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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section A: Main continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
November 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00043

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
November 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00043

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
Full Text
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Ali
WA-MA-TF g-" In-N -


Or- I PNL.Ivr- JWkI Aul
Celebrities Mingle
At Gala
Anniversary Bash
(see Page


/-%Z&IfUM.i I-;-I

^^Real People!


'ITHIE;


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


OhfFLORIDAs


thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
1:00 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


Jacksonville Man Sought For Georgia Murder


Victim Shot In Front

Of 4- Year-old Son;

Sister of NFL Player

VALDOSTA, Ga. Detective Wanda Edwards said
Thursday morning, "We are still looking for' Julonda
Clayton. We have received a lot
of calls from around the country
S' saying he has been seen but
none of them have panned out."
The hope is that Julonda
Lecedrick Clayton, 28, will
show up in his hometown,
Jacksonville' so that he can be
arrested as a suspect in the mur-
der of Deidre Miller, 29.
Ms. Miller was found shot in
Julonda L. her car Tuesday morning, two
Clayton houses from her home in
Suspect Lowndes County, Georgia.

Supreme Court Ruled Against
Execution Of Murderers Under 18
The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that it is against the con-
stitution to execute murderers who were 18 or under
when they committed their crime. Prior to this ruling, 19
states in the U. S. were able to give the death sentence to
16 and 17-year olds. This ruling turns over the death
sentence of 72 inmates on death row for murder. Florida
passed legislation in 2004 that limited the use of the,
death penalty for those who committed crimes when they
were children.
Court continued on A-7

U.S. Postage Rates To Increase
A two-cent boost in the price of a postage stamp was
approved Tuesday by the independent Postal Rate
Commission. The recommendation must go to the
Postal Service's Board of Governors for final action.
Postage rates last increased in June 2002.
This new rate is expected to go into effect in January.
The increase is needed so the post office can make a $3.1
billon escrow payment required by Congress. A bill that
would eliminate that payment and make other changes in
postal operations was approved by the House but has not
yet passed the Senate.The rate changes are: First-class

Rates continued on A-7


NEWS IN BRIEF
MUHAMMAD ALI
LOSING FIGHT
WITH DISEASE

In a Diversity Inc.
report, the Athlete of the
Century, Muhammad
Ali, is showing signs
that he s losing his fight
with Parkinson's dis-
ease, according to his
daughter, Layla.
She said he is living a
secluded life, taking
many medications, has
good days and bad days
but his speech is so
slurred, he can barely be
understood.
He appears to have
things he wants to say


Mutammad Ali


but can't get them out.

BLACK TALK RADIO
NETWORK PLANNED

Radio One, the nation's


cDeidre is the sister of
Randall Godfrey, a Lowndes
High School graduate and
linebacker for the San Diego
Chargers.
SIt is thought that the sus-
pect, who is the former
boyfriend of the victim, shot
her prior to chasing her.
The chase ended when her,
car ran into a cluster of trees
Deidre Miller in a neighbor's back yard.
Victim Investigators said it appears
the vehicle traveled about 200-plus-yards before crash-
ing. Her mother lives behind the neighbor's house.
Detective Edwards said Clayton dropped off Miller's
4-year-old son at his daycare center after the incident.
The child had blood on his clothing, according to reports,
and told daycare workers that Clayton had shot his moth-


er.
Clayton is not
the biological
father of Miller's
son even though
it is understood
that the couple
had dated off and
on for about nine
years.
The city is
very shaken
about this inci-
dent, according to
friends and fami-
ly.
They have but


Murder continued on A-7


Why The Noose At A Jacksonville School?


New Black Panther Party members (shown here in a file photo) are questioning the
motives of students at First Coast High School who said they meant no harm when
they hung a nose from a tree at the school and told a black student to put his head
through the noose.
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. High School said they hung a noose from a tree at
- Students at First Coast meant no harm when they the school and told the


black student to put his
head through the noose.
The 17-year-old student,
along with three others,
was suspended for ten
days but the New Black
Panthers Party feel the
punishment given is not
enough. The organization
feels such a demonstration
falls into the category of a
"hate crime" and should be
punished accordingly.
According to Mikhail
Muhammad, recognized as

School continued on A-7


Patricia .ohinson and State Senator. Anthlon. C.
"Tony" Hill, Sr. were married Saturday, October 29, 2005
at the Cypress Club and Ballroom in Jacksonville,
Florida.
The Matron of Honor was Cynthia Scipio, sister of the
bride. The Best Man was Anthony C. Hill, Jr., son of the
groom. Following a trip the couple will reside in
Jacksonville, Florida.
Wedding continued on A-7


V


seventh-largest radio
company and Reach
Media, which owns the
Tom Joyner Morning
Show, plans to launch an
African-American-cen-
tered talk-radio network
with the cornerstone show
being hosted by the Rev.
Al Sharpton.
Alfred Liggins III,
CEO of Radio One,
founded with majority
ownership by his mother,
Kathy Hughes, said that
even though the network
is not yet named, if all
goes as planned, broad-
casting will begin after
the first of the year.
Both Radio One and
Reach Media are majority


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black owned.

