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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section C: Local
 Section C continued
 Section C: Around the Area
 Section C: Sports
 Section C continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
November 26, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00046

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
November 26, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00046

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section C: Local
        page C 1
    Section C continued
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Around the Area
        page C 4
    Section C: Sports
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text




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"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


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..FLORIDA


thefloridastar~com


Ar


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
'Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
1:00 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


SNVM R 26,2005 i DCEMER2, 00 VO 5 N.10 ,ENS


Another Joyous Thanksgiving For Seniors


Who Is Killing Our



Young Black Males?


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
- The victim, Ernest D.
Williams was found
deceased behind a house
located at 2.802 Wilson
Street. He was badly
decomposed and could not
be identified at the' scene.
The victim was then turned
over to the Medical
Examiner's Office to deter-
mine the cause of death
and identity.


Senior citizens
from throughout
the First Coast
were treated to a
delicious meal
and entertain-
ment as part of
the 19th Annual
ThanksgiVing
Luncheon For
Seniors on

November 22, at
The Radisson
Riverwalk Hotel.' -
TOP FRAME:
From left are,
Alice Sheppard (90), Maria Dufart (94), Ardie Mae Daughtry (90), Ruth Towns, and
Anna Williams (106). BOTTOM FRAME: A crowd of seniors and guests arrive early
for the event whose theme was "Celebrate Life". SEE MORE PHOTOS ON A-7

Priestly-Jackson New School Board Chair


Duval County Public
Schools now have a new
Superintendent and a new
Chair of the Board.
The Superintendent,
Dr. Joseph J. Wise, who is
a Jacksonville native
returning to the city, and
Mrs. Brenda Priestly
Jackson, who is an attor-
ney with four children
attending Duval County
Public Schools is the new


chairman of -
the Board.
They both
said that
their goal is
to serve the
children.
Dr. Wise Brenda
Priestly-
released his Jackson
plans earli-
er this month and then
scheduled schools with
special programs and/or


NEWS IN BRIEF


CLICK IT

OR TICKET

FLORID A


Click It Or Ticket!
Beginning this holi-
day season, which
includes Thanksgiving
and Christmas, Florida
and Georgia drivers are
being warned, they will
be watched. No seat belt
- a ticket; speeding, a
ticket.
These law officers
said their goal is to save
lives so that as many dri-


vers as possible, can see
2006.

MAD DADS'
President Announces
Candidacy

Saying "I promise to
vote for what is right, not
what is popular!", Elder
Donald R. Foy, President,
MAD DADS Jacksonville


awards and recognition
to personally visit. Mrs.
Priestly-Jackson said she
is looking forward to
working with Dr. Wise
and assessing the stu-
dent's strengths and
weaknesses with a goal of
closing the achievement
gap between black and
white children. She has
served on the Board for
Chair continued on A-7


Chapter, announced his
candidacy for the Florida
House of Representatives
District 14.
Elder

,a actti-vae

and. Elder
of the
Potter's
Donald H o u s e
Foy Christian
Fellowship Church,
announced plans to run
for the office during a
gathering hosted by
Friends For Donald Foy
on November 23 at The'
Potter's House Multi-
Plex.
"My candidacy will be


The Medical
Examiner's Office deter-
mined that the victim died
as a result of a gunshot
wound. This young male
was 21-years-old. He had
a criminal record. It has
been observed that all of
the young black men, who
have been found, have
criminal records and most
of their murders have been
brutal.


Guilty!
Y_
April 2004 to discuss his
child support payments.
Mosley, a married man,
claimed he was not the
father and should not be
Guilty continued on A-7


'John Mosley, Jr.
It took a Duval County
jury six
hours to
decide that
John Mosley.
S L-," Jr. was guilty
of two
Jay Quan of two
counts of first-
degree murder.
Mosle y
Swas found
guilty of
abducting the
mother of
Linda 10-month old
Wilkes Jay Quan
Mosley and her son in.


based on real Christian
values," assures Foy

FAMU Announces
Change At Top
For School Of Business
And Industry

F 1 o r i d a
A&MUniversity officials
have announced that two
top administrators have
resigned from their
posts at FAMU's School
of Business and Industry
(SBI).
Interim Dean Amos
Bradford and Interim
Associate Dean Wilbur
Smith have stepped
down and will return to
Brief continued on A-7


Ernest D. Williams
The Sheriffs Office and
First Coast Crime Stoppers
are asking for help. All
helpers may remain anony-
mous and may receive a
cash award up to
$1,000.00. Call (904)
630-0500 with any infor-
mation to this or other
murders. This seemingly
trend, said board members
Black Males continued-A 7


Thousands Of Olympians Coming
To Jacksonville Next Week
Over a thousand
Olympians and world champi-
ons in the sports of track &
field, race walking and long
distance running, will be in
Jacksonville next week,
including two notables,
/ lLauryn Williams of Miami,
the 2005 100m World
S Champion and American
t triple
Tiombe Hurd j u In p
record holder and 2004 Olympian
Tiombe Hurd. Williams is a
2004 finance graduate from the
University of Miami and Hurd is 336
a graduate of James Madison
University and Howard
University with an MBA. She is
the American record holder in the Lauryn Williams
triple jump.

Music Biz Plans For World AIDS Day
NEW YORK -- LIFEbeat the Music Industry
Fights AIDS will honor World
AIDS Day on December 1 with an
Internet auction featuring some
1,000 items from stars in music,
film, theater and television.
The "Bid 2 Beat AIDS" auction
.. on eBay will include a signed bot-
"tle of officially licensed, limited-
Kanye West edition Lindsay Lothan Heinz
ketchup, a diamond watch donated
by Lil' Kim and a signed jogging suit worn by Jennifer
Lopez, it was announced Monday.
Other items include a 2006 Vespa LX-50 signed by
Kanye West and other stars; the podium from the 2005
MTV Movie Awards signed by Tom Cruise, Katie
Holmes and Nicole Kidman; and signed guitars from
Tim McGraw, Metallica, Red Hot Chili Peppers and
Wynonna Judd.


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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA 1
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


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LIORID A STAR


NOVEMBER 26 2005


DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order '"
with subscription amount to:
SThe Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into W
The lonrida Presc Hall Of Fama


To Be Equal
Memo to GOP: Be Like Mike
Marc H. Morial, President and Chief Executive
National Urban League


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN EDITOR
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


DANIEL EVANS
SALES DIRECTOR
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


This fall has brought
relief from the glib conven-
tional political wisdom that
the Republican Party is
poised to capture a signifi-
cant percentage of African-
Americans voters.
That article of faith has
been proclaimed with unvar-
nished confidence ever since
President Ronald Reagan
first captured the White
House twenty-five years
ago. Unfortunately, it's
never been backed up with
actual accomplishment.
One startling measure of the
GOP's neglect of the Black
Electorate is that from
Reagan's victory to today,
there's never been more than
one black GOP representa-
tive in Congress. Currently,
there's not been one since
2002. (In contrast, there are
44 black Democratic mem-
bers of the Congressional
Black Caucus.) President
Bush's two-percentage-point
increase--to 11 percent-in
black votes in 2004 from
2000 was confidently
declared by some pundits to
be the start of something
big.
Now, such predictions
have been very quietly
packed away, in large meas-
ure because the slow gov-
ernmental response to the
terrible toll Hurricane
Katrina took on the citizens


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113 11th Street
904-246-1330


Orange Park
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611 Blanding Blvd.
904-272-2272


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of the Gulf region-with
many African Americans
among the most deeply vic-
timized-pushed blacks'
distrust of the GOP, and
President Bush specifically,
down to never-before-seen
levels.
One may say the silver
lining of that bad news is
that the GOP has no place to
go but up. But even that old
saw has been called into
question by the news that's
roiled the federal
Department of Justice this
month.
Two new articles in the
Washington Post raised the
question of whether Bush
Administration political
appointees in the
Department of Justice were
deliberately trying to purge
the department's famed Civil
Rights Division of career
attorneys who don't meet a
conservative "litmus test" on
civil rights enforcement.
Things went from bad to
worse when the Post later
reported that high-ranking
officials in the department
overruled the recommenda-
tion of a team of the divi-
sion's veteran attorneys and
analysts to reject the contro-
versial Georgia state voter
identification law because it
would likely discriminate
against black voters. These
hew claims of an ideologi-


cally motivated tampering
with the decision making of
Justice's Civil Rights
Division bodes even worse
for GOP prospecting for
votes among blacks.
That's the farthest thing
from what we at the National
Urban League want. Not
that we're promoting the
GOP. As a nonpartisan, non-
profit organization, we can't
and don't promote any polit-
ical party.
What we do promote,
however, is African
Americans' full participation
in the game of American
politics. That means we want
them to participate in-and
be sought after by-both
major political parties.
What can the Republican
Party do to gain black votes?
We ask the question not for
the sake of the GOP-
although the mood of the
electorate suggests it needs
to marshal all the support it
can for next year's midterm
elections.
No, we ask for the sake
of Black America, and the
larger American society.
And we can supply an
answer. The GOP should try
to be like Mike.. Michael
Bloomberg, that is-the
newly re-elected Mayor of
New York City. Bloomberg,
an erstwhile Democrat
turned Republican, won the
city handily, defeating his
Democratic opponent,
Fernando Ferrer, by 20 per-
centage points: This in a city
in which Democratic voters
outnumber Republicans by


nearly four to one.
Moreover, running against a
Latino Democrat with a long
history in city politics,
Bloomberg won nearly half
the votes of African-
American voters and about
30 percent of Latino voters.
True, it's possible to
exaggerate the implications
.of Mike Bloomberg's victo-
ry for political life beyond
New York City.
After all, the city has a,
unique social and political
culture; Bloomberg is a, to -
use a dreaded word, liberal
Republican; and, not
insignificantly, he, who,
made billions in business, is'
estimated to have spent at"
least $70 million on his cam-
paign, dwarfing Ferrer's
expenditures.
But there's no question
about the one achievement,
of Bloomberg's that is the
hallmark of success in
American politics.
He has made the majority
of New York City's elec-
torate believe he cares about-
their interests and is doing-
something to improve their'
opportunities and life in the
city- and the believers
included a substantial num-
ber of people of color.
There's the key. Black-
voters support political can--
didates for the very same:
reason other voters do:-
because they believe the;
candidate has their interests:
in mind. Is anyone in the:
national Grand Old Party"
paying attention?


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com '


$AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION ,


National Newspaper
Publishers Association


VERIFICATIONN



















Victory AM 1360 WCGL Celebrates 26 Years ,
,_ ...r ,- .. .....- .. .... :-., *; ... .-... ^M. ^a^E sas "-', eMgllfld


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-


A large crowd of well wishers, listeners, and supporters were on hand November 5 at the Cathedral of Faith COGIC
to help Jacksonville's Victory AM 1360 celebrate it's 26th anniversary. The celebration included performances by
Keith Wonderboy, William Murphy, III, The Christianiares, and Alvin Darling. It also included appearances by Akilah
Sweet, the Hope Chapel Mass Choir, and V. J. "The Messenger". Shown here from left are WCGL staff members
'Lil" Ralph Jennings, Tye Stanley, "Dr. Jay" (Project Manager), Rev. Marcius King, Sherrie Roberts (Project
Manager), Dan Evans, Maria Dennis (Public Relations Director), Freddie Rhodes (Program Director), and Minister
Kevin Postell (Operations Manager)


4$


Ak'


William Murphy, III (Praise Is What I Do) and Debra
Maiden, President and Owner of Victory AM 1360.


Evan 1el
^T ^-i-----
Tem=pe
I '.. ,. ? ; < .. I .. ,
Su.ncda3' Se'rvices
No'venn her 27thi
8-: I o i .Ri i- I O: -4.5 a rn.
"**I-EXPELIl NCE': lHI l IYN.ALMICS
C ,ull\(),~qi '


S4ijid


-i7-L'-)5ltmiio(n.A H1I1%d.
.ladcihnnm ll~, FL -122().z
904i-781 -9393


A.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR
Frequently Asked Questions


,


















Paul Porter of The Christianiares with Debra Maiden of








W C G L,.'... *


An appreciative and enthusiastic
celebration.


audience enjoys the


Alvin Darling (Blessing Coming Through For You) per-
forms with the Hope Chapel Mass Choir.

