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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section C: Local
 Section C continued
 Section C: Around the Area
 Section C: Sports
 Section C continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
October 15, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00040

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
October 15, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00040

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section C: Local
        page C 1
    Section C continued
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Around the Area
        page C 4
    Section C: Sports
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text




a In LEAI A A -a Ms3 RT M om, N1Yvil, I


Bow Wow Rol


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


209 PerlSt


THE


eFLORIDA


thefloridastar.com


Three Black Females One Severely Beaten, One Burned, One


Murdered This Week-Month Of Domestic Violence Awareness


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
The United States
Violence Policy Center
issued their annual report
about two weeks ago
showing that in 2003,
black women were mur-
dered at a rate three times
higher than white women:
2.95 per 100,000 versus
0.98 per 100,000.


On Monday, Janese
James, 43, of Arlington,
was found beaten and
unconscious in her home,
in critical condition.
James' friends became
concern because she did
not attend church Sunday,
did not report for work
Monday and had last spo-
ken -to family members on


Friday. Her husband of
three months, Dwayne
James, 35, had not been
seen and a search was
instituted for him while
his wife remained in criti-
cal condition at Shands
Jacksonville.
It was not until late
Wednesday that Dwayne
Females continued on A-7


Murder-Suicide Leave Four

Children Under 12 Without Parents


Michael &
Felecia Jenkins

CLAY COUNTY, Fla. -
Clay County Sheriffs
office reported that


deputies, detectives, nego-
tiators and SWAT mem-
bers responded to a 10:30
a.m. call to a home owned
by Michael Jenkins, 33
and Felecia Jenkins, 31,
advising that a man was
threatening to harm his
wife and himself.
According to reports,
nearly a dozen residents
from hereby homes were
evacuated and the street
was closed to traffic while
efforts were made to nego-
tiate.


It is not known
had occurred in the
but fortunately,


what
home
the


All Head Start Children

Moved From Toxic Site
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. For months, there were peo-
ple marching with signs saying "Danger, Danger, Danger
- Warning.... Your Child's Health is at Risk." Well this
week, all of the 750 children attending Head Start at that
site, were officially moved from the Forest Park Center
and finally, the protest is over.
Dr. Richard Danford was able to get them all out of
the center ahead of schedule.
The EPA has vowed to clean the site, which was once
the location of an incinerator that spewed toxic ash for
years. They have not indicated when the clean up will
begin for the area but for the children and their families,
such a move is a welcome relief.


NEWS IN BRIEF
Screenplay By Tupac
To Become A Feature
Film

"Live 2 Tell," a
script written by Tupac
Shakur in 1995 about
an inner-city black
youth who becomes a
drug kingpin and later
goes straight, was
acquired by Insomnia
Media Group who
plans to begin produc-
tion of the film in
March. Tupac's moth-
er will be a producer





JalO3a. C3


on the film. A cast has
not been chosen at this
time.

Gingerbread House
Extravaganza
Unveiling

To benefit the
Ronald McDonald
House of Jacksonville,
HabiJax and Rotary
Club of South
Jacksonville Charities
unveiled the first
Gingerbread House.
The Gingerbread
Village showcases


51,069 )5151


Jenkins' four children,
ages 4, 10, 11, and 12,
were not at home at the
time of the incident.
. Michael did not have a
criminal record in Clay
County.
Family members said
the couple was experienc-
ing difficulties that each
was trying to deal with.
Domestic violence was
not one of the difficulties
and no prior calls to the
home had been made.
However, records show
that at approximately 1:30
p.m. Michael was on the
phone with his attorney
discussing the couple's
marital problems and
pending divorce.
Without warning, the
police report show;
Jenkins shot his wife, shot
a stray round into a wall of
the home and then shot
himself. An unsuccessful
attempt was made by the
SWAT paramedic to save
the couple. An investiga-
tion is being made to
determine what led to this
tragic event.
Family members said
that Pastor Jenkins is not
Murder continued on A-7


more than 50 homes
built by local builders,
professionals, archi-
tects, restaurants, com-
panies, schools and
individuals. The tasty
village will be on dis-
play from November
25 December 20 and
will be open to the
public.