Houston Astros First
World Series Team
Without A Single
Black Player

Some feels that per-
haps if Houston had had
a black player, they
might have won the
World Series this year.
The team, which lost to
the Chicago White Sox,
is the first World Series
team in more than 50
years to be without a
single black player.
Two blacks played for
the team earlier in the
season but are no longer
Brief continued on A-7


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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDAj
PO BOx 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


Editorial .... .... A-2
Lifestyle .... ...... ... A-4
Church ............ ... A-3
State .. ... ...... A -5
N national ...... ......... A -6
Prep Rap ..... ... .... -B-1
Local ..... ..... ....... C -1
Jail O r Bail .............. C -3
Sports, .... ...... ...... c _5
BusinessNet)t*Drk ... C-7
TV, -D-2


Randall Godfrey
Victim's Brother


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PA LMCi A I RDAVSTA TOVFAIF .20-U


LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER


DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
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SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
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WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
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The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
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Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
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Publishers Association
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To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
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On the Web:
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5AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION



National Newspaper
Publishers Association


First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame









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To Be Equal
Rosa Parks: Humanity at Its Best


Marc H. Morial, President/CEO, National Urban League


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN EDITOR
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


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It may be difficult for
many people under 50 today
to fully grasp the courage
Rosa Parks displayed 50
years ago while sitting on a
Montgomery, Alabama pub-
lic bus. After all, one might
think, all she did was say no.
In fact, Rosa Parks, who
died October 24 at age 92 in
her adopted hometown of
Detroit, did far more. For, as
she well understood and her
tormenters immediately real-
ized, her refusal to give up
her seat in the middle of a bus
to a white male rider and
move to the "colored section"
at the back was an unaccept-
able transgression of the
South's established, pervasive
order of racial segregation-if
you're black, get back: one
that could be punished by any
force, including murder.
Remember, earlier that
same year of 1955 a fourteen-
year-old black Chicagoan,
Emmett Louis Till, visiting
relatives in a small
Mississippi town, had been
brutally kidnapped, tortured,
and murdered for having
wolf-whistled at a white
woman-and his killers had
brazenly been acquitted by an
all-white jury. So, when Rosa
Parks said no, and the city
police were called to arrest
her, she had, literally, put her
life at risk.
But she had done some-


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


thing else, too. She had lit the
match-the resulting 381- day
Montgomery Bus Boycott-to
the nonviolent mass-action
movement for racial justice
that was to transform
America.
In the 1940s Americans-
had gone abroad to fight 'a
war to make the world safe
for democracy. Rosa Parks'
act-her "individual expres-
sion of a timeless longing for
human dignity and freedom,"
in Martin Luther King Jr.'s
words-signaled that now the
war for democracy would be
waged at home in the most
dramatic way possible. It is,
of course, an exaggeration to
say that Rosa Parks alone, or
even largely, "made" the
Civil Rights Movement of
the 1950s and 1960s.
She was not the "mother"
of the Movement. As she her-
self constantly pointed out,
many, many blacks (and
some whites) in Montgomery
and elsewhere throughout the
country had been working
diligently for years awaiting
the "right moment."
Some, like Thurgood
Marshall and the "Brain
Trust" of the NAACP Legal
Defense Fund, worked in the
legal sphere, challenging the
network of laws supporting
segregation. Others, includ-
ing activists in Montgomery,
had been preparing to chal-


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lenge the public superstruc-
ture of racism on public
transportation, in parks,
beaches, swimming pools,
and at the polls.
Rosa Parks was part of
that network of civil rights
activists in Montgomery.
Indeed, she and her husband,
Raymond, had been involved
in civil rights work since the
1930s, and she herself was
secretary of the Montgomery
chapter of the NAACP.
So, in that sense, she was
as good a "representative" of
the will of African Americans
to grasp their full American
citizenship as can be found in
the twentieth century or arny
other.
Nonetheless, as she told
the story in later years, she
had not been looking that day,
December 1, 1955, to jump-
start the Movement in
Montgomery all by herself.
She simply wanted to get
home from her job as a seam-
stress at a department store to
prepare for a full evening of
civic work.
But when the bus driver
demanded her seat, Rosa
Parks made her stand. As she
explained in her 1992 autobi-
ography, My Story. "I was not
tired physically, or no more
tired than I usually was at the
end of a working day. I was
not old, although some peo-
ple have an image of me
being old then. I was forty-
two. No, the only tired I was,
was tired of giving in."
Parks was bailed out the
very night of her arrest-while
the leadership of the local


NAACP and the black
Women's Political Council
were leafleting the black
community with calls for a
bus boycott, and prevailing
upon a young minister, newly
arrived in town, named
Martin Luther King, Jr. to
take the presidency of the
new effort. A year later, the
U.S. Supreme Court invali-
dated Alabama's racist public
transit statutes.
The struggle took a bitter
economic toll on the Parks'
and the ever-present threat of
violence forced them to move
from the South. America
itself is indebted to U.S.
Representative John
Conyers, Democrat of
Michigan, for his steadfast
support of the Parks (Mr.
Parks died in 1977) for the
lasi four decades.
According to Rosa Parks'
obituary in the New York
Times, she would recount
with amusement that in later
years children often wanted
to "know if I was alive during
slavery times. They would
equate me along with Harriet
Tubman and Sojourner Truth
and ask if I knew them."
Chronologically speak-
ing, the children were wrong,
of course. But I'd say that in
connecting Rosa Parks to
those two legendary freedom
fighters of an earlier time, the
children got an important
facet of their American histo-
ry exactly right.


