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Florida star

HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section C: Local
 Section C continued
 Section C: Around the Area
 Section C: Sports
 Section C continued
 Section D: Entertainment
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 17, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00049

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 17, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00049

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section C: Local
        page C 1
    Section C continued
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Around the Area
        page C 4
    Section C: Sports
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
    Section D: Entertainment
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
Full Text



I I I I 3A 3 AA A 1A1 1V1*A.


Mos Faiat



Black Men


I(seePa


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


iFLORIDA


thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
1:00 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


SWAT Team Had 4 Hours Standoff; Ten Detained


Carnell Tyrone Phelps Larry G Phelps
Suspect Suspect


Garrett W. Jones
Suspect


.JACKSONVILLE,
Fla. -- Residents of the
Washington Heights area
off Moncrief kept their
distance for about four
hours as Jacksonville's
SWAT Team and hostage
negotiators surrounded an
apartment in the 4100
block of Lorenzo Court.
Because the officers felt
that those who they sus-
pected were dangerous and
had firearms, many of the


residents had to vacate
their apartments.
It all began because of
an armed robbery that had
occurred at a liquor store
off Lem Turner the night
before where a man had
been robbed and shot.
The ,vehicle that the
suspects were driving was
backed up riext to the vic-
tim's vehicle and after the
shooting, headed west-
bound on Trout River.


According to the police
report, a call had already
come in reporting a stolen
vehicle. The same vehicle
had earlier been reported
to be in an earlier robbery.
Another officer recog-
nized the vehicle later
parked in the Washington
Heights area and the
.SWAT Team was called.
The apartment was sup-

SWAT Team continued on A 7


Old Stanton Is Again Providing A New Head Start Teen Charged With


The first Stanton High
School, now known as
"Old Stanton" was found-
ed in the 1800's when
freed slaves purchased the
land to educate "colored
people." Now, about two
centuries later, the same
land is being used to begin
an educational program for
Jacksonville's Head Start
Program.
Dr. Richard Danford,
President of Jacksonville's


Urban League said that
"the partnership between.
the Jacksonville Urban
League, Old Stanton, Inc.
and the City of
Jacksonville is strategical-
ly designed to re-vitalize
Old Stanton as an educa-
tional entity in historic
LaVilla and to increase
educational access for
families with children
between the ages of three
and five."


Doctors Begin Surgery To Remove Growth On Teen's Face

.MIAMI A 14-year-old
k Haitian girl underwent a
rare operation Wednesday
to remove much of a 16-.
pound tumor-like growth
on her face that all but
obliterated her features.
Doctors at Holtz
Children's Hospital fin-
-ished operating on Marlie
v-'. -Casseus about 11:40 p.m.,
Photos provided by the International Kids Fund show nearly 16 hours after the
Marlie Cassueus as an infant and at age 14. Surgeons procedure began. The sur-
hope to carve away the growth, then reconstruct the
right side of the girl's face and her swollen jaw. Growth continued onA-7


Many alumni attended Battery On An Officer
the grand opening to tour
the facility, from classes While already in cus-
of 1943, 1947, 1952 and tody for an attempted mur-
1955 as well as many local der and firearms charges,
celebrities such as Dr. R. Odale Tremaine Baker, 18,
L. Mitchell, who proudly had other charges placed
provides a history of against him.
Stanton, City Council It was reported that
President Kevin Hyde and Baker, while in handcuffs, .
City Councilwoman Mia slammed a corrections off-
Jones as well as school cer's head into a wall outside
board member, Betty an elevator while being
Burney and former State taken to another floor. Odale Tremaind Baker
Senator, Dr. Otis The officer, Lawrence Suspect
Head Start continued on A-7 Teen continued on A-7


Richard Pryor Dead At 65


WASHINGTON
(NNPA) Richard Pryor, the
groundbreaking comedian
wRh o

over the
week -
end of a
heart
Richard Pryor attack,


was known for his foul
mouth, insight into racism
and honesty, a combina-
tion that caused many to
be repelled by him and
many more to be mesmer-
ized by his brilliance. He
suffered a heart attack
Saturday in his California
home in San Fernando


Valley.
Pryor- turn 65 on
December 1 and had been
battling multiple sclerosis,
a degenerative disease that
strikes the central nervous
system, for two decades.
Pryor prepared the

Pryor continued on A-7


Pastor, Mentor, Florida Religious Hall Of Fame Honoree, Dies At 98


Jeff Kunerth I Sentinel Staff Writer
and staff of The Florida Star

The Rev. Fred Maxwell, a man
considered the father of Central
Florida's black preachers, died
Tuesday. He was 98. A role
model to many, the Rev. Fred
Maxwell is hailed as a tireless
source of inspiration. The Florida
Religious Hall of Fame named
their highest honor, after Dr.
Rev. Fred Maxwell. Maxwell and Dr. Thonfas Wright,


of Gainesville "The Maxwell-Wright Life Time
Achievement Award." This award is given to a Florida
minister considered to be the most outstanding at The
Hall of Fame event. .
Maxwell, who served as pastor of St. John
Missionary Baptist Church for 37 years, was a civil-
rights leader, ardent advocate for the homeless, human
history book and a man so universally respected that he
often was called in to mediate church disputes.
"This was.a man anyone would want to know -- sim-
ilar to Rosa Parks to me. The Reverend Maxwell had
that kind of presence," Orlando City Commissioner.
Daisy Lynum said. "You are talking about an icon."


To ministers such as the Rev. Randolph Bracy of
New Covenant Baptist Church of Orlando, Maxwell
was a mentor who encouraged them, and helped resolve
the problems that arise with pastoring.
"He knew how to bring calm to a very raucous situ-
ation. He had a special gift that way," Bracy said. "I
have lost a dear friend. I have lost a mentor."
Orange County Commissioner Homer Hartage
remembers Maxwell as a tireless advocate for the
homeless.
Maxwell was instrumental in securing a $4.8 million
federal grant to convert a former motel on Colonial
Pastor, Mentor continued on A-7


NEWS IN BRIEF

Three Year-Old
Burned At Gas Station

According to the
Pensacola Voice, a three-
year-old is in critical
condition'after he was
burned at a gas pump
while his father was
pumping gas last


Tuesday.
The youth was taken to
the hospital with second
and third-degree burns on
his upper thighs and hands
after following his father
out of the car to swipe his
credit card. The father,
27-year-old, Daniel
Roberts, said, according
to the report, that as his
son was getting back in


the van, gas came. out of
the hose and the pump
hose and van caught fire
and spread to his legs and
completely engulfed his
son, Elijah.
The father was able to
step over the hose, push
his son out of the fire and
extinguish the fire from
both their hands. The
father was treated for sec-


ond-degree burns and
arrangements are being
made for Elijah to be
treated at the Shriners'
Hospital in Galveston,
Texas.

Police Look For Suspect

Jacksonville's Sheriff's
Office is still trying to
locate the person who


shot and killed a man at
Builder's First Source on
Roosevelt Boulevard on
October 18, 2005 when
the man was robbing a
female co-worker.
Anyone with information
should call Detective
Scott Dingee at 630-
2791.

Same Lotto Numbers


Hit Saturday
And Sunday

Maybe it helps to
play the same number
each week. In
Oklahoma City, the
Oklahoma Pick-3 lottery
numbers came up two
nights in a row. The
numbers were 1-7-5 and
Brief continued on A- 7


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FT. 39211 7nn7


mmm


Looking for customers to patronize you
':business or utilize your services? If you
answered YES, then you need to place an ad'
'in The 'Flonda 'Star! GALL-rWjaQ6.Z834 to
place your ad TODAY!!
Check, Money Order, Or Cre AL.-
r


-- 1-11 -u I /UU


'I~fi~3E






FinRInA .S'TA R


DrFCFMRFR 17. 2005


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN EDITOR
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


DANIEL EVANS
SALES DIRECTOR
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER


DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star.Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00"
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
-National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com




SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION



National Newspaper
Publishers Association


First African American Inducted In
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


To Be Equal
Checkmating Hurricane Katrina Fatigue
Marc H. Morial, President and Chief Executive
National Urban League


Three months ago
Hurricane Katrina ravaged
the Gulf Coast in a relentless
whirlwind that left hundreds
of thousands of Americans
homeless and produced
searing images of physical
devastation and human
despair.
In its wake, and amid a
shockingly confused
response by some local,
state and federal agencies,
Americans of all kinds from
all over the country opened
their hearts- and their wal-
lets.
Now, as the holiday sea-
son shifts into high gear, we
should not let our own good
fortune and the visions of
sugar plums dancing in our
heads erase or obscure the
feelings-of horror and
grief and compassion and a
determination to help fellow
human beings-we felt and
acted upon then.
Now is no time for
Katrina fatigue.
The fear that that is what
is happening as time dis-
tances us from the actual
event itself and the ques-
tions regarding the recovery
effort unavoidably become
more and more complex
has itself become the topic
of numerous news articles in
recent weeks. Public offi-
cials, business leaders and
ordinary citizens throughout


the Gulf region and espe-
cially in Louisiana, the hard-
est hit area, express concern
that the rest of America has
become alarmed'at the pos-
sible total cost of the recov-
ery, distracted by interven-
ing events, and "moved on,"
as the popular phrase goes.
Writing in a recent issue
of Time magazine, Donna
Brazile, the veteran
Democratic Party strategist
who is a native of New
Orleans, urged the Congress
and the general public not
to surrender to "Katrina
fatigue."
Speaking of her col-
leagues on the newly formed
Louisiana Recovery
Authority, she declared,
"We simply can't afford
Katrina fatigue. There's too
much work to do."
Howard Kurtz, media
critic for the Washington
Post, worried in a column
this week that "there seems
to be no sense of national
urgency about the slow
destruction of a major
American city (New
Orleans)" and asked, "The
hurricane hit in late August,
but hundreds of thousands
are still suffering, and it's
entirely possible that much
of [New Orleans] will never
be rebuilt and many of its
residents will never come
home. Isn't that as impor-


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


tant as anything else going
on in this country right
now?"
The concern has grown
even as the media is now in
the midst of a fresh round of
hurricane-related stories.
Some, rightly, focus on
the progress made by com-
munities and individuals
throughout the region in get-
ting back on their feet; and
on the efforts of evacuees
scattered across the country
to either get back to their
former communities or sink
roots now where they are.
Other stories, however,
plumb the growing com-
plexity of and disputes about
the recovery effort-of the
huge but as yet unclear price
tag; of government policies
toward the evacuees and
homeowners and' business
owners in the Gulf;. of what
environmental policies
should -be part of a new
flood-protection effort; and
indeed what should be the
scope of the latter, and so
on.
In light of such difficult
questions, it's easy to see
that the "human element"
that so gripped the nation's
attention and compassion in
September and October may
have waned somewhat.
But perhaps some statis-
tics about what New Orleans
and the rest of the Gulf
region still face will re-ani-
mate our imaginations.
For example, about
250,000 wrecked businesses
have applied to the federal
Small. Business


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Jacksonville
Bennett's Ace Hardware
8080 W. Beaver St.
904-693-0929


Jacksonville
Ronnie's
Repair Shop
5091 Sunbeam Rd.
904-636-0739


Neptune Bea
Tucker
Equipment
113 11th Stre
904-246-1331


Available at participating dealers.

Jacksonville
Nichol's Equipment
10237 Beach Blvd.
904-641-2923

ch Orange Park
Orange Park
it Power House
et 611 Blanding Blvd.
0 904-272-2272


sthise,,cmA. .radyfb aS. I


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A ULE A -ZE A k


Administration for loans;
150,000 evacuees remain
housed in hotel rooms
around the country, wholly
dependent upon the federal
government to pay their
hotel bills (having recently
gained a reprieve from the
cut-off of such federal sup-
port until January 7); and
roughly 25 percent of evac-
uees who lost their jobs
because of the storm remain
unemployed.
The import of the latter
figure was suggested in a
recent report by the Center
on Budget and Policy
Priorities, a progressive
Washington, D.C. think
tank.
,Due to the extent of
poverty and job losses
among families displaced by
Katrina, many will be able
to secure stable housing
only with government assis-
tance. The nation conse-
quently faces a transitional
housing challenge that far
exceeds anything it has
confronted in the past."
One meaning of that
reality is that the nation will
be dealing with not only the
complexity of rebuilding the
Gulf's physical infrastruc-
ture for years to come, it will
also need to attend to set-
ting a significant segment of
its "human capital" on, solid
footing as well.
Neither duty can be
shirked.
Donna Brazile had it
right. America can't afford
Katrina fatigue. There's too'
much work to do.


I


0 go






FLORIDA STAR


Homegoing Services Held For Bishop Moses Baker The Church Directory
.. ---I' __ 1 *11*- 1- A t i fi e ir r~~ i" "1- .I, I I T 7 _)


Bishop Moses M. Baker
Homegoing Services for
Bishop Moses M. Baker,
pioneer, and well known
Jacksonville religious
leader, were held on Friday,
December 16 at 11:00 a.m.
at All People Church
International, Inc., 1973 W.
Edgewood Ave., Bishop
Arthur T. Jones, Sr., Pastor.


If There had been a death
in rour fiamile yesterday.
what would lyou e doing
Iodaiy?




-:' %


Pre-Need



FORE-

. THOUGHT


funeral

planning


program

FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED

ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
SDirectors .
Deborah '\est Alphonso West
Jacqueline Y. Bartley


u-i


A.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR
Death Of Co-worker


Full-time workers often
spend as much or more time with
their co-workers then they do
their friends and' family.
Therefore, if a person at work
dies, you may find that you are
struck with a sense of sadness
similar to loosing a family mem-
ber or close friend.
The extent of your grief will
depend on your relationship with
your co-worker, your age, your
sex, your religious beliefs, your
previous experience with grief
and a number of other factors.
However, most people experience
several common emotions such
as shock, numbness, anger or
even guilt.
Since most working people


are under age 65, chances are
your co-worker's death seemed
unfair and untimely. As a result,
you may feel vulnerable, fright-
ened and depressed, especially if
you:are in the same age group as
your co-worker.
Even if you were not close to
your co-worker's family, attend-
ing the funeral can give you a
time to say your good-byes and
begin .the healing process. Your
co-worker's grieving family will
probably appreciate your pres-
ence and your condolences.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.*
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman.com


Mvae, Roscoe, Bsteia,.
Mamie Lee, Alice, Ethel and
Zebedee, preceded him in
death.
Bishop, received his'
early education in Nashville,
and when the family estab-
lished residence in
Jacksonville he' continued,
further study at Edward
Waters College, and the
Baptist Seminary.
In 1935, he was joined in.
holy matrimony to the for-
mer Lucille Dobson, and at
the time of her death, in
1998, they had enjoyed 62
years of marital bliss.
Bishop Baker, joined the
Holy Church of the Living
God, .in 1938; he was
appointed Pastor, in 1945,


el IU tJ S.LV i l U .LJJ V vUi
14th St, on April 25, 1949.
He was Ordained a
Bishop of the Church,
August 27, 1949, by Bishop
Alaska Augusta Smith.
Shortly after Bishop Smith's
death, he was appointed
Chief Apostle and Presiding
Prelate.
' He was known as the
Father of the
Sabbath/Commandment,
Keeping Church in
Jacksonville.
Bishop Baker is survived
by a daughter, Mary Wilson.
two sisters, Hazel Hepburn,
and Rosa Lee Samuels, of
Miami, Fla.; other relatives
and many friends.


His body was at rest at
his church for the visitation
of friends Thursday,
December 15 from 4:00
p.m.-10:00 p.m. A Victory
Service was held beginning
at 6:00 p.m.
Entombment *as at the
Edgewood Cemetery.
Arrangements were entrust-
ed to BROWN-GREEN-
FRALIN FUNERAL
DIRECTORS, 5065 Soutel
Dr.( 924-9340).
Bishop Baker died
December 10, 2005. He was
born January 1, 1900, in
Nashville, Georgia, to the
union of James and Ellen
Burke Baker.
His mother died when he
was very young, and his
father, continuing as "head
of the family," raised him
and his nine siblings. ,


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


;7j
ALI


GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Ad dress: 723 W. 4th St.
Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see I Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach. 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School.....9:00 a.m. and5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
-- Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service..................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-


ANNUAL TOY AND GIFT GIVEAWAY/GOSPEL
CONCERT-' First Lady Productions presents its Fourth
Annual Toy and Gift Giveaway/Gospel Concert on Saturday,
December 17, 7:00 p.m. at One Accord Ministries.
International, Inc. located at 2971 Waller St. "A Christmas
To Remember" is the theme. The founder of this event is
First Lady Dr. Vera Goodman, wife of Bishop, Dr. Jan D.
Goodman, Sr., Pastor of One Accord Ministries
International, Inc. Dr. Vqra Goodman is the CEO of First
Lady Productions and had been serving and reaching out to
the community prior to establishing her business in 2002.
Through the Gospel Concert and Toy Giveway, Dr. Good
man has impacted the lives of hundreds of youths. The
evening will include music, singing, dance and drama featur-
ing artists from First Lady Productions and from throughout
the city. Drawings will be held for door prizes and games
will be provided for the kids. For more information call the
church at 904/389-7373 or 537-2539.
SERVICES-St. Paul A.M.E. Church, 6910 New Kings Rd.,
invites the public to. share, ii' a Christmas Community
Outreach in the Proctor Center on Saturday,,December;,17.
The Christmas Pageant entitled "Every Knee Shall Bow"
will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, December 24. >On
Sunday, December 25, the Christmas Worship Service enti-
tled "A Birthday Party For Jesus" will be held at 10:00 a.m.
Rev. Marvin C. Zanders Pastor.
ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION-The Clean Hearts
Gospel Singers, of Jacksonville will celebrate their Third
Anniversary on Sunday, December 18, 6:00 p.m. at Life
Temple of Deliverance Church located at 2725 North Laura
St. Guests will include Dr. B.J. Hamilton and The Voices Of
Hope, Golden Clouds Gospel Singers, Touch Gospel
Singers, New Creation Gospel Singers, and The Spirit
Travelers of Atlantic Beach, Fla. Special guests are The
Uplifters of Passaic, New Jersey and The South Florida
Gospel Singers of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
BRING IN THE NEW YEAR WITH PRAISE-Southside
C.O.G.I.C. will host its first Annual New Year's Musical ,on
Sunday, January 1, 2006 at 12:30 a.m. The church is locat-
ed at 2179 Emerson St.

