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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State/Nationa...
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section C: Local
 Section C continued
 Section C: Around the Area
 Section C: Sports
 Section C continued
 Section D: Entertainment
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 24, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00050

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 24, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00050

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State/National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section C: Local
        page C 1
    Section C continued
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Around the Area
        page C 4
    Section C: Sports
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
    Section D: Entertainment
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
Full Text




NORTHEAST FLORIDA'S OLDEST AND LARGEST AFRICAN AMERICAN OWNED NEWSPAPER


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


THE


iFLORIDA


thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
1:00 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


JACKSONVILLE, STOP THE VIOLENCE!


One Child Dead, Two Females Wounded, Two Men Dead;


One Suspect Captured; Three Or More Suspects On The Run


Elmer Moore
Waated


Jamison D. Pollock
Arrested


Jerome Gist
Suicide


Damian Hughes, Murdered


The Florida Star Staff

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. This week Jacksonville
started with an attempted car jacking, robbery with
hostages, murders, believed for cars and other possibili-
ties, and suicide. "It must stop," said Elder Foy of MAD
DADS. "This is all black on black violence. It must
stop."


Thomas E. Abrams (murdered) and his mother Ms.
Deborah Abrams.
Damian Hughes, a fourth grade honor student at St.
Clair Evans Academy and the youngest of five children
was shot and killed Monday morning about 1:11 a.m.
Christmas is just a few days away and 11-year-old
Damian will not be able to share the love and gifts of the
holiday because of unwarranted violence and greed.
Violence, because they came with weapons; greed,
because they wanted unear.ied property. Such behavior
caused his 16-year-old sister, Kenitra, to suffer with a
wound and the memory of losing her "baby" brother
while trying to protect him. The attempted car jacking


Dark Chocolate May Be Good For You


and murder occurred around 2100 26th Street, W.
A similar car jacking attempt and murder occurred
about thirty-five minutes earlier, when two to three
armed, masked men fatally shot 35-year-old Gerald
Violence continued on A-7

Christmas By

The Fire In Jacksonville


LONDON -- A few
squares of dark chocolate
every day might cut the

NEWS IN BRIEF
The Homeless Can
Call Home Free
For Christmas

JA C K S 0 N VILL E.
FL. volunteerss from
Sprint %\ill take \ ire-
less phones to the l.IM.
Sulzbacher Center to
pro ide homeless rest-
dents the opportunity to
reach out to lfami il\.
friends and lo\ed ones
this holiday\ season.
Sprint \,ill allo\\ them
to make a free call It
anyone in the Linited



IN St te .... A-5
National
U p ....B-1
D CI-3
c F
E]


risk of serious heart dis-
ease by helping to stave
off the hardening of arter-

States,. Canada, Puerto
Rico or the Virgin Islands.
The calls can be made
Saturday December 24
between 5 and p.m. The
Center is located down-
to wni under the Hart
Bridge behind the jail oni
East Adams Street.

Pastor Osteen's
\\ ife asked
To Lease Airplane

N Mrs. Victoria Osteen.
\ ife of the pastor oft the
largest church in the U.S.,
Pastor Joel Osteen of


House 'ton'


Laket ood


ies, according to a study
published on Tuesday.
Researchers from
University Hospital in
Zurich studied 20 male
smokers, who are at
greater risk of hardening
arteries characteristic of
coronary heart disease, to
see the effects of dark and
white chocolate on arteri-
al blood flow.
The men were asked to
abstain from eating foods
rich in antioxidants for 24
hours and were given 2
ounces of chocolate to eat.

Church. w\as kicked off a
Continental Airlines
flight to Colorado after
Mlrs. (Osteen and the flight
attendant had a di,;agree-
illentl.
The pastor. his wife
and two children had
boarded the plane and the
doors had been closed.
when the\ all had to
lea\ e, said the FBI
spokes oman. Lu?
Garci a.
The departure delayed
the flight for more than
an hour w while the
Osteen's luggage \as
retrieved. but no charges
\were filed.


After two hours,
sound scans reveal
dark chocolate ma
of 74 percent cocoa
- significantly imp
the smoothness of a
flow, while white
late, with four p
cQcoa, had no effect
"Only a small
treat of dark cho
may substantially in
the amount of antio
intake and benef
affect vascular hi
they said.


Donald Trump
Gets Black
,Apprentice

The fourth season
.Apprentice produce
bl

ti
b I


Rai
Pin

Pin
Randal P
Pinkett
Rebeca Jar\ ris i i
final episode. iHe
graduate of Rut
Brief ..,n'.J ,n .-I-


ultra-
-d that
ade up
solids
roved
rterial
choco-
ercent A fireplace provides the environment that most families
t, desire: warmth, strength and devotion. There is noth-
daily ing like the warmth and beauty of being at home for the
colate holidays and gathering around, a crackling fire at
Christmas time. a fireplace helps to create a cozy, invit-
icrease ing atmosphere for tree trimming, greeting card writing,
xidant present wrapping, or just relaxing after a hectic day.
icially Yes, the fireplace in your home is a source of relaxa-
ealth," tion for your family and friends. Like any appliance, it
should be safe, properly maintained, and good for the
environment-inside and out. Have a Merry Chrsitmas
and create safe and good memories around your fire-
place!

Americans Losing Privacy?
A federal judge, U. S. District Judge James
)n of -. Robertson, resigned from a special court designed to
ed a oversee government surveillance, possibly in opposition
a c k of President Bush's secret authorization of a domestic
'ren- spying program on people who are suspected terrorist.
c e Governor Howard Dean, M.D., of the Democratic
n d al Party said that such actions explicitly violate a law
k e t. designed to protect US citizens and has requested the
party's general counsel to draft a Freedom of Information
Act request.
He said Americans need to know exactly what
o n authority this administration believes it has. According
e to Dr. Dean, Bob Barr, who was one of the most conser-
the vative members of Congress said: "What's wrong with it
is a is several-fold. One, its bad policy for our government
gers. to be spying on American citizens through the National

Privacy continued on A-7


Looking, for customers to patronize your
business or utilize your services? If you
answered YES,, then you need to place an ad
in The Florida Star! CALL 9041766-8834 to
pace youradTODAY .
:or;de, .Cedi CardO Acepted


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
CTAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


d


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__ I






FLORIDA A TAR


PArG A-Z*, A*t.'.Z A a liAKZt.JJ.-,uui


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN EDITOR
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN; RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: RITEH PIIHOTOGR \PH-rIs. % IS
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$1 8.50
-Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinionsexpressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National NewspaperAssociation
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Flnrida Proes Hall Of Fame


To Be Equal
Seriously Investing in Preventing AIDS
Marc H. Morial, President and Chief Executive
National Urban League


DANIEL EVANS
SALES DIRECTOR
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER


Currently, the world's
nations contribute more than
$5 billion a year to the global
effort to fight the spread of
HIV, the virus which causes
AIDS.
So, at first glance, one
might be inclined to dismiss
the recent charge made by
one AIDS expert that "the
world is seriously under-
investing" 'in preventing the
spread of the scourge.
But if we widen our
glance to consider some of
the numbers contained in the
just-released annual United
Nations report on AIDS, we'll
gain a sobering perspective
on the funding fighting AIDS
deserves.
'We'll see that just because
the official World AIDS Day,
December 1st has come and
gone, doesn't mean we
shouldn't consider every day
World AIDS Day. For exam-
ple, the number of people
infected with HIV has dou-
bled in the past decade to 40
million worldwide-nearly,
half of whom are women, and
2 million of whom are chil-
dren. More than 3 million
people around the globe have
died this year of AIDS-relat-
ed illnesses; that's a rate of
60,000. per week. More than
500,000 of them were chil-
dren.
The massive global effort
that $5 billion supports-
involving research into vac-
cines, public education cam-
paigns and large-scale distri-


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


bution of the antiretroviral
drugs which retard the dis-
ease's ravages-has produced
some notable successes. But
in nearly every country
where HIV/AIDS has a sig-
nificant footprint, the pan-
demic is spreading faster than
efforts to prevent new infec-
tions and treat those already
sick.
In other words, the
scourge shows little sign of
being brought-under control.
"It is increasing everywhere,"
said Jim'Yong Kim, director
of HIV-AIDS for the World
Health Organization, in
November upon the UN
report's release, "We really
are failing in attempting to
prevent the epidemic in most
of the world."
As has been evident for
years, the situation is
grimmest in sub-Saharan
Africa. More than half of
those with HIV in the world
live there; 75 percent of the
world's AIDS-related. deaths
this year have occurred there,
as have nearly two-thirds of
this year's 5 million cases of
new infections.
In this welter of grim sta-
tistics, the most alarming of
all may be that in this region,
where medical systems are
weak and frequently over-
whelmed by high caseloads
of AIDS, only one in 10 of
those infected with HIV is
getting antiretroviral medi-
cine. In other words, the
dynamic of a hollowing-out


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Ronnie's
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5091 Sunbeam Rd.
904-636-0739


Neptune Beach
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V A *Myu g U


of the humanity of much of
Black Africa continues.
But there is plenty of
cause for concern in other
regions of the world as well:
a record number of new
infections in Latin America; a
spike in infection rates in
Indonesia and Pakistan, and,
though the absolute numbers
are small compared with
Black Africa, ''growing epi-
demics," according to the
U.N. report, in Eastern
Europe, India, China and
East Asia.
The full effect of
HIV/AIDS has been sharply
blunted in the developed
nations of Europe, Canada
and the United States by the
widespread availability of
antiretroviral drugs. But,
even in the West, the persist-
ence and danger of the
scourge is underscored by the
fact that, with many perhaps
seduced by the relative dis-
connect between AIDS and
death, the number of overall
infections has risen.
Amid these multiple caus-
es for dismay, however, are
signs of hope of what can
occur when concentrated
efforts are made to beat back
the disease: the stabilization
or reduction of rates of HIV
infection in such varied coun-
tries as Zimbabwe, Kenya,
Burkina Faso, Argentina,
Lesotho, Swaziland, Cuba,
and Chile. The most dramatic
instance is Brazil, where the
Brazilian legislature's man-
dating free antiretroviral
treatment for all HIV-positive
citizens eligible for national
insurance a decade ago has
produced sharp declines in
the country's AIDS-related
death rates.


And in the United States,
where African Americans are
far more likely to contract
HIV/AIDS than other groups,
their rate of newly-reported
infections has been dropping
by about five percent a year,
according to the federal
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention.
While the situation of
African Americans vis-a-vis
HIV/AIDS remains dire,
there's no question that the
decline reflects the concen-'
trated efforts of black com-
munity leaders, the
Congressional Black Caucus
and the CDC to fund national
as well as local community
AIDS prevention and educa-
tion efforts.
Thus, the proof exists
both within, and outside our
borders of the critical role, in
the words of Dr. Peter
Lamptey, the top AIDS offi-
cial of the nongovernmental:
organization, Family Health,
International, "political will
and astute leadership [can].
play ... in the global fight
against the AIDS epidemic."
The missing piece thus far
is more money, according to
Richard Feachem, executive,
director of the Global Fund to'
Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis
and Malaria. He asserts that
the current $5 billion annual-
ly needs to be quadrupled to
$20 billion in order, to pro-:
duce dramatic, large-scale'
declines in new infections'
and deaths. "Investment in
AIDS works," he says. "
Surveying the wrenching
trail of misery and death the,
AIDS pandemic has already.
forged, one could add: think.
of the alternative.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridystar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association


&as


V
I


I


nlr 'r A .


DECFHRERn~i 24.20


AL







DECEMBER 24, 2005


143rd Emancipation Celebration To Be Held The Church Directory


At Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist Church "Come and Worship With Us"


Rev. James sampson
Joseph Johnson, Vice
President and Media
Spokesman for the Lincoln-
Douglas Emancipation
Proclamation Association
(LDEPA) announced. that
Program Director Gayle
Kendell has released the
outline for the 143rd
Emancipation Proclamation
Celebration to be held
Monday, January 2, 2006, at
Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist
Church located at 2036
Silver St.
The service begins at
10:45 a.m. with a Song fest
by the Mt. Sinai Choir.
A memorial tribute will
be held. in memory of
deceased members of the
LDEPA. Music will be
directed by Charles T.
Maxwell of LDEPA. -
I Rev. James Sampson, the
speaker for the occasion,
will be introduced by Elder
Lee Harris.
James Richardson will
portray President Abraham
Lincoln. This will be his
final portrayal of President
Lincoln.
- Brian Baham, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Floyd Baham, will


Evangel

Temple
\ j ( ." I .' .

CHRISTi L S SERVICES
"'C)tn Fr IP \E m u- li, '"
Saturdayl, Decemler 2-ith

.A a I- I.,. Ij -& lt r ia -,, c .I r 'iJI .- 2-pn,. ct ',t.L I;I- L..
Sunl rlZ. CI J, '-C.m htr 2.. tI-
1. l.. I. ; o.. l' _'s .l..l.h -,rin I m. I Ii.'A II ,. I I r C lh.".

/<:*-/ i L I/ St fr ils '-"YcIt','t t Me') f l, I ft-/* t..


6.00 p~..mi. -C -Ilii illla%-
CclcbintkcirlSer, iLtv



781-9593


r s].


I IA.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR
Finding Help When A Sibling Dies


Many siblings find help by
talking with others about their
brother or sister. However, even
good friends can quickly become
uncomfortable with the. subject,
often at just the point when their
support is most needed. Some com-
munities offer sibling support
groups, and adult siblings are wel-
come to attend meetings of The
Compassionate Friends. A number
of chapters of The Compassionate
Friends have separate sibling sub-
groups, and the national organiza-
tion provides special chat rooms for
siblings on the national Web site.
Often, simply finding another
bereaved sibling with whom, to
share concerns and feelings pro-
vides a'path toward healing, Adult
.l;ic, may be living in areas


where no one knew their deceased
brother or sister-or even of their
existence. This caTi be painful at a
time when the surviving sibling
longs to share memories.
When your parents die, it is
said you lose your past; when your'
spouse dies, you lose your present;
and when your child dies, you lose
your future. However, when your
sibling dies, you lose a part of your
past, your present, and your future.
-Because of this tremendous loss, it
is important that everyone work
together to ease the path toward
healing.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.*
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABC,)leman.com


Woods, will present the
Youth Department.
Rev. Odell Smith is


President of the LDEPA.
Rev. R. L. Gundy is host
pastor. The pubic is invited


portray Frederick Douglas.
Mrs Shirley Fowler,
assistant to Mrs. Gloria

Evangelist Tutt

Returns

To Mississippi

Evagelist Betty Tutt, rep-
resenting Watch the Lamb
Ministries and Prison
Felllowship Ministries,
returned to Gulfport,
Mississippi to help five
chuches along with Pastor
Earlean Tooley and Kim
Pugh. Naomi Koogler was a
part of the previous' group
making the trip to the area.
The group carried winter
clothing, Chirstmas toys and
other supplies to the area
affected by Hurricane
Katrina.
"While things have
improved, there is still a
.need," said Tutt. "We just
helped toward fulfilling a:
big need."
She returned to help'
Watch The Lamb Minstries
and Second Baptist Prison
Fellowship Ministry's Angel
tree Christmas Party held at
the Hollybrook Center on
December 17 joined by
Erline Menefee and Sam'
Roberts (assistant).