Thousands
in Breast


Enrolled
Cancer


Study

Thousands of
women have joined the


Bullet Bob Hayes To Be Inducted Into

The U. S. Olympic Hall of Fame


Bob Hayes
JACKSONVILLE. Fla.
-- There has only been one


man in the world to win an
Olympic gold medal and a
Super Bowl ring and that
man was a Jacksonville
native and Matthew
Gilbert High School grad-
uate "Bullet" Bob Hayes,
also known as the "World's
Fastest Human" after he
won two gold medals at
the 1964 Olympics.
Hayes died in 2002 and
in 2005 he will be induct-
ed into the U. S. Olympic
Hall of Fame.
He had an outstanding


track and field record and
afterwards, played for
eleven years with the
Dallas Cowboys where
they won the Super Bowl
in 1971.
Even though
Jacksonville residents
annually push for Hayes to
be placed in the NFL Hall
of Fame, and he has been
nominated, he has not yet
been selected.
But the city is proud -
Hayes will be in the
Olympic Hall of Fame.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
- Shelton Chappell was ten
months old when his moth-
er was murdered and died
from a bullet fired by at
least one man because he
and three other white men
set out to kill a black per-
son during the period of
racial strife in ]America.
Because of the desire of
these four men, Chappell
and his nine brothers, and
sisters were left without a
mother. Shelton said he
was placed into ten foster
homes while growing up.
Senator Tony Hill said he


Sister Study, the first
study of its kind to
explore how the envi-
ronment and genes
affect the chances of
getting breast cancer.
The Sister Study
launched nationally


during
Breast


last year's
Cancer


Awareness Month
(October 2004) will
continue enrollment
through 2007. Women
in the U.S., ages 35-
74, may be eligible to
join if their sisters had
Brief continued on A-7


Looin for0cstomrs t patoniz you


buins or utlieyor0evies f o
anwee YStenyu ee oIlaeana


will not stop in his effort
to help the family of
Johnnie Mae Chappell
who just happened to be
walking down New Kings
Road, searching for her
wallet when the four men
drove by after expressing
their desire.
Of the four men, all are
still living and only one
was tried and convicted
for the murder. He served
three years for manslaugh-
ter and was therefore made


to testify a few weeks ago
since he cannot be tried
again. All of the men
admitted to the shooting.
Now, a local law firm
(Spohrer, Wilner, Maxwell
and Mathews) has agreed
to represent the Chappell
family in their pursuit to
have these men tried and
convicted.
This very reputable
firm said they are commit-

Punishment continued, A-7


Two Political Activists Dead
The first black woman to serve as Pennsylvania's sec-
retary of state and longtime civil
rights activist, C. DeLores Tucker,
died Wednesday. She worked with
Dr. Martin Luther King and is the .
founder of the National Political
Congress of Black Women, now .
known as the National Caucus of *
Black Women. Her recent efforts C. Delores
have been campaigns against violent Tucker
and misogynistic lyrics in rap and hip-hop music. She
accused the music companies of celebrating rape, torture
and murder, and in 1995, read lyrics from one of Time
Warner artists that depicted drug use and violence
against women.
Vivian Malone Jones, one of two black students
whose effort to enroll at the University of Alabama led to
George Wallace's infamous "stand in the schoolhouse
door" in 1963, died of a stroke on October 13 at an
Atlanta hospital. Jones was the first black to graduate
from the school.
Political Activists continued on A-7


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA LNIU OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESUILLE FL 32611.7007


.-' '




Dwayne A. James
Suspect of Beaten


Steven Montgomery Roger Hargrave
Suspect of Murdered Suspect of Burned


Punishment May Be Forthcoming

For 1964 Racial Slaying





I


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
1:00 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360



















SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
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TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
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with subscription amount to:
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Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
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Publishers Association
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To reach The Florida Star


via electronic mail:
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On the Web:
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MAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


To Be Equal
Racial Profiling: For the People Who Don't
Look Like Us
Marc H. Morial, President/CEO, National Urban League


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN EDITOR
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


Many of us, still reeling
physically and psychologi-
cally from the back-to-back
battering of our Gulf coast by
hurricanes Katrina and Rita,
and the controversies the
governmental responses have
provoked, may momentarily
find it difficult to recall the
man-made tragedy that had
consumed our attention for
much of the summer.
It was the terrorist bomb-
ings that struck London in
July.
In some ways, that
moment now seems far away.
But that feeling is an illusion
we should not allow our-
selves to hold too long. The
London terror bombing will
not be the last in the West; a
future tragedy looms.
That craven attack proved
once again that it is not only
nature humankind must fear.
Predictably, it also brought
renewed calls from some
quarters for authorities to use
racial profiling in the war
against global terrorism.
In this instance, propo-
nents of racial profiling
asserted that because the
London terror bombers were
people of color, authorities
are justified in being suspi-
cious of all people of color
and singling individual peo-
ple of color out for greater
scrutiny simply because
those individuals are people