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to:
info@thefloridastar.com

"Study To Show Thyself Approved Unto God" By Enrolling In
FOUNDERS FAITH BIBLE COLLEGE & INSTITUTE
Three campuses to serve you:
*The Matthews Campus
2434 Old Middleburg Rd.
*The Jacob's Campus
86138 Palm Tree Dr. in Yulee
*The Thomas Campus
931 3rd Ave. So.,.in Jacksonville Beach
CLASSES REGION .ANUIARY 10 2006
Contact: Dr. Harry Johnson, Founder and Chancellor at (904) 695-1745;
Fax (904) 696-1788 or Angela Green, Campus Director, at (904) 225-5388
or Fax (904) 225-8208.
*Afternoon classes are available
Affiliated with LOGOS Education Network
"Study to be a workman that need not to be ashamed,
rightly dividing the word of Truth."


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PAGE A-3


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DM UP- A -r 4 17/2005


Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"

10,000 Elementary School Children Experience
Volunteer Jacksonville's A Visit from Saint Nicholas
Ten thousand children who attend fourteen chal-
lenged elementary schools had a big surprise when they
arrived at school recently on the A Visit from Saint
Nicholas Day of Discovery.
They found gold tinsel cov- ering their hallways
and classrooms. Entering their classrooms, they dis-
covered clear, colorful backpacks filled with books and
toys on each of their desks.
Volunteer Jacksonville's A Visit from Saint
Nicholas" is based on the treasured European holiday
tradition of anonymous giving. Saint Nicholas is
remembered as a kind person who cared for all people,
especially children.
The annual event continues to rally the community
around those "challenged" schools and their students
promoting literacy and celebrating the philanthropic
spirit.
In many instances the gifts given at the event were
the only ones they receive at this time of year. 5,000
pre-kindergarten through second graders each found a
clear colored backpack stuffed with toys and books on
their desks. 5,000 third through fifth graders received
three gift-wrapped new books.
On this exciting day volunteers employed by spon-
soring corporations served as readers in each class-
room. They read aloud The New Secrets of Saint
Nicholas, Volunteer Jacksonville's third published
book about kindness and anonymous giving.
They brought joy to children at the "challenged" ele-
mentary schools, letting them know someone cares. As
volun- teers they experienced themselves the joy of
anony- mous giving demonstrating how human kind-
ness builds a strong community.
Major event sponsors for the 200 Saint Nick event
were: Bombardier Capital; BSF; Coggin
Automotive Group; Demetree Brothers; Fed Ex;
First Book National Book Bank; Heart of America
Foundation; HSBC, Inc.; Miller Electric Company;
Parker Family; PGA Tour Associationi; Publix Super
Market Charities; Summit Contractors; University of
Phoenix; UPS; VyStar Credit Union; Weaver
S Family Foundation; Witten Family Foundation;
World Golf Hall of Fame and W. W. Gay.
Kudos to Volunteer Jacksonville for another suc-
cessful event!

Remembering The East West Classic

They called .it the East West Classic
The football game of all time for many a year
Played between Matthew W. Gilbert
and New Stanton High.
Supported by the community-at-large so dear.

Now this was a main attraction
That many people looked forward to
With anticipation and enthusiasm
To see the orange and green clash
with the white and blue.

The fans were dressed sporty and elegantly
From head to toe
Some had saved all yeai-
Just to put on a fashion show. .

The Gator Bowl (now Alltel) was the scene
For fans from far and near
Who armed themselves against cold and rain
To see their favorite teams in gear.


One could hear from the press box
The words and familiar talk
To fans parading all around
If you're in the walk way, "walk"

At the helm of the music and half-time
It was the bands Kernaa D. McFarlin
and George Hill
Great friends, yet competitors
as their bands hit the field.
Each in his own way keeping the pride still.


The half-time show
Was always something to behold
And remembered
As future stories unfold.
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Corsages boutonnieres, pennants, programs
and more Were the souvenirs of "the day"
With memories lingering inside
those who attended
For an instant replay someday.

Though time and circumstances has erased
Some of the most precious moments of all
Those of us who remember know that
This game was so much more than just football.

Wishing so often now
That we could reclaim the spirit of those times
Since we cannot do that, we're grateful
For the many memories
that remain in our minds.

Written by
Bessie Davis Fitzgerald
Bdf Productions
9-24-04
Ms. Fitzgerald is a Jacksonville native who spent
most of their life in South Florida. She is a proud


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Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming
events. Contact us at 904 766-8834; E-mail
socially@TheFloridaStar.com or you may reach me
directly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777
or fax (904) 285-7008.
See you in the paper!

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DECEMBER 17.2005


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DLELICIMBE .1/, ZUUJ


Senator Barack Obama Headlined Jam-Packed New DOE Report Provides

Weekend Oraanizina Conference In Orlando Florida High Schools With


w w


Senator Barack Obama with Senator Bill Nelson of Florida and Congressman Kendrick Meek of Florida, just bef
they went on stage at the 2005 Florida Democratic Party conference. (PHOTO BY BILL PERRY))


ORLANDO -- More
than 2,000 Democrats
assembled in Orlando for
the 2005 Florida
Democratic Party confer-
ence, which was highlighted
by an energizing speech by
United States Senator
Barack Obama, who shared
his vision for positive, hard-
working and corruption-free
government.
Senator Obama attended
the 2005 conference as the
featured speaker at the invi-
tation of Senator Bill Nelson
and promised to join
Floridians in the struggle to
return honesty and integrity
to government.
"We are going to fight
tooth and nail, inch by inch,
across this state to make sure
the future of this'country is'
secure." Obama said.
"We will leave this con-.


ference more energized,
more organized, and more
prepared than ever befte."
said Congresswoman Karen
Thurman, Chair of the
Florida Democratic Part\.
"Now the job is up to us to
win the hearts and minds of
every Floridian."
The delegates were treat-
ed to visits by several
national leaders, including
Former Senator John
Edwards of North Carolina,
Governor Tom Vilsack of
Iowa, and Governor Mark
Warner of Virginia.
All three leaders have a
proven record of winning
and service in Republican-
dominated states, and shared
their thoughts on ways that
Florida Democrats can turn
the tide.
"People care about lead-
ership and results," said


Thurman, echoing the senti-
ment of Edwards, Vilsack
and Warner. "The
Republicans would like to
make this about liberal ver-
sus conservative,
Republican versus
Democrat, but they just don't
get it. This is about doing
what's right by the people of
Florida and America not
what's right for cronies and
lobbyists."
The 2006 Florida
statewide candidates appear-
ing at the conference
included: U.S. Senator Bill
Nelson, candidate for reelec-
tion; U.S. Congressman Jim
Davis and Senator Rod
Smith, candidates for
Governor; Alex Sink, candi-
date for Chief Financial
Officer; Senator Skip
Campbell, candidate for
Attorney General; and Eric


Holiday Fire Safety Tips Issued


TALLAHASSEE As
Floridians crank up -their
heaters and fireplaces and
set out the holiday candles
and lights, State Fire
Marshal Tom Gallagher is
urging residents to keep
safety in mind.
"The- number of home
fires usually doubles in
December, but most can be
prevented," Gallagher said.
"The most important safety
precautions are having
working smoke alarms and a
fire escape plan."
Other seasonal fire safety
tips, including a new Home
and Holiday Fire Safety CD,
are available at
w w w. fl dfs .com.
Throughout December, fire


prevention specialists with
the State Fire Marshal's
Office will disseminate the
CD at fairs and various edu-
cational programs through-
out the state. The most
important tips Gallagher is
urging Floridians to follo\\
are:
*Make sure you have
smoke detectors and make
sure they work.
*Use a flashlight instead
of candles if electLAcal
power is knocked out. :
*Plug electric space
heaters directly into a wall
outlet. Do not use them with
an extension cord.
Keep space heaters and
other heat sources at least 3
feet away from furniture,
walls and drapes.


*Before using a fire-
place, make sure the chim-
ney flue is open so carbon
monoxide gas can escape.
*If your natural gas is.
shut off or the pilot light
needs to be re-lit, contact
* your local gas company. Do
* not attempt to turn it on
yourself.
Water live trees daily.
*Don't let tree lights
touch needles or curtains.
*Turn out lights and
snuff candles before going
to bed or leaving the house.
*Keep candles out of
reach of children and pets
and use sturdy candlehold-
ers.
*Have an operable fire
extinguisher readily avail-
able.


Copeland, candidate
Agriculture Commissionc

TO
SUBCRIBE
TO OR
ADVERTISE
IN
THE
FLORIDA
STAR
CALL
(904)
766-8834


Feedback On Graduation
TALLAHASSEE Education Commissioner John L.
Winn today unveiled a new Florida Department of Education
report providing Florida's public high schools with informa-
tion about the performance of their 2004 graduates.
Individualized for each school, the reports present a com-
prehensive profile of college readiness based on graduates'
performance while still in high school compared to their
enrollment in and first semester performance at a postsec-
ondary institution.
Administrators can use the analyses contained in the
report to effectively evaluate and plan school improvement
strategies. This is the earliest schools have had access to this
data and the first time it has been available in one, consoli-
dated report.
Previously, Florida based its evaluation of college readi-
ness solely on student performance on the Common
Placement Test (CPT). However, performance on the CPT is
just one of many indicators, of student preparedness. The
new reports, known as the "High School Feedback Reports,"
ore include school, district and state level data on 10 pre-gradu-
ation and seven post-graduation indicators.
Pre-graduation indicators include performance on the
for tenth-grade Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test
er. (FCAT), participation in the PSAT, SAT and ACT, number of
students completing Advanced Placement, dual enrollment
or other high-level courses and the percentage of students
eligible for Bright Futures scholarships.
Post-graduation indicators -include the percentage of
graduates attending a postsecondary institution in Florida,
percentage of students enrolled in college-level Math and
English courses and postsecondary fall term Grade Point
Averages.
Available to schools via the Department of Education's
website, information found in the reports was compiled from
the K-20 Education Data Warehouse. A reference page
explaining the calculations and sources of data is also avail-
able on the website. By combining Community College and
Bright Futures data, the Department was able to provide a
more complete history of students' best test scores along
with a snapshot of graduates' participation in an academical-
ly-demanding and well-planned curriculum. For access to
the reports, visit http://data.fldoe.org/readiness/.


"Jacksonville's


Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted

&


The Victory is in


the Word & Music










6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214

Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW WCGL1360.COM


PA GEA-5


F.ORInA ,STA R


nz t vr lfTT- 7 117far I


j







'TAJEJ A 0IC, k.DC- t


Footsteps Of Civil Rights Leaders To Be Placed


At Historic Site During Trumpet Awards


Xernona Clayton, founder and executive producer of
the renowned Trumpet Awards poses with the display.
Front Row: Left-to-Right: Reverend Joseph Boone;
Reverend William Holmes Borders; Stevie Wonder;
John Jacob; and Reverend James Orange. Second
Row: Left-to-Right- Reverend Martin Luther King, Sr.;
Archbishop Desmond Tutu (in Ms. Clayton hands);
Xernona Clayton; Bernard Parks; and Lena Home.


NAACP, NitroMed
Partner To Narrow
Cardiovascular
Healthcare Gaps
BALTIMORE, Mass.--
The National Association
for the Advancement of
Colored People (NAACP)
and NitroMed, Inc. (NAS-
DAQ:NTMD News) have
announced a strategic
alliance to implement meas-
ures to narrow health care
disparities that exist
between African Americans
and Caucasians in areas of
access, affordability, quality,
infrastructure and compli-
ance.
As part of the partner-
ship, NitroMed is providing
a three-year $1.5 million
grant to establish an organi-
zational infrastructure to
allow the NAACP to devel-
op health advocacy initia-
tives towards equal access to,
quality healthbare.
The NAACP intends to
roll out programs that
include: increasing visibility
and awareness in the black
community; developing an
Advocacy Action Plan with
the NAACP National Health
Leadership Committee;
implementing a two day
training with the seven
regional health care repre-
sentatives of the NAACP
Health Advocacy
Department; rolling out the
Plan for the top tier state and
local NAACP chapters and
during the 2006 National
Leadership Summit; and
developing a consensus
paper on the state of African
American health care and
the impact of Medicare.
The NAACP and
NitroMed partnership'
includes an initiative to
inform Medicare beneficiar-
ies about prescription medi-
cine coverage options,
which become available
January .1, 2006 and to
encourage people to enroll
early. The deadline to be eli-
gible by January 1 is
December 31, 2005.
Medicare beneficiaries are
eligible for drug coverage
regardless of income or
health status. Enrollees may
choose from an array of
plans relative to types of
medicines patients need and
pharmacies included as well
as co-pays and deductibles
required.


ATLANTA, Ga.-- A new
collection of "Footsteps" of
civil rights icons will take
their place in the
International Civil Rights.
Walk of Fame.
This 2006 ceremony will
be one of the .featured events
of the Annual Trumpet
Awards and is scheduled for
January 23, at' 10:00 a.m. at
the Martin Luther King, Jr.
National Historic Site,
National Park Service, locat-
ed at 450 Auburn Avenue
(Atlanta, GA).
The Walk of Fame, now
in its third year, includes the
footprints of President
Jimmy Carter, Justice
Thurgood Marshall, Henry
Aaron, Ralph McGill,
Mayor Maynard Jackson,
Harry Belafonte and Rosa
Parks. The Ceremonial Host


for the event is Frank Ski
with WVEE FM (V103)
Radio.
The International Civil
Rights Walk of Fame was
created in 2004 to give
recognition to those valiant
soldiers of justice who sacri-
ficed and struggled to make
-equality a reality for all.
This extraordinary display
has enhanced the historic
value of this geographic
area, enriched the cultural
heritage, and augmented
tourist attractions in the city
of Atlanta.
The shoes used to create
the footsteps will also be on
display during the unveiling
program.
The International Civil
Rights Walk of Fame Will
add ten new esteemed civil
rights leaders to the Walk of


Johnson teams With Carlyle Group To Launch Equity Firm
NEW YORK-- Robert L. Johnson, founder and chairman of Black Entertainment
Television, has teamed up with the Carlyle Group to launch a private-equity firm that plans
to raise a $500 million-plus buyout fund. The joint venture, which is Johnson's first
attempt in the private equity field, has received an unspecified amount of seed capital from
Carlyle, which will have up to a 20 percent stake as a general partner, said Johnson. He
will own the remaining 80 percent and plans to use the money to build an investment team
comprised of African-American professionals.
Johnson hasn't chosen a name for the firm or the fund, but said Tuesday the firm will.
operate as a subsidiary of RLJ Cos., which Johnson founded in 2001, and which houses
his other asset management arms, such as a hedge fund of funds. While Carlyle won't par-
ticipate in the fundraising, it has agreed to co-invest in certain deals that are sourced by
Johnson and are too large for his fund to do alone. Carlyle will also advise on deal sourc-
ing. Johnson will start fundraising in the first quarter of 2006, he said.