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services- >

SERVICES-St. Paul A.M.E. Church, 6910 New Kings Rd.,
invites the public to share in a Christmas Pageant entitled
"Every Knee Shall Bow" to be held at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday,
December 24. On Suriday, December 25, the Christmas
Worship Service entitled "A Birthday Party For Jesus" will
be held at 10:00 a.m. Rev. Marvin C. Zanders Pastor.
CHRISTIAN WOMEN"S CLUB LUNCHEON-All area
ladies are invited to attend the Mandarin Christian Women's
Club January Luncheon "Sew Perfect" on January 3, 2006 at
the Ramada Inn in Mandarin. The luncheon cost $13.50 and
will be held from 12:00 1:30 p.m. Doors open at 11:30 a.m.
Tonya Wang of M&J Creations will share personalized
embroidery items for birthdays, weddings, home d6cor and
more. Speaker, Nikki Jatindranath, will share about "Turning
Exhaustion into Elation: Running on Empty? Time to Fill
up!" She will also sing "Over the Rainbow". Reservations
for Lunch and FREE Nursery can be made by calling Patsy
at 287-2427 or Mary at 880-2792 or email pbkwjk@bell-
south.net. Come and invite a friend! She'll be glad you did!
BRING IN THE NEW YEAR WITH PRAISE-Southside
C.O.G.LC. will host its first Annual New Year's Musical on
Sunday, January 1, 2006 at 12:30 a.m. The church is locat-
ed at 2179 Emerson St.

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to:
info@thefloridastar.com



Presidential Christmas Message

'Behold, a virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and his
name shall be called Emmanuel' which means, God with
us. Matthew 1:23
More than 2,000 years ago, a virgin gave birth to a Son,
and the God of heaven came to Earth. Mankind had received
its Savior, and to those who had dwelled in darkness, the
light of hope had come. Each Christmas, we celebrate that
first coming anew, and we rejoice in the knowledge that the
God \\ho came to Earth that night in Bettilehem is with us
still and will remain with us forever.
Christmas is a season of hope and joy, a time to give
thanks for the blessing of Christ's ,birth and for the blessings
that surround us every day of the year. We have much to be
thankful for in this country, and we have a responsibility to
help those in need. Jesus calls us to help others, and acts of
kindness toward the less fortunate fulfill the spirit of the
Christmas season.
On Christmas, we pray .for freedom, justice, and peace on
Earth. We remember those who have made the ultimate sac-
rifice for our country and for our freedom, and we ask for
God's blessing on their loved ones. We ask God to watch
over all of our men and women in uniform. Many are serv-
ing in distant lands, helping to advance the cause of freedom
and peace. Our entire Nation is grateful to them and prays
for their safe return.

Laura and I send our best wishes for a blessed and merry
Christmas.

GEORGE W. BUSH


"Study To Show 'Thyself Approved Unto God" By Enrolling In
FOUNDERS FAITH BIBLE COLLEGE & INSTITUTE
Three campuses to serve you:
*The Matthews:,Campus
2434 Old Middleburg Rd.
*The Jacob's Campus
86138 Palm Tree Dr. in Yulee
*The Thomas Campus
931 3rd Ave. So., in Jacksonville Beach
CLASSES BEGIN.TANIIARY 10 2006
Contact: Dr. Harry Johnson, Founder and Chancellor at (904) 695-1745;
Fax (904) 696-1788 or Angela Green, Campus Director, at (904) 225-5388
or Fax (904) 225-8208.
*Afternnon classes are available
Affiliated with LOGOS Education Network
"Study to be a workman that need not to be ashamed,
rightly dividing the word of Truth."




S ,- \h *, / ar //-. .. .. / .
have crne c ss -a.-itc















CrossDaili com


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


n..1 ~I:2


GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904),359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586 .
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m=.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see I Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.,
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
-Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School.....9:00 a.m. and5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R.L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
^ (Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
SYouth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
K Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service..................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities


- -- -- ...... ... .


PAGE A-3


FLORIDA STAR






t'AUI A-4


Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"

Deck the halls with boughs of holly
Fa la la la la, la la la la.
Tis the season to be jolly,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.
Parties! Parties! And More!
The Jacksonville Link's Christmas Party
The Genesis Caf6 became 'Partyland' when The
Jacksonville Chapter, Links, Inc. celebrated the group's
annual Christmas tradition with their Connecting Links
and friends. Dedicating themselves to service, the
members, under the leadership of. president Mrs.
Gloria Dean, took a little break to have some fun. And
fun they had!
DJ/Songtress 'Peaches' was the perfect entertain-
ment for the evening. It was an evening of full partici-
pating that included singing and dancing. With the
assistance and urging of 'P1eaches' the ladies became
'The Supremes,' 'Tina Turner,' 'Tempations,' 'Marvin
Gaye 'and 'Martha & The Vandells. 'Well, Motown had
nothing on these revelers. And did I tell you about the
'Soul Train Dancers'? Well, somehow there was a
transformation and the 'Soul Train 'dance line swooped
into the Genesis Caf6 and somehow took over the
dance floor.
The Jacksonville Links Social Committee chaired
by Mrs. Marjoria Manning, co-chaired by Mrs.
Vivian Walker and assisted by Link members
Mesdames Elizabeth Downing, Susan Jones,
Carolyn Joyner Ed.D, Katherine Massaquoi, Anest
McCarthy, Juanita Cohen-Storey and Betty Asque
Davis put on a fabulous party!

A Country Christmas Supper With The
Jacksonville Moles
The Mill Cove Golf Club was the setting for The
Jacksonville Moles' Christmas Party. This year's
party was hosted by this column's writer and photogra-
pher Mole member Betty Asque Davis and J. Carl
Davis, Sr.
When members and their guests arrived they could
hear the soulful Christmas tunes being spun by DJ
Rodney Hurst. And of course as Moles and Mules
always do, they were living up to the organizations
motto: Enjoy Yourself! It's Later Than You Think!
And there can't be enough said about the cuisine at
the Mill Cove Golf Club. Owners T.C. and Ruby
Newman really put it on! Following the 'Country
Christmas Supper' theme The Jacksonville Moles and
guests seated in small intimate tables feasted on a
delectable fare of Burgundy Beef Stew, Grilled
Chicken, Country Style Green Beans, Steamed Yellow
Squash with Sweet Potato Pie and 7Up Pound Cake for
dessert. The tasty and scrumptious dishes were served
Family Style.
After dinner there was time for fellowship and plen-
ty of dancing. Before members and their guests 'called
it a night' they were directed to the grand Mille Cove
Christmas tree that was bordered by a Red County
Wagon to select their hosts gift.
Enjoy Yourself It's Later Than You Think!

Partying With The Conrads
The downpour of rains this past weekend did not
deter guests from gathering at the James Island home of
Blueprint for Prosperity Exec Jarik and Corporate
Attorney Adrienne Conrad's home for their annual
'Get-Together'. And having braved the rain myself
with my hubby I know why! It was such a fun party!
Once you were indoors the very spacious home was so
warm as was the graciousness of the Conrads.
It was a lovely evening meeting new friends and
ruminating with the old! What a lovely party!
$4@@!@@@@


Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming
events. Contact us at 904 766-8834; E-mail
socially@TheFloridaStar.com or you may reach me
directly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777
or fax (904) 285-7008.
See you in the paper!


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PAGE__ A- FOID SA Dcmbr 4 20


BCC College Alumna Honors Mother's Memory


~. .


Lucille O'Neal poses with her son NBA star Shaquille
O'Neal. Ms. O'Neal isa graduate of B-CC and continues
to support the historically black college through philan-
thropic efforts.
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Orlando philanthropist and
community activist, Lucille O'Neal recently presented
President Trudie Kibbe Reed a check for $50,000 from the
Odessa Chambliss Quality of Life Fund to double the
endowed scholarship named in her mother's honor to
$100,000. The Odessa Chambliss Endowed Scholarship
will support the needs of aspiring nurses at Bethune-
Cookman College.
Ms. O'Neal is the mother of four children, one of which
is NBA basketball star, Shaquille O'Neal of the Miami Heat.
While O'Neal beams with pride over her son's accomplish-
ments, an equally special point of pride for her is in being the
eldest daughter of Mrs. Odessa Chambliss. A native of
Dublin, GA, Mrs: Chambliss raised her family in Newark,
New Jersey where she was a nurse for many years. "It took'
a lot of sacrifices for my mother to go to school to become a'

Presidential Kwanzaa

Message
President Bush's 2005 Kwanzaa message:
I send greetings to those observing Kwanzaa.

African Americans and people around the world reflect on
African heritage during Kwanzaa. The seven days of this celebra-
tion.emphasize the seven principles of Nguzo Saba unity, self-
determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative
economics, purpose,, creativity, and faith. These values contribute
to, a culture of citizenshipand compassion, and Kwanzaa activi-
ties help pass on African values and traditions to future genera-
tions. '
As families and friends gather for Kwanzaa, Americans
remember the many contributions African Americans have made
to our country's character and celebrate the diversity that makes
our Nation strong. May your commitment to family, faith, and
community thrive during this holiday season and throughout the
coming year.

Laura and I send our best wishes for a happy Kwanzaa.

GEORGE W. BUSH


nurse," Ms. O'Neal explained, but that profession suited the nursing students. We believe these students are called to a
special, caring person that she was." special vocation and we want to see them succeed."
The Odessa Chambliss Quality of Life Fund honors the President Reed states: "With the shortage of nurses
lifetime accomplishments of this special woman. "At the across the country, assistance such as this makes a phenom-
time of her death we learned it is not the quantity of years enal impact on our local, regional and state workforce. We
you live but the quality of life that is so important, Ms. are grateful for the support of thoughtful and compassionate
O'Neal stated. The fund is committed to supporting this alumni donors like Ms. O'Neal. She is a tireless proponent
principle and enhancing the lives of others in various of education and has demonstrated an incredible commit-
ways." Ms. O'Neal serves as a facilitator of the monies along ment to helping Bethune-Cookman College create a power-
with her sisters Vivian Hailes and Velma O'Neal, and broth- ful learning environment that can inspire and empower a
er Roy O'Neal. She also serves as Director of the Southeast new generation of nurses." Ms. O'Neal is a 2003 graduate of -
Region. Mrs. O'Neal states that "The Quality of Life Fund's Bethune-Cookman College who commuted from Orlando to
mission is to assist students who would not be able to realize Daytona Beach. She graduated Magna Cum Laude with a
their dream of becoming nurses due to financial difficulty, major in Business Administration. Reminiscing about her
Most scholarships just don't provide enough assistance to matriculation at Bethune-Cookman College, Ms. O'Neal
pay for the supplies, uniforms and books that are required of said: "I truly miss the students and this drive."

Southern AIDS Coalition Seeks


Equitable Distribution Of All


HIV/AIDS-Related Federal Funds


BIRMINGHAM, AL-- The
Southern AIDS Coalition
(SAC) asks Congress, the
Administration, and all, con-
cerned citizens for those living
with : HIV/AIDS 'to ensure-
equitable, prevention, care,
treatment, and housing acces-
sibility across the nation.
One critical element of
achieving solid public health
policy will be to change the
Ryan White C.A.R.E. Act to
ensure that funds follow the
epidemic. SAC will host a
national Satellite Broadcast on
Friday, January 27, 2006, from
2;:00 pm 4:00 pm CST.
The purpose of the broad-
cast is to reengage the nation
concerning the continuous
growth of HIV/AIDS cases in
the country, especially the dis-
proportionate rates in the
South, and the' funding dispar-
ities that continue- to impact
regions of the nation through
premature -. deaths and
increased infections because
access to care is dependent
upon a fair. distribution of
funds.
The broadcast is supported
by the Alabama Department of
Public Health Video
Communications Division and
will include national, regional,
and local speakers.
"The Southern AIDS
Coalition's policy :ec:mminends
fair distribution of federal tax
dollars based on sound
HIV/AIDS: data. 'HIV has
spread to commin niLies that are
less urban and require .support
that matches the per-case
amounts received iri many
urban areas, We have never
recommended anything other
than a same per-case dollar
distribution of the. funds.
Today if you live in an urban
setting, you receive more
money than if you live outside
one of the pre-determined 51
areas in the nation. This sys-
tem is not fair, nor .is it good


public health policy. It leads to
premature death and increased
infections in communities of
poverty and communities, of
color," said SAC Director,
Randall Russell.
"The existing policy to dis-
tribute federal funds based on
geography rather than the per-
case distribution approach of
Ryan White funds are a trans-
parent attempt to distract the
HIV. Community, Congress
and the Administration from
the real issues. SAC continues
to call for increases for all fed-
eral resources, including the
Ryan White C.A.R.E. Act.
Increased appropriations
and fair distribution of federal
dollars will improve access to
care, and prevent new infec-


tions. We only want an even
chance to fight the disease and
to provide reasonable and
comparable services to people
infected with and affected by
the disease who happen to live
in our states," said Kathie
Hiers, SAC Community Co-
Chair.,
SAC released a detailed,
thorough analysis that recom-
mends changes in the distribu-
tion of Ryan White funds as
well as several policy changes
in issues related to federal
funds for HIV/AIDS care,
treatment, and prevention on
August 22, 2005.
To date Congress has not
reauthorized the C.A.R.E. Act,
which expired September 30,
2005.


"President Bush and his"
administration are the first to
stand up and say that we
should serve the neediest
first," said Tony Sea, I an-
African-American male living-
with HIV disease in:
Tennessee. "In his State of the-
Union address he said that
'...we must focus our efforts on-.
fellow citizens with the highest: -
rates of new cases, African-
American men and women.'.,
We have the highest percent--
age of African-Americans liv-'-
ing with HIV disease in the
South, and we have the fe%%est
resources. I am outraged at the-
lack of national support to pro--
vide the same resources for
care and treatment in the entire-
country," Sea concluded.


"Jacksonville's


Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted


&

The Victory is in


the Word & Music











6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214

Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955

Web address: WWW. WCGL1360. COM

$ _


I I


FLORIDA STAR-


December 24, 2005


PAGE A-6







DECEMBER 24, 2005 FLORIDA STAR PAGE A-7


Brief continued from A-1

with an M.S. from the University of Oxford in England as a Rhodes Scholars. He also
has a M.S., MBA and Ph.D. from MIT in Massachusetts.
Pinkett was born in Philadelphia, Pa. and grew up in Highstown, N. J. He is the
owner of a consulting firm.
He will receive a six-figure salary working with Donald Trump and will be respon-
sible for the expansion and renovation of Trump's three Atlantic City casinos. The job
is scheduled to last for at least one year.

U.S. Senate Approval Cuts Needed Chaney To Break Tie

The Republican-controlled Senate was able to cut federal deficits by $39.7 billion
with a 51-50 vote, Vice President Chaney casting the deciding vote.
The change will make a small dent in the deficit but will freeze Medicare benefits
for a year; Medicaid regulations would be changed to make it more difficult for the eld-
erly to qualify for federal nursing home benefits; premium employers will have an
increase in what they pay for covered workers or retirees and lender subsidies will be
reduced as part of an attempt to squeeze $12.6 billion from the student loan pro-
grams.
All Democrats voted against the item as well as the independent senators, along
with five Republicans.


Wal-Mart Apologized To Black Man

A Tampa Wal-Mart Super center, held up a black customer for two hours when he
wrote a check for $13,600 to pay for 520 gift cards to give to employees of GAF
Materials Corp. According to the Associated Press, the man, Reginald Pitts, is a human
resources, manager for the company, hand provided Wal-Mart with his business card,
his driver's license and the toll-free numbers to GAF's bank. GAF annually spends
approximately $50,000 with Wal-Mart and had never had a problem when their white
employees made such a purchase.
GAF filed a. formal complaint against Wal-Mart and decided to buy their gift cards
from Target. Wal-Mart apologized for the manager's "poor judgment."


