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Florida star

HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section C: Local
 Section C continued
 Section C: Around the Area
 Section C: Sports
 Section C continued
 Section D: Entertainment
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
November 12, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00044

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
November 12, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00044

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section C: Local
        page C 1
    Section C continued
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Around the Area
        page C 4
    Section C: Sports
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
    Section D: Entertainment
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
Full Text



A *3A *3 A 3 A A A AY A *~ V~


TH OS HSS

- ISalte T

Chrle-Hs' nleo


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


MEET ELEN-


(seePageB-3


THE


iFLORIDA


thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
1:00 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


Blue Angels Bring


Thrills And Thunder


Second Largest Seizure Of Marijuana,


Cocaine In Jacksonville's History


Nassau County Judge Brian Davis was among eleven
members and four generations of his family who
enjoyed the Sea & Sky Spectacular. From left to right
seated, Brynne Marshall Davis, Cicely Davis, Ebony and
Brian Davis, II, Sheila St. Etienne (New Orleans) holding
her grand nephew, Brian Davis, III, Jordan and Dionne
St. Etienne (New Orleans). Standing Judge and Mrs.
Brian (Tanya) Davis and Johnnie Davis.

By Marsha Dean Phelts

The Jacksonville Sei & Sky Spectacular over the
weekend was invigorating. A quarter of a million citi-
zens converged on Jacksonville Beach for the two and a
half-day Navy air show celebration. The activities were
family oriented and all ages from newborn babies to
centenarians were present.
Over 60 exhibits and kiosks were among side attrac-
tions that added to the grandness of the occasion. The
Kiddy Hawk Kids Area was a most popular spot.
Children seemingly bounced skyward on the quad
power jump. They enjoyed having their faces painted
and being presented with a variety of fun treats.
Personalized dog tags and sailor hats were distributed.
The City of Jacksonville and the Fire and
Rescue Department provided KID identification
bands and ID Kits.The world's largest grill tthe
Johnsonville Brat's Sausage Grill rolled into town for
Blue Angels continued on A-7

Man Shoots Into Home,

Wounds 6 Year-Old,

Turns Himself In
JACKSONVILLE, Fl.
-- In the beginning, no
one could. Understand
why someone would
shoot at the house in the
1000 block of Woodstock
Avenue but what they did
know was that a six year
old, Oakhill Elementary
School student was shot
in her right shoulder, arm
and hand.. There were
two shooting attacks on Ankoma Deoach
the house. The victim Suspect
was wounded in the first attack. She and her sister were
sleeping in the front bedroom. There were five people in
the house during the first shooting. About 15 shots had
been fired but only te 6-year-old was injured, but not
seriously.
Officers found eleven expended shell casings on the
street directly in front of the resident', one bullet on a
north ledge of the front poach and the front.window dam-
aged after the second shooting. The brother admitted
that he had a disagreement with a black male only known
to him as "KD" the night before around 10 p.ffth., and that
he had gotten "the best of KD" during the fight.
However, he did not hear KD make any, specific threats
to return. The suspect, Ankoma DeLoach, 27, turned
himself in the next day.


Michael Trusel
Suspect


JACKSONVILLE, Fl.
- Sheriff John Rutherford
announced this week, the
second largest seizure of
marijuana and cocaine
resulting from a criminal
investigation, in the his-
tory of the Jacksonville
Sheriffs Office.
Suspect Alexander
Rivera was one of two
targets suspected of oper-


Alexander Rivera Juan Aleman
Suspect Suspect


ating a multi-drug opera-
tion in Clay County,
Jacksonville and surround-
ing areas and the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement and the FBI
were brought in to assist in
the investigation in
August.
Rivera and Mercado
were found to be involved
in trafficking in excess of


500 pounds of marijuana
and- multi-kilogram
cocaine trafficking.
According to the report,
the criminal organization
reached into Orlando and
Kissimmee with narcotics
suppliers and distributors
identified there, including
Juan and Jose Aleman
(brothers) who were found
to be major distributors in


Jacksonville and Clay
County, and Michael
DePriest Trusel of
Jacksonville.They were
directly involved in the
illegal importation of the
drugs from Mexico.
Displayed was 1,925
pounds of pot, a represen-
tation of 127 pounds of
powder cocaine. Also
seized was $68,236 in
cash, five vehicles, one
semi truck with a trailer,
three motorcycles, 3
firearms and seventeen
drug traffickers and deal-
ers over the course of two
take downs.
The Sheriff explained
that the drug flow do not
enter Florida via Miami
or from Central America.
.They come from Mexico,

Seizure continued on A-7


Florida Diabetes Deaths Rate Highest For Blacks

Early Detection, Lifestyle Changes Strongly Recommended


TAMPA Diabetes
exacts a steep toll on
African Americans in
suffering, deaths and med-
ical costs. That's why
health advocates are tar-
geting African Americans
in particular this Diabetes
Awareness Month for this
life-saving message: Get
screened and adopt
healthy` lifestyle changes
now.
African Americans are
more likely than any other
ethnic group- to develop
type 2 diabetes and they
are far more likely to die
from it.
In a 2001 comparative


NEWS IN BRIEF
CONGRESSWOMAN
BROWN-WAIT E
COULD HOLD
DECIDING VOTE
ON BUDGET CUTS

The House of
Representatives is
scheduled to take up a
bill to slash spending by
$54 billion on initiatives
which thousands of
Florida citizens depend
on to make room for $70
billion in tax cuts for
primarily the rich.
"This 'Robin Hood in
Reverse' effort to cut
programs 'that support
the poor and middle
class to give tax breaks


analysis, the death rate for
African' Americans in
Florida with diabetes was
more than double the
death rate for the
Hispanic/Latino popula-
tion and almost triple the
Caucasian death rate for
people with diabetes.
Compared to white
Americans, African
Americans experience
higher rates of three dia-
betes complications
blindness, kidney failure,
and amputations.
They also experience
greater disability from
these complications due in
part to delays in diagnosis


for millionaires is unfair,
unproductive and un-
American," said Brad
Woodhouse, spokesman
for Emergency Campaign
for America's Priorities
(ECAP). ECAP will be
undertaking a number of Mi
efforts to convince Jai
Brown-Waite to vote said
against these cuts. recei
since
MICHAEL JACKSON of cl
his l
WON'T LIVE IN n
no h
AMERICA ANYMORE ne
Neve
Calif
Michael Jackson's M
father, Joseph Jackson a cha
told the Associated Press cane
in a recent interview that. as R
Michael will come back Dog.
to the United States, but it


and treatment, denial of
diabetes, and high blood
pressure.
And that's expensive.
Annual healthcare costs
for people without dia-
betes amounted to $2,560
per person in 2002, com-
pared to $13,243 for peo-
ple with diabetes.
"The number of deaths
each year is highly pre-
ventable," says Dr.
Sumesh Chandra,
Leadership Council
Member of the American
Diabetes Association of
Southwest Florida and
leading adult endocrinolo-
gist. "Half of the battle is


chael,
ckson
that
ved a


is unlikely
the King
of Pop
would
ever make
it his
h'o m e
again. Mr.
J a c kso n
Michael has
lot of threats


his acquittal in June
iild molestation and
lawyers said that he
longer considers his
riand Ranch in
ornia as his home.
ichael is working on
rity single for hurri-
relief with stars such
Z. Kelly ad Snoop


getting diagnosed. With
local screenings people
with diabetes can then get
the treatment they need
and go on to lead active,
productive lives."
Approximately 2.7 mil-
lion or 11.4% of all
African Americans aged
20 years or older have dia-
betes. Of these, one-third
of them are not aware they
have the disease.
Besides early detection,
experts say people can
reduce their risk of type 2
diabetes significantly by
losing weight, if they are

Diabetes continued on A-7


KOBE BRYANT'S
WIFE IS PREGNANT

Venessa Bryant, wife
of Los Angeles Lakers
star, Kobe Bryant is said
to have reported to her
spokesman that they are
expecting their second
child in May. Their first
daughter will be 3-
years-old in January.

NEW COUNTY
SUPERINTENDENT
OUTLINES GOALS


The new


County School
Superintendent, Joseph
Wise, outlined his plan
Brief continued on A-7


Looking for CUstomers to patronize your
bLISiness 01- Utilize You[- services? If you
answered YES. then you need to place an ad
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place YOUr ad TODAY!!
Poll"I. 01. Credit Cards. 1(vq1ted


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


L fs ty e.. .. .. -
C h r h -. .. -
S ta e ... .. ... ... ...A -


Duval


1


A07 T ?ED


it 'IleffA


NOVEMBER 12, 2005 NOVEMBER 18, 2005 VOL. 55 NO. 98 50 CENTSI







PAE FORD SARNVEBE .20


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN EDITOR
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


0 0op04m
ft %WD k m


LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER


DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksofinville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
'MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


sAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION



National Newspaper
Publishers Association-


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cc


-



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Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The FIrrida Prce HHall Of Fama


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~FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-2


NOVEMBER 5. 2005 '







FLORIDA STAR


NOVEMBER 12, 2005


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-

ANNUAL DUAL DAY CELE-
BRATION-West Union
Missionary Baptist Church,
1605 W. Beaver St., will
observe Annual Dual Day .
on Sunday, November 20
beginning with Sunday .- .
School at 9:30 a.m.
Worship service will be
held at 11:00 a.m.
Minister James C. .
Sumpter of Abyssinia ,
Missionary Baptist Church
is the speaker. Rev. Leroy C.
Kelly, Pastor. Minister
COMMUNITY JOB FAIR- James C.
The Worship Place, 2627 Sumpter
Spring Glen Rd., will host a.
free Community Job Fair on November 19, 10:00 a.m.-2:00
p.m. The community .is invited to learn about available job
opportunities in Jacksonville. Bring copies of your resume,
dress for success, and be prepared to find a job.
CWIU ANNIVERSARY-The CWIU of Genesis
Missionary Baptist Church located at 241 South McDuff
Ave. will observe its 6th Anniversary on Sunday, November
20 at 5:00 p.m: Minister Angie Thompkins of Sanctuary at
Mt. Calvery is the Minister of the Hour. Deaconess Ann
Turpin is the Program Chairperson and President of CWIU.
Rev. Calvin 0. Honors, Assistant Pastor. Rev: Nelson B.
Turpin, Pastor.
FRIENDS, FAMILY, AND HOMECOMING DAY-
Friendship Primitive Baptist Church is observing Friends,
Family and Homecoming Day on Sunday, November 20 at
11:00 a.m. The church is located at 1106 Pearce St. Elder
Bobbie Sheffield, Pastor.
HURRICANE RELIEF-First A.M.E. Church of Palm
Coast has formed a Disaster Relief Task Force. The task
force seeks to provide housing, food, medical supplies, psy-
chological support and job placement for Hurricane Katrina
victims. The task force is collaborating with the Flagler
Housing Authority led by Chris Beyers. The church plans to
serve a minimum of 10 families, and will pay the cost of rent
and utilities for these individuals for a period of six months.
To date, four families have been placed and help for a fifth
family is pending. The Pastor, Rev. Gillard S. Glover, has
challenged the congregation of First A.M.E. Church to con-
tribute S100,000 to underwrite the costs of assisting these
families. Persons \wishing to contribute may make their
checks payable to: Disaster Relief Task Force, Care of First
A.M.E. Church of Palm Coast, P.O. Box 353967, Palm
Coast, FL 32135-3967. All, contributions designated for
Disaster Relief will be used for that purpose. For more
information, contact Rev. Glover at ,(386) 446-5759.
SPIRIT-FILLED WORSHIP SERVICE-The Sword and
.Shield Kingdom Outreach Ministry will host a Spirit-filled
Worship Service. The service will feature Dr. Joy F.
Canaday from Christian Counseling Services, Rev. Mattie
W. Freeman, Sword and Shield Founder/Pastor, the Word
and Praise Team under the direction of Ms. Kenshela
Williams, Sis. Pat Speights (Solist), Sis. Donna Holland, and
gospel music. The service will be held at the Father's House
Conference Center, 1820 Monument Rd., Building 1.
SECOND MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH CELE-
BRATES-Second Missionary Baptist Church, 954 Kings
Rd., is celebrating the 155th Anniversary of the Church and
the 19th Anniversary of Pastor Odell Smith, Jr. "The Church
Celebrating, Honoring, and Praising God" is the theme.
Services begin nightly at 7:30 p.m. Services on Sunday,
November 13 will be held at 11:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Rev.
Price Wilson of Chipley, Fla. is the speaker for the Sunday
morning service. For transportation, call the church at (904)
354-8268.
GOSPEL EXPLOSION-T. Rose Production and Bishop
Lorenzo Hall present a Gospel Explosion Program benefit
for Hurrican Katrina Victims on Sunday, November 20 at
Israel United Baptist Church (Rev. Eugene White, Pastor)..
Doors open at 4:00 p.m. The program begins at 5:00 p.m.
Bill Pinkney of the original Drifters and The Gospel Drifters


Perhaps no other moment in the
funeral process is as powerful as the
final disposition. For survivors, this
is a strong symbolic moment, a con-
firmation that they must let go of the
person who died and look ahead to a
changed life.
Earth burial, otherwise known
as interment, is the most common
form of disposition in the United
States. Americans seem to prefer the
idea of a final resting place and a
gravesite where they can go to
remember the person who died.
Cemeteries may be. owned by
municipalities, churches, religious
groups, or other private organiza-
tions. Veterans may be eligible for
burial in state or nationally owned
government cemeteries. Cemeteries
vary in the type of outer receptacle
they require; some place restrictions


of Sumter, S.C. are the special guests. The program will also
feature Jesse and The Miracles, The Singing Trumpets, Pure
Gold, and Bishop Lorenzo Hall. The program is free. The
church is located at 6901 N. Main St.
CELEBRATION-New Hope Missionary Baptist Church,
217 North McCargo St., is celebrating the church's 115th
Anniversary and the 13th Anniversary of Pastor Freddie
Jackson, Jr. on Fridays November 11 and November 18 at
7:30 p.m. and on Sundays November 13 and November 20
at 3:30 p.m. Sis. Marjorie Dubose, Chairperson.
CHURCH AND PASTOR'S 20TH ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION-The public is invited to attend the Church
and Pastor's 20th Anniversary at Mt. Charity Missionary
Baptist Church on Sunday, November 13 at 11:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m.. Pastor George Harvey, Jr. has diligently labored,
through Christ's empowerment, at Mt. Charity during the
past 20 years. The church is located at 1417 North Laura St.
in the heart of Jacksonville. The public is invited to join the
congregation as it worships Christ for His blessings upon the
Pastor and Church during the past 20 years, including vari-
ous outreaches and consistent preaching and teaching min-
istries. Dr. R. J. Cameron is the guest speaker for both serv-
ices. He is pastor of Mt. Carmel Orthodox Presbyterian
Church in Somerset, New Jersey. In addition to serving as
Pastor of Mt. Carmel, Dr. Cameron is also a professor at the
New York School of the Bible.
COMMUNITY FEASTING AND FELLO\\ SHIP-The
Brotherhood Ministry of Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist
Church will host Thanksgiving Day at "The Mount" on.
Thursday, November 24, 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. The commu-
nity is invited to enjoy a "no strings attached" day of feast-
ing and fellowship. A free delicious meal with all of the
trimmings will be served. The church is located at 2036
Silver St.. Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR PRISON FELLOW-
SHIP MINISTRY-Ministers, Missionaries, and Lay
Members are needed to give spiritual visiation to prisoners
(Matthew 25:36. Churches are needed to sponsor Angel,
Trees to give the children of prisoners toys and clothes at
Christmas time. Teachers are also needed to tutor children
of prisoners in math and reading. Businessmen are needed
to provide training and jobs to released prisoners (Matthew
9:37). Contact Sam Roberts at P. 0. Box 37676, Fax (904)
765-9214,email newsherrie20000@yahoo.com or call (904)
994-1044. Monthly meetings are held on the fourth
Thursday of each month 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at Watch The
Lamb Ministries located at 2519 Soutel Dr. at llth Avenue.
For directions call 713-9100.
PARENT EMPOWERMENT CONFERENCE-Parents
are invited to a Parent Empowerment Conference on
Saturday, November 12, 12:00 p.m.-2:06,p.m. at New Bethel
AME Church, 1231 Tyler St. The conference is presented by
New Bethel AME CHurch, Rev. William H. Lamar, IV,
Pastor, and The Project Reach Foundation, Inc. Parents can
select two workshops. The workshop choices are Public
Library, Family Empowerment, Diversity and Justice,
Fathers Make A Differen'ce, Dynamic Mothering (How To be
An Effective Mother In The 21st Century), and Financial
Peace. For more information call (904) 353-1822.