Igo m I


TEAS AND TREASURE-All area ladies are invited to
attend the Mandarin Christian Women's Club December
Luncheon "Teas & Treasures" on December 6, 2005 at the
Ramada Inn in Mandarin. The luncheon will be held from
12:00 1:30 p.m. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Krista Thomas
of Special tea Treats and Treasures will be speaking about
the benefits and differences of Green, Black, Rooibos and
White Teas. There will be a tea tasting and instructions on
brewing tea. She will also reference a book called the 12
Teas of Christmas. Speaker, Bonnilee Ashley, will relate how
she overcame fear. She has had a diverse career in public
relations, travel and administration. Please bring a Christmas
Ornament for an "Ornament Exchange" at the luncheon. For
luncheon costs and reservations for Lunch and FREE
Nursery call Char at 287-6814 or Mary at 880-2792 or email
Caliredchar@Hotmail.com

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to:
info@thefloridastar.com




"Come and Worship With Us"


Su
Su
Su
(E:
Tu
Su


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208

nday School 9:30 a.m.
nday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
nday Afternoon Bible Study
except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m. '
esday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m. -. '.
nday School Review 8:00 p.m. .
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church .
(904) 768-0272 Home


GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: -P.O.- Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586

Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.'
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church '
"without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
'" Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
j Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service..................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities


The holidays are a busy time, full of
joyful gatherings of family and friends. But
for those who have experienced the death
of a loved one, the holidays can seem much
more daunting, especially stressful and
lonely. For those affected by the recent hur-
ricanes that devastated much of the South,
this holiday season may present an even
greater sense of loss. While it may be a
struggle, there are things that can be done
to ease the grief and make coping less dif-
ficult. The National Funeral Directors
Association (NFDA) offers the following
suggestions for the bereaved to help them
better cope with the holiday season:
Take care of yourself, both physically
and mentally. Don't be afraid to set limits.
The holiday season is busy enough that it
can exhaust anyone, but if you are shoul-
dering an extra burden of grief, it only
makes it more unappealing. Get enough
sleep, eat well and take time out for your-
self. Think about what family traditions
you want to take part in and what may be
too much, and don't be afraid to say no to


activities that may overwhelm you.
Share your memories with others.
Speaking about your loved ones and shar-
ing remembrances can often help alleviate
some of the pain of the season. If it helps,
take part in a memorial or remembrance
service at your local place of worship or
family funeral home. Spending time with
others who understand what you're going
through is often a great source of comfort.
Above all, do what's right for you.
Your family and friends care about you,
and will likely offer advice about what
they think is best for the grieving process.
Don't forget to do what feels most com-
fortable for you. If volunteering at a local
hospital or food pantry helps you heal,
then seek out opportunities in the commu-
nity,

"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.*
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman.com


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Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
During this season of Thanksgiving,
Let us remember to thank GOD, for everything.
May we remember that every day is a day of sincere
THANKSGIVING!

Giving Thankful Service-The Jacksonville Links
The members of the Jacksonville Chapter, Links,
Inc. under the leadership of Mrs. Gloria Dean and
committee, chairpersons Mesdames Anest Schell
McCarthy, Wanda Montgomery and Kenyoinn
Demps are determinedly involved in gi\ ing communi-
ty service on the First Coast. You can find the members
during the week at Paxon Middle School's Team Up
after school program and in the early hours on a
Saturday morning preparing and serving meals along
with sorting clothing for the homeless at Simpson
United Methodist Church's Soup Kitchen. These
members are committed to service and their commit-
ment also includes their Connecting Links.
Creating meaningful experiences from actress Jada
Pinkett Smith's book, Girls Hold Up This World,
members of the Jacksonville Chapter, Links, Inc. are
fully involved with the young ladies at Paxon Middle
School's after school program. In a cooperative effort
with the after school coordinator and the principal Mrs.
Pam Pierce the activities for the Team Up program
have included the young ladies taking photos of them-
selves and creating collages that was surrounded with
self-concept words. During the sessions the young
ladies have made nameplates and have each read aloud
"Girls Hold up the World". Along with activities that
have included a painting session with the Links chap-
ter's own professional artist Mrs. Vivian Walker the
Paxon young ladies focused on positive words for each
green leaf. Experiences are planned throughout the
school year to include making Christmas cards for
nursing home residents, male/female interaction, role-
playing sessions, writing notes to special people, and
scrapbook making.
Following the Saturday of truly doing God's work in
Simpson Methodist Church's Soup Kitchen the
Jacksonville Links members returned for Sunday morn-
ing worship. It was the ideal Sunday to worship at
Simpson for Connecting Link Dr. Kenneth Jones
spoke during the worship services on the importance of
organ donations. Later during the'worship services
Connecting Link Dr. William Cody spoke to the need
for preventive health practices. Several members of the
Simpson Methodist congregation gave spontaneous
testimonials of the exceptional medical skills of both
Connecting Link physicians.
Jacksonville Chapter, Links, Inc. expressed mean-
ingful commitment in making a difference in the lives
of others both at Paxon Middle School and at Simpson
United Methodist Church's Soup Kitchen. These serv-
ice commitments are for the long run.



Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming


events. Contact us at 904 766-8834; E-mail
socially@TheFloridaStar.com or you may reach me
directly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777
or fax (904) 285-7008.
', See you in the paper!


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TO IMPACT WITH
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For more information about the
im nporta nce of arts ed u( i Ition. please contact
www.AmericansForTheArts.org.



AMERICANS
for HEARTS


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Multiple-Birth Babies, Boys Have Higher Risk Of Defects


GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- Twins, triplets and other multi-
ples have a nearly 50 percent greater chance of being born
with birth defects, and boys tend to be more at risk than girls,
according to two population-based studies conducted at the
University of Florida.
UF researchers who studied all Florida births from 1996
through 2000 found multiples have a higher risk than babies
born singly of developing 23 of 40 birth defects, such as
spina bifida, according to results recently published online in
the Maternal and Child Health Journal.
The same team of researchers, from UF's Maternal Child
Health Education Research and Data Center, studied 4,768
pairs of opposite-sex twins and found that boys had a 29 per-
cent higher risk for birth defects than girls. This could be
because boys tend to develop at a slower pace, leaving a lit-
tle more time for potential problems to arise, according to
findings published this month in Birth Defects Research
(Part A): Clinical and Molecular Teratology.
"In the past 20 years, multiple births have increased
because of greater reliance on assistive reproductive technol-
ogy, especially among women delaying childbirth until their
30s and 40s," said Dr. Yiwei Tang, an assistant professor of
pediatrics and a lead researcher on both studies. "In offering
these options to women, full disclosure of an increased risk
of birth defects should be made."
Multiples had the highest risks of having certain brain,
heart, bladder and liver defects.
Although the risks are greater for multiple-birth babies,
the number of children born with birth defects is still small.
About 3.5 percent of multiples are bom with birth defects,
whereas 2.5 percent of single-birth babies are, the research

Motown's 'Funk Brothers'


shows.
"Though birth defects are not a common occurrence,
when they do occur within a family, it can be life-altering,"
said Jeffrey Roth, an associate professor of pediatrics, direc-
tor of the data center and a study co-author. "For the affect-
ed family, it doesn't matter that what has happened to them
is a rare event."
The team analyzed years of data from Florida Birth Vital
Statistics and the Florida Birth Defects Registry, studying
972,694 births for the multiple-birth study. Of those, about
28,000 were multiples, about 3 percent of all births.
"The strength of population-based research is that all
women in Florida who gave birth during this time period
were taken into account," Roth said.
Among twins, boys were twice as likely as their sisters to
have defects of the genital and urinary organs and five times
as likely to be bore with an obstruction between the stomach.
and small intestine. But congenital hip dislocation was 10
times more common among girls.
Previous research has shown that boys tend to be more
susceptible to birth defects, but little was known about
defects among opposite-sex twins, who develop in the same
environment and have similar risks for genetic defects, said
Christine Cronk, an associate professor and leader of the
birth defects epidemiology team at the Medical College of
Wisconsin.
"(The UF researchers have) speculated that certain birth
defects, which occur very early in gestation, have to do with
developmental speed in males and females," Cronk said.
"The assumption is that if (the baby) is further ahead in
development, that would serve as protection against

To Perform In Gainesville


defects."
Because older mothers naturally have an increased risk of
giving birth to children with birth defects, the researchers
used statistical models to factor out age, race and even edu-
cation levels that could have led to inaccurate results, Tang
said. This way, they only compared babies born to similar
mothers, Tang said.
This information allows prospective parents, especially
those considering fertility treatments that will increase their
odds of having multiple children, to make more informed
choices, said Michael Resnick, a pediatrics professor and a
co-author of the study.
Informed decisions also increase the chances that parents
and their physicians will be prepared to provide the best care
should children be bom with birth defects, Resnick. said.



Sharing Season


.GAINESVILLE, Fla. --
The Florida Museum of
Natural History, Harn
Museum of Art and
University of Florida
Performing Arts will host
MOTOWN at the Cultural
Plaza, a fund-raiser benefit-
ing the University of Florida
Cultural Plaza, orr January
21, 2006.
The corner of Hull Road
and 34th Street will become
Detroit City complete with
cars, musical instruments


TALLAHASSEE --
Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson has launched a pro-
gram to assist employees of
auto repair .shops with addi-
tional training in an effort to
enhance customer service at
the state's more than 20,000
repair shops.
The Motor Vehicle
Repair-Education
Assistance Program will
provide scholarships for
mechanics to attend techni-
cal training or other courses
related to auto repair.
Letters informing repair
shop owners about the pro-
gram have been sent to
every registered auto repair
shop in Florida.
"Consumers will greatly
benefit from a more educat-


and record albums. The
event is black tie optional,
and Motown attire is wel-
comed. You may even see a
Supreme or two in the
crowd.
Begin the evening at
5:30 p.m. at either the
Florida Museum or the Ham
Museum for cocktails. A
dinner buffet will be served
at both museums following
the cocktail hour. The muse-
ums' exhibits will also be
open for your enjoyment.


ed work force in the repair
industry," Bronson said.
"Automobiles become more
technologically advanced
every year and consumers
rely on the expertise of
repair technicians to keep
this investment in good
working order."
The law creating the
assistance program was
passed in 1993 but there was
no available funding until
the 2005 legislative session.
As part of Bronson's legisla-
tive budget request in 2005,
lawmakers appropriated
$100,000 to be used on a
first-come-first-served
basis.
The funds can only be
used to pay the cost of tech-
nical training and cannot be
used to cover travel costs or
other expenses. The funding


The party moves to the
Phillips Center for the
Performing Arts for live
music and dancing to the
sounds of The Funk
Brothers at 8:30 p.m.
The Funk Brothers are
Motown's unsung heroes.
The studio musicians behind
hits of Diana Ross & The
Supremes, Marvin Gaye,
Stevie Wonder, Smokey
Robinson & The Miracles
and many more Motown
legends, The Funk Brothers


comes from registration fees
paid by the motor vehicle
repair industry.
Motor vehicle repair
shops must apply to the
Department to be eligible
for the program.
Educational assistance fund-
ing is limited to $1,000 per
registered location per year,
or a maximum of $3,000 to a
shop owner with multiple
locations. Shops must also
provide the Department with
proof that training has been
completed.
The training facility must
also meet the requirements
spelled out in the law.
For more information
about the program, visit the
Division of Consumer
Services web site at
http://www.800helpfla.com/
mvreducation.html.


actually played on more No.
1 records than The Beatles,
The Beach Boys, Rolling
Stones and Elvis Presley --
combined. In 2003, The
Funk Brothers won two
Grammy Awards for the
soundtrack to the film
"Standing in the Shadows of
Motown." For more infor-
mation, visit www.plaza-
party.uff.ufl.edu.


Ann Goodson (left), an employee in the University of
Florida provost's office, and Dorcas Ramseur from the
Gainesville Police Department, load food baskets Friday
morning at the Alachua County Fairgrounds. About
1,000 needy residents in Alachua County will benefit
from the more than 200 baskets that were assembled.
The Helping Our Neighbors holiday food project was
sponsored by UF and the Martin Luther King Jr.
Commission of Florida Inc.


Education, Training Program Launched

For Auto Repair Shop Employees


74






4S,







"Jacksonville's


Long- Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted


&

The Victory is in


the Word & Music










6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209

Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214

Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955

Web address: WWW. WCGL1360. COM


II I I~ II


PAGE A-5


FLORLDA STAR


NOVEMBER 26.2005n








PAGE A-6O iLLumL'.- /I


Congressman Meek: New Medicare Drug Plans Are 'Confusing'


WASHINGTON, DC -Congressman Kendrick B. Meek
wants, to give Medicare beneficiar-
ies additional time to navigate
through the dozens of confusing
Medicare drug plans, and the right
to change their plan if their needs
change or if they make a mistake.
.' "Seniors are overwhelmed by
stacks of information about premi-
- ums, deductible, co-pays and dif-
ferences in coverage. Even health
care experts are confused. At the
same time, many seniors are afraid
- of making the wrong choice, since
the law locks them in for a full
year," Meek said. "The least we can do is give Medicare
beneficiaries the time and flexibility then need to make good


choices."
Meek cosponsored the Medicare Informed Choice Act,
which would give seniors and persons with disabilities an
additional six months to make the best decisions and allow
them the opportunity to change their plans one additional
time in 2006 should they make a mistake in selecting a plan,
or if their needs change.
"It's not fair that seniors can only change their plans year-
ly, while private insurance companies can change which
drugs they will cover whenever they like," Meek said.
The Kaiser Family Foundation released new polling
information on the Bush Administration's drug plan and
found that 73% of beneficiaries say having so many choices
of plans is confusing and makes it difficult to choose. Meek
noted that the Administration has sent incorrect information
to beneficiaries and now tells seniors to use the internet to
determine the best plan for them, even though the Kaiser


report has found that 76% of seniors have never been online.
"The Bush Administration misled Congress about the
cost of the prescription drug benefit plan, and its manage-
ment of this program leaves a lot to be desired," Meek said.
"I think the Bush Administration should get behind the
Medical Informed Choice Act so we can pass it into law and
ease a lot of anxiety during this confusing implementation
period."
Under the Medicare prescription drug law, which was
signed by President Bush in 2003, beneficiaries have to sift
through dozens of private drug plans, and then are locked
into their decisions. The enrollment period begins November
15, 2005 and ends on May 15, 2006. Under that law, benefi-
ciaries will be charged a late enrollment penalty if they
enroll at a later date.