Two Officers Fired For New Orleans Beating


In a file photo police officers subdue Robert Davis, center, on
Conti Street near Bourbon Street in the French Quarters of
New Orleans Saturday night, Oct. 8, 2005. Two of the officers
videotaped and photographed by the Associated Press beat-
ing Davis in the French Quarters shortly after Hurricane
Katrina were fired Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2005. A third officer was
suspended. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
the FBI agents that participated.


Violence continued from A-
Matthews and wounded
the 25-year-old female
who was with him, just a
few blocks away in the
2700 block of Grunthal
Street.
Ms. Deborah Abrams
had just talked with The
Florida Star about the pain
she is still feeling from the
shooting death of her son,
an upcoming rap artist,
Thomas E. Abrams (aka
Gene).
She and her son, G,
have put together a pro-
gram, "Stop the Viole.nce."
She said the tragedy, she
encountered and pain she
feels is not just for her
family but the families
involved in her son's mur-
der.
She has attended hear-
ings almost monthly and
has experienced a "lot of
sleepless nights."
She said that there is a
song on her son's CD that
says, "I got to wake up,
you have to wake yourself
up out of the dream you
feel that you're in."
He had one song left, at
the time of his death, to
complete the CD album.
His brother who is CEO of
Bungi Entertainment com-
pleted it.
G, the brother said that
on the night of Thomas'
death, they had arranged to
.go to the opening night of
"The Passion of Christ."
Hq and his wife- went to
the theater and "Thomas
was supposed to join them


but said he had to make a
stop first.
That stop prevented
him from meeting them
because apparently, the
shooters were waiting for
him.
,Mrs. Abrams said, "It
saddens my heart to know
what length a person will
go through to take some-
one's life; what makes a
young man so filled with
anger and hostility that
would cause him to take
another's life and assume
he will get away with it?"
She added, "Youing men
wake up, unstop your
death ears and take the
blinders .off."
.MAD DADS and
Senator Tony Hill, along
with several other commu-
nity organizations and
churches, are offering a'
$1,000 reward for infor--
mation leading ,to the
arrest and conviction of
the individuals(s) who
shot and murdered Damian
Hughes and injured his 16-
year-old sister.
They pleaded, "Even if
this is one of your family
members, do the right
thing!" Contact the
Sheriffs Office at 630-
0500 or MAD DADS at
388-8171.
Help is also needed in
locating Elmer Moore Jr.,
born November 20, 1980
for the shooting death of
Shawn Kelsey, 25, who
was found deceased, lying
in a pool of'blood on the
second floor landing of the


Two of the offi-
cers who were video-
taped beating a black
man in New Orleans'
French Qualters after
Katrina, were fired
and a third one
received a 120-day
suspension. The
beating was video
taped by an
Associated Press.
reporter.
The video shows
two FBI agents join-
ing the New Orleans
police when they
said they were sub-
duing the 64-year-
old retired teacher,
Robert Davis. The
officers will face trial
on January 11 and a
federal civil, rights
investigation is being
launched regarding


London Town Apartments
located on Lane Avenue, S.
Investigators believe that
there may have been some
type of issue involving the
victim and suspect prior to
the shooting.
Moore has not been
located. He had 17 crimi-
nal incidents from 1998
through 2005 consisting of
drugs, other criminal
offenses, traffic arrests and
now, suspect in a murder.
And if that is hot
enough, two young men
broke into a Winn Dixie on
Sago Avenue, W. about
11:30 Monday night and
held two women hostage
for more than five hours.
A SWAT team was sum-
moned arid surrounded the
store.
Once they were in the
building, they founded the,
two ladies bound and
gagged but could not
immediately locate the
suspects.
They were later discov-
ered in the attic of the
building. Jamison
Pollock, 19, was arrested
and charged but, his part-
ner in the incident, Jerome
Gist, 23, appeared to have
committed suicide.
An arrest, a charge of
armed robbery and false
imprisonment, and a sui-
cide, all for some personal
items, cash, and cell
phones.


PEN POINTS

Letters must include name, address, and phone number. They are due the Tuesday before
the next issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com


Christianity Under Attack-Not New


It is certainly not new hiM T if ,
that Christianity would be
under attack. It's been
going on for 2,000 'years. '2 i 41,
What is new is that a nation
that was built on principles
derived from the teachings
of Christianity is attempt- 6
ing to wipe out all refer- .
ences to it. Our society has
shown that the more the
principles of the teachings.
of Christianity are moved
to the background, the .
more the principles of evil
will mor e to the fore-
ground. It has happened in France, England, etc. This results in a lack of morals,
respect, decency and an increase in crime, rudeness, lewdness, indecency, reckless
driving,disrespect, lawlessness, etc. If this is the.kind of society we want, then go
ahead and remove God from everything but inside the church or synagogue, and that's
the kind of society we will have fast.
Thdse kinds of things have always been around, and will always be. But let's keep
them in the background, not the foreground. Teaching our children that there is no God,
no moral law, no need to respect any kind of law, no need to live for anything but the
present and self-serving things, no need to consider the value of living toward an after-
life, etc., will be the downfall of our decent society.. It is time for decent, law-abiding,
God-loving people to stand up sand say enuf is enuf. The way for evil to triumph is for,
good people to do nothing, because they're afraid to offend anyone.
Well, I'm offended by the lack of Christmas spirit in these holidays, and I'm speak-
ing out. The stores and the governments say they don't want any references to religious
stuff around because they don't want to offend anyone, yet they don't seem to care that
they are offending the 2.1 billion people in the world who make up Christianity. Most
Americans are Christians. Christians may not be a majority in the world (33% of the
world's population are recorded as being Christian), but we are a majority ing America
(84% of the population).
Barbara Walters will reported in her TV special on heaven on December 20th, that
90% of Americans believe that heaven is a real place and most feel they're going there.
1.2 billion people in the world are Muslims and only a few of them are militant extrem-
ists, only 14 million are Jewish (1% of the American population is Jewish), 376 million
are Buddhist, 900 million are Hindu, 20 million on Sikhs. That's 75 % of the world's
population right there, and there are other religious people in smaller religious groups.
So, the majority of the world has religious principles and teach decency and the value
of living for an afterlife. Only 3% of the American population is listed as atheistic or
agnostic. We are letting a minority rule. Don't let that happen.. Here is a report of how
that is happening right under us, from a report from the American Family Association:
In Dodgeville, Wisconsin, Ridgeway Elementary School's "winter program" has
changed the name of "Silent Night" to "Cold in the Night." Sung to the tune of "Silent
Night," the lyrics include: "Cold in the night, no one in sight, winter winds whirl and
bite, how I wish I were happy and warm, safe with my family out of the storm."
The "winter program" included decorating classrooms with Santa Claus, Kwanza
symbols, Menorahs, and Labafana--a Christmas witch! Also in Wisconsin, the
Glendale-River Hills School District has banned every Christmas song which has any
Christian "motive or theme." But while banning Christian Christmas songs, the district
permits secular holiday songs as well as songs celebrating Hanukkah. In defending this
policy, Frances Smith, the district administrator, says that the Hanukkah songs are more
cultural than spiritual.
What these schools are doing to, our children is not educating, but indoctrinating!
And they are using Christmas as an excuse. Following the lead of the National
Educational Association, Wisconsin educational leaders preach tolerance and diversity
while being highly intolerant! Most of the residents of Wisconsin are tolerant, but not
their educational leaders.
Banning nativity scenes. Banning Christmas songs in school. Banning Christmas in
advertising. Calling a Christmas tree a "holiday" tree. Calling a Christmas parade a hol-
iday parade. Refusing to mention the Reason for the season. It is time to take a stand
for our children, our families, our faith and our freedom!
Educational leaders in your state could be the next officials to join this anti-
Christian bigotry parade. Please don't be silent about this. I wish each of you a very
Merry Christmas.and may God bless you every day.

Ed Murfin,
Jacksonville, Florida

Privacy continued from A-1

Security Agency. Secondly, its bad to be spying on Americans without court over-
sight. And thirdly, it's bad to be spying on Americans apparently in violation of fed-
eral laws against doing it without court order."
Files show that the FBI watched domestic activist group reported the New York
Times.
According to CBS and The Associated Press, since the 2001 attacks, the govern-
ment has focused on preventing disrupting attacks.
However, they said experts cautioned that future legal prosecutions could be
tainted if evidence is uncovered about a terror plot using a wiretap determined to be
improper.





FL)RORIA STAR


Ai'EA-8' A


DECEMBER 24, 2005


Career Education


Ippr


F'bA 71A


`1








-Angel Tree Party




Delights Local Kids

,\CroI s Ils e h at liii
-i.hs 1holIdaN t ,iCJon an
01 : on Iunization called
'Tile .n el YITree
---- .Net\% ork formed it.
.W' nMake ld'e of incarcerated
perlsons are not for-
gotten du'n.
Christmas.
Civic orgal i'zation
rallied around the
I scriptural imetlapht w "
When I was in prison
-,you visited me not".
.... ... They made sure that
-aUatry, December

some children and
adults will not forget.
In Jacksonville.
m o Chuirch pril -on
nIilllsll',ie look on011 the
mm '- n cllelll. The
Potlelrs House
Christiul Fellow s\hi%.
%\ ith the leadership of
Niartha Shider. Rod
and Renee Inranm:
and The Household of
Faith follow ing the
leadership of Drs.
Lewvis and
B e r a B ernad ette
Williams hosted par-
ties for over 40I chil-
dren.
Volunteers visited
V iinmates, contacted
f families, and organ-
ized parties including
rappers, dancers,
TOP FRAME: Kids stand in line to get their faces painted during the Angel Tree steppers. and door
Network Event at Potter's House. BOTTOM FRAME: Angel Tree volunteer Dee prizes. At the Potters
Whitfield (third from left) gathers with some of the children. l-Hou'e, ministerr Rod
Pruiti encouraged the children reminding them of the real reason for this season: ".lesus camine as a bab\ for our
Angel Tree continued on B-4









Department Of Agriculture Offers Science Fair Project Ideas


TALLAHASSEE -- Do
you know a student who is
looking for a science fair
project idea? The Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
would like to help in the
search by encouraging stu-
dents to consider a topic in
agriculture.
The Department has
developed "Planet Ag," a
web site designed to assist
middle and high school
students in developing a
science fair topic and see-
ing the project through to
completion.
The site can be
accessed at
http://www.florida-agri-
culture.com/PlanetAg.
"A science fair project
is a great way to begin to
learn about agricultural
science," Florida
Agriculture Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson said.
"Agricultural science is
the science of growing
plants, breeding animals,
and producing food. It's
an exciting field, and it's
vital to the future of
Florida and our nation.
This web site allows stu-
dents to begin to explore
the world of agricultural
science and to start to
think about the 'many
interesting questions and
challenges associated with
-food production."
Planet Ag provides stu-
dents with an explanation
of the scientific method,
the step-by-step process
that will enable them to
complete their science fair
project.
Students learn how to
come up with a hypothe-
sis, decide on- a procedure
for the experiment, record
the results, and come to a
conclusion based on those
results.
Planet Ag also offers
practice projects for stu-
dents to review and pres-
ents topic ideas in the


areas of biochemistry,
botany, chemistry, engi-
neering, environmental
sciences, medicine and
health, microbiology, and
zoology. Among the
dozens of topic ideas
included on .the web site
are:
-- How can animal
pests be genetically con-
trolled?
-- Why do salts build
up in soils? How can this
be avoided?
-- Do different colors
attract different kinds of
pollinators?
-- How many insects
will a common insect
predator, such as a toad or
a praying mantis, eat in
one day?
-- How is seed shape
associated with seed dis-
persal?.
Integrating agriculture
into the science curricu-
lum is a very important
process. More and more
rural areas are becoming
urbanized and families are
becoming further removed
from their agricultural
roots. Bringing agricul-
ture into the classroom
provides students with an
opportunity to learn where
their food comes from. It-
also allows them :to move
beyond book learning and-
get hands-on experience in
science.
"Associating science
lessons with 'real world'
experiences like growing a
garden or raising animals,
makes learning relevant to
students' lives," Bronson
said. "Performance
improves, and kids begin
to think about career
ideas."
A visit to Planet Ag
might be the first step
toward a career in agricul-
tural science.
The web site examines
many interesting career
possibilities in agriculture-
including veterinarian,


aquaculturist, plant pathol-
ogist, forester, and agricul-
tural economist-and offers
suggestions to students on
courses to consider in high
school and college.
It also provides an
overview of the impor-
tance of agriculture in,
Florida.
There's an added
incentive for students to
consider an agricultural
topic for their science fair
project.
Bronson will present a
$1,000 United States
Savings Bond to junior
and senior division stu-
dents whose agricultural
projects are selected as
winners during the 51st
Annual State Science and
Engineering Fair of
Florida in 2006.
The winners of the
savings bond at the 2005
science fair were Sravya
R. Keremane of
Gainesville in the senior
division and Briana E.
Lytton of Naples in the
junior division.
Keremane analyzed
transgenic citrus and
tomato for cold tolerance,
and Lytton studied -the
effects of acid on sugar-
cane growth.
The State Science and
Engineering Fair of
Florida is a three-day dis-
play of science project
exhibits prepared by aspir-
ing scientists and engi-
neers in grades 6 through
12 from throughout the
state. The fair is adminis-
tered by the Florida
Foundation for Future
Scientists, which promotes
activities that encourage
young people to pursue
careers in science, engi-
neering, and research. The
Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services is among numer-
ous government agencies,
businesses, and organiza-


tions that contribute awards for the fair.

A Winning Combination:

Cookies, Ice Cream And Pizza!


(NAPSI)-Pizza and ice cream are perennial favorites
with the younger set, so why not go for the entertaining
and appetizing combination of a pizza made with ice
cream?
Creative ideas like that are the inspiration for a popu-
lar contest that invites youngsters to put together recipes
for a chance to win such delicious prizes as a year's sup-
ply of ice cream.
The Dreyer's/Edy's Junior Chef Recipe Quest asks
kids to dish out their creativity and come up with origi-
nal snack and dessert ideas, starting with one main ingre-
dient: ice cream inspired by Girl Scout Cookies.
Children ages 8 to 12 are invited to submit original
recipes featuring 9ne of the following five flavors:
Dreyer's/Edy's Girl Scouts Tagalongs, Thin Mint,
Samoas, Thin Mint Light or Samoas Light Cookie Ice
Creams. Recipes must be fun to make, have interesting
ingredients and taste good. A portion of the proceeds
from the sale. of each carton, available nationwide
through the end of April, goes to support Girl Scouting.
This 2005 winning recipe, created by a 10-year-old
from McMinnville, Oregon, will be featured on one mil-
lion cartons of Dreyer's/Edy's Thin Mint Ice Cream this
year:
Thin Mint Ice Cream Pizza

Makes 8-12 servings


1 package (15-17 oz.) brownie mix for an 8 x 8-inch pan

8 to 10 large scoops Dreyer's/Edy's Girl Scouts Thin Mint
Cookie Ice Cream

1/2 pint whipping cream

1/4 cup granulated sugar

15 Girl Scout Thin Mint Cookies

Candy-covered chocolate pieces

Fresh-sliced strawberries
Winning Combination continued on B-3


Th'e Florida' Sta'r/Pr'ep q~ip


Page, B-2/.Decem ber 24, 2005








Emerson Offers Full Scholarships To Prestigious Interlochen Arts Camp


High School musicians,
like this Andrew Jackson
High School student,
can apply for an
Emerson Scholarship
Award to the world-
famous Interlochen Arts
Camp in northern
Michigan.
INTERLOCHEN,
Mich.-Top high-school
musicians around the
country have the opportu-
nity to apply for an
Emerson Scholarship
Award to the world-
famous Interlochen Arts
Camp in northern
Michigan. Fifty-two stu-
dents from across the
United States will receive
a full scholarship for the
2006 Interlochen Arts
Camp.
The merit-based schol-
arships are funded through
a generous grant from St.
Louis-based Emerson.
The Emerson Scholars
Award is a $5,802 scholar-
ship, which provides full
tuition, private lessons,'
and room and board for the
six-week summer pro-
gram. Interlochen's 79th
Camp season dates are
June 24 through August 7,
2006.
Emerson Scholars
applicants must be in
grades. nine through 12
and demonstrate excep-
tional proficiency on harp,
string, wind or percussion


instruments. An audition
submitted on tape or CD is
required with application.
Applications must be
postmarked by Feb. 15,
2006, and winners will be
announced by April 15,
2006. Winners will be
determined solely on
merit.
"What defines
Interlochen is the intense
energy and commitment of
the teachers and students,"
noted 2005 Emerson
Scholar Benjamin Ou-
Yang of Pennsylvania.
"Although the students
come from places around
the world, everyone shares
a common passion for the
arts."
"Emerson and
Interlochen partnering
together," said Andrew
Sharkey, 2005 Emerson
Scholar from Indiana,
"have given me one giant
step in the direction of
allowing me to pursue
dreams of becoming a pro-
fessional musician."