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. ,Send to:
info@thefloridastar.com










--_. -- -




5 E



a e

or 1%


on markers or monuments. Your
funeral director can answer your
questions about local cemeteries.
Like burial, entombment offers a
fixed, final resting place. When a
body is entombed, the casket is
placed in a mausoleum, an above-
ground structure usually made of
marble or stone. Cremation is often
accompanied by the rites and cere-
monies of funeralization, including
embalming and visitation. Final dis-
position options include earth burial,
entombment and scattering. Some
families keep cremated remains in
an urn or other appropriate contain-
er.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.*
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman.com


The Church Directory>

"Come and Worship With Us


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see I Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell175@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


.1


CHRISTIAN FAMILY

WORSHIP CENTER

Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
i .' Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
S Baptism-Praise & Worship
i (Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
A Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service.................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities




Evangel

Temp-e
,, : 11. "' !. < c i 'i.t

Sunday Sei-rices
November 1 3th
8:15 am 0 10O-:4 am
MISSION EMAPI-LASIS
"I s Conirnmis.ion- Our .iMarching Orders"
"/dl-i45 I t! _'S'rte-, r 6i7r-hth'rer't-t) br ir fl.' .

Sunda\ 0 h:00 p.m.
"The I-ield ir Thie WVorld"

Conmc Experien1e I he Io ne'
Of \ rrshi;p-1 "ou We"re
CDeVR,;iS'd IiLi c orTI-=h R
FOR RATES CALL (904) 766-8834.
,Jacks.o, alle. FL 32205
90o4-781 -9.933
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ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA STAR!
FOR RATES CALL (904) 766-8834


PAGE A-3







X- -- -A----- 4 ------ --


Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
Sister 2 Sister A Sea of Pink and Green
The Arielle Restaurant swam with a "Sea of Pink and
Green" as members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc,
came together for an afternoon of fun, love and fellowship.
Gamma Rho Omega chapter's membership committee and
president Mrs. Patricia Mitchell invited all Alpha Kappa
Alpha women to come together "Sister 2 Sister". Chairperson
Mrs. Felicia Cruse and Co-Chairperson Mrs. Willetta
Ritchie and their committee, created an atmosphere where
Alpha Kappa Alpha women were able to meet fellow sorority
sisters for the first time, rekindle friendships with "line sis-
ters" and just relish the bond between fellow sorority sisters.
The event was especially memorable for Dr. Kia Mitchell,
Ms. Ne'Tosha Dopson, Ms. Erica Dobson and Ms. Kortney
Mosley for not only are they members of Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, but they were also Alpha Kappa Alpha "Silver Rose"
debutantes together ten years ago. And of course the event
afforded the opportunity to share that very special time for
each of them.
An added delight for all of the sorority members was the
presence of Gamma Rho Omega's own Dr. Norma Solomon
White the 25th National President who was in town to par-
take of the festivities.

Durkeeville Historical Society's Sixth Annual Music Fest
Durkeeville Historical Society's Sixth Annual Music Fest
honoring the late Charlie "Hoss" Singleton was a melodious
event of fantastic jazz music, pleasurable dancing and splen-
did fellowship!
The late Mr. Singleton a Jacksonville native, Durkeeville
resident and father of Warner Singleton (a splendid musician
and promoter) was one of the nation's most prolific and talent-
ed songwriters. He wrote numerous songs for famous record-
ing artists. Among his most noted credits are the lyrics for
Frank Sumatra's 1966 Number One single, Strangers in the
Night. Other artists that recorded songs written by Mr.
Singleton were: Ruth Brown (Mama He Treats Your
Daughter Mean), the late Nat King Cole, Jacksonville native
Pat Boone, the late Ella Fitzgerald, the late Elvis Presley
and a group from England called The Beatles.
Among the artists celebrating the rich legacy of Mr.
"Hoss" Singleton were: The magnificent Ray Love Jazz
Ensemble and Sleepy and The Gang. Ray Love himself
'brought the house down' with his flute renditions, along with
featured vocalist Anson Mitchell. Sleepy and The Gang
'rocked' as always!
Each year we look forward to seeing the Get Up And Go
Dancers. And this year they were just as rhythmic as always
with Mesdames Betty Ford, Mary Robinson, Pauline
Exson Davis and dance instructor Evelyn Ford dancing the
night away.
The Emcee and Music Director of the program Warner
Singleton has devoted himself to keeping his father's legacy
alive along with ensuring jazz entertainment for the First
Coast. And the Durkeeville Historical Society continues to
flourish under the leadership of UNF professor Dr. Carolyn
Williams.

Calendar Notes
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's annual Ebony Fashion
Fair event is January 20, 2006 at the Florida Theatre.
Tickets are being distributed to members this weekend.
Greater Mt. Vernon Missionary Baptist Church honors
it pastor Reverend Kelly E. Brown at its Pastor's
Appreciation Program Sunday, November 20, 2005 11:00
AM. Reverend Charles F. Gadson of the Mount Calvary
Missionary Baptist Church, Stuart, Florida will be the guest
speaker.
For more information, please call the church office at
(904) 355-6800.
Stop by the Jacksonville Museum of Modern Art
S (JMOMA) to celebrate the much-anticipated Downtown
Library opening during the week of November 12 19.
JMOMA is offering complimentary tours of the museum and
special membership discounts for everyone with a library
card. Stop by JMOMA and help them welcome their new
neighbor, the Downtown Library, and begin your holiday sea-
son at their fun Museum Shop Open House. Every Sunday is
Bank of America Family Free Day!!!
The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens and SunTrust
Bank welcome Vintage 2005 at Cummer Winefest Thursday
November 17, 5-7 P.M. Celebrate the Sixth Annual Cummer
Winefest with a splendid menu, wine pairings and jazz by The
Les DeMerle Orchestra. Enjoy this year's release of
Beaujolais Nouveau along the St. John River in the beautiful
Cummer Museum Gardens. Fabulous festivities with vint-
ners' new releases of select wines to complement the
evening's catered dining. The Beaujolais Nouveau is a cele-
bration of not just new wine but of everything new and excit-
ing. From 6-9 P.M. is the Vintner's Tent and Gala Reception
with a Special Reserve Private Dining. Call The Cummer
Museum of Art & Gardens at 904-899-6007.


Don't forget to let us know of your .upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834; E-mail
socially@TheFloridaStar.com or you may reach me directly at
imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-
7008.
See you in the paper! "


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Afterschool
programs
Helping kids find the hero within.

Let us know you want
-aftcrschol programs in your area,
Call 1-800-USA-LEARN


is __ .. ..


RITZ
Cl lAMBER ( ,. ,, // ,,
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CLICK HERE FOR SEASON TICKETS .
Season Opens November 19.2005


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Ushering in the New Season
November 19. 2005
In Remembronce of the Dream
Jonuory 14 206
Pipe Dreams wlh Stdngs
e .*. ,y 19. 2006
Let's Dancel
with Mortho Graham Dance Company
..orc. 1. 2006,M
Sounds of SpdngI
Ac-1& 2006
Summer Finale
Amello Island Chamber Music Festival
June 16. 27.:)A

99QQ.C('Al.!
S IX
concert'


FL~ORIDA STAR


NOV/EMBER 12. 2 005


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IYUVEIV 12 1V,20U.)


Project Ranks State Penalties



Regarding Freedom Of Information


GAINESVILLE, Fla. -
Government officials in six
states face the toughest civil
penalties in the nation if they
don't provide information to
the public and the press as
required by their laws.
Only Washington,
Virginia, New Jersey, New
Mexico, Maryland and Utah
rated as high as a 5 on a 7-
point scale for laws that pro-
vide noncriminal penalties
for public employ~ ees who
violate aspects of the public


records ,laws, according to
new findings compiled by
University of Florida
researchers.
The Marion Brechner
Center Citizen Access
Project at UF's College of
Journalism and
Communications found that
the six states either provided
for a fine for every day the
state's records law was vio-
lated or provided steeper
fines for additional viola-
tions. The six were rated


highly by a panel of experts
for having penalties punish-
ing violations of state
records laws, often for offi-
cials' failure to release
records as required by law to
individuals, the press, or
businesses and organiza-
tions.
"Most states with civil
penalties provide for only a
one-time penalty," said
William F. Chamberlin,
director of the Citizen
Access Project. "Most


penalties are fines up to
$1,000 or monetary dam-
ages to individuals harmed
by the failure to release
records."
The project's advisory
board rates states from 1 to
7, depending on whether a
state's law in a particular
category is judged to pro-
vide for complete access to
government records or no
access at all. The laws of the


most highly rated states in
the study of civil penalties
were judged to be "some-
what open." Sixteen states
scored a 4, considered to be
neither more open nor more
closed. Massachusetts and
Kentucky scored a 3 for
being "somewhat closed"
and 26 states and the District
of Columbia scored a 1,
completely closed.
The project's Sunshine


Review Board decided that
states that had no civil
penalty provisions should
receive the lowest possible
score, a rating given laws
that block access to govern-
ment information.
Chamberlin appoints experts
on public records laws with
backgrounds in law, educa-
tion and government to the
11-member Sunshine
Review Board.


0GIVui:" OOD SAV


Lee Jacobs, a maintenance support worker, waters a newly planted tree on the Reitz
Student Union lawn on Monday. Trees have many environmental benefits, including
removing carbon dioxide from the air, preventing soil erosion and cooling the air from
10 to 15 degrees.

Supreme Court Action Protecting

Sex Offender Website Applauded


TALLAHASSEE
Attorney General Charlie
Crist today issued a state-
ment praising the U.S.
Supreme Court's decision
not to consider a challenge
to the Florida law requiring
sex offenders to register
with the state so their pic-
tures and other identifying
information can be posted
on the internet.
The nation's high court
recently denied certiorari
review of a petition filed by
10 anonymous sex offend-
ers, who identified them-
selves only as John Does.
The sex offenders argued
that the sex offender registry
violates, among others, their
equal protection, privacy
and travel rights.
A federal trial court dis-
missed the claims without a
hearing, and the llth U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals
affirmed that action in a


unanimous 27-page order in
the case of Doe v. Moore
issued on June 6.
Attorney General Crist
issued the following state-
ment in response to the U.S.
Supreme Court action:
"The sex offender regis-
tration system protects the
public by collecting relevant
information on sex offenders
and making the information
available on the internet.
Today's wise decision by the
U.S. Supreme Court upholds
the validity of this success-
ful program.
The most effective way
to stop sex offenders in their
tracks is to make the public
aware of them. That's why
sex offenders hate Florida's
registration system. It gives
innocent, law-abiding citi-
zens a way to find out who
they are and where they live.
Sex offenders are among the
most unsavory elements of


our society, and the registra-
tion law and website give
parents and others a power-
ful tool to protect Florida's
children from these despica-
ble individuals.
This office was prepared
to aggressively defend the
validity of our law, and I am
gratified by the Supreme
Court's quick disposal of
this frivolous legal chal-
lenge.
I especially wish to com-
mend Assistant Attorney
General Jay Vail for his out-
standing legal work protect-
ing this important statute
from attack."
The sex offender website
can be reached through the
Attorney General's website
at http://myfloridalegal.com
or via the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement website at
http://www.fdle.state.fl.us.


Authorities Say Dead Women

Were Part Of GroupTrying

To Illegally Enter United States


POMPANO BEACH,
Fla.--The U.S. Coast Guard
searched waters near the
coastline where the bodies
of three women thought to
be Haitian migrants, washed
ashore on a South Florida
beach.
No boat was found, said
Barbara Gonzalez, spokes-
woman with U.S.
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement.
A deputy saw 10 to 12
people running from the
water nearby, said sheriffs
spokeswoman Liz


Calzadilla-Fiallo.
The bodies of the women
were found early Saturday.
Authorities say they were
among a group that included
up to 12 other people who
apparently were trying to
illegally migrate to the
United States.
Five people in the group
were detained. Four were
turned over to the U.S.
Border Patrol and the fifth,
who was injured, was taken
to Broward General Medical
Center for treatment,
Calzadilla-Fiallo said.


Authorities are investi-
gating whether the group
was part of a smuggling
operation, said Steve
McDonald, border patrol
spokesman. All the people in
custody were Haitian
nationals, he said.
No identification was
found but the women were
believed to be from Haiti
and in their 20s and 30s, she
said.
They were found at three
locations along an ocean-
front road, said Calzadilla-
Fiallo.


Planting The Future


"Jacksonville's

Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted

&

The Victory is in

the Word & Music










6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW WCGL1360. COM


I I


PAGEA-5


F nLRnA CTAR


ArnTu\v-m r 1) Innr


Cko L







AI \ 1, Af-0D STAR NOVEMBER12,20^0-


Dellums Commisions Shaw University Receives

Calls For Reducing Number $1,000,000 Donation

Of Minority Youths Tried As Adults ______


Ronald V. Dellums


LOS ANGELES -- The
Dellums Commission, head-
ed by former Oakland
Congressman Ronald V.
Dellums, is calling on
national and state criminal
justice officials to reform
practices and polices
responsible for increasing
the number of minority
youths tried as adults in
courtrooms across the coun-
try.
At a symposium held
jointly with the National Bar
Association on Saturday,
Rep. Dellums led a discus-
sion of the problems associ-
ated with treating juveniles
as adults in the court system,
and also addressed the
broader impact on commu-
nities when a disproportion-
ate percentage of minorities,
particularly African-
American youths, are sen-
tenced to fill the nation's


ers, government officials,
educators, health profession-
als and business, legal and
religious leaders, who are
studying the problems
plaguing male youth of
color, and making recom-
mendations ,to: increase
opportunities for these
youths.
The symposium identi-
fied several public policy
issues that need to be
addressed, such as zero-tol-
erance policies in schools
that are resulting in exces-
sive expulsions among
African American males;
judicial policies that allow
juveniles to face criminal
infractions in adult courts
with subsequent detention in
adult facilities: dwindling
economic and job opportu-
nities for the minority
youths, which is often a fac-
tor in turning them to crime;
and the lack of adequate
mental health and drug treat-
ment programs.


LEFT FRAME: Attorney Willie Gary and sons, Kenneth and Ali Gary, present a
$1,000,000 donation to Dr. Clarence Newsome, President of Shaw University during
half-time festivities in Raleigh, North Carolina. RIGHT FRAME: Attorney Willie Gary
(left) presents a "Making A Difference" Award to Actor Emmanuel Lewis during the
Shaw University Homecoming Reception


prison and jail cells.
"This trend of sending
young men off to prison
instead of using the juvenile
justice system is limiting the
life options for male youth
of color," Mr. Dellums said.
"Too frequently the adult
justice system is the destina-
tion point for young men of
color due to policy failures
in health and education, and
a lack of family and commu-
nity support."
Rep. Dellums cited
"alarming statistics" from
the US Bureau of Justice
.Statistics showing that last
year 2,267,787 people were
incarcerated in the United.
States, and nearly two-thirds
of the prison population
were persons of color, most-
ly males.
In fact, the data showed
that 8.4 percent of African
Americans ages 25 to 29 are
in state or federal prisons.
Further, Amnesty
International found that
there are currently *2,225
prisoners across the country
serving life without parole
sentences for crimes that
were committed when they
were a juvenile.
The Dellums
Commission, established
this year by the Joint Center
Health Policy Institute, con-
sists of national policy mak-


During the reception, the
2005 Willie E. Gary
"Making A Difference "
awards were presented to
honored guests: Actors
Emannuel Lewis, Clifton
Davis. and Tommy Ford,
Mayor Charles Meeker,
CIAA Commissioner Leon
Kerry and Shaw
University's Athletic
Director, Alfonza Carter.
Gary welcomed over
1,000 guests to the annual
homecoming brunch and


awards ceremony which fea-
tured live music.
Gary and' Williams are
alumni of Shaw University
and continue to be strong
supporters of the universi-
ty's academic and sports
programs.
Attorney Gary and his
wife, Dr. Gloria Gary,
founded The Gary
Foundation, which provides
college scholarships to at-
risk students who wish to
attend college.