Judge Hatchett Takes On Mission To Educate Youth About HIV/AIDS


CULVER CITY, Calif., -
-In an effort to raise aware-
ness about the alarmingly
rapid increase of HIV infec-
tions in the African
American community, par-
ticularly among young
African American women,
Sony Pictures Television's
syndicated courtroom series,
Judge Hatchett, offers a
hard-hitting, candid episode


during which a dangerously
promiscuous teenage girl is
taken for the intervention of
a lifetime at HIV / AIDS
ground zero in South
Africa.
This episode, airing on
World AIDS Day, Thursday,
- December 1, 2005 (log onto
www.judgehatchett.com for
local stations and times),
aims to get viewers talking
about this preventable dead-
ly virus and why so many
young people are needlessly
contracting it.'
According to the Center
for Disease Control and the
Black AIDS Institute, young
people under the age of 25
account for half of all new
HIV infections each year,
with African Americans
accounting for over half of
those new infections.
"Current statistics detail-
ing HIV infection in the


Shoppers Prepare to Deck the Malls
Nearly a third of holiday shoppers will begin their serious
shopping on "Black Friday," the day after Thanksgiving, accord-
ing to the Shopping in America Holiday 2005 survey. The nation-
al survey was conducted for The Macerich Company
(NYSE:MAC News) by August Partners among more than
3,700 shoppers.
Overall, U.S. consumers are getting an early start on filling-
their gift lists, shows the survey: '
Most (77 percent) will begin holiday shopping before the end
of November. Twenty-eight (28) percent will start on Black
Friday, November 25.
Women will make up the majority (61 percent) of consumers
who will begin holiday shopping on Black Friday. Shoppers aged
25-to-44 will make, up nearly half (48 percent) of those who will
start on Black Friday.
Men are more likely than women to wait until the last minute,
representing 63 percent of the shoppers who start on Christmas
Eve.

Black Activists Support Increased
Domestic Oil Exploration
WASHINGTON -- Citing the need for America to achieve
energy independence as well as aid poor and minority households
already suffering from the undue burden of rising heating bills,
activists with the black leadership network Project 21 are speak-
ing out in favor of oil and natural gas exploration efforts under
consideration for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)
and the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS).
The U.S. Senate approved legislation on November 9 to
allow oil drilling on approximately 2,000 acres -- or 0.01 percent
-- of ANWR's 19.6 million acres.
The House of Representatives is expected to consider similar
legislation as early as this week. Drilling on this small and deso-
late portion of ANWR is expected to generate $2.5 billion in gov-
ernment revenue, create countless new jobs nationwide and pro-
duce over 10 billion barrels of oil. OCS-related legislation in the
House would allow states to "opt out" of federal moratoriums that
currently prohibit offshore oil and gas production.
A small group of Republican congressmen are attempting to
block any provision that would allow oil and natural gas explo-
ration in both ANWR and the OCS.
"Home heating bills are expected to be higher than usual this
winter. People can choose not to drive their car when fuel prices
are high, but they shouldn't have to choose not to turn on the heat
to keep their family warm," said Project 21 member Deneen
Moore.
"Low-income households unable to afford rising heating bills
might resort to unsafe alternatives. Drilling in ANWR, for exam-
ple, would be essential to helping alleviate the high cost of ener-
gy in the U.S., create jobs and help America become less depend-
ent on foreign oil." If new sources of energy are not found and
utilized, minority households will be forced to spend a greater
percentage of their budgets to keep their homes warm. The U.S.
Department of Energy recently projected that heating costs will
soar this winter. The cost of heating a home with natural gas is
expected to increase by 32 percent increase; with heating oil, 26
percent.


African American commu-
nity are staggering, and
regrettably, not as widely
known as they should be,"
commented Judge Glenda
Hatchett. "We must equip
our children with the edLica-
tional tools and information
they need to combat HIV
and AIDS. In this case, we're
providing a rare inside look
at what is happening in
South Africa and what could
happen here without proper
education about preven-
tion."
When 14-year-old
Kaniesha Robinson is
brought before Judge
Hatchett's bench by her
grandmother and legal
guardian, Ann Robinson
Wright, the Judge is shocked


and saddened by the news of
Kaniesha's excessive sexual
behavior and casual attitude
toward sexually transmitted
diseases.
In an effort to drive
home the dangers of
Kaniesha's behavior and
enlighten viewers about the
ramifications of promiscu-
ous sexual conduct, Judge
Hatchett sends Kaniesha for
the most awe-inspiring
experience of her life -- sen-
tencing her to spend several
days living in the rural vil-
lage of Ingwavuma, South
Africa to personally experi-
ence the devastation
HIV/AIDS can wreak on an
entire community.
Out of all the countries
in the world, South Africa


has the third largest number
of people living with
AIDS.
Ingwavuma, home to the
Zulu people since the 1700s,
including such famous his-
toric figures as Shaka Zulu
and the Zulu warriors, is a
small town in the province
of KwaZulu-Natal.
Unfortunately, this province
is now known as the worst,
HIV / AIDS effected area in
South Africa. An astonishing
four out of 10 mothers in
KwaZulu-Natal are HIV
positive.
During her stay -in
Ingwavuma, Kaniesha is
exposed to a community that
now hosts approximately
3,000 orphaned children
who lost their parents to


AIDS.
She also meets a group
of peers who are learning
and practicing abstinence
including one young HIV-
positive mother who learned
the hard way that her actions
have irreversible, dire con-
sequences.
"On World AIDS Day, it
is important to remember
that HIV is still spreading
and threatening the lives of
young people in this coun-
try, and we still don't have a
cure," noted Executive
Producer Michael Rourke.
"With this episode, we want-
ed to raise awareness about
HIV in our country as well
as remind our viewers of the
ongoing health crisis in
Africa."


Race Prejudice Ignited Most Hate Crimes In 2004;

Hate Crimes Against Blacks Were More Prevalent


WASHINGTON--Racial
prejudice lay behind more
than half the 7,649 hate
crimes reported to the FBI in
2004, the bureau said
Monday. Hate crimes
against black Americans
were most prevalent.
The number of race-
based incidents rose by 5
percent last year to 4,042
from 3,844. Authorities
identified prejudice against
blacks in 2,731 of those
crimes, the FBI said.
Overall, the number of
hate crimes grew by just 2
percent compared with the
7,489 in 2003, and there
were slight declines in
crimes motivated by bias
based on sexual orientation
and ethnicity, the FBI said.
The data also showed
that crimes against Muslims
have leveled off since a
spike following the Sept. 11,
2001, attacks. "We tend to
see the number of bias inci-
dents go in cycles in large
part tied to international
events," said Ibrahim
Hooper, spokesman for the
Council on American-
Islamic Relations. "It has
leveled off since 9/11, but
unfortunately at a higher
level than prior to 9/11."
In 2001, there were 481
anti-Islamic incidents. There
have been around 150 in the
three years since, the FBI

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said.
Among anti-religious
hate crimes, anti-Jewish
incidents have long been the
most common. Of the 1,374
incidents of religious bias,
954 were directed at Jews,
the FBI said.
The information was


supplied by 12,711 local law
enforcement agencies
nationwide covering nearly
87 percent of the U.S. popu-
lation.
Because the number of
police agencies reporting
varies each year under the
voluntary system estab-


lished by the Hate Crimes
Statistics Act of 1990, offi-
cials caution against draw-
ing conclusions about trends
in hate crime volumes
between years. They say the
figures provide a rough pic-
ture of the general nature of'
hate crimes.


NOVEMBER 26, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


. A z








FivLOI STAR,\ PAG Auuj


Celebrate Life continued from A-]


Aw


..... S I


ei


-7; -"F-


Enoch Thomas (96) enjoyed the festivities.


Jacksonville City Councilwoman Pat Lockett-Felder greets some of the sensational seniors celebrating during the
19th Annual Thanksgiving Luncheon For Seniors held at The Radisson Riverwalk Hotel on November 22. The affa-
ir was presented by the general managers of Gospel Radio Stations AM 1360 WCGL and AM 1400 WZAZ, The Senior
Life Foundation, various city agencies, companies and the Independent Living Advisory Council


Dr. Gary L. Hall, Sr., Pastor of West Jacksonville Church
of God In Christ, speaks on the theme "Celebrate Life"
using Matthew 25 as his text.


Mayor John Peyton speaks to the audience.


Alexia Smith performs.


Brief continued from A-1


the classroom.
FAMU Provost Debra Austin thanked Bradford and Smith for their outstanding leader-
ship, and assured students and faculty that they will not be adversely affected by the admin-
istrative changes.
Bradford was appointed Interim Dean in September 2003. His resignation is effective
November 30. Austin said a national search is under way for a new SBI Dean; interviews
will begin in the near future.

Guilty continued from A-1

required to pay child support.
A 15-year-old teen-ager, Bernard Griffin was with Mosley when Wilkes was murdered
and burned. He said Mosley also stuffed the baby in a bag and threw the bag in a trash bin
near Alachua County. The teen directed the police to the scene. He is the brother of a female
that Mosley dated.
Jay Quan's body was never found and Mosley.claims that someone saw him alive after
his mother was found in the woods near Waldo. His wife, children and mother testified on
his behalf.
What penalty Mosley will.pay will be known November 30. The state is seeking the
death penalty.
Black Males continued from A-1


of MAD DADS, must
cease.
During 2005, several
young black males with
criminal records have been
killed, leaving no clues.
MAD DADS' founder,


Rev. Eddie Staton contacted
Mayor Peyton and Sheriff
Rutherford last week,
requesting that they be a
part of the committee being
organized of individuals
and agencies that are focus-


ADVERTISEMENTS

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@ 5 p.m.

904-766-8834






Email your ad:

ad@thefloridastar.com
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ing on issues such as domes-
tic abuse, neighborhood
crime, violence, and espe-
cially homicides get togeth-
er to seek an understanding
and solution to the- high
per-capita murder rate in
Jacksonville.
Chair continued from A-1
served on the Board for
three years and was elected
Chairman Tuesday night.
Mrs. Priestly Jackson is
married to a Duval County
teacher.



"Never be
afraid

to sit awhile
and think."

-From "A Raisin in the Sun"
written by Lorraine
Hansberry. This was the
first drama by a black woman
to be produced on Broadway


State Representative ,
Audrey Gibson.


City of Jacksonville
Invitation To Bid

Scaled bids will be received by the City of Jacksonville, Department of Procurement, 3rd Floor, City
Hall until the time an dates recorded below and immediately thereafter pub;icly opened and record-
ed in the Conference Room "C", 3rd floor. City Hall (a) St. James Building, 117 West Duval
Street.


BUYER: DIANE FARMER (904) 630-1168

BID OPENING DATE: WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2005-2:00P.M.

BID NUMBERIDESCRIPTION:ECF-0016-06-REDEVELOPMENT OF THE JACKSONVILLE
LANDING PARCELS AND A PORTION OF HOGAN STREET.


AGENCY:


JACKSONVILLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION


SCOPE OF DEVELOPMENT

The JEDC, in furtherance df both the Act and the JEDC's charter, and pursuant to the City of
Jacksonville Resolutions and ordinances that established the JEDC as a.CRA (copies of all of which
will be providedupon request), hereby invites sealed proposals for a developer to purchase and
redevelop the following city-owned property located in the downtown area:

Jacksonville Landing-East Surface Parking Lot parcel comprising 1.79 acres or
77, 972 square feet of land area bounded by the Jacksonville Riverwalk to the
south, the Main Street Bridge to the west and north, and the Hyatt Hotel to the
east (RE#074445-0000). The foregoing parcel is presently subject to JLI's rights
to parking on such parcel and therefore any proposer other than JLI would be
required to purchase JLI's interest in the Lease in order to develop this parcel.
Additionally, the city would also convey approximately 2,869 acres of land
located under and between the Main Street Bridge off ramps, subject to
easements in favor of the Florida Department of Transportation that permit the '
city to use the easement area for parking where possible (together with the
above 1.79 acre parcel the "East Parcel").

Jacksonville Landing 'Buildings West Parcel ("West Parcel") comprising 6,143
acres or 267,589 square feet of land, bounded by the Jacksonville Riverwalk to
the south, Hogan Street to the west, Independent Drive to the north and the Main
Street Bridge to the east (RE#074457-0000). The West Parcel contains all of the
present buildings comprising the Jacksonville Landing and any conveyance of
the West Parcel would be subject to the Lease and JLI's rights thereunder.
Accordingly, as stated above, any proposer other than JLI would be required to
purchase JLI's interests in the Lease.