mu
LMU


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e.g


FLORIDA STAR


NOVEMBER 5. 20)05


PAGfE A-2







FLORIDA STAR


Faith In Our Community
N -Schedule of Events and Services-

- ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION-First New Missionary
Baptist Church, 4835 Soutel Dr., invites the public to share
in their Aniiversay Celebration. The congregation is cele-
brating the Church's 84th Anniversary and the 20th
Anniversary of Pastor James B. Sampson. The Anniversary
Worship Services will begin on Sunday, November 6 at 4:00
p.m. and each Sunday thereafter, culminating on Sunday,
November 27.
SECOND MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH CELE-
BRATES-Second Missionary Baptist Church, 954 Kings
Rd., is celebrating the 155th Anniversary of the Church and
the 19th Anniversary of Pastor Odell Smith, Jr. "The Church
Celebrating, Honoring, and Praising God" is the theme.
Services begin nightly at 7:30 p.m. Services on Sunday,
November 13 will be held at 11:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.mi. Rev.
Price Wilson of Chipley, Fla. is the speaker for the Sunday
morning service. For transportation, call the church at (904)
354-8268.
PASTOR AND CHURCH ANNIVERSARY CONTIN-
UES-New generation Christian Fellowship, 1424 Franklin
St., is observing it's 6th Pastor and Church Anniversary
November 2-6. Services are held nightly at 7:00 p.m. Pastor
Leofric. Thomas, Sr. of Open Arms Christian Fellowship
was the speaker on November 2. Bishop Vaughn
McLaughlin of The Potter's House Christian Fellowship was
the speaker on November 3. The speaker -on Friday,
November. 4 is Pastor Bruce Allen of The Church
Fellowship. Pastor Sirdelrol and Lady. Elveta Drayton's
Appreciation Banquet will be held on Saturday, November
5,6.:0Q p.m. at The Potter's House Multiplex Annex Building,
located at 5732 Normandy Blvd. Pastor Hosea Beverly of
Love All People Ministry is the speaker on Sunday,
November 6 at 11:00 a.m. For more information call
Minister Berdette Pierce at 765-4625 or Sis. Sabrina
Lampkin at 778-8660.
GOSPEL EXPLOSION-Rose Production and Bishop
Lorenzo Hall present a Gospel Explosion Program benefit
for Hurrican Katrina Victims on Sunday, November 20 at
Israel United Baptist Church (Rev. Eugene White, Pastor).
Doors open at 4:00 p.m. The program begins at 5:00 p.m.
Bill Pinkney of the original Drifters and The Gospel Drifters
of Sumter, S.C. are the special guests. The program will also
feature Jesse and The Miracles, The Singing Trumpets, Pure
Gold, and Bishop Lorenzo Hall. The program is free. The
church is located at 6901 N. Main St.
CELEBRATION-New Hope Missionary Baptist Church,
217 North McCargo St., is celebrating the church's 115th
Anniversary and the 13th Anniversary of Pastor Freddie
Jackson, Jr, on Fridays November 11 and November 18 at
7:30 p.m. and on Sundays November 13 and November 20



Evangel

Temfp)le
MP

.. o. ,, h ly ,f, C';,,d In .
Sunday Services
November 6th
S:1 i-.m. & I10:-45 a.rm.
C o.pr 1 l .-'- .[n srn'iiU..-: .ht" P| i'-_" e nTH
STor -il j wni4 hiir \\'L i -,h[I fl
I-I .'. LIT. ..,- /.. t "... .j," tfes f D .-,r
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SundZay Cf6 6 p.m.
"-He ,-o ,d the Caes of Splendor"
.1 Lic:- t-'n n,i'it ; I i/ii
National Singles Day"
Sunda3. Nov. 6t i
-HoI.v Ground (._uartet
.. FR.E 1.ULNCIT

57.55. -Rniona lAh1d.
.lackIoriRilot. I.L.32205

90-4-781-959393


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At some time in our lives,
most of us will make or assist in
making funeral arrangements
for a family member or friend.
This information is intended to
answer many of the questions
you may have about arranging a
funeral.
The funeral is an important
ritual. As difficult 'as it may' be
to face, most of us accept death
as an inevitable part of life.
Today, a dignified funeral
ceremony and opportunity to
say "good-bye" to the deceased
remain an important part of life.
Although the exact nature
of funeral rites and ceremonies
can differ greatly 'from one cul-
t,


ture or religion to another, in
many ways they have remained
the same throughout history.
Across the ages funeral
have:
Brought together a commu-
nity of mourners.
Created an opportunity for
participants to offer each other
emotional support and talk
about the life and death of their
loved one.
Provided a sense of clo-
sure.