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Fame. The 2006 group of
inductees include: Reverend
Joseph E. Boone; Reverend
William Holmes Borders;
Xernona Clayton; Lena
Horne; John E. Jacob;
Reverend Martin Luther
King, Sr; Reverend James
Orange; Bernard Parks;
Archbishop Desmond Tutu;
and Stevie Wonder.
The "Walk of Fame" is
sponsored by the Trumpet
Awards Foundation, Inc..
and was created and
designed by Xernona
Clayton, founder and execu-
tive producer of the
renowned Trumpet Awards.
Ms. Clayton says, "This is a
lasting monument to those
whose contributions were
testaments to the fact that
human progress is neither
automatic nor inevitable."
Footprints from previous
years include: Henry Aaron,
Ted Turner, Harry
Belafonte, Congressman
John Conyers, Jr., Dick
Gregory, Mayor Maynard
H. Jackson, Jr., Ralph E.
McGill, Reverend Fred L.
Shuttlesworth, Judge Elbert
P. Tuttle, Sr., Nancy Wilson,


and Reverend Addie L.
Wyatt (2005 inductees).
Juanita J. Abernathy;
Reverend Ralph David
Abernathy, Sr.; Mayor Ivan
Allen, Jr.; Julian Bond;
President Jimmy Carter;
.Medgar Evers; Dorothy
Height; Reverend Jesse L.
Jackson, Sr.; Frank M.
Johnson; President Lyndon
Baines Johnson; Johff
Lewis; Evelyn G. Lowery; '.
Reverend Joseph E. Lowery;
Justice Thurgood Marshall;
Rosa Parks; Hosea
Williams; and Ambassador
Andrew Young were placed
at the site in 2004. Each
year more foot soldiers will
be added to the Walk of
Fame.
There are hundreds of
additional spaces designated
for future placements of
worthy footsteps.
"We will build a memori-
al to the civil struggle that
depicts every step taken
toward freedom and justice
and the tireless exertions
and passionate concern of
these devoted and deter-
mined souls," said Ms.
Clayton.


Millions of Americans Include
Financial Fitness In their
2006 New Year's Resolutions
WASHINGTON, DC With the season of New Year's reso-
lutions upon us, more than 58 million Americans aged 18 and
older say they resolve to better manage their finances in' 2006.
Additionally, 29 million say they plan on making a major pur- '.
chase, such as buying a car, next year, according to a nationwide
consumer poll conducted by Americans Well-informed on
Automobile Retailing Economics (AWARE), a group of automo-
tive industry leaders providing free tips and resources on vehicle -
financing. I .
The national poll, conducted by KRC Research on November
17-21, questioned 1,030 Americans aged 18 and older.
Additional information on AWARE, along with other vehicle
financing tools and resources, is available in English and Spanish
at www.autofinancing 101.org.

More Blacks Live In Neighborhoods
With Industrial Pollution
CHICAGO An Associated Press analysis of a little-known
government research project shows that black Americans are 79
percent more likely than whites to live in neighborhoods where
industrial pollution is s suspected of posing the greatest health dan-
ger.
Residents in neighborhoods with the highest pollution scores
also tend to be poorer, less educated and more often unemployed -
than those elsewhere in the country, AP found.
"Poor communities, frequently communities of color but not
exclusively, suffer disproportionately," said Carol Browner, who
headed the, Environmental Protection Agency during the
Clinton administration when the scoring system was developed.
"If you look at where our industrialized facilities tend to be locat-
ed, they're not in the upper middle class neighborhoods."
In 19 states, blacks were more than twice as likely as whites
to live in neighborhoods where air pollution seems to pose the
greatest health danger, the analysis showed. More than half the
blacks in Kansas and nearly half of Missouri's black population,
for example, live in the 10 percent of their states' neighborhoods
with the highest risk scores. Similarly, more than four out of
every 10 blacks in Kentucky, Minnesota, Oregon and Wisconsin
live in high-risk neighborhoods.

Ex-Rwandan Officer Gets Prison For Genocide
ARUSHA, Tanzania A United Nations tribunal convicted'
a retired Rwandan army officer of genocide Tuesday and sen-
tenced him to 25 years in prison for participating in the slaughter
of ethnic minority Tutsi.
The tribunal found retired Lt. Col. Aloys Simba guilty of
genocide and extermination charges stemming from the 100-day
slaughter of more than half a million Tutsi, as well as political
moderates from the Hutu majority.
Prosecutors said one of the largest killings in the'period
occurred in a region where Simba, 63, was the top civil defense
.officer. They said that Simba commanded the military, police and
civilian militias that carried out most of the killing in the
Gikongoro and Butare regions of southern Rwanda in May and
June 1994.
"This is a very important judgment as one of the largest
killings happened in Gikongoro," said Steven Rapp, chief prose-
cutor for the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.
Judge Erik Mose said the tribunal was convinced that Simba.
supplied guns and grenades that killed thousands of innocent peo-
ple. He.also was part of a group of anny officers who led a 1973
coup that brought President Juvenal Habyarimana to power, pros-
ecutors said. .


DECEMBER 17, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


. A1- A -







TE .1r' LNDI fl f


FT.ORIA nS TAR


PAGE A-7


Pastor, Mentor continued from A-1
Drive and John Young Parkway in Orlando into a 127-unit rental complex for.the home-
less that became known as Maxwell Terrace. But he didn't stop there. When Maxwell came
to Hartage seeking support for another motel conversion on South Orange Blossom Trail,
Hartage turned him down -- four times. Maxwell kept coming back until Hartage finally
relented.
Two years later, Hartage had a cousin who got out of prison and needed a place to tran-
sition back into society. He found an apartment at-Maxwell Gardens on South Orange
Blossom Trail. "He ended up living in the same place I had problems approving," Hartage
said. Maxwell, who used a wheelchair, was still active and alert, working on a land deal in
Maitland just a few months ago, Hartage said.
"He was still strong, and he was still able," Hartage said. "You really, in your heart, want-
ed to see him around forever. You just expect him to be there." Eatonville Mayor Anthony
Grant called for a moment of silence at a Town Council meeting Tuesday night to honor
Maxwell.
"He stood up for everything that was right. We have lost a good leader," said Ella
Dinkins, 87, a volunteer at the Zora Neale Hurston Museum. Born in .Williston, Florida on
Aug. 2, 1907, Maxwell grew up in Lake County as. the son of turpentine-industry workers.
He said he first heard the calling to the ministry when he was 19 but rejected it. He worked
as a carpenter, grew citrus and started a janitorial business. He was the father of six chil-
dren.
A man who left school in the third grade, Maxwell obtained his high-school diploma later
in life and would become known for his intellect and eloquence. He later attended law
school.. "He was not pretentious, even though he was very.intelligent, very capable," said
Commissioner Lynum. of Orlando. "He is going to be remembered as an advocate, but not
just for the homeless. He worked in the community unselfishly."
Maxwell's life spanned the Ocoee race riot of 1920 to the civil-rights struggles of the
1960s to the election of blacks to public office. And he remembered it all until the end.
Christopher Sherman of the Sentinel staff and The Florida Star contributed to this report.
Jeff Kunerth can be reached at jkunerth@orlandosentinel.com or 407-420-5392.


Pastor, Mentor continued from A-1 ,

"Drive and John Young Parkway in,Orlando into a 127-unit
rental complex for 'the homeless that became, known' as
Maxwell Terrace.
But he didn't stop there. When Maxwell came to Hartage
seeking support for another motel conversion on South
Orange Blossom Trail, Hartage turned him down -- four
times. Maxwell kept coming back until Hartage finally
relented.
Two years later, Hartage had a cousin who. got out of
prison and needed a place to transition back into society. He
found an'apartment at Maxwell Gardens on South Orange
Blossom Trail.
"He ended up living in the same place I had problems
approving," Hartage said.
Maxwell, who used a wheelchair, was still active and
alert, working on a land deal in Maitland just a few months
ago, Hartage said.


Growth continued from A-1

gery is the first of many she will have to undergo.
International Kids Fund / APPhotos provided by the
International' Kids Fund show Marlie Cassueus as an infant
and at age 14. Surgeons hope to carve away the growth, then
reconstruct,the right side of the girl's face and her swollen
jaw.
A nonprofit group brought Casseus to the U.S. in
September after the painful growth became so big it began to
crush her breathing passage. The doctors are donating their
time.


Head Start continued from A-1

Girardeau. Presently the Head Start program is located on
the first floor of the building.

Team continued from A-I

time Kronbach, 55, said that Baker refused to gather his
belongings, he did so and tried to lead him to the elevator
when he was slammed into the wall, hurting his head, shpul-
der and hand.
He also fell into: a bench during the altercation. .The
inmate said he was not trying to fight the officer but simply
pulling away from him while waiting for another officer to
bring him the rest of his personal belongings. However, the
additional charges were filed.

Prior continued from A-I


the world for a series of
edgy comedians: Chris
Rock, Eddie Murphy, Robin
Williams, David Letterman,
George Wallace, David
Chappelle and Keenen Ivory
Wayans.


"Richard is the ground-
breaker," Wayans later
explained. 1He "showed us
that you can be Black and
have a Black voice and be
successful."


SWAT Team continued from A-1

posed to be an empty apartment but the lights were on.
Ten people were arrested but it was determined that none
of them were involved in the armed robbery the night
before, and two were runaways who were returned to their
parents. Those arrested were done so on unrelated charges.
Residents watched as male and females were handcuffed
and taken away.
Even though robbery charged had not been filed at the
time of this report, three of the suspects are in custody
regarding this matter. Both Carnell Tyrone Phelps, 29 and
Larry Gene Phelps, 29, admitted to living in the apartment
where the tire rims from the stolen vehicle were stored.
Larry had been living there for eight months and Carnell
said he was in the apartment because it was "rent free."
Both were aware that the electricity was on illegally. Garrett
William Jones, 46 had been at the site of the earlier robbery
but was arrested for other charges, rather than the robbery
and shooting.


Brief continued from A-1
.they both came up on
Saturday and Sunday, two
days in a row. An Oklahoma
mathematician said the odds
of this happening is one in
1,000. ,

MERRY
CHRISTMAS!


The Holiday Season: A Great Time For Reflection


The holiday season is
always a great time to reflect
upon the previous year, and
2005 has given all of us
cause for celebration. From
hosting the Super Bowl to
opening our new Main
Library, it has been an excit-
ing year in Jacksonville, and
one of the most exciting
developments has been the
growth of the Jacksonville
Small and Emerging.
Business (JSEB) program.
With the help of commu-
nity leaders and business
people, and a lot of great
input and fine-tuning from
the Jacksonville City
Council, I created the JSEB.
program to help small busi-
nesses grow by leveling the
playing field for businesses
applying for city contracts.
Since its creation, the pro-
gram has been a huge suc-
cess; It has certified 297
companies, 264 of which are
minority-owned, to do busi-
ness with the City of
Jacksonville. And, as of
September. nearly 50 formal
and informal bids totaling
more than $80 million have
been awarded to JSEBs as a
result of the program.
The main obstacle to the
success of a small business
is access to, capital, and the
JSEB program directly
addresses that issue. The


program provides financial
assistance in the forms of
access to upfront capital and
assistance in securing
bonds. Thanks to the
involvement of several local
banks, there is nearly
$630,000 available for loans
to JSEBs, and 17 JSEBs
have participated in the
bond enhancement program.
Also vital to the JSEB initia-
tive are business certifica-
tion, "fiscal physicals" a
mentoring program and
continuing education oppor-
tunities, such as classes on
cash flow management,
business planning, market-
ing, human resources and
technical training. This pro-
gram is the first of its kind
in city history to take such a
comprehensive approach to
growing small business.
Small business is one -of
the cornerstones of our
nation's economy, and that
is just as true at the local
level. An estimated 96 per-
cent of the businesses in
Duval County are small
businesses.
They help individuals
succeed, -strengthen our
economy by providing jobs
and contribute to a diverse
business climate -- which is
vital to enhancing our abili-
ty to thrive in a continuous-
ly changing market. Small


JacKSonvime mayor Jonn
Peyton
businesses are the city's
largest major employer, and
we must do all we can to
build their capacity.
As mayor, I have
pledged my full support of
small and minority-owned
businesses. The City of
Jacksonville is proud of the
JSEB initiative and its mis-
sion to ensure that entrepre-
neurs get the help they need
to participate in
Jacksonville's growing
economy. To find out if your
small business qualifies for
the JSEB program, contact
the Equal Business
Opportunity (EBO) office at
(904) 630-1165.
Please accept my best
wishes for a joyous and
meaningful holiday season,
and a happy, healthy and
safe New Year.


State Representative Audrey Gibson Fights For Doctors And Patients


TALLAHASSEE-
Representative Audrey
Gibson (D- Jacksonville)
debated the Medicaid
reform bill offering two
amendments and co-spon-
soring another, fighting for
community doctors to have
participation in the reformed
process and against


statewide expansion without
proper Legislative review.
In an amendment to have
the Agency for HealthCare
Administration (ACHA), to
help establish provider serv-
ice net" orks. Representative
Gibson offered the follow-
ing debate:
"Currently there are


providers who do not have
the means to suddenly put
up capital to form a network
to continue to provide for
their patients who have
been their patients for years.
This amendment will enable
Iuval County providers to
continue offering high qual-
ity, caring medical care to


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their patients by assisting
them with establishing a net-
work. so that thousands of
minority patients do not fall
through the "reform" hole
and end up with a provider
who .knows nothing about
them nor do the patients
know or trust who will be
caring for their medical
needs; This amendment is
of particular importance to
seniors in Duval County."
"This bill is not about
consumer choice. This bill
itself is fraud and it is
flawed. It proposes to be
about consumer choice. It is
not. This bill is not con-
sumer driven; it is being
driven, by forces who know
nothing, or pretend to know
nothing or don't want to
know nothing about the.
struggles of the poor, the
disabled and seniors have to
go through to have their
health care needs met. I
heard someone on the floor
say something about seeing
the big picture, well picture
this, confusion, limited care,
increased emergency room
cost, patients being snatched
from caring doctors. This is
not the right thing to do."

Stan "Tookie"
Williams Put To Death

A former leader of the
Crips street gang was put to
death on Tuesday morning,
by lethal injection while
some 225 non-ethnic jour-
nalists watched at
California's San Quentin
State Prison. Many celebri-
ties and community leaders
tried to prevent his execu-
tion since Mr. Williams
made several changes in his
life during his imprison-
ment, including fighting
against gang violence and
being nominated for the
Nobel Peace Prize. Those
who .watched said he was
very quiet and acted in a
manner as if he had made
peace with God but relatives
of those who had died
because of his suspected
activities, said he did not
make peace with them.
Minister Farrakhan was his
funeralservice speaker.


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FTORIDA STAR


DECEMBER 17, 2005


FORD.,




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Young Student Making


Inroads To Writing Career

Hele, ina E.' Cone\. .7: llJIF -. J'
N \ lI' I\11 IIle -, P
illustrator \\Iho is a f fourth
grade student at Enterprise
Learning Academli\. has to '
short stories puibli-.hed. She
also recently\ completed an A' i
eight chapter noi el and is .
Scurrentl\ \\orkine on anoth -
The lo' el\ and talented
aspiring author is the -.
daughter of Fred and Ton\a .;
C \illiams and -
Christopher and T ila "'
Cone'. She is the grand-
daughter of Florida Star
emplo ee Liz Billingslea.
For Thlanksi% intz.
Hele\na \ rote and pro-
duced a four act play. star- .v
ring herself, little sister
S\dne\ and babh\ brother
Jordan. She received ra\e
rex ie%\s and a standing oa- From left, Jordon Williams, 3; Heleyna Coney, 9; and Sydney Coney, 7.
tion from her family .
Along \\ ith \ ritinig'. "Le\ na" enjo\ s singing in the Children's Choir at Greatei Church of God b\ Faith. She's
also in\ ol\ ed in Children's Church, is a Girl Scout, and participate annual\ in the "iRun For The Cure" and "Kids
Da\"
She has man\ jouimals and books of short stories that she has \\ written o\ er the \ears. 'Lei na" is supported b\
her ftamil \\ho is proud of her accomplishments and encourages her to remember "\\"il Christ All Things Are
Possible".

Kwanzaa Crafts For Children
Exjend the holiday season for \our children b\ introducing them to the African-American cultural celebra-
tion of K\\anzaa. This seven-day holiday is based on the traditional African %\inter harest festival and begins
the da\ after Christmas. K\\anzaa is a time to celebrate life, heritage and values Here are a Ile\ crafts ideas from
Trish Kuffner. author of "The BusI Book" series i Nleado\ brook Press. 9) 95; \\ \w.meadox brookpress.com).
to help children learn more about this holiday's customs.
Pasta Necklace from "The Toddler's Busy Book"
This project offers a creative \'a\ to teach your child about the traditional colors of K, anzaa. Black repre-
sents the people, red symbolizes their struggle and green stands for hope. Paint ziti noodles w ith black, red and
green tempura paint. Allow to dr\ Spra\ with clear acrylic spra\ if ou like. Gi\e your child a shoelace (or a
piece of ribbon. \arn. or thin elastic cord i with a piece of masking tape %' rapped around one end. Show him how
to thread it through the noodles to make a colorful necklace
Kwanzaa conhnued on B-2

VOL. 11 NO. 35 INSIDE:
Published Weekly
By The Florida Star TOP OF THE CHARTS.................................................................................................... B-8
C O M IC S ................................................................................................................................. B -8


December 17, 2005


I!


II I _,__, I_ I -~


t










Advice For Kids Who Want To Become Writers


(FeatureSource)
Bruce Lansky is a best-
selling author and editor of
humorous children's poet-
ry and inspiring children's
stories.
-"If Pigs Could Fly," a
collection of funny poems,
and "Girls to the Rescue
#7," a collection of excit-
ing stories, were recently
published. In this ques-
tiona and answer session,
he offers advices to kids
who aspire to become
writers.