Hogan Street Parcel ("Hogan Street Parcel") comprising, after a street closure,
approximately .483 acres or 21,040 square feet of land, and conisting of the
portion of Hogan Street between Water Street and the Riverwalk. Under JLI's
attached proposal, the city would close the Hogan Street Parcel and convey
such parcel along with the conveyance of the East and West Parcels, for the
construction of the parking garage on a portion of the Hogan Street Parcel and
the West Parcel, a proposed other than JLI could propose to build the garage
on the existing open spaces of the east and/or West Parcels, and keep Hogan
Street as a city right of way. Keeping Hogan Street as a city right of way would
negate the obligation under JLI's attached proposal in section 5.4.1 to build an
alternative view corridor at the end of luara Street.


John Peyton, Mayor
City Of Jacksonville


By: Devin Reed, Director
Department of Procurement


PAGE A-7 -


.**'ill


. .r


FLORIDA STAR


N MEMBER 262005


j


f'
4






iPAGEA-6 -------


Helping People

(Even the little ones)


Medical
Assistant


- .1.


Call now, and ask for a
Career Training Brochure.


SAN FORD
BROWN
rI STATUTE


10255 Fortune Parkway, Suite 501
Jacksonville, FL 32256


Less time shopping means


more time together


Publix Advantage Buy makes
saving simple. Easy-to-spot signs
*, right on the shelf show which
items are marked down.

You'll find thousands of Advan-
tage Buy' sale items every day, on
every aisle of your neighborhood
Publix, on national, local, and
Publix brands. And we add new
markdowns all the time, so you'll
always discover new bargains.

Save money. Save time. With
Publix Advantage Buy, the
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NOVEMBER 19, 2 005


FLORIDA STAR


" 14 If El A


j


"If I had time..."
Rev. Joe Calhoun, New Bethlehem Baptist Church, Jacksonville,
Florida willfretire as Pastor on December 31, 2005. Please join us as
we pay tribute to his life's work as a pastor and leader in this
community.
There will be two celebrations as we honor his many
contributions as a leader on God's program. A banquet will be
held on January 7, 2006. Tickets are $50.00. A table for 8 is
$400.00
On Monday, December 12, 2005 at 7:00 p.m., there will be a
casual celebration at New Bethlehem Baptist Church.

We are preparing a memory book so everyone can share best wishes
with him. A full page is $100.00; half page is $50.00 and a fourth
page is $25.00. All monies are due no later than December 4, 2005.

To reserve tickets, purchase ads or for more information, you may
contact Dee Woods at 904 614 4842 or deewoodsl@bellsouth.net or
send correspondence to
New Bethlehem Baptist Church
Attn: Retirement Committee Sister Deloris Armstrong
1824 Prospect Street
Jacksonville, FL 32208


TAW








Sing! Sing! Celebrate!


The Ribault High School Chorus, directed by the Rev. Dr. Eugene White, performed 1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
on Sunday, November 13 on the Second Floor Landing at the new Main Library. In the top frame, the
Singing Trojans of Ribault perform one of several outstanding selections. The Chorus poses with Dr. White
in the bottom frame. The City of Jacksonville kicked off a week-long celebration on Saturday, November
12 to open the new Main Library. Festivities included a RALLY Parade featuring members of Mayor
Peyton's Book Club, a dedication ceremony, lectures, tours, story hours, art and fun. The new main library
is located 303 N. Laura St. (corner of Laura and Monroe Streets). The library opens at 11:00 a.m.


c o i s ......................................................... ........ 31









Study Reveals Female College


Students Study More Than Males


(NAPSI)-It may not be
considered a varsity sport,
but women are hitting the
books more than men and
for a better. average. In a
recent study, it was learned
that America's female col-
lege students study more,
are more likely to read
their textbooks thoroughly
and to earn "A"s in their
courses, and expect to
graduate in less time than
their male- counterparts.
Male. students, study
one-third less than women,-
party more often, are more
likely to earn a "C" or
less in their courses and
expect to take longer to
graduate.This came from a
nationwide study of 1,800
college students released
by Student Monitor, a col-
lege market research com-
pany.
The study of four-year
and two-year students was
commissioned by the
Association of American
Publishers to help publish-
ers and educators under-
stand students' study
habits and better deter-
mine what impact they


have on academic achieve-
ment.
"We've generally taken
for granted that hitting the
books translates- to better
grades and a more suc-
cessful college experience.
This research confirms
that hard work matters,
and quantifies the differ-
ence between those stu-
dents with a set of solid
study habits and those
without," said Eric Weil,
managing partner of
Student Monitor.
"The survey revealed
significant differences in
the study habits between
men and women.
For example, women
are 35- percent more like-
ly to study daily, 21 per-
cent more likely to study
15 or more hours weekly
and 23 percent more likely
to read their textbook thor-
oughly.
These differences in
study skills and habits
translate to higher grades
and a higher course
completion rate," Weil
added.
Two-year community


college students-who are
more likely to work full
time-are 36 percent more
likely to use supplemental
materials, such as study
guides, lab manuals and


digital media, and 23 per-
cent more likely to say
they study efficiently.
To learn more, visit
www.publishers.org/high-
ered. A survey of college


student study habits
showed that male students
study one-third less than
women and that women
are 35 percent more likely
to study daily.


SCHOOL UR CHI, ON

PAYING FORE
COLLEGE


Get a free planning and paying for college guide
from The Salie Mae Fund. You'll learn where to
find the money youi child needs to pay for college
Call or visit us online to receive your free guide -
available in English and Spanish.


Sandalwood Students Greet
International Visitors-
Students at Sandalwood High School were full of
excitement and enthusiasm as officials from Germany,
Iraq, Serbia, Montenegro, the Philippines and the
Maldives visited the School on Wednesday, November
23, from 1-3:30 p.m..
The visit was as part of their tour of substance abuse
prevention, education and treatment programs in the
Jacksonville area.
Sponsored by the International Visitors Corps of
Jacksonville (IVCJ); the tour introduced the participants
to the school's peer-mediation training for students as
part of the school's Zeroing in on Prevention (ZIP) and
Drug-Free Youth Incentives (DFYANCE) programs.
The international visitors arrived in Jacksonville on
Sunday, November 20 and returned to their home coun-
tries on Friday, November 25..


FIND OUT

HOW YOU CAN

APPEAR IN

PREP RAP

CALL

9041 766-8834


* .*.
-


~I-~ a~ es~ --- ---- I II-= ~r e


The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Page B-2/November 26, 2005










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Six Student Persona1% Sun Sports To Televise
Class 5A Final Live;

( Class 2A Final

SMoves To December 1

The 2005 Dodge Florida High School Athletic
Association (FHSAA) Football Finals will be played
ODec. 1, 2, 3, 9 and 10 in Miami. Games on Dec. 1, 2
and 3 will be played at Florida International
University Community Stadium.
0. Games on Dec. 9 and 10 will be played at
,^J Dolphins Stadium, the site of Super Bowl XXIII in
1989, Super Bowl XXIX in 1995 and Super Bowl
XXXIII in 1999, and the ftiture site of Super Bowl
XLI in 2007 and Super Bowl XLIV in 2010.
Dolphins Stadium also is the site of the FedEx
Orange Bowl, which doubled as the 2000 and 2004
Sz BCS national college championship games.

0 Class 5A Championship Game Goes Live
Sun Sports and FHSAA has announced that the
SClass 5A championship game to be played Friday,
Dec. 9, will be televised live statewide with the
L ._ exception of the South Florida market, which instead
will see the Miami Heat host the Denver Nuggets in
NBA action.
EJ The live telecast will be the first of an FHSAA
Football Finals state championship game since the
al 1984 Class 4A championship game between Miami
Southridge and Woodham in Pensacola.

Class 2A Championship Game
Rescheduled For Thursday, Dec. 1

The Class 2A championship game originally
scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3 at FIU
--- uCommunity Stadium, has been moved to 7 p.m.
J /f) ^Thursday, Dec. 1.
L" ,The switch was made at the request of FIU offi-
cials so that the Panthers can play a makeup game
with Middle Tennessee State, which originally was
scheduled for Oct. 29, but was postponed because of
Hurricane Wilma.
."FIU has been extremely cooperative with the
FHSAA," Stewart said. "They have provided their
Facilities for the boys volleyball finals the last two
m years, and now the first weekend of football finals
This year. We're happy that we arc able to return the
>favor by assisting them with their scheduling dilem-
ma." The FHSAA office contacted several top-
ranked schools in Class 2A and Class 2B that have
the potential of reaching the respective champi-
onship games and discussed a number of scenarios
with them before reaching its decision.


Page B-4/November 26, 2005


The Florida Star/Prep Rap








Nelly's 'SWEATSUIT' Is Released

New Single 'Grillz' Featuring Paul Wall, Ali & Gipp, Sizzles

At Urban And Rhythm Crossover Radio Formats
NEW YORK-- Universal Records/Derrty Ent. hip-hop icon Nelly's multi-platinum, record breaking dual release Sweat and Suit newly pack-
aged as one CD, titled SWEATSUIT, features a sizzling new single, "Grillz," which is the #1 Greatest Gainer on the Rap BDS Monitor chart for
the 3rd week in a row. The single was also the #1 Most Added Song at the urban mainstream
and rhythm crossover radio formats.
The hit single, produced by Jermaine Dupri, and featuring Paul Wall and Derrty Ent.'s own
Ali & Gipp, has been given an eye-popping video by the celebrated directors The Fat Cats. Th-e
video is soaring up both the MTV and BET play list, Nelly recently appeared on MTV's TRL
to showcase SWEATSUIT's debut offering.
SWEATSUIT is not just a CD of re-released old songs, each song was specifically chosen.
The CD features all the #1 hits culled from the Sweat and Suit discs, as well as three brand
Snew tracks. The New York Times says that "Nelly might be on to something ... perhaps artists
and record labels should be forced to follow Nelly's lead."
The #1 hits assembled include "Over And Over," Nelly's groundbreaking, genre-defying
duet with country superstar Tim McGraw. The song tied the record with superstars Whitney
Houston and Mariah Carey upon its initial release, ascending to #1 status on Billboard's
Mainstream singles chart faster than any other single. SWEATSUIT also feature fan favorites,
S"My Place," "Na-Na-Na-Na," and "Flap Your Wings," along with others. As a special bonus,
the CD also includes "Fly Away," a song from The Longest Yard soundtrack.
The brand new tracks include, "Nasty Girl" a
much buzzed about collaboration with the late
Notorious B.I.G., Diddy and Derrty Ent. singer Avery ..
Storm, who also appears on the new song "Tired."
The original release of Sweat and Suit in
September of 2004 made hip hop and music history,
with Nelly becoming the first solo and rap artist to
debut in -the two top spots on the Billboard Top
Albums Chart (Suit #1, Sweat #2) putting Nelly in the
company of superstar artists such as Bruce
Springsteen and Guns N' Roses -- delivering two best selling albums simultaneously.
Sweat and Suit went on to sell well over 5 million albums, adding to the record breaking legacy Nelly I"
established with his two previous albums, Country Grammar and Nellyville, and bringing the St. Louis
native's total album sales to nearly 30 million albums worldwide. The 3-time Grammy winner also received
critical-acclaim as an actor with his role in The Longest Yard.
Most recently Nelly was honored at the Russell Simmons' Hip Hop Action Network for his contribu-
tions to the community. You can catch Nelly, along with Paul Wall, Ali and Gipp performing "Grillz," on
BET's 25th Anniversary show on the UPN network.


FIND OUT


HOW YOU CAN


APPEAR IN PREP RAP


CALL 904/ 766-8834


Page B-5/November 26, 2005


The Florida Star/Prep Rap








F~age B-6lNovember 26, 2005 The Florida Stan Prep Rap


Clean Kids Jokes


Silly! Silly!
Q. What is a skeleton?
A. Bones, with the person off! .

Q. What's the nearest thing to silver?
The Lone Ranger's bottom!

Q. Why are astronauts successful people?
" A. Because they always go up in the world!

Q. What has two humps and is found at the North
Pole?
A. A lost camel!

Q. Why did the clock get sick?
A. It was run down!

Q. What holds the sun up in the sky?
A. Sunbeams!

Q. What's the name for a short legged tramp?
A. A low down bum!

Q. What is the best thing to take into the desert?
A. A thirst aid kit!

Q. Why did the lazy man want a job in a bakery?
So he could loaf around!

Q.What stories do the ship captain's children
like to hear?
A. Ferry tales!

Q. Why did the silly kid stand on his head?
A. His feet were tired!

Q. How did the farmer fix his jeans?
A. With a cabbage patch!

Q. What do you call an American drawing?
A. Yankee doodle!

Q. What runs but never walks?
A. Water! -

Q. Who was the world's greatest thief?
4 A. Atlas, because he held up the whole world!

Q. If two's company and three a crowd, what are
four and five?
A. Nine!

Q. How was the Roman Empire cut in half?
A. With a pair of Caesars!

Q. What steps would you take if a madman came
rushing at you with a knife?
A. Great big ones!


Tongue
Twister

A bitter biting bittern
Bit a better brother
bittern,
And the bitter better bit-
tern
Bit the bitter biter back.
And the bitter bittern,
bitten,
By the better bitten
bittern,
Said: "I'm a bitter biter
bit, alack!"

Can you imagine an imag-
inary menagerie manager
imagining managing an
imaginary menagerie?.

Don't pamper damp
scamp tramps that camp
under ramp lamps.