Memphis Acknowledges Benjamin Hooks With High Honor


County criminal court judge.
In 1972, Hooks became
the first African American
appointed to the Federal
Communications
Commission by President
Nixon. As a member of the
FCC, Hooks addressed


issues concerning the lack of
minority ownership of tele-
vision and radio stations,
minority employment statis-
tics for the broadcasting
industry and the image of
blacks in the mass media.
Serving as NAACP


Executive Director from
1977 to 1992, Hooks is rec-
ognized for elevating the
Association's position on
issues such as the environ-
ment, national health, wel-
fare and the criminal justice
system.


NBA And Southwest Airlines Spotlight
The History Of African Americans In Basketball
NEW YORK--The National Basketball Association and
Southwest Airlines, Official Airline of the NBA, are proud to give
NBA fans the opportunity to witness and view the history of
African Americans in professional basketball through the first
ever tour of the National Civil Rights Museum exhibition titled,
"The Quest for Equality." The exhibit debuting November 3,
2005 at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles
provides a historical timetable of the pursuit of justice and equal-
ity that paved the way for today's players, coaches and owners.
The exhibit includes, artifacts and historical information dating.
back to 1891.
The goal of the exhibit is to raise awareness across cultural
lines of the long history of civil rights pioneers who used basket-
ball to help create a more level playing field. The exhibit includes
eight thematic sections: Pioneers of the Game, A League of Their
Own, Ten Games in Seven Days, Invitation to the Big Leagues,
Black Players at White Colleges, Opportunity Arrives, The NBA
Today, and The Hall of Fame. The exhibit, developed in collab-
oration with the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and
academic support from Ron Thomas, author of the book "They
Cleared the Lane", opened at the National Civil Rights Museum
(2002) in partnership with the Memphis Grizzlies, as part of the
community commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The
NBA and Southwest Airlines will bring the exhibit on the road for
the first time ever to four NBA cities during the 2005-06 NBA
season.

Barriers To Access And The Digital Divide Still
Remain The Blocking Factors
For The African Americans Online Market

Research and Markets
(http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/c27068 ) has
announced the addition of African Americans Online: Crossing
the Digital Divide to their offering. The African American online
market is gaining momentum as more users come online and
blue-chip advertisers begin targeting the growing audience.
However, the digital divide does still exist--and the barriers to
access for the segment of the population that is not already online
are formidable. The African Americans Online report examines
the dynamics why African Americans--who have long lagged the
broader US population in online usage--are finally starting to
catch up. African Americans now make up 10.5% of all US
Internet users and are a strong potential market for broadband
services and for education, career-oriented and informational
content. They will also be among the early adopters of the mobile
Internet.

Mugabe Tells U.S. Diplomat To, 'Go to Hell'
HARARE, Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe said a U.S.
diplomat who said government policies were to blame for
Zimbabwe's crisis could "go to hell." U.S. Ambassador
Christopher Dell last week blamed Mugabe's policies, rather than
the drought and Western-imposed sanctions and boycotts
Zimbabwe officials often blame, for 80 percent unemployment,
359 percent inflation, and an escalating humanitarian crisis.
"Mr. Dell, go to hell," state radio quoted Mugabe as saying
Tuesday.


MEMPHIS, TN--The
Memphis Shelby County
Public Library has been
renamed the Benjamin L.
Hooks Central Library in
honor of NAACP and civil
rights leader Benjamin L.
Hooks.
Bruce S. Gordon,
NAACP President and CEO,
said: "Mr. Hooks is not only
a leader in the civil rights
era; he is one of the patri-
archs of the movement. We
take pride that under his dis-
tinguished leadership the
Association became the
most revered civil rights
organization in the world."
The naming of the
Benjamin L. Hooks Central
Library honors Hooks'
regard as a leader. During
the ceremony, Hooks told
attendees about the discrim-
ination his family encoun-
tered when trying to use the
public library.
"Books have been a
defining force in my life and
a powerful symbol to me,"
said Hooks. Carol Hooks
Higgs, Hooks' niece, was
arrested in 1960 when she
and other black students
tried to use the Central
Library. "I am grateful for
the struggles my niece and
my grandmother endured."
Hooks was born in
Memphis in 1936. He
attended De Paul University
in Chicago and worked as a
lawyer in Memphis before
being ordained as a Baptist
minister. After establishing
his own law firm,. Hooks
fought to break down segre-
gation and in 1965 became
the first African American
appointed as a Shelby


Prominent Attorney
Willie E. Gary, chairman of
the Black Family Channel,
recently presented Shaw
University with a
$1,000,000 donation during
halftime festivities at the the-
Shaw University homecom-
ing game.
Gary and his law partner,
Lorenzo Williams, also host-
ed a reception as part of
Shaw's homecoming cele-
bration in Raleigh, North
Carolina.


NOVEMBER 12, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


iPAGE A







F1L SrTLvrx 1,4R --P-G---- P-


Seizure continued from A-1


It was a perfect day for Brandon Douglas who collected autographs from the pilots
and model airplanes from vendors. His mother Nicole Douglas and grandmother
Charlotte White had just as much fun as he did.


The sights and sounds of the mighty bomber planes
thrilled Elijah Covington and his mother Tameka
Covington.


for the event. With the
grill's capacity to turn out
2500 sausages an hour,
there was more than enough
festive fun food to eat.
Opportunities to meet the
air show performers and to
get their autographs .were
available.
For the thrilling and
thunderous air show every
spot along the beach
between 1st and 5th Avenue
was idealistic, viewers from
the sea to the shore had
ringside seats.
A few construction
workers had the advantage
view from the buckets of
their cranes fifty feet above.


A battalion of private boat
owners and their guest
watched the.sky show while
anchored at sea. From
oceanfront restaurants,
condominiums and pubs,
guests filled the balconies.
People were seen on
rooftops; ocean view hotel
rooms were sold out for the
weekend.
A Viewing Chalet with
bleachers, patio chairs,
tables, food drinks, and
comfort stations was jam
packed .with spectators.
The Chalet was in the direct
flight path of the Blue
Angels.
The 30 different per-


formances were spectacular
as all types of military and
civilian aircraft flew upside
down, side-by-side or pig-
gyback. '
The' planes crisscrossed
each' other, met in forma-
tion, swayed from one side
to another, soared' out or
sight, pirouetted with the
gracefulness, of a ballerina
as the\ roared underneath
the baby blue skies on a per-
fect Jacksonville Beach day.
The Blue Angels are the
,equivalent of a dance troupe
only they do it in the sky.
The sky is their stage. Their
performance season is nine,
months from April through
December.
When the 2005 season
concludes, the Blue Angels
will have flown more than
70 shows at 34 locations
across the nation.
The United States Navy
Blue Angels got its start
right here in the River City
of Jacksonville, Florida and
since that first show here,
June 1946, the Blue Angels
have performed for nearly
400 million fans.
There were hundreds of
sponsors and volunteers of
the Jacksonville Sea & Sky'
Spectacular. So much
thanks goes to all of them
and, especially to Rear
Admirals Annrette E. Brown,
and D. Brian Peterman,
Captain- Charles King
Commanding Officer at
Mayport Naval Station, and
to Mayors John Peyton,
Jacksonville: Fland Sharp,
Jacksonville Beach; Dick
Brown, Neptune Beach and
John Meserve, Atlantic
Beach.


into Texas and then brought to Jacksonville, Orlando and
other more northern Florida locations for distribution and
sale.
S. 5On Wednesday, it was announced that about $1.7 billion in
drugs were prevented from reaching their targeted market
because of the aircraft surveillance crews based in
Jacksonville, using P-3 aircraft.
.i. "Sheriff Rutherford estimated the street value of the seized
marijuana was $1.9 million and the cocaine was $1.1 million.
Lead investigator Tommy Herrington said it was not clear
how long the operation had been in business but said the deal-
ers had a client list that "stretched to Southeast Florida as well
4- as Jacksonville." Rutherford said 164 people have
Jose Aleman been arrested in the half-dozen operations, four are in Duval
County Jail. The takedown for this seizure, was coined "Operation Poppy Seed, in part
because "poppy is a term of respect drug dealers use for one another.


Diabetes continued from A-]

obese, increasing their level of exercise, and adopting a healthier diet.
A recent study completed by the Diabetes Prevention Program showed that 30 minutes
of moderate physical activity a day and a 5 to 10% reduction in body weight produced a
58% reduction in the development of the disease.
"In many cases, type 2 diabetes is preventable," says Dr. Chandra. "If a proper diet and
moderate exercise regimen are followed, those with pre-diabetes can drastically cut their risk
and avoid the debilitating disease."
When Sam Raghoonanan of Orlando was diagnosed with diabetes 16 years ago it came
as a complete surprise.
"I thought that I had a very bad cold, when I finally ended up in the emergency room
with extremely high blood sugar," says Sam. "I was living a very carefree life, not worried
about my diet or getting diabetes, even though many of my family members had it. When
I was diagnosed, I was devastated. It has changed my whole life, and I now have to live a
much healthier lifestyle."
,Among the lifestyle changes that can decrease the risk of developing diabetes are these:
Eat breakfast every day.
Keep meat, poultry and fish servings to about 3 ounces (about the
size of a deck of cards).
Use less oil and butter. Stir-fry, broil or bake with non-stick
spray or low sodium broth.
Cook with a variety of spices.instead of salt.
Keep a water bottle handy and drink water from it throughout the day.
Make a few less phone calls. Catch up with friends during a
regularly scheduled walk.
Park as far away as possible at your favorite store or mall.
Take the stairs to your office.
Deliver a message in person to a co-worker instead of e-mailing.
Don't try to change your entire way of eating and exercising all at
once. Try one new activity or food a week.

For additional information on diabetes treatment and prevention, go online at
diabetesorg or call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383).


Briefs continued from A-]


A plan for his first 100-
days when he arrives offi-
cially on November 17,
2005. The plan has six
goals, which several objec-
tives.
The six goals are: (1)


Open communication with
the School Board (2)
Evaluate student perform-
ance, programs and infra-
structure (3) Develop a net-
work of community partners
(4) Consolidate and stream-
line the administration (5)


Evaluate safety concerns
and education issues and (6)
Build positive relationships
with the county officials,
parents, teachers, communi-
ty groups and political lead-
ers.


ADVERTISEMENTS

DUE:



Tuesday

@ 5 p.m.

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Email your ad:

ad@thefloridastar.com


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Blue,Angels continued


FLORID)A STAR


PAGE A-7'


NOVEMBER 122005





FLORIDA STAR


NOVEMBER 12. 2005


WHEN:


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2005


WHERE: KEN KNIGHT DR. W. & MONCRIEF ROAD


TIME:


12:00 PM NOON


The march will proceed thru Washington Heights up Richardson Rd.and
conclude at St. Paul A.M.E. Church located at 6910 New Kings Rd.

COMMUNITY LEADERS WILL ADDRESS CONCERNS!


Parking will be available at 11:00 AM at
bus available to the march site!


St. Paul A.M.E. Church. Shuttle


(CyUVR


This event sponsored by:


State Senator Tony Hill; MAD DADS JAX;


St. Paul A.M.E. Church and St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL 904 764-2755


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phy. The Vikings defeated neighborhood rival Ribault 36-6 at Trojan Field on Friday, November 4.
., ~















By Kevin S. McCo'. Sr.
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The Vikings took a 2-0 lead after Rb-ult's first pla\ from sr,-age. The route .as on. Raines" Phillip

touchdown.
X A '- -" .,.
-5--



Members of the Raines Vikings celebrate while displaying the 2005 Northwest Classic championship tro-
phy. The Vikings defeated neighborhood rival Ribault 36-6 at Trojan Field on Friday, November 4.


Victory For Valiant Vikings!
By Ke\in S. NlcCoN. Sr.
ans poured in at Ribault Stadium. There was hardly an\-x here to park. but that'-' %hat happens \% hen fans
gather for the annual neighborhood rival uame between Raines and Ribault hi2h schools.
Inside the stadium, the scoreboard \\as broken. Things got \worse. On the first pla. of the night Ribault
\%as called for a touchback in it's o%\n endzone.
After a long first half and a \erN short second half. the smoke settled and the 9-1 Raines Vikings had beaten
Ribault 36-6.
The Vikings took a 2-0 lead after Ribault's first pla. from scrinnmage. The route \\as on. R~aines Phillip
Teamers ran a five Nard touchdown. The extra point \\as good and Raines led 9-0.
The Vikings led 22-0( before half-time after Viking Rashard Dunbar retunied a Trojan pont 78 \ards for a
touchdown.
The Ribault defense pla.,ed well..just as Raines coach Cedric Thoniton had said throughout the season. (One
example was Raines Junior Ray Dukes (#3) had 43 Nards on six carries, but two of them were for touchdowns.


Vikings continued on B-2


W


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Pag B-l~oemer 2, 00 Th Flrid SarlrepRa


First Step ToThe Future:
Don't Drop Out
Of High School

When I. start thinking
about new topics for this
column, I sometimes take
it for granted that students
will finish high school.
Then I run across informa-
tion that reminds me that
far too many teens drop
out of high school before
earning a diploma.
The U.S. made steady
gains in high school grad-
uation rates until about 20
years ago. Now we're los-
ing ground.
Around three in ten
high school students will
drop out before gradua-
tion, according to research
based on data from the
National Center for
Education Statistics.
A recent report from
the Organization for
Cooperation and
Development says the
U.S. is now ninth among
industrialized nations in
the- proportion of young
adults (25-34 years old)
with a high school diplo-
ma. Korea, Norway, .The
Slovak Republic, Japan,
The Czech Republic,
Sweden, Canada and
Finland are all graduating.
more of their young peo-
ple from high school than
does the United States.
The reasons students
drop out are varied and
often -complex. The
biggest hurdle seems to be
the ninth grade.
More students fail the
ninth grade than any other
grade. Students who don't
develop strong academic.
study and social skills in
the earlier grades are often


overwhelmed by ninth
grade. And many times
these students are at or
near the age where they're
no longer required to
attend school.
If you or someone you
know is thinking about
dropping out, talk to a
teacher, counselor or
another adult.
They will help you to
see how important it is to
stay in school. If you need
help in school, consider:
Spend extra study
time with your teacher or a
tutor in classes that are dif-
ficult for you.
Talk to adults you
know about going to work
with them for a day of job
shadowing.
Ask people in careers
that interest .,you about
how they got their jobs,
and what education is nec-
essary to get into the field.'
If you work while
you are in school, ask to
schedule your work hours
around schoolwork.
Get a "reading
buddy," an adult with
whom you can read and
discuss books. Several of
my co-workers at ACT do
this.
The first step to your
future is earning your high
school diploma. Without a
diploma, your options are
limited, but once you walk
across that graduation
stage, your future is an
open book.


Rose Rennekamp Jis
the vice president of com-
munications for ACT. She
is a mom and has a mas-
ter's of education in guid-
ance and counseling. For


more college and career-
planning information,
visit www.act.org. Have a


question you want
answered in a future col-
umn? Send a letter to this


newspaper or e-mail Rose
at AskRose@act.org.