"I was solo euphonium
with the World Youth
Symphony Orchestra for 6
consecutive weeks, which
was amazing," said
Pamela Miller, 2005
Emerson Scholar from
Nevada. "At the same time
I got to meet kids from all
over the world and build
friendships that will last a
lifetime. [the Emerson
Scholars Award has]
changed my life in such a
unique and positive way."
"This has been a sum-
mer that I will never for-
get, said Andrew Hall, a
2005 Emerson Scholar
from North Carolina, "and
the Emerson name will
always be tied to that.
meaning."
Established in 1987,
the Emerson Scholars
Program recognizes
exceptional high-school'
musicians and gives them
an opportunity to hone
their talents in an environ-
ment that is recognized
around the world as the


Merry

Ch rsitmas!


FIND OUT


HOW YOU


CAN APPEAR


-IN


PREP RAP


CALL


904/766-8834


premier training ground
for young artists.
"This is one of the
most prestigious scholar-
ship offerings at
Interlochen," said
Interlochen President
Jeffrey S. Kimpton.
"Thanks to the generosity
of Emerson, we can pro-
vide some of this nation's
top young artists with an
artistic experience unlike
any other."


For more information,
or to obtain an application,
e-mail admissions@inter-
lochen.org or call (231)
276-7472 or write the
Emerson Scholars
Program, Interlochen
Center for the Arts, P.O.
Box 199, Interlochen, MI,
49643. Complete informa-
tion also is available
online at www.inter-
lochen.org.


Winning


Combination
(Continued From B-2)

Preheat oven to 350F. Prepare brownie mix as pack-
age directs. Grease a 12" round pizza pan. Spread brown-
ie mix on pan and bake 15 minutes or until brownie tests
done per package directions. Cool completely on pan.
Place scoops of ice cream on top of brownie. Let soft-
en slightly, then spread evenly. Return to freezer for 15
minutes or until firm.
To make whipped cream, beat cream and sugar with
an electric mixer until soft peaks form. Spread whipped
cream over ice cream. Arrange Thin Mint Cookies,
candy pieces, and strawberries on top of cream to create
a "pizza." Freeze at least one hour or until cream is
frozen. Cut into wedges to serve.
About the Contest
Original recipes for the contest should be classified in
one of two categories: "After-School Snack" or "My
Favorite Dessert." Entries must be received by April 4,
2006. Four pint-sized chefs will be awarded a year's sup-
ply of Dreyer's/Edy's ice cream and their choice of one of
the following gift packages:
Cooking in the Kitchen-Features all the right tools
for an up-and-coming chef.
Outdoor Camping Adventure-Equipment for your
next camping expedition.
My Home Library-A dream for any young reader.
Of the four finalists, the grand-prize winner will have
his or her recipe featured on the carton of one of
Dreyer's/Edy's Girl Scout Cookie Ice Cream flavors in
2007 and will receive a $500 U.S. Savings Bond (in
addition to the prizes listed above). Winners will be
announced in May 2006.
For additional contest details, visit
www.IceCream.com.
Ice cream, cookies and brownie mix combine to make
a delectable "pizza" that kids can decorate with candies
and fruit.
Note: TagalongsiE and Samoas.E are registered
trademarks and used with permission.


The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Page B-3/December 24, 2005






Page B-4/December 24, 2005 The Florida StarlPrep Rap


Angel Tree
(Continued From B-I)


a b e einrrrs


@ccehloot


@grvy


al@stuw


Children and their parents await the presentation of gifts during The Angel Tree
Network session at the Household of Faith.


Kevin Postell, Freddie Rhodes, Bro. Jay, and Lil Ralph were on hand as WCGL
1360 AM participated in a live remote for The Angel Tree Network at the
Household of Faith.


sins".
Dee Whitfield stirred
the young audience with
a motivating poem and'
Brother Tomcat got their
attention with gospel rap.
Jacksonville Jaguar defen-
sive back Donovan Darius
created a light in the
eyes of the every kid pres-
ent that will last a life-
time.


At the Household of
Faith, WCGL radio
announcers joined Pastor
C. Williams during a live
remote broadcast. A skit
informed the young chil-
dren they are not alone and
that Jesus was born for our
sins. There were door
prizes, rappers, and words
of inspiration by Pastor C.
Williams.


The guest enjoyed deli-
cious food and goodies.
The children then received
gifts addressed to him or
her from their parents.
Children received new
bicycles, clothes, toys and
gifts from their parents
with words of encourage-
ment giving true meaning
to "Angels Watching
Over Me".


@eikoos


d ginpu


.@krtuy


ffgir@tu


Answers const


Answers continued on B6


Unscrble the letters to find the words in our


Christmas Foods


Anagram

Hidda Wv r


I -


I 'II


The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Page B-4/December 24, 2005









Lil Wayne's 'Tha Carter II' Scores Huge


Breakthrough: Debuts #2 on Top Albums

NEW YORK--Cash Money Records' hottest rising superstar, Lil
Wayne, scores a breakthrough debut this week on Billboard's Top 100
Albums chart, coming in at #2 with his new album, Tha Carter II.
The New Orleans native's critically-acclaimed CD comes right behind .-M
Eminem, and ahead of several other top tier album releases such as Korn,
Ja Rule, Tori Amos and others. Lil Wayne's astonishing debut is Cash
Money Records' biggest-selling debut in the hip-hop dynasty's history.
Although the label boasts many top- selling artists and achieved many
multi-platinum successes, this current accomplishment re-affirms Cash
Money's continued prominence within the music world.
"This truly is an historic moment for Lil Wayne and the entire Cash
Money family," stated Cash Money co-founder Ronald 'Slim' Williams.
"This albuni shows his growth as a young man and artist. He's changing the
game from top to bottom and this is just the beginning for him." Ronald's
brother, and Cash Money co-CEO, Bryan 'Birdman' Williams, added. "He's
like a son to me, so I'm proud of him. This isn't just a big win for him and
the label, he delivered big time for New Orleans as well," says Bryan
Williams.
The stunning debut of Tha Carter II comes on the heels of Lil Wayne's
first ever Grammy nomination in the "Best Rap/Sung Collaboration" cate-
gory for his work with Destiny's Child and T.I. The album continues to gar-
ner outstanding reviews: The LA Times describing the album as "explo-
sive" and "poetic;" The New York Times raves "Lil Wayne's voice, like his
flow keeps getting better;" and USA Today praises Wayne's "sharper-than-
usual production and more diverse than ever lyricism."
The lead single, "Fireman," from Tha Carter II has been burning up the
radio charts, and the video remains a Top 10 staple on MTV2 and BET.
Along with Tha Carter II, Cash Money/Universal Records has also simul-
taneously released a deluxe package of Tha Carter II which contains the
new CD and a chopped and fcrewed versions of some of Lil Wayne's
biggest songs including: "Go DJ," "Tha Block is Hot," "Get Off The
Corner" as well as the new single, "Fireman."
Lil Wayne, who was born and raised in the infamous poverty-stricken ,ar
section of New Orleans' i7th Ward, has become an inspiring symbol of the
crescent city's tenacity, beginning with his rise to stardom in 1995. Lil
Wayne was only 12 when he made his debut on his former label mates'
B.G's True Story CD. Success with the group Hot Boys followed, featuring rappers Juvenile, Turk and B.G., with their 1997 debut album, Get It
How You Live, followed by 1998's platinum certified Guerilla Warfare and 2003's Let Em Burnm. His first solo album, 1999's Tha Block Is Hot
achieved platinum status. He released Lights Out in 2000, 500 Degreez in 2002 and his touchstone album, 2004's gold certified, Tha Carter, which
featured the hit single "Go DJ."
Cash Money was launched in 1991, with the Williams Brothers creating the New Orleans based company that would eventually become a
national phenomenon. In 1997 the label inked a breakthrough deal with Universal Records, making the Cash Money moniker synonymous with
platinum selling artists and ground breaking entrepreneurship. The hip hop empire has sold more than 25 million records since their inception,
claiming an explosive array of artists from Juvenile, to Lil Wayne, to Big Tymers, Hot Boys and Teena Marie, whose new album Sapphire is due
out in the spring of 2006.

Mary J. Blige Scheduled For Essence Music Festival
Mary J. Blige will perform at the 2006 Essence Music Festival, which is temporarily moving to Houston as New Orleans
continues to rebuild after Hurricane. Katrina. The annual event, sponsored by Essence magazine, has been held in the
Superdome in New Orleans since 1995.
The 2006 festival will be held July 1-3 at Houston's Reliant Park. Several concerts, a marketplace and empowerment sem-
inars will be featured. A portion of the event will be aimed at helping victims of Katrina.
Other performers will be announced in coming weeks, organizers said in a statement Monday.
Nearly 500 artists have performed at the Essence Music Festival, which has brought millions of dollars into Louisiana's
,, economy since its inception.


Page 13-5/1ecer-bneb_'2-4,_. 2-01 066"


The Florida Star/Prep Rapp






Page B-6lDecember 24, 2005 The Florida Star! Prep Rap


Clean Kids Jokes

'Silly! Silly! Tongue
Twister
Q. What has a head and a foot but no arms?
A. A bed! Santa's sleigh slides on slick


Q. The turtle took two chocolates to Texas, to
teach Thomas to tie his shoes. How many "Ts" in
that?
A. There are 2 "Ts" in "THAT!

Q. What kind of keys do kids like to carry?
A. Coo-kies! (submitted by nerd)

Q. Why do Teddy Bear biscuits wear long
trousers?
A. Because they've got crummy legs!

Q. Why don't traffic lights ever go swimming?
A. Because they take too long changing!

Q. Why did the robber take a bath before
he stole from the bank?
A. He wanted a clean getaway!

Q. What has 5 eyes, is blind, goes
for miles, yet bumps into nothing?
A. The Mississippi River!

Q. What's the hardest part about sky diving?
A. The Ground!

Q. What gets wet the more you dry?
A. A towel!

j. What happens if you eat yeast and shoe polish?
A. Every morning you'll rise and shine!

Q. How many books can you put
in an empty backpack?
A. One! After that its not empty!

Q. What washes up on very small beaches?
A. Microwaves!

Q. Why do candle trimmers work
so few days a week?
A.They only work on wick-ends!

Q. What's the difference between
a TV and a newspaper?
A. Ever tried swatting a fly with a TV?

Q. What breaks when you say it?
A. Silence! (submitted by Dawn)

Q. If Phil & Lil were a fruit,
what kind would they be?
A. A pear (pair)!


snow.
Bobby brings bright bells.
Running reindeer romp
'round red wreaths.

Tiny Timmy trims the tall
tree with tinsel.
Chilly chipper children
cheerfully chant.

Two trains travel together to
Toyland.
Eleven elves licked eleven lit-
tle licorice lollipops.
Santa's sack sags slightly.
Ten tiny tin trains toot ten
times.


(c ceh loot

9 rv y

al (st u w

a m S

e i k o.o s

d(ginpu

@k rtu y

ff i n t u

i m(e)st


KNOCK! KNOCK!

Knock Knock!
Who's there?
Kanga.
Kanga who?
No! Kanga roo!

Knock Knock!
Who's there?
Reed.
Reed who?
Reed between the lines.

Knock Knock!
Who's there?
Candice.
Candice who?
Candice get any better?

Knock Knock!
Who's there?
Formosa.
Formosa who?
Formosa the summer I was away on my holiday.

Knock Knock!
Who's there?
Ken.
Ken who?
Ken I come in, it's freezing out here?


chocolate

gravy

walnuts

yams

cookies

pudding

turkey-

stuffinq

mints


CHRISTMAS FOODS ANAGRAM ANSWERS


Unscramble the letters to find the words in our

Christmas Foods

Anagram
Hidden Word (circled letters):
candycanes


a b)e e i n rrr s cranberries


I I' I L


The Florida Star/ Prep Rap


Page B-6/December 24, 2005





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B-8!DECEMBER 24, 2005


Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
jTOP HIP-HOP SINGLES
1. Mariah Carey, Don't Forget About Us (Remix featuring
Jueiz Santana & Bone Thugs-n-Harmony)
2. Dem Franchize Boyz Featuring Jermaine Dupri, Da
Brat & Bow Wow, I Think They Like Me I Think They
Like Me
3. Ray J, One Wish
4. Mary J. Blige, Be Without You
5. Chris Brown, Run It!
6. Keyshia Cole, I Should Have Cheated
7. Alicia Keys, Unbreakable
8. Juelz Santana, There It Go! (The Whistle Song)
9. Nelly Featuring Paul Wall, Ali & Gipp, Grillz
10. Twista Featuring Trey Songz, Girl Tonite
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. Tequila Makes Her Clothes Fall Off, Joe Nichols
2. Come-A Little Closer Dierks Bentley
3. Who You'd Be Today Kenny Chesney
4. Good Ride Cowboy Garth Brooksl
5. Must Be Doin' Somethin' Right Billy Currington
6. She Let Herself Go George Strait
7. Big Blue Note Toby Keith
8. Jesus, Take The Wheel Carrie Underwood
9. Better Life Keith Urban
10. Like We Never Loved At All Faith Hill
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY,
1. Hung Up, Madonna : :
2. Everybody, Martin Solveig
3 I Will Love Again, Taras
4. Everyday (Rudebwoy), Kardinal Offishall ft. Ray .
Robinson
5. Hard To Beat (Remix), Hard-Fi
6. Nasty Girl, Notorious B.I.G. ft. Diddy, Nelly, Jagged
Edge & Avery Storm
7. Perfect Love, Simply Red
8. Shattered Dreams, Jaybee ft. Morris
9. Precious, Depeche Mode a i S wa
10. Watchin' Me, The Show ft. J-Luv swo 0 W 116 s