KNOCK! KNOCK!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Ach
Ach who?
God Bless You!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Adore
Adore who?
Adore is between us open it up

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Anita
Anita who?
Anita another minute to think it over

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Amos
Amos who?
A mosquito bit me?

Knock Knock
Who's there?-
Tank .
Tank who?
You're welcome!


What's Missing From The Above Spot?
Information About Your Business,
Services, Or Goods!
To Place Your Advertisement
In This Spot
Call The Florida Star Today At (904) 766-8834


Wage B-6/N~ovemrber 26, 2005


The Florida Star/ Prep Rap





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0







Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "Hung Up" Madonna (Maverick) Last Week: No. 1
2r "My Humps" The Black Eyed Peas (A&M) No. 3
3. "Because of You" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 2
4. "Run It!" Chris Brown (Jive) No. 5
5. "Gold Digger" Kanye West Featuring Jamie Foxx (Roc
A Fella/Def Jam) No. 4
6. "Don't Bother" Shakira (Epic) New Entry
7. "Photograph" Nickelback (Roadrunner) No. 6 e
8. "Soul Survivor" Young Jeezey Featuring Akon O *
(Corporate Thugz/Def Jam) No. 10 V
9. "Wake Me Up When September Ends" Green Day O *
(Reprise) No. 7
10. "Shake It Off" Mariah Carey (Island) No. 8


TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Who You'd Be-Today" Kenny Chesney (BNA) Last
Week: No. 2
2. "Better Life" Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 1
3. "Skin (Sarabeth)" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street) No. 3
4. "Come a Little Closer" Dierks Bentley (Capitol) No. 6
5. "Good Ride Cowboy" Garth Brooks (Pearl) No. 7
6. "Tequila Makes Her. Clothes Fall Off' Joe Nichols
(Universal South) No. 9
7"Probably Wouldn't Be This Way" LeAnn Rimes
(Asylum/Curb) No. 4
8. "Best I Ever Had" Gary Allan (MCA Nashville) New
Entr-
9. "Somebody's Hero" Jamie O'Neal (Capitol) No. 5
10. "You're Like Comin' Home" Lonestar (BNA) No. 13
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Hung Up" Madonna (Maverick) Last Week: No. 1
2. "No Strings" Lola (Sobe) No. 3
13. "Cool (Richard X/Photek Mixes)" Gwen Stefani
(Interscope) No. 4
4. "Precious" Depeche Mode (Sire/Mute) No. 2
5. "Night of My Life" Barbra Striesand (Columbia) No. 5
6.."Ends of the Earth" Sun (BML) No. 8
7. "The Other Side" Paul Van Dyk Featuring Wayne
Jackson (Mute) No. 7
8. "Feels Just Like It Should" Jamiroquai (Columbia) No. 6
9. "What Will She Do for Love? (Kaskade/A. Caldwell/Ken
Mixes)" .Colette (OM) No. 10
10. "Cliche" Simone Denny (JVM) No. 9


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THE FLORIDA STAR


B-8/NOVEMBER 26, 2005







NOEME 26. 200 FLORID STAR AGEC-


COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

OPEN AUDITIONS-Professor Plum's Playhouse,
an interactive murder mystery dinner theater is hold-
ing and open audition for "Deadly Housewives" on
Sunday Npvenber 27, 1:00-3:00 p.m at 45,78
Blanding blvd, Jacksonville. ALL ROLES ARE
COMPENSATED. Talent should have good memo-
rization skills and be prepared to read sides from the
script. Production dates are December 31, 2005-
February 25, 2006. Headshots and resumes request-
ed but not required.
ENTERTAINERS NEEDED-The Jacksonville
Local Organizing Committee is soliciting entertain-
ers, to volunteer their talent for a Millions More
Movement Unity Family Rally to help galvanize our
communities for positive change. If you are a
singer,singing group, dancer,dancers,rapper,rap-
pers,church group,steppers,greek organization, club,
church choir, poet, comedian (no.age limitation and
open to male and female), please call 904-355-
9395,904-768-2778 or email:axn@bellsouth.net.
MEMORIAL SERVICE-Haven Hospice will host
a Memorial Service Tuesday, December 6, 2006 at
Taylor Nursing Home, 3937 Spring Park Road,
beginning at 7:00 p.m. The memorial service is part
of Haven's bereavement program and is open to any
individual in the community who wishes to pay trib-
ute to a lost loved one, regardless on whether or not
they have used other Haven services or not. For
more information, call 904-733-9818 or toll-free at
866-733-9818. Haven Hospice of Jacksonville is
part of a not-for-profit hospice network that serves
Duval, Nassau, Clay, Baker and St. Johns counties.
The end-of-life organization specializes in provid-
ing a network of services to patients in long-term
care facilities, hospitals, four Haven Hospice care
centers or in their own home. Haven Hospice also
provides ongoing grief and bereavement support
services, pediatric support programs, home medical
equipment and educational programs for those
affected by serious illnesses.
DEBUT OF SOLO PROJECT-Carmelita Terry, a
gifted and anointed vocalist, will debut her first solo
project entitle "I Give You Praise" during serving
events scheduled in the area. She will perform in a
Gospel Musical on November 27 at Mt. Sinai
Missionary Baptist Church (4:00 p.m. at 2036
Silver St); a Women's tea on December 3 at New
Covenant Ministries (6:00 p.m. at St. John's Bluff
Rd.); the Single's Christmas Banquet on December
3 at the Omni Hotel (7:00 p.m., contact Pastor
Marvin Reese at (904-783-1777 or 904- 386-7110),
and on February 25 at First African Baptist Church,
at Kingland, Ga. for the Black History Heritage
Music Fest.




DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Jacksonville's

Most Heated

Radio Talk Show!


North Florida's Best
Daily Talk Show!


AM 1530 t>
WEEKDAYS
2-6 P.M.


CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http://www.wymml530.com
4 a


It's Not All Cards For Bridge Club


Bridge club members and friends. Top left: Thelma Geiger, Luvenia Newman, Marie
Koon, Barbara Harper, Margaret Day, Vivian Jefferson, (I will get this name for you),
Mary Mitchell, Eva Lamar, Noah Henry Newman, Ernestine Poole, Marian Walker,
Gwendolyn. Schell, Ann Bodison, Matthew Walker, Pearl C. Barnett and Sollie Mitchell.


Kneeling are Lawrence Nixon and Evelyn Jones.






., u ,t I a:
SunCruz k itC.


Eva Lamar and Mr. and Mrs. Noah Henry Newman check
in at Mayport for a fun filled day at sea.






v ,-








Bridge club organizer Luvenia Newman and SunCruz
organizer Marie Koon found lots to smile about offshore.


By Marsha Dean Phelts

What do retired north
side teachers; business pro-
fessionals and social service
workers do on Tuesday
mornings? If they know
Louvenia Newman they
play Duplicate Bridge or
Party Bridge and afterwards


have lunch at the Moncrief
Senior Activities
Community Center.
Newman organized the
Tuesday Morning Bridge
Club upon her retirement
from the Duval County
School System in 1991 and-
they have been meeting
since.


No longer teaching chil-
dren, Newman enjoys shar-
ing universal bridge tech-
niques with peers.
The bridge enthusiasts in
this group have gone on
bridge playing field trips to
American Beach, they have
played in bridge tourna-
ments throughout the city
and a number of them have
traveled cross-country to
compete.
Recently, charter mem-
ber, Marie Koon arranged a
free fun filled day at sea on
board the SunCruz Casino
Ship for the Tuesday
Morning Bridge Club and
their guests.
The Casino bus provided
transportation to and from
Mayport and a number of
other amenities.
The group, enjoyed a
delicious brunch while
cruising into the internation-
al water zone off the Atlantic
Coast.
Once the ship reached
international zone the group
scattered to bingo, slot
machines and more with the
stashes of nickels and quar-
ters they brought with them.
Judging from the broad
smiles at the end of the day
there were many winners in
the group as they, joyfully
headed back to town. The
next big splash for the
Tuesday Morning Bridge
Group will be the annual
Christmas Party held at the
Newman's spacious and
lovely home. Members and
their guests look forward to
this treat.


Oprah's Favorite Things Effects First Coast Business
Once again, the Queen of daytime TV has proclaimed her "Favorite Things For 2005".
Once again, this media mogul has sent a spending frenzy across the country via e-mail,
phone, and brick and mortar. Americans show every year that they too want Oprah's
favorite things. And once again, Oprah's words have hit the first coast and a locally.owned
business. For the second time in three years, Oprah has mentioned a hard to find product
that is sold exclusively at an independently owned and operated Jacksonville business.
"Thankfully we had an eight hour window to know that "THE" show was going to air and
that Oprah was going to showcase Amazing Grace products from a company called
Philosophy, states Beauty Bar owner Jennifer Walsh.
The Beauty Bar has felt Oprah's power in the past. In the past few years she has men-
tioned products that The Beauty Bar carries exclusively and they are sold out within hours.
As soon as the viewers see the show, they either know that the store has it or they go online
to see where their nearest retailer is located. Amazing Grace is already one of our most pop-
ular items, so I believe that both of The Beauty Bar stores will be sold out by the end of
business today, states Ms.Walsh. Unfortunately, this is already the busiest times of year for
vendors like Philosophy so the likelihood that it will be back in stock within the next 2-3
weeks is prettyislim.


K w a n z a a
Celebrates
Family, Community
The African Institute
for Cultural Awareness
invites the African
American Community to
celebrate the first day of
the 7 days of Kwanzaa,,
an African American
Holiday. Kwanzaa was
created in 1966 by Dr.
Maulana (mah-oo-lah-
nah) Karenga (kah-ren-
gah), a renowned ideolo-
gist and historian.
It is designed to uplift
the spirits of African
Americans as a means of
opposing black on black
crime with black on
black love.
It is also designed as a
ceremony of commit-
ment based on the seven
foundations of the holi-
day. Join the millions of
African Americans who
will be celebrating
Kwanzaa across the
nation.
Kwanzaa which
begins December 26 con-
tinues through January
1st. Kwanzaa is not con-
sidered a religious holi-
day or an alternative to
Christmas.
The local community
will celebrate the 24th
year of Kwanzaa in
Jacksonville beginning
on Monday, December
26. 6:00 p.m. in the
Edward Waters College
Milne Auditorium (locat-
ed in the Administrative
Building) at 1658 Kings
Road.
Enjoy food, songs,
stories, singers, art and
crafts, speakers and wit-
ness the Kwanzaa ritual.

It's all free! Please bring
3 guest and fruit for the
Kwanzaa display.
This event is spon-
sored by the African
Institute for Cultural
Awareness and Edward
Waters College. For more
information contact
Volume Burks at 403-
6960 or go to
www.KemetHouse.com

American Legion
Post 197 Provides
Thanksgiving
American Legion Post
197 held their annual
Thanksgiving Dinner for
Seniors on Sunday,
November 20.
A delicious meal was
prepared and served by Post
197's own chef, Third Vice
President Jasper Watkins.
Approximately 150
guests attended the occa-
sion. In thanking the legion-
naires, guests and those who
assisted in making 'this
year's event successful,
Commander Theodore
"Teddy Bear" Green reiter-
ated that Post 197, in con-
junction with its Fraternity
40/8, that Approximately 43
Thanksgiving baskets would
be distributed this year.
"This is Post 197's way of
giving something back to
the community," said
Commander Green.


PAGE C-I


NOV~EMBER 26, 20055


FLORIDA STAR








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Kids under 4'9" .



are under-protected.









4 STEPS FOR KIDS







INFANT TODDLER BOOSTER SAFETY BELT











S.-- The #1 killer of children is

car crashes. With a booster

seat, your. child is 59% less

.-likely to be injured in a car

crash. If they're under 4'9"

-' they should be in a booster

r.. '~seat. It raises them up for a

proper fit. And the right fit

t makes- all the difference to

their future.


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ohm quop-40D







inner-Fashion Show To Benefit Edward Waters College

Dinner-Fashion Show To Benefit Edward Waters College


The Gift Boutique, etc.
will host "Simply
Gorgeous," a Dinner-
Fashion Show Benefit for
Edward Waters College on
Friday, December 2 at 7:30
p.m. in the George N.
Collins Cafeteria on the
upper lever of the George N.
Collins Student union


Building on the College
campus. The College is
located at 1658 Kings Rd. in
northwest Jacksonville.
Thompson Hospitality of
Edward Waters College and
well-trained staff will serve
a delicious meal while atten-
dees relax and enjoy the
sounds of the Christmas sea-


The latest fashion from
casual to formal wear will be
modeled in an assortment of
sizes for males and females.
Models will ensure that
guests are able to view
details of the garments in
anticipation of purchase at
the end of the elegant affair.


The Gift Boutique, etc.,
is privately owned by Ella
Maria Sykes, a graduate and
former employee of EWC.
Mrs. Sykes says she is
proud of the Double E
Principle:Excellence &
Ethics, adopted by the
administration, faculty, staff
and students.


"This is an attitude that Alumni and friends are
requires one to rise above encouraged to secure tickets
the average and go beyond at an early date.
the ordinary. With financial For sponsorship for your
gifts from the Jacksonville business and to secure tick-
Community, the Edward ets, please call 713-9269 or
Waters College family will 389-4404.
reach their goals, assures The attire is dressy and
Sykes. the deadline is Sunday,
Seats are limited. November 27.