COLLEGE


CAREER

CORNER
By Rose Rennekamp


Get a free planning and paying for college guide
from The Saltie Mae Fund You'll learn where to
find the money your child needs to pay for college
Call or visit us online to receive your free guide -
available in English and Spanish.


Vikings continued From B-1
The Trojans had another Raines running back to worry about. -Viking running back
Jasmine Parker led all rushers with 102 yards on nine carries.
Ribault quarterbacks Brad Swain and Chris Everett combined for 108, completing
12 of 33 passes. They had three interceptions. The Trojans could not recover after the
initial shock and many dropped passes,- but managed score a touchdown.
Ribault coach Arthur Mallory said, -"lately we've been starting games like that;
shooting ourselves in the foot, trying to dig out of a hole we wish we weren't in.
Very good sportmanship was displayed after the game, ranked the number three best
football classic in Florida. Ribault coach Mallory congratulated Raines coach Cedric
Thornton. Now that's a classic ending.


FIND

OUT HOW

YOU CAN APPEAR

IN PREP RAP

CALL 9041 766-8834





SCHOOLYOUR CHILD ON

PAYING FOR COLLEGE

COLLEGE


Page B-2iNovernber 12, 2005


The Florida Star/Prep Rap







Jax Girl Becoming


Seasoned Performer


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Selena Rhodes
As energetic as she is beautiful, Selena Rhodes, a
dynamic 10 year -old Jacksonville girl, is a seasoned
veteran when it comes to performing. Selena started
singing at the age of two, learning "The Greatest Love Of
All".
At the age of four she started ballet. By the time she
was seven, she was learning both tap and ballet. At age
eight embarked on what would become the journey to
her destiny. After joining the Denise Carol Modeling
Agency she tried her hand at performing as an amateur at
the Ritz Theater and won three consecutive times.
At the age of nine she joined the "Ritz Voices" and
again at the age 10. At this point opportunities began to
open up even more as television spots brought the
chance to be seen by a broader audience. She landed the&
role of hostess on the locally broadcast program, "The
Kids Show." on cable Channel 7 on Monday nights from
7:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. ;
She can also be seen every third Saturday at 7:30 a.m.
on the exercise show "Sarge Of Hollywood". During her
life away from the stage she is a student at Fishweir
School of the Arts where she studies music and plays the
clarinet. Selena is working on an album at the Phat Cave
Recording Studio. She recently continued her involve-
ment with charity work by donating the proceeds of a
newly recorded song called "Tomorrow" to the United
Way and Red Cross.
In the beginning, said Selena, the song was to help
the people devastated by hurricane Katrina, but as more
hurricanes developed the scope of the needs of the peo-
ple affected became larger. Suddenly it became more
important to help the people who help people. Through
this endeavor Selena has come to the attention of many
as a kind hearted little angel trying to do her best to do
her part.


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Page B-3/November 12, 2005


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Page B-4/November 12, 2005


The Florida Star/Prep Rap


*Tune in to IMPACT on Saturdays from 1:00 -1:30 p.m. and hear High School Football Highlights on IMPACT Sports with Ron Williqms.
You can also submit your play of the week selections to The Florida Star by email at Info@TheFloridaStar.com. Information is needed by
Monday of each week.
Raines' Rashard Dunbar returning a punt for 78 yards and setting up a 1-yard touchdown run by
Antoine Atwater in a 36-6 win over Ribault on Friday, November 4.
Raines running back Jasmine Parker carrying the ball nine time for 102 yards in a 36-6 win over
Ribault on Friday, November 4.
Bolles Junior Andre Byrd carrying the ball 10 times for 161 yards and scoring two touchdowns (7-
yard run and 8-yard pass) in a 31-7 win over Mandarin on Friday, November 4.
Bolles fullback Ryan Van Rensburg rushing for 148 yards on 19 carries in a 31-7 win over Mandarin
on Friday, November 4.
Jackson tailback Troy Pollard carrying the ball 22 times for 169 yards and scoring a touchdown off
of a 90-yard run in a 17-14 win over Robert E. Lee on Friday, November 4.
,. Receiver Torie Haywood catching an 84-yard pass for a touchdown in a 17-14 win over Robert E.
Lee on Friday, November 4.
10 Daryll Richardson of Sandalwood carrying the ball 27 times for 113 yards in a 19-14 win over First
Coast on Friday, November 4.
Ed White's Eric Baker rushing for 145 yards on 23 carries and scoring three touchdowns ( runs of 12, 9, and 40 yards) in a
28-8 win over Forrest on Friday, November 4.
Stanton Prep's Art Grigoryan rushing for 119 yards and scoring a 4-yard touchdown in a 23-7 loss to University Christian
on Friday, November 4.


BRAIN FOOD SOLUTION


1 =

2.

3.

4.

5.


7

8.

9.

10.


Raines 9-1

Bolles 9-1


Andrew Jackson


Lee


First Coast

Ed White


Trinity Christian

Englewood

Bishop Kenny

Univ. Christian


7-3

7-3

7-3

6-4

6-3

6-4

6-3

6-4


Solution:

June (given as the 1st answer) becomes

junior (1 blanks)- Sp.

junior becomes "julio" (#2 blanks)- Sp.

julio becomes "July" (#3 blanks)- Eng.

July becomes "May" (# blanks)- Eng.

May becomes mayo (5 blks)- Sp.

mayo becomes "marzo" (answer given)- Sp.


I FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN


A -~


----- ---- ----------- ----







The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Page B-5/November 12, 2005


D4L's "Laffy Taffy" Shaking Up



Airplay Charts Coast To Coast

NEW YORK, NY- Asylum/DeeMoney Entertainment/D4L Records announced
the release of "DOWN FOR LIFE," the eagerly anticipated debut album from
Atlanta-based hip-hop collective, D4L. The album -- which features the irresistible
hit single, "Laffy Taffy" -- landed in stores on November 8. s
Since their founding in 2003, D4L have made a name for themselves as one of
the most innovative outfits on the current hip-hop scene, pioneering the hot party
sound known as "snap" music. Introduced by DJ T-Rock at the Bankhead, GA, club,
the Pool Palace, snap music takes the Dirty South to a new level, as heard on a num-
ber of sensational mixtapes that have blazed through the ATL underground in recent
months.
Along with D4L, the sound of snap has broken out via such Bankhead-based
artists as Trap Squad and Dem Franchize Boyz, as well as through the work of an
influential group of strip club DJs known as the Legion of Doom DJs, whose ranks
include such names as the DJ Cloud, DJ K-Base, and DJ Cool Aid. DL
The first snap track to break through to a national audience, "Laffy Taffy" is cur-
rently climbing the airplay charts, coming in this week at #13 with-a-bullet at Urban outlets, as well as #16 with-a-bullet at CHR/Rhythmic. In addi-


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tion, the track's naughty companion video is in "Blazin'" rotation on MTV Jams and is
the #2 most-played clip at BET and in Heavy rotation on BET's "Rap City." D4L will
celebrate their album release with a performance today on BET's "106 & Park." "Laffy
Taffy" is also the #2 video on Yahoo! Music and the #2 ringtone on Moviso.
"DOWN FOR LIFE" -- which also includes last year's underground smash, the crazy-
catchy "Betcha Can't Do It Like Me" -- sees D4L doing what they do best, spitting nim-
ble southern-fried flow over unprecedented snap grooves.
Also known for their inventive dance moves, Fa-bo, Mook-B, Stoney, and Shawty Lo
have created a truly unique new hip-hop noise, captured at its best on tracks such as
"Game Owe Me," "Diggin' Me," and "Do It Like Me Baby." With the release of "DOWN
FOR LIFE," D4L and the crispy fresh sound that has been popping the westside of
Atlanta are certain to rock the rest of the country and beyond.
New Artists Join Efforts For 'Hurricane Relief:
Responding to the overwhelming outpouring of support from musicians, writers and
producers, EMI Group, SONY BMG, Universal Music Group, Warner Music Group and
Concord Music Group, along with the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network and the-
Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), today announced the addition of
new artists and songs to complete the double CD multi-artist benefit album Hurricane
Relief: Come Together Now. The 35-song collection, to be released November 22, will
feature new recordings and classic cuts from more than 80 artists, spanning a variety of
generations and genres. All proceeds will aid the relief efforts for the Gulf Coast victims
devastated by recent hurricanes Katrina and Rita.
An accomplished cast of new artists has joined the already stellar group of perform-
ers. R. Kelly sparkles on the specially recorded "Let Your Light Shine;" Kanye West
chums out the uplifting "We Can Make It Better" featuring Talib Kweli, Q-Tip, Common
and Rhymefest; sisters Black Buddafly introduce "Make A Change," and Diddy offers
the soulful "By Faith" featuring Fred Hammond.
"It's important for Americans to remember that rebuilding efforts and providing aid
to those still in need is a long term process," R. Kelly shared. "It's easy for all of us t6
get caught up in our daily lives, but we should remember that the human crisis contin-
ues." The Hip-Hop Summit Action Network is the latest to join the industry-wide effort
with representation from music's urban community. "Responding to the challenges of
S,. hurricane relief is an awesome responsibility, yet serving the ongoing needs of those
most affected is a blessed cause worthy of our support and giving," emphasized Russell
Simmons, Chairman of the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network. All of the participating
artists, publishers, songwriters and record companies have waived their royalties and
donated their services to this important cause as have the American Federation of
Musicians (AFM) and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists
(AFTRA).


I 40 :%1S 004#10:19







Page B-6lNovember 12, 2005 The Florida Stan Prep Rap


Clean Kids Jokes


Silly! Silly!


Q. Why was the Egyptian girl worried?
A. Because her daddy was a mummy!

Q. What pet makes the loudest noise?
A. A trum-pet!

Q. What is a tornado?
A. Mother nature doing the twist!

Q. Whats red and flies and wobbles at the same
time?
A. A jelly copter!

Q. Why did the sword swallower swallow
an umbrella?
A. He wanted to put something away for a rainy day!

Q. What's the name for a short legged tramp?
A. A low down bum!

Q.Why did the man take a pencil to bed?
A. To draw the curtains!

Q. What's the difference between an American
student and an English student?
A. About 3000 miles!

Q. Who invented underground tunnels?
A. A mole!

Q. Why did the clock get sick?
o A. It was run down!

Q. Why did the burglar take a shower?
A. He wanted to make a clean getaway!

Q. What kind of fish can't swim?
A. Dead ones!

Q. Why do polar bears have fur coats?
A. Because they would look silly in anoraks!

Q. Why did the woman take a loaf
of bread to bed with her?
A. To feed her nightmare!

Q. What city cheats at exams?
A. Peking!

Q. What makes the leaning Tower of Pisa lean?
A. It doesn't eat much!

Q. Why is Alabama the smartest state in the USA?
A. Because it has 4 A's and one B!


Tongue
Twister
Cheryl's chilly cheap chip
shop sells Cheryl's cheap
chips.


The cat catchers
catch caught cats.


can't


All I want is a proper cup
of coffee
Made in a proper copper
coffee pot.
You can believe it or not,
But I just want a cup of
coffee
In a proper coffee pot.
Tin coffee pots
Or iron coffee pots
Are of no use to me.
If I can't have
A proper-cup of coffee
In a proper copper coffee
pot,
I'll have a cup of tea!


What's Missing From The Above-Spot?
Information About Your Business,
Services, Or Goods!
To Place Your Advertisement
In This Spot
Call The Florida Star Today At (904) 766-8834


KNOCK! KNOCK!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Manuel!
Manuel who?
Manuel be sorry if you don't open this door!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Mara!
Mara who?
Mara mara on the wall....!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Marcella!
Marcella who?
Marcella is full of water and I'm drowning, help!

Knock Knock
Who's there?
Max!
Max who?
Max no difference. Open the door!


The Florida Star/ Prep Rap


Page B-6/November 12, 2005





THE FLORIDA STAR B-7/NOVEMBER 12, 2005


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Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "My Humps" The Black Eyed Peas (A&M) Last Week:
No. 2
2. "Photograph" Nickelback (Roadrunner) No. 1
3. "Because of You Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 3
4. "Gold Digger" Kanye West Featuring Jamie Foxx (Roc
A Fella/Def Jam) No. 5
5. "Run It!" Chris Brown (Jive) No. 8
6. "Wake Me Up When September Ends" Green Day
(Reprise) No. 4
7. "Shake It Off' Mariah Carey (Island) No. 7
8. "Pretty Vegas" INXS (Epic) No. 6
9. "Soul Survivor" Young Jeezy Featuring Akon
(Corporate Thugz/Def Jam) No. 10
10. "Like You" Bow Wow Featuring Ciara (Columbia)
No. 9
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Better Life" Keith Urban (Capitol) Last Week: No. 1
2. "Redneck Yacht Club" Craig Morgan (Broken Bow)
No. 2
3. "Somebody's Hero" Jamie O'Neal (Capitol) No. 3
4. "Skin (Sarabeth)" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street) No. 8
5. "Probably Wouldn't Be This Way" LeAnn Rimes
(Asylum/Curb) No. 5
6. "Stay with Me (Brass Bed)" Josh Gracin (Lyric Street)
No. 6
7. "Who You'd Be Today" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 10
8. "Good Ride Cowboy" Garth Brooks (Pearl/Promo
Single) No. 9
9. "A Real Fine Place to Start" Sara Evans (RCA) No. 7
10. "Something to Be Proud Of" Montgomery Gentry
(Columbia) No. 4
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Precious" Depeche Mode (Sire/Mute) Last Week: No. 2
2. "Feels Just Like It Should" Jamiroquai (Columbia) No. 1
3. "Clich6" Simone Denny (JVM) No. 3
4. "No Strings" Lola (Sobe/Promo) No. 6
5. "Hung Up" Madonna (Maverick) New Entry
,6. "Night of My Life" Barbra Striesand (Columbia) No. 9
7. "Cool (Richard X/Photek Mixes)" Gwen Stefani
(Interscope) No. -16
8. "The Feeling" Chris The Greek Panaghi (DJG/Promo)
No. 8
9. "Everything U" Superchumbo (Twisted) No. 4
10. "Pon de Replay (Norty Cotto Remix)" Rhianna
(SRP/Def Jam) No. 5
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Jag Mania Is Alive And Well At Alltel


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FRAMES ON AND TWO: Yvette (left) and April (right) membersof The Roar found plenty to cheer about on Sunday,
November 6 when the Jacksonville Jaguars hosted the Houston Texans at Alltel Stadium. FRAME THREE:Jaxon
DeVille, the Jaguars' mascot, leads the team from the tunnel to the field to clash with the Texans. FRAME FOUR:
Jets from a nearby naval air station in Jacksonville buzz Altell Stadium piror to kickoff. (PHOTOS BY LAURENCE GREENE)


Ritz Theatre & Lavilla Musem Awarded Grant


The Ritz Theatre &
La\illa lMuiseum received a
2005 Conservation
Assessment Program I(CAP)
grant from the Institute of
Museum and Librar\
Services (INILS) in the
amount of $4.520.00 to pro-
%ide valuablee peer consulta-
tion to help the museum


cope with collections chal-
lenges and provide thought-
ful suggestions that lead the
w ay to future success.
On November 7 and 8,
Alexandra Klingelhofer,
Director of Collections and
Conservation at the Museum
of Arts and Sciences in
Macon, Georgia, made a


site visit to Ritz Theatre &
LaVilla Museum to assess
the museum's exhibit and
storage practices and poli-,
cies.
A report will be submit-
ted with recommendations
for implementing revisions
or changes that will result
in utilization of best prac-
tices in collection manage-
ment.
"We are looking forward
to this opportunity to
strengthen the foundation
for the growth of our collec-
tion and our ability to pre-
serve and present the his-
toric legacy of Jacksonville's
African American commu-
nity," said Museum
Administrator, Lydia P.
Stewart.
The Institute of Museum
and Library Services is an
independent federal grant-
making agency dedicated to
creating and sustaining a
nation of learners by helping
libraries and museums serve
their communities.
The Institute of Museum
and Library Services and
Heritage Preservation have
awarded grants totaling
$806,820 to 118 museums
across the country.