"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.*
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman.com


14'


at 3:30 p.m. Sis. Marjorie Dubose, Chairperson.
CHURCH AND PASTOR'S 20TH ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION-The public is invited to attend the Church
and Pastor's 20th Anniversary at Mt. Charity Missionary
Baptist Church on Sunday, November 13 at 11:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m.. Pastor George Harvey, Jr. has -diligently labored,
through Christ's empowerment, at Mt. Charity during the
past 20 years. The church is located at 1417 North Laura St.
in the heart of Jacksonville. The public is invited to join the
congregation as it worships Christ for His blessings upon the
Pastor and Church during the past 20 years, including vari-
ous outreaches and consistent preaching and teaching min-
istries. Dr. R. J. Cameron is the guest speaker for both serv-
ices: he is pastor of Mt. Carmel Orthodox Presbyterian
Church in Somerset, New Jersey. In addition to serving as
Pastor of Mt. Carmel, Dr. Cameron is also a professor at the
New York School of the Bible.
COMMUNITY FEASTING AND FELLOWSHIP-The
Brotherhood Ministry of Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist
Church will host Thanksgiving Day at "The Mount" onr
Thursday, November 24, 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. The commu-
nity is invited to enjoy a "no strings attached" day of feast-
ing and fellowship. A free delicious meal with all of the
trimmings will be served. The church is located at 2036
Silver St.. R. L. Gundy, Pastor.
THE YEAR AFTER JUBILEE-A NEW BEGINNING-
The Northside Church of Christ located at 4736 Avenue B
will celebrate two events November 5-13--it's 51st
Anniversary and its 28th Annual Homecoming. "A New
Beginning" is the theme. The celebration begins on
Saturday, November 5, 12:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m., with a free fish
fry at the church. Activities have been planned for small
children, teenagers, and adults including a mega slide, fun
house, jumping games, and honey drippers. The week-long
Revival will be held November 6-10, at 7:00 p.m. Samuel
Pounds of Rockford, IL, and Orpheus Heyward of Atlanta,
GA are the speakers. An invigorating Songfest will be held
on Saturday night November 12 at the Prime Osborne
Convention, Center beginning at 6:00 p.m. November 13 is
Homecoming Day. activities include an Annual
Breakfast/Program 7:00 a.m.-8:30 a.m.; Worship Services at
8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.; the Annual Homecoming Dinner
12:45 p.m.-2;30 p.m.; Annual Homecoming Program 2:45
p.m.-4:30 p.m.; and Group Singing 4:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. For
more information, call the Northside Church of Christ at
(904) 765-9830. Bro. Charlie McClendon, Minister.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR PRISON FELLOW-
SHIP MINISTRY-Ministers, Missionaries, and Lay
Members are needed to give spiritual visiation to prisoners
(Matthew 25:36. Churches are needed to sponsor Angel
Trees to give the children of prisoners toys and. clothes at
Christmas time. Teachers are also needed to tutor children
of prisoners in math; and reading. Businessmen are needed
to pro\ ide training and jobs to released prisoners (Matthew
9:37). Contact Sam Roberts at P. O0. Box 37676, Fax (904)
765-9214,email newsherrie20000@yahoo.com or call (904)
994-1044. Monthly meetings are held on the fourth
Thursday of each month 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at Watch The-
Lamb Ministries located at 2519 Soutel Dr. at 11th Avenue.
For directions call 713-9100. '
PARENT EMPOWERMENT CONFERENCE-Parents
are invited to a Parent Empowerment Conference on
Saturday, November 12 12:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. at New Bethel
AME Church, 1231 Tyler St. The conference is presented by
New Bethel AME CHurch, Rev. William H. Lamar, IV,
Pastor, and The Project Reach Foundation, Inc.. Parents can
select two workshops. The workshop choices are Public
Library, Family Empowerment, Diversity and Justice,
Fathers Make A Difference, Dynamic Mothering (How To be
An Effective Mother 'In The 21st Century), and Financial
Peace. For more information call (904) 353-1822.
RIBAULT AND RAINES COMMUNITY WORSHIP
SERVICE-The Ribault High School Class of 1983 invites
the public to attend a Worship and Praise Service at the
Ribault and Raines Community Worship Service on Sunday,
November 6, 'at 8:00 a.m. in the Ribault Senior High
Auditorium. The Guest speaker will be Kenneth Middleton,
Pastor of One Lord, One Faith Christian Assembly. Also
featured will be the Ribault Senior High Choir. This event is
being sponsored to bring the Ribault and Raines community
together to praise God for his blessings and to give both-
schools an opportunity to fellowship and strengthen commu-
nity relations. The community, students, parents, friends and
all graduating classes of both schools are invited. For mTore
information call Letitia Flanders @ 764-9924 or Edwin
Davis @ 924-7620.

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to:
info@thefloridastar.com


I.. 79
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The Church Directory

"Come and Worship With Us"


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again' (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
-Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 VV. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00. a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m..
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


IA,
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CHRISTIAN FAMILY


4" WORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy-Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richaridson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
S' Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
S. Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service.................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities



Ask us about Our


If There had been a death
in 'our faiili yesterday.
wiiil wouldd you be doing
toda.l'..