Westside Community Fest Planned Guess Who's Coming To Dinner?


Florida Community
College is hosting a
Westside Community Fest
on Dec. 3 from 10 a.m.-2
p.m. at the Cecil Education
Center. The theme is Safety
Awareness.
The Community Fest
will offer free food, games, a
silent charity auction and
entertainment. For the kids
there will be face painting, a
clown, a "moonwalk" sta-
tion and arts and crafts.
Neighbors can enjoy hot


dogs, popcorn and cotton
candy. Shands Trauma One
helicopter will be coming in
for a landing, as well as the
American Red Cross, and
-their mascot, Ready Red
Cross, to promote safety
awareness. Jacksonville
Sheriffs Office will be on-
hand, fingerprinting children
for safety identification.
Representatives from
Jacksonville Fire and
Rescue Department will also
attend.


A silent auction to bene-
fit United Way will give bid-
ders a chance to win golf for
four at Deerfield Lakes'
Country. Club, restaurant
prizes from Red Lobster,
Olive Garden and Cracker
Barrel, and hair care from
Shear Perfections.
Cecil Education Center
is located at 13367
Normandy Blvd. For more
information, contact the
Cecil Education Center at
904.997.2860.


The December,Birthday Club of New Bethel A.M.E.
Church, 1231 Tyler St., presents, by popular demand, a
dramatic presentation that has been hailed as "soul stir-
ring" and "soul searching" by those who attended the
first production.
Club members say "Guess Who's coming To Dinner"
will be just as spectacular the second time around.
A cast of sixteen will provide a riveting presentation
of this play on Friday, December 2, 7:00 p.m. at the
church. The presentation .is free. A Seafood Dinner
($15 for adults and $7.50 for children) will be served
prior to the production.
* 'The play is directed by Rev. Jeanette Graham, Pastor
of the Zion Christian Church of Jacksonville.


AML n Anucans CA .

On H~ u~gSi


- e


a -


PEN POINTS

Letters must include name, address, and phone number. They are due the Tuesday before
the next issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com

Personally, I would like to thank you, "The Florida Star", for publishing 'The Legacy and
Times" of my late husband Dr. John H. Bolden, Professor Emeritus who taught at Florida
State University for 15 years.
It is with warmth and gratitude that I salute you.


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


-a -


In Loving
Memory Of

John "Bull" Williams













12-19-72-11-26-03
If we could have
a lifetime wish, a dream
that would come true, we
would pray to God with all
our hearts for yesterday
and you. A thousand
words can't bring you
back, we know because we
we have tried.
And neither can a million
tears, we know
because we have cried.
You left behind our broken'
hearts and happy
memories too. We never
wanted memories, we only
wanted you.
We All Love You
And Miss You,
Step, Tech, Grandmother
Alma, Sisters, Nieces,
Nephews, Aunts, Uncles,
Cousins, and Devoted,
Friends Shannon, Petey,
and Big "T"


S- Bertha M. Bolden
Affiliated with
- Florida State university
Foundation Scholarship Fund
Tallahassee, Florida


THANKS


FOR READING


AND SUPPORTING


THE FLORIDA STAR!



ADVERTISE IN


AND SUBSCRIBE


TO THE FLORIDA STAR


CALL


(904)766-8834

------------------------ m ------------------ 1

PLUMBING REPAIRS

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DEATH

NOTICES
DARBY-Clara Mae, 76,
died November 16, 2005.
PAULK-Donna M., died
November 17, 2005.
FRAZIER-Rudolph,
died November 13, 2005.
GOODMAN-Charlie,
died November 11, 2005:
HOLLINGS-Charlie, Jr.
died November 17, 2005.
INMAN-Betty, died
November 13, 2005.
A.B. Coleman Mortuary,
Inc.
JONES-Lois M., died
November 12, 2005.
KNIGHT-Lloyd, died
November 15, 2005.
MCCLENTON-Ethel,
died November 13, 2005.
Alphonso West Mortuary,


Inc.
MORRIS-Sharon, died
November 15,'2005.
REYNOLDS-Terry, died
November 13, 2005.
ROBERTS-Juanita, died
November 16, 2005.
TAYLOR-Lula M., died
November 16, 2005.
THOMAS-John Henry,
died November 15, 2005.
WAYMAN-Michael 1.,
died November 12, 2005.
WILLIAMS-Debora A.,
died November 11, 2005.
WOODS-Duane j., Sr.,
died November 16, 2005.
WRIGHT-Patrick N.,
died November 16, 2005.


A


- -


PAGE C-3


FLORIDA STAR


MBER 262005


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WHAT TOOK YOU A LIFETIME
TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.


WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.
Learn the warning signs at
StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE.
Amcrivin Strckv
As2ociaion. .


LOOKING FOR A PLACE WHERE REAL GROWN
FOLKS CAN GO TO RELAX AND UNWIND?
JOIN US AT "THE POST"
2179 Benedict Road
Tuesday Game Night
Bring your game and play cards with soimne of the best players
in town
Thursday Talent Night
Bring your best song, dance or comedy routine and show us
what you got!
Friday & Saturday
Disco (featuring DJ Larry "Georgia Boy" Douglas)
When the pretty people come out to play, dance and have a
good time.
For More Information Call 768-1206


IMPACT
WCGL AM 1360
THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
SATURDAYS @ 1:00 PM.
Issues That Address
Concerns Of The
African American
Community In
Jacksonville AndThe
World


ART.


FOR


ASK


MORE.


For more information about the
importance of arts education, please contact
www.AmericansForTheArts.org.


I.


AMERICANS
^ARTS


The Readers of the Black Press in America are more
educated,
make more income
and have
substantial buvina Dower.



Source: The Media Audit
2004 Black Newspapers. Readership Report, nnpa.org


A 4


PAGE C-4


S(912) 242-6477 ,
Brwnswick, Gerigla 31520


Gi/ Ap .p.,'lfor f It. a(,es!
Gift Baskets
Handbags
Hats
Gloves
Shoes
T-Shirts
Socks
Monday Thursday Friday
1 p.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday
10 a.m. 6 p.m.


I~h~+B~


~*WIIRk-aa~~Uh-*~a~o~


q% NOOMMMMM i 099pr


.NOVEMBER 26, 2005,


FLORIDA STAR


I1


kk






'VflT&",RF 26. 200 FLRDSAAG


( rtr if-h oatvi**o" fhtf Prom Was Exciting For Venus


...| j ...


.. 4k .... .


1. Who was Avery Brundage's successor as International Olympic
Committee chairman?
2. What form of horse racing boasts the Little Brown Jug?
3. What does MTA stand for among Frisbee aficionados?
4. What part of a dartboard must be five feet, eight inches above the floor?
5. How many balls apart from the cue ball are used in snooker?
6. Who was the first person inducted into the U.S. Swimming Hall of
Fame? -
7. What is the umpire's ruling if a line drive hits the third-base bag and
bounces into the stands?
8. What New York Mets manager asked, "Can't anybody here play this
game?"?
9. What is the claim to fame of the Royal Montreal Golf Club?
10. What two skills make up the winter biathlon?
Sports Challenge Answers


*auI 'iipaItH[Ia sooz (0)
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g 'tasoosq q 'lj IolV ttll tumnu!xnn UW '.uioLI ssOuJreH "l 'uIuNlliN pJ1o 'I
-------------------------------------------------------
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"--- -"-.-.... ___ -- __- _-_-r_- _


BEVERLY
7 aHILLS, Calif. -
Venus Williams
says winning her
t h i r d
Wimbledon title -
was exciting-- but
it wasn't the best -"
thing that hap-
pened this year.
"It wasn't the
highlight of my ..
year. There's so .. -
many other things -
I was so excited....
about," she said in
a recent interview.
Tops on' her list was attending a 1980s-themed prom.
"Seriously, it was the best time of my life," she said. "I had
lace gloves. I was so '80s it was ridiculous; I was disgusted
.. .. with myself."
.. Neither Venus nor her sister Serena attended public high
...- school, so Serena threw a party with a high school theme.
"We played all kinds of games like bobbing for apples,"
Venus said. "I don't get to do that, it was amazing. I took it
so seriously."
Both sisters will start 2006 with an exhibition in Hong
Kong before going into the Australian Open without play-
ing an official warmup event.

FAMU Players Earn MEAC Honors

After Florida Classic Win Over B-CC


VIRGINIA BEACH, Va.
- Albert Chester of Florida
A&M was named Mid-
Eastern Athletic Conference
Offensive Player of the
Week the league announced
on Monday. The Rattlers'
Sammy Doughty and
Bethune-Cookman's
Taurean Charles shared


Defensive Player of the
Week honors.
Other winners include
Don Carey of Norfolk State,
who earned Rookie of the
Week honors; South
Carolina State center
Raymond Harrison
(Offensive Lineman of the
Week) and the Rattlers'


Turnovers By B-CC

Lead To Clemson

Win In Basketball

The Clemson Tigers defeated the Bethune-Cookman
College Wildcats 84-55 on Friday night, November 18 at
Littlejohn Coliseum
Clemson, South Carolina.
Clemson (1-0) led by 40
points (57-17) at the half,
holding Bethune-Cookman to
'less than 20 points in the first
half for the second time this
season.
The Wildcats scored just
16 against Syracuse over one
week ago in the 2K Sports
Coaches vs. Cancer Classic in
Syracuse, New York.
The Wildcats turned the
Antonio Webb ball over 18 times in the first
half while taking just 19 shots
from the floor.
That number led to 39
points for the Tigers on B-CC
turnovers for the game.
Trailing by a sizeable
margin, B-CC (1-2) would
not give up as senior guard
Antonio Webb (Fairfax, Va.)
continued his assault on the
B-CC record books with his
third consecutive double-digit
performance of the year.
Webb led the 'Cats with 22
points on the night, including
four (4) three-pointers.
B-CC outscored their opponent from the basketball
heavy Atlantic Coast Conference by a 38-27 margin in the
second half, thanks, in part, to the double-double effort of
Michael Williams II (College Park, Ga.) who missed last
Monday night's exhibition contest with a neck injury.
Williams returned to the lineup with his first double-double
(14 pts./11 rebs.) performance of the year.


November 10
November 19
Delaware State 23, Howard 7 -
Hampton 44, Savannah State 6
Alcorn State 31, Jackson State 14 -
Southeastern LA 38, Miss Valley State 21 -
North Alabama 24, NC Central 21 -


Wesley Taylor (Special
Teams Performer of the
Week).
Chester (QB, 5-9, 175, r-
So. Jacksonville, Fla.) -
directed

from a 17-
0 deficit
against B-
CC to a 26-
23 over-
Stime win in
A t! the Florida
Chester Classic.
He drove the Rattlers 95
yards in the fourth quarter to
cut the Wildcats lead to 23-
20 and engineered the game-
tying drive in the final 1:15.
Chester finished the game
14-of-19 passing for 165
yards, along with 75 rushing
yards on 11 carries. He was
voted Classic MVP for
FAMU.
I Doughty (FS, 6-3, 205,
Sr. Columbus, Miss.) had
12' tackles (six solo), an
interception returned for 21-
yards, 1.5
tackles for
loss and
one pass
break up as
the Rattler
defense

t h e
Doughty Wildcats in
the second half.
Taylor (P/PK, 5-7, 170,
So. Riverview, Fla.) After
missing his
first field
goal of the
day, Taylor
bounced
back to
Make his
AL next four
Taylor k i c k s ,
including a
game-tying 43-yarder to
send the game into overtime
and the 17-yard game win-
ner in overtime to seal the
win for FAMU. Taylor's
final kick was voted the No.
9 Play-of-the-Day on ESPN
Sportcenter Saturday night.


Norfolk State 34, Liberty 17
SC State 43, NC A&T 27
Arkansas-Pine Bluff 40, Texas Southern 23
Eastern Kentucky 49, Tennessee State 0 -
Florida A&M 26, Bethune-Cookman 23 -
- OT
Alabama A&M 31, Prairie View A&M 16 -


PAGE C-5


FLORIDA STAR


NOVEMBER 26.2005~


I


. .............