Help Make Jax
Better Through
Blueprint
For Prosperity

Jacksonville's plan for a
better future called
Blueprint for Prosperity is
under discussion and is in
need of public input..
- The top 10 issues are:
education, economic devel-
opment, quality of life,
racial opportunity and har-
mony, infrastructure, trans-
portation, government,
moral and parental values,
marketing and housing.
The Sierra club will host
a representative from
Blueprint for Porsperity to
outline details of the plan
and ask for feedback from
the pubic on Monday,
November 14 at 7:00 p.m.
The meeting will be held
:at Lakewood, Presbyterian
Church located at 200.1
University Blvd.
Another round of com-
munity meetings to get input
on the draft Blueprint will be
held before the plan is
implemented in February
with an attempt to imple-
ment the plan over the next
five years.
The public is invited to
come and offer thoughts and
ideas for a better
Jacksonville. Bring your
own cups for refreshments.
For more information con-
tact Janet Larson at (904)
247-1876.


THANKS
FOR
READING
AND
SUPPORTING
THE
FLORIDA
STAR!


COMMUNITY

CAPTIONS
Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

COMMITMENT MARCH-State Senator Tony Hill,
MAD DADS Jax, St. Paul A.M.E. Church and St. Paul
Missionary Baptist Church will hold a Commitment
March on Saturday, November 12 at 12 noon. The march
will begin at Ken Knight Drive and Moncrief Road. The
march will then proceed through Washington Heights up
Richardson Road. It will conclude at St. Paul A.M.E.
Church located at 6910 New Kings Rd. Community lead-
ers will address concerns. Parking will be available at
11:00 a.m. at St. Paul A.M.E. Church. Shuttle bus avail-
able to the march site.
RITZ RENT PARTY-The Ritz is throwing an old
school bash. Leave the kids at home and come out for a
night of old school partying', hot food, cold drinks, rock-
ing' jazz and blues and rug cutting till dawn! Hear Billy
Paul live in concert as he sings "Me and Mrs. Jones".
The Sugar Daddy Blues Band will keep the night hot.
Tickets are available at Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum
box office, Veterans' Memorial Arena, Times Union
Performing Arts Center and Ticketmaster outlets. For
more information, please call 904-632-5555.
ENTERTAINERS NEEDED-The Jacksonville Local
Organizing Committee is soliciting entertainers to volun-
teer their talent for a Millions More Movement Unity
Family Rally to help galvanize our communities for pos-
itive change. If you are a singer, singing group,
dancer,dancers,rapper,rappers,church group, steppers,
greek organization, club, church choir, poet, comedian
(no age limitation and open to male and female), please
call 904-355-9395,904-768-2778 or email:axn@bell-
south.net.
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING-The Duval County
School Board will conduct its annual Organizational
Meeting on November 22, at 6:00 p.m. in the 1st Floor
Board Room, located at 1701 Prudential Dr. Any person
who anticipates an appeal of a decision made by the
Duval County School Board with respect to any matter
considered at these meetings, or who may decide to
appeal such decision, will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made. This record will need
to include the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
TEACH-A-RAMA FORUM-The National Sorority of
Phi Delta Kappa, Inc., Delta Delta Chapter presents its
27th Annual Teach-A-Rama Forum on Saturday,
November 12, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the
Emanuel Missionary Baptist Church Fellowship Hall at
2407 Division St. A continental breakfast will be served.
"Math Investigation" is the topic of discussion. Mrs.
Sylvia Johnson, Principal of West Jacksonville
Elementary School is the speaker. For additional infor-
mation, call the Chairperson, Betty R. Burney, at 768-
3013. Flora L. Parker is Basileus.
BLACK AND WHITE DINNER DANCE-The Second
Annual Black & White Dinner Dance will be held
Saturday, November 26, 6:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. at the
Elks Lodge on Anastasia Island ($30 General / $50 VIP
Donation). Live Entertainment will be provided by The
OCEANSIDERS Band (Semi-Formal).


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Jacksonville's

Most Heated,

Radio Talk Show! A

North Florida's Best
Daily Talk Showl


AM 1530
WEEKDAYS
2-6 P.M. -


CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http://www.wymml530.com


- -f .


PAGE C-1


FLORID)A STAR


NOVEMBER 122005


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Pass It On.


THE FOUNDATION FOR A BETTER LIFE
www.forbht:ttrlifc.org


M Deadline for Ads:



J(S Tuesdays @ 5 p.m.



Call: (904) 766-8834















9 MAYO CLINIC
Jacksonville, Florida


Do you have a family member or
close friend who asks the same
questions over and over again?
Does their memory seem worse
than others' their age?

Mayo Clinic offers free memory
screenings by phone. The
program is part of a clinical
research study.

For more information, please call
953-2677.


MORE THAN 50 WAYS TO
PREVENT DIABETES
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Eat a small

meal, Lucille


Take Your First Step Today.
Talk to your health care provider,
If you are ... -,. ti. you may be
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diabetes. For more information
about diabetes prevention, call
1-800-438-5383 and ask for "More
Than 50 Ways to Prevent Diabetes"

f small steps. .
big rewards
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Deadline for Ads: Tuesday @ 5 p.m.

Call: (904) 766-8834
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4


NOVEMBER 12, 2005


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We Pay Tribute To Our Armed Forces

By Senator Martinez

I 6 ', As we pay tribute to our armed forces past and present this Veterans Day, I am
reminded about the value of freedofn in this great country. We owe a debt of grati-
tude to the brave soldiers who have fought for our safety and security and have given
us the privilege to live in a free land. This day takes on additional significance, as we
: support and reflect on the deployed troops in Iraq, Afghanistan,. and elsewhere
throughout the world.
Though officially recognized as Veterans Day in 1954, November 11th was orig-
inally recognized at the conclusion of World War I in 1918 as the day that ended "the
war of all wars." Since then, November 11th has rightly become a day of remem-
brance and tribute to all uniformed individuals who have fought in the name of
.. America in the name of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.
S. After the attacks on September 11, 2001, I sat with President Bush at the Cabinet
Room table as we discussed what was to follow. It was that day we truly realized that
~*',~''"* our freedom and future safety were at stake, and direct action was required. Our
courageous military willingly accepted the call-to-action, and still today they contin-
~---- .. ue to persevere under harsh circumstances.

In response to the needs of these men and women that risk their lives each day and our veterans from throughout the
country, President Bush and this Congress have supported the greatest increases in veterans spending and benefits in our his-
tory. Today we are spending more money then ever before on veterans' care, increasing their health care benefits by 47-per-
cent over the past five years. :

Even so, there is still more to be done. Since taking office, I have joined my Senate colleagues on a number of measures
important to improving services for-veterans and military retires, including major improvements in health care services. In
the 2006 Budget Resolution, we rightly set aside a full $70 billion for the Department of Veterans Affairs -- almost half of
this amount specifically designated for the Veterans Health Administration.
Not only are we focused on improving veterans' healthcare, but I also joined my colleagues to co-sponsor the Senate
Retired Pay Restoration Act (S. 558). This legislation would allow military retirees to receive full concurrent receipt of both
deserved-disability compensation and retirement pay, regardless of the disability rating. In addition, individuals who have
retired or separated from military service due to a service-connected disability would be eligible for concurrent receipt of
veterans' disability compensation and either military retired pay or combat-related special pay. This will be effective January
1, 2006..
Another important issue for veterans and their families is survivor benefits. By passing the Military Survivors Benefit
Equity Act (S. 185), we can repeal the reduction of military survivor benefit pay (SBP) annuities for survivors receiving
dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC).
Teddy Roosevelt once said, "A man who is good enough to shed his blood for his country, is good enough to be given a
square deal afterwards." In that same vein, I too believe we must come together as a nation to commemorate and reward the
sacrifice of our men and women that have fiercely protected our freedom. On this Veterans Day, I commend our dedicated
veterans for their sacrifices to our nation, and I want to reaffirm my commitment to protecting our veterans for many years
to come. God bless.


First Tee Of Jacksonville's Safety Festival


The U.S. Navy,
Jacksonville Sheriffs
Office, Fire Departnient, and
Housing Authority will par-
ticipate in a Safety Festival
on Saturday, November 12
from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
at The First Tee of
Jacksonville, 1157 MBO1
Golfair Blvd.
The Jacksonville Fire
Department will have a
truck at the site and provide
fire safety tips.
The Jacksonville


Sheriffs Office will provide
information on car seat safe-
ty.
First Student will pro-
vide school bus safety tips.
Self-defense lessons will be
offered for the children.
Child identification kits will
be available.
The First Tee .of'
Jacksonville staff will pro-
vide a golf demonstration.
There will be food, drinks,
and inflatable rides (includ-
ing a Space Walk).


The US Navy will have a and conduct a ball drop.
helicopter on the grounds
La Salsa Fresh Mexican Grill Feeds
Fans When Jaguars Score 14 Or More


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
La Salsa Fresh Mexican
Grillg gives Jacksonville'
fans another reason to cheer
on their Jaguars against the
Baltimore Ravens in
November if their home-
town team scores at least 14
points against their visitors


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(904)766-8834




PLUMBING REPAIRS

*Repipes (5 year Warranty)

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on SundaN, November 13,
supporters will feast on free
. tacos the very next day,
courtesy of the local and
newly opened La Salsa
Restaurant.
Franchise operator Eric
Farr, of REF Holdings, Inc.
feels that his "14- on-the
14th" promotion is an excel-
lent opportunity to introduce
North Florida to the unique
culinary profile offered by
La Salsa Restaurants.
"What better way to cele-
brate our grand opening on
November 14 than by invit-
ing everyone in Jacksonville
to enjoy fresh- grilled tacos
when the Jaguars score 14
on Sunday? We look for-
ward to hosting locals for a
free sample of the delectable
fare La Salsa has to offer-
and getting them hooked."
Should the Jaguars
achieve the feat against
Baltimore, guests will
receive any taco of their
choice (grilled chicken,
steak, shrimp, fish or carni-
tas) with chips and fresh
salsa. This, the first of seven
La Salsa Fresh Mexican
Grills planned for the
Jacksonville metro area, is
part of the Regency Plaza at
9527 Regency Square Blvd
in Jacksonville.
La Salsa Fresh Mexican
Grill offers a menu of fresh,-
ly prepared Mexican cuisine
in a contemporary fast-casu-
al environment.
The restaurant features
an exhibition-style kitchen
where guests can view their
food being prepared to
order. Consumers order at
the, counter, pick up their
drinks and choose from
seven freshly prepared sal-
sas at the salsa -bar. The
unique salsa bar includes
seven distinct varieties of
foods.


Participants Lauded
For 40 Years Of Service
To Prison Fellowship Ministry;
PFM Helps Hurricane Victims
Plaque were presented to Erline Menefee, Ola
Williams, and Annette Ward for 40 years of service to
Prison Fellowship Ministries (PFM). The awards were
presented by PFNM President Sam Roberts.
The .honorees. frequently visit Lowell Women Prison,
Raiford, Baker, Columbia and other institutions conduct-
ing workshops and Bible Study.
They also assist 'with, the Annual Angel Tree
Christmas Program. This year, PFM anticipates support-
ing 4,000 children in December. To participate, contact
Sam Roberts at (904) 994-1044. A donation of a gas and
other donations may be mailed to Prison Fellowship
Ministries (PFM), P.O. Box 37676, Jacksonville, FL
32236.
Certificates were presented to Betty Tutt, Rev. John
*Garner, Rev. Winston and Janet Smith, Rev. Charles
Kyles, John Cheney, John and,Linda Rokus, Kim Pugh,
Rev. Raymond Burkhart, Regional Director, and
Executive Director Raeanne Hanee.
Betty Tutt of PFM led a team to Mississippi and New
Orleans with a truck loaded with food and clothes. "It
was just overwhelming to share with the victims and they
were very receptive and grateful to receive the items,"
said Tuft.
Others accompanying Tutt were John Scott, Sr. and
Wilhelmnia Ross.
Tutt will return to those areas in December with win-
'ter clothes, toys, toiletries and more staple food items.
Persons who would like to donate to this cause may leave
items at 2519 Soutel Dr. (rear of house) or call Sam
Roberts at (904) 994-1044 or Tutt at (904) 713-9100 for
more information.


State Of the Art
New Main
Library
To Open

The City of Jacksonville
will kick off a week-long
celebration on Saturday,
November 12 to open the
,new Main Library..
Festivities will include a
RALLY Parade featuring
members of Mayor
Peyton's Book Club, a dedi-
cation ceremony, lectures,
tours, story hours, art and
fun.
The dedication ceremony
begins at 10:00 a.m. at the
new Main Library located at
303 N. Laura St. (comer of
Laura and Monroe Streets).
The library opens at 11:00"
a.m.
The Ribault High School
Chorus will perform 1:30
p.m.-2:30 p.m. on Sunday,
November 13 on the Second
Floor Landing at the Main
Library.
Linda Erson and the
Voices of Victory Choir
(Contemporary Gospel) will
perform 4:30-5:30 p.m. on
November 13.
The Ritz Voices will per-
form on Tuesday, November
15 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. on
the Second Floor Landing.
Kezia Justice (Dance) will
perform 1:30-2:00 p.m. on
Sunday, November 20 in the
Courtyard.

UNF Presents
Crime Scene
Reenactment
"Deception, Mayhem
and Murder," an original
crime scene reenactment
and trial, will be presented
on Tuesday, November 29,
at 7:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts
Center Lazzara Performance
Hall by the University of
North Florida's Women's
Center, Department of
Criminology and Criminal
Justice and Department of
Anthropology and
Sociology.
This play is part of a liv-
ing, breathing curriculum
for UNF students and is
filled with excitement as
well as anticipation as the
crime scene investigation
unfolds, followed by a mock
trial and verdict.


THANKS
FOR
READING
AND
SUPPORTING
THE
FLORIDA
STAR!


DEATH

NOTICES;

ANGELES-Maria D.
(Tunon), died November 2,
2005.
BEAL-Vesiller, died
November 3, 2005.
BROWN-Amzie, died
October 31, 2005.
GAY-Albert, 87, November 2,
2005.
GREEN-David, died
November 4,
GRIFFIN-Isiah, died
November 5, 2005. A.B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
GROVES-James, 49, died
November 1
HARRIS-Sherrell L., 56, died
October 31, 2005..
HARRISON-Zechariah, died
November 5, 2005.
HILL-Helen, died November
7, 2005. A.B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
JARRELL-Kenneth R., Sr.,
died October 21, 2005.
JOHNSON-Bridgett, died
November 5, 2005.
LOTT-Marty Sr., died
November 4, 2005.
LOTT-Marty, Jr., died
November 4, 2005.
LOTT-Melanie, died
November 4, 2005.
LOVING-Cody, died
November 4, 2005.
MARION-Patricia, died
November 7, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
MITCHELL-Elizabeth R.,
died November 8, 2005.
NEAL-Robert, died
November 6, 2005.
RICHO-Leonard, died
November 5, 2005.
SHELLMAN-Tamya, died
October 28, 2005.
STRICKLAND-James C.,
died November 3, 2005.
TYSON-ALtamese, 94, died
November 2, 2005.
VALEZ-Baby Girl Juana, died
November 4, 2005.
WASHINGTON-Angela,
died November 3, 2005.
WATKINS-Mae, died
November 1, 2005.
WELLS-Virginia, 46, died
November 7, 2005.
WILLIAMS-Arthur, Jr., died
November 4, 2005.


IVOVFIBER 5.200


I


PAGE C-3


FLORID)A STAR






ARNVEBR 2 20


FLORIDA SI


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Mayor or tBrunswick


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Shoes
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Socks
Monday Thi
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LOO~KIIN(C IFORA \PL.\CL NN UIIFRRIIEA\L GROWN
FOLKS (CAN (A() To REIA\ .ND) UNWVIND?