Pre-Need



FORE-

THOUGHT


funeral


planning

I-F. program
FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED

ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
Directors


Deborah West


Jacqueline Y. Bartley -

Thanks For Reading
And Supporting The Florida Star!
1 4


PAGE A-3


L \


Alphonso West





PADE '~4 A-4VflVArF (


"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"


Healthy Walking For Hunger With The
Jacksonville Chapter Links, Inc.
Last weekend was great for those early risers
and healthy lifestylers who joined The Jacksonville
Chapter of Links, Inc. for a morning of fun and fitness.
Participants not only had a great two-mile walk, there
was also great music and they received the latest health,
beauty and fitness tips during the two miles-eight laps
event inside the Gateway Mall. This is always a popu-
I lar event that everyone looks forward to each year.
"The Walk for Health and Hunger is an annual
health awareness event of The Jacksonville Chapter of
The Links Inc. This event is a National endeavor with a
two- fold purpose: To encourage healthy activities in
our communities and to support local soup kitchens,"
states chapter. president, Mrs. Gloria Dean.
Sergeant Ivan Scott a U.S. Army Recruiter got
everyone off to a healthy b1cginnin x% ith a warm up
exercise. And even though the participants were most-
ly women and children, Sergeant Ivan challenged the
group as only Exercise Guru Donna Richardson-
Joyner could!
Did you know that a two-mile walk equals eight
laps around the Gateway Mall? So now you know you
can combine healthy walking with the shopping that all
ladies love to do. And as walkers completed each lap,
they received a string of green or white beads distrib-
uted by members of The Links. The beads helped keep
track of the laps as well as being great motivation to
continue walking.
There was water and fruit for the participants.
Staff from Shands of North Florida conducted Health
Screenings joined by Infinite Beauty Options, Golds
Gym, Get Paid to Travel, Northeast Florida
Community Hospice, Regal Cinema and Nova
University. The Jacksonville Chapter, Links, Inc. is a
membership organization whose purpose is to promote
and engage in educational, civic and intercultural activ-
ities in order to enrich the Jacksonville community.
The local chapter provides support to the Sickle
Cell Anemia Foundation, Dignity U Wear, Ritz
Chamber Players, Paxon Middle School, the Coalition
on Organ Donation and many other community organ-
izations. Their fund raising events support these com-
munity initiatives.
Calendar Notes
Ernest J. Gaines, author of A Lesson Before
Dying, will be at Books-A-Million (Regency) Nov. 9 at
7:00 p.m. He'll be talking about his new book Mozart
and Leadbelly.
Ebenezer United Methodist Church located
at 9114 Norfolk Boulevard is celebrating its 141st
Homecoming Celebration on November 13, 2005
atll:00 A.M. Homecoming Chairpersons are: Ms.
Pennie Funchess and Warren W. Schell III. Speaker
for the anniversary celebration is Dr. Trudie Kibbe
Reed, President of Bethune Cookman College.
The Mayor's Commission on the Status of
Women is seeking nominations of women who made
indelible impressions on the Jacksonville community
through their positive efforts. The commission will
select four women who have made contributions of
lasting value to honor during Women's History Month
in March.
The 20th annual breakfast is scheduled for
Wednesday, March 8, 2006, in the UNF University
Center off Kernan Boulevard. The theme of the event is
"The Faces of Women: Celebrating 20 Years of
Strength, Courage, Spirit and Diversity."
Nominations must be faxed by 5 p.m. or post-
marked no later than November 17. For more informa-
tion, please contact Ms. Vanessa Dari Boyer, poster
committee chair, at (904) 355-0000, Ext. 116, or Ms.
Lorrie DeFrank, mayor's liaison to the commission, at
(904) 630-1650.

Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming
events. Contact us at 904 766-8834; E-mail
socially@TheFloridaStar.com or you may reach me
directly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777
or fax (904) 285-7008.
See you in the paper!


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CLICK HERE FOR SEASON TICKETS (
Season Opens November 19.2005


awi// ( ///// / / + -,'<<.,/*
Ushering m ihe Now Season
November 39. ; .
to Romcmbornco of !ho Droom
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Sounds of Spring!
Summer Finoao
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B-CC Trustee Makes Major


Investment In College


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From left to right are Dr. Herbert Thompson, Dr. Michelle Thompson, Dr. Reed, The
Masseys, Dr. Oswald Bronson, Sr., Dr. Mary Alice Smith, Jacquline Mongal, Dr. Hiram
Powell


Crist Urges Legislature To Stand

Firm On Dealth Penalty


TALLAHASSEE -
Attorney General Charlie
Crist today wrote to House
Speaker Allan Bense and
Senate President Tom Lee
expressing his disagreement
with the Florida Supreme
Court's recent suggestion
that the Legislature change
current law governing the
imposition of the death
penalty in Florida.
The Attorney General
stated that the suggested
changes would weaken the
death penalty in Florida.
The Court recommended
that Florida law be amended
to require a unanimous vote
from juries before capital
punishment could be recom-
mended to a judge.
In his letter, Crist high-
lighted the fact that Florida
juries do not impose the
death penalty, but instead
make recommendations to
the trial judge. Several other
states allow juries to make a
final determination, but
Florida reserves that impor-
tant role for the trial judge,
who takes the jury's recom-
mendations into considera-
tion.
Florida law requires that
the jury and judge hear and
consider all factors that
might make a convicted
murderer a candidate for life
in prison instead of receiv-
ing the death penalty," Crist
wrote. "Therefore, the jury's
recommendation is an
informed action represent-
ing the collective wisdom of
12 everyday Florida citi-
zens."
Had the requirement for
a unanimous vote to recom-
mend been in place earlier,
serial killers such as Ted
Bundy, Aileen Wuornos and


other murderers would rot'
have met the fate they
deserved for their actions. ,


Juries recommended
death for both Bundy and
Wuornos by 10-2 votes.