"":-:...:: *








SPAU"GEt.'i ,C-6 1 .Ui


JAIL OR BAIL

EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
VIOLATION OF INJUNCTION-On Monday,
November 21, 2005 at 8:30 a.m. a police officer was
.dispatched to the 7800 block of Wilson Boulevard
West in reference to a dispute that involved a-battery.
Upon arrival, the officer met with a 22-year-old female
(victim), who advised that her 22-year-old boyfriend
(suspect) became physical with her that morning after
an argument. The victim had an injunction for protec-
tion against the suspect for repeated violence against
her. The police officer observed a small scratch and a
small abrasion on her shoulder and collar area. She told
'the officer that the suspect left marks on her from grab-
bing her. JSO records and ID verified that the suspect
has an injunction against him for domestic violence
against his girlfriend. The suspect was arrested and
,transported to jail.
A HABITUAL TRAFFIC OFFENDER-On Friday,
November 18, 2005 at 9:15 a.m. a police officer was
"working off duty at the downtown FCCJ (101 West
;State Street) in the north parking lot of the campus.
While in the patrol car, the officer saw a blue 4-door
Chevy, driving southbound in the parking lot. The offi-
.cer saw the car run a stop sign in the parking lot, con-
ducted a traffic stop on the vehicle, and met with a 36-
year-old female driver (suspect) who had no ID. The
officer ran the tag on the car and a check with ID and
records revealed that she was the owner of the vehicle.
Her license had been revoked on 11/14/05 for five
years. She was cited as an habitual traffic violator. The
suspect was read her rights. She told the officer that she
had just paid off a large fine to get her license back and
doesn't understand how her license got revoked. The
suspect was arrested, transported to jail, and charged
with a felony.
CHILD SUPPORT-On Sunday, November 20, 2005 at
10:30 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to the resi-
dent of a 32-year-old male (suspect) for late child sup-
port payments. A warrant had been issued for his arrest
by Judge Wiggons. The suspect was arrested and trans-
ported to jail with a civil charge for late child support
payments in the amount of $1,000.
WORTHLESS CHECKS AND DEBIT CARDS-On
Sunday, November 20, 2005 at 6:30 p.m. a police offi-
cer was dispatched to the 4300 of Beverly Avenue in
reference to theft. Upon arrival, the officer made con-
tact with a 45-year-old female (suspect). It was deter-
mined that she had several active warrants for her arrest
:for worthless checks, and debit cards. The suspect was
read her rights, arrested, transported to jail, and
[charged with a misdemeanor.
POSSESSION OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA-On
Friday, November 18, 2005 at 9:00 a.m. a police officer
while on patrol, observed a 35- -year-old male (suspect)
'consuming alcohol from a can on a city sidewalk. The
police officer made contact with the suspect, stopped to
speak with him, and informed, him of the law concern-
ing consumption of alcohol on city property. The offi-
'*cer requested that the suspect pour out the remaining
:alcohol on the ground and he complied. A check of the
'suspect's identification with missing person revealed
that the suspect had an outstanding warrant for.his
-arrest. The suspect was searched prior to being placed
into the police vehicle, and the search revealed a brillo
-pad which is a common device used for smoking crack
;cocaine. The suspect also had a piece of crack cocaine
which field-tested positive for crack cocaine in his front
jacket pocket. The suspect was read his rights. He stat-
.ed that he had a drug problem, and had used the pipe to
smoke crack cocaine earlier in the day. The cocaine and
pipe were placed into the property room. The suspect
was, arrested, transported to jail, and charged with a
'felony.
;PETIT THEFT-On Sunday, November 20, 2005 at
,,8:15 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to (Bealls
Department Store) in the 800 block of Commerce
:'Center Drive in reference to a petit theft in which a 34-
'year-old female (suspect) and her three children entered
the store. Once inside, the suspect and her children
'began taking various pieces of merchandise from dis-
'play stands and racks, and concealed them on their per-
son. When the suspect and her children exited the store
without paying for the items, they were detained by
S police. The suspect and her children were advised of
,their rights. They admitted to taking the merchandise.
S While in custody, the suspect told the officer that her
name was Jackie. The officer later discovered that her
j name was not Jackie and that she had multiple war-
rants. The suspect had her three children with her and
was openly committing the theft and having them par-
* ticipate. The children were also arrested for stealing
items. The mother was transported to jail and charged
with a misdemeanor.


WANT CUSTOMERS?
ADVERTISE IN
THE FLORIDA STAR!
TO PLACE
YOUR
AD CALL
US TODAY
AT 904/766-8834


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19)
ARIES (March 21
to April 19) A
minor irritation at
work shouldn't throw you
for the whole week. You
have important tasks ,to
accomplish. Later, your
social life is positively
whirling!
TAURUS (April 20 to
SMay 20) An
unexpected
opportunity falls
right into your
lap. Where it concerns your
career, choose carefully.
Compromise is the watch-
word for week's end.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) You're
in no position to
be lending people
money. With the
holidays, things are tight as
it is. While your heart's in
the right place, you're not
thinking clearly.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) Come up with a
plan wherein you
and your family
can donate time to
a nursinghome or
hospital this holiday season.
You'll find the true meaning
of giving. Later in the week,
a bigwig at work has a
happy surprise for you.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22) Social invita-
tions are arriving.
Thus, you'll need
to sort out the
wheat from the
chaff. Not every outing can
be undertaken, so choose
wisely.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) A gift
you ordered .some time ago
still hasn't
arrived. You may i r
have to come up
with an alterna-
tive. This weekend is a good
time to finish up all pre-hol-


Your Weekly Horoscope
(NOVEMBER 27, 2005-DECEMBER 2, 2005)


iday chores.
LIBRA (September
23 to October
22) Your usual

is marred this
week by a work worry.
Remember, fretting won't
change things. Come up
with a concrete plan of
attack.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21) A
meeting you'd prepared for
is taken off the
schedule. Deal
-... with this graceful-
ly. When it does
happen, you're up for it.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December 21)
Tie up some loose
ends on the job.
This clears your
schedule for
upcoming important events.
Over the weekend, you
enjoy domestic harmony. ,
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19) The best way
to deal with a
r contentious co-
worker is with
tact. Ultimately,
this person comes around to
your way of thinking. Later,
some holiday shopping is in
order.
AQUA R, I US
(January 20 to
February 18)
Those in negotia-
tions, whether in
business or per-
sonally, will succeed. In
general, things are going
your way. Travel is in the
stars after the holiday season
winds down.
PISCES (February
19 to March 20) Your
intuition is working ov.er-
time. Follow
these hunches.
While it makes no
logical sense,


Elderly Georgia Man

On Oxygen Fouls Robbers
SAVANNAH, Ga. Despite being 83 years old and
reliant on oxygen tubes for a lung ailment, Harry Carpenter
wouldn't let his wife of 57 years be robbed by knife-wield-
ing intruders in his own home.
Two would-be robbers forced their way into the home of
Carpenter and his wife, Jackie, Wednesday evening while
the two were having dinner, according to a police report.
One of them made Harry Carpenter sit down in the sun
room, while the other went with Jackie Carpenter, 80, to get
money from her bedroom.
Carpenter tried to come to his wife's rescue but was
threatened with the knife.
Then he got his break his wife pretended to faint and
the intruder who was holding him went into the other room
to see what was happening.
Carpenter shuffled to the laundry room, where he kept an
old, unloaded rifle that he used to shoot squirrels, he said.
When one of the intruders came back, he found
Carpenter aiming the rifle at him and yelled at his compan-
ion to flee. Police were unable to locate the two suspects,
who didn't get any money.,


WANT

CUSTOMERS?

ADVERTISE IN

THE FLORIDA STAR!
TO PLACE

YOUR AD
CALL US,

TODAY

'AT 904/766-8834


5-10-27-44-45-50

November 19, 2005


you're often successful
when you just go with your
gut instincts.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Little
Richard, December 5;
Janine Turner, December 6;
Larry Bird, December 7;
Teri Hatcher, December 8;
Kirk Douglas, December 9;


Tara's

24/7


Kenneth Branagh,
December 10; Bess
Armstrong, December 11..
2005 DBR Media,Inc.
THANKS
FOR
SUPPORTING
THE FLORIDA STAR!


Bail
Bonds


9 L Service
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Your business is always welcome!


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WE PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR: :
OHypertension
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OFFICE HOURS:
M-F 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. Wed. 2 P. M. TO 5 P.M.

Student Allegedly Urinates In Ice Machine
CARLISLE, Ky. A Nicholas County High School
student was suspended after he was accused of urinating
in an ice machine that at least 31 people got ice from
before the incident was reported.
Ben Buckler, chief of police for Nicholas County
Schools, said another student dared the boy, who told
officials he relieved himself in the ice machine in the
gymnasium lobby just before physical education class
Wednesday.
School law officials say charges will be filed,
although officials were still trying to decide Thursday
what to charge him with. He was suspended for 10 days,
pending an expulsion hearing.
Other students witnessed the incident, but it wasn't
reported to Principal Doug Bechanan until Thursday
morning. By the time the machine was taken out of serv-
ice, some students and staff had taken ice from the
machine.
School officials contacted the Department of Public
Health in Frankfort.


Crime doesn't pay
but we do!
CRIME STOPPERS
1-866-845-TIPS (8477)

No Names...

No Faces...

No Hassles

i ^ s'V


I I


NO VEMBER 2 6, 2 0 05


FLORIDA STAR


rb -Tle l








FLORIDA STAR


NOVEMBER 26, 2005


EMPLOYMENT


Change Your Life.
Your Future.
You have the power to change
your future. And you can do it
right here at Florida
Community College at
Jacksonvile. To learn about
employment opportunities that
are available, please visit our
website at Jobs.FCCJ.edu.


Driver CDL-A req'd.
'Home Every Night &
Weekend Guaranteed


Avg. $888 $1018/wk
No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
Sunday calls welcome!
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

Highway Maintenance Worker
Apply online for requisition
#55004792 @ https://people-
first.myflorida.com by midnight on
Tuesday, 12-02-05. FL DOT Jax,
FL. For job requirements contact
Barbara @ 800-865-5794. FDOT
is a DFWP/EEO/AA/VP/LAA.

FOR SALE
Bed Brand Name Queen set
New, w/warranty $119 can
deliver, 904-858-9350

FOR SALE
Bed Full Size new, with
Warranty, in plastic $99 must
sell 904-398-5200

TOP $$$ PAID
For JUNK CARS
CALL: S & T Towing Inc.
370-0254 Ask for: Terry


-* u
r "MedicaCf areern I

W Want to help people?
STrain in less time
than you think
Career service avail- *
1 able
Financial Aid available
' for those who qualify.
! Training includes an "
S externship!
For a Brochure
Call Now! 800-761-0620k
Sanford Brown
Institute
10255 Fortune Parkway, |
Suite 501
Jacksonville, FL, 32256



Announcements


Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by Ron I...
Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99 to Dianetics. 3102
N. 1Ilabana Ave., Tampa Ft, 33607.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE SS$$ Buy Direct From Manufacturer.
20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.


Business Opportunities


ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day) 30 Ma-
chines. 1Free Candy All for $9.995. (888)629-9968 B0200(1033.
CALL US: We will not be undersold!

Equipment For Sale

SAWMILLS from only $2,795.00 Convert your LOGS '[I
VALUABLE LUM BER with your Norwood portable band
sawmill. Log skidders also available.
www norwoodindustries com -Free informationo.
(800)578-1363 ext 300N.


Health


OXYGEN USERS: Enjoy more freedom! Travel without canis-
ters, Oxlife's lightweight. Oxygen concentrators run off your
car & in your home. U.S.A.- made Wa'anteed (800)780-2616
www oxlifeinc corn

SAVE ON PRESCRIPTION MEDICINES! Up to 90% dis-
count! Patent. Generic. OTCs too. Reliable. Safe. Easy. Fast!
Order via internet.' CC payment. US Postal Service delivery.
www pharmamx.com

Help Wanted

DRIVERS WANTED Average dispatch is 2,100 miles.*3-Pay
Packages to choose from "*Late model Equipment *No Hlaz-Mat
*No East-Coast *100% No-Touch Freight *Weekly Advances
*Direct Deposit *weekly (same week) Settlements. Solos and
Owner Operators Welcome. Requirements: I-year T0R verifi-
able experience. CDI. CLASS A Plus Safe Driving record, ...Call
Smithway Logistics. Inc. (800)282-1911 ext 115.

S/E& 3-State Run: T/TDrivers. HOME WEEKENDS. Mileage
Pay, Benefits. 401K. Trainees Welcome. Miami area- exp. req. 21
min age/Class-A CDL Cypress Truck Lines
(800)545-1351..

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay& benefits
for Experienced Drivers, 0/0. Solos. Teams & Graduate Stu-
dents. Bonuses Available. Refrigerated Now Available.
(888)MORE PAY (888-667-3729).

Driver- NOW HIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for Central
Florida Local & National OTR positions. Food grade tanker, no
hazmat. no pumps. great benefits, competitive pay & new equip-
ment. Need 2 years experience. Call Bynum Transport for your
opportunity today. (800)741-7950.

OWNERSOPERATORS *$1.010 SIGN-ON BONUS *Refriger-
ated *SE Regional *Hlome Weekly *Weekly Settlements *Top
Percentage Pay ', Fuel Surcharge *Dedicated Dispatcher *Own
Lightweight Late-Model Truck. Call Cammy 1q, (800)237-8288.

ACT NOW DRIVERS- Flatbed. Bulk Ttink and Refrigerated
Divisions. Performance based pay. Experienced Operators. In-
dependent Contractors or Company Drivers. CDL instruction
Program available. (800)771-6318. www prinmeinc coit


SERVICES


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
*CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764






THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

CURL QUEEN
"Specials"
Curls -Ages 7-12 ONLY $29.95
Relaxer w/ Roller Set ONLY
$25.00
766-4510

Want to purchase minerals and
other oil/gas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201

AUTO FOR SALE
1992 Ford Station Wagon
Runs great. $1500. 355-6007


The Readers of the
Black Press in
America are more
educated,
make more
income
and have
substantial buvinq




To place an ad:
CALL:
(904) 766-8834

FAX:
(904) 765-1673


BUSINESS NETWO
MB I El


THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAY @ 1:00 P.M.


