, and Reverend Alton Coles,
Jacksonville Branch NACCP Executive Committee
member.
Dr Williams a most charming and gracious president
remained on her feet the entire evening taking time to
informally chat with everyone there and to accommo-
date all of the photographers. Dr. Williams really knows
how to 'work a room'.
The NAACP-Jacksonville Florida Branch has been
active since 1917 volunteering their time, energies and
money to do the work of the organization. Their goal is
to improve the political, educational, social and eco-
nomic status of minority
groups and work to elimi-
nate racial prejudice and to
keep the public aware of L
the adverse effects of racial
discrimination and takes
lawful action to secure the viH
elimination of racial dis-
crimination, consistent
with its policies when nec-
essary.
The NAACP Needs
You! Your contributions Mesdames Betty Howard and A
are invaluable to the con-
tinued existence of the i.. -- .
Jacksonville Branch
NAACP's advocacy initia-
tives, outreach programs ...-.* .
and litigation efforts.
Contact us and find out \
how you can help. They
can be reached at 5422
Soutel Drive, Jacksonville, W,,
FL 32219, (904) 764-7578. Sister Mesdames Martha Cumm


Mrs. Elnora Atkins, Dr. Claudette Williams, Isaiah Rumlin, Mrs.
Sandra Thompson, Rev. Ernest Griffin, Sen. Tony Hill, and
Anthony Rodgers.
-.. i i


Senator Tony Hill, Dr. Claudette Williams and Isaiah Rumlin.

A --


NAACP Education Committee: Isaiah Rumlin, Mrs. Rubye Georg, Dr.
Charlotte Williams, Ms. Deborah Mackey, Mrs Gloriden Norris, Lloyd
Pearson,Tho s Mrs. Sanraompso s ElnoraAtns, Mrs. Rita Frankin,
Mrs. Pam Payne, and Femandand JaLuke.
~,a-m 11 1 I


Mrs. Verona Mitchell, and Claude Hunter -
NAACP Life Members.


innette Hill.


Mr. Baker and Mrs. Janie Madry.


Katn, Jmson, -lidelto Coreiup-ie oian Conrri Broi, and Erie
Bitiwi,,~N -L] CP Eve~t udi'e Co,,uniiuee ,memher.


Mrs. Jessie Bush NAACP Executive Committee member with Mrs. Joyce Johnson and EWC's human Resources Director Lee
her mother and husband Charles Bush. Brown.


I WP


Mvr. anad IMms. renanaanajaLuke, vAA.L r'tecuuve Coninee '11 't~uliw' J. I(. IIIuuI('(I, a 11 r1W ri-t'I'Qi' "fluII 1[1 I- Mes dYleLUhIli. Z intz'j L,,,LstUpilei-Aisqua ti aoU u ..Jerc.,.u, .
member.
.Jq 4I I
(r.com or.ou' ma,
PC U..' itsI. cT~, te lq io -
-1. ~ ~~: :i,9


NAACP Youth Council members with 1ASS Rumlin and
Advisor, Mrs. Flo-Rush White.


THE STAR


V..Eukm-HLK 1, 2UUl


Vil]h- 1%tmI.;/ al pAviiaodRaoit raal ditp-







DECEMBER 1, 2007


PAGE A-4


Faith In Our Community

Schedule of Events and Services

O'NEAL MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH SIXTIETH
ANNIVERSARY The O'Neal Memorial Baptist Church
will celebrate its 60th church anniversary and the Third for
the Pastor, Rev. Fred Denson Sr., on December 6 and 7 at
7:30 p.m. and December 9th at 3:30 p.m. All are invited.
Take 1-95 to Exit 373, exit right on A1A South, straight to
Barnwell Rd. and turn left.
SUMMERVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH is having their
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS EXTRAVAGANZA, Saturday,
December 1st from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Come One, Come
All. Fashionable items will be sold at this event! Given and
sponsored by Joyce Hunter. This event will be held at
Summerville Baptist Church Fellowship Center located at
2842 Mars Ave.. For information, please contact Joyce
Hunter at 751-6175.
SWORD AND SHIELD KINGDOM OUTREACH MIN-
ISTRY invites you to their 2007 Serious Praise Service,
December 9th at the Father's House Conference Center
located at 1820 Monument Rd., Bldg. #2, in Jacksonville.
Join them for a Spirit filled worship service as they give
Thanks To Our Lord and Savior! When Praises go up,
Blessings come down. Rev. Mattie Freeman will be bringing
a powerful word of God! Holy Communion will be served.
No admission fee.
GENESIS MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH, INC.,
DISTRICT #4 is having a Musical on Sunday, December
9th at 4:00 p.m. A spirit-filled program has been planned fea-
turing various choirs from in and around Jacksonville. The
church is located at 241 South McDuff Ave., where Rev.
Calvin O. Honors is the Pastor. The public is cordially invit-
ed to attend.
New Advent Devotion Written to Engage the Unchurched
- ST. LOUIS, MO New this year, Lutheran Hour Ministries
is offering an Advent devotion designed expressly for the
unchurched. Revolutionary Christmas, written in'a warm,
interactive style that engages both seekers and the
unchurched, invites readers to ponder and meditate on the
Christmas story wherever they are in their lives.
Revolutionary Christmas, along with its counterpart, the
more traditionally written Radical Advent, are now both


available at www.adventdevotions.net.
The idea of "church" is a foreign concept to many individu-
als these days. Revolutionary Christmas is written to pique
the spiritual interest of those who may have abandoned such
considerations, or whose idea of Christmas is grounded
hopelessly in the materialism of our age. It is also prepared
for those who are genuinely searching for the true meaning
behind the birth of a Child 2,000 years ago in Bethlehem.
Both Radical Advent and Revolutionary Christmas are
offered as a download from the Internet and can be cus-
tomized in various formats (Spahish, large-print, daily,
weekly). When used by churches, schools, ministry centers,
community clubs, or study groups, the devotions can be tai-
lored to include name, address, telephone number, Web site,
and other pertinent details for promotional purposes. The
Web site explains the specific options available for each
devotion.
Lutheran Hour Ministries is a Christian outreach ministry
supporting churches worldwide in its mission of Bringing
Christ to the Nations-and the Nations to the Church. It is also
a volunteer movement more than 100,000 people strong.
LHM produces Christian radio and TV programming for
broadcast, as well as Internet and print communications, dra-
mas, music, and outreach materials, to reach the unchurched
in more than 40 countries. LHM's flagship program, The
Lutheran Hour, is the world's longest-running Christian out-
reach radio program. It airs weekly on nearly 800 stations.


In Loving Memory


We remember you
each day, right
from the start.
Because your
memories will
lvo i


our he
our he


Parents:Tommie
and Ida M.
Thomas;
Children: Antonio
(Madie) Blunt and
VaShawn (Jerome)


,e in,,. \. Wynn, Jr.
arts. Grandcl
Jerome T.I
Robert J. Blunt, Jr.
"Lil Robert"
August 10, 1955 December 2, 1986


fld:
Wynn, III.


Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com


Ask Us About Our


If there had been a death
in your family yesterday.
what would you be doing
today?






"r'm
to hav "
to tell
you this...


Pre-Need



Fore-

S'Thought


Funeral

SPlanning

Program


"r ,t .. .. 2

FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED
Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville. FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
DIRECTORS


Deborah West


AIphonso West


Jacqueline Y. Bartle.


^- -,--.... 5"


Almighty God, Father of all mercies and giver of all
comfort: Deal graciously, we pray thee,
with those who mourn, that casting every care on thee,
they may know the consolation of thy love,
through Jesus Christ our LORD.


V~l*.' K r


ALBERTIE, Marvin,
died November 26, 2007.
ATKINSON, Robert, Sr.,
63, died November 26,
2007.
BLAKELY, Lee Costa,
died November 2, 2007.
B O G G S -
BILLINGSLEA; Bettye
J., died November 22,
2007.
COLEMAN, Michelle,
38, died November 21,
2007.
COSBY, Bessie, died
November 20, 2007.
Alphonso West Mortuary.
DANIELS, Alfreda, 56,
died November 26, 2007.
DAVIS, Tracey R., died
November 24, 2007.
EVANS, Little Jasmine,
died November 24, 2007.
FOSTER, Robert, died
November 20, 2007.
GARMEN, Walter, died
November 20, 2007.
GILES, Walter, died
November 20, 2007.
GRANT, Vera, died
November 22, 2007.
GREENE, Roosevelt F.,
died November 25, 2007.
GROOVER, John, died
November 24, 2007.
HAMILTON, Robert,
died November 25, 2007.
HARDEMAN, Leonard,
died Nqvember 23, 2007.


.,>1 ...