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


of color.
Writ large, this is the
essence of the argument for
racial profiling, whether it be
for the war against terror, or
the racial profiling some
claim American law enforce-
ment is justified in using to
ferret out criminals in the
U.S: race and/or ethnicity
should be used as markers of
suspicious individuals, and
those individuals should be
considered guilty until
proven innocent.
But no matter how glib
the words and how tortured
the logic, the fundamental
characteristic of racial profil-
ing remains: its proponents
always advocate its use
against people who don't
look like them.
That was so for the racial
profiling that marked the
early stages of the barbaric
Nazi campaign against
German Jews in 1930s
Germany. That was the crux
of the racist "logic" that led
to the imprisoning of
Japanese immigrants and
Japanese Americans in con-
centration camps in the U.S.
during World War II. That is
so for those who declare that
African Americans' and
Hispanic Americans' dispro-
portionate involvement in
street crime justifies the
police racial profiling of indi-
viduals of both groups.


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Jacksonville
Bennett's Ace Hardware
8080 W. Beaver St.
904-693-0929


Jacksonville
Ronnie's
Repair Shop
5091 Sunbeam Rd.
904-636-0739


Neptune Beach
Tucker Equipment
113 11th Street
904-246-1330


Jacksonville
Nichol's Equipment
10237 Beach Blvd.
904-641-2923


Orange Park
Orange Park
Power House
611 Blanding Blvd.
904-272-2272


sthAs cm our* f;br a0 T HV


PAGE A-2


I don't recall anyone
advocating the racial profil-
ing of white men from the
American heartland in the
wake of the shocking 1995
bombing of the federal build-
ing in Oklahoma City, a
crime for which Timothy
McVeigh and Terry Nichols
were convicted-even
though talk then was thick of
"white militias" infesting
rural America.
Nor do I recall calls for
the racial profiling of certain
kinds of white men during
the years the anti-abortion
bomber Eric Robert Rudolph
was the object of a massive
federal manhunt.
For me, however, the
most conclusive proof of
racial profiling's racism
came in the wake of the
September 11, 2001 terrorist
attack-and, ironically, it
came from African
Americans.
In late September 2001
two national polls found that
African Americans were
more likely than other
Americans to favor the racial
profiling of Arab Americans
and Arab nationals-findings
which at first clearly dis-
mayed leading African-
American politicians, schol-
ars and activists.
But, as Hugh B. Price, my
predecessor as president and
chief executive of the
National Urban League,
wrote at the time, black
Americans' immediate
response perhaps shouldn't
have been all that surprising.
He cited the points made


by Professor Alvin Poussaint,
of Harvard Medical School,
that the poll numbers showed
how profoundly angered
African Americans, whose
deep-rooted patriotism is
only rarely acknowledged,
were by the attacks; and may
also have reflected black
Americans' historical,
unshakable commitment to
reforming America through
nonviolent social and politi-
cal means.
But Hugh Price also
wrote that blacks' stance in
the polls was "more evidence
of the perniciousness of
racial profiling itself... These
polls' show that whenever
people speak in favor of
racial profiling, they always
favor its use against some
other group, not theirs.
"That said," Price contin-
ued, "for any African
Americans, or anyone else,
to think that a policy of racial
profiling of those who 'look'
Arabic would be confined to
those who are of Arabic
descent, is ludicrous. [There
is plenty of] tragic evidence
that many Americans, includ-
ing some who are African-
American, have trouble
telling people of color apart.'
What Hugh Price wrote
then remains true today. As
we must take the strongest
measures possible to guard
against terrorism, we must
also remain vigilant that we
adhere to the standards of
civil rights and civil liber-
ties-and human decency-
that makes our society worth
saving.


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PAGE A-3


OCTOBER 15, 2005


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-


CHURCH AND PASTOR'
Matthew Baptist Church,
located at 3731 Moncrief Rd.,
will 'celebrate the 104th
Anniversary of the Church
and 42 Years of dedicated
service of the Pastor, Rev.
George A. Price, on Sunday,
October 16, at 3731 Moncrief
Rd. The guest speaker for the
11:00 a.m. service is Dr.
Ronald Rowe, Director of*
Missionas of the Jacksonville
Baptist Association. At 3:00
p.m., the church will fellow-
ship with their sister churches.


'S ANNIVERSARY-St.