UF Scientists Seek To Close

Cell Doors To HIV Invasion

GAINESVILLE, Fla.-- University of Florida researchers
have identified a biochemical code that a form of HIV uses
to access immune system cells and turn them into virus-mak-
ing factories.
New targets for HIV treatment might be found by decod-
ing the genetic makeup of this virulent version of the virus,
which can pick a biochemical lock and break into cells called
macrophages, UF scientists report this month in the Journal
of Virology. Researchers had set out to identify genetic bio-
markers of HIV-1, which emerges in the later stages of the
disease.
"Most times When people think about HIV, they think
about it infecting the T cells, the lymphocytes," said
Maureen Goodenow, the study's senior author and the
Stephany W. Holloway University Chair in AIDS Research
at the UF College of Medicine. "When HIV enters the
macrophage, it doesn't kill the cell, it uses it to create more
virus. If we can stop that, we can stop the virus. Not kill it
directly, but stop it'from getting what it needs to complete its
life cycle, a cell."
Guity Ghaffari, the study's lead author and an assistant
professor in pediatrics at UF's College of Medicine, said
specific forms of HIV-1 develop in late-stage AIDS.
"With the biomarker, we can predict the virus's emer-
gence over time," Ghaffari said. "A long-term goal is to use
this genetic information to design a vaccine that doctors can
use in combination with antiretroviral medications."
All strains of HIV-1 can invade T cells, the body's infec-
tion-fighting cells also known as lymphocytes. But they vary
in their ability to enter macrophages, the- long-living white
blood cells often considered the scavengers of the immune
system. The HIV-1 viruses that can infect both types of
immune cells share a genetic lineage that allows them to
chemically access macrophages through a series of ordered
interactions at the virus's outer coating, called its envelope,
the researchers noted.
To identify how HIV-1 can enter macrophages, UF
researchers took RNA and DNA samples from a group of 50
HIV-1 infected children 'and, through a series of steps,
sequenced the DNA and analyzed the genetic makeup.
They found that a region on the surface of the virus, gly-
coprotein 120, dictates how viruses get into macrophages. To
enter, the virus requires the presence of a molecule called
CD4 and certain co-receptors, or "locks," CCR5 or CXCR4,
on the macrophages' outer cell wall.
iWs, 4Lm"p'.i 74"IR VE'fiW ws-n _1.vv 1~,".' i^ --,*- i".i... nii ('K .n-ffSB f


DAYTONA BEACH,
FLA When Bethune-
Cookmain College Trustee
Mary Alice Massey sat on
the committee searching for
a new president for historic
Bethune-Cookman College
two years ago, she was
immediately impressed with
the vision articulated by
candidate Dr. Trudie Kibbe
Reed. Her strategy to
enhance academic excel-
lence struck a cord of com-
patibility with her own phi-
losophy.
Reed was selected by the
committee in August 2004
to become the fifth president
of the college located in
Daytona Beach, Fla.
"I liked what Dr. Reed
had to say about academic
excellence and the direction
she wanted the college to
go," says Massey, a resident
of Jacksonville, Fla. and a
member of the B-CC
Trustee Board since 1996.
As a member of the
trustee committee on educa-
tional policies, Massey has
become well acquainted
with the College's continual
progress toward raising the


bar on academic standards.
"It was through my dis-
cussions with our Vice
President for Academic
Affairs and Provost, Dr. Ann
Taylor Green that I -first
became interested in the col-
lege's quest for academic
excellence," says Massey,
who served on that commit-
tee for eight continuous
years.
Together with her hus-
band Massey has established
the Robert B. and Mary
Alice. Massey "Excellence
in Teaching Endowment."
Their gift of $50,000 will be
used to enhance academic
excellence through incen-
tives for the faculty. The
couple own Massey
Properties, Inc., incorporat-
ed in July, 1985 as a wholly-
owned subsidiary of Massey
Motors, Inc., which has been
doing business in
Jacksonville since 1938.
Both companies are family-
owned and operated.
"We believe in Bethune-
Cookman College and the
leadership of President Reed
and Dr. Taylor Green. As
life-long members of the


Florida Conference of The
United Methodist Church,
we have come to appreciate
the college for its mission
and emphasis on a strong
liberal arts education
grounded in Christian val-
ues," said Robert Massey.
Bethune-Cookman .College
became affiliated with the
UMC in 1923.
Founded by the leg-
endary Mary McLeod
Bethune, B-CC enrolls
3,000 students and employs
141 faculty, 57 percent hold
the doctorate degree.
"The Massey's gift will
assist us in offering more
competitive salaries and
incentives for our faculty,"
says President Reed. "Well-
credentialed and experi-
enced professors and
instructors greatly enhance
the educational experiences
for the students. On behalf
of our entire college com-
munity, I am grateful to Bob
and Mary Alice Massey for
their endorsement of our
vision for the future, and for
becoming a part of our
founder's legacy of faith,
scholarship and service."