HOLMES, R. B., 86,
died November 23, 2007.
Alphonso West Mortuary,
Inc.
JERIDO, Elijah, died
November 23, 2007.
JOHNSON, Jessie C.,
87, died November 25,
2007.
JONES, Rev. Charlie,
died November 25, 2007.
JONES, SaTanya A.,
died November 26, 2007.
LONG, Clarence, Sr., 58,
died November 22, 2007.
McDANIEL, Sharon E.,
died November 24, 2007.
McNEAL, Ametta, died
November 26, 2007.
MEGILL, Charles, died
November 24, 2007.
MYERS, Laura, died
November 27, 2007.
PORTER, Minnie M.,
75, died November 27,
2007.
STANLEY, Lula Mae,
88 died November 21,
2007.
STAKES, Powell, died
November 24, 2007.
WASHINGTON, Nellie,
died November 27, 2007.
WOLF, Susan, died
November 20, 2007.
GEORGIA DEATHS

SCRIVEN, Ruby Mae, 76,
died.November 00, 2007.


The Church Directory

"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School ....................................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .......................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays
(Old Sanctuary).............................11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting...................... 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 8:00 p.m.
Rev. Eric Lee, Pastor
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus
(904) 764-5727 Church


II.
I I $
,j B


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15 -10:15 a.m.
i. Baptism-Praise & Worship
k (Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.
Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service...................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32269
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
-Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship 12:00 Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study Tuesday & Friday------ 7:00 p.m.

(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520


THE FLORIDA / GEORGIA STAR

SOFFICE (904) 766-8834
FAX (904) 765-1673


EMIAIL:

info@TheFloridaStar.com


S.. d "To ever'y-
... o thing there
ig. U r. a. h is a season
land a time
to every purpose under the heav-
en. A time to be born, and a time
to die."--Ecclesiastes 3:1-2.
No one wants to talk about
death and funerals. Too depress-
ing. Unfortunately, death is a fact
of life and there simply is no way
to avoid it. For indeed there is a
"time to be born and a time to
die."
You may want a traditional
funeral service with visitation
and a member of the clergy con-
ducting services at a church or a
funeral home. .Would you want
an open or closed casket? Maybe
you want a special friend to do
the eulogy or family members to
read scripture passages or poetry.
Any favorite hymns?
First, you should shop
around and talk to a few funeral
directors. Yes, let your fingers do
the walking-comparing prices
for such things as casket,
embalming, ant the cost for pro-
fessional services.
Resist one-stop shopping,
which can include such things as


prayer cards. thank--ou no.es.
and guesi registers-they add up
quickly. hlanN opt tor the tLuner-
al home m their neighborhood
for personalized services.
Decide on body disposition.
Burial or cremation? If earth bur-
ial, a cemetery plot should be
purchased; if above ground, a
mausoleum crypt. If cremation is
the choice, plan disposition of
the ashes. Do you want them
stored in a columbarium niche or
buried? Maybe you prefer to
have your ashes scattered?
An option some people take
is to donate organs and tissues to
a medical school (have a donor
card and check on requirements).
If you would rather have a
memorial service express that
wish. That.means a service in the
funeral home or a church where
the body is not present. A com-
mon misconception is that when
the body is cremated you don't
hold a funeral. You can hold a
funeral before cremation.
A.B. COLEMAN MORTUARY, IC.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman.com


Evan el

Temple
Assembly of God, Inc.
CENTRAL CAMPUS
(Lane Avenue & I-10)
December 2nd
and 8:15 a.m. 10:45 a.m.
gins 6:00 p.m.


Pastor Garry an4
Kim Wiggins


"The Miracles of December"
With God All Things...
* He Can Turn Your Mourning Into Dancing
SOUTHWEST CAMPUS CLAY CO.
5040 CR 218. Middleburg, FL 291-1426
Come hear special missionary guests,
Nelson & Renee DeFreitas from the Dominican
Republic, share their hearts.
December 2nd
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Night 7:30 p.m.
ST, MARYS GA CAMPUS
901 Dilworth Street *' (912) 882-2309
December 2nd
Come worship with us and know the
"Reason for the Season"
Sunday School at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship and KIDS Church at 10:45 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Service at 7:00 p.m.
5755 Ramona Blvd.
Jacksonville, Florida 32205 (904) 781-9393
Website: www.evangeltempleag.org
Email: evangeltemple@evangeltempleag.org
10:45 am Service Interpreted for ljtafat Central Campus


THE STAR








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"It's better to get smart than to get mad. I try not to get so insulted that I will
not take advantage of an opportunity to persuade people to change their
minds."


John H. Johnson, 1918 -2005
3 Founder, Ebony/Jet *


PAcri A-A


DECEMBER 1, 2007


Afterschool


programs


Helping kids find the hero within.




Let us know you want

afterschool programs in your area.


Call 1-800-USA-LEARN.


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ASJ TA-0-ITARDECEMBE 1 0-- -


Loretta Devine, A Quiet Spirit With Strength!


By Rych McCain
Photo 2006 by Andre'
B. Murray,
bernagency.photoreflect. corn


It is said that still
waters run deep. Being
in the physical presence
of actress Loretta
Devine may give the
impression that she is
softly quiet and reserved
but at the same time a
treasure trove of show
business knowledge and
experience as well as a
seasoned understanding
of life in general is
strongly evident in her
conversation. Those fac-
tors are visibly revealed
in her latest role as Ma'
Dere the matriarch of
the Whitfield family in
the Screen Gems movie
THIS CHRISTMAS.
Devine is a native of
Houston, Texas. She
graduated from the
University of Houston
with a B.A. in Speech
and Drama and received
a MFA in theater from
Brandeis University.
She is a member of
Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, Inc. After grad-
uation, Devine landed a
role in the stage play A
Broadway Musical,
which closed after only
one show but went on to


become a dream girl in
the original Broadway
smash hit Dreamgirls
which premiered on
December 20, 1981 and
ran for over 1500 per-
formances winning six
Tony Awards in the
process. Who could for-
get her loving, romantic
encounter with the late
great Gregory Hines in
her role as Gloria
Peaches in the hit Terry
McMillan novel turned
movie Waiting to Exhale
opposite Whitney
Houston, Angela Bassett
and Lela Rochon?
Devine is currently
starring as high school
teacher Marla Hendricks
on Fox's TV drama
"Boston Public" where
she has won three
NAACP Image Awards
for the role. She also
won an Image Award
and an Independent
Spirit Award nomination
for her work in the 2004
film Woman Thou Art
Loosed arid appeared in
the 2005 Academy
Award-winning film,
Crash. If that is not
enough, Divine plays
Rochelle's mother,
Maxine, who's always
picking on her, on the
sitcom, "Everybody
Hates Chris": and has
been cast in "Eli Stone, "
a projected ABC televi-
sion series for the 2007-


2008 season. Whew!
When asked about
her attraction to roles
and the factors that go
with them such as
salary, who is directing,
writing, producing and
the fellow cast mem-
bers; Devine reflects on
her experience in the
biz, "I think the life of a
female actress and the
life of a male actor are
very different. The life
of a Black male actor,
White actor, they're all
extremely different. I
think your body of work
sort of like attracts what
you are offered and
what people are con-
vinced of what you can
do. There are things that
you turn down and it's
primarily because you
are so well kiltered, you
try to make a lot of
things work that some-
times doesn't work."
Devine goes on the
compliment her role as
Ma' Dere in This
Christmas saying, "This
project had a lot of. gut
in it and had a basic sto-
ryline and a full charac-
ter which is really rare
for a Black woman. I
felt very fortunate to be
able to do something
that could show and rep-
resent such a great light.
She's a woman with her
own profession, she
reared all of her chil-


about This


Christmas. I think all of
the women and men
who see it are going to
feel good about them-
selves. The images that
we portray are very pos-
itive and realistic. It's
not something far
fetched about any of
these images."


STON *We
Jc sonileCo cs t voenie.m


By Rych McCain/
feedbackrych@sbcglob-
al.net

Internet
Check out
www.blocksavvy.com ,
the supper hip, upscale
website that was
launched last year by
music mogul and
RocaWear fashion co-
creators Damon Dash
and Kareem "Biggs"
Burke. The site has
plenty of features that
will tickle your genera-
tion X fantasy!
TV
Look for BET's
annual Celebration of
Gospel to air on Sunday,
January 27,2008 from 8
PM to 10 PM ET/PT
(check your local list-


ings). Funnyman and
radio host Steve Harvey
will host again with a
Gospel superstar line up.
Gospel enthusiast
should also tune into
BET's Sunday Best live
finale, where the winner
will be picked. These
folks are the real singers
- period! Those weak
voice, flavor-of-the-
month, lip synching,
need electronic doctor-
ing to their pitiful
vocals, video/hip-hop
pretty boys and girls
couldn't cut the mustard
with the gospel bunch. It
takes a real voice with
strength to hollaa" over
a 50-voice choir!
The Tunnell twins
i.e., Janice and Denise,
have relaunched their


make-up line call
Illusions Cosmetics for
women of color. The sis-
ters are veteran make-up
artists that have worked
with the who's who
actors, models and
recording stars. Their
line of products include;
their "must have" lip
glosses, foundations,
powders, blush, eye
shadows, eye and lip lin-
ers, lipsticks, make-up
brushes and men's
grooming products.
Check them out at
www.illusionsbeauty.co
m
Boycott Christmas
Shopping
I know my call not to
buy anything until after
the first of the year is
falling on a lot of deaf


ears but I'm sticking to
my guns. Those of you
who will be angered and
insulted by the increase
of nooses being hung in
the office place and else-
where need not open
you mouth in January if
you helped fatten the
oppressor's cash regis-
ters in the next three
weeks. Stickin' it to
them in the pocketbook
will get our message
across that we as a peo-
ple won't stand for the
increased racial attacks
on us.
Hit me up at
feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net
Maat-Hotep!
Rych


B i l :- Belay


Top Rated Primetime Programs Among
African-American TV Homes
Week Ending 11/18/07

1. The OC, FOX

2. NBC Sunday Night Football, NBC

3. The Game, CW

4. American Music Awards, ABC

5. CSI, CBS

6. 60 Minutes, CBS

7. Without A Trace, CBS

8. Dancing with the Stars, ABC

9. Shark, CBS

10. CSI: Miami, CBS

Source: Nielsen Media Research


dren, they're all healthy,
their all well educated,
their all thriving and
she's in a relationship
where she understands
what love is. There are
so many wonderful
things about her that are
generic to the women in
my family, to the
women that I know, so
that was one of the rea-
sons that I was so
attracted to.this role."
Devine ads, "I've
done a lot of junk! I'm a
working actress you
work! Sometimes it
turns out to be fabulous
and sometimes you go
'oh my God, I thought
that was going to be
great,' but I feel really


Deadline for Ads:


Tuesday @ 5 p.m.