-. --.
(. "



^


Rev. George A. Price

The choir will render their


Annual Musical at 6:30 p.m. The community is invited to
share in the observance of another milestone of the church
and pastor.
FALL HARVEST FAIR-First New Zion Missionary
Baptist Church, 4835 Soutel Dr., invites the public to the
"Fall Harvest Fair on Saturday, 'October 15 from 10:00 a.m.
until 3:00 p.m. The. community health fair will feature
organizations and vendors.There will be free food, free flu
shots, fun activities for kids, uplifting music and preaching.
The Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, Pastor.
FREE HEALTH FAIR-The HOPE Ministry of New Bethel
A.M.E. Church, 1231 Tyler St., will host a Free Health Fair
on Saturday, October 15, 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Free screen-
ings for Prostrate Cancer, Blood Pressure, STD, Vision,
Dental and Cholesterol will be provided. Vendors will be on
hand to distribute important information. Free food and fun
will be provided. Rev. William Lamar, IV, Pastor.
PASTOR JAMES B. SAMPSON'S 20TH ANNIVER-
SARY-First New Zion Missionary Baptist Church will cele-
brate on Saturday, October 29, at 6:00 p.m. at the Prime
Osborn III Convention Center, during an appreciation gala
honoring the Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson for 20 years of
anointed and dedicated pastoral leadership at the church.
Pastor Sampson is the spiritual father to many sons who have


-Ask us about Our


If There had been a death
in your family yeslerda .
what would.rou be doing_
todar.' "


Pre-Need



SFORE-

THOUGHT


Funeral

planning


S-l jF program
FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED


ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
Directors


Deborah West


Alphonso West


Jacqueline Y. Bartley


~i&~ a22~ LID


I1A.S. OAULt iOL-MAIV
DIRECTOR
THE OBITUARY NOTICE


An obituary notice has two
functions: 1. To notify friends, fam-
ily and colleagues of the death. 2. To
give specific details concerning the
funeral service.
Some alternative functions
could be: 1. Memorial donations
information: "In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to ...." 2. To
list surviving members of the family
and pay' tribute to those predeceased
(so friends/family can identify the
deceased). 3. To announce special
thanks to care workers, hospital staff,
clergy, etc. Obituaries can be written
at the time of death or before.
Many people find it helpful to
write their own obituary notice in
advance for the following reasons:
1. The surviving family mem-
bers might not rennember, or struggle
to find, specific dates (birth, employ-


ment, retirement, previous deaths).
2. They might not know proper
spellings of people's names, places,
companies or organizations.
3. They might not know all of
the deceased's memberships to vol-
unteer organizations and community
clubs.
4. It could specify a favorite
charity for donations that the surviv-
ing family wouldn't have thought of
Some people find that they can save
money by placing a shorter obituary
notice into their local newspaper
and making use of the longer ver-
sion as part of the eulogy said by the
clergy, family member or friend.

"Our Aim is Not to Equal, But Excel"
S MjOmoncrlefRd."
*Tel: 768-0507
wwwABColeman.com


-2


accepted the role of minister, including his own biological
son, Rev. James J. Sampson. He is a visionary and builder.

Nearly 10 years ago, he led the First new Zion Family from
Davis Street to its present location at 4835 Soutel Dr. Rev.
Sampson was very instrumental in obtaining the HOPE
Plazaq and adjacent properties, which provide opportunities
for many businesses, organizations and empowerment
opportunities for people in the community. He continues to
serve as President of the Baptist Ministers Alliance of Duval
and adjacent counties, serves on many boards, and holds var-
ious positions of leadership in the community, state, and
nation. For ticket information, please call the church office
at (904) 765-3111.
UNIVERSITY CHOIR CONCERT-The Florida
Memorial University Choir of Miami, Fla. will perform on
Sunday, October 16, at 3:00 p.m. at Mount Sinai Missionary
Baptist Church, 2036 Silver St. The public is invited to sup-
port the call for Higher Education at Florida Memorial
University.
REVIVAL-Rev. James Graham of James Graham Mortuary,
Inc. will be the guest Evangelist for a revival to be held
October 19-21 at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church.
Services will be held nightly at 7:30 p.m. The public is invit-
ed to attend. The church is located at 271 W. King St. Rev.
Randy Hezekiah, Jr., Pastor.
CONCERT-A free concert featuring the Concert Chorale of
Bethune-Cookman College, and presented by the Mary
McLeod Bethune Circle #1 (Mrs. Annie Mae McBride,
President), will held at Simpson Memorial United Methodist
Church on October 16, at 4:00 p.m. The public is invited to
attend. The church is located at 1114 Cleveland St. Rev.
Moses H. Johnson, Pastor.
CHURCH ANNIVERSARY- Faust Temple Church of
God, 2238 Moncrief Rd., will celebrate its 64th Church
Anniversary. Services will be held on Thursday, October 20,
at 7:30 p.m., Friday, October 21 (Musical) at 7:30 p.m.,
Saturday, October 22 at 6:00 p.m. and will conclude on
Sunday, October 23, at 4:30 p.m. The pubic is invited to
attend. Sis. Sharon Hunter, Committee Chairperson. Bishop
Rushie L. Dixon, Pastor.
QUARTERLY DISTRICT ASSEMBLY-The Jacksonville
District Church of God By Faith will meet for the Quarterly
District Assembly on Thursday, October 27 and Friday,
October 28, at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, October 30 at 6:00
p.m. at New Dimensions Church Of God By Faith, 3142 W.
Edgewood Ave. Sam Roberts, District reporter. Elder
Charles McGriff, Host Pastor. Dr. Harry J. Johnson, District
Elder.,
RIBAULT AND RAINES COMMUNITY WORSHIP
SERVICE-The Ribault High School Class of 1983 invites
the public to attend a Worship and Praise Service at the
Ribault and Raines Community Worship Service on Sunday,
November 6, at 8:00 a.m. in the Ribault Senior High
Auditorium. The Guest speaker will be Kenneth Middleton,
Pastor of One Lord, One Faith Christian Assembly. Also
featured will be the Ribault Senior High Choir. This event is
being sponsored to bring the Ribault and Raines community
together to praise God,for his blessings and to give both
schools anr opportunity to fellowship and strengthen commu-
nity relations. The community, students, parents, friends and
all graduating classes of both. schools are invited. For more
information call Letitia Flanders @ 764-9924 or Edwin
Davis @ 924-7620.