TO SUBCRIBE TO

OR ADVERTISE IN

THE FLORIDA STAR

CALL (904) 766-8834


PAGE A-5


FLORIDA STAR


NOVEMBER 5.20055


Pl







J-i u F'STRNOEMBE 5, -SNB"--- -


Thousands Honor Civil Rights Icon Rosa Parks


During Homegoing Celebration In Detroit


410 IP Pm


DETROIT-Thousands in
the audience held hands and
sang "We Shall Overcome"
as family members filed past
the casket before it was
closed just before noon at
the funeral of civil rights
pioneer Rosa Parks on


Wednesday, Novemb
Bishop Charles E
of Greater Grace Ten
the service for 4,000
packed in to say goo
the diminutive figui
sparked a civil rights
tion by refusing 50 ye


to give up her seat on a bus
in Montgomery, Ala.
"Mother Parks, take your
rest. You have certainly
earned it," Ellis said.
Former President
Clinton, his wife, Sen.
Hillary. Clinton, and others
paid their respects at Parks'
open casket before the start
of the funeral service that
$rs included the prayer in song
by mezzo-soprano Brenda'
Jackson.
Mourners waited in long
_ lines on the chilly morning
to honor Parks. Hours before
the funeral began, the line to
er 2. get one of the 2,000 avail-
illis III able public seats at the
iple led church extended more than
people two blocks in Parks' adopted
dbye to hometown.
re who Clinton once presented
revolu- Parks with the Presidential
-ars ago Medal of Freedom.


Prior to the start of the
service, black-suited ushers
in white gloves escorted
people to their seats.
More than 20 people
were scheduled to give
remarks. The Rev. Jesse
Jackson, who has called
Parks "the mother of a new
America," was also to speak.
Aretha Franklin was prepar-
ing to sing, and Philip R.
Cousin, a senior bishop of
the AME Church, had pre-
pared a eulogy.
As a white hearse carried
Parks' body from the
Charles H. Wright Museum
of African American
History, where viewing last-
ed until the pre-dawn hours,
dozens of people holding
pictures of Parks crowded
around it. As it began mov-


ing, they shouted, "We love
you."
Parks was 92 when she
died Oct. 24 in Detroit.
Nearly 50 years earlier, she
was a 42-year-old tailor's
assistant at a department
store in Montgomery, Ala.,
when she was arrested and
fined $10 plus $4 in court
costs for refusing to give up
her seat to a white man-on a
Montgomery city bus. Her
action on Dec. 1, 1955, trig-
gered a 381-day boycott of
the bus system led by the
Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
The U.S. Supreme
Court ruled in December
1956 that segregated seats
on city buses were unconsti-
tutional, giving momentum
to the battle against laws that
separated the races in public


accommodations and busi-
nesses throughout the South.
But Parks and her hus-
band Raymond were
exposed to harassment and
death threats in
Montgomery, where they
also lost their jobs. They
moved to Detroit with Rosa
Parks' mother, Leona
McCauley, in 1957.
Parks was initially going
to be buried in a family plot
in Detroit's Woodlawn
Cemetery, next to her hus-
band and mother.
But Swanson Funeral
Home officials confirmed
Tuesday that Parks would be
entombed in a mausoleum at
the cemetery and the bodies
of her husband and mother
also would be moved'
there.


Workers Speak Out In Recent Manpower Survey


October, more than two
thirds indicated that rising
gasoline prices are affecting
their ability to get to work.
The most common ways
that employees are adjusting
in response to soaring fuel
costs include:


African Americans Starting to Catch Up In Online Usage
NEW YORK, NY -- The gap in Internet usage between
African Americans and whites still exists, but a report published
today by eMarketer shows that the gap is narrowing, and will
continue to narrow over the next decade. eMarketer's new report,
African Americans Online: Crossing the Digital Divide, finds that
usage among the African American population is now 48.7%,
which is still short of the 68.8% level among whites. However, as
the number of African Americans online increases and growth
among whites plateaus, that difference will decrease.
"The African American online market is gaining some
momeritum as more users come online and as blue-chip advertis-
ers reach out to this growing audience," says the author of the
report, Debra Aho Williamson, senior analyst at eMarketer.
African Americans now make up 10.5% of all US Internet users.
"Put another way, there are nearly as many African Americans
online as there are teens online in the US," says Ms. Williamson.
"African Americans are a strong potential market for broadband
services and for education, career-oriented and informational
content. They will also be among the early adopters of the mobile
Internet." Of course, critical barriers do remain. Chief among
them is that many African American households still do not have
a computer.

MGM MIRAGE Named Among 'Top 25 Companies
For African-Americans' by Black Professionals Magazine
LAS VEGAS -- MGM MIRAGE has been recognized as one
of the "Top 25 Companies for African-Americans," according to
the Fall Issue of Black Professionals Magazine. The list salutes
major corporations for. their workforce and supplier diversity ini-
tiatives, in addition to overall commitment to hiring diverse can-
didates. .MGM MIRAGE was cited for being the- first company
in the gaming industry to establish a voluntary diversity initiative
in 2000. In addition, the company's establishment of a board-
level diversity committee,, as well as a diversity council com-
posed.of top executives was also mentioned as best practices for
effectively championing diversity within the organization.
Also, the magazine named Debra Nelson, MGM MIRAGE
Vice President of Corporate Diversity & Community Affairs, to
its 2005 "Top 100 Blacks in Corporate America" list. According
to Black Professional Magazine, the list highlights the contribu-
tions of those who are "leading by example."