Q: I think I want to be
a writer, but where do I
start?.

Lansky: Read a lot.
Become aware of what
kind of writing you like
best. Use your favorite
books as sources of ideas.
For example, if you like
Shel Silverstein's poem"
"Sick," see if you can
write a few more lines that
.would fit its rhythm and
rhyme pattern. Or work
with any story or poem
you like a lot. Don't worry
about "copying" a writer.
Instead, think of this exer-
cise as "learning" from a
writer.

Q: How, much do I
have to write before I can
be good?

Lansky: If you want to
be a photographer, it's


important to take lots of
photos. If you want to be
an artist, it's important to
create lots of art. It's the
same with writing. The
more you write, the better
you become. So keep at it.
Try to establish a regular
time to write in the morn-
ing before school or in the
evening before bed.

Q: How do I think of
things to write about?

Lansky: Keep your
mind open to new ideas.
Be aware of how, where
and when you do your best,
creative thinking.
Sometimes ideas will just
"come" to you. I seem to
get new ideas while run-
ning, riding a bike or driv-
ing my car. Keep a little
notebook handy to write
down your ideas. I have
one in my car at all times.

Q: Sometimes my
poems and stories have no
point. What can I do?

Lansky: It's important
to develop a point of view,
perspective or message.
What do you want to say?
In plain English, write
down whatever you feel
strongly about. It may help
if I list a few things that
you might want to say:

"Life isn't fair" or. "Life
is wonderful"


"Nothing goes right for
me" or "I'm glad I'm me"

"I hate my brother" or
"I love my brother"

"Spring is the most
wonderful time of the
year" or "Spring sucks"

"I have a crush on
him/her but he/she doesn't
know I exist" or "He/she
has a crush on me, but I
wish he'd/she'd leave me
alone."

Once you've written
your message in plain
English, you've started the
writing process. If you use
that statement as the first
line in your poem or the
first sentence in your story,
it will get you thinking
about what comes next -
probably examples that
illustrate your point.

Q: What can I do with
my finished poems and
stories besides store them
in a closet?

Lansky: When you've
written something, don't
hide it. Instead, share it
with parents, teachers or
friends. Ask them what
they think. It's nice to
know that they like it, of
course. But it's also impor-
tant to ask for constructive
criticism or suggestions on
how you can improve your
writing. Does the rhythm
sound right in your poem?
Is your story too long? Try
not to be thin-skinned or
sensitive about comments
you receive. Instead of
feeling hurt, thank your
advisors, and then get back
to work.

Q: Why do I need sug-
gestions to improve my*
writing?


Lansky: A very com-
mon mistake for beginning
writers is to believe that
their first effort is a fin-
ished work. It's better to
think of your first effort as
a "draft" to be revised and
improved. This is where
constructive criticism
comes in handy. We call
great writers "artists"
because they are never sat-
isfied with a piece of writ-
ing until it is as "perfect"
as they can get it. If you
want to be a writer, you're
going to have to rework
your poems or stories until
they are as good as you
can make them. You may
think this is a bit much, but
I often find something to
improve in poems or sto-
ries I've already published.
I make revisions, and then
I submit the new version
for publication in the next
printing of the book.


Q: Now that I've
revised my poems and
stories, what do I do
next?

Lansky: After you've
"perfected" your written
work, submit it for "publi-
cation" on your classroom
bulletin board or wall, in a.
school newspaper or mag-
azine or on a children's
Web site (like www.gig-
glepoetry.com). Sign up
for any young authors
groups or programs that
are available. Why?
Because it's rewarding to
get your work noticed, dis-
cussed or published. And
it's very helpful to meet
teachers or other students
who will support and
encourage your desire to
learn the craft of writing.

A u t h o r :
FeatureSource Staff


Kwanzaa


(Continued From B-l)

Napkin Rings from "The Arts and Crafts Busy
Book"
.Ears of corn are another important symbol of
Kwanzaa used to represent children and hope for the
future. Cut an empty paper towel roll into 1-inch sec-
tions. In separate containers,- mix black, red and green
paint with white glue. Have your child paint each section
and roll them in popcorn kernels. Once they are dry,
insert a napkin and set the table for a Kwanzaa feast.
Woven Mat from "The Preschooler's Busy Book"
It is custom to place the traditional Kwanzaa symbols
on a woven mat. To make one for your table, fold a piece
of black construction paper in half to make a frame for
the mat.. Show your child how to cut from the folded
edge to within one inch of the opposite side. Make an
even number of cuts about one inch apart across the
entire width of the paper; unfold. Cut 1-inch strips of red
and green construction paper the length of the frame's
width or slightly longer.
Show your child how to weave the red and green
strips over and under the cuts in the frame. Use glue or
a stapler to secure the strips in place along the edge of
the frame.Each book. in Trish Kuffner's "Busy Book"
series (Meadowbrook Press) contains 365 arts and crafts
projects to stimulate a child's creativity.


The Florida Sta'r/Prep Rap


Page 13-2/1ecember 17, 2005










Funny Magic For Funny Kids

(FeatureSource) Not every child can get into Hogwarts Academy. But children out here in the
muggle world can still reveal their true gifts by embracing their inner magician – and crack
up their audience while doing it. "Magic is very popular right now," says Steve Chamey, author of '
"Hokus Jokus: How to Do Funny Magic" (Meadowbrook Press, $7.95;
www.meadowbrookpress.com). "From books to movies to television, it's everywhere." Charney says A
children are at the forefront of the interest in sorcery and slight of hand. He adds that just like any
child can make people laugh, any child can learn magic. "Kids want to learn about disappearing
coins, optical illusions and other tricks," Charney says. "But they also have a natural drive to amuse .
people. Put the two goals together, and you develop a highly entertaining child who will never get
bored." Here are three tricks from Mr. Charney's book guaranteed to amaze your child's audience... ...'
or at least make them laugh.

The Wizard

This trick requires a deck of cards, a working phone and a trustworthy accomplice (perhaps you). To do it, your child invites some friends over
to the house. He announces that he wants to introduce them to his mentor, "The Wizard." With great fanfare, he has one of his friends pick a card.
Your child looks at the card and says that he will call the Wizard, who will magically announce to everyone what the card is, even though he is.
miles away. Your child then makes a phone call and asks for the Wizard. "Hello, Wizard. Is that you?" he asks when his mentor comes to the line.
"Can you tell my friend what her chosen card is?" Your child then hands the phone to his friend, or even better, switches to speakerphone. Your
friend says hello, and the Wizard announces her card on the first try.
How does your child do it? Magic and a little deyiousness.The key is that your child and his accomplice have worked out a system. When your
child asks for the Wizard, the accomplice starts reciting card numbers (i.e., "deuce," "three," "four" and on up to "ace") until your child says,
"Hello, Wizard. Is that you?" when the right number has been said. This tips off the accomplice as to the number of the card. The "Wizard" then
starts reciting suits (i.e., "clubs," "hearts" and so on) until your child says, "Can you tell my friend what her chosen card is?" This lets the accom-
plice know what suit has been picked. All.that remains is for your child's friend to say hello, and the booming voice of the Wizard will announce
the exact card.

A Very Cool Mind-Reading Trick -

The only prop your child needs for this trick is a willing volunteer (perhaps your spouse).
Your child asks the volunteer to do the following:
"Think of a number between one and "10."
"Multiply that number by nine."
"Add the digits of your answer."
"Subtract five."
"Figure out the letter of the alphabet that matches
your number. One equals A, two equals B and so on."
"Think of a country that starts with that letter."
"Pick the last letter of that country's name."
"Think of an animal that starts with that letter."
"Pick the last letter of that animal's name."
"Think of a color that starts with that letter."
"Now think of the country, animal and color all at
once.
Your child then pretends to read the volunteer's mind for a moment- Then she casually says, "But there are no orange kangaroos in Denmark."
The volunteer is amazed and is forced to bust out laughing at your child's mind-reading powers. How does she do it? The trick is that for any num-
ber between one and 10 that is multiplied by nine, the digits always add up to nine. Doing the math correctly will always give the volunteer the
letter D. Most people asked to think of a country that starts with D will think of Denmark. Similarly, most people asked to think of an animal that
starts with K will think of a kangaroo. Finally, most people will think of orange when asked to think of a color that starts with 0. Of course, if
your child runs into that stray odd person who says, "I was thinking of an olive-colored koala in the Dominican Republic," it's time to move on
to the next trick.

The Washcloth

Your child shows his friend a plaini, old washcloth. Then he says, "This washcloth is magic. If we stand on opposite sides of it, you will not
be able to punch me in the nose." The friend scoffs at this, but your child says it's true. So your child places the washcloth on the threshold of a
door. He stands on the other side of the door and closes it. "Go ahead," your child says through the closed door. "Punch me in the nose."
Magic triumphs again. Make that humor triumphs again: For these and many other funny tricks for budding wizards, pick up a copy of
Chamey's "Hokus Jokus: How to Do Funny Magic."


Page 13-3113ecernber 17, 2009


The Florida Star/Prep Rap






Page B-4/December 17, 2005


The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Christmas Fun Page For Kids


9'


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Christmas

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Triv ia


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HO' Q ( O iz


Each word below has "ho" in it. We give you the clues, you try to
figure out the word. We've done the first one for you. Great for
Christmas Eve and Christmas Day to Click to print answers

1. Where you and your family live home
2. You do this in stores at Christmastime h o
3, A Christmas plant h o
4. Place where people stay on vacation h o
5. A place of learning h o
6. His nickname is "Tommy" h h o
7. A group of singers h o
8. The writer of a book h o
9. His nickname is "Tony" ho_
10. Soup made with seafood and vegetables h o
11. Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Hanukkah h o_

12. School assignments that you do after school h o

13. A sea creature with a pouch h o
14. A state capital H o
15. A sweet treat__ h o
16. They help us remember past Christmases h o_

17. Opposite of vertical h o
HO! HO! HO! Quiz Answers continued on B5


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"Page B-6lDecember 17, 2005 The Florida Stan Prep Rap


Clean Kids Jokes

Silly! Silly! Tongue
Q. Why did the apple go out with a fig? Twi ter
A. Because it couldn't find a date! If you understand, say
"understand".
Q. Why do bees have sticky hair? If you don't understand, say
A. Because they have honeycombs! "don't understand".
But if you understand and
say "don't understand".
Q. Why do golfers bring an extra pair of socks? How do I understand that
- A. In case they get a hole in one! you understand?
Understand!
Q. Where do you find giant snails?
I thought, I thought of think-
A. On the ends of their fingers! ing of thanking you.

Q. Why was Cinderella kicked out of the basket I wish to wish the wish you
ball team? wish to wish, but if you wish
the wish the witch wishes, I
A. Because she ran away from the ball! won't wish the wish you wish
to wish.
Q. What does a dentist call his X-rays?
A. Tooth-pics! If one doctor doctors another
doctor does the doctor who
doctors the doctor doctor the
Q Why couldn't the butterfly come to the dance? doctor the way the doctor he
A. Because it was a moth ball! is doctoring doctors? Or does
the doctor doctor the way the
Q. Why do elephants never forget? doctor who doctors doctors?
A. Because nobody ever tells them anything!

Q. Why don't bats live alone?
A. They prefer to hang out with their friends!

Q. How do locomotives hear?
A. Through the engineers!

Q. What must be the luckiest animal in the world?
A. A bunny, because it has four rabbits' feet!

Q. Whit has six eyes but cannot see?
A. Three blind mice!

Q. What bird can be heard at mealtimes?
A. A swallow!

Q. What do ducks watch on TV?
A. Duckiumentaries!

Q. What nails do carpenters hate to hit?
A. Fingernails!

Q What do you get when you cross a frog and a
-bunny?
A. Aribbit! What's M,

Q. What do you get if you cross a sheepdog and a Inform4
daffodil?
A. A collie-flower! T P

Q. What's orange and sounds like a parrot?
A. A carrot! Call The Flo


KNOCK! KNOCK!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Anita
Anita who?
Anita another minute to think it over.

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Tank
Tank who?
You're welcome!

Knock-knock.
Who's there?
Dishes.
Dishes who?
Dishes your friend, open the door.

Knock, knock.
Who's there?
Lena.
Lena who?
Lena little closer, I want to tell you a secret.

KNOCK KNOCK
Who's There?
Jamaica
Jamaica who?
Jamaica my lunch yet? I'm starved!


missing From The Above Spot?
nation About Your Business,
Services, Or Goods!
'lace Your Advertisement
In This Spot
ida Star Today At (904) 766-8834


The Florida Star/ Prep Rap


-Page 13-6/1ecernber 17, 2005






The Florida Star/Prep Rap Page B-5/December 17, 2005.~


Young Buck



Pleads No Contest


LOS ANGELES Rapper Young Buck plead-
ed no contest Monday to a felony in the stabbing
of a man during a melee at last year's Vibe Awards
show. The 24-year-old entertainer (real name:
David Darnell Brown) entered the plea to a charge
of assault likely to produce great bodily harm and
he was sentenced to three years' probation by
Superior Court Judge James Brandlin. He also
was ordered to perform 80 hours of community
service.
He was charged with stabbing show attendee
Jimmy James Johnson, 27, after Johnson punched
producer Dr. Dre during a melee at the Nov. 15,
2004, awards sliow at the Santa Monica Airport's
Barker Hanger.
Johnson pleaded guilty Sept. 14 to felony
assault and was sentenced to a year in jail. He also
was placed on three years' probation.
Young Buck is signed to Dre's label as part of
50 Cent's G-Unit rap crew. His first solo album
"Straight Outta Ca$hville," debuted at No. 3 on
the Billboard charts last year. A collection of
songs recorded before he signed with G-Unit was
released last month as "T.I.P."
In August, the rapper pleaded not guilty to
felony gun possession charges after he and fellow
G-Unit member Lloyd Banks were arrested in a
van after performing at New York's Madison
Square Garden on the Anger Management 3 tour.
Young Buck is due in court in New York on January 26, 2006.


HO HO HO Quiz Answers

1. home
2. shop
3. holly
4. hotel
5. school
6. Thomas
7. choir
8. author
9. Anthony
10. chowder
11. holidays
12. homework
13. sea horse
14. Honolulu
15. chocolate
16. horizontal
17. photographs


Notorious B.I.G. Duets:

'The Final Chapter'

Out On December 20 '
THE NOTORIOUS B.I.G. DUETS: THE FINAL
CHAPTER" is the most eagerly anticipated album in hip-
hop history. Over two years in
the making, the 22-track col- I
election features rhymes record- i .
ed by B.I.G. throughout his
career, melded with newly
recorded performances by
some of contemporary music's
greatest vocalists and MCs. In
addition, "THE FINAL CHAPTER" incorporates
posthumous appearances by 2Pac, Bob Marley, and Big
Pun.
Featured with the Notorious B.I.G. on "THE FINAL
CHAPTER" are, in order of appearance: Diddy,
Eminem, Obie Trice, Twista, Bone Thugs N Harmony,
Jay-Z, Nate Dogg, Redman, Big Pun, Fat Joe, Freeway,
Snoop Dogg, Ludacris, Faith Evans, Cheri Dennis,
Bobby Valentino, The Game, Nelly, Jagged Edge, Avery
Storm, 2Pac, Mary J. Blige, Nas, Mobb Deep, Lil Wayne,
Juelz Santana, Jim Jones, Scarface, Akon, Big Gee, T.I.,
Slim Thug, Missy Elliott, R. Kelly, Charlie Wilson, Bob
Marley, and KoRn.
The music tracks are all brand-new, created by many
of the industry's top producers, including: Eminem,
Swizz Beatz, Danja, Timbaland, Jazze Pha, Sean C "Sean
Cane," Sean "Diddy" Combs, LV, Coptic, Lesette
Wilson, Andre Harris, Vidal Davis, Just Blaze, Havoc,
Stevie J, D. Dot, Reefa, Mike "Suga Mike" Allen, Mario
Winans, J-Dub, Scott Storch, DJ Green Lantern, Clinton
Sparks, Jonathan Davis, and Atticus Roff.
"Nasty Girl," the first single from the album, was the
#1 most-added track at Urban and CHR/Rhythmic radio.
nationwide last week. Produced by Jazze Pha, it features
The Notorious B.I.G. with Diddy, Nelly, Jagged Edge,
and Avery Storm. Another song from the album, "Hold
Ya Head," was the first music to be released from "THE
FINAL CHAPTER." The dramatic and poignant track-
pairs B.I.G. with a moving sample from "Johnny Was" by
Bob Marley, another legendary artist who died before his
time.
Other highlights of the project include "Get Your
Grind On," which brings together for the first time B.I.G.,
Big Pun, Fat Joe, and Freeway; and "Spit Your Game,"
which pairs Twista with Bone Thugs N Harmony's
Krazie Bone, a long-awaited collaboration that hip-hop-n
fans will go wild for. R. Kelly and Charlie Wilson join
B.I.G. on the soulful groove "Mi Casa,".and the group
KoRn rocks with B.I.G. on "Wake Up Now." B.I.G.'s
mom, Voletta Wallace, makes an appearance on the
album's closing track, "Love Is Everlasting," with the
recital of an original poem about her son Christopher
Wallace. Diddy and Notorious B.I.G. are the album's
Executive Producers, while Voletta Wallace is Co-
Executive Producer along with Faith Evans, Harve
Pierre, and B.I.G.'s managers Wayne Barrow and Mark
Pitts.