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to:


The First

New Zion

Missionary

Baptist

Church Family
Rev Dr.
James B. Sampson

Cordially Invite You To An


Evening


Of Elegance

Celebrating 20 Years
Of Annointed And Dedicated
Pastoral Leadership
Of Their Pastor
Rev, Dr. James B. Sampson


Saturday, October 29, 2005
6:00 p.m.
Prime F. Osborn III
Convention Center


The Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Toy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


'.4
~~-I i~i.;o


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


WORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
S- Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
S (Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
SFellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service.................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities
'\


Evangel

Temp-e
,,t // I 1 ',,I (, ,l .f I n ..
October 16th
Sunday Service
8:25 am 10:45 am 6:00 pm
In Times Like These -It's Important
to be Connected to a Local Church.
Sermon Sunday
"Healed From a Diagnosed Disease"
Miracles Still Happen Today
Healing is a Part of the Atonement.


5755 Ramona Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32205
904-781-9393
\\ V.e\ .in'clcimpleag.org
L ma I:
e\ ajngelij-.x 'comcat .net


Thanks For Reading
And SupporYing The Florida Star!


For Ticket Information
Call The Church
At (904) 765-3111
"ST.? *


Pamor C-il & AViggi-,


I


'02V7


~FLORIDA STAR


:tQ..






F A ( E A 4 .i .