Call: (904) 66-8834


AR T. -



MORE.



For more information about the
importance of arts education, please contact
www.AmericansForTheArts .org.




AMERICANS
io ^'heART


WHASSUP IN HOLLYHOOP


DEfCEIMBER]1, 2007


THE STAR


PDAG A_6


i


Loretta Devine


good






Iuvuit(I uu~1 AUU1 U Z 1 ilL )i/1it


Up In Continued from A-1
interviewing business owners. The fire, that has produced many rumors thought out
the Sherwood Forest Community left six businesses destroyed or closed down. Five
black owned businesses and Harry's Food Mart is without power, completely
destroyed or suffering smoke damage as The Florida Star go to press. J P's Sports
Bar, where investigators have determined the fire started, is completely destroyed.
The owner, Jessie L..Mincey informed this reporter he may not re-open. Lillian
Smith, owner of Yours and Mine Boutique, a long time resident of the strip mall
believes, after listening to the speculation of firemen and inspectors, that the fire
was caused by an electrical shortage. Ms.Smith has lost new clothing to smoke dam-
age.
While at the scene Johnny Green and many customers of Yours and Mine came by
to see how they could help and purchase some of the damaged goods. Ms. Smith
indicated because of the smoke, new items will be sold at a "Discounted Smoke
Sale".The sale is expected to take place on the corer of Soutel and Devonshire.
James O' Mckenzie, owner of Washington Estate Barber Shop says he is not sure
how the fire started. He has experienced electrical surges often because the building
is old and has electrical problems. James would like to re-open but is waiting for
JEA to turn the power on and inspectors to give their findings.
Yvonne Gray, owner of Asante' Beauth Salon also thinks the fire was electrical
because of the age of the building and her "breakers continually going off because
of bad wiring." she said. "I'm not interested in re-opening and have no idea of my
loss at this time, there is a lot of smoke damage"'.
ALLSTARS Barber Shop has already re-opened, moving to 4862 Soutel. Owner,
Chris Frison, says the building has a lot of electrical problems. He said he had expe-
rienced problems and complained to the owners, in writing numerous times, and
they did nothing."
Harry's Food Mart, owned by ARA.BS at the end of the strip is on a different elec-
trical outlet, and suffered only smoke damage. They plan to re-open as soon as
JEA turns on the power and city and insurance inspectors give the OK.
This reporter made several attempts to speak with the owners of the mall, Haifa
Alkhoury/ Basem Alkhoury. They said they do not know what caused the fire; their
decision to rebuild will depend upon the insurance company and did not wish to
address possible negligence in repairing electrical problems.
Steve Chauncey,Code Enforcement officer, says there are many factors to
consider before anyone can re-open or re build including how long the inspection
with take, the insurance companies, schedule of contractors, back log of city inspec-
tors and decision of business owners.
The rumor at press time is someone broke into JP's and instead of the alarm
going off the faulty wiring caused a fire. This reporter left CSI fire inspectors at the
scene.
Violence Continued from A-1
The chase started on Baymeadows and officers saw the suspects throwing money
out the car. The officers said that at least one of the suspects displayed a gun and
threw at least one gun out of the window. A .22 caliber handgun was discovered at
the scene and some cash was recovered on 1-95.
This was the ninth police shooting this year.

STOP THE VIOLENCE

USE YOUR TALENTS!

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DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

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Most Heated
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Black Leaders in Jacksonville



BLACK LEADERSHIP

The question of Black Leadership is always raised when
people of color offer suggestions to confront the ,
Sociological Issues of Crimes, Murder, Poor Education and i
Under Employment in our Community. Specifically, the
lack of Black Leadership is the point of interest. -I I i l
Jackie Brown,
Harry Shorstein, Pat Sher, Mother Davett Turk, Kevin former activist
Gay, Carl Cannon and Robert Martin are just a few very
concerned citizens who have asked the question, "Where is the Black
Leadership"? Their interest is legitimate and honest. However, others interest are
not sincere. What is meant by Black Leadership and what standard by which can it
be measured? These questions were answered by Michelle Barth, Regional
Director Office of U. S. Senator Bill Nelson when she told me "I miss Jackie
Brown".

Jackie Brown was feared by some and respected by those who had no voice in the
political, economic and business arena. She represented a form of Black Leadership
which challenged the political and economic injustice which is presently running
rampant and unabated in this city. Jackie Brown's unconventional tactics turned
most citizens off. She made the issues so clear but unfortunately the points were
always ignored. Jackie's brand of Black Leadership and her impact was not realized
until her untimely death and funeral earlier this year. The Reverend James
Sampson, President of the National Baptist Convention said it best when recount-
ing being with her in Ocean Way. Reverend Sampson said Jackie asked him "are
you afraid" and his reply at her Funeral Service was "I had to Man up".

Contemporary Black Leadership in this City must do as Reverend Sampson said
"Man up". Black Leadership must "Stand up", "Speak up", be consistent and not
for sale and become real in the minds, spirits and souls of those who encounter it.
Kudah Andrews of Kudah's Ethnic Emporium on 8TH and Myrtle Avenue has a sign
outside his business which says Outta The Box Ministries hopes that Jackie
Brown's life inspires a new breed of political activism in the Black Community.
The kind that does not allow its decisions to be shaped by fears of what those in
power might do to them if they do not shape up and behave".

Black Leadership exists in our Community. Mike Clark, one of the few Black
CEO's in Jacksonville, who leads the Jacksonville International Airport is spear-
heading a diversified group to combat crime and murder. His efforts are motivated
by the murder of a close family member. Michael Winston T & H Helping Hands
Corp., Chris Robinson, Jacksonville Jaguars, Maria Richardson Tibet The Salon,
Kudah's Ethnic Emporium and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference
partnered to feed 500 Homeless and Needy for Thanksgiving.
According to television Channel 4 News, "they started serving the meals at
noon...and quickly reached their goal of 500 dinners served. By the time they
finished serving at 4 PM they had served 702 meals". True Black Leadership
does not speak for the Mayor or Sheriff but instead must focus on the "Greater
Good for Humanity" and move away from greed, selfishness and being "Brought
Off'/ Sold Out".

The dilution and eradication of Black Leadership is rooted in the Consolidation of
our City. A former mayor of Jacksonville is not bashful in proclaiming that the
Consolidated City had two purposes: One was to ensure we never had a Black
Mayor, Sheriff or Fire Chief. We have had two of the three. The other was to seize
control of the Airport, Seaport and Transportation Authority, which are all located in
the inner city and even today are sources of vast economic income. The overall goal
was to diminish the political power of Blacks in the core and inner city.

Some Black Leaders of the past sold the "political birth right" by helping to sell
out the Black Community on the failed idea of Consolidated Jacksonville, which
can be verified today by the economic status of Blacks, according to the JCCI Study.
It is ironic for some insincere citizens to ask "Where is the Black Leadership"?
History can bear witness to the conspiracy to "wipe out and buy off" Black
Leadership in this City. The aim of all leadership regardless to ethnicity should be
as Dr Martin Luther King said "Do justice love mercy and walk humbly with your
God".