Page B-5/December '17, 2005-


The Florida Star/Prep Rap




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"B-8/DECEMBER 17, 2005
Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "Hung Up" Madonna (Maverick) Last Week: No. 1
i 2. "My Humfps" The Black Eyed Peas (A&M) No. 2
3. "Don't Bother" Shakira (Epic) No. 6
4. "Run It!" Chris Brown (Jive) No. 4
5. "Because of You" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 3
6. "Gold Digger" Kanye West Featuring Jamie Foxx (Roc
A Fella/Def Jam) No. 5
7. "We Be Burnin'" Sean Paul (VP) No. 12
8. "Photograph" Nickelback (Roadrtmnner) No. 7
9. "Soul Survivor" Young Jeezey Featuring Akon
(Corporate Thugz/Def Jam) No. 8 "
.10. "Sugar, We're Goin' Down" Fall Out Boy (Fueled By
Ramen/Island) No. 11
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES ,
1. "Who You'd Be Today" Kenny Chesney (BNA) Last
Week: No. 1
.2. "Come a Little Closer" Dierks Bentley (Capitol) No. 4
3. "Better Life" Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 2
4. "Tequila Makes Her Clothes Fall Off' Joe Nichols
(Universal South) No. 6
5. "Good Ride Cowboy" Garth Brooks (Pearl/Promo) No.
5
6. "Skin (Sarabeth)" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street) No. 3
7. "Best I Ever Had" Gary Allan (MCA Nashville) No. 8
8. "Probably Wouldn't Be This Way" LeAnn Rimes
(Asylum/Curb) No. 7
9. "You're Like Comin' Home" Lonestar (BNA) No. 10
10. "She Let Herself Go" George Strait (MCA Nashville)
No. 13
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Hung Up" Madonna (Maverick) Last Week: No. 1
2. "Ends of the Earth" Sun (BML) No. 6
3. "Night of My Life" Barbra Striesand (Columbia) No. 5
4. "I Don't Care" Ricky Martin Featuring.Fat Joe & Amerie
(Columbia) No. 15 .
5. "I Got Your Love" Donna Summer (Universal) New
Entry
6. "No Strings" Lola (Sobe) No. 2
7. "Precious" Depeche Mode (Sire/Mute) No. 4
8. "Cool (Richard X/Photek Mixes)" Gwen Stefani
(Interscope) No. 3
9. "Extraordinary Way" Conjure One (Nettwerk/Promo) No.
23
10. "The Sound of San Francisco" Global Deejays
(Superstar/Import) No. 12
*. ** ** 0




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COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS
Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

WELLNESS CENTER MEMBERSHIP BEING
I ACCEPTED- Struggling with HIV/AIDS, diabetes,
obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, and
other serious health problems? The Wellness Center of
Optimum Health and Well-Being, Inc. can help you.
Certified Specialists work with you to help manage your
health through counseling, education, fitness, and, nutri-
tion. Membership applications are accepted daily, year
round. Must be referred by a physician and services are
free. Located at 2998 Edison Avenue. For more infor-
mation, call Walter Morrison or Dr. Valveta Turner, 904
389-3952.
HOLIDAY HOOPLA FOR CHILDREN-Holiday
Hoopla, a one-day art camp for children filled with spe-
cial art making activities, music, storytelling and much
more on Monday, December 19, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00
p.m. at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829
Riverside Ave. While mom or dad finish their holiday
shopping, children will spend the day creating holiday
treasures to decorate the home or share as gifts. Holiday
Hoopla is open to children ages 6 to 12. Holiday Hoopla
activities will be held throughout Art Connections, the
studios, galleries and gardens. For cost, more informa-
tion or to register, please call 355-0630.
CRITTERS OF THE TALBOT ISLANDS-Fuzzy,
fiirry, or full offeathers, Florida's natural environments
accommodate an assortment of wildlife. The Talbot
Islands State Park is hosting a Ranger Program that will
discuss a wide variety of animals that live and visit the
Talbot Islands. Join Ranger Cliff at the Ribault Club on
Fort George Island Cultural State Park on Saturday,
December 24 at 1:00 p.m., or Sunday, December 25 at
1:00 p.m. for this informative talk. Free! No reserva-
tions necessary. Please call the Ranger Station (904-
251-2320) for further information. DIRECTIONS TO
THE RIBAULT CLUB: From 1-95 or SR 9A: take
Heckscher Drive/ A1A north past the St Johns River
Ferry. Turn left at Fort Geoige Road. From Amelia
Island: take A1A south over the Ft George Inlet and past
the entrance to Huguenot Park. Turn right at Fort George
Road. After the entrance turn proceed 1.8 miles on Fort
George road bearing right at the fork in the road. Parking
lot is across the road from the Club.
JAZZ PERFORMANCE-Five-time-Grammy award
winner Bela Fleck & the Flecktones will perform at the
University of North Florida on Thursday, January 26,
2006. The curtain will rise at 7:30 p.m. in the Lazzara
Performance Hall of the University's Fine Arts Center,
The concert is part of the 2005-06 season of the Great
American Jazz Series that is sponsored by the school's
Department of Music. Now in its 18th year and unique
among American colleges, the Great American Jazz
Series has brought more than 100 major jazz artists to
the University for both concert performances and class-
room appearances. Also appearing that evening will be
UNF's own award-winning Jazz Ensemble 1, under the
direction of J.B. Scott. This ensemble completed a two
week tour of the People's Republic of China last summer
and a performance at the Great Wall. Tickets can be
purchased from the UNF Ticket Office, 620-2878 or
online at www.unf.edu/coast/music/calendar.


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Jacksonville's

Most Heated

Radio Talk Show!

North Florida's Best "...,.
Daily Talk Show!


AM 1530

WEEKDAYS r I
2-6 P.M.


CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http://www.wymm1530.com

A 9 J


Children's Christmas Party Of Jacksonville To Give

Away 50,000 New Toys On December 17


501c3 charity. All contribu-
tions are tax deductible. For


more information, call Joan
Lamer at 904- 221-1452 or


visit us
www.ccpoj.org


online at


Bold City Chapter Links


Celebrate Holiday Season


JACKSONVILLE -- The
seventh annual Children's
Christmas Party of
Jacksonville will take place
Saturday, December 17,
2005, from 9 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. at the Prime Osborn
Convention Center.
The Children's
Christmas Party of
Jacksonville is an independ-
ent charity that partners with
area businesses and Toys for
Tots to distribute new toys to
more than 9,000 area chil-
dren who might not other-
wise receive them.
Children age 12 and
younger may attend and
must be accompanied by a
chaperone to receive toys.
Santa Claus, Jaxson deVille,
and the ROAR cheerleaders
will make special appear-
ances.
The Party will also fea-
ture musical performances
by various local groups.
First Student, Inc. has
recommitted its buses and
drivers to bring children to
the Party from designated
communities throughout the
day.
Hope Worldwide, a non-
profit charitable organiza-
tion that offers programs to
serve disadvantaged chil-
dren around the world, will
partner with the Party.
Major Children's
Christmas Party sponsors
include Armor Holdings,
Broad Based
Communications, Inc.,
Brumos Motor Cars, Coggin
Automotive Group, CSX
Corporation, Florida East
Coast Industries, Florida
Times-Union, FPIC
Insurance Group, Inc., Gate
Petroleum Company,
Jacksonville Jaguars, Ja-Ru,
Inc., KPMG, Mac Papers,
Mayo Clinic, Publix
Supermarkets Charities,'
RegencyCenters Corp.,
Stein Mart, Travis &
Margaret Storey, Suddath
Companies, Universal
Motor Credit, Wachovia,
Wal-Mart Stores and WJXT.
The Children's
Christmas Party of
Jacksonville is a non-profit
organization founded in
December 1999 by Travis
and Margaret Storey to pro-
vide toys for Jacksonville
children who might not oth-
erwise receive Christmas
toys.
The Children's
Christmas Party of
Jacksonville is a tax-exempt


Seated is Dr. Norma S. White, President. Standing from
left are, Mrs Sandra Hull-Richardson, Dr. Barbara Darby,
Mrs. Roslyn Phillips, Mrs. Diana Spicer, Mrs. Arlinda
Adams, Mrs. Francina Dunbar, Chairman; Mrs. Mary
Walker, Mrs. Pamela Grant Adams and Mrs. Santhea
Brown.


Mrs. Deloris Mitchell (center) is presented one of many
door prizes. Presenting the prize are Mrs. Francina
Dunbar and Mrs. Mary Walker of the Courtesy
Committee.


Members and guests dance the night away doing thme
Mississippi Slide. On the front row are Dr. Barbara
Darby, Mrs. Pamela Grant Adams and Mrs. Mary Brown.
On the Second row from left, are Mrs Ruth Waters
McKay and Lt. Col. Bob Porter. On the third row are Mrs.
Roslyn Phillips and John Draby.


Shown here, Committee members Diana Spicer, Mary
Walker and Francina Dunbar award a door prize to Mrs.
Anita Ford.


The Bold City Chapter of
the Links, Inc. started the
yuletide season with a
Christmas Fellowship
.Service at the Hyatt Hotel.
Members and their
guests enjoyed an evening
of comradery, feasting,


dancing and socializing.
Members present includ-
ed Links Arlinda Adams,
Judy Batson and Connecting
Link Alonzo Batson, Mary
Brown, Santhea Brown and
Connecting Link Alvin
Brown, Christella Bryant


and Connecting Link
Ezekiel Bryant, Barbara
Darby and Connecting Link
John Darby, Francina
Dunbar, Josephine Fiveash
and guest, Anita Ford.
Connecting Link Bill
Ford and guests, Pamela
Grant Adams and
Connecting Link Charles
Adams, Sandra Hull
Richardson and Connecting
Link James Richardson,
Jacquelyn Lee and guest,
Ruth Waters McKay and
guest, Deloris Mitchell,
Janice Nelson and
Connecting Link Tony
Nelson.
Ruby Newman and
Connecting Link T.C.
Newman, Roslyn Phillips,
Pamela Prier and
Connecting Link Lemorris,
Barbara Shuman, Diana
Spicer, Mary Walker, Norma
White, Wanda Willis and
Connecting Link Floyd
Willis.
Flu Shot Campaign
Underway
Jacksonville residents
are being encouraged to pro-
tect themselves and their
families by getting the shot
and not the flu.
Who should get the shot:
*People who are 50 and
older.
*Children 6-23 months.
*Adults and children
with chronic health condi-
tion (like heart diseases, dia-
betes, kidney disease, asth-
ma, cancer or HIV/AIDS).
*Women who will be
pregnant during the flu sea-
son.
*People who can give
the flu to those at high risk
(if you live with or care for
anyone in the. groups men-
tioned above).
*Anyone who wants to
prevent the flu.
For more information
about getting a flu shot for
yourself and your family
members, call your doctor or
pediatrician.
If you don't have a doc-
tor, call the Duval County
Health Department's
Immunization Center at
924-1697.

MERRY
CHRISTMAS!
THANKS
FOR
READING
AND

SUPPORTING
THE
FLORIDA
STAR!


PAGE C-1


FLORID.A STAR


DECEMBER 172005







FrnRInA STAR


DECMEBER 17, 2005


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4 STEPS-FOR KIDS






INFANT TODDLER BOOSTER SAFETY BELT


The #1 killer of children is

car crashes. With a booster

seat, your child is 59% less

likely to be injured in a car

crash. If they're under *4'9"

they should be in a booster

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proper fit. And the right fit

makes all the difference to


their future.


4


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Ron
Williams
Co-host/
Sports


REAL TOPICS!


REAL ISSUES!


SATURDAY


1 p.m.


WCGL 1360 AM


'( Deadline for Ads:

,. "I)

CA, Tuesdays @ 5 p.m.



Call: (904) 766-8834






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DECEMBER 17, 2005 FLORIDA STAR PAGE C-3


GETTING,


TO KNOW US


*Profiles of area businesses and business persons whose ads appear in The Florida
Star. To place your. ad and profile call (904) 766-8834.


J& W Discount Jacksonville's

Best Kept Secret Until Now


.

i-.1 .
-





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i
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1 .,* .- ;.' .


J&W Discount, located at the corner of Edgewood Avenue and Post Street in Murray
Hill, has a 11,000 square foot showroom with groceries, cleaning supplies, health and
beauty, housewares, home decorating products, paint accessories, plumbing, electri-
cal, automotive and more.
Have you heard about J&W Discount. It's the store in Murray Hill that everybody's talk-
ing about. The store is one of Jacksonville's most fun and exciting places to shop.. The
store started in 1994 as an outlet for mostly hardware type items-such paint, plumbing, etc.
It has now grown into a store that sells high quality top-of-the line merchandise at discount
prices..
The store is located at the comer of Edgewood Avenue and Post Street in Murray Hill. It
has a large parking lot.
J&W Discount scouts the southeast for closeouts, overstocks, bankrupt sales, going out
of business sales, auctions, etc. looking for top quality merchandise that can be sold to cus- '
tomers at prices that are below wholesale.
'The store has a 11,000 square foot showroom with groceries, cleaning supplies, health
and beauty, housewares, home decorating products, paint accessories, plumbing, electrical,
automotive and more. It is currently featuring two large departments just in time for
Christmas. .
The store has the best deals in town on TVs--big screens up to 65 inches, Plasma TVs and
LCD TVs. It also has regular TVs and TV/DVD Combos. You can also check out the big
selection of Camcorders and Digital Cameras.
J&W Discount has a huge selection of name brand clothing for men, women and children
that is now on sale for 50% off of the already low prices. These are brands like Tommy
Hilfiger, Nike, Gloria Vanderbilt, Izod and many more. They are authentic brands and not
copies or "knock-offs". For example, the store has boys Izod jeans that regularly sell for
$9.95 but are now on sale for only $4.98. These jeans have a suggested retail price of $32.00
Merchandise is coming everyday. Many discount.stores are crammed with a lot of stuff
that is odd, damaged, or just stuff nobody:really wants. Many times, the reason they have it
is because nobody else could sell it. At J & W. Discount, employees concentrate on buying
merchandise that they know people want and need. They also keep an eye out for things that
are a little different and no just "run-of-the-mill" stuff that everybody else has. The store has
a lot of top quality merchandise that is hard to find at discount prices.
The store has lots of Christmas items. There are tons of decorations, blow-up Santas and
Snowmen, lights, ornaments, trees, gift wrap, bows and gifts for everyone (SEE AD ON
PAGE A-6). For direction to the store call 387-4651.

City Government Office To Close

In Observance Of Holiday Season


City government offices
will be closed on Friday,
December 23 and Monday,
December 26, in observance
of the Christmas holiday.
City government offices will
be closed on Monday,
January 2, 2006.-
CIty Hall (117 W. Duval
/Street), the City Hall Annex
(220 E. Bay Street), the
Courthouse (330 E. Bay
Street) and the Yates
Building (231 E. Forsyth
Street) will be closed on
those days.
Residential solid waste
collection schedules will not
change for the Christmas
and new York holidays.
The Trail Ridge Landfill
(5110 Highway 301) and the
West Yard'Waste Facility on
Imeson Road will maintain
the normal operating sched-
ule for the Christmas and
New year's holidays.
The South Yard Waste
Facility on Philips Highway
will be closed on Saturday,
December 24, but will main-
tain the normal operating
schedule the remainder of
the holidays.


The Household
Hazardous Waste and
Appliance Drop-off
Facilities (2675
Commonwealth Avenue)
will be closed on Saturday,
December 24, for Christmas
Eve, but will be open on the
normal schedule of
Tuesday-Saturday for the
week following Christmas.
The business offices of
the JEA, JEA Plaza, 21 W.
Church Street, the Office of
the Tax Collector, including
all Tax Collector branch
offices, and the Property
Appraiser's Office will be.
closed December 23,

Character cannot be
developed in ease
and quiet. Only
through experience
of trial and suffering
can the soul be
strengthened, ambi-
tion inspired, and
success achieved.

Helen Keller
(1880 1968)


December, 26 and January 2.
The Offices and clinics
of the Duval County Health
Department will be open on
Friday, December 23, but
closed on Monday,
'December 26 and Monday,
January 2.
All public libraries will
be closed Friday, December
23 through Monday,
*December 26. The libraries
will also close Sunday,
January 1 and Monday,
January 2.

In Loving
Memory Of
The Late

John Henry Peacock
1914-1985
Out of our lives you may
have gone, but in our
hearts you still live on.

We Love and Miss You:
Daughter and Son-In-
Law Don and Ora
McQueen; Grands,
Greatgrands and other
relatives.