JOIN US AT "THE POST"
2179 Benedict Road


TOP FRAME: Signs promoting "Elaine Brown For Mayor" of Brunswick, Ga. are
almost washed out by a wave of other signs with names of other Mayoral candidates
and City Commissioners. BOTTOM FRAME: 'A campaign supporter tends a barbecue
grill during a post election gathering. (PHOTOS BY CLARISSA DAVIS)


Elaine Brown


BRUNSWICK, Ga. -
Cincinnati, Ohio elected its
first black mayor, State
Senator Mark Mallory (D),
43; citizens of Detroit stood
in long lines, even before
the polls opened to re-elect
Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick,
who overcame scandals;
Atlanta Mayor Shirley
Franklin won her second
term in a landslide but
Brunswick, Ga., residents
did not get out to elect
their first black or female
mayor.
Less than 2,000 voted in
the town of 16,000 with a
60% black population. Of
the votes counted, 19%
were write-in votes.
Late Monday, a federal
judge ruled that Elaine
Brown, the first mayoral
candidate for this election,


and had been removed from
the ballot by the Election
Board and by an appeal
judge, be placed back on the
ballot as a write-in for the
Tuesday election.
Not much time for the
residents to get the message
but 19% did.
Even some of those who
had worked with Elaine
Brown did not write in her
name because they had not
received the message that a
vote for her would be count-
ed.
Ms. Brown said the city
is going to have to deal with
the issues she brought for-
ward for the residents of
Brunswick. She said she is
not giving up or giving in.
She ran against three other
candidates and has vowed


to contest the outcome of
the election.
If Elaine Brown had
won this election, she
would have been the first
female and the first black
mayor of Brunswick.
The state of Georgia
may be facing a lawsuit by
The Rev. Joseph Lowery of
The Coalition for the
People's Agenda, the
NAACP, SCLC and the
Georgia Association of
Black Elected Officials
because of a bill passed ear-
lier this year that would
require all voters to present
a state approved photo iden-
tification in order to vote.
They feel such a
requirement would affect
minorities, the elderly and
the poor.


WHAT TOQK YOU A LIFETIME
TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.



WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.
Loarn tho warning signs at
StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE.
A .wr imn .Sikr
AfB *e.;g ;ciaric.m
f-~'"a>K'^0 A ;- K 'Ak^!!r A., -^rw^-


Tuesday Game Night
Bring your game and play cards with some of the best p
in town

Thursday Talent Night
Bring your best song, dance or comedy routine and she
what you got!


I




players




\\ Lus


Friday & Saturday
Disco (featuring DJ Larry "Georgia Boy" Douglas)
When the pretty people come out to play, dance and have a
good time.


ForMr.Iue In/otonal'ini Cal/ -0-1 20p


The Readers of the




""
,! > !
z ,,-


Black Press in America are more
educated,
make more income
and have
substantial buvina cower.


Source: The Media Audit
2004 Black Newspapers Readership Repbort, nnpa.org


IMPACT

WCGL AM 1360

THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
SATURDAYS @ 1:00 P.M.
Issues That Address
Concerns Of The
African American
Community In
Jacksonville AndThe
World


A RT.



MO0R E.


For more hinLfrinati~on about the
IrIimj IO nci. 'lIaxts HdII-.( ,rion R..H4YTl,:





AMNAER ICAN


NOVEMBER 12, 2005.


4AR


PAGE C-4


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FLORIndA VTAR


PAGE C-5


Jaguars Aim to Clip Ravens' Wings



After 21-14 win Over Houston Texans


With a 21-14 victory
over injury-riddled Houston
on Sunday., November 6,
the Jacksonville Jaguars (5-
3) tied the NFL record for
consecutive games played
without scoring 30 or more
points.
The Jags matched
Cleveland's mark of 58
games set between 1995 and
2002 (the Browns didn't
field a team in 1996-98).
Jacksonville trailed 7-0
at halftime and 14-7 in the
fourth quarter before waking
up from a first-half stupor.
Leftwich directed scoring
drives of 80 and 82 yards in
the final quarter.

Monfills Won't Play
In Paris Masters


Jacksonville running back Fred Taylor (#28 in dark jer-
sey) ends up under a pile of Houston defenders. Taylor
was still sore during practice after re-injuring the ankle
Sunday against Houston. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE),


Gael Monfils
Gael Monfils


Wide receiver Ernest Wilford (#19) dark jersey) takes off
past a Texan defender. In the last two games, Wilford
had 10 catches for 234 yards and two touchdowns.
Against Houston, Wilford,caught four passes for 89 yards.
(PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)


PARIS Rising French
teenager Gael Monfils
pulled out of the Paris
Masters tennis tournament
Monday because of tendini-
tis in his left knee.
The 19-year-old player
lost to Andy Roddick on
Sunday in the final of the
Lyon Grand Prix, but said he
has felt soreness for the last
two weeks. "It was becom-
ing more and more painful,"
Monfils said. "I managed to
hide it at Lyon, but I prefer
to take this decision."
Last year, he lost to
Lleyton Hewitt in the sec-
ond round of this tourna-
ment. It has been hit by a
number of high-profile with-
drawals, including defend-
ing. champion Marat Safin,
top-ranked Roger Federer,
No. 2 Rafael Nadal, Andre
Agassi and Hewitt.


Ali Receives Presidential Medal Of Freedom


President Bush presents the
Presidential Medal of
Freedom, Wednesday, Nov. 9,
2005, to boxer Muhammad Ali
in the East Room of the White
House. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
WASHINGTON, D.C.--
Calling him the Greatest of


All Time" and "a man of
peace," President Bush gave
Muhammad Ali the nation's
highest civilian award dur-
ing a ceremony on
November 9 at the White
House.
The President placed the
Presidential Medal of
Freedom around the former
heavyweight champion's
neck. It was Ali's first pub-
lic appearance in months,
six days after undergoing


November 3-5

Edward Waters 63, Atlantic College 6 -
SC State 23, Howard 9 -
Hampton 24, Bethune-Cookman 10 -
Florida A&M 24, NC A&T 14 -
Eastern Illinois 27, Tennessee State 3 -
Southern 44, Texas Southern 20 -
Grambling State 32, Alabama State 27 -
Stillman 22, Clark Atlanta 12
Coastal Carolina 42, Savannah State 16
Alcorn State 38, Miss Valley State 36 -
Benedict 42, Lane 20 -


back surgery in Atlanta.
Wobbly from the effects of
Parkinson's disease, the 63-
year-old Ali at 'times had to
applaud with his left hand
clenched in a fist, and now
and then appeared to have
trouble sitting up in his seat
But when it came time to
accept his medal, Ali stood
proudly in his black suit and
red, yellow and black tie,
embraced the president and
whispered in his ear.


Albany State 41, Fort Valley State 23
Norfolk State 24, Morgan State 21 -
NC Central 26, Bowie State 23
Shepherd 51, West Virginia State 10 -
Texas College 22, Southern Nazarene 7 -
Tuskegee 31, Kentucky State 13
Alabama A&M 52, Jackson State 6
Langston 35, Northwest Oklahoma State 33
Miles 34, Morehouse 24 -
Allen 32, Southern Virginia 20 -
Concordia 21, Paul Quinn 8 -
Kutztown 29, Cheyney 12 -


Leftwich scored on an 8-
yard run on third down to tie
the game at 14. Then Greg
Jones, playing in place of
injured starter Fred Taylor,
had a 12-yard TD run that
put the Jaguars ahead for
good with 2:53 to play.
Taylor sprained his right
ankle in the third quarter and
did not return. It was the
same injury that kept Taylor
from playing against
Pittsburgh three weeks ago.
Leftwich was 19-of-25 .
for 218 yards. Wilford, play-
ing in place of former first-
round draft pick Reggie
Williams, caught four passes


for 89 yards.
The Baltimore Ravens
hope to play better against
the Jacksonville Jaguars this
year at Alltel Stadium. on
November 13.
After losing the first
eight matchups with the
Jags, Baltimore has earned a
victory in the last six meet-
ings.
Ravens quarterback Kyle
Boller will start on Sunday,
against the Jaguars after
missing the previous seven
games with a hyperextended
right big toe.
Boller was hurt in the
third quarter of the team's


24-7 season-opening loss to
the Indianapolis Colts. The
team has gone 2-5 in his
absence.
The Ravens' misery con-
tinued on Sunday,
November 6. They suffered
a 21-9 decision to the AFC
North- leading Cincinnati
Bengals at M&T Bank
Stadium.
Coming into the season,
the Ravens were picked .by
some to come out of the
AFC. However, at 2-6 they
have matched their worst-
ever start after eight games
and have showed no signs of
getting back on track.


1. What tennis star wrote the book, "Court Hustler"?
2. What are the clay targets in trap shooting called?
3. What movie Tarzan won the 400-meter freestyle at the 1932
Olympics?
4. How many nail holes are there in a standard horseshoe?
5. What three ways, other than a disqualification, can a boxer win a
fight?
6. What does the bell rung during the 1,500-meter race mean?
7. Who was the first African-American to play major league baseball?
8. What did second baseman Bill Wambsganss do all by himself in a
1920 World Series game?
9. Who was the first man to run the mile in less than four minutes?
10. How many umpires handle a regular-season major league baseball
game?
Sports Challenge Answers

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,r-------------- ---^----
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JAIL OR BAIL
s ter.:: :.??t ..w :^::. .. s :..:-.; .: ::.:*'*
EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
DOMESTIC BATTERY-On Saturday, November 5, 2005 at 9:35
p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 3rd & Bridier Street on a
domestic violence call. When the officer arrived at the intersec-
tion, a 58-year-old male (victim) flagged the officer down and
directed him to the 1200 block of East 3rd Street. The officer
went to the location and met the 33-year-old male (suspect).
According to the victim, the suspect is his son and has not lived
at the house since May 2005. He said the suspect came on the
front porch and wanted to enter the house. The victim and wit-
ness told the suspect to go away due to past domestic violence
against his father. The suspect refused and the victim went on the
front porch from inside the house. While on the front porch, the
suspect grabbed his father by the neck and twisted it. The victim
had. to grab a porch railing for balance or would have fallen
down. The witness, the suspect's mother, saw this and told the
suspect to let his father go. The suspect did so. The officer read
the suspect his rights and questioned him. He told officer he
wanted to go into the house and his father got in his way. He said
he pushed the Victim aside and tried to go in the house. The offi-
cer saw the suspect exit the house upon arrival. The suspect was
arrested for domestic battery on his father. The suspect was
transported to jail. On the way there, the suspect stated,
"Someone ought to shoot that Man". He was charged with a
felony.
BATTERY WITH A DEALY WEAPON-On Sunday,
November 6, 2005 at 8:00 a.m. two police officers were dis-
patched to the 1800 block of Francis Street in reference to a
domestic battery call. Upon arrival, a 37-year-old male (victim)
met the officers. He advised the officers that his 26-year-old wife
(suspect) of six months cut his hand. InT estiuation re\ ealed that
the victim and suspect were lying in bed and the \ victim advised
that the he was going to a friend's house across the. street. The
suspect became angry and started accusing him of sleeping with
their mutual friend. The suspect walked into another room of the
apartment and picked up a large butcher knife. She went back to
the victim, who was still in bed, and swung the knife at the vic-
tim's right hand. The victim got up, put some clothes on, walked
to a nearby phone, and called police. On 11/6/05 around 8:00
a.m. the officer responded back to the listed address to try and
locate the listed suspect. The suspect was hiding inside her bed-
room closet. The officer arrested the suspect and advised her of
her rights., The suspect stated that she and her husband were
arguing while she held a knife in her hand. When the victim tried
to take the knife from the suspect, he cut his hand. The suspect
stated that she did not mean to cut her husband. The suspect was
transported to jail and charged with a felony.
DEALING IN STOLEN PROPERTY-On Sunday, November
6, 2005 at 4:20 p.m. a 42-year-old male (victim), reported to
JSO, that his house had been broken into and someone stole his
"TV and DVD" player. He felt that it might have been his 18-
year-old nephew (suspect) who stole the listed property. On
11/2/05, the officer located the stolen property at two pawn
shops. The property had been signed. A Florida Pawnbroker said
the property was the victim's. On 11/6/05 the officer made con-
tact with the suspect at the zone #2 Substation in the 9000 block
of Arlington Expressway to discuss this incident. During the
interview, the suspect was advised of his rights. The suspect stat-
ed that he moved out of the victim's residence on 9/22/05 and
had never returned to that address. When the officer showed the
suspect the listed Florida Pawnbroker Transaction Forms he
I acknowledged that he had lied. He further admitted that the
pawned items were not his and that he removed them from the
victim's house on 9/22/05 when he moved out. The suspect said
he was sorry for stealing the listed items and will pay restitution
to his uncle. The suspect was arrested, transported to jail, and
charged with a felony.
FORGED WORTHLESS CHECKS-On Sunday, November 6,
'2005 at 2:30 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to the 700
block of N. Edgewood Ave. Upon arrival, the officer made con-
tact with a 37-year-old female (suspect). A check of ID and
records revealed an outstanding warrant for her arrest for trying
to cash worthless checks. The suspect was arrested, transported
to jail, and charged with a misdemeanor.
POSSESSION OF CONTROL SUBSTANCE WITH
INTENT TO SELL-On Sunday, November 6, 2005. At 3:45
p.m., detectives were posing as drug buyers in the 700 block of
Washington Street. The detectives engaged an unknown 56-year-
old male (suspect), who was seated on the front porch in the 700
block of Spearing Street. One of the undercover detectives told
the suspect that she wanted one piece of crack cocaine for
$10.00, and if it looked good, she wanted two more. The suspect
handed the undercover detective one more piece of crack cocaine
for $20.00 of marked JSO funds. The take down signal was
S given, and the suspect was apprehended. A search of the suspect
revealed $30.00 of marked JSO funds in the suspect's front pock-.
et. The undercover detective positively identified the suspect as
the person who sold her the crack cocaine, which field tested
positive, and was entered into the property room. The suspect
was transported to jail, and charged with a felony.
A HABITUAL TRAFFIC OFFENDER-On Sunday,
November 6, 2005 at 3:00 p.m. while on patrol, a police officer
saw a vehicle come down to the exit ramp off MLK Parkway on
to E. 8th St. The office saw that the light was green on E. 8th-St.
The listed vehicle did not come to a stop at the red light and


made a right turn on to E. 8,th St. The listed vehicle traveled east
on E. 8th St., and made a left turn onto Lambert St. The police
officer conducted a traffic stop at 2100 Lambert St. and made
contact with a 23-year-old male driver (suspect). The suspect
informed the officer that his license was suspended and he did
not have any on himself. He presented a FL ID card. The check
of his driver license revealed that the suspect was a habitual traf-
fic offender. A search of the vehicle revealed that the suspect had
an open container of a 12oz beer can, which was still half full in
the floorboard of the vehicle. The suspect was detained and
advised of his constitutional rights arrested, transported to jail,
and charged with a felony.