"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
A More Than Usual Grand Reopening for Jenkins
Quality BBQ
Usually when there's a grand opening or
reopening of a business establishment there are usually
coupons for discounts or maybe free beverages. This
was not the case when family owned Jenkins Quality
BBQ Restaurant at US 1 and Edgewood Avenue
reopened recently. And who would have ever thought
that the reopening of the US 1 and Edgewood Avenue
restaurant would mean a complete complimentary meal
of the restaurant's famous quality barbecue, which
included dessert and a beverage for all patrons during
the standard lunch period? "We wanted to show our
appreciation to our wonderful customers who have
been with us for the past forty-eight years," stated
Jenkins Quality BBQ's CEO/President Mrs. Meltonia
Jenkins-May. And during the lunch period patrons and
friends waited in the fast moving line for this delicious
meal. While waiting in line they were entertained by
The Fabulous Moods of Roger Glover, refreshed with
Dr. Charlotte Powell's Gourmet Punch (She has
twenty-six flavors of punch. She also decorated for the
affair along with serving her Gourmet Punch for the
luncheon guests). Councilwoman Mia Jones blessed
the reopening with a soul stirring prayer. It was truly a
blessing as the US 1 location had been closed for over
a year due to the establishment being extensively dam-
aged when a surprise tornado touched down in the area.
The luncheon guests moved so orderly and patiently as
they waited being served. Yours and Mine Boutique
owner Mrs. Lillian Smith was the dessert hostess at
the reopening.
It was truly a family affair and even though Mr.
Melton Jenkins has turned the reigns of the business
over to his daughter, he was there as always with that
welcoming trademark smile that he is known for
attended by his caregiver Mrs. Sandra McNeil and
cousin Derrick Edmondson. And the family business
includes not only the daughters Mrs. Meltonia Jenkins-
May, Mrs. Wilhelmenia Jenkins Brown and Ms. Pam
Jenkins and grandchildren but also the long-term staff
members such as Mrs. Gussie Johnson who has been
with the business for twenty-seven years.
Jenkins Quality BBQ Restaurant began in the
late 1950's on Kings Road across from the College
Gardens Subdivision. "Later my father Mr. Melton
Jenkins would open a restaurant at 1513 West Beaver
Street," states Mrs. Jenkins-May. During the 1970's the
family expanded the business opening the US 1 and
Edgewood location and today you can also- enjoy
Jenkins Quality BBQ at locations downtown on Pearl
Street, on the Southside at Emerson Street and on Kings
Road in the heart of the. Edward Waters College cam-
pus. In fact Mr. Jenkins in recent years donated a parcel
of property on Kings Road to the college to expand its
campus.
This entrepreneurial family had its beginnings
in the First Coast's 'Sugar Hill' area on West Eighth
Street. I can remember frequenting their convenience
store after school day dismissal at Darnell-Cookman
or during the weekly walks to the Wilder Park
Library. When my family moved to College Gardens
the distress of leaving my friends in the 'Sugar Hill'
area was lessened somewhat when a familiar business
of my earlier childhood opened in my hew neighbor-
hood. My own family's tradition of savoring Jenkins
BBQ has continued now to the fourth generation begin-
ning with both our parents, siblings, our children and
grandchildren. In fact one of the family meals must
always be Jenkins Quality BBQ when my sons James
C. Davis, Jr. (Nebraska) and Lorn C. Davis
(Massachusetts) visit the First Coast with their families.
And when we visit them we must always take them a
gallon of Jenkins Quality BBQ's famous sauce.
Coincidentally, the grand reopening was also my moth-
er's eighty-seventh birthday. Having Jenkins Quality
BBQ on her birthday really completed the day!
Best Wishes to Jenkins Quality BBQ! I know
the neighborhood and surrounding area is delighted that
you've reopened and will now be opened on Sundays!

Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming
events. Contact us at 904 766-8834; E-mail
socially@thefloridastar.com or you may reach me
directly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777
or fax (904) 285-7008.


See you in the paper!


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FLORIDA STAR


OCTOBER 15.2005.


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tiLl 1 DLI 1 -/UU.J OlIZIA


Second Gas Price Gouging Lawsuit Filed


'i Copyrig hted Material


.Synmdicated aContent


- Available from Commercial News Providers"

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Women In Mid-Life Want Doctors To Discuss Risks Of Sex


GAINESVILLE, Fla. they are too old for intimate
Sex for newly single women relationships, a new
can be a wonderful experi- University of Florida study
ence, but it puts them at risk finds.
for disease if doctors think Nearly two-thirds of


middle-aged women who
had re-entered the dating
scene after widowhood or
divorce said they considered
themselves at risk for con-


tracting AIDS and other
sexually transmitted dis-
eases, but their physicians
rarely discussed those issues
with them, said Kathryn
Grant, who did the research
for her doctoral degree in
anthropology.
Doctors, who also were
interviewed for the study,
said they considered female
patients in their late teens
and early 20s to be much
more susceptible to HIV and
AIDS, and in many cases
never thought of their
older, single patients as
being sexually active, Grant
said.
"When doctors have
their own biases that lead
them not to think of a par-
ticular group as having sex-
ual health concerns, then
they don't bother to bring
the subject up and many
patients don't feel .comfort-
able discussing it," she
said. "I think that most doc-
tors are well-intentioned.
But the doctor may think,
'Oh, this lady is in a wheel-
chair,' or 'She has multiple
health problems and so
she's not sexually active,'
only to learn later that she
has caught syphilis or HIV."