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COMMUNITY

CAPTIONS
Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.
SPRING CAREER FAIR-The WorkSource, Florida
Community College and Rosanne Hartwell Women's
Center are sponsoring a Spring Career Fair Wednesday,
March 8, from 9 a.m. to noon. in the Florida Community
College's Downtown Campus Lobby located at 101 West
State St. The event is free and open to the public.
Employers (to be announced) will be on-hand to connect
with potential employees. Attendees are reminded to
bring multiple copies of resumes and to dress .as if they
may be attendinm- an interview-because they may be
attending an interview. For more information call
904.633.8270 or 904.633.8224.
KWANZAA AT THE RITZ-Ritz Theatre & LaVilla
Museum announces our annual Kwanzaa celebration
December 30, 2005, 6:00pm. Kwanzaa is a celebration of
culture, family and the community, and is open to the
entire family. Celebrating *Nia* the 5th day of the week-
long celebration, the Ritz will host. a traditional Kwanzaa
celebration where visitors witness the lighting of the
mishumaa saba (the seven candles), the pouring of liba-
tion and the cultural unity of this community wide cele-
bration. Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum*s Kwanzaa cel-
ebration will incorporate song, dance, musical perform-
ance, African drumming and poetry performance by
members of the community. Visitors are encouraged to
bring fresh fruit in the African harvest celebration tradi-
tion. Kwanzaa at the Ritz is free to the public. For more
information, please call 904-632-5555. Ritz Theatre &
LaVilla Museum is located at 829 N. Davis Street,
Jacksonville.
ANNUAl NEW YEAR GRAND REUNION CELE-
BRATION 2006-Matthew W. Gilbert Junior-Senior High
School students and teachers will gather to for the 8th
annual New Year Grand Reunion Celebration 2006 on
Friday, January 6, 2006 and Saturday, January 7, 2006 at
the Hyatt Regency Walk Hotel (former Adams Mark),
225 Coastline Dr. A Semi-Formal Welcome reception
will be held from 7:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m. .Activities on jan-
uary 7 include a receptiort from 6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m., and
Dinner from 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m., and a Dance/Party from
9:00 p.m.-Uritil. The celebration is sponsored by the
Matthew W. Gilbert Alumni. All classes and teachers are
invited. No ticket will be sold at the door. For addition-
al information contact Almetya J. Lodi (904) 355-7583 or
Vivian W. Williams (904) 766-2885.
FLAJAX CLUB CHRISTMAS DANCE-Navy Captain
(Ret) Samuel A. Allen, Jr., Chairman of the FlaJax Club
76th Anniversary Dance, announced the organization will
sponsor the most elegant and fun-filled formal event of
the year. This year's annual dance will be held at the
Radisson Riverwalk Hotel on Prudential Drive.
Traditionally, this event is an evening of spirited dancing
and reunion with family and friends from around the city,
state and nation. The formal dance is by invitation, how-
ever, interested persons who have not received one
should contact Chairman Alen at 264-9481 or any Flajax
club member. Dance and listening music will be provid-
ed by Rod McMorries and the incomparable Elite Band.
During intermission will be six new FlaJax members -
James E. Daniels, James E. Fralin, Neil Frink, Ronald E.
Jones, Warner E. Singleton and Kenneth W. Reddick.



DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Jacksonville's

Most Heated

Radio Talk Show!


North Florida's Best
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AM 1530
WEEKDAYS
2-6 P.M.


CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
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China's Wonders Of The World


TOP FRAME: From left, 1952 U. S. Olympian Mable
"Dolly" Staton and Michael Phelts at the Summer Palace
in Tiananmen Square. MIDDLE FRAME: Hollywood
Casting Director Pamela M. Staton jaming with Chinese
performer at Temple of Heaven. BOTTOM FRAME:
Laura Hand, Vernessa Carpenter, Pamela Staton, Mabel
"Dolly" Staton, Marsha and Michael Phelts at the Peking
Opera House.
By Marsha Dean Phelts

My husband, Michael and I spent this Thanksgiving in
Beijing, China. After encouragement from our church mem-
ber, Mildred Holmes to visit this country we signed up for
the next tour. China was everything she said that it would
be. While there we feasted on dishes such as Peking duck,
century eggs, preserved vegetables, steamed bok choy, gar-
lic stems, dragon fruit, a variety of dumplings, potent rice
wine, and of course tea with each meal. It was dining at its
best in five star restaurants and in a private home.
Our tour began at the first of the Seven Wonders of the
World, the 35 foot tall, 4600 miles long Great Wall of China.
We climbed a portion of the Wall, constructed around 400
years Before Christ.
In the city of Xian we visited the 8th Wonder of the
World at the Terra-Cotta Warriors Museum. We saw the
underground burial of 8000 life-size pottery warriors, hors-


es, carriages and weapons that guarded Emperor Qin's tomb.
When Emperor Qin died in 210 BC, "his ladies who had no
children were ordered to follow him to the grave and were
buried alive. Thousands of officials were killed and thou-
sands of craftsmen were buried alive with the purpose of
keeping secret" the construction sites. (Awakened: Qin's
Terra-Cotta Army, c. 2001)
Throughout our journey we visited an elementary school,
the Beijing Zoo, Peking Opera and took in many other sight-
seeing adventures including a rickshaw tour. At no time did
our Chinese hosts or we (foreigners) forget that we were in a.
Communist country.
Daily we observed groundkeepers meticulously sweep-
ing leaves using brooms handmade from twigs. There was
not a gas blower anyplace. These laborers were ,paid the
equivalent of $80.00 a month.
In the silk shops where 2' x 3 V2 wall carpets sold for
$3000.00 or at the cloisonne factory where an 18" figurine
sold for $4000.00, the artisans were paid $200.00 a month.
Artists and laborers work under conditions Americans con-
sider inhumane and intolerable.
We were'informed that these workers were the lucky
ones-they lived in dormitories at the factories. Tourist were
encouraged to take pictures of the craftsmen, while hovering
over their workstations watching their every move.
However, pictures of soldiers or police were strictly forbid-
den.
As we traveled through China the adage, "An idol mind
is the devil's workshop" would constantly reoccur in my
thoughts. While workers performed repetitious menial or
skilled tasks, there was no time for idol thoughts. Laborers
did not chatter among themselves for they concentrated on
counting threads and numbers in their patterns and moving
the production line.
We were in Tiananmen Square the day that President
Bush visited and saw the unusual and beautiful sight of
China continued on C-3

Let's Hear It For The Jags!
IF." W "'- w U


Join Us In
Celebrating
Our

50th

Year Of Service
To The
Community


Roar of The Jaguars
cheerleader Monica
pumps up the crowd dur-
ing the Jacksonville
Jaguars home game
against the San Fransico
49ers on Sunday,
December 18 at Altell
Stadium. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE
GREENE)


WENDELL P. HOLMES,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
AND STAFF

Jacquelyn S Holmes, Assistant"
Warren Thomas, -
liary JV Ram'nell


Al" ARM


PAGE C-1


FLORIDA STAR


DECEMBER 242005


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C~5~tm~-


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/'P AG E C -2 1 t- ..


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DECMEBER 24, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


rb I- 7 o I


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ULL(VIDI I .MBUUJ AIUU) A


China


(Continued From C-I)


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Hand made broom used for sweeping leaves.

Former Secretary

Of Education Discusses

Policy And Reform


Rod Paige
Dr. Rod Paige, former
Secretary of Education, will
be speaking about
."Educational Policies and
School Reform" at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, January 18, at
the University Center on the
University of North Florida
campus.
On January 21, 2001, the
United States Senriate. con-'
firmed Paige as the 7th U.S.
Secretary of Education, the
crowning achievement of a
long career in education.
He began working with

In Loving

Memory Of

Vanessa Jones





.j,



I

L .
.. '" ;'-


Vanessa Jones
January 25, 1953
December 29, 2003
Vanessa, you're missed so
much, you'll never know,
but when God called ,you
had to go.
If we could have just one
more chance, we'd hold
your hand and smile, and
let you know your love and
strength made our lives
worthwhile.


We Love and Miss You:
Mother, Sons, Sisters,
Brothers, Grandnother,
.Aunt, and Other relatives


students early in his career
as a teacher and a coach.
Paige served for a decade as
dean of the College of
Education at Texas Southern
University and later became
superintendent of the
Houston Independent
School District, the nation's
seventh largest school dis-
trict.
Dr. Paige is the first
school superintendent ever
to serve as Secretary of
Education, with his experi-
ence in the classroom pay-
ing off to pass President
Bush's No Child Left
Behind Act of 2001.
Paige led the charge to
implement these historic
reforms, which gives local
-school districts the tools and
resources they need to help
every child learn.
By June 2003, every
state had an approved
accountability plan in place
to ensure that every student
was learning.
Dr. Paige earned a bach-
elor's degree from Jackson
State University as well as a
master's and a doctorate
from Indiana University.
This lecture is part of the
Robinson Eminent Scholar
Lecture Series, sponsored by
the College of Education
and Human Services.
Tickets for this free lec-
ture can be ordered online at
w w w un f edu u

Click on the Spring 2006
Lectures link

"I'm concerned about
justice. I'm concerned
about brotherhood. I'm
concerned about truth;
And when one is con-
cerned about these, he
can never advocate vio-
lence. For through vio-
lence you may murder a
murderer but you can't
murder murder. Through
violence you may murder
a liar but you can't estab-
lish truth. Through vio-
lence you may murder a
hater, but you can't mur-
der hate. Darkness can-
not put out darkness.
Only light can do that".

Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr.
"Where Do We Go From
Here?".Speech (August 16,
1967) in his last presidential
address ti the SCLC.


TOP FRAME: Jean Johnson, Sheila Nieder, Mary Macrae, Michael and ,Marsha Phelts
and Tiffany Nieder. All from Jacksonville, American Beach and Amelia City. BOTTOM
FRAME: Seated from left: Candace Miller, Raphael Graybill, Turner Graybill and
Michael Phelts. Standing, Joe Looou Knoll, Mary Lou Wagner, Chen Jinxiu, hosted
luncheon in her Hutong home; and Marsha Dean Phelts


Chinese and American flags
being flown side by side
down the twelve lane
Chang'an Avenue, the
largest street in all of China.
There were no mass inci-
dents either.
The Chinese government
doesn't tolerate freedom of
speech or the right of its cit-
izens to incite illegal
demonstrations.
Protesters are killed by
the police such as an esti-
mated 20 persons who lost
their lives the weekend of,
December 10 (near Hong
Kong) for protesting the loss
of their property to the gov-
ernment.
Reportedly, 'some people
weren't given anything for
their (real estate) property.
and equipment. A Sunday,
December 11, 2005 New
York Times article stated,
"Villagers said they had not
been adequately compensat-
ed for the use of their land -
less than $3 per family, one
said and feared pollution
from the plant would
destroy their livelihood as
fishermen."


In China there are more
than the Wonders of the
World to wonder about.-
This was the most exciting
trip that Michael or I ever
experienced. The People
were hospitable, welcoming
and warm.
If we could go back as
soon as Christmas we would


be ready for another 7500
miles (one-way) flight out of
Chicago across the Polar
Region over the Arctic
Ocean paralleling the
Siberian Mountains to the
Asian Continent. China is a
great place for a SHORT
VISIT.


TO~~ N 1 T4ETN


COUNCIL IENIiBER

<9 GWENNYA-TE S










<~PRO PO--SED D ISTFR I CFT S'-'kTINGC,



StIieri. ~ ~cis~w Ofjeaw HOIIaiid, and his


'I'his recin, ~is Z5t pen I tck the ptiblic, and intcrcsted pakrties 17re. elcI~bilne to
a~ttend'.
14I


FLORJD.%-ASI R



F IRS1 151. C S FOR FLORID)A


I


PAGE C-3


nllrwarjn in 1 / 1 /j/1c


I


FT IOTIIA VTAR


nomegomg
Service Held
For Lula Bell Harrell
Ms. Harrell, 95, died
Tuesday, December 20 of
natural causes. Born August
10, in Perry, Florida, she
was a housekeeper for over
forty years until her retire-
ment.
Her daughters Marie
Gipson, Betty Davis and her
husband Fred Harrell, pre-
ceded Ms. Harrell in death.
She leaves behind one
son, Murray W. Harrell, a
grandson Michael J. Harrell,
Sr. great grands, and great-
great grands.
Her funeral service was
held Friday, December 23 at
10:00 a.m. at the Mount
Nebo Missionary Baptist
Church, 8778 E. Lake Placid
Dr.
Interment was held at
Restlawn Memorial Park,
2600 Ribault Scenic Dr.

DEATH

NOTICES

BOUCHEE-Jessie N, 73,
died December 19, 2005.
Alphonso West Mortuary.
BRAZELL-Rock Fellow,
65, died December 16,
2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary.
BROWN-Christina, died
December 16, 2005.
COATES-Frank, Jr., died
December 13, 2005.
COLLINS-Louise, died
December 16, 2005.
FOSTER-Eunice H., died
December 16, 2005.
GANATT-Deacon
Wilford, 83, died
December 14, 2005.
HOWARD-BRACY-
Patricia Ann, died
December 14, 2005.
HUTSON-Maud D., died
December 16, 2005.
JOHNSON-Donald A.,
died December 15, 2005.
A. B. Coleman Mortuary,
Inc. \
JUDGE-Helen, died
December 15, 2005.
KIRKLAND-Agustas,
died December 14, 2005.
MCNAIR-Daniel, 70, died
December 15, 2005.
Alphonso West Mortuary,
Inc.
MEBANE-Leonidas L.,
died December 13, 2005.
PAYNE-Carrie, died
December 12, 2005.
SANDERS-Gladys, died
December 15, 2005.
STEELE-Dorothy, died
December 16, 2Q05.
Alphonso West Mortuary.
WASHINGTON-Eloise,
died December 16, 2005.
WEBB-Anthony, died
December 3, 2005.
WILLiAMS-Alma L.,
died december 17, 2005.
WILLIAMS-Willie C. ,
58, died December 10,
2005.


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AND
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TO
THE
FLORIDA STAR
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P F ORID SD E2 0


Older Women Were And Are Katrina's Worst

Casualty


Margaret M. Gullette,
Special to the NNPA from
Women's eNews
Amid all the devasta-
tions of Katriiii. what
g Iroup was most vulnera-
ble?
If \o0 followed the
. news co pi i',ioiitl.
\ O it ii u1L -, "tile p' or'."
"Al ('r Ii i. -Americans,"
-. \\oml.n o t' color" The
best answer is actually
old."
oljL'tr Nei Orlicaniats
were most at risk by lie i ng
also i-,edoiminItl\ poor.
female. African-
.\merican, and (some-
times) weak, ill or institu-
tionalized. They couldn't
crawl out on roofs or set
off on highways alone
i with their backpacks.
It's not that news didn't
cover this. We know that
dozens of helpless people
in one nursing home died,
and a hospital is being
investigated for euthana-
sia. As the Houston
Chronicle noted, Katrina
was "one of the worst
medical catastrophes for
the aged in recent U.S.
history."
"The elderly and criti-
cally ill plummeted to the
bottom of priority lists as
calamity engulfed New
Orleans," said a Sept. 19
New York Times article
by David Rohde, et al.
Older people "had spe-
cial needs neglected by
disaster workers. In New
Orleans, some seniors
died from dehydration
even as they were being
bused to safety," reported
Nancy Weaver Teichert in
the Sacramento Bee.
Even emergency work-
ers may not know that
dehydration comes faster
in elderly people and is
harder to reverse.
"Most Katrina Victims
were Elderly," the
Washington Post head-
lined Oct. 24.
Yet there in the media
is that unwillingness to
use the word "old" or to
conclude that this catas-
trophe is about old peo-
ple. The information was
available but the focus
was missing.
In a "Frontline" Nov.
22 special report, Martin
Smith reported that the
"vast majority" of the
1,300 people who died in
New Orleans were old.
But that shocking statistic
claimed only one sen-
tence's worth of attention
in an hour-long show.
Aside from "old," the
other missing keyword is
"women." Women live
longer than men and tend
to wind up widowed,
alone or in nursing
homes. They are poorer
than men. Almost 25 per-
cent of women over 65 in
New Orleans were poor,
double the national aver-
age, according to the


Washington-based Older
Women's League.