Dr. Juan Gray


-..,,? NOTICE
c "." S CANCELLATION


Notice is hereby given, the Public Health and Safety Committee of the Jacksonville City Council
scheduled for Monday, December 3, 2007 has been cancelled.
For a list of meeting times and locations, view the City Council Gatefndar webpage at
http://www.ooj. nct/City+Council/Caloidtar/default.htm.
Any questions concerning the schedule change should be directed to the Legislative Service
Division Office of the Jacksonville City Council- at (904) 630- 1404.
Cheryl L. Brown Kevin Hyde, Chairman


,E NOTICE
F JACKSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL
HOLIDAY MEETING SCHEDULE


In accordance with Ordinance 2006 361 E, all Standing Committee and Council Meetings sched-
uled from December 12, 2007 January 1, 2008, have been suspended. The regularly scheduled
Council meeting cycle will resume with Standing Committee meetings on Wednesday, January 2,
2008, in the City Council Chamber located at 117 West Duval Street, 1st Floor City Hall St. James
Building.
For a list of meeting times and locations, view the City Council Gaei daf webpage at
http://www.ooj.not/City+Counoil/Calondar/default.htm.
Any questions concerning the schedule change should be directed to the Legislative Service Division
- Office of the Jacksonville City Council- at (904) 630- 1404.
Cheryl L. Brown 4 Daniel Davis, Preident


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DECEMBER 1, 2007


THE STAR


PAGE A-8


a:
W''. : :-~.-:::


X










BROWN SUGAR DREAMS FOR


LITTLE BROWN GIRLS


LA UNCHES TWO PROGRAMS IN


U.S.


FOR SOUTH AFRICAN GIRLS


GQ NMedia & Public Relations. Inc. is launching two programs in the U.S. in support of the South
African-based project. BRO\\WN SUGAR DREAMS FOR LITTLE BROWN GIRLS.
The main purpose of Brown Sugar Dreams is to foster positive self-awareness and image in South
African black girls through the tool of play. The organizers are requesting supporters help through the
donation of bro\ n baby dolls to support the project's main desire of helping these little girls celebrate
the skin the- are in against the backdrop of a fast growing westernrn culture. Supplying the brown
baby dolls is a \\wa of helping them to be proud of \\ho they are and a re-confirmation of the celebra-
tion of self.
During a trip to South Africa. Gw\endolyn Quinn, President of GQ Media and Public Relations -
at the suggestion of mutual friend \ivian Scott Chew met with Gail Hamilton Nlasondo. a U.S. cit-
izen no\\- livin in South Africa and one of the founders of Brow\n Sugar Dreams. Hamilton Nlasondo
shared \\ith Quinn that there are \ e few\\. hardly any. brow n baby dolls cuTrentl- in South African toy
shops. Follo\ ing that discussion. Quiiun a doll collector herself) decided that she \\anted to become
a U.S. representative for the project and participate in this profound exchange program.


BRO\N SUGAR c itl/l uie on PR4


.. ,,. .
VOL. 12 NO. 33
Published Weekly
By The Star
December 1, 2007


INSIDE:


JUST FO R KIDS! .................................................................................................... PR 3
MORE COLLEGE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES FOR MINORITIES.......................PR 2









Pennsylvania HBCU Seeks to.Expand Research Opportunities
for Minority Students


Diverse Education

Lincoln, a historically
Black university in
Pennsylvania, has been
awarded a five-year grant
from the National Science
Foundation to design a
mentorship program in sci-
entific research as part of a
national effort to expand,
research opportunities for
minority students.
Officials hope the program
will encourage more
undergraduate students to
pursue graduate studies in
biology, ecology and other
science disciplines.
"This really is the age
of biology and there are a
lot of opportunities to do
research and we need a lot
of bright people to deal
with environmental and
health issues," says Dr.
David Royer, the grant's
principal investigator and
chair of Lincoln's biology
department. "I don't think
students are aware of the
opportunities that are
available (and) the purpose
of the undergraduate
research and mentoring in
biology,program is to get
more undergraduates, in


particular minorities,
n\olved in research."
Royer adds that
Lincoln faculty members
\will mentor students and
develop one-on-one
research projects over the
course of the program.
Lincoln officials \\Ill final-
ize their selection process
by the end of this year and
choose sophomore stu-
dents from environmental
science, biology and chem-
istry majors to participate
in the mentorship experi-
ence, Royer says. The
$209,000 grant will fund
research opportunities for
three students during the
program's first year and
four students for each
remaining year.
Govind C. Sharma, a
program director in the
division of biological
infrastructure at the
National Science
Foundation, says Lincoln's
grant is part of a national
push to expand research
opportunities for minority
students.
"This fund supports
one year or longer research
experiences while students
are undergraduates in an


effort to increase the num-
ber of underrepresented
minorities going to gradu-
ate school in biological sci-
ences." says Sharma,
adding that 10 other
schools including the
University of \\isconsin
and the Uni\ersrly of New'
Nlexico have adopted simi-
lar mentorship programs
that are NSF funded.
"Our program here is
to see if we can increase
the number of students
who go to graduate school
by working with the col-
lege ... and to immerse
them in good mentoring
and participation in hands-
on research and therefore
increase the interest in
graduate studies in biologi-
cal sciences."
Royer notes that
selected students will con-
duct research at Lincoln
and the University of
Delaware's College of
Marine and Earth Studies,
beginning next summer.
Students will return to
Lincoln to continue their
research under a mentor
throughout the academic
year before returning to
Delaware for another sum-


111A z'~


A-


mer, says Royer, adding
that students will analyze
various issues relating to
pollution and various bay
species. "The general
theme will be the ecology
of an urbanized estuary.
We are really focusing on
the Delaware Bay but the
type of research will be
quite varied."
Dr. David Kirchman, a
Harrington professor of
marine studies at the
University of Delaware,
says Lincoln students will
join a host of other stu-
dents from across the
country who engage in a
list of research projects
every summer at the
diverse institution.
"I think it's critical that
students .get involved in
research at the undergradu-
ate level. One of our goals
is to expose these students


to other types of sci-
ences ... including
oceanography and marine
biology," says Kirchman,
who adds that students will
gain and refine hands-on
research skills. "I think it
really gets students excited
about science because oth-
erwise, science has the
danger of being just a col-
lection of facts (and) stu-
dents don't see that it's a
living process and that it's
a problem solving enter-
prise."
Royer says that biolo-
gy is one of the most popu-
lar majors at Lincoln.
Many students, he adds,
view the biology major as
a pathway to medical
school. But Lincoln offi-
cials hope the mentorship
program will encourage
more students to pursue
research.


How Can I Prepare Myself For A Career In Technology?


fastweb.com

Explore the field by
picking and choosing from
this list of tips to get a
sense of the technology job
world and what you're like-
ly to find fulfilling.
Attend an Industry
Organization Meeting
Techies working in the
industry's trenches can pro-
vide lots of guidance to
those just getting started.
They can also serve as
mentors to assist you as
you embark on a tech
career. Where can you find


these mentors? At industry
groups, many of them with
college chapters and men-
toring programs. Be up.
front with your need for
advice, and ask lots of
questions.
Explore Tech Job
Roles
Too many would-be
techies blast into the field
without thinking through
the myriad job roles avail-
able. Why commit to
studying networks when
programming may be right
for you? The TechCareer
Compass, a resource from


industry group CompTIA,
will help you sort through
the possibilities with its
still-evolving taxonomy of
technology job roles.
Learn HTML
Programmers, technical
writers, information archi-
tects and many other
techies are now expected
to know HTML, the lan-
guage used to display Web
pages. Learning HTML is
a first step in moving
beyond browsing to delve
into the Internet's innards.
Read Computer
Books


Visit your local library
or bookstore, and head to
the computer books sec-
tion. If it's a megastore,
you'll find hundreds of
books, many with obscure
titles and topics. Simply
perusing books about the
industry, as well as specific
topics like programming
and networking, will help
you explore the variety of
jobs in the field.
Write a Program
Programming is an
essential skill for technolo-
gy pros. Scores of lan-
guages exist, such as C++,


Java, C#, Visual Basic and
more. Learning JavaScript
is one relatively quick way
to get started in program-
ming. You'll need nothing
more than a Web browser,
a text-editing program and
the help of an online tutori-
al.


Page PR-2/December 1, 2007


.; -4


The Star







Page PR-3lDecember 1, 2007 The StarlPrep Rap


obs"%DmeP"

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Commercial News Providers"
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M I tea ** *a 0% *
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mH e .O0



Optical T ions


I Siy Jokes


Q: Where do snowmen go to
dance?
A: A snowball!

Q: Why do polar bears have fur
coats?
A: Because they would look silly
in anoraks!

Q: What did the fireman's wife
get for Christmas?
A: A ladder in her stocking!

Q: If athletes get athlete's foot,
what do astronauts get?
A: Missile toe!

Q: What has two humps and is
found at the North Pole?
A: A lost camel!


Q: What soldiers smell of salt
and pepper?
A: Seasoned troopers!

Q: What lies at the bottom of
the sea and shivers?
A: A nervous wreck!

Q: How do you make a milk
shake?
A: Give it a good scare!

Q: Who invented underground
tunnels?
A: A mole!

Q: What is the best day of th&
week to sleep?
A: Snooze-day!


C6lor This!


Stare at the center of this

image and move your

head toward the page.

The outer circles appear

to spin.