Bronson Steps Up Avian
Influenza Surveillance Program
TALLAHASSEE -- Florida Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner Charles H. Bronson today
announced his Department is increasing its surveillance pro-
gram of poultry in a stepped-up effort to look for virulent
strains of avian influenza. Avian influenza is a serious dis-
ease concern for poultry producers and animal health offi-
cials. There are various influenza strains which vary consid-
erably in severity. Some are devastating to domestic poultry.
Recent information indicates an Asian strain can infect
people and there is concern that the virus may mutate and
allow for people-to-people spread. Currently, the Asian
strain is spread to people by infected birds. Infected birds
shed flu virus in their saliva, nasal secretions and feces. It is
believed that most cases of bird flu infection in humans have
resulted from contact with infected poultry or contaminated
surfaces. Symptoms of bird flu in humans have ranged from
typical flu-like symptoms including fever, sore throat and
aches to eye infections, pneumonia and severe respiratory
diseases
"Its important for the public to know that this
Department is aggressively looking for any signs of danger-
ous strains of avian influenza and has an ongoing outreach
program to educate the industry and poultry flock owners
about these diseases," Bronson said.
The Department's Division of Animal Industry is increas-
ing its collection and testing of samples, but the division has
had a testing program for more than 20 years. Samples are
regularly collected and tested from backyard flocks and
commercial poultry breeding flocks. For the period of
August 2004 through August 2005, the Department tested
approximately 4,000 birds from over 300 premises or farms.
Starting October 2005, the Department is implementing two
enhanced programs.
The first is a surveillance program which will involve
increasing the number of birds tested at small animal sales
sites, live bird markets, county fairs and exhibitions and
botanicas. Under this program, it is projected that 6,000
birds will be tested. The second program is a surveillance
program which will target the commercial poultry industry.
This program is projected to test an additional 7,800
birds from 36 laying complexes and 25 broiler and pullet
premises. All together, it is estimated that 15,488 birds, rep-
resenting commercial and backyard flocks throughout
Florida, will be tested by the Department, a 387 percent
increase from the previous year. While the stepped-up test-
ing is not directly related to the recent outbreak of Asian flu,
Bronson says it's important that Florida take every step pos-
sible to prevent the introduction of bird flu in this state.
~ ~1, .4
IrM


PAGEA-5


F.OR nIA STA R








PA CI? A.AF.RDSA COBR1,20


Black Man Beaten, Arrested By New Orleans Cops


Appears In Court;Civil Rights Probe Opened


Three New 'Orleans police officers are facing battery
charges for beating a 64-year-old retired school
teacher. The officers charged were identified as S.M.
Smith, Lance Schilling and Robert Evangelist. Robert
Davis (shown here) was booked on public intoxication,
resisting arrest, battery on a police officer and public


intimidation.
NEW ORLEANS--
Robert Davis ,A 64-year-old
retired teacher accused of
being drunk and resisting
arrest, and whose beating by
city police was caught on
videotape, pleaded not


guilty Wednesday, October
12.
Davis and police offi-
cials have said they did-not
'believe race was a factor.
Davis is black; the three city
police officers on the tape


Robert Davis lies on the ground in the French Quarter as an Associated Press
Television News crew records the action.


are white. Davis said he had
returned to New Orleans
from Atlanta to inspect
properties owned by family
members.
He said he was no longer'
sure he'll return permanently
to the city he has called
home for 28 years. Davis
claims that he has not had a
drink in 25 years." They've
got nothing," said Davis'


attorney Joseph Bruno
Bruno noted that charges of
public intoxication, resisting
arrest, battery on a police
officer and public intimida-
tion were groundless and
that they should be dropped.
Davis said he wandered
into the French Quarter in
search of cigarettes before
the confrontation. "I didn't
do anything," said Davis,


who said he had approached
a mounted police officer to
ask about the city's curfew.
He said he had not been
drinking before he was beat-
en by two police officers, a
weekend confrontation
taped by an Associated Press
Television News crew.
Those officers and a third
accused of grabbing and
shoving an APTN producer


have pleaded not 'guilty to
battery charges.
Another officer on foot
"interfered and I said he
shouldn't," Davis said. As he
crossed the street, Davis
said, he was hit and eventu-
ally thrown to the pave-
ment.
'Davis and his lawyer
said no blood or breath tests,
for drunkenness were
administered following
Davis' arrest. New Orleans
police said they typically do
not test people arrested for
public intoxication.
Spokesman Marlon Defillo
said judges traditionally rely
on an officer's expertise.
Police, however, argue
differently and the officers'
lawyer, Frank DeSalvo, said
they arrested a stumbling
.Davis to protect him from
himself. The Justice
Department also has opened
a civil rights investigation
stemming from the incident.


New Book Criticizes Blacks Who Use 'N' Word


* BEVERLY HILLS, -- A
new book criticizes African
Americans who use the N-
word. The book, written by
H. Lewis Smith, is called
"Bury That Sucka" and it is
a non-fictional account of a
scandalous, bizarre love
affair that the black commu-


exposing
how they
have
been
mesmer-
ized by
this. infa-
mo us ,
diaboli-


-






H. Lewis Smith


nity has with the N-word, cal word.