Were women a vast
majority of those who
died? Were most elderly
evacuees female? Were
most women of color?
C heck hurricane coverage
in the media archives
under keywords like "eld-
crl\" and "women" and
you don't come up with
much.
But while you can't get
to the bottom of the story,
you can certainly collect
the evidence that older
women bore the brunt.
Newspaper stories about
Katrina that have any-
thing about old people,
missing people,
unclaimed dead or bodies
recently found mostly
refer to old women.
Neglect of age contin-
ues in the "aftermath" sto-
ries. Reporters have been
investigating conditions
of prisoners and asking
teen evacuees about their
"unique" problems. What
about the unique prob-
lems of frail, sick and old
evacuees from the
drowned city? Are they
homesick, lonely, suffer-
ing from post-traumatic
stress?
Did they have any
Thanksgiving? What hap-
pened to the mothers and
grandmothers? I keep
thinking of a photo I saw
in the Boston Globe of an
elderly woman lying on a
baggage remover at an
airport. Has she moved
on? And to what kind of
life?
Ah, the disconnects.
Here in the real world,
elderly people--primarily
poor women and women
of color--were the needi-
est in a national emer-
gency that took over the
news. They were ignored,
kept waiting for aid, died
alone; somehow they fell
to the bottom of priority
lists.
A great opportunity
now exists for educating
the public about the multi-
ple conditions of old age,
the later lives of women
and the profound sources
and alienating effects of
ageism. Every member of
society benefits from see-
ing its elderly well treat-
ed. But Katrina shows
how hard it is for younger
people in charge of the
story, the social response
or the rescue effort to put
themselves in the shoes of
the vulnerable elderly.
That is part of ageism: not
hatred but ignorance,
indifference and the fail-
ure to imagine oneself as
older and in need of care.
One way to judge the
coverage is to ask how it
has changed anything.
Has there been enough
attention to the sufferings
of our aged to change
public opinion and create
better laws, rules or agen-
cies for rescuing elderly
women and men, espe-


cially those trapped in


Katrina victims getting help in Jacksonville.-


institutions? Has there
been enough coverage to
change private behavior,
so that 'younger people
hesitate next time to leave
elderly relatives? Are
Americans now likelier to
be active on behalf of a
collective anti-ageist
agenda?
Is it crystal clear that
old people have as much
right to survive as
younger people?
I don't think so.
Many news sources
can be given credit for
bringing racism and clas-
sism to the fore in Katrina
coverage. But the
American neglect of age
is also shameful.
"This is a wake-up
call," said frantic social
workers and gerontolo-
gists in Houston doing
triage. But to wake up
Americans about age, the
alarm clock has to sound
much louder than the tin-
kle provided by the press
to date.
The media need to
focus on age with a sense
of urgency. There's a poli-
tics of aging in America.
Misrepresentations of the
elderly as "greedy
geezers" must be chal-
lenged. Covering the age
beat better will require
emphasizing that elders
are mainly women with-
out pensions, living on
Social Security--women
get considerably less than
men--and dependent on
Medicare. They are, alas,
even in dire circum-
stances invisible.
The Bush budget tried
to cut Medicaid even as
exhausted and trauma-
tized elders return to New
Orleans. Desperate to pri-
vatize old age, Wall
Street, the business press
and many leading
Republicans have dogged
Social Security for a
decade and never give up.
If Katrina coverage
had done its job, it Would
have indelibly convinced
the most recalcitrant that
old age needs to be spared
these cruelties. Silence
can be fatal; in this disas-
ter and .all the ones to
come.


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REAL TALK
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n,,
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FL.ORIDA STAR


DECEMBER 24, 2005


PAGE r-4C







DECEMBER 24, 2005 FLORIDA STAR PAGE C-5


461:i01 MW


aguars Edge 49ers Face Key Game With E

David Garrard ran for a San Francisco 49ers 10-9 at
S" ", o'' ', touchdown, Josh Scobee home on Sunday, December
kicked the winning field 18.
'..goal and the Jaguars, but It was Jacksonville's
that was all it took for Jack- (10-4) sixth win in seven
Ssonville to squeeze past the games. The victories were


vi-
Q !A1,
4A,


TOP FRAME: Jaguars quarterback David Garrard (#9 in teal jersey) scampers for
Jacksonville's only touchdown in a 10-9 win over the visiting San Fransico 49ers on
Sunday, December 18 at Altell Stadium. Garrard finished 21-of-40 for 216 yards. BOT-
TOM FRAME: San Fransisco quarterback Alex Smith (#11 in white jersey) withstands
pressure from the Jaguars defense and launches a pass. Smith finished 8-of-24 for
123 yards and ran four times for 30 yards. (PHOTOS BY LAURENCE GREENE)
r---------------- -----------------------------------4
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TOP FRAME: Jaguars fans try to harnish their entusi-
asm as they watch their team struggle against the 49ers.
MIDDLE FRAME: The Roar of The Jaguars cheerleaders
spreads holiday joy to the fans with a sizzling. dance
routine. BOTTOM FRAME: Cornerback Rashean Mathis
(#27), safety Deon Grant (#37), and linebacker Akin
Ayodele appear pumped as they enter the field from the
Jaguars locker room in a cloud of smoke.

B-CC's Lady Wildcats Post

Lowest Point Total In Team's

History Against South Carolina

COLUMBIA, S.C. -- There was little to cheer about
Wednesday night, December 21 as the Fighting Lady
Wildcats of Bethune-Cookman College were downed by the
University of South Carolina Gamecocks by a count of 87-
26 in a women's basketball contest at the Colonial Center in
Columbia, South Carolina.
It was the first time in recorded history that the B-CC
Wildcats (2-5) were unable to score at least 30 points in a
women's basketball game. A stingy defense and season-low
14 percent shooting from the field forced B-CC into their
lowest scoring output since January 31, 1991 when they fell
at South Florida 81-30 under current B-CC head football
coach, then WBB head coach, Alvin B. Wyatt, Sr.
B-CC just couldn't find the basket on Wednesday as they
shot just 8-of-57 for the game from the field, and a season-
low 2-for-25 from the floor in the first half. The seven points
recorded by the 'Cats was the lowest in history for points in
a half, as well as the reversal for South Carolina.
Both teams will now break for the Holidays as B-CC is
wrapping up its fourth game in eight days, just as South
Carolina completed its fifth game in nine days. The 'Cats
will not tip-off again until playing at Jacksonville against the
homestanding Dolphins on Dec. 29 at 7 p.m.
Townsend Named Athletic Director At FAMU
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Florida A&M
University presented veteran administra-
tor Nelson E. Townsend as the school's
new Director of Athletics during a news
conference at the Galimore-Powell
Fieldhouse Tuesday afternoon. Dr. Castell
Vaughn Bryant, 'University President
Nelson E. introduced Townsend to the gathering of
Townsend media, coaches, athletic staff and alumni
at the football fieldhouse.
Townsend, 64, brings 29 years of experience as a direc-
tor of athletics and as an administrator in education at both
the collegiate and secondary levels to Florida A&M, where
he previously served as Director of Athletics from 1986 to
1987. Townsend comes to Florida A&M from the
University of Maryland Eastern Shore, where he had been
serving as Director of Athletics since January of 2003. He
previously served as Director of Athletics at UMES from
1976 to 1979.


Houston


earned against teams with
losing records.
The question being
asked now is can the Jags
return to the postseason
for the first time since 1999.
A win against Houston
on Christmas Eve or a win
over Tennessee at home on
New Year's day would be
sweet for the Jaguars who
are in the drivers seat in the
Wild card Playoff spot.
San Francisco, which has
lost 12 of 13 since beating
St. Louis in the season open-
er, led 9-7 after Joe Nedney's
33-yard field goal on the
second play of the fourth
quarter. But Nedney's ensu-
ing kickoff went out of
bounds and gave the Jaguars
good field position.
Jacksonville, which
struggled to sustain long
drives against a blitzing
defense much of the day,
moved the ball 47. yards to
set up a 32-yard field goal
by Scobee with 9:45 to play.
Garrard was 4-of-5 for 36
yards on the drive.
Garrard finished 21-of-
40 for 216 yards. Jimmy
Smith caught six passes for
70 yards, and Reggie
Williams had four recep-
tions for 65 yards.
Fred Taylor and Greg
Jones shared carries until
Jones left the game in the
fourth quarter with a neck
strain. Taylor finished with
61 yards on 17 carries. Jones
ran 12 times for 44 yards.
The 49ers managed field
goals on their first and last
drives of the first half
behind key plays from rook-
ies Frank Gore and Alex
Smith.
Gore finished with 79
yards rushing on 19 carries.
Smith avoided his usual
troubles-- he didn't have a
fumble and had just one
interception-- but continued
to struggle. Smith finished
8-of-24 for 123 yards and
ran four times for 30 yards.
He has 10 interceptions this
season and no touchdown
passes.
The 49ers are tied for
worst record in the league
with Houston, which beat
Arizona on Sunday. But the
Texans always find a way to
give the Jaguars a run for
their money.
Oddsmakers have the
Jaguars listed as 6-point
favorites over Houston.
Against San Francisco,
Jacksonville faced the team
with the worst record in the
NFC. Now they face a
Houston Texans (2-12) club
that has the worst record in
the AFC.
Ugly certainly is one
way to describe the Texans"
season, but after three
straight losses that all came
down to the final play,
Houston had its best offen-
sive game of the season in
last Sunday's 30-19 win
over Arizona.
With starting running
back Dominick Davis side-
Slined with a knee injury,
Jonathan Wells and Vernand
Morency combined for 119
yards rushing and a fran-
chise-record three rushing
touchdowns.
The Texans are expected
to get a boost from the return
of Davis on Saturday.
They also have some


bragging rights to maintain,
as they own a 4-3 lead in the
series with the Jaguars.


r ,4p







PAG C- FLOID STRDEEBE4.20


JAIL OR BAIL

EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless prove
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are c
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
TRESPASSING-On Friday, December 16, 2005 at 6:20 p.m.
a police officer was dispatched to North Pearl Street in refer-
ence to a 49-year-old man (suspect) who was trespassing at
the Greyhound Bus Station. Upon arrival, the officer made
contact with a security officer (witness). He stated that earli-
er that day, he observed the listed suspect sleeping inside of
the bus terminal. The officer recognized the suspect and
recalled that he was issued a trespass warning on an earlier
date and was advised not to return. Investigation revealed
that the suspect was issued a written trespass warning on 12-
04-05 by another police officer, and was advised at that time
not to return. The suspect was advised of his rights, arrested,
and booked into jail with a misdemeanor fine.
BATTERY-On Saturday, December 18, 2005 at 12:02 p.m. a
police officer was dispatched to 4400 block of West Moncrief
Road in reference to a dispute. Upon arrival, the officer
made contact with a 51-year-old female (victim),who stated
that at approximately 2:00 a.m. a 56-year old female friend
(suspect) grabbed her from behind in the face area with her
fingernails and scratched her face. The victim told the offi-
cer that the suspect was angry with her for not sharing her
food. The victim and witness stated that they were sitting in
the kitchen area when the suspect grabbed the victim from
behind and scratched the victim in her in the face with her
fingernails. The victim was transported to Shands Hospital
by rescue due to her injuries. The officer made contact \\ ith
the suspect who stated that the victim was upset with her for
not sharing her food. The suspect also stated that the victim
hit her in the chest with a shoe. The suspect also stated that
when the victim turned around to leave she grabbed her by
the head and beat her "a The officer observed that the
victim had multiple scratches and bruises inher face area.,
The officer stated that the suspect attempted to hit the victim
in the back of the head with a, mayonnaise jar while they
were at the scene. The suspect was read her rights, transport-.
ed to jail, and charged with a misdemeanor fine.
PETIT THEFT-On Sunday, December 18, at 1:00 p.m. a
police officer was dispatched to 6001 Argyle Forest Blvd. to
T. J. Maxx Department Store, to investigate a shoplifting
case. Upon arrival, the officer met with two prevention offi-
cers (witness section #1 &2). They told the officer that two
male (suspects) in their 20's, entered the department store,
concealed several bottles of perfume and cologne on their
person, and exited the store without paying for the items.
They were stopped in the parking lot and detained until
police arrived. One of the suspects had a total of 8 bottles of
perfume, and a bottle of cologne concealed on his person,
which was also recovered by the employees. Both suspects
were read their rights, arrested, transported to jail, and
charged with misdemeanors fines.
POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE-On
Sunday, December 18, 2005 at 1:30 p.m. Jacksonville,
Narcotics Unit executed a search warrant in the 1600 block
of East 16th Street. Upon making entry into the residence of
a 29-year-old female (suspect), the officers observed the sus-,
pect hiding in a closet upstairs with her baby in her arm. A
second individual was upstairs with the suspect. The detec-
tives found power cocaine in a butter bowl (packaged for
sale) in the kitchen cabinet. The detectives also found two
scales and marijuana in the kitchen drawers. The suspects
were read their rights. The grandmother came and picked up
the baby. The suspects stated that they had no knowledge of
the cocaine being inside the residence. One of the suspects
stated that she had been dating her boyfriend for about four
months and this is the only place she knows him to live. The
suspects were arrested, transported to jail, and charged with
a felony.
POSSESSION OF A SHORT BARRELED SHOT GUN-'
On Sunday, December 18, 2005 at 2:30 p.m. a Narcotics
Team executed a search warrant on a 35- -year -old male
(suspect) in the 1600 block of East 16th Street. Upon entry
and search of the residence, the listed suspect was observed
by a detective in the bedroom at the right of the stairs. The
detective took the suspect into custody. The other detective
Observed another suspect in the closet of the same bedroom,
and took her into custody. 'The detectives searched the
kitchen of the residence and located power cocaine in the
. cabinet in a plastic bowl. Further search of kitchen, revealed
powder cocaine, marijuana, drug paraphernalia, and a sawed
off shotgun, and the suspect's checkbook in the kitchen draw-:
er. One of the suspects is a convicted felon for fleeing and
attempting to elude a police officer on 12/04/1998. The sus-
pects were read their rights, arrested, transported to jail, and
charged with a felony.
UNDER THE INFLUENCE-On Sunday, December 18,
2005 at 12:18 a.m. three police officers were dispatched to a
traffic crash with injuries at Arlington Expressway 'and
University Boulevard. Upon their arrival, the witness
advised the officers that he observed the suspect spinning on
the Eastbound Expressway. The 26-year-old female's (sus-
pect) vehicle struck the concrete barrier wall and stopped.
The witness told the officers that the suspect was the sole
occupant in the truck. The suspect exited her vehicle and


began walking into traffic. The witness pulled over to contact
the police. While his door was open, the suspect attempted to
get into his vehicle twice. While the witness was waiting for
the police to arrive, the suspect dropped her pants and urinat-
ed on the Arlington Expressway. After they arrived, the offi-
cers observed that the suspect had an odor of an alcoholic
beverage on her breath. The suspect's eyes were red and
watery, her speech was slurred, and her physical, condition
was impaired. The officers advised the suspect that they were
investigating a DUI as well as a traffic crash violation. The
suspect was read her rights. She admitted to consuming two
drinks. The suspect was placed under arrest, transported to
jail, and charged with a misdem anor.