S. 0


Page PR-3/December 1, 2007


The Star/Prep Rap











BROWN SUGAR DREAMS FOR LITTLE


BROWN GIRLS


continued from front page


"After sharing commu-
nications with Gail and
hearing the passion in her
voice about this project
aji discussing the emo-
tional and psychological
affects this has on our
sweet little girls, I immedi-
ately took up the charge to.
get involved," says Quinn.
"It is a perfect fit for me
and my ministry," Quinn
adds. "I fell in love with
South Africa and the peo-
ple there.
This gives me the opportu-
nity to stay connected to
the people, land and cul-
ture.
Although the U.S. ini-
tiative is being launched
during this holiday season,
the project will be an
ongoing effort, 365 days a
year, and will correspond
to holidays and special
events in South Africa.
One program will be
designed for individuals
and groups, including
church and faith-based
organizations, sororities,
civic organizations, non-
profits, corporations, com-
munity groups, etc.
The second program will
be directed and geared
towards female celebrity
talent and their on-going
part c ipation .
To date, the project has
received dolls from Oleta
Adams, Cece Winans and


Dionne Warwick, "among
others.
The female celebrities
will be responsible for
soliciting- and collecting
dolls, as well as incurring
the shipping costs to South
A f r i c a
The tag for the campaign
is titled "[Talent Name] for
Brown Sugar Dreams --
South African Project" will
be credited and listed in all
marketing, promotional
and PR materials on behalf
of the project.
Groups interested in
participating will also be
responsible for shipping
dolls to South Africa.
Individuals who would
like to get involved with
the project can send their
doll(s) for shipping to GQ
Media & Public Relations,
1650 Broadway, Suite
1011, New York, NY
10019
Attention: Brown Sugar
Dreams Project, 212-765-
7910.
Specifically the organ-
izers are requesting baby
dolls, "No Barbie dolls,"
states Hamilton Masondo.
"We are looking for BABY
dolls that look like our lit-
tle girls, not teenage look-
ing dolls, with lots of long
down to your knees hair.
We want soft body dolls
that can be cuddled and
held closely and slept
w i t h
All dolls should be lead
and toxic free.
"There is a whole gen-
eration of South African
girls (ages 4-16) growing
up without the gift of
'mommy nurturing,'"
according to Hamilton
Masondo. "The average
age and heads of house-
holds [because of


HIV/AIDS related dis-
eases] are 12 years of age
and some younger -- it
may not be a direct result,
but we are finding younger
girls falling pregnant, car-
rying the baby full term,
delivering the baby on
their own and then throw-
ing the babies away in
fields, trash cans, out hous-
es -- and these babies
LIVE!"
"Every girl child is not
raped, poor or from a rural
community who throw
their newborn babies away,
most come from every
background that exists
here in the new South
Africa -- black, white,
poor, middle class or privi-
leged," says Hamilton
Masondo. "If, through the
Brown Sugar Dreams for
Little Brown Girls Project,
we can also begin the
process of introducing nur-
turing and parenting skills
to our little girls now to
help save one life later, it
will be worth it.
This also gives us a door
to speak of options for
example, giving the baby
away for adoption rather
than throwing a life away."
Brown Sugar Dreams
for Little Brown Girls
began just seven short
months ago. Schulya.
Goodson, a co-founder and
board member, came up
with the idea for the proj-
ect when she was looking
for a brown doll for her
then 6-year-old daughter in
toy shops in South Africa.
She asked her friends in
the Delta Sigma Theta
sorority to get involved
once she noticed there
were few, if any, brown
dolls in the South African
toy shops.


About the same time that
Goodson was looking for
her child's birthday gift,
Hamilton Masondo saw a
little 5-year-old black girl
walking down the street in
Johannesburg, carrying a
little white baby doll on
her back emulating the
South African custom of
women within the black
community carrying little
children on their backs. It
was only after arriving
home that it hit Hamilton
Masondo that there was
something wrong with the
picture she had just wit-
nessed. It was not uncom-
mon to see little girls play-
ing with old hand me down
white baby dolls, but what
really struck a nerve was
the idea that there needed,
to be a different message
for little black girls as they
are imitating their mothers
and grandmothers that
there should be a brown
baby doll in place of the
white doll on their backs.
"Through this project,
we hope to encourage
these little girls to dream
about something other than
growing up to be a domes-
tic worker as their mothers,
grandmothers and aunties
before them, but to desire
to grow up and get into the
'child care' business as a
teacher, caregiver, or
owner of her own nursery
school and not to settle and
think she can do nothing
else," says Hamilton
Masondo. "Hopefully the
project will plant a seed in
these little girls that
receive a little brown baby
doll, and will serve to
remind them that they can
be and do anything."
The concept for the
project derived from a


music project Hamilton
Masondo created for black
children in the states. She
had written a song for a
project titled, BROWN
SUGAR DREAMS, when
the company she worked
with
Warner Brothers Records -
did a special project just
before she decided to
marry and move to South
Africa from the United
S t a t e s
While having a conversa-
tion with Goodman (her
friend and future co-
founder of the project), the
two decided that the name
seemed to fit the purpose
behind the project. In
addition, it would allow for
a greater depth of involve-
ment in many other areas
directed at positive affir-
mation for both brown
boys and. girls in South
Africa.
Get involved, donate a
brown baby doll and help
little brown girls in South
Africa celebrate the 'earth
suit' God has put us each
in. If we can plant this
seed in these little girls
now, there is better chance
of having self-confident
young women" in South
Africa's future.


Thae Star/Prep Rap


Page P>R-4/December 1, 2007









SECTI ON


. .Be/nihnc-Cookinan tI ildcatr take on the F-lurida
A&HM Raiders tirn their annual niatclnhip at Orlando '
Ci/tI.s B iil I.

November 1". 2007. Orlando. FL--This \ear the
Wildcats beat the Rattlers 34 7 in their annual
matchup in the Walt Disney World Florida Classic at
the Florida Citrus Bo\\l in Orlando.
The stadium \\as full of fans read\ to cheer for their
special team. but the biggest highlight of the game \\as
half-time, that's \\hen the McDonald Battle of the
Bands began. It \\as over 65,000 fans at the Citrus
Bowl.
Jimmie Russell was named MVP of the Walt
Disney World Florida Classic for Bethune-Cookman
College.


FAMU Rattlers Marching 100's Band performing doing
McDonald's half-time Battle of the Bands.


Bethune-Cookman Wildcats Marching
Bethune-Cookman 's president, Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed and during McDonald's Battle of the Bands.
FAMU's 10th President, Dr. James Ammons. _


governor crist is seen on tnejieia along wnn nernune-Coi
Reed and school VLP.s


To the left: While the football teams battle for
supremacy on the field, there's just as big a
rivalry at halftime as the marching bands take
the field. FAMU getting ready for the battle of
the bands.


ed on No\ ember 14 \\ itli .11n _"_
open house and j special
recognillon tol U.S From leti: Dr. Gerold Schichh'r, Clhildren'c .tledical Services
Congresswoman Corrine consultant and former vice president, Governmental Affairs,
Brown for her dedication to University of Florida; Dr. Jay Schauben, director of the
the nation's poison centers Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville; Mr.
and for her tireless efforts Ken L. Johnson, U. S. Congresswoman Corrine Brown's Office;
and commitment to public Dr. Robert Nuss, dean, College of Medicine, University of
health. Florida Health Science Center Jacksonville; and, Mr. Roger
^ Porter, Mayor's Office, Cit of Jacksonville.


Bethune-Cookman's president was presented
with the Walt Disney Mickey Mouse Trophy after
winning the football game.


Governor
Powell.


PAGE B-1


THE STAR


DECEMBER 12007






Trfi-f .T-A DEE. 12--0


ASK Deanna, is an advice column nnown jor tus
fearless approach to reality-based subjects!

Dear Deanna!
SMy marriage is on a rocky road. We married as partners and now we're
on the way to becoming enemies. My husband appears jealous of my
success and he finds joy in my failures and tries to compete financially.
I thought I was paranoid but he focuses on getting ahead of me and tries
to outdo me in everything. My request for him to stop this behavior falls
on deaf ears. We spend most days arguing or not speaking and I'm at the end of my rope. Help!
Pam Tiggs (Durham, NC)
Dear Pam:
Your husband's no longer the big fish in your small pond. He's always been competitive but you were
not in a position of upward mobility, so you didn't notice. His manhood has been insulted and he feels
he's no longer the hero. You have to stroke his ego. Give verbal compliments, make him feel need-
ed and constantly drill in his head the idea that you're a team. After a while, he'll feel like the king
again and you can smile and keep it moving.