CDLAOTR DRIVERSTEAMS .60CPM SOI.OS.34CPM 100%
DROP&HOOKHEALTH BENEFITSASSIGNl) EQUIPMENT
REQUIRE- 1 YEAR OTR IAZMAT& DOUBLES (321)202-4406.

S600 WEEKLY Working through the government part-time,
No Experience. A lot of Opportunities. (800)493-3688 Code J-
14.

Now Hiring for 2005 Postal Positions S I7.50-$5'9.00+/hr.
Full Benefits/Paid Training and Vacations No Experience Nec-
essary (800)584-1775 Reference # 5600.

MOVIE EXTRAS, ACTORS & MODELS! Make S75-S250/
day. All ages and faces wanted! No exp. Required. FT/PT!
(800)851-9046.


Instruction


Heavy Equipment Operator CERTIFIED. Hands on Training.
Job Placement Assistance. Call Toll Free (866)933-1575. AS-
SOCIATED TRAINING SERVICES, 5177 Homosassa Trail.
Lecanto, Fl. 34461.

Legal Services

DI)IVOR(:ES275-$350*COVERS children. etc. Only one signa-
ture required *Excludes govt, fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext.600. (8am-7pm) Alta Divorce, LLC, Estab-
lished 1977.

ARRESTED-NEEDALAWYER? AllCriminal Defense.*Felo-
nies *Misdemeanors *DUl *Automobilc Accident *Domiestic
Violence 'Wrongful Death. "Protect Your Rights" A-A-A At-
torney Referral Service (800)733-5342 24/7.


Miscellaneous


EARNDEGREE online from home. *Medical, *Business., *Para-
legal, *(Computers. Job Placement Assistance. Computer &
Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
www.onlinetidewatertech coin

FREE 4-ROOMD(IRECTV'W/INSTALLATION! FREE DVR!
FREE DVDPLAVYER! 3 MONTIIS PREiE 1IBOCINEMAX I AC-
CESS2251 CHANNELS. 100% DIGITALCON EDITIONS APPLY.
CALL NOW (866)500-4056.

Real Estate

North Carolina Gated Lakefront Community 1.5 acres plus,
90 miles of shoreline. Never before offered with 20% pre-
development discounts, 90% financing. Call (800)709-5253.

BEAUTIFULNORTI I CAROLINA.ESCAPETE l I lEATlIN'l IE
COOL BEA UTI Fl.UL PEACIFU L .MOUINTAINSOF WESTERN
NC. Homes. Cabins, Acreage & Investments. Cherokee Moun-
tain Realty GMAC Real Estate. Murphy
www.chernokdemotinttainrealt com ( Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.

Coastal Southeast Georgia Large wooded water access, marsh
view, lake front, and golf oriented homesites from the mid $70's
Live oaks, pool, tennis, golf. (877)266-7376.
wwM.cooerspoita.com.

SEASON CLOSE-OUT SALE IN THE TENNESSEE
SMOKIES Gated Waterfront Community Riverfrontan d Moan-
tain Views Available. Prices Starling Low as $46.900. Final
Phase 1 limitedd Lots C'all Now! Ask about our lot/ home pkg. Buy
Direct from the Developer SAVE THIOUSANDSS$$$ (800)559-
3095 ext 327 www.riverscrest comn.

Mountain, Lake, and Vacation Properties available in North-
east Georgia and Western NC. Contact Exit Realty
(877)203-5151 w,'ww.cxitng.cnom


SWeek of Nvember 21, 2005


East Alabama Mountain Property For Sale One hour west of
Atlanta in Piedmont, A.. Great for enjoyment or investment
19.5 acres $6.142 down $510/Monthly. Information Call -
Glenn (850),545-4928.

ESCAPE TO YELLOW 'TOPMOUNTAI N, Western NC. Easy
Access. Paved Roads. Privacy, Gated, Awesome views! Acreage
w/creeks & log cabin shell from $89,900. Financing Available.
(828)247-0081.

Unique 6,000 sq. ft. Lake Lanier home, private-2ac. 325 It on
lake. exquisite gardens. waterfalls, boat dock. 50mi. NE of
Atlanta, GA $1.500.000: Doris, Savage RE. (770)861-8525.


FINDPEACEFROMTIIESTORMS!
Magnificent Georgia Properties For Sale.
Timberland, Farmland & Recreational
*Acrcage's From 3 'l'O 3,000*
-Call PeachState at (866)300-7653.
vwww farmandtimbcr comn
GAL 2550


GRAND OPENING SALE Phase 2. Lake View Bargains! -Water
access from $34,900 w/ FREE Boat Slips. PAY NO CLOSING
COSTS! Sat & Sun 12/10 & 12/'l. Huge pre- construction
savings on heautifiully wooded parcels at 34,000 acre lake in
Tennessee. Enjoy unlimited water recreation. Surrounded by
state forest. Lakefront available. Excellent financing! Call now
(800)704-3154 x 701.

NC MOUNTAIN LOG CABIN on mountain top, unfinished
inside, view. trees, waterfall & large public lake nearby, no
Ira lic, $89,900 owner (866)789-8535 wy ,NC2Z,g.om.

OWN A LAKEFRONT RETREAT Private community on the
TN/KY border. Just 1-1/2 hours to Nashville. Spectacular views
of Lake Barkley. I lo 6 acres from the $40s. New to Market. Call
(866)339-4966.

TN WEEKEND RETREAT ACREAGE New lake community
close to Chattanooga & Knoxville. Limited number of private
boat slips. Community lake access and amenities. 1/2 + acres
from $40K. Call (866)292-5769.

S1 0,000 DISCOUNT! Grand Opening! Ocala area- The Preserve
at Oak Hill. Upscale equestrian community of 5 to 21 acre
parcels. Private. gated, trails. Discount ends 12/15/05. Broker/
Owner. (352)330-0022.

OWN A PRIVATE MOUNTAIN RETREAT Spectacular gate
riverlionIt mountains community near Asheville, NC. I-8 acre
building sites from the $60s. Borders National Forest. Conmmu-
nity lodge & river walk. Call-(866)292-5762.

"TENNESSEE LAKE PROPERTIES" Located on pristine
Norris Lake. TVA's first reservoir. Lakefronts, lake & mountain
views, homes and land. CALL Lakeside Realty (423)626-5820
w;ww. lakesiderealtv-tn conm.

Coastal Living at it's Best- Brunswick County. North
Carolina. Homes and homesites. CALL NOW! (800)682-9951
Coastal Carolina Lifeslyle Inc
www.coastalcarolinalilfestvle info

Steel Buildings

3-WEEK BU ILDING SALE! "Last Chance!"20x26Now $3995.
25x30 $5700. 30x40 $8300. 40x60 $12,900. Others. Meets
140 M.P.H. Higher available. One end included. Pioneer
(800)668-5422.


L ANF Ford
Advertising Networks of Flo-da,


FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


Have you been turned down fora loan?
lDo 'u n.I'.d nI i '-I l I.tSI Il i 'i .ii'y
eason? Are you paying more than 7 %
inicrC 'i .i .u i ,lhC IIlI 'I s i'.i l I:t i U. '
If you are a homeowner and answer-
ed 'yes"to any of these question s,they
can t l o ',]' i Ie, th c '1.1 .-.,,,d without
ca., L.,'I "' '- t 1 qII.o"
High.ceitcai Wde? Less-than-perfect
credit? Self employed? late house pay-
ments? Financial problems? Medical


..ill I R' liens?It does matter!
If3ou are homeowner with sufficient
equity, "lic i "c u'i II.i .I 'll Lh.:,I-ir; .. u
* dll U.i]il, k ,I aln', -- ,' 'li,n :4
hours.
'i:. ii.i nld out over the phone-and
free of charge-if you qualify. Honey
Mae Home loans is licensed by the
the FL Dept. of Financial
Services. Open7 days a week for
your con venience.
1-800-700-1242 ext.233


The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits, Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EQE



.' ri1 f. U cii: b rr \*


CLAIMS

1-800-882-2525
Free Case Review .
Trust Your Case
To A Doctor/Lawyer


F' I,' t r.t f Ing


in.br


Send us email!

info@thefloridastar.com

.


nAre V '-


FAUJ (--/- -


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP'
L- ---- -------------------J


VR State Plan Public Meetings
Come share your thoughts on the ways to improve
Florida's Vocational Rehabilitation Program.

December 1
11AM 1PM
Millhopper Branch, Alachua County Library
3145 NW 43rd Street
.Gainesville, Florida

December I
5PM 7PM
Columbia Counlt Library
308 NW Columbia A enue
Lake City, Florida

If you would like to send a ,: i ..' ..'.a. plea/ ~.l-(ahl uis'ft
vrplan()vrcdoe.stat ,'i ,.. ,.. .,h' /.Si-S.i-51-3692


Please note that the following accommodate l.r l t... P ...i r," .' 111 *,, I ,*'~ ,'a
Interpreters, Assistive Listening Devices,
Large Print, Disk, and Braille nyterials.



Hurley Manor Apartments "Celebrate
& Life with Us"
San Jose Manor Apartments
Senior Community s
Spacious Efficiencies & One Bedroom Apartments Available
Convenient to Shopping '. Planned Activities Onsite
Coordinator Invidually Controlled Heat and A/C Group
Outings HUD Subsidized
Hurley Manor...3333 University Blvd. N., 32277...744-6022
San Jose Manor............3630 Galicia Rd., 32217............739-0555


IMPACT

WCGL

AM 1360


HaTfreTean rur it he. au U wny uur 3 ntpre ,WhU S, t Luvv L.W nrT.M..I.
1o.c L ithB^6tS *
0 C *!" '
8.. alowSeasonsl "
..A a agemnentOpportunillesl ''
S Allowance Proganl
^ idgct is a Recognized Household Namel "
s of prt '( tite tested In What YourV''S llhigi .
2. p 0 i completed Presentall6n for you ',
;,' Frt your prospect Buy--.'s or Not! ,


Advealjsement
Homeowners with money worries
may qualify for low-interest loans


- --


A, U-C TJ -0 N
one of these Magnificent Nornes Will he Sold Absolute 116gardlesS of Price
MAGNIFICENT BEACHFRONT HOMES


A


As seen

on TV. 7.






-MiA


I







AP--I. GEJ_ C.-o8....


ABOUT






ATRICS


Betty Asque Davis
REALTOR


All About Kids is the premiere pedi-
atric facility in Jacksonville, Florida.
We are dedicated to providing chil-
dren with the highest quality of
health care. Our doctors are Board
Certified Pediatricians with years of
Pediatric Emergency Room experi-
ence. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of
families with busy lifestyles. Come
see why so many parents trust All
About Kids Pediatrics with their chil-
dren's health.


Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD.
Both doctors are board certified and
have pediatric ER experience.


904.565.1271

877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com


SERVICES
Asthma Therapy
Pain Relief
Hemoglobin/Hematocrit Testing
Mono Screening
Rapid Strep Screening
Sport and School Participation
Physicals
Urinalysis
Well visits/Immunizations

EMR Technology
Our Electronic Medical Record System
enables us to be more efficient with
less paperwork and allows for:
Direct Pharmacy Link for fast and
convenient prescriptions
Check-in/Check-out process made
quick and efficient
Medical record history inquiries
and transfers that are concise and
easy with electronic database
management
*'Prompt subspecialty referrals

HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F; weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted


615 Highway AIA
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082


Office:
Direct:
Fax:
Toll Free:


904-285-6300
904-473-1502
904-285-5330
800-288-6330


Email: badavis@WatsonRealtyCorp.com


r F B M UMI M MMM (A M w W MM I s SSSA H B9MI
.
I The Readers of the Black Press in America are
mqre eqycated,
make more income"
i and havel
substantial buying pqwQr.,


12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225
Located in the new Hidden Hills Executive Park (near the corner of Fort
Caroline and Monument Rd.)



wAMiAw BcwxAfStING, INC.


Source: The Media Audit
L 2004 Black Newspapers Readership Report, nnpa.org
u m *n s a m m A ONE= w m a


..~...

4


www.fiesta925.com


www.whjx.bi



CONGRATULATIONS TO O0UR WINNERS!!!!



GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND

JAZZ, RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL

Oct 26 30, 2005


Lisa Chester Smooth Jazz 1053FM
Marion Hunley Hot 105.7FM
Wanda Davis Fiesta 92.5FM


THANK YOU FOR LISTENING!!!!!!
**** WE APPRECIATE YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT****



9550 Regency Square Blvd. Suite #200 Jacksonville, Fl 32225 Off (904) 680-1050 Fax (904) 680-1051
i ww.tambroadcasting.com


:r ." ^..


L2 Education



r I -FHUD


I


The Federal Fair Housing Act protects your right to live where you
want. In fact, in any lc ,..i :... n.) rental, sales, or Irn.dnq, it
is against the law to consider race, color, national origin, religion, sex,
disability, or family status. If you think you've been denied housing,
please call us. Fair Housing. It's not an option. It's the law.


" ., M A-.- : .. ,.


105.7 FM
"THE PEOPLE'S STATION"


FLORIDA STAR


NOV~EMBER 26, 2005


A/-',i7 d' -O