Your Weekly Horoscope

(DECEMBER 24, 2005-DECEMBER 31, 2005)


Aries (March 21 -
April 19) Sit back and
observe, regardless of how hard
that might be. ...
Misunderstandings
at work could easily
lead to your demise.
You will enjoy events that lean
toward theater, art, or music
this week. Take time to help
children with projects that may4
be too hard for them to do on
their own.
Taurus (April 20 May
20) Coworkers may not be on
your side. Take
time to help chil-
dren with, projects
that may be too
hard for them to do
on their own. Be honest if you
wish to solve the problem. Try
to be fair in your dealings with
acquaintances.
Gemini (MaI 21 June
21) Your partner could make
you angry if the\
steal your thunder I
or embarrass you in
front of others. You I
can accomplish a
lot if )ou \\ork out of your'
home this week. Creative pur-
suits should pa\ off. TrI to
make )oiur [over understand
that )yu need to do things with
3our friends.
Cancer (June 22.- July
22) Secret affairs will only
lead to deception.
Don't ruffle the
feathers of' those
you care about
most. Do not expect
too much from others. Courses
dealing with psychology or
health care will be of interest.
Leo (Jul 23 August
22) Don't let your
emotions, interfere
with mone\ making
deals. Your emo-
tional reaction will be depend-
ent upon your partner's respon-
siveness. You may not have the
same ideas when it comes to
what you both enjoy. You will
probably have to defend your
mate.
Virgo (August 23 -
September 22) You can
D expect to experi-
ence delays or addi-
tional .red' tape if
you deal with insti-
tutions. Things have been mov-
ing so quickly that you need to
do -something physical to
release your tension. If you
can, try to work out of your
home this week. Go out shop-
ping this week.


Libra (September 23 -
October 23)
Any financial lim-
itations will prob-
ably have to be
dealt with on your own. A long,
quiet walk alone may help you
sort out your thoughts. Don't
forget family obligations. Don't
be too eager to give a piece of
your mind or even your opinion
this week.
Scorpio (October 24 -
No% ember 21) You can come
up with ways of
earning extra cash.
1Help elders with
their concerns.,You
will "enjoy lavish
forms, of entertainment and
should' consider making
arrangements early. Luck is
with you. : :
Sagittarius (November
22 December 21) Don't
gossip. Stick l- to
your own projects
and by the end .of
the day you'll shine.
Be sure to get involved, with
those \,iho can introduce NLou to
unusual forms of entertain-
merit; Don't be too-eager to
spend .\\hat's left over; more
unexpected expenses are evi-
dent.
Capricorn (December
.22 January
19)Don't allo\
someone to do a jobh
that was designated
specifically for you.
Don't make those you live with
feel unloved or unworthy. Your'.
sensitivity toward those you
love will capture their hearts
Don't make promises that you
can't possibly keep.
Aquarius (January 210
February 18) Be cautious
while traveling;
minor accidents .are
evident. You are best
to deal with'those
outside your family.
Don't shy away from potential
mates the\, -ant to introduce
you to. Don't torment yourself.
Disharmony in the home will
be extremely stressful.
Pisces (February 19 -
March 20)
Grumpiness won't
change a thing.. So
smile and fake a
good mood and
pretty soon you'will find your-'
self have more fun than you
ever expected. Plan a special
luncheon or dinner date with an
associate and just relax and
enjoy. A demand by'an employ-


Teen Pleads Guilty

After Blog Confession
TAVARES, Fla. An 18-year-old passenger who caused
a fatal crash by pulling on the steering wheel pleaded guilty
to DUI manslaughter after prosecutors discovered a confes-
sion on his online blog.
Blake Ranking wrote "I did it" on his blurty.com journal
three days after the October 2004 crash that caused a friend's
death and- left another seriously injured. He had previously
'told investigators he remembered nothing of the crash and
little of its aftermath.
Blake was sitting inthe back seat as he and then-17-year-
old friends Jason Coker and Nicole Robinette left a party
when he pulled the steering wheel as a prank; causing the car
'to somersault off the road. His blood alcohol content after
the crasf measured 0.185, more than double the legal limit.
Robinette, who was driving and had no traces of drugs or
alcohol in her system, was seriously injured.. Coker lay in a
coma at Orlando Regional Medical Center until he died Jan.
11.
"It was me who caused it. I turned the wheel. I turned the
wheel that sent us off the road, into the concrete drain ..."
Ranking wrote in the blog. "How can I be fined when every-
one else is so messed up?"
Ranking, later retracted his words, deleting them from the
blog and penning an explanation.
"People say I 'contradict' myself since I 'already admit-
ting pulling the wheel.' I didn't 'ADMIT' anything. I went on
a guilt trip, and I posted the story that I WAS TOLD .
Nicole told me I pulled the wheel, I believed her," he wrote.
Still, the confession forced him to lead guilty Monday to
manslaughter charges.. He could have gotten 15 years in
prison, but defense lawyer John Spivey and Assistant State
Attorney Julie Greenberg recommended five years in prison,
10 years of probation and a permanent license suspension.
Circuit Judge Mark Hill agreed to impose the sentence
Dec. 28. Greenberg said she had planned to use the blog as
evidence, a first for the office covering Lake, Citrus,
Hernando, Marion and Sumter counties, but almost certain-
ly not4he last.


er or associate may have you a fuse the logical
little miffed. However, with great.
your amazing ability to con-


you will do-


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Man Caught In Restroom

After Wacky Chase
WICHITA, Kan. What started with a car theft
turned into an escape and resulting chase that ended with
the male fugitive being caught hiding out in a woman's
restroom by an officer who received a ride from a pizza
deliveryman.
Wichita police say an officer who stopped a car
Sunday aftiemoon discovered that it was a vehicle stolen
from a sales lot two days earlier.
The driver, a 30-year-old man, said he had some
injuries that needed treatment. Police, who didn't know
the nature of the injuries the man claimed to have, had
him taken to a hospital emergency room.
Police said that after being treated the man asked to
use the restroom and an officer escorted him there and
.waited outside. A short time later, he was spotted in the
air lock at the exit of the emergency room, and he ran out
of the hospital with the officer in pursuit, police said.



FLORIDA LOTTO
9-10-16-22-25-28
December 17, 2005


Crime doesn't pay

but we do!

CRIME STOPPERS

1-866-845-TIPS (8477)

No Names...

No Faces...

No Hassles!


I (i


PAGE C-6


FLORIDA STAR


DECEMBER 24,2005


I








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BEAUTIFUL & COLORFUL FALL FOLIAGE!
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS Homes, Cabins, Acre-
age & Investments. Cherokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainrealtv.com Call for Free
Brochure (800)841-5868.


Tennessee Waterfront Land Sale! Direct Water-
front parcels from only $9,900! Cabin Package from
$64,900! 4.5 acres "suitable for 4 homes and docks
only $99,900! All properties are new to the market!
Call toll-free (866)770-5263 ext. 8.

MURPHY NORTH CAROLINA COOL SUMMERS
MILD WINTERS Affordable Homes & Mountain
Cabins CALL FOR FREE BROCHURE
(877)837-2288 EXIT REALTY MOUNTAIN VIEW
PROPERTIES www.exitmurphv.com.

WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS North Carolina Where
there is: Cool Mountain Air, Views & Streams,
Homes, Cabins & Acreage. CALL FOR FR.EE BRO-
S-in -.r' OF MOUNTAIN PROP-R i", SALES
(800)642-5333'. Realty Of Murphy 317 Peachtree St.
Murphy, N.C. 28906. www.realtyofirurphy.comn.

NC MOUNTAINS-Log cabin $89.900. Easy to
finish cabin on secluded site. Million $$$ Views
Available on 1-7 acre parcels $29,900-$79,900. Free
Info Available! (828)256-1004.

Coastal Southeast Georgia Large wooded water
access, marsh view, lake front, and golf oriented
homesites from the mid $70's Live oaks, pool, tennis,
golf, (877)266-7376. www cooperspoint.com.

East Alabama Mountain Property For Sale One
hour west of Atlanta in Piedmont, AL Beautiful View
48 acres $144,000 14,400 down 1,087 per month
owner financed. Call Glenn.(850)545-4928.

ASHEVILLE, NC AREA ACREAGE 1 to 8 acre
mountain view and riverfront homesites from the
$60s, Gated. community, custom lodge. Near natural
hot springs. Don't miss outl Call (866)292-5762.

TENNESSEE ACREAGE FOR SALE Near Chalta-
nodga. Beautiful new lakeside community. I to 5 acre
homesites from the $40s. Limited number of private
boat slips. Call for appt. (866)292-5769,

Steel Buildings


BUILDING SALEI "Extended 3 Weeks!" 20x26
Now $3340, 25x30, $4790. 30x40, $7340. 40x60,
$11,490 Factory Direct,' 25 Years. Many Others.
Ends/accessories optional. Pioneer, (800)668-5422,.


Your Ad Could Be Here


Run your ad STATEWIDE!!! For only $450 you
can place your 25 word classified ad in over 150
newspapers throughout the state reaching over 5
MILLION readers. Call this newspaper or Advertis-
ing Networks of Florida at (866)742-1373. Visit us
online at www.florida-classifieds,com.. Display ads
also available.





ANF

Advertising Networks of Florid6a


EMPLOYMENT


Adverosement

Homeowners with money worries
may qualify for low-interest loans
LOANS: Direct lender loosens its rq- ments? Fnanu1ial prOIbleni' Medical
idiremrnls frir h nitim ner m l j need bills?IRS licis?/,),' I ..I, '

I (l 41 lurwi 1 d11 n l 1l dLi trAlutih l 1 0 I l l
I)3toilI i in telr'i n H .11.111lm r ill ual if .anfor -Ltlelln JUi Il. en
1 if rl lfolru pl'\I ,rell lll. l l, 1 1l d 010
I nintN fi,,i ,,fller IihrI I h,, n-:,
dnI..ehrel o 11 ~o


If uau )iU .1 r ov.1 ollr and 0le tk ~suer-

can !eli )tx w li ''[L h -octal t I ii/hl It11 IIl
li lIP II F'1J1 IL ii1

credit tlf I C I i,11.lj 'Late house payr


free ofa cdi -if',iu qtilif, Honey
Mae M i'rtgl is liLdinld t" the FL
Dept of i llancloll Sr. n es Open days
a v .800-700-1242 ext.23

1-800-700-1242 ext.253


THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 1:00 P.M.































IMPACT


WCGL

AM 1360





"09#Y Mourn N4 24 Log Home Packages To Be Offered At Public Auction.
n Rogers Realty & Auction Co.
SaturdayJan. 14th FL license #AU2922
11:00 A.M. 336.789.2926 or www.rogersrealty.com
Orlando, FL r' I
(Port of Sanford) _r'r r'rjr L r

For More Information! 1.888.562.2246
Or Log Onto: www.auctionloghomes.com



Send us email!

info@thefldridastar.com

..................................................... *** ****


I ISAIAH RUMLIM
ES 5600 Kings Road Suite #4~
II (Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
,o LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
1 L LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L. - - -


A I u =min u m I





I


DECEMBER 24,2005


FLORIDA STAR


Ts A 'el F7 'el 17


As seen f
..." fl;-..

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V. ,
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794.7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW l
for Structured Settlements! "
INVITATION TO SUBMIT RESPONSES TO THE
ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
The Governing Board of the District requests that interested parties respond to the
solicitations) below by 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 10, 2006. Further information is
available through DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com (800) 711-1712, or
the District's website at www.sjrwmd.com.. Bid packages may be obtained from
DemandStar by Onvia or the District by calling Jill R. Williams, CPPB, Contracts
Administrator at .(386) 329-4133.
BID NUMBER SJ625XA
Timber Harvest & Sales
Heart Island Conservation Area (Volusia County, Florida) &
Crescent Lake Conservation Area (Volusia County, Florida)

Heart Island sale consists of approximately 279 acres. Crescent Lake sale consists of
approximately 208 acres. Both sales contain pulpwood, chip-n-saw and saw timber.
Awards shall be made to the highest responsive and responsible bidder(s) for each
conservation area. Payment to the District will be on a per ton basis.
Staffs recommendation will be presented to the District's Executive Director.
,Special accommodations for disabilities may be requested through Jill R. Williams,
CPPB, Contracts Administrator or by calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5)
business days before the date needed,





DOUBLE YOUR INVESTMENT IN ONLY 1 YEAR!

Builders Lots Available in the .

Fastest Growing Areas in Florida a

WHOLESALE Pi g ~RICING~
95455-530


1






PACI7 ('..LOI--AS DEEME 24


REALEST A AT


ABOUT



DS

AT R I C S


.. 1 .


Betty Asque Davis
REALTOR



tt -,,'- '-' K.:.-.6 (r.- .^ i i'".1' :


All About Kids is the premiere pedi-
atric facility in Jacksonville, Florida.
We are dedicated to providing chil-
dren with the highest quality of
health care. Our doctors are Board
Certified Pediatricians with years of
Pediatric Emergency Room experi-
ence. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of
families with busy lifestyles. Come
see why so many parents trust All
About Kids Pediatrics with their chil-
dren's health.



Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and
have pediatric ER experience.


904.565.1271

877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com

12086 Ft Caroline Rd. Suite N
Located in the new Hidden Hills E
Caroline and Monument Rd.)


SERVICES
Asthma Therapy
Pain Relief
Hemoglobin/Hematocrit Testing
Mono Screening
Rapid Strep Screening
Sport and School Participation
Physicals
Urinalysis
Well visits/Immunizations

EMR Technology
Our Electronic Medical Record System
enables us to be more efficient with
less paperwork and allows for:
Direct Pharmacy Link for fast and
convenient prescriptions
Check-in/Check-out process made
quick and efficient
Medical record history inquiries
and transfers that are concise and
easy with electronic database
management
Prompt subspecialty referrals

HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F; weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted

umber 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225
executivee Park (near the corner of Fort


615 Highway AIA
Ponte Vedra Beach,


]


FL 32082


Office:
Direct:
Fax:
Toll Free:


904-285-6300
904-473-1502
904-285-5330
800-288-6330


"'fi ll. d ,.,I t.-. M'tlr'n i. hU .- Kinr ', Jr. v'w i its,;
,rI AiiuNaI. Iile E. (G.ary -
.611i L I i(t" K iI,) v.,


Tuesday January 10, 2006

Mi Be 1Thec Lite Cornference Cenr;r
Arlington Expressway


Bernice




ADMISSION IS $20
PURCHASE TICKETS, CALL (9041 353-3008
I ,


-- ~* ~~:t..Vr.f~:


,^ A BA~wxAsToqr, INC.