Dear Deanna!
I dated a guy for three years. We spent time together, traveled and he occasionally stayed at my place.
As far as I can remember, we spent several major holidays together. I didn't meet his family and
never stayed with him. One day he suddenly left town without telling me. I tracked him down by hir-
ing a private investigator and learned he had a wife and kids. I want to know if I should appear on
his doorstep and surprise him or leave it alone?
Anonymous (On-Line Reader)
Dear Anonymous:
When a normal relationship ends, you're entitled to closure. However, in this case, you have a full
stop with something called a wife. You were used and taken advantage of. You're no dummy and if
you didn't have his home number, never met his family or been to his house, you should've known
something was up. But hey, you were in love, sexually sprung and he always played with you when
his wife wasn't available. Count this as a loss, and move on because anything otherwise can get you
seriously hurt.
*********** ****

Dear Deanna!
My mother has always been true to her marriage. Now that the pastor of our church is single due to
divorce, he's paying extra attention to my mother and she loves it. I think they're having an affair
because she's parking her car in strange places when he picks her up and there's too many sneaky
looks when they're around each other. People in the church are starting to talk and I'm embarrassed
and don't know how to address this. What should I do?
Embarassed Daughter (Whittier, CA)
Dear Embarassed Daughter
Although a man of the cloth, your pastor is still human and may sow his wild oats now that he's
newly single. However, you should let your mom know that her actions look suspicious and if she's
having an affair she needs to stop it or fix or end her marriage. If that doesn't help, have the same
talk with the pastor. As. a last resort, tell both parties you have no choice but to tell your father and
that'll get things jumping or bring everything to a complete halt.
Ask Deanna is written by Deanna M. Write Ask Deanna! Deanna M, 264 S La Cienega, Suite 1283,
Beverly HIls, CA 90211 orEmaik askdeannal@yahoo.com Website: www.askdeanna.com




Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE -The Jacksonville City Council's Public
Health and Safety Committee will be holding 2 public forums to receive pub-
lic input on the subject of crime, crime prevention, and dealing with crime's
aftermath:Monday, November 26th 6p.m. Edward Waters College, Milne
Auditorium, 1658 Kings Road. Monday, December 10, 2007, 6:00 p.m. -
Wayman Ministries Spirit of Life Worship Center, 1176 Labelle Street. All
interested parties are invited to attend and contribute their ideas.
THE JACKSONVILLE LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
INC., for the Millions More Movement will 'Serve Food and Give-A-
Way Clothes', Saturday, December 8th from 11a.m. til 5p.m. The location is
916 N. Myrtle Avenue., between Kings Rd. and Beaver St. For more informa-
tion about the Millions More Movement visit our website www.jaxloc.com,
or call 904-240-9133. Support the Jacksonville Local Organizing Committee
Inc., 'as we strive to end the violence through education, and not more incarceration.'
DOWNTOWN JACKSONVILLE'S HISTORIC CHURCH TOUR
Tour a Century of Sanctuaries,, Saturday, December 8th 1 p.m. 5
p.m. Tour a century of sanctuaries in one afternoon at seven
Downtown historic churches. The guide at each church will highlight
the architectural and historical significance of the building. Visitors
can walk the tour route or take advantage of our complimentary trol-
ley service along the tour route. The tour begins and ends at the Main
Library. The Junior League of Jacksonville's Annual Festival of
Trees will be on display at the Main Library.' Downtown historic
churches on the tour: *First Baptist Church, *First Presbyterian
Church, First United Methodist Church, *HiStoric Mt. Zion AME
Church, *Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, *St. John's
Episcopal Cathedral, ;and *St. Phillip's Episcopal' Church. Street
parking .is free. Free parking is available at the Duval Street Garage
with library validation. Free parking is available at First Baptist's #1
garage on Laura Street between Church and Ashley Streets. Tour tick-
ets are $5 per person and sold at the Main Library the day of the
event. Children 12 and under are admitted at no charge. Tickets can
be purchased in advance at the December 5th Art Walk. Twenty per-
cent of all ticket sales will benefit the Emergency Services and
Homeless Coalition. Musicians or. chorale groups interested in per-
forming at this event need to download and submit a participation
form to Michelle Brooks, promotions manager. Forms are posted online at
www.downtownjacksonville.org. For more inflation call 904-451-
3344.
I STANTON CLASS OF 1953 will have their ANNUAL CHRIST-
MAS CELEBRATION on Saturday, December 15th at Holiday Inn,
Commonwealth, from 1p.m. to 5p.m. All ,classmates are cordially


EMANCIPATION FROM DIABETES AND
OBESITY
Ester Dav\is. ReligioiiAndSpiritualit.com .
Our history is packed full of emancipations locally and glob- .
ally. In 1829. the Catholic Emancipation Act freed Roman '
Catholics from the civil disabilities imposed on them by English
law in the United Kingdom. In 1844, there w as the emancipation
of the British West Indies. In 1861, Tsar Alexander issued an emancipation manifesto free-
ing serfs in Russia. In 1863, President Lincoln issued an edict freeing all slaves in the
Confederate States, declaring the abolition of slavery in America. In 1920 women won the
right to vote in the United States, now referred as the emancipation of women. There is fur-
ther the emancipation of the Jews. History is chronicling the Emancipation Network, which
is destined to cease human trafficking: History has documented the emancipation of homo-
sexuality in Germany. The Caribbean Islands celebrate Emancipation Day every year with
festive costumes, dance and food. All states allow emancipation of minors. Children have
sought emancipation from parents in court and won.
This past week an astronaut, wearing .a helmet' camera, repaired a wing on the
International Space Station without a safety net. Imagine stepping outside on nothing, land-
ing on nothing. Imagine the vastness. This space walk, about a football field length from the
space ship, was available via satellite television on your PC, for free. Imagine the many
masterminds, locally and globally, contributing to the International Space Station over the
years. In 2004, Iremember a pair of astronauts, one from America, one from Russia, pulled
off another risky complex mission to make a repair. They accomplished the space walk, fin-
ishing "well ahead" of schedule. Imagine two countries accomplishing an uncommon act
ahead of schedule. (Where should that place "common acts"?) Remember now, the first tel-
evision weather satellite was placed in 1960. In 1963, two spacecrafts were in orbit at the
same time. That same year in an October issue of Wireless World, a concept proposal on
global communications was written. The rest of the story is "walking" history, because
everyone is walking around with a cell phone.
Amazingly, we have witnessed in our lifetime other benchmark successes that we all
ultimately benefit from, because progress embraces us all. Our world is indeed wireless.
Our world has a new airplane that flies longer with less fuel, lighter in weight, carrying
more people. Our world has a car that can parallel park without human intervention. And
my all-time favorite ... the average home can order 700 television channels. You have to ask
yourself, have we lost our minds?
Emancipation is liberation, being set free from subjections of any kind. Today, our
world is a "slave" to sickness, and our lawmakers are comfortable with our being there.
Over half of our population is on legal or illegal pills. I personally see the greatest danger
to our society as not global warming, not energy prices, not the economy or.race relations.
Our greatest danger is our health, locally and globally. In the greatest interest of all human-
ity, we want and need emancipation from our two'largest enemies, diabetes and obesity. To
accomplish this is not a risky, complex mission requiring a long bureaucracy map of mad-
ness in two meetings a day somewhere in a five-star hotel only to set the next meeting. The
statistical signs and stats on diabetes and obesity have only doubled, with no "repair" in
sight. If we can create a wireless world in 20 years, surely we can emancipate and retire dia-
betes and obesity by ... say, 2015, starting with Texas. The evidence is clear. Tools, toys and
triumphs matter, but history reminds us that people do also. Can we please have a true bet-
ter world?

Ester Davis is a writer and television producer. She can be reached at
host@esterdkais.com. Copyright 2007 by Estei Davis.
IL7


invited. For more information, please contact Leath Iles at 768-7446
or Ora McQueen at 924-7322.
BLODGETT HOMES AND SURROUNDING AREAS CHRIST-
MAS SOCIAL, December 8th at 8p.m. la.m. Florida Council of
Delibration, 29 West 6th St., Jacksonville. Entertainment by Sleepy
C4 In Company. Disc Jockey Gaines & Gaines, refreshments. Tickets
on sale at Bernards Beauth Supply, 1525 West Edgewood Ave. &
Skinner's Florist, 1519 Myrtle Ave.

UA .AUl!


DAfGE D B


DECEMBER 1, 2007


THE' TA R







PAEr R-.


I .I'


IIIU, :j~


r 1, 27 D 7, 27

SDecember 1, 2007 December 7, 2007


THE STAR


I.-\


sSSHH!


From Actual Police Reports

Did You Hear About?...


*1


ARIES
March 21st thru April 19th


You're stuck inside your own head on Monday
and Tuesday, unsure of why things aren't quite
going the way you'd like. And then it hits you:
You have to get outside your head! The second
you look at things from someone else's point
of view, thunder strikes. Everything changes.
Things become so much easier. You get what
you want, almost immediately. Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday are less instantaneously
satisfying; in fact, there's noting instantaneous
about them. But slowness has its virtues. On
Saturday and Sunday, it's time to strike out
into the wilderness. Who's up for snowboard-
ing?

STAURUS
S April 20th thru IMa 20th
On Monday and Tuesday, you're in a good
mood, and it can't really be explained. If you're
at work and your coworkers are doing that lazy
thing, you fire them up. If you're at the gym
and your workout pal wants to end early, you
give an electrifying speech on the importance
of not giving up. Wednesday through Friday,
your intensity level remains high. All of this
vigor is great, but it might inspire more heated
emotions than you necessarily want to deal
with. It may even bring out your sensitive side.
Saturday and Sunday, don't let anyone pull the
wool over your eyes. Ask lots of questions.


GEMINI
May 21st thru June 21st
Monday and Tuesday are totally romantic --
so, naturally, that's all you can think about. Oh
sure, you're having successes at work and
socially, impressing people with your ability to
spin off into intellectual debates about this or
that. But what's really going on in your life is
this romantic thing. Wednesday through
Friday, the stars see you entering unfamiliar
terrain. You're trying to be confident and care-
ful at the same time, which is a hard balance to
strike. This weekend, you and you-know-who
do something together and have a roaring good
time.