Jacksonville Business Incubator

Adds Four New Tenants


The Beaver Street
Enterprise Center is a
25,000 sq. ft. professional
office facility offering mod-
em, ready to move in work-
place amenities for startup
and existing small business-
es as well as business techni-
cal assistance, counseling,
mentoring and assistance in.
marketing and in obtaining
business financing.
The Center is geographi-


The Beaver Street
Enterprise Center has added
four new tenants to the mix
of businesses at the Center's
location at 1225 W. Beaver
St., on the comer of Beaver
and Blanche Streets in
Northwest Jacksonville.
Originally formed in
1985, Lee Wesley
Restaurants, LLC has
focused exclusively on the
Food Service industry since
1993. The firm currently
operates in orlando and
Jacksonville, and plans to
expand its Jacksonville
operations.
Currently the company
owns three Burger King
franchises in Jacksonville; at
the airport, on Union Street
and on Kings Road near
Edward Waters College.
Its general manager will
staff the regional office,
located at the Beaver Street
Enterprise Center, and will
handle personnel issues and
marketing for the local
stores. Owner Arthur Lee
can be contacted at (904)
265-0337.
Augustine Enofe, CPA,
is a sole proprietorship
offering full service
accounting and business
consulting for mid to large
size companies.
In addition to the CPA
firm, Mr. Enofe recently
formed Image Title
Company, which handles
title insurance services for
residential and commercial
customers.
The title company, co-
located with the CPA firm at
the Beaver Street Enterprise
Center, is staffed by,
President William davis and
closing agent Daniel
Demoy.
The firms can be reached
at (904) 265-1938
(Augustine Enofe, CPA) and
(904) 265-1937 (Image Title
Company).
Lionel Smith and
Associates mobilizes over
11 independent licensed
agents who help distribute
financial services products
such as life insurance,
investments (short-term and
long term), debt
solutions/mortgages (refi-
nances and purchases), and
prepaid legal services.
Led' by Reginald Vice
President Lionel Smith and
Regional Vice President
Partner, Janeen Smith, the
company plans to bring their
sales force to a total of 20
within the next 12 months.
additional information can
be obtained by contacting
the company. at (904) 265-
2934.
"We are pleased to add
new businesses to the roster
of service providers housed
at the Beaver Street
Enterprise Center," said cen-
ter Manager, Jackie Perry.
"Each of them exhibits the
best of the entrepreneurial
spirit, and we look forward
to their continued growth
and success."


THANKS
FOR READING
AND
SUPPORTING
THE FLORIDA
STAR!


ADVERTISE IN

AND

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iTHE FLORIDA STAR

CALL

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cally positioned to stimulate
economic growth in
Jacksonville's northwest-
neighborhoods and is run by
nonprofit Core City
Business Incubators, Inc. as
an initiative of
FreshMinistries.
For more information on
the Beaver Street Enterprise
Center, contact Manager
Jackie Perry at (904) 265-
4702.

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FI RST BLACKS FOR I'FLORIIA

,.-.





DEATH

NOTICES
BARAN-Edward Joseph,
65, died December 8, 2005.
BAKER-Bishop M., died
December 10, 2005.
BELLAMY-Lillie Mae,
died December 13, 2005
BOOKER-Johnny F., 60,
died December 9, 2005.
BROWN-Altamese, died
December 4, 2005.
Alphonso West Mortuary
BROWN-Ionas, died
December 10, 2005.
COHEN-Wendelin F., died
December 2, 2005.
FRAZIER-Theresa, died
December 11, 2005.
GAUDLIN-Sudie Mae,
died December 5, 2005.
GILLISLEE-Clarence W.,
died December 7, 2005.
GREEN-Wanda Y., 53,
died December 12, 2005.
HILL-Josephine, died
December 10, 2005.
Alphonso West Mortuary.
JAMES-Annie Ruth, died
December 11, 2005.
Alphonoso West Mortuary.
JENKINS-Henry, Jr., 95,
died December 13, 2005.
Alphonoso West Mortuary,
Inc.
JOHNSON-Thelma C., 85,
died December 12, 2005.
LONDON-Baby Shirah
Chanel, died, December 7,
2005.
MCCLENDON-
Christopher, died
December 2, 2005.
NEWSOM-Cynthia, 61,
died December 6, 2005.
SOWENS-Jack, died
December 7, 2005.
PATTERSON-Johnathan,
20, died decemebr 6, 2005.
PAYNE-Carrie, died
December 12, 2005.
ROCKWELL-Azzie L.
Rockwell, died December
12, 2005.
SANDERS-Kiara, died
December 7, 2005.
SWAIN-David Earl, Jr., 56,
died December 9, 2005.
THOMPSON-Delores,
died December 10, 2005.
TUTSON-Willie Lee, died


December 11, 2005.
WEATHERS-Baby Girl,
died december 9, 2005.
WILLIAMS-Willie C., Sr.,
died December 10, 2005.
YOUNeGBLOOD-Dan C.,
died December 11, 2005.


.PAGE C-j


FLORIDA STAR


DECEMBER 17, 2005


oil 1l

66



lot






(L 1~fASA EEBR1,20


Flagler College Graduates St. Johns County

Sheriff's Office Public Servants


The St. .Johns County
Sheriffs Office is pleased to
announce the graduation of
several of its public servants
from the Public
Administration
Baccalaureate Program
offered by Flagler College.
The ceremonies performed
this past Saturday December
10, 2005 included personnel
from the Sheriffs Office
Finance, Administration and
Victim Advocacy units, as
well as, Sheriff Shoar who
served as the commencement
speaker and was awarded an
honorary Doctor of Laws
Degree.
Sheriffs Office members
awarded their BA in Public
Administration include;
Sergeant Susan Selfridge;
New Orleans


Ms Raye Tanner, Ms. Cristie
Taylor, and Ms. Donna
Miller.
This graduation repre-
sefts many years of hard
work and collaboration by
Flagler College, community
leaders and the students
themselves to bring the first
Public Administration
Program graduation to
fruition. Additionally,
Flagler College established
the "David B. Shoar Award
for Academic Achievement", Left to Right; Chancellor William
an award to be given at each (Asst to the President); Sheriff D
graduation to the student of the St. Johns County
who achieves the. highest Sheriffs Office and Michele
grade point a% erage. There Sammons from The Flagler
were two recipients for this County Sheriffs Office, each
year's David B. Shoar Award graduating with a 4.0 GPA.
for Academic Achievement; Sheriff Shoar stated
they were Ms. Cristie Taylor "Working together with

Mayor Nagin Addresses


L. Proctor;. Ms. Mary Jane Dillon
David B. Shoar (with presented
Flagler College and others to
bring this program to our
community has been a
worthwhile effort, one which
will elevate excellence at The
St Johns County Sheriffs
Office."


'4Gift-h
~t~12906 Norwich Street0

Orlrinswic14 Georgia 31520 ,.
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i~ A.;, ''.


Gift Baskets
Handbags
Hats
Gloves
Shoes
T-Shirts


"' ~,'i,*


Monday Thursday Friday
1 p.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday
10 a.m. 6 p.m.

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Evacuees In Houston


By. Jesse Muhammad

HOUSTON (NNPA) -
With an optimistic spirit,
New Orleans Mayor C.
Ray Nagin visited
Houston recently to.
update Hurricane Katrina
evacuees on the recovery
efforts of the devastated
city. Hundreds filled the
domed sanctuary of
Pleasant Grove
Missionary Baptist
Church for an opportunity
to hear his address, share
their frustrations and
regain hope.
"Everything that you
didn't like about New
Orleans, let's get rid of it.
Everything that you liked
about New Orleans, let's
enhance it. Everything
you dreamed about and
wished New Orleans had,
let's make it happen,"
Mayor Nagin stated.
The visit was one of
several meetings Mayor
Nagin is convening out-
side of Louisiana as a
way to assure displaced
residents that the city will
survive and prosper.
Although his report
revealed that New
Orleans is facing a $200
million budget deficit, he
focused on the accom-
plishments since the
storm-nearly 4 million
cubic yards of debris have
been removed; 60 percent
of the city now has elec-
tricity and about 50 per-
cent gets natural gas serv-
ice. He also informed that
clean drinking water is
available in many of the
neighborhoods and emer-
gency services, such as
911, are functioning.
"There will be an
explosion of school activ-
ity after the first of the
year," he said, adding that
those willing to work at
minimum-wage jobs at
Sears or Burger King can
earn bonuses, where they
will make upwards of $16
an hour.
Mayor Nagin is focus-
ing on three core issues
with the federal govern-


ment: rebuilding the levee
system, solving crucial
housing issues and tax
incentives for New.
Orleans businesses.
For rebuilding the
levee system, Dutch and
German officials are
being consulted about
how to strengthen the lev-
ees to withstand a greater
impact. Mayor Nagin pre-
sented the proposed
development of a regional
levee board that will be a
consolidation of levee
boards from neighboring
states.
He also said Federal
Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) officials
had begun to identify safe
places to set up mobile
homes for as many as
6,400 returning families.
He also urged everyone to
start planning to assess
damage to their destroyed
properties and decide if it
is feasible for them to
return. Lastly, New
Orleans businesses may
be encouraged to reopen
and operate in New
Orleans if given tax
incentives.
"New Orleans is com-
ing back, but it will take
time. You cannot entirely
fix a city that was entirely
devastated in three or four
months," Mayor Nagin
maintained. "I'm trying
to make it better. But I
can only do so much. I
need your help." He
stressed the importance of
writing letters to state and
federal lawmakers to
apply pressure.,
"We're sitting around
with anger, but we need
to get more vocal and
speak up. Washington is
afraid that we're going to
wake up and apply pres-
sure!" he insisted.
The meeting that was
scheduled for two hours
stretched into five, as the
mayor then opened the
floor to questions. Two
long lines formed imme-
diately, with evacuees
asking questions regard-
ing environmental con-


cerns, such as air quality,
toxic fumes and contami-
nated topsoil, to Katrina
flu rumors. Several won-
dered whether the hardest
hit areas--New Orleans
East and the Lower 9th
Ward-would be rebuilt.
Many in attendance felt
that those areas will not
be rebuilt and are being
purposely overlooked.
"We demand that one
of our members be in
those planning meetings,"
stated Dorothy Stakes of
the ACORN Katrina
Survivors Association.
"We demand that there be
some form of public rela-
tions on behalf of the city
to clean up the image of
the New Orleans people.
The media has portrayed
us wrong."
Along with Mayor
Nagin were FEMA offi-
cials who received heated
words from several frus-
trated evacuees who felt
they were being treated
unjustly by the federal
agency.
"There is no consisten-
cy when you phone
FEMA!" shouted.Danyell
Santiago, who worked in
the professional nursing
field.' She complained
that she has constantly
faxed and mailed her doc-
uments to FEMA only to
have them lost. She has
over $95,000 in damages
to her property. "I'm tired
of hearing their same old
apology and how they
feel sorry for us. I need
somebody to tell me
something." One of the
FEMA representatives
stood to answer her ques-
tion, but offered only to
speak with her, after the
conclusion of the meet-
ing, which upset the audi-
ence even more.
"We're going to
rebuild every section of
New Orleans, but when
you all receive money to
rebuild, be aware of false
contractors who are steal-
ing people's money,"
Mayor Nagin cautioned.


WHAT TOOK YOU A LIFETIME
TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.



WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.
Learn the warning signs at
StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE.
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Source: The Media Audit ,
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DECEMBER 17,'2005


P4d F C-4


FLORIDA ST,4R





F/AUL C- -


DEC hizLvIlLR 17, 2005


National Day To Honor Jaguars Lick Wounds, Get Ready


Negro League Pushed Rebound Against San Francisco


Still unscuffed and encased inside a small, clear cube in
the office'of U.S. Senator Bill Nelson is the solid-cork base-
ball bearing the signature of Bob "Peach Head" Mitchell.
The aging pitcher, who played for the Kansas City
Monarchs from 1954 to 1957, gave the ball to nelson's office
last year after the senator helped convince Major League
Baseball to give dozens of former Negro League players a
retirement stipend.
Now, Nelson is filing new legislation urging Congress to
designate May 20, 2006 as National "Negro Leaguers
Recognition Day."
"Even after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in
1947, baseball still was slow to integrate," Nelson, "This
legislation would pay tribute to the many athletes who were
denied opportunities in the mdst of segregation."
The resolution not only recognizes former Negro League
players like "Satchel" Paige, Josh Gibson and Robinson, but
it's also intended to educate fans about the Negro Leagues'
coni t ibutioni. to the national pastime..
The legislation is being introduced by Nelson, a democ-
rat from Florida, and Senator Jim Talent, a Republican from
Missouri. in recognition of "the teams and players of the
Negro baseball I Cag,2Li for their achievements, dedication,
! ..cr:'fic>. and contributions to both baseball and our
Nation."
It sets Nla\ 2i as the dat of recognition because on that
day in 1920 the first game of the first successful Negro
L ea ie was played.
Last year. Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig agreed to
nelson's request to establish a fund for players, giving them
the option of geUiini $833.33 per month for four years--a rate
of $10.000t per year--or $375 a month for life.
Nelson got involved in 2001, after receiving a letter from
Mitchell of Tampa. Mitchell lives in tampa, an area that's a
home to a number of former Negro League players.

Tiger Woods Won't

Play In Mercedes
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. Tiger Woods is so serious
about wanting a shorter season on the PGA Tour that he is
skipping the season-opening Mercedes Championships at
Kapalua next month.
"I haven't had an offseason," Woods said. "And I need
one."The only other time Woods has missed the tournament
was in 2003, when he was recovering from surgery on his
left knee that kept him away from golf for two months.
His withdrawal is a serious blow to the star-depraved
Mercedes Championships, which usually has a strong field
because it is limited to PGA Tour winners from the previous
year.


Jacksonville defenders put the clamps on Indianapolis
quarter Peyton Manning (#18 in white).Manning was
sacked a season-high three times. Manning finished 24
of 36 for 324 yards. He threw two touchdown passes to
Marvin Harrison. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)


David Garrard heaves the ball against the colts. Garrard
finished 26-of-35 for 250 yards, including a 1-yard touch-
down pass to Jimmy Smith. He is 37-of-55 for 366 yards,
with three touchdowns, one interception and one fumble
in two starts. He also has 14 carries for 32 yards and a
score. The Jags are 1-1 with Garrard as the starter this
season. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)


The Jaguars defense (in teal) rejoice after sacking Colts
Quarterback Peyton Manning (#18 in white).






"4


Jacksonville runningback Greg Jones (#33 in teal) i
stopped after making some positive yards against the
Colts. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)


Jimmy Smith (#82) became the 13th player in NFL his-
The Roar of The Jaguars Cheerleaders perform a dance tory to surpass 12,000 yards receiving, against the
routine during a break in the game. Colts, he finished with eight catches for 102 yards and a
score. It was his third 100-yard game of the season and


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(PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)

Following their 26-18
loss to the Indianapolis
Colts at home on December
12, appear headed for the
playoffs for the first time in
six years.
The Jacksonville
Jaguars, play the San
Francisco 49ers (2-11) at
home on Sunday, Deember
18.
The Jaguars (9-4) are
likely to earn the AFC's No.
5 seed and play New
England in a wild-card
game, which would be their
first appearance in the play-
offs since the 1999 team
went 14-2 and lost the AFC
Championship Game at
home against Tennessee.
Jacksonville could clinch
a wild-card berth, but only if
Denver also wins and
Pittsburgh, Kansas City and
San Diego lose. .
The Jaguars' three
remaining opponents -- the
49ers, Houston and
Tennessee -- have a com-
bined record of 7-32.
Peyton Manning threw
two touchdown passes to
Marvin Harrison, Mike
Vanderjagt kicked four field'
goals and the Colts
remained unbeaten with a
26-18 victory over the
Jacksonville Jaguars on
Sunday.
Indy became the fourth
team in NFL history to start
13-0, locked up a third con-
secutive division title and
secured home-field advan-
tage throughout the playoffs.
Backup quarterback


the 46th of his career. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)


David Garrard will once
again lead the Jaguars into
battle while an injured
Byron Leftwich heals.
The Jaguars will try to
avoid having a letdown
after losing to the Colts.
A letdown, however,
may not make much of a dif-
ference against the 49ers.
The Jaguars, ranked No. 8,
have the highest-rated pass
defense that San Francisco.
quarterback Alex Smith has
faced.
Last Sunday, the 49ers
started Smith, overall No.'l
draft pick, against the
Seattle Seahawks. The
Seahawks won 41 3
Smith, who had a passer
rating of 31.8, completed
40.9 percent of his passes
(9-for-22) for 77 yards. He
threw an interception, fum-
bled twice and had the ball
slip out of his hands on two
occasions.


The 49ers have lost six
in a row and are 1-11 since
an opening day victory over
the St. Louis Rams.
Jacksonville Coach Jack
Del Rio said Fred Taylor and
Greg Jones will continue to
share time, and Taylor
agreed with the decision
Wednesday.
Taylor, who has 16 car-
ries for 11 yards in the last
five games, starting two of
them and missing the other
three with a bruised right
foot, returned from injury
Sunday against
Indianapolis,.
Jones played mostof the
second half as the Jaguars
tried to rally from a 26-3
deficit.
Taylor has 625 yards
rushing and two touchdowns
on 155 carries this season.
Jones has 531 yards and four
scores on 16 fewer attempts.