23 Killed in Rioting in Ethiopian Capital
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia Riot police deployed across the
Ethiopian capital firing guns and. lobbing grenades Wednesday to
quell a second day of protests over disputed parliamentary elec-
tions. At least 23 people were killed and 150 wounded, including
children, doctors and hospital workers said.
One man said police broke into his family's housing com-
pound firing, guns indiscriminately in their search for stone-
throwing demonstrators.
However, government Information Minister Berhan Hailu
said the casualty figures had been exaggerated and put the death
toll at 11 civilians and o.ne police officer. He said 54 officers and
28 civilians were injured.
The killing of civilians was a political setback for Prime
Minister Meles Zenawi, touted by the Bush administration as a
progressive African leader and a key partner in the war on terror.
The May 15 vote, which gave his ruling Ethiopian Peoples
Revolutionary Democratic Front control of 60 percent of the par-
liament, had been seen as a key test of Meles' commitment to
reform. Opposition parties say the vote and ballot-counting were
marred by fraud, intimidation and violence, and accuse the ruling
party of rigging the elections.


*Searching for a job
closer to home 35%
*Other 12% (i.e. driving
more fuel efficient motorcy-
cle, shortened driving route)
*Increasing use of public
transportation 6%
*Purchased a more fuel
efficient vehicle 5%
*Carpboling 5%
*Have changed jobs for a
shorter commute 4.5%
*Working from home or
an alternate location 3.5%
*No Change 29%
"It seems we have finally
crossed -a price threshold,
and consumers are ready to
make lifestyle changes. in
reaction to high gas prices,"
said Melanie Holmes, senior
vice president for
Manpower Inc.
"This is a red flag. to
employers. The survey
results show that 4.5 percent
of people have already
changed jobs and another 35
percent are thinking about it
in order to reduce expenses
associated with commuting.
Clearly, the price at the
pump is the newest threat to
employee retention."
There are steps employ-
ers can take to avoid
turnover attributed to the ris-
ing cost of commuting.
*Provide employees with
information about public
transportation options,
including bus and train
routes, park and ride options
and pricing details
*Add onsite services,
such as dry cleaning and
banking
*Offer telecommuting
*Establish a corporate
carpool program
*Provide accommoda-
tions to support people who
use other forms of trans-
portation, such as bike
racks, lockers and showers
4Implement parking dis-
counts to help balance the
increased cost of fuel
*Raise mileage reim-
bursement to the new rate
announced by the Internal
Revenue Service in
September 48.5 cents per
mile (for use of personal
vehicles for business travel)
"Companies are facing
hardships related to the
spike in gas prices, but they
need to be sensitive to the
fact that employees are
experiencing a similar budg-
et crunch," said Holmes.


S .- m .. .
Tens of thousands of people, including top politicians, filed by the casket of civil
rights icon Rosa Parks in the US Capitol, as she was hailed for her role in the battle
for racial equality.


MILWAUKEE--The
pinch at the pump is taking
its toll on the American
worker, according to. a
recent survey by Manpower.
Among the 1,300 partici-
pants in an online survey
conducted in September and


NOVEMBER 5, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


PAGfE A6








NOVEMBER1Z 3, SUU-J


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cents, household magazines up to 28.9 cents, small non. profit publications up to 28.3 cents
and presorted advertising mail, 2 ounces, up to 21.4 cents.


Anthony C. Hill, Jr. (son of the groom). (Photo by the office staff of Senator Hill)

Murder continued fom Al

one prayer, "Please help us find the man who murdered Deidre."
Detectives said that Clayton is about 5-feet-10 with a medium build. He a\as dri\ ing a
dark blue Chevrolet Avalanche with Florida license plate number X25BTA lihen he fled the
scene. He is considered armed and very dangerous, according to authorities. AnN one spot-
ting him should call the Lowndes County Sheriffs Office at (229) 245-5270. All calls are
confidential.

School continued from Al

as a general with the Panther Party, the organization has been formed for some time with a
goal of mobilizing the black community, and letting others know that they will no longer tol-
erate intimidation of our women, our men, our people.

Court continued from A-1

Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing for the majority, cited three major differences between
adult and juvenile offenders:
1. Juveniles have "a lack of maturity and an underdeveloped sense of responsibility"
resulting in "impetuous and ill-considered actions and decisions." a
2. Juveniles are "more vulnerable or susceptible to negative influences and outside
pressures, including peer pressure."
3. The character of juvenile "is not as well formed as that of an adult."

Briefs continued from A-]

with them. The number of black American baseball players is rapidly declining.


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PAGE A-7


FIRnIDA STA R


I CLINIC8









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The "I TOOK THE PLEDGE"
Community Day Celebration included
youth, teachers, and parents represent-
ing Christian, private, public, and char-
ter schools tn Duval county. The
program brought together adult leaders
to lead Jacksonville youth in a pledge
to remain drug and violence free
throughout their school years. To date,
7500 pledge cards have been signed
and turned into MAD DADS!


PROJ E C T**
4h4 SAFE A FLORIDA= STAR
EDUCATION SERVICES *
S. MEN AGAINST DESTRUCTION
001 I NIN O AGAIN' DRUGS AND ) CA oRr


SPECIAL THANKS TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS AND SPECIAL GUESTS!


PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS:


Hyde Grove Elementary School
S. P. Livingston Elernentary School
S.O.S. Middcile School
Lake Shore Middle
Cedar Creek Elementary
Potters House Christian Fellowship
Cedar Hills Elementary School
'A


Paxon Senior -IS
Potter's House Middcle School
Crystal Springs Elementary School
maniel Memorial School
Marine Institute School
Gateway Con-rr unity Services
Imract House


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NOVEMBER 5,2005


FLOIRIDA STAR


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