CANCER
June 22nd thru July 22nd
Your home life is a source of some agitation on
Monday and Tuesday. Someone else -- the per-
son you live with, the landlord, a neighbor -- is
not communicating very well, or else they're
communicating very well but you don't like
what they're saying. It only follows that
Wednesday through Friday are marked by a
sense of upheaval, of not knowing what you're
going to do next, of being unsure. Saturday
and Sunday, as weird as it feels, do something
for yourself. Take yourself to the movies. Or to
the mountains. Or to a spa. You deserve some
real relaxation.

LEO
S July 23rd thru Aug 22nd

It's so weird that this new romantic interest
was until recently just one of your friends. It's
hard to get your head around. It has left your
mutual friends scratching their heads. But --
whoa -- it's fun, too. Monday and Tuesday are
basically an extended 48-hour date, and
Wednesday through Friday, even though
you're not together as much, you can tell from
text messages and the like that your minds are
in the same place. This weekend is crazily
romantic. Passion and adventure are in the
stars. Travel, too. Get in the car and start driv-
ing. You can figure out where you're going
while you're on the road.

~7K VIRGO
Aug 23rd thru Sept 22nd

There's a good chance that you'll buy some-
thing you don't need or want on Monday or
Tuesday. So why the purchase? Your friends
have something to do with it, but you can't lay
all the blame on a few excitable pals. You're
indecisive in general this week, which results
in some funny mishaps. Wednesday through
Friday, you're analyzing everything, including
your own actions. You're in listening mode.
This weekend, if you find yourself in a tense
social situation, do something slightly risky.
Be daring.


I II_ I


LIBRA
Sept 23rd thru Oct


22nd


Monday and Tuesday you're incredibly flirta-
tious -- although, in your defense, you're just
trying to keep up with this other incredibly
flirtatious person. You wouldn't want to come
across as uninterested. But try to strike a bal-
ance. You don't want to be looking over a
friend's shoulder as they're talking -- that's just
rude. Wednesday through Friday you're in a
strangely possessive mood; you want more,
more, more. There must be some lack some-
where in your world. Think about what that
might be this weekend.



SCORPIO
Oct 23rd thru Nov 21st
For some reason, on Monday and Tuesday you
have a hard time saying, 'Okay, here's what I'm
going to do,' and doing it. All of these other
things get in the way -- distractions, com-
pelling counterarguments, weird demands.
The only way to handle this is to be easygoing
about it. Just don't worry too much one way or
the other. It's all going to work out in the end.
Wednesday through Friday, people are drawn
to you like you won't believe. Saturday and
Sunday, your instincts can't be beat. Finally!
You make a few decisions you can get behind.



SAGITTARIUS
Nov 22nd thru Dec 21st
You're a cause for celebration on Monday and
Tuesday. Everyone's paying you compliments,
giving you unprompted hugs and sighing about
how you'd be perfect for dating their relatives.
Oh, and they're picking your brain, too. Your
opinion -- defined by a strong sense of justice
-- means more to other people than ever. Oddly
enough, Wednesday through Friday see you
turning inward, indulging your introspective
side. It's just more fun staying at home listen-
ing to music and sitting in your big chair than
it is being social. No worries -- you'll feel like
coming out again this weekend.

CAPRICORN
Dec 22nd thru Jan 19th

Monday and Tuesday you have lots of energy, but
it doesn't seem to help with the weird issues
plaguing you. The phone call you've been waiting
for doesn't come until the second you get up from
your desk. You keep forgetting to send an impor-
tant email. And the boss is cranky. In the second
half of the workweek, try to detach yourself from
the messy particulars and look at the bigger pic-
ture. This will relax you and also help you see
what's most important. Saturday and Sunday, you
start to wonder if your life goals are possible. Of
course they are! Be confident. Stick to your guns.


AQUARIUS
Jan 20th thru Feb 18th

You and someone you don't normally chat
with spend some time alone together Monday
or Tuesday -- possibly on an elevator, possibly
waiting for a bus ... something unplanned like
that. During this talk, you find you have some
random thing in common.'The weird things
that people connect over can be funny.
Wednesday through Friday, you could use a
few more of those moments of social connec-
tion; according to the stars, you feel kind of
weird, sluggish, even lonely. Whatever the rea-
son for your rhoodiness, just wait for the
weekend. It's more than exciting: Lots of
friends and new faces figure strongly.

PISCES
Feb 19th thru March 20th

Someone owes you something, and you're put
in the uncomfortable position on Monday or
Tuesday of figuring out how to ask for it. It
might not be money. And it might not be
worth asking for. Thing is, you don't really
need this thing that's owed to you, but you
don't want to come across as a doormat. Life
is complicated, and finding a balance isn't
always easy. You're turning this doormat issue
over in your mind Wednesday through Friday.
In the end, it may be wiser not to involve
yourself in messes you don't need. This week-
end, luck is on your side. You must be doing
something right!


BURGLARY-At 11:30 p.m., a police officer was dispatched to 213
May Street, (R. W. Townsend Construction), in reference to a bur-
glary of a business. Upon his arrival, the police officer observed a
63-year-old male (suspect) inside the fenced-in construction trailer.
The suspect was throwing items out of the broken window, includ- ;; -.
ing a "silver portable stereo." The K-9 officer and my self jumped
the fence and went to the front of the construction trailer. The sus-
pect was still inside the trailer. The K-9 officer commanded the sus-
pect to come out and the suspect crawled out of the window. The
suspect was read his rights. He stated that he crawled under the fence to get to the con-
struction trailer. The suspect refused to say anything else about the incident. It appeared
the suspect broke the glass window on the construction trailer and crawled into the win-
dow. The suspect then threw the listed item out the window. The police officer observed
the portable stereo on the ground outside the construction trailer and the broken window
in front of the trailer. The suspect was arrested, and transported to jail, and charged with
a felony.
POSSESSION OF A CONCEALED FIRE ARM -while on patrol, a JSO police officer
observed a vehicle traveling north in the 2900 block ofN. Liberty St. The vehicle made a
left turn into the "Shell" convenient store parking lot at 3020 N. Liberty St., without using
a turn signal, the police officer also noticed the vehicle had no tag lights. The police offi-
cer then conducted a traffic stop on the vehicle in the parking lot. As the police officer
approached the vehicle, he discovered that neither the driver, nor co-defendant, or the pas-
senger, (suspects), were wearing their seat belts. The police officer then observed a
"Remington UMC" ammunition box under the suspect's left leg. The officer then called
for assistance, at which time two other police officers arrived. The officer then removed


the suspect from the vehicle, and he told the officer there
was.a gun under the seat. The co-defendant was then
removed from the vehicle, and detained because he did not
have a concealed weapon permit. One of the assisting offi-
cers retrieved two firearms, and a box of ammunition from
under the driver's seat. One of the guns was fully loaded,
with a round in the chamber. The co-defendant and suspect
told the police officer that fire arm #1 and #2 do not belong
to them, and they do not know how they got under the seat,
and that they keep them for protection. The suspect and co-