Wesley Taylor Named All-American
STALLAHASSEE, Fla. Florida A&M
sophomore kicker Wesley Taylor was
named a first-team selection by the
Associated Press to its' 2005 NCAA
Division I-AA All-American Football
Team on WedAesday afternoon.
Taylor, a 5-7, 170-pounder from
SJ Riverview, Florida, led Division I-AA and
J the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference with
Wesley a 45.88 (45.9) punting average on the year,
Taylor on 59 attempts.
A member of the 2005 All-MEAC
team, Taylor eclipsed the Florida A&M single-season mark
of 43.4 set by All-American John Eason in 1966.
Taylor is the first FAMU punter to achieve All-America
status since Darrin Ford in 1997 and Vaughn Wilson in 1987
and 1988.


FLR non A CTAR


I







DUE1


JAIL OR BAIL.

EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
POSSESSION OF CONTROL SUBSTANCE-On Sunday,
December 10, 2005 at 10:55 p.m. a police officer was
dispatched to Myrtle Avenue. Upon arrival, the officer
made contact with a 40-year-old male (suspect) who
was outside his vehicle. The suspect had a strong odor
of .an alcoholic beverage on his person and bloodshot
eyes. The suspect said that he was drunk and that he
had called his wife to pick up the car for safety reasons.
The officer placed the 'suspect in the back seat of his
patrol car. The officer then looked inside of the sus-
pect's car, and in plain view was a dollar bill laying in
the driver's seat folded neatly. The officer observed a
white powdery substance fall to the seat. This substance
tested positive for cocaine. A further search of the ash-
tray revealed a small blunt cigarette that had contained
marijuana. Also, there was an open container of Mad
Dog 20/20 wine in the rear seat of the vehicle. The sus-
pect was read his rights, arrested, transported to jail
and charged with a felony.
PETIT THEFT-On Saturday, December 10, 2005 at
10:30 a.m. a police officer was dispatched to Belks
Department Store, located at 10306 Southside Blvd.
Mall, in reference to a retail theft by a 40- year-old
female (suspect). Upon arrival, the officer met with the
store manager. The store manager told the police officer
that the suspect entered the toy department section of
the store, and started concealing toys in a pink Belks
bag she was carrying. The suspect exited the store
without paying for the items. The store manager and
the loss prevention officer confronted the suspect in the
mall and escorted her back into the store until the police
arrived. The property that was recovered-,totaled
$20.00. The suspect was read her rights. She admitted
to stealing the items. The suspect was arrested, trans-
ported to jail, and charged with a misdemeanor.
LATE CHILD SUPPORT-On Saturday, December
10, 2005 a police officer was dispatched to the football
field at Paxon High School at 3239 Norman E. Thagard
Blvd. in reference to a 28-year-old male (suspect),
wanted for late child. support. Upon arrival, the officer
met with the. complainant who pointed out the suspect
on the football field. The police officer made contact
with the suspect who was very cooperative. After con-
firming the outstanding warrant with the suspect for
late child support, the suspect was arrested, transport-
ed to jail, and charged nxith a ci il offense.,
FORGED COUNTERFEIT BILLS-On Saturday,
December 10, 2005 at 7:30 a.m. a police officer made
contact with a 22- year-old female (suspect), at 8916
Galveston Ave. The suspect has an outstanding warrant.
On 6/29/05, the suspect cashed a payroll check for
$335.42 at a convenience store located at 8916
Galveston Ave. which was later returned as a counter-
feit check. The suspect provided her driver's license
number and fingerprint when the check was cashed.
The driver's license number matched the suspect's
identity and the fingerprint analysis matched the sus-
pect as well. Additionally, the employee of the (victim)
business that cashed the check positively identified the
suspect in ,a photo spread.. The suspect was read her
rights, and she' said that she understood. The suspect
was arrested, transported to jail, and charged with a
felony.
A HABITUAL TRAFFIC OFFENDER-On Saturday,
December 10, 2005 at 4:23 p.m. a police officer, while
on patrol, observed a 22- year-old male driver (suspect)
driving a, vehicle, with a covering obscuring the tag.
The officer initiated a traffic stop in the 2000 Block of
Market Street and made contact with the suspect. The
officer asked the suspect for his driver's license, regis-
-tration, and proof of insurance. The suspect advised the
officer that his driver's license was suspended. The offi-
cer checked with ID and records which revealed that his
license was indeed suspended for five counts of traffic
violations from 4/22/03 to 12/10/05. Further search
revealed that the suspect had a baggie of marijuana. The
suspect was advised of his rights at this time. The sus-
pect stated that the drugs belonged to .him. The suspect
was arrested, transported to jail, and charged with a
felony.
WRITING STOLEN CHECKS-On Saturday,
December 10,2005 at 8:00 p.m. a police officer respon-
der to a follow up investigation at 1501 Normandy
Village Park Way-K-Mart Store in reference to a 26-
year-old female (suspect), possibly writing checks from
a checkbook at a K-Mart a Winn Dixie, and a CVS


store. The detective interviewed the suspect who
admitted to purchasing items from all three stores with
stolen checks. .There were three receipts from CVS and
one from the Winn Dixie store on Roosevelt Blvd. in
her purse. The items that were purchased with the
stolen checks were returned to the stores, and signed
for by the store managers. Employees of the stores pos-
itively identified the suspect. The receipts were placed
in the property room. The suspect was read her rights,
arrested, transported to jail, and charged with a felony.


DECEMBER 17, 2005


Your Weekly Horoscope

(DECEMBER 17, 2005-DECEMBER 23, 2005)'


Aries (March 21 -
April 19) You can have some
wonderful experi-
ences this week if
you are willing to
be open to the sug-
gestions of others.
Your ability to. communicate
grows stronger and a creative
impulse may lead you in new
directions. Prepare to be sur-
prised! Party plans could sud-
denly change.
Taurus (April 20 May
20)Your sense of humor, will
surprise a few folks
this week. Careful
with your wit which
is sharper than
usual. An intense
work relationship suddenly
turns to sugar and spice.,
Beware of strangers bearing
gifts -- or at least be aware of
strange gifts. Shop frugally.'
Gemini (May 21 -
June 21) You have
the special power to
make a difference
this week in some--
one's life. Perhaps
you will'be asked t Ioluhteer
or help out another in some
way. Do so gladly because you
will be planting seeds that will
bring you a true sense of your
special purpose in life.
Cancer (June 22 July
22) Require others to state
their true desires
and you will find
preparing for the
holidays will be a
lot more delightful. Some
changes in your home could
positively delight you even if it
confuses others. This is a great
time to buy stuff for your home
and to do some redecorating. A
message from a distance gives
you renewed hope.
Leo (July 23 August
22) Let the good
times roll. You are
ready for the parties
and the fun but it
seems like every-
one else is lha\ ig trouble keep-
ing up with you. Take a leader-
ship role in planning -the
upcoming events. People are
looking for direction right now
and you are just the person to
provide it.
Virgo (August 23 -
September 22) Last minutes
D changes in plans
could really have
you jumping for
joy. A release from
a commitment or responsibility
brings you back into focus so


that you can concentrate on
what brings you joy. Take time
off for yourself this week and
let some work slide. It will still
be here next week.
Libra (September 23 -
October 23) When the joy of
life comes to one, it
is often easy to
ignore the wonder
that has occurred.
Be ready to observe and then
engage in the pleasures that
will be afforded you. This is no
time to be shy or turn down the
compliments that will be com-
ing your way.
Scorpio (October 24 -
November 21) The time for
D shopping has
arrived. You have
some wonderful
magic going on this
week that will lead to wonder-
ful bargains. Secrets become
kind of fun as you try to hide
the. sweet surprises that you
have planned for others. A sud-
den invitation could prove to be
just what you need for a bit of
rest and relaxation.
Sagittarius (No ember'
22 December
21) It is mune to
prepare for th'ove
special guests. You
may find that an unexpected
visitor brings some special joy
to your life. There is a focus on
children and you may find
younger people just more fun
than usual. Travel plans could
get confused so watch all your
bags and recheck your reserva-
tions.
Capricorn (December
22 January 19)
Put your work on
hold this week and
move out into the
world of fun. You can be the
center of attraction as you net-
work in your social scene. A
new opportunity presents itself
that is quite unexpected but
will lead you to new adventures
in the coming ear. Be killingg
to consider serious\ a new job
- offer.
Aquarius (January 20
February 18) You are going
D to be a special
attraction this week
Ij. others are drawn
to your sense of
unique mystery. You have cre-
ated quite a following in your
special circle and others will be
asking for your advice and
guidance. Journeys for next
year begin with planning at this
time. Research that special


Man Arrested For Engqaed


place you want to visit.
Pisces (February 19 -
March 20)
Grumpiness won't
change a thing. So
smile and fake a
good mood and
pretty soon you will find your-
self have more fun than you
ever expected. Plan a special
luncheon or dinner date with


Tara's

2d/7


an associate and just relax and
enjoy. A demand by an employ-
er or associate may have you a
little miffed. However, with
your amazing ability to confuse
the logical you will do great.


Bail
Bonds


d NT" L/ Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville, Florida 32206


356-TARA
(8272)


-I
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Your business is always welcome!


REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.
FAMI LY PRACTICE
3160 Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32209












WE PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR:
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*Obesity and Weight Management
OWomen's Health
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Dr. Reginald Sykaveliit-eis LDi-Tonya Hollinger
Sto ithe pr~cwice.
NO\V AXC.CEP. TING
N E \V PA TIE NTS
11e invite you to c lt ,as i'our provider
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M-F 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. Wed. 2 P. M. TO 5 P.M.


In Solicitation Of Contributions (fnr ufinn -Chriqfm q
O1F~ ~era Eo ChrEistmas U


Without A License
TALLAHASSEE -- Florida Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner Charles H, Bronson today
announced the arrest of a Tamarac man for allegedly solicit-
ing contributions from the public without a license.
Charged with grand theft was Audie A. Watson Jr.,
72, program administrator for the non-profit business identi-
fied as U.S.D.G., Inc. / Universal Services Dedicated to God,
Inc., of Tamarac.
He was arrested by officers with Bronson's Office of
Agricultural Law Enforcement (OALE) who were assisted
by the Broward County's Sheriffs Office and the Sunrise
Police Department.
The investigation began when OALE received informa-
tion from the Florida Department of Financial- Services,
Bureau of Financial Investigations, in Fort Lauderdale.
That agency requested that OALE review a complaint
regarding a solicitation proclaiming a lucrative program in
which the public could make large sums of money on a
monthly basis.
This solicitation, called a "Cash Gifting Program," was
determined through the investigation to be an elaborate
"pyramid scheme," a classic investment fraud in which
Watson promised high returns to current investors from the
contributions made by new investors.
Following his arrest, Watson was taken to the Broward
County Detention Center, where bail was set at $1,000. The
department has jurisdiction in such cases because it regulates
solicitations of contributions. Anyone who believes that
they have been a victim of the non-profit business involved
in today's case is being asked to call the department's Office
of Agricultural Law Enforcement at 1-800-342-5869.

FLORIDA LOTTO
11-19-33-36-43-44
December 10, 2005


Light Results

The Clay County Sheriffs Office is continuing its
focus on holiday shopping safety and Operation
Christmas Lights is yielding results. The CCSO
Organized Crime Division has organized a high visibili-
ty enforcement effort that includes detectives, patrolman
and Traffic Unit deputies in large numbers.
Their focus has been, and will be through Christmas,
the stores and roadways along Wells Road in Orange
Park.
Here are the results so far (11-25-05 to 12-11-05):
Arrests = 24 total
Tickets = 71 total
Warnings = 23 total
There have been no stolen vehicle cases or serious
criminal acts committed in this area since the beginning
of Operation Christmas Lights.


Crime doesn't pay

but we do!

CRIME STOPPERS

1-866-845-TIPS (8477)

No Names...

No Faces...

No Hassles!


I


FO nRInDA S.TA


P CA I AV -







AGiEi C-7 R- -S


SERVICES

Aluiu Awig


EMPLOYMENT |
Change Your Life.
Your Future.
You have the power to change
your future. And you can do it
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Community College at
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Driver CDL-A req'd.
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* Career service avail-

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For a Brochure
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Ron L., Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99
to Dianetics, 3102 N. Habana Ave., Tampa FL
33607,

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING-SAVE $5$ Buy Direct From
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories.
Quick turn around! Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/
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.Equipment For Sale

SAWMILLS from only $2,795.00 Convert your
LOGS TO VALUABLE LUMBER with your
Norwood portable band sawmill. Log skidders also
available. www.norwoodindustries.com -Free infor-
mation: (800)578-1363 ext 300N.


Health


LOWEST PRESCRIPTION PRICES Less than
Canada. A better deal than Medicare. Global Medi-
cines, American Physician managed. (866)634-0720
www.globalmedicines.net.

Help Wanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay
& Benefits for Experienced .Drivers. 0/0, Solos,
Teams & Graduate Students. Bonuses Available.
Refrigerated Now Available. (888)MORE PAY (888-
667-3729).

MOVIE EXTRAS, ACTORS & MODELS! Make
$75-$250/day. All ages and faces wanted! No exp.
Required. FT/PT! (800)851-9046.

Now Hiring for 2005 Postal Positions $17.50-
$59.00+/hr. Full Benefits/Paid Training and Vaca-
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erence # 5600.

CYPRESS TRUCK LINES, INC Driver Designed
Dispatch. FLA ONLY/Flat Bed students welcome.
Home Every WeekEnd Most Nights (800)545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com.

Driver- NOW HIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS
for Central Florida Local & National OTR positions.
Food grade tanker, no hazmat, no pumps, great
benefits. competitive pay & new equipment. Need 2
years experience. Call Bynum Transport for your
,opportunity today. (800)741-7950.


BUSINESS NETWORK


GnWf''ENERA ETA LSTICIn


CURL QUEEN
"Specials"
Curls -Ages 7-12 ONLY $29.95
Relaxer w/ Roller Set ONLY
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FOR SALE ,
Bed Brand Name Queen set
New, w/warranty $119 can
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FOR SALE
Bed Full Size new, with
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sell 904-398-5200

The Readers of the
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A COMCAR
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EOE


Legal Services

DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS children, etc. Only
one signature required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call
weekdays (800)462-2000, ext.600. (8am-7pm) Alta
Divorce, LLC. Established 1977.

ARRESTED Needi Li':,,r ll i.inirA.Dl Dc'ene.-
f'elonic "'.l.dem n .r-,r 'Ilt.nm .-t '. ,'l'.: .-'r *I1 IIl
*Wroneful Death "Protect Your Rights" A-A-A At-
torney Referral Service (888)733-5342 24 HOURS
7 DAYS A WEEK.

Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Medical, *Busi-
ness, *Paralegal, *Comiputers. Job Placement Assis-
tance. Computer & Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-
2121 www.onlinptidewatertech.com.

Real Estate

North Carolina Gated Lakefront Community 1.5
acres plus, 90 miles of shoreline. Never before
offered with 20% pre-development discounts, 90%
financing. Call (800)709-5253.

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. MUST SEE
BEAUTIFUL & COLORFUL FALL FOLIAGE!
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS Homes, Cabins, Acre-
age & Investments. Cherokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www cherokeemountainrealtv com Call for Free
Brochure (800)841-5868.

Tennessee Waterfront Land Sale! Direct Water-
front parcels 'from only $9,900! Cabin Package from
$64,900! 4.5 acres suitable for 4 homes and docks
only $99,900! All properties are new to the market!
Call toll-free :.,.,.i770-5263 ext. 8.

MURPHY, NORTH CAROLINA COOL SUM-
MERS MILD WINTERS Affordable Homes & Moun-
tain Cabins CALL FOR FREE BROCHURE'(877)837-
2288 EXIT REALTY MOUNTAIN VIEW PROPER-
TIES www.exitmurphy.corn.

NC MOUNTAINS-Log cabin $89,900. Easy to
finish cabin on secluded site. Million $$$ Views
Available on 1-7 acre parcels $29,900-$79,900. Free
Info Available! (828)256-1004.

ASHEVILLE, NC AREA, ACREAGE 1 to 8 acre
mountain view and riverfront homesites from the
$60s. Gated community, custom lodge. Near natural
,hot springs. Don't miss out! Call (866)292-5762.

TENNESSEE ACREAGE FOR SALE Near Chatta-
nooga. Beautiful new lakeside community. I to 5 acre
homesites from the $40s. Limited number of private
boat slips. 'Call for appt. (866)292-5769.

Coastal Southeast Georgia Large wooded water
access, marsh view, lake front, and golf oriented
homesites from the mid $70's Live oaks, pool, tennis,
golf. (877)266-7376. www.cooperspoint coin.


East Alabama Mountain Property For Sale One
hour west of Atlanta in Piedmont, AL Great for
enjoyment or investment 33 acres $115,500. Owner
Financing available. Call Glenn (850)545-4928.

Steel Buildings

BUILDING SALE! "Extended 3 Weeks!" 20x26
'Now $3340. 25x30, $4790. 30x40, $7340. 40x60,
$11,490 Factory Direct, 25 Years. Many Others.
Ends/accessories optional. 'Pioneer (800)668-5422.