Your Weekly Horoscope

(NOVEMBER 12, 2005-NOVEMBER 18, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) You ]
manage to suc- 1 .
cessfully juggle
socializing and
work this week. As a result,
an exciting opportunity
comes your way. Devote
some time over the weekend
to going over finances.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) Getting out and
About with family
members is
favored -this
week. Romance is
also in the stars for singles.
Later, get cracking on a
home decorating project.
GEMINI (Ma) 21 to
June 20) Before you can
enjoy the holiday,
you'll need to
clear up lingering
work matters. On
that special day, count your
blessings. The weekend is
devoted to shopping, but
watch your use of credit.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) Early in the week,
-you're busy.. get-.
ting the house
ready for the holi-
da\. Once that's
done, relax and enjoy. A
minor crisis at work is avert-
ed thanks to your quick
thinking.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22)
You're center
stage for the holi-
day. However,
pay attention to the needs of
family members.-They need
their share of the limelight
as well. /
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) The
rn beginning of the
Ifyt week is favored
for reaching
agreements and
signing contracts. Once this
is attended to, you focus on
the holiday. Despite. a bit of
friction, everything goes


well. '
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) You put
undue stress on
yourself by
expecting things
to be perfect. If
you relax more, you'll be
able to enjoy that special
day. Go' for ease and con-
venience not perfection!
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21)
You're just not up
for a lot of com-
A pany this week.
Force yourself.
The family is counting on
you.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December 21)
A family member
comes through on
a promise made
some time ago. Later in the
week, everyone has a special
holiday idea. As a result, you
have more fun than you'd
anticipated.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19) A friend
proves invaluable
to .\ou on a busi-
ness deal. Be
-sure, though, you
both understand all the
terms you've agreed to. This
way, you avoid misunder-
standings at a future date.'
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18) You'll find
yourself hosting
lthe holiday meal
S- this year. Go all
out. This isn't the
time to be frugal.
PISCES (February
19 to March 20) Give a
loved one some
space. You've
been a bit over-
bearing. Once
you do, you'll find your hol-
iday most enjoyable.
CELEBRITY


Jailhouse Boast Leads

Officers To Cash

FORT WALTON BEACH, Florida A bank robber's
jailhouse boast about the location of his hidden loot led
officers to the stash after fellow inmates shared his
secret.
Okaloosa County. sheriffs spokeswoman Michele
Nicholson said Tuesday investigators dug up nearly
$5,000 last week that 26-year-old Julian Leon Jordan
was convicted of stealing from First City Bank in the
nearby Florosa, Florida, community last year.
Two inmates overheard Jordan telling other inmates
where he had buried the cash and they contacted author-
ities, she said'
Investigators failed to find the money in an October:
search behind a storage and building company in Fort
Walton Beach, Florida, but they had success the follow-
ing week when a former inmate appeared and asked the
business, for permission to search for money behind the
building.
The business called the sheriffs office and the former
inmate cooperated with investigators to locate the buried
cash.
"He'd been arrested for trespassing in the past and
didn't want to get 'arrested again," Nicholson said.
Nicholson said the man had been in jail with Jordan
who told him where to find the money. She said the man
wasn't arrested


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November 5, 2005


BIRTHDAYS: Juliet November 24; Amy Grant,
Mills, November 21; Jamie November 25; Tina Turner,
Lee Curtis, November 22; November 26; Jaleel White,
Bruce Hornsby, November November 27.
23; Dwight Schultz 2005 DBR Media,Inc.

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THE FLORIDA STAR!



Tara's Bail
24/7 Bonds
Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville, Florida 32206
*I


356-TARA
(8272)


:,,


Your business is always welcome!



REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.
FAMI LY P RA C TWICE
3160 Edge wood Ave. Jacksonville,, FL 32209












WE PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR:
*Hypertension
ODiabetes
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PChildcare and Im uniziat;ios
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Dr. Reginald 5'r/kes.ielois-es r-Tonma Hollinger
to the u, tice.
NOW AC C(.EkPTING
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1He invite you to Ir t ii at'ifas your provider
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WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR HEALTH PLANS
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3160 EdgewoodAvenueeJacksonville, FL 32209
OFFICE HOURS:
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Pirates Blasted With Sonic Weapon
MIAMI -- The crew of a luxury cruise ship used a
sonic weapon that blasts earsplitting noise in a directed
beam while being attacked by a gang of pirates off
Africa this weekend, the cruise, line said Monday.
The Seabourn Spirit had a Long Range Acoustic
Device, or LRAD, installed as a part of its defense sys-
tems, said Bruce Good, a spokesman for Miami-based
Seabourn Cruise Line. The Spirit was about 100 miles
off Somalia when pirates fired rocket-propelled
grenades and machine guns as they tried to get onboard.
The subsidiary of Carnival Corp. was investigating
whether the weapon was successful in warding off the
pirates, he said.
The ship's captain dlso changed its course, shifted.
into high speed and headed ou\ into the open sea to elude
the pirates, who were in two small boats, he said. He had
no further details.


Crime doesn't

pay but we do!

CRIME

STOPPERS

1-866-845-TIPS (8477)

No Names...


No Faces...

No Hassles


NO~VEMBER 12, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE r-_6







FLORIDA STAR


NOVEMBER.12, 2005


-A U ISURANC


EMPLOYMENT


Change Your Life.
Your Future.
You have the power to change
your future. And you can do it
right here at Florida
Community College at
Jacksonvile. To learn about
employment opportunities that
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website at Jobs.FCCJ.edu.


Driver CDL-A req'd. .
Home Every Night &
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Avg. $888 $1018/wk
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Sunday calls welcome!
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877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com
HELP WANTED
Accepting resumes for: Personal
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603 or www.sucerfridge comr

FOR RENT
1, 2, and 3 Bedroom houses &
duplexes for rent or possible
lease to own. Near downtown
and EWC area. Clean with
CH&A. Call Bob at 343-1380

NOTICE
I, Herbert Priester
Accuse Dr. Frederick Mann, DDS
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Refrig Stoves, Washers,
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inets, including sink and coun-
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4179


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Want to purchase minerals and
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Send details to:
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Denver, CO 80201

TOP $$$ PAID
For JUNK CARS
CALL: S & T Towing Inc.
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AUTO FOR SALE
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BEAUTY SALON
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Snack and Soda machine
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Announcements

IsStress RulningYoturLife? ReadDIANETICS byRon L. HubbardCall
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ABSOLUTEAUCTION-Lakefrontsubdivisionon Watts BarLakeoff
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AUCTION DECEMBER 3RD 10:15 A.M. DOOLY COUNTY/
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Auction 134+/- Acres. Farmland- Divided. 3bdr,2ba home. development
potential. Thomas Co., GA. Nov25, 10 a.m. 10%B.P. Rowell Auctions.
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OCALACOM/RES. High visibility &desirable locations. 501 Spring
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Building Materials


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Equipment For Sale

SAWMILLS from only S2,795.(10 CnvertyourLOGS TOVALUABLE
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BUSINESS NE7WO7R~


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EARN DEGREE online front home. 'Medical, '*Business. 'Paralegal,
*Computers. Job Placement Assistance. Computer & Financial-aid if
qualify. (866)858-2121 www onlinctidewatertech coin

CREDIT REPAIR- 29 yearsexperience licensed and bonded. One price
- clean credit for life. Lee Harrison Credit Restoration. Call
(903)835-1667forfree information package. niw-Lla.lctter.co.r,
LH2171@aol.com.

FREE4-ROOMDIRECTVW/INSTALLATIONI FREE DVRI FREE
DVD PLAYER! 3 MONTI-S FREE HBOCINEMAXI ACCESS 2251-
Cl IANNELS. 100% DIGITAL CONDITIONS APPLY. CALL NOW
(866)500-4056.


Real Estate


NEW LOG CABIN-NC Mountains. New shell on secluded mountain
site,$89,900.I hardwood forest. Greatfall colors. Paved road.Near parks
& lakes. Acreage & financingavailable. (828)247-008 1.

North Carolina Gated LakefrontCommunity 1.5acresplus.90milesof
shoreline. Never before offered with 20% pre-development discounts,
90% financing. Call (800)709-5253.

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. ESCAPE THE HEAT IN THE
COOL BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUN' A INS OF WESTERN NC.
Homes, Cabins, Acreage & Investments. Cherokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate,Murphywww cherokeemnounlainealtv com Call for
Free Brochure (800)841-5868.

WESTERNNorth Carolina MountalnsCoolAir, Views,Streams, Ilomesi.
Cabins. Acreage FREE BROCHURE OF MOUNTAIN PROPERTY
(800)642-5333. RealtyOfMurphy 3171'eachtreeSt.Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www realtvofmurphyv cor


1967
1987
199 5
1994
1986
1983
1986
1992
1985
1995
1990
1981
1992
1993

2991

1987
3.984
3.986
1.987
3.989
1995
1987
1987
1990
1987
1973
1990
1987
1995
1995
1991
1994
1991
1990
'1999
1989
1993
1986
1987
1993
1992
1987
1979
1991
1989
198 8


CHOVROLET
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
CHEVROLET
CHEVROLET
CHEVROLET
CHEVROLET
CHEVROLET
CHEVROLET
PONTIAC

OLDSMOBILE
OLDSMOBILE
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BUICK
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CHEVROL ET
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GMC
PONTIAC
HONDA
CHEVROLET
LTNCOLN
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FORD
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FORD
CHEVROLET
CHEVROLET
MERCURY
PLYMOUTH
TOYOTA
DODGE
DODGE
HONDA
MAZDA
NISSAN
HYUNDAI
GMC
MERCEDES
SAAB
SAAB


Tennessee Waterfront Sale! 2.4 Acre Waterfront $9,900! Dockable
Building Lots from $14,900! Cabin Package $54,900. CallNow!
(866)770-5263Ext.8.

Unique 6,000 sq. ft. Lake Lanier home, privatle-2ac. 325 ft on lake,
exquisite gardens, waterfalls, boat dock, 50mi, NE of Atlanta. GA
$1,500.000: Doris,SavageRE.(770)861-8525.

NC MOUNTAIN 2.87 acres on mountain top. view, trees, waterfall &
large public lake nearby, paved private access. $19,500 owner
(. -.. ) *: _":. .._ ,

OWNA LAKEFRONTRETREATPrivatecommiunityonthe TN/KY
border. Just 1-l/2 hours toNashville. SpectacularviewsofLake Barkley.
Sto 6 acres from the $40s. New to Market. Call (866)339-4966.

Serene Mountain GolfHomesiteS69,900. Breathtakingviews. Upscale
golf community set amid. Dye designed 18 hole course int Carolina
Mountains. Near AshevilleNC.AsanctionedGolfDigest Schools teach-
ing facility! Excellent financing. Call, toll-free (866)334-3253 x. 993
www cherokeevallevsc corn.
[t I NkrN IFk fRI 51 \C, R F .F J.:.1 i *I..I..,.i ,.'., hI .
nity lake access and amenities. 1/2 + acres from $40K. Call
(866)292-5769,

$10,000I DISCOIUNT! GrtndOpening! Ocala area- The Preserve attOak
hllu I -l., l K i...... -. l' it ., l, l

OWN A PRIVATE MOUNTAIN RETREAT Spectacular gated
riverfront mountain community iiearAsheville,NC. 1-8 acre buildingsites
from the $60s. BordersNational Forest. Comminunity lodge& river walk.
Call (866)292-5762.

Coastal Solbeanst Georgia Large wooded water access, marsh view.
lakefront. and golforientedhonmesites from the tmid $70'sLive oaks. pool.
tennis.golf (877)266-7376. www.cooperspoint com,

MinlmiWaterfroutPre-coastruction 10% down,2yearhbuildout. GA
Coastal WaterftixntPre-constuiction istphaseasslgnable/GA Lots$6,900+,
RV otsS15k. Realtor/(877)468-5687.

NEWMEXICO -16acres$24.990 Scenic region.views, canyons,trees,
rollinghills, wildlife.Enjoy hunting, hiking.horses,greatclimate. Power.
great access. 100% financing.Call (914)232-5100.

SEASONCLOSE-OUTSALEINTHETENNESSEESMOKIESGaed
WaterfrontCommunity RiverfrontandMountain ViewsAvallable.Prices
StartingLow as $46,900. Final Phase Limited LotsCallNowl Askabout
our lot/ home pkg. Buy Direct from the Developer SAVE THOU-
SANDS$$$$(800)559-3095ext327swww.rivercrest corn

GEORGIA PROPERTIES FOR SALE PARCEl S RANGE FROM to
1000 ACRES AlL DEEPLY DISCOUNTED 1031 TAX EXCHANGE
WELCOME VISIT PEACH STATE AT www,farmandtimber corn or
Call (866)300-7653.

Investment lots $5,000 increaagini valueby tile month. onpaved roads
will all tieiliiesFSBO(954)523-8118.

Runyourad STATEWIDE!I! For only$450you can placeyonr25 word
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The following vehicle will be held for'
public auction on November 23, 2005 at
3:30 PM. The vehicles are stored at, and
will be auctioned at Superior Towing, 4S30
Lenox Avenue, Jacksonville Florida. No
titles are available, nor Is there a guar-
antee of the issuance of a title for vehicles
purciiased. These vehicles are $old "as is"
v;ith no 1iplied warranty or guarantee of
anv kind. Tarmis of sale are CASH ONLY".
All payments are due at t!ii of sale.


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..........................................................


AI. fr i C7


PAUL U-/ -1--


IMPACT
WCGL AM 1360
THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 1:00 p.m.


I_ __


FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, On V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!

INVITATION TO SUBMIT RESPONSES TO THE CITY OF COCO
The City of Cocoa ("the City") requests that interested parties respond to the solicita-
tion below by 4:00 p.m., December 16, 2005. Further information is available through
DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com [(800) 711-1712], or the City's web-
site at www.cocoafl.org. The Request for. Qualifications (RFQ) package may be
obtained from DemandStar by Onvia.
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS NUMBER Q-06-03COC ST. JOHNS
RIVER/TAYLOR CREEK RESERVOIR WATER SUPPLY PROJECT PRELIMINARY
DESIGN REPORT-ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT (PDR-EID)
The St. Johns River/Taylor Creek Reservoir Project ("the Project") requires a
Professional Engineer to prepare the St. Johns River/Taylor Creek Reservoir
(SJR/TCR) Water Supply Project Preliminary Design Report Environmental
Information Document (PRD-EID). In order to maximize potential water supply and
production from the St. Johns River and the Taylor Creek Reservoir, the PDR-EID will
identify new surface water supplies from multiple sources to multiple users at differ-
ent locations over long distances. Additionally, the design work of this project must
comply with federal guidelines in order to maintain eligibility for State and Tribal
Assistance Grants (STAG) funds. The report and EID will provide sufficient informa-
tion for the water utilities to prepare 'detailed construction design documents and
obtain the necessary permits.
A NON-MANDATORY Pre-submittal Conference is scheduled for November 17, 2005,
from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Claude H. Dyal Water Treatment Plant, 28400 SR-
520, Christmas, Florida 32709. The pre-submittal conference is intended to provide
respondents background information regarding the Project and the opportunity to
receive clarification of any requirement of this RFQ.
The authorized budget for the Project is $5,000,000. However, the City estimates that
the cost shall not exceed $4,000,000.
Pursuit of the Project is contingent upon execution of a funding agreement between
the St. Johns River Water Management District and the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency under the STAG Grant Program.
The Evaluation Committee will meet at 9:30 a.m., January 11, 2006, at the Orange
County Utilities Admihistration Bldg., Public Meeting Room, 1st Floor, 9150 Curry
Ford Road, Orlando, Florida 32825, to evaluate and rank the Qualifications
Submittals. The Evaluation Committee shall require that some or all respondents
make an oral presentation in advance of finalizing the rankings. Oral presentations
shall be made at the aforesaid location beginning at 1:00 p.m. on January 26, 2006
and on January 27, 2006; if needed. Respondents selected for oral presentations will
be notified in advance of the presentation date.
As a result of presentations, a final ranking will be determined and the City shall enter
into negotiations with the top ranked firm. It is the intent of the City to short-list at least
three firms. However, in the event only one submittal is received, the City may elect
to proceed with the procurement as a direct procurement through negotiations with
the offeror at the best terms and conditions available, or may reinitiate the solicitation.
Special accommodations for persons with disabilities may be requested through Hank
Rowan, Contracts Administrator, (321) 639-7542 or by calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD),
at least five (5) business days before the date needed.
INVITATION TO SUBMIT RESPONSES TO THE
ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MAN4(GEMt.NT DISTRICT
The Go.cning Boarai of the Diri t reqv.smr that interested parties respnd to the
solicitatica. below by 200 p.m. Tued.ay, D h mbser 6, 2005. Ftuther information is
available though DemandStar by Onvia at w'w9.dikan4 0.'0,1a [~0l 71 l-1721},orteI
sMrii's web.itre at www.sirvmd ernm. Bid paclk:e anY hbe obtained frCmnDemamtfar
b'y Onvin or Uh Djisnnct k callumn 1ll Willipams "3?'i 329-4133.