defendant was post-miranda, arrested and transported to
jail, and charged with a felony.
ARRESTED FOR STEALING MAD-DOG 20/20 WINE -A police officer responded
to a burglary call at 2854 Phillips Highway, to a locked storage shed where merchandise
was stored. Upon arrival, a witness told the police officer that he observed a 36-year-old
male (suspect) brake into the business and take a large amount soft drinks, bottled water,
and M/D 20/20 wine. The suspect is known around the area. The witness told the police
officer that he would be willing to testify against the suspect. The suspect was observed
walking down the street next to the "City Center Motel" with a shopping cart full of "beer,
water, wine, sodas, and cigarettes. The suspect was trying to sell the items to numerous
people. The police officer observed the suspect walking in the parking lot of "City Center
Motel" at 2414 Phillips Highway. The suspect was taken into custody and advised of his
Miranda rights. When questioned about the offense, the suspect denied being involved in
the burglary. The listed witness told the police officer that he knows the suspect, and that
he saw him take the items. The suspect was arrested, and transported to a pre-trial deten-
tion facility, pending a felony charge.
POSSESSION OF CONTROL SUBSTANCE-A police officer.was dispatched to, the
200 block of 6th St. Avenue South in reference to a possible drug activity. Upon his
arrival, police officer made contact with a 30 year old female (suspect), who was a pas-
senger in a vehicle parked in the driveway. During his
contact with the suspect, he asked if she had any drugs U
and weapons on her and she replied, "no". The police
officer then asked the suspect if she mind her purse being
searched, she replied, "no, go ahead." A search of the sus-. ,
pect's purse revealed a marijuana cigarette. When the sus-
pect observed me remove the marijuana cigarette from
her purse she stated, oh well I smoke weed." The suspect
was arrested for possession of marijuana less than 20
grams, and transported to jail, and charge with a misde-
meanor. The marijuana was placed in the property room .
for evidence.
CASHING WORTHLESS CHECKS-A JSO police
officer, while on patrol, conducted a traffic stop for unlawful speed on a 30-year-old
female driver (suspect), vehicle in the 13700 block of Atlantic Blvd. A subsequent warrant
check on the suspect revealed an outstanding warrant for a worthless check of $150.00.
ECO Durham confirmed the warrant with Jacksonville Sheriffs Office. The police officer
placed the suspect under arrest for the outstanding warrant. The suspect's vehicle was
towed by Auto Store towing. The suspect was arrested, and transported to jail, and charged
with a misdemeanor for passing bad checks.
ASSAULT WITH A DEADLY WEAPON-A police officer was dispatched to 7581
103rd St. (Hollywood Video) in reference to an aggravated assault. Upon his arrival, he
met with a 39 year old female (victim #1), who said that a 49 year old male (suspect)
approached her as she exited her vehicle at the Hollywood Video Store. She told the police
officer that the suspect asked her if she had seen a set of keys. She replied no and contin-
ued walking towards the store. The suspect then asked victim #1 if she could let him bor-
row fifty cents to use the pay phone. She replied no, and continued walking toward the
store. (Victim #2) then exited the vehicle and asked the suspect to.leave victim #1 alone.
The suspect and victim #2 then got into a confrontation in the parking lot. The suspect told
victim #2 that he would be back. The suspect then left the scene on a bicycle and returned
to the store in about one minute with a brown handle gun in his front waist. The suspect
opened the door of the business and told victim #2, "come outside, I'm back, I'm gonna
kill you". Victim #1 walked outside the store and'asked
..the suspect to leave them alone. The suspect then pulled
out a revolver and said, "I'm gonna kill that nigga". The
suspect waved the gun in victim #2 face and continued
yelling, "I'm gonna kill you nigga". The victims felt
threatened when they saw the gun, and thought the sus-
pect was going to shoot them. Another witness, that
wants to remain anonymous, saw the suspect with the
*'.t. ..- -" :... i gun as he placed it in a wooded area behind the store. A
S-.. search for the gun in the area yielded negative results.
The victims and the witnesses positively identified the
suspect. The police officer read the suspect his rights. He
said that victim #2 called him a "Pusy Nigga" and he thought that victim #2 wanted to
fight. He said that he never had a gun. The suspect was arrested, transported to jail, and
charged with a felony.


DECEMBER 1, 2007


0


.`1 ;-------,







DI2MJ DI

,:.


The Jaguars' 36-14 win over
the-Buffalo Bills on Sunday left
the Jags a game behind the Colts
in the AFC South title race and
in the top spot in the wild-card
standings.
"We have a good team.
We're working hard at it," coach
Jack Del Rio said.
Don't let Sunday's score
fool you. The Jaguars, found
themselves facing tense
moments in the fourth quarter as
they nursed a 22-14 lead. At
crunch time, however, it was the
Jaguars who made all of the big
plays.
"I thought David (Garrard)
was sharp. Fred (Taylor) ran
hard. Ernest (Wilford) made two
big catches on third down," Del
Rio said.
Garrard completed 23 of 37

N j.. I


passes for 296 yards, a touch-
down, no interceptions and a
96.2 passer rating. Garrard
struck the game-clinching below
inside three minutes to play
when he hit wide receiver
Reggie Williams with a perfect
strike on a slant route and
Williams split defenders to race
the remaining distance to the end
zone.
Taylor opened the scoring
with a 50-yard touchdown run
and totaled 104 yards rushing for
the game, the first time he's hit
the 100-yard mark this season.
Wilford caught five passes
for 60 yards. He and tight end
Marcedes Lewis were Garrard's
go-to guys on third down and
Wilford made a couple of acro-
batic-type catches.
The only negative on this


J -


day was the Jaguars' failure to
score touchdowns from inside
the red zone. Del Rio says he's
the blame, but he may have been
just joking with reporters.
"I think we can .catch the
Colts," Garrard said. "I think
these guys are very hungry and
we're determined this year. We
have a lot of things going our
way this year. Guys are showing
a lot of ability to just concentrate
on playing football. We need to
do that this week because this is
a big one coming up."
The Jaguars will go to
Indianapolis next weekend with
a chance to tie for the division
lead.
"We're chasing Indy. We're
chasing a division title," Fred
Taylor said.


Fred Taylor eluding Bills for a touchdown. (Photo by Laurence Greene, Photographer for The Florida
Star)


Jaguars'fan applauding play. (Photo by Laurence Greene, Photographerfor
The Florida Star)




NFL STAR SEAN TAYLOR DIES

FROM A GUNSHOT WOUND


November 17. 2007


SHAW UNIV
ALBANY STATE
DELAWARE STATE
NORFOLK STATE
SC STATE
HAMPTON
FLORIDA A&M
SAVANNAH STATE
TEXAS SOUTHERN
JACKSON STATE
PRAIRIE VIEW A&M


7
35
29
23
51
27
7
3
10
31
30


DELTA
CATAWBA
HOWARD
WINSTON-SALEM STATE
NC A&T
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS
BETHUNE-COOKMAN
MISS VALLEY STATE
ARKANSAS-PINE BLUFF
ALCORN STATE
ALABAMA A&M


November 22 24. 2007


ALABAMA STATE
GRAMBLING STATE
HOUSTON
DELAWARE STATE


TUSKEGEE
SOUTHERN
TEXAS SOUTHERN
DELAWARE


NFL football player Sean Taylor has died of a gun-
shot wound he suffered early Monday morning in his
Miami home.
Richard Sharpstein, Taylor's attorney and family
friend, told CNN that Taylor's father, Peter "Pedro"
Taylor, called him about 5 a.m. to tell him the football
star was dead.
"His father called and said he was with Christ and
he cried and thanked me," said Sharpstein. "It's a
tremendously sad and unnecessary event. He was a
wonderful, humble, talented young man, and had a
Obviously God had other plans."


huge life in front of him.


Taylor, 24, died at Jackson Memorial Hospital, where he had been taken after
being shot once in the leg early Monday morning. Police are investigating the inci-
dent as a possible home invasion.
The bullet severed Taylor's femoral artery, causing massive blood loss. He
underwent seven hours of surgery, and there were some initially optiniistic signs
after he emerged from the operation early Monday evening. Described at first as
"unresponsive and unconscious," Taylor had squeezed a doctor's hand and made
facial expressions, Redskins officials and a family friend said, providing some hope.
"Maybe he was trying to say goodbye or something," Sharpstein said.

Miami-Dade Police were investigating the attack, which came just eight days
after an intruder was reported at Taylor's home. Officers were dispatched about 1:45
a.m. Monday after Taylor's girlfriend called 911. Taylor was airlifted to the hospital.
Sharpstein said Taylor's girlfriend told him the couple was awakened by loud
noises, and Taylor grabbed a machete he keeps in the bedroom for protection.
Someone then broke through the bedroom door and fired two shots, one missing and
one hitting Taylor, Sharpstein said. Taylor's 1-year-old daughter, Jackie, was also in
the house at the time, but neither she nor Taylor's girlfriend were injured.
According to reports, Monday's incident is the third attempted break-in to occur
at his home since last Monday.

( Jaguars' Schedule
Regular Season


..........

.. .. .


CRIMINAL DEFENSE
PERSONAL INJURY
FA MIL.Y LAW


220 E. FORSYTH STREET, SUITE E
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vs Tennessee
vs Atlanta
At Denver
Bye
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vs Indianapolis
At Tampa Bay
At New Orleans
At Tennessee
vs San Diego
vs Buffalo
At Indianapolis
vs Carolina
At Pittsburgh
vs Oakland
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- ----------- --9--- -- ~-~c~e~


DECEMBER 1, 2007


THJE STAR


PDAGF R


kl _,-. _






0HI 1 1 ltA DECEMBER -1,200


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Week of November 26, 2007)


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THE


'FLORIDAD"STAR


To place an ad:
CAII: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673


rL -


THE
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REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
MARITIME PUBLISHING VENDOR
2009 LOGISTICS AND INTERMODAL CONFERENCE
FOR THE
JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY
The Jacksonville Port Authority ("JAXPORT") will receive pro-
posals no later than Friday, December 14, 2007 by 2:00 PM
local time at 2031 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32206.

All proposals must be submitted in accordance with specifica-
tions No. 08-02, which may be obtained after 8:30 AM on
Tuesday, November 27, 2007 from our website at:
http://www.jaxport.com/about/projects.cfm

Procument Department
Jacksonville Port Authority
2831 Talleyrand Avenue
Jacksonville, FL 32203-0005
904-357-3018


................... -----------


--- .......... --


DECEMBER 1, 2007


TLff .TA R


In.L


PAGF R-7








PAGE~~a)~~BP B- TH STA DECEMBER'~" 1,00


The Statio "Whiere Chnst Gets Lifted"


Victory AM I 6OC CGL

JACKSONVILLE'S LONG-TIME FRIEND


j


13961 SOUND OVERLOOK DR oah. JACKSONVILLE ,FLORIDA; 3224


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Office: 904 285-6300


LZ 03
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Wsarvmsan lin faRM= FMS5


This information is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.


THE STAR


DECEMBER 1, 2007


PAGE B-8