STEEL BUILDINGS, Factory Clearance. New,
never erected 30x40, 40x60, 50x100 and 60xl00.
Will Sell for balance Call Frank. (800)803-7982..

ALL STEEL BLDGS! UP TO 50% OFF!! Engi-
neered for Hurricane Coast! Ship Factory Direct for
quick delivery. 24x30 Up to 100x200! Call Now!
(800)499-6401 Eddie,


Your Ad Could Be Here


Run your ad STATEWIDE!!! For only $450 'you
can place your 25 word' classified ad in over 150
newspapers throughout the state reaching over 5
MILLION readers. Call this newspaper or Advertis-
ing Networks of Florida at (866)742-1373. Visit us
online at www.florida-classifieds.com. Display ads
also available.


ANF
Advertising Networks of Florida
I^ J


(Week of December 19, 2005)


N


AUTO INSURANCE


The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951 1
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 10OK verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits, Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE

Adveftisement

Homeowners with

money worries may qualify

for low-interest loans


Hawe you been turned down
fora loan? Doyou need more
than $10,000 for ay season?
Are you paying more than
7% interest on any other loans
orcreditcards?
If you are a homeowner,
and answered "yes" to any of
these questions, they can
tell you over the phone and
without obligation if you
qualify.
High aeditcad debLess-
'than-perfect credit? Self
employed? .Late' house pay-
ments? Financial problems?


Medical bills? IRS liens? It
doesn t matter!
If you are a homeowner with
sufficient equity, there's an
excellent chance you will
qualify for a loan-usually
within 24 hours.
You can find out over the
phone-and free of charge-
if )ou qualify. Honey Mae
Home Loans is licensed by
the Florida Dept. of
Financial Services.
Open 7 days a week for
your convenience.
1-800-700-1242 ext.248


THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAY @ 1:00 P.M.























IMPACT
WCGL


AM 1360




M





www.smokymountainmarketplace.com
ORDER YOUR NEW FREE CATALOG NOW
Online or 1-800-624-0281 Ext.313
........................... ...................................

Send us e-mail!

Oinfo@thefloridastar.com

S............................ .....................o.............
: ,
********************* ********************* ******** ll****** OlO*


TiI tlMG


D~ECEMBER 17, 2005


_rz t ILTJU, IL.-/ .........


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4 |
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753 I
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
I LIABILITY/PLUS PIP -
L-- --------- -------------------------------


(_A:' FN r As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V. -',
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794.7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements! .
INVITATION TO SUBMIT RESPONSES TO THE
ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
The Governing Board of the District requests that interested parties respond to the
solicitations) below by 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 10, 2006. Further Information is
available through DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com (800) 711-1712, or
the District's website at www.sjrwmd.com. Bid packages may be obtained from
DemandStar by Onvia or the District by calling Jill R. Williams, CPPB, Contracts
Administrator at (386) 329-4133.
BID NUMBER SJ625XA
Timber Harvest & Sales
Heart Island Conservation Area (Volusia County, Florida) &
Crescent Lake Conservation Area (Volusla County, Florida)

Heart Island sale consists of approximately 279 acres. Crescent Lake sale consists of
approximately 208 acres. Both sales contain pulpwood, chip-n-saw and saw timber.
Awards shall be made to the highest responsive and responsible bidder(s) for each
conservation area. Payment to the District will, be on a per ton basis.

Staff's recommendation will be presented to the District's Executive Director.

Special accommodations for disabilities may be requested through Jill R. Williams,
CPPB, Contracts Administrator or by calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5)
business days before the date needed.


FLORID)A STAR


P A 1/-,V C-7





FLORIDA STAR


DECEMBER 17, 2005


EALSAT


ABOUT


)IDS
PEDIATRIC CS

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All About Kids is the premiere pedi-
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FL 32082


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Toll Free:


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800-288-6330


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6

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CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS!!!!



GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND

JAZZ, RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL
Oct 26 30, 2005


JOIN BUSINESS, GOVERNMENT & CIVIC LEADERS:
Tuesday, January 10th 10;30am-5:00pm
Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:
.himes P W'miack
Founder and President, Lean Enterprise Institute

PRESENTERS INCLUDE:
EmilN DeRocco
Assistant Secretary; USDOL (Invited)
Jason Dorsei
Author and Consultant
Hans K. Meeder
Former Deputy Assistant Secretary, USDOE

Rogel Hlerman
CEO, The Herman Group
To register, visit mnyijachamw er.coi.l, click on Calendar ofEvents, go to January
10, 2006 and click Workforce Summit. Registration cost $25 per person.
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Deeme 17 0
Deemer2
2005-


Rych McCain and Andre' B. Murray's List Of The

Most Fascinating, Alluring Men On Earth!


By Rych McCain
After releasing our
list of soulfully beauti-
ful sistahs, we received
a barrage of e-mail
inquiries from the
ladies basically
"demanding," to see a
list of brothas. To
maintain a sense of bal-
ance, while at the same
time "keeping the
peace," we have put
that list together as
well. For this week, we
present to you lovely,
"melanin dominate"
sistahs, Rych and
Andre's list of; THE
MOST FASCINAT-
ING, ALLURING
MEN ON EARTH!
Of course, the
brothas on this list
were taken from the
pool of black men we
have personally inter-
viewed and pho-
tographed. Every man
on this list has his own
unique life story and
circumstances, but they
all have the same com-
mon denominator of
talent, success and
mass appeal especially
among the ladies.. We
had a ball with all of


them either in our stu-
dio, on the set, at a press
junket or red carpet. As
with our list of sistahs,
the names are presented
in alphabetical order as
not to place significance
of one over the other.
We hope our female
readership will feast
their eyes, indulge in
their fantasies and enjoy
this feature.
This year's list
includes: Texas Battle
(actor) Mark Brown
(screen writer, film pro-
ducer/director): Nick
Cannon (comic, rapper,
actor, screen writer/pro-
d.u cer/director);
Chamillionaire (rap-
per/producer); Larry
*The Clown (dancer);
Tommy The Clown
(dancer); Ee.-De
(singer); Cedric The
Entertainer (actor/film
& TV writer-producer);
Eriq Ebouaney
(actor/businessman);
Crooked I (rapper/pro-
ducer); Ray J
(singer/actor/TV host);
Martin Lawrence
(actor/comic/screen
writer/film producer);
Mario (singer/song


writer-producer);
Larenz Tate (actor/film
producer/philan-
thropist); Kenan
Th o m p s o n
(comic/actor); TQ
(singer/song writer-pro-
ducer); Keenan Ivory
W a y a n s


(actor/com


ic/TV talk


show host/screen
writer/film producer-
director); Mario Van
Peebles ( actor/screen
writer/film producer-
director); and Blair
Underwood (actor).
List continued on D-4


Wa su In Soly oS


By Rych McCain
V e n t u r a
Entertainment will
release the romantic com-
edy FAIRGAME in
stores nationwide in
Jantiary. The movie stars
Kellita Smith (The Bernie
Mac Show), Christopher
B. Duncan (The Jamie
Foxx Show, Soul Food),
Gina Torres (The Matrix
Reloaded, Hair Show),
Terri J. Vaughn (The


Steve Harvey Show, All of
us), Michael Jace (The
Shield), Michael Whaley
(CSI Miami, Profiler), and
radio personality/actress
Mother Love. The project
was written and directed by
Michael Whaley.
Our condolences go out
to the family, friends and
worldwide fans of the late,
great comedian Richard
Pryor who made his transi-
tion to the ancestors. Pryor


set the standard that every
comedian has tried to
match since. Veteran black
Hollywood publicist,
Cheryl Boone Isaacs, will
chair the 2006 Governors
Ball for the third consecu-
tive year. This gala is the
post-telecast event that will
immediately follow the
78th Academy Awards
which will be televised
live, Sunday, March 5,
Wassup continued on D-8


.-\


MOM

















Icc


I

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TV Listings
Inside!













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The Florida Star





The Florida Star Page D-3/December 17, 2005


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All About Kids is the premiere pediatric facility in
Jacksonville, Florida. We are dedicated to provid-
ing children with the highest quality of health
care. Our doctors are Board Certified
Pediatricians with years of Pediatric Emergency
Room experience. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of families with
busy lifestyles. Come see why so many parents
trust All About Kids Pediatrics with their children's
health.
Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and have pediatric
ER experience.
904.565.1271
877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com


SERVICES
* Asthma Therapy
* Pain Relief
* Hemoglobin/Hematocrit
Testing
* Mono Screening
* Rapid Strep Screening
* Sport and School
Participation Physicals
* Urinalysis
* Well visits/Immunizations
HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F;
weekend and after hour -
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All Insurances Accepted


12086 Ft Caroline Rd. Suite Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225


The Florida Star


j2"A~kAnp -nns;


UI'


'






EINITERTAINMEN


Mariah Carey, John Legend And Kanye West

Lead Grammy Nominations With Eight Each


Topping this year's
gra rni nominations,
Mariah .Carey, John
Legend and Kanye W\Vest
each earned eight.., 50
Cent, Beyonce Know\les
and Stevie Wonder gar-
nered six a piece. lMissy
Elliott;, Alicia Keys.
Brnce Springsteen. G\\en
Stefani and U2 received
five nods each, while


Common, Destiny's
Child, Foo Fighters,
Gorillaz, Neptunes, Brad
Paisley, Phil Tan, and
Gretchen Wilson each
earned four.
The nominees were
announced on December
8.
Half of Mariah Carey's
eight nominations, six of
John Legend's eight nods


and all of Alicia Keys'
five nominations are in
the R&B Field. All three
artists are vying for Best
Traditional R&B Vocal'
Performance and Best
R&B Song; Legend with
Will.i.amr for "Ordinary
People"; and Keys with
Garry Glenn, Harold Lily
& Kanye West for
"Unbreakable."


I T-I B AC


HIGHLIGHTS
WEEK OF 12/17/05:

TV ONE
(Jacksonville -
Comncast Channel 160)

* Weekdays, 7 a.m. & 4
p.m. "B. Smith with
Style"
* Weekdays, 9 a.m. &
9:30 a.m. "Amen" fea-
turing TV legend
Sherman Hemsley and
Clifton Davis.
* Weekdays 11 a.m. -
"Living It Up With Patti
LaBelle"
* Weekdays, noon,
"Showtime at the
Apollo"
* Weekdays, 1 p.m.-
Daily movie,
*Weekdays, 6 p.m. -
"227" '
*Weekdays, 6:30 p.m. -
"Amen"
* Weekdays, 7 p.m.
"Good Times"
* Weekdays, 7:30 p.m. -
"Martin"
*Saturdays 6:00 p.mi -
"Tom Joyner"
*Friday, 12/16, 7 p.m. -
JJ's artwork is put to the
test in a local art contest.
See his dynamite work
this Fiiday.
*Saturday. 12/17, 9 a.m.


- B. Smith Christmas
Special.
*Saturday, 12/17;.1 p.m.
- Movie Black Mama,
White Mama starring
Pam Grier.
* Saturday, 12/17, 4:30
p.m. Tangles & Locks
- Special: Behind the
scenes of Washington
D.C.'s Golden Scissors
*Black hair show.
* Sunday, 12/18, 8 p.m.
- Ray Charles
Celebrates a Gospel
Christmas.,
* Sunday, 12/18, Cathy
Hughes' goes one on
one with rising star
Terrence Howard this
Sunday at 10pm.

BET
* Daily, 6:00 a.m. -
BET's Morning
Inspiration with Brother
Gerard BET showcas-
es top ministers in the
African-American com-
munity, along with BET
personality, Gerard
Henry who provides
updates on gospel and
religious events.
* Weekdays, 11 a.m., 6
p.m. "106 & Park" -
Hang out with the
industry's hottest talents
and count down the


day's top videos voted
on by you.
* Weekdays, 4:00 p.m. -
"Rap City" Watch the
latest and hottest rap
videos.
* Weekdays, 5:00 p.m. -
"'Road Show" BET
hits the road to various
cities and college cam-
puses across the country
for a high-energy
"Battle of the Sexes"
between 20 young men
and women as they try
to outdo one another for
bragging rights and
prizes! Join new host
Danella and "Rap City"
veteran host Mad Linx
as they spotlight the best
in this week's spirited
competitions.
*Weekdays, 11 p.m. -
"In Living Color" -
reruns of the award-
winning sketch comedy
series.
*Fridays, 10 p.m. -
"ComicView" BET's
favorite primetime conm-
edy is back for a brand
new 14th season, bring-
ing more jokes than ever
from the city of New
Orleans. The "Big
Easy's" rich gumbo of
culture and music sets
the spicy backdrop as


131aclk ____________HIHIGT


Crids"1a1 Prgram special;

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bo.vierojr -f brgo Immi., n C nai-r ", Alat~a, IXns: this area Vo,~ia BUY Of.' 16itl~dImm
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Tmo Christraws(112 hr):


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115wsy c Stnd tikt~A Chal"SChdhbrliaSpe::sLTMh siio ihe tei firforlhoChlisitais hierrmtes;and Isder Intrie
ft' Annual Spellman.Monshouse Choral Chrlithias (I frlr
A criorai .Lwofl or .rnua C'i i L, mrirrmone mr.. Ima JMrpf.yAb CW*rg s.'a Searo urdorev
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SulipArol V5 aeAAri( it & a is:oIfui rrrrorha vb olir. AiblSIreyelA rem pai' &,v mwax.
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new host Sheryl
Underwood cranks up
the laughs \\ ith the help
from a mix of up-and-
coming comics and
show veterans.
* Tuesday, 9 p.m.,
Saturday, 8 p.m. So
do you really want to
work in the music biz?
Do you know what it
takes to get there?
Savvy music mogul and
mega-entrepreneur
Damon Dash will gladly
teach the lessons with
an edgy attitude that
accepts no failure easily.
Watch the excitement,
fierce competition' and
tense moments as a set
of 16 young and eager
entrepreneurs vie to be
part of Dash's multi-


million dollar empire
and earn the title of the
"Ultimate Hustler."
Don't miss a single
episode to see who sur-
vives Dash's mogul
"boot camp" and who
gets sent packing.
* Saturday, 12/18, 11:00
p.m. Blackbuster
Movie: Woman Thou
Art 'Loosed A film
adaptation of Bishop
T.D Jakes' self-help
novel of the same title,
"Woman Thou Art
Loosed" chronicles the
struggle of Nlichelle. a
worma on death row. As
a child, Michelle was
sexually abused by her
mother's' boyfriend
while her mother looked
TV in Black continued on D-7


Page D-5/December 17, 2005.


-.I-s. c..-:.a. cj.-





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Whassup continued from D-1
2006 on ABC.
California Governor
Arnold Schwarzenegger
refused to grant clemency
to
Standly Tookie
Williams who was "ques-
;tionably" convicted of four
homicides during the
course of two separate rob-
beries in the LA area in
1979. Williams is a highly
touted co-founder of the
LA Crips street gang and
was executed at
California's notorious San
Quentin prison by lethal
injection Tuesday,
December 13, 2005 at
12:01 AM. It will be inter-


testing to see if there will be
a box office backlash (par-
ticularly among blacks
who always "flock" to his
films) or how
Schwarzenegger's future
movies will hold up in the
mainstream in general
when he returns to
Hollyweird. And return-
he most certainly will! It is
a sure bet that
Schwarzenegger will "not
be back," to Sacramento
via re-election after the
sound kickin' he and his
ballad initiatives suffered
in that last special election.
King Kong starring;
Naomi Watts, Jack Black,
Adrien Brody, Thomas


Kretschmann, Colin
Hanks, Jamie Bell and
Evan Parke is supposed to
be the holiday "biggie" at
the box office and it has all
of the right ingredients to
live up to the hype. The
special effects and the look
and feel of the depression
era 1930's were very
authentic.
The giant 25 foot, 8,000
pound Kong was modeled
after the real silver back,
African gorilla. We all
know the story. Film crew
goes to Skull Island,
blonde lady is offered up to
Kong. Crew rescues her,
captures Kong and brings
him back to New York


where he is put on
Broadway, only to break
loose, tear up jack and get
shot off of the Empire State
Building. Of course, you
all know my pet peeve with
Hollyweird. The only black
brother on the crew, First
Mate Hayes (Evan Parke),
stupidly goes to the
entrance of a cave on Skull
Island (while everybody
else with some sense stays
back), to see if any
dinosaurs are in it. We all
know what happens next.
The dinosaur storms out
after the brotha, he aims
with his rifle but it jams
(like it was supposed to
do), then he tries to kill a


ten ton reptile with a pea
shooting pistol. Then you
know what happens
next-the animal catches
him and tears his behind
apart like a rag doll.
Also the blacks on
Skull Island all looked and
acted like they were on,
crack and PCP at the same
time. They worked up a
trance like spell with their
drumming and dancing
until they were possessed
with a weird spirit that had
their eyes rolling up in
their heads. Minus the
flaws, you should enjoy
this movie.
Maat-Hotep!
Rych


40 W -


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The Florida Star


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