105.7FM
www.smoothjazzIO53.com "THE PEOPLE'S STATION" www.fiesta925.com
www.whjx.biz






















THA NK YOU FOR Listening!!!! !
**** WE APPRECL4 TE YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT****



9550 Regency Square Blvd Suite #00Jacksomille, Fl 32225 Off l904 680-1050 Fa (904) 680-1051
,ww.tamabroedasting~eom


The earthquake was just the beginning. The upcoming winter
could kill 3.3 million more. Making it the deadliest natural disaster in history.
Don't leave South Asia in the cold. You can change the forecast.
Please help. Now. Go to: www.safewinter.org


S *


Email: badavis@WatsonRealtyCorp.com


FLORIDA STAR


DECEMBER 24,2005


PA GE r-R


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(Thold








The 10th Annual Multicultural Prism Awards

Gala Highlights! Photos 2005 by Leon Bennett


qrornA


By Rych McCain
The Universal City
Hilton Hotel in
Universal City, Calif.,
was the elegant setting
for the 10th annual
Multicultural Prism
Awards Gala put on by
Minorities In Business
Magazine. This year's
event benefited dis-
placed children through
the Katrina Missing
Children's Coalition.
This year's theme was,
"Tragedy To
Triumph... Hollywood
Cares!" The affair also
will use the proceeds
from charitable dona-
tions to help minority
business owners devas-
tated by Katrina, to
rebuild and reclaim their
businesses.
Yours truly wishes to
personally thank pho-
tographer Leon Bennett
for stepping in at the last
minute to sub for my
regular photographer
Andre' B. Murray who
was delayed on a far
away assignment and
physically could not
cover the distance to get
to the event. Leon was
professional, on top-of it
and allowed me to bring
you the red carpet high-


lights. Thanks again
Leon!
This year's Prism
Awards was hosted by the
lovely Ananda Lewis
(NBC's "The Insider"),
foxy Taraji P. Henson
(Hustle & Flow) and
super sex
symbol/singer/actor
Tyrese. Talent perform-
ances included Comedian
Rodney Perry, Gospel
singe Vicki Yoke accom-
panied by guitarist Doc
Powell, Flii Stylz, Three
Mo Tenors, Elsise Neal
and Assorted Flavors and
dancers from the movie
RIZE. The evening was
elegant and a good time
was experieficed by all in
attendance.
Winners included:
*Best Actress-Taraji
Henson-Hustle and Flow.
*Best Movie-4 Brothers-
John Singleton.
*Best Actress in a
Comedy Series- ]Tracee
Ellis Ross
*Best Comedy Series-
"Everybody Hate Chris"-
(UPN).
*Outstanding Actress in a
Drama Series- "Vivica A.
Fox" (Missing).
*Outstanding Actor in a
Motion Picture-"Terrence
Howard" (Hustle &


Ananda Lewis hosted the 2005 10th Annual
Multicultural Prism Awards.


Flow).
*Outstanding Actor in a
Drama Series-"James
Lesure" (Las Vegas).
*Outstanding Actor in a
Comedy Series-"Donald
Faison" (Scrubs).
*Outstanding Supporting
Actor in a Drama Series-
"Daniel Dae Kim" (Lost).


*Outstanding
Supporting ,Actor in a
Comedy Series-
"Malcom Jamal Warner"
(Listen Up).
* Outstanding
Documentary Film
Award-"Mad Hot
Ballroom."
List continued on D-4


Wa su In Soy oS


By Rych McCain
Vocalist Phillip Bell
took to the stage at the
world famous Club Fais
Do-Do in Los Angeles,
with his six-piece band
and three background
singers for his revue
titled "Chilin with Phil. "
The show features Phil
crooning his smooth
vocals through pop, jazz
and R&B tunes. Our con'-
dolences go out to the


family, friends and fans of
Funk/R&B Icon, Charles
Wright, founder and
leader of the legendary
WATTS 103rd STREET
RHYTHM BAND, which
produced many hits in the -
late 60's and 70's includ-
.ing the mega smash
"Express Yourself "
Wright's lovely wife of 32
years Eva Wright, made
her transition to our ances-
tors on Thursday,


December 8, 2005 as a
result of complications
caused by high blood pres-
sure. She was 54.
Super record producer
Rodney Jerkins headed a
star-studded holiday toy
drive event at the Church
Street Station (The
Exchange Lounge) in
Orlando, Florida to benefit
the Central Florida Branch
of Toys For Tots. The
Wassup continued on D-8


TV Uistirgh





Page D-2/December 24, 2005 The Florida Star





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A OUT



DS

ATRICS


mr.-


All About Kids is the premiere pediatric facility in
Jacksonville, Florida. We are dedicated to provid-
ing children with the highest quality of health
care. Our doctors are Board Certified
Pediatricians with years of Pediatric Emergency
Room experience. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of families with
busy lifestyles. Come see why so many parents
trust All About Kids Pediatrics with their children's
health.
Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and have pediatric
ER experience.
904.565.1271
877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com


SERVICES
* Asthma Therapy
* Pain Relief
* Hemoglobin/Hematocrit
Testing
* Mono Screening
* Rapid Strep. Screening
* Sport and School
Participation Physicals
* Urinalysis
* Well visits/Immunizations
HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F;
weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted


12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225


Paae D-4/December 24. 2005


The Florida Star


AWE^'







TheFloidaSta Pae D5/Dcemer 4, 0.D


Queen Of Hip Hop Soul Mary J. Blige Headlines

2006 Essence Music Festival


ESSENCE
announced Monday that
Mary J. Blige, the
Queen of Hip Hop Soul,
will perform at the 2006
Essence Music Festival,
July 1, 2 and 3; which
will be held in its new
temporary home at
Reliant Park in Houston,
Texas. ESSENCE, how-
ever, continues to work


closely with city and
state officials to rebuild
the city of New Orleans.
The Essence Music
Festival, known as "the
party with a purpose," is
the nation's largest annu-
al African-American
event and gathering of
musical talent in the,
world. The Festival has
become a destination of


choice for families and
friends as they schedule
their reunions.
Tickets are on sale at
ticketmaster.com or
(800) 488-5252. Tickets
are $45, $56, $67, $72,
S83. $110 and a very
limited number in the
Gold Circle section at
$165.


I TV IN BAC


HIGHLIGHTS
WEEK OF 12/24/05:

TV ONE
(Jacksonville -
Comcast Channel 160)

* Weekdays, 7 a.m. & 4
p.m. "B. Smith with
Style" .
* Weekdays, 9 a.m. &
9:30 a.m. "Amen" fea-
turing TV legend
Sherman Hemsley and
Clifton Davis.
* Weekdays 11 a.m. -
"'Living It Up With Patti
LaBelle"
* Weekdays, noon,
"Showtime at the
Apollo"
* Weekdays, 1 p.m.-
Daily movie
*Weekdays, 6 p.m. -
"227"
*Weekdays, 6:30 p.m. -
"Amen"
* Weekdays, 7 p.m.
"Good Times"
* Weekdays, 7:30. p.m. -
"Martin"
*Saturdays 6:00 p.m. -
"Tom Joyner"
*Saturday, 12/24, 12
p.m.. B. Smith
Christmas Special..
* Saturday, 12/24,
"Good Times" Watch a
Christmas episode of


the legendary sitcome
starring Janet Jackson,
"Penny's Christmas."
* Saturday, .12/24, 4:30
p.m. Watch a
Christmas episode of
"MIartin" starring
Martion Lawrence,
,"Holiday Blues."
*Saturday, 12/24, 11
p.m. "Ray Charles'
Christmas" Hear the
holiday sounds of Ray
Charles in one of his last
taped performances.
* Sunday, 12/25, 12
p.m.- T h .e
Spirit of Christmas -
Celebrate the true spirit
of christmas on "Gospel
of Music with Jeff
Majors."
* Nlonday, 12/26, The
fighn- Quinn Movie
(1989) with Denzel
Washington, Robert
Townsend, Mimi
Rogers, Sheryl Lee
Ralph, Esther Rolle.

BET
* Daily, 6:00 a.m. -
BET's Morning
Inspiration with Brother
Gerard BET showcas-
es top ministers in the
African-American com-
munity, along with BET
personality, Gerard


Henry who provides
updates on gospel and
religious events.
* Weekdays, 11 a.m., 6
p.m. "106 & Park" -
Hang out with the
industry's hottest talents
and count down the
day's top videos voted
on by you.
* Weekdays, 4:00 p.m. -
"Rap City" Watch the
latest and, hottest rap
videos.
* Weekdays, 5:00 p.m. -
"Road Show" BET
hits the road to various
cities and college cam-
puses across the country
for a high-energy
"Battle of the Sexes"
between 20 young men
and women as they try
to outdo one another for
bragging rights and
prizes! Join new host
Danella and "Rap City"
veteran host Mad Linx
as they spotlight the best
in this week's spirited
competitions.
*Weekdays, 11 p.m. -
"In Living Color" -
reruns of the award-
winning sketch comedy
series.
*Fridays, 10 p.m. -
"ComicView" BET's
favorite primetime com-


Christmas Proqram Specials
Ar.n,frted Prrqrr
Alabaster's Song (112 hr): r

1 .. 1., d .,7. h I, ,,4


yn CrMI r. I, Ti. riih

True Christmas (112 hr):
Music & Entertainment
85 Christmas Special (1 hr):
Get crunk this Christmas with the hottest new teen sensation, B5! The brothers are a classic group of male grooners who will free style the
B5 way in their first Black Family Channel Christmas special. They'll also share their favorite Christmas memories and insider information
on making the hit single "All I Do'.
fh Annual Spellman-Morehouse Choral Christmas (1 hr):
A choral concert of Christmas Classic's by combined choirs from Morehouse College and Spellman University.
Gospel Video Countdown: Holiday Special (f hr):
Host Bennie Moore takes you on a musical journey of traditional Christmas videos with special guest Gospel legend Shirley Caesar.
BadamiProductions:2005 Holiday Inspiration (1 hr):
This one hour special is filled with holiday cheer frm om som of the legends of contemporary and inspirational music. Through song they will
share the true meaning of Christmas.
Gary's Gift II: The Gift of Giving (1 hr):
Black Family Channel Chairman and CEO, Willie E. Gary invites the entire community to join him in Stuart Florida for 3 days of fun, golf,
music, and holiday entertainment as money is raised throughout the weekend for the education of our youth. Celebrities, athletes, and
entertainers join in the fun to party with a purpose.


4 Cnr .smn' AWr S'".' 2 hr tr

Sa ( ,a ',- ,41 r .. -
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edy is back for a brand
new 14th season, bring-
ing more jokes than ever
from the city of New
Orleans. The "Big
Easy's" rich gumbo of
culture and music sets
the spicy backdrop as
new host Sheryl
Underwood cranks up
the laughs with the help
from a mix of up-and-
coming comics and
show veterans.
* Tuesday, 9 p.m.,
Saturday, 8. p.m. So
do you really want to
work in the music biz?
Do you know what it
takes to get there?
Savvy music mogul and
mega-.entrepreneur
Damon Dash will gladly
teach the lessons with


an edgy attitude that
accepts no failure easily.
Watch the excitemeil
fierce competition and
tense moments as a set
of 16 young and eager
entrepreneurs vie to be
part of Dash's multi-mil-
lion dollar empire and
earn. the title of the
"Ultimate Hustler."
Don't miss a single
episode to see who sur-
vives Dash's mog 1
"boot camp" and who
gets sent packing.
* Saturday, 12/24, 7:00
p.m. "Ashanti's
Christmas" Ashanti
heads home to spread
her Christmas Joy on
"Ashanti's Christmas."
*Saturday, 12/24 -
TV in Black continued on D-7


Page. D-5December 24, 201P5


The Florida Star






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TV in Black continued
Christmas Memories -
Movie Ebony Scrooge
is a one of the world's
most successful pop
singers. Yet her cold-
hearted soul and nasty
attitude makes her lack
holiday cheer and her
bandmates unhappy.
Ebony intends to cal-
lously exploit the
Yuletide season by stag-
ing a charity Christmas
concert "on behalf of
the homeless," an act of
"generosity" designed
mainly to expand her
popularity and -increase


her own bank account.
Inevitably, on the eve on
the concert, the con-
tentious Ebony is visited
by a trio of spirits who
persuade her to change
her ways before it's too
late. Starring Vanessa L
Williams and Rozonda
"Chili" Thomas.

Black Family Channel
* Saturday, 9 a.m. until
noon Programming for
children including
"Aqua Kids" and
"Fun!".


Among African-American TV Homes
Among African-American TV Homes


Week: December 12, 2005 December 18, 2005
1. Girlfriends, UPN
2. Half And Half, UPN
3. All Of Us, UPN
4. Everybody Hates Chris, UPN
5. NFL Monday Night Football, ABC
6. One On One, UPN
7. Fox NFL Sunday, FOX
8. CSI: NY, CBS
9. NFL Monday Showcase, ABC
10. Without A Trace, CBS


Sunday
8 p.m. on
DISN
Rodgers &
Hammer-
stein's Cin-
d derel Il
Brandy stars
in this charm-
ing 1997 Dis-
ney adaptation of Rodgers
and Hammerstein's musical
version of the classic fairy
tale. The star-studded cast
includes Whitney Houston,
Bernadette Peters, Whoopi
Goldberg, Jason Alexander
and Paolo Montalban.


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Whassup continued from D-1
show's host was Sherman
Brown. Some of the spe-
cial guest included
actor/comedian Chris
Tucker, Orlando Magic
basketball player Grant
Hill and his Elektra
R.-ording artist wife
Tamia.
Krump/Clown dancer
DAISY, from last sum-
mer's hit dance movie
RIZE, will celebrate her
"sweet 16," birthday at a
special party put on by her
personal manager Tasha
L. Cooper and 5th
A m e n dm e n t
Entertainment Inc.


The 12th annual
Screen Actors Guild
Awards, the only industry
accolades devoted solely
to actors honoring actors,
will be simulcast live on
TNT and TBS on Sunday,
January 29, 2006, at 8 PM,
ET/PT (check your local
listings), from the Shrine
Exposition Center in Los
Angeles. -
Memoirs Of A Geisha;
stars Ziyi Zhang, Ken
Watanabe, Michelle Yeoh,
Kojo Yakusho, Youki
Kudoh, Kaori Momoi,
Tsai Chin, Cary-Hiroyuki
Tagawa, Suzuka Ohgo,
Gong LI, Zoe
Weizenbaum and Thomas


Ikeda. It is directed by
Rob Marshall with a
screenplay by Robin
Swicord.
The word gei (pro-
nounced gay) means "art"
in Japanese. A geisha is a
trained dancer, singer and
musician, as well as a
witty conversationalist.
She is neither wife nor
prostitute. As a refined
artist, she earns her living
entertaining powerful
men, (mostly wealthy
businessmen and politi-
cians), in very up stat tea-
houses. The tradition of
the Geisha goes back for
centuries in Japan. In
ancient times, the geisha


was the supermodel of that
era.
. This film is a story of a
young child in pre-World
War II around 1929, who
is sold from her dirt poor
family to work as a servant
in a geisha house. Despite
a treacherous rival who
nearly breaks her spirit,
the girl blossoms into the
legendary geisha Sayuri
(Ziyi Zhang). She capti-
vates the most powerful
men of her day but is
secretly in love with a
wealthy businessman, the
Chairman (Ken
Watanabe), who showed
her kindness as a child.
She goes through many


changes and situations
with her house mother, her
geisha rivals and the
power broker men until
she finally ends up with
her true love.
This is an art film and
can only be appreciated by
those who are into this
type of movie. The acting
is superb and is directed
by Rob Marshall who
directed Chicago (which
won six Oscars). You will
get an authentic feel, look
and time setting of 1929
Japan and the geisha
world. This film should
create some Oscar buzz.


1!


-- -- -- --


The Florida Star


P~e D-8IDecember 24. 2005