N.MoIalr Office P.ejalr
DistriNl cia iert. ?Ga, --, Ft.
Building repirdmovakasxa of Kcnpie j office To becomplised in two phmses toof
replacement: flnoow rimntceem. minor flhor pla nio&dfieons,; ralznasnt of HVAC
equipment: addinoa of building aalomanon syicm
The estinsated budgetforibis piris S445000.0M.
A1MANDATORYPRe.BidConference isdchduled for
1o:00 am., Wednesday, November 16,2005,
District Heladquagtrs, 4049 Reld Sreet,Piatka, Florida 32177
The pre-bid conference i intended to provide W4ddes tbs opportuidty to receive
'tiiarfiton of any requirement of this Jvitatn tFor Bid. The District wil oay accept
bids from those attending the pe-btd conference,
Staff's reconommendattion will be presented to the Govemning Boad at its January t0. 2006,

Special accommodations for disabilities may be requested through Ji Williams orby
callinS 386) 329-4450 (TD), at least five (5) business days sWore lte date needed.







The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits, Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE


WHY BUY SECONDHAND?
BUY NEW. SHIPPING IS FREE.






PAGE .. ..C-


REAL SAT


ALL ABOUT



IDS

fPED IAT RIC S


All About Kids is the premiere pedi-
atric facility in Jacksonville, Florida.
We are dedicated to providing chil-
dren with the highest quality of
health care. Our doctors are Board
Certified Pediatricians with years of
Pediatric Emergency Room experi-
ence. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of
families with busy lifestyles. Come
see why so many parents trust All
About Kids Pediatrics with their chil-
dren's health.


Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and
have pediatric ER experience.


904.565.1271

877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com


SERVICES
Asthma Therapy
Pain Relief
Hemoglobin/Hematocrit Testing
Mono Screening,
Rapid Strep Screening
Sport and School Participation
Physicals
Urinalysis
Well visits/Immunizations

EMR Technology
Our Electronic Medical Record System
enables us to be more efficient with
less paperwork and allows for:
Direct Pharmacy Link for fast and
convenient prescriptions
Check-in/Check-out process made
quick and efficient
Medical record history inquiries
and transfers that are concise and
easy with electronic database
management
Prompt subspecialty referrals

HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F; weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted


Betty Asque Davis

REALTOR








Watton Reain (rp RC A.T K-'


615 Highway AIA
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082


Office:
Direct:
Fax:
Toll Free:


904-285-6300
904-473-1502
904-285-5330
800-288-6330


Email: badavis@WatsonRealtyCorp.com


12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225
Located in the new Hidden Hills Executive Park (near the corner of Fort
Caroline and Monument Rd.)



T^AIRQDCASTINo, INC.


wwwfiesta925.com


CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS!'!!!



GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND

JAZZ, RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL
Oct 26 30, 2005


THANK YOU FOR LISTENINGf!!!!
**** WE APPRECIATE YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT****


9550 Regency Square Blvd. Suite #200 Jacksonville, F 32225 Off (904) 680-1050 Fax (904) 680-1051
,' www.tamabroadcasting.com


The "It's Only Another Beer"
Black arnd Tan
8 oz. pilsner lager
8 oz. stout lager
1 frosty mug
1 icy road
1 pick-up truck
1 10-hour day
1 tired worker
A few rounds with the guys
Mix ingredients.
Add 1 totalled vehicle.






Never underestimate 'just a few.'
Buzzed driving is drunk driving.









m O
Cl.Org U.S. Department of Transportation

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105.7 FM
"THE PEOPLE'S STATION"
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Lisa Chester
Marion Hunley
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FLORIDA STAR


NOVMEBER .12, 2005


73t A -fi 7 ,f n








2005


John Singleton Receives The 2005 Daimler

Chrysler "Behind The Lens," Award!


By Rych McCain
Writer, producer and
director John Singleton
was recently presented
with the 2005 Daimler
Chrysler "Behind The
Lens," Award! Singleton
joins previous winners of
this prestigious award
that include famed direc-
tors Gordon Parks
(Learning Tree and the
original Shaft); Melvin
Van Peebles (Sweet
Sweetback 's Baadasssss
Song) and Hollywood
casting veteran Reuben
Cannon.
The Behind The Lens
Award was established in


2002 by Daimler Chrysler
to recognize and celebrate
the achievements of
blacks who work behind
the scenes in the entertain-
ment industry. The affair
was held at the lavish
Beverly Hills Hotel and
was complete with the red
carpet arrival of many
celebrities and special
guests. The awards cere-
mony included a special
performance by Tyrese.
An advisory panel of pro-
fessionals working in the
entertainment industry
chooses recipients of the
award.


More photos on D-4

Wasu In SoyoS


By Rych McCain


"Girlfriends" star
Tracee Ellis Ross and
actor Anthony
Anderson will host the
third annual Vibe
Awards which will be
broadcast on UPN,
Tuesday, November 15.
Check your local list-
ings. Ciara, Ludacris,
Pharrell, Young Jeezy,
Keyshia Cole, David


Banner, Paul Wall and
Lil' Wayne are among
some of the industry's
hottest artists scheduled
to perform at this year's
ceremony. Also on UPN,
former NBA player Rick
Fox will guest star in
three episodes of
"LOVE, INC." which
will broadcast on
Thursday, Nov. 3; Nov.
10 and Nov. 17. Check
local listings. His charac-


ter (David Marley) will
play the love interest of
Love, Inc., owner and
relationship guru Clea
Lavoy played by Holly
Robinson Peete.
Look for rapper
Rashad Burrell PK.A.
"K.A.S.H." and his
brother Trumaine
Lamar a singer/musi-
cian, to drop a sizzling
Wassup continued on D-8


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TV Listings
Inside!




;:..1: .:. :.:.I,.::::'..I..: ;::i:.1 .,............. ._ ....


Paae D-2/November 12. 2005


The Florida Star


P -2e 12 2005


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Page D-3/November 12, 2005


The Florida Star


I









Photos From The Red Carpet: African-Americans Love New R&B
Behind The Lens Award Hurricane Song By Allen Watty


0)





am -

FIR IEME


Allen Watty's new song
about Hurricane Katrina has
been circulating on the Internet
for weeks now. The song, which
combines a soulful R&B style
with a pop feel, creatively refer-
ences the Hurricane Katrina
disaster with a unique approach.
The lyrics are very compelling,
as they paint an extremely col-
orful picture of what it was like
to be stranded on a rooftop. The
words are so powerful, that
many are asking whether or not
Watty (the singer) was an actual
victim in New Orleans.
One listener from Brooklyn
said, "This song brought tears
to my eyes; I've listened to it 10
times already."
Another listener from San
Francisco said, "Now this is
music. Why aren't there more


songs out like this songs about
the struggle?"
Yet, another listener from
New Orleans said, "Why isn't
this song on the radio? This
song is a hit."
The song, however, has been
played on several smaller urban
radio stations across the coun-
try-and has been featured on
"The Tony Brown Show." In
addition, the song has been
highlighted by several major
news organizations.
"We're happy with the
results so far," says Dante Lee
of Diversity City Media, who is
helping to promote the song.
Web surfers can listen to the
song for free at
www.HurricaneSong.com


0(0


Cn


NIEdN

Ji

-- -~ M 1*


ALL ABOUT


DS


PEDIATRICS


All About Kids is the premiere pediatric facility in
Jacksonville, Florida. We are dedicated to provid-
ing children with the highest quality of health
care. Our doctors are Board Certified
Pediatricians with years of Pediatric Emergency
Room experience. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of families with
busy lifestyles. Come see why so many parents
trust All About Kids Pediatrics with their children's
health.
Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and have pediatric
ER experience.
904.565.1271
877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com


SERVICES
* Asthma Therapy
* Pain Relief
* Hemoglobin/Hematocrit
Testing
* Mono Screening
* Rapid Strep Screening
* Sport and School
Participation Physicals
* Urinalysis
* Well visits/Immunizations
HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F;
weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted


12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225


1


L.

(1)


Page D-4/November 12, 2005


The Florida Star'










Page Kennedy Gets Evicted From Wisteria Lane


Page Kennedy, who
played the mysterious
Caleb (or the Guy in
Betty's Basement), was
kicked off of "Desperate
Housewives," ABC con-
firmed Tuesday.
Kennedy was termi-
nated Friday for "improp-
er conduct" according to
the show's spokesperson
Janet Daily.
According to anony-
mous sources on the


show's production team,
Kennedy was terminated
for some unspecified mis-
conduct that involved no
other cast members. He
has not been criminally
charged.
The 28 year-old actor
described the role in an
interview with the
Associated Press as repre-
senting the chance of
"making a name for
myself."


S,


Actor Page Kennedy


TV IN BAC


HIGHLIGHTS
WEEK OF 11/12/05:

TV ONE
(Jacksonville Comcast
Channel 160)

* Weekdays, 7 a.m. & 4
p.m. "B. Smith with
Style"
* .Weekdays, 9 a.m. &
9:30 a.m. "Amen" fea-
turing TV legend
Sherman Hemsley and
Clifton Davis.
* Weekdays, noon,
"Showtime at the
Apollo"
* Weekdays, 1 p.m.-
Daily movie
* Weekdays, 7 p.m.
"Good Times"
* Weekdays, 7:30 p.m. -
"Martin"
* "Living It Up With
Patti LaBelle" 8:30
p.m.
* Saturday- 11/12, 3 p.m.
- Movie Cappuccino
(1998) with Angelle
Brooks, James Black.
Story by Eric Jerome
Dickey.
* Saturday 11/12, 10
p.m. Black Mama,
White Mama (1972) -
Movie with Pam Grier,
Margaret Markov.
* Sunday 11/13, 3:00pm
- Brewster's Millions
(1985) Movie starring


Richard Pryor, John
Candy, Lonette McKee.
*Sunday 11/13, 8:00pm -
Posse (1993) Movie
with Mario Van Peebles,
Blair Underwood,
Stephen Baldwin, Tone
Loc, Big Daddy Kane,
Salli Richardson, Tiny
Lister, Isaac Hayes
*Monday, 11/14, 1:00pm
- The Expendables
(2000) Movie with
Robin Givens, Tempestt
Bledsoe, Idalis Deleon

BET
* Daily, 6:00 a.m. -
BET's Morning
Inspiration with Brother
Gerard BET showcases
top ministers in the
African-American com-
munity, along with BET
personality, Gerard
Henry who provides
updates on gospel and
religious events.
* Weekdays, 11 a.m., 6
p.m. "106 & Park" -
Hang out with the indus-
try's hottest talents and
count down the day's top
videos voted on by you.
* Weekdays, 4:00 p.m. -
"Rap City" Watch the
latest and hottest rap
videos.
* Weekdays, 5:00 p.m. -
"Road Show" BET hits
the road to various cities


and college campuses
across the country for a
high-energy "Battle of
the Sexes" between 20
young men and women
as they try to outdo one
another for bragging
rights and prizes! Join
new host Danella and
"Rap City" veteran host
Mad Linx as they spot-
light the best in this
week's spirited competi-
tions.
*Weekdays, 11 p.m. "In
Living Color" reruns of
the award-winning
sketch comedy series.
*Fridays, 10 p.m. -
"ComicView" BET's
favorite primetime come-
dy is back for a brand
new 14th season, bring-
ing more jokes than ever
from the city of New
Orleans. The "Big
Easy's" rich gumbo of
culture and music sets
the spicy backdrop as
new host Sheryl
Underwood cranks up
the laughs with the help
from a mix of up-and-
coming comics and show
veterans.
* Tuesday, 9 p.m.,
Saturday, 8 p.m. So do
you really want to work
in the music biz? Do you
know what it takes to get
there? Savvy music


Sitcom Pilot
"With Friends Like These"
to air on The Black Family Channel
Saturday, November 12, 2005
@ 9:00 pm

T.Y. Entertainment is proud to
announce the Black Family Channel to
air the pilot for Trina's "With Friends
Like These" sitcom, where the
Diamond Princess character Cleo
inherits a beauty salon from her
deceased aunt. Cleo quickly learns all
is not glamorous, the beauty salon
requires a lot of work and in addition to
inheriting a salon she's also inherited
her aunt's arch rival.

The Black Family Channel is viewed in 14 million house-
holds; in all of the top 25 African American TV Markets.


mogul and mega-entre-
preneur Damon Dash
will gladly teach the les-
sons with an edgy atti-
tude that accepts no fail-
ure easily. Watch the
excitement, fierce com-
petition and tense,
moments as a set of 16,
young and eager entre-
preneurs vie to be part of
Dash's multi-million dol-
lar empire and earn the
title of the "Ultimate
Hustler." Don't miss a
single episode to see who
survives Dash's mogul
"boot camp" and who
gets sent packing.
* Saturday, 11/12, 12:30
p.m. "BET.com" -
Watch the videos you
voted for on BET.com.
* Saturday, 11/12, 2:00
p.m. "Top 25
Countdown" Your


favorite celebrities count
down their favorite 25
videos.
* Saturday, 11/12, 7:30
p.m. Movie Special: Get
Rich Or Die Trying Go
behind the scenes of the
new movie.
* Sunday, 11/13, 12:00
p.m., "Cousin Jeff
Chronicles" Cousin Jeff
focuses on the decline in
education, the decay of
the family structure and
the increase in violenog
and incarceration due to
the lack of mentorship
and guidance. Jeff will
take a look at the differ-
ences between the Civil
Rights and the Hip Hop
generations by interview-
ing members of each
while trying to provide a
TV in Black continued on D-7


Page D-5/November 12, 2005


The Florida Star






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Whassup continued from D-1
debut single with Young
Jeezy soon on' the
In die tmen t/E n a on
Records label. And yes
the Burrell brothers are
the cousins of rap'dance
maestro Hamminer.
ISC4P announced that
it is sponsoring a nation-
al -conference dedicated
to songwriting and com-
posing called "I CRE-
ATE MUSIC." It is the,
first and only national
conference dedicated to
songwriting and compos-
ing that is designed to
bring together music cre-
ators with top name


music industry pros who
want to work together to
achieve greater success.
The Expo will take place
April 20-22, 2006 at The
Hollywood Renaissance
Hotel in Hollywood,
California. Some of the
featured pro songwriters
include Jimmy Jam ("No,
More Drama," "That's
The Way Love Goes"),
Hal David ("Close To
You," "What The World
Need Now Is Love. Sweet
Love") and Glen Ballard
("Man In The Mirror")
among other famous
names.
Singer Robin Thicke


am* U


had. a jammin' listening
party at the headquarters
of Universal/Interscope
Records to introduce his
.new single featuring
Pharrell titled "Wanna
Love You Girl." The
grand master of record
promotion, Interscope's
o\wn Kevin Black, hosted
this packed, jumpin'
affair which featured the
best soul food on earth
catered by Desiree E.
Edwards of the Watts
Coffee House.
Z A TH U R.A ;
Columbia Pictures; stas
Josh Hutcherson, Jonah
Bobo, Dax Shepard


Kristen Stewart, Tim
Robbins and is directed
by ,Jon Favreau. This
film is delightfully dif-
ferent from the other so-
called space adventure
flicks. It is about two
brothers who are always
squabbling with each
other. The oldest Walter
(Hutcherson) is better at
everything and is a bully
to his six year old little
brother Danny (Bobo).
Their older sister Lisa
(Stewart) is left in charge
to baby sit when their
dad goes to work.
Bobo is a really cute,
adorable child that the


audience will most likely
adore while his older co-
-star Hutcherson may
draw a few sneers and
jeers. Both boys deliver
solid believable perform-
ances as does Stewart
who perfectly plays the
snob, "I'm-miss-cute-
with-attitude," big sis.
Shepard is also an audi-
ence pleaser with the
way he displayed his
protective and comical
nature. This is the best
adventure movie for
children so far this year.
Maat-Hotep!
Rych


Page D-8/November 12, 2065


The Florida Star


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