"Bury That Sucka," is
now available nation-wide.
The book contends that
the N-word is a Trojan horse
that African Americans have
accepted into their commu-
nity not realizing or under-
standing the peril in their
actions and it is revealed as
to why the users of this word


COm .NITY HOSPICE OF NORTHEAST FLORIDA PRHE.-NTS


.really needs to bury that
sucka -- not only for the
good of their community but
the entire country.
Smith says there no other
race of people on planet
earth who has taken -- or
ever taken.-- a racial epithet
and embraced it with such
loving care as the black
community has with the N-
word, but is nonetheless
insulted when this word is
used by a non-black.


He says mixed signals
are sent to non-blacks. On
one hand blacks want
respect, but on the other
hand blacks demonstrate
lack of self-respect by refer-
ring to each other with the
N-word.
Other assertions in the
book are:
There is nothing --
absolutely nothing --
RESPECTFUL about call-
ing one another the N-word.


No one in their right mind
'goes around insulting them-
selves to the extent that
many African Americans do.
Then, there isn't any
other racial slur with almost
400 years 'of built up nega-
tive energy such as the likes
of the N-word. The N-word
has power and is impacting
and controlling the destiny
of a community of unsus-
pecting people and all of
America as well.


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Economic Fallout From, Bird Flu a Concern
SINGAPORE The United States and the World Health Organization on Wednesday
warned that the economic impact from a flu pandemic would be enormous, and urged coun-
tries to prepare for a possible outbreak reminiscent of the infamous 1918 flu epidemic that
killed as many as 50 million people. Officials have repeatedly expressed concern that the
H5N1 strain of avian influenza that has swept through poultry populations in many parts of
Asia since 2003 and jumped to humans, killing at least 60 people, could mutate to become
contagious among people. So far, most of the infections have been traced to direct contact
with sick fowl.
"If the (H5N1) virus mutates to allow easier human-to-human transmission, it could end
in an influenza pandemic," said Paula Dobriansky, undersecretary for democracy and global
affairs at the U.S. State Department.
"There are also consequences for economic growth as well as regional and global secu-
rity. ... It could kill millions." Dobriansky and Health Secretary Michael Leavitt are touring
Southeast Asia after President Bush last month established the "International Partnership
on Avian and Pandemic Influenza." Washington is pushing for a global strategy against
H5N1 and other types of influenza. Dobriansky said U.S. officials have recently toured
Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, China and Indonesia where people have died from bird flu,
while $25 million has been allocated to identify "capacity-building needs" in those countries.

Liberians Vote for First Postwar President
MONROVIA, Liberia With U.N. tanks and troops standing guard, Liberians waited in
long lines Tuesday to vote for the country's first postwar president, who many hope will
bring stability to one of Africa's most turbulent countries. Turnout appeared to be strong,


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with some voters lining up hours before the
polls opened in churches, schools and long-
shuttered banks. Many sat on benches or hud-
dled under umbrellas to shelter them from the
broiling tropical sun.
Some 1.3 million Liberians had registered
to vote at more than 3,000 polling
stations.Twenty-two candidates are vying for
the top job in Liberia, in tatters after 14 years
of nearly continuous civil war that ended with
a peace deal in 2003. A transitional govern-
ment has arranged the vote and 15,000 U.N.
peacekeepers are keeping the calm. While no
polling data exist, many believe the front-run-
ner is former international soccer phenome-
non George Weah, 39, whose rise from a
Monrovia slum to athletic stardom has capti-
vated much of Liberia's youth-- including
many among the 100,000 demobilized fight-


ers who raped, pillaged and murdered during the civil war.
But Weah's critics say he has neither the education nor the management experience to
govern Liberia's 3 million people. Also considered a contender is Ellen' Johnson-Sirleaf, a
Harvard-educated, 66-year old veteran of Liberia's often-deadly politics. She has a long his-
tory of work as a government minister and with overseas banks and international organiza-
tions. Her detractors say she's part of.a political class that has only led to Liberia's ruination
and needs to Pe swept aside. If voted into office, her campaign says shq would become
Africa's first elected female president.


OCTOBER 15,2005


PA E A_-6


FLORIDA STAR


I


W.-V

OL







OCTOBER 15, 20


005


PAGE A-7


The Nation's Energy Crisis


Personal Responsibility Key to Hurricane Safety


By Congresswoman
Corrine Brown

The Republican lead-
ership has decided to
address the nation's ener-
gy crisis by decimating
The Clean Air Act and
granting billions of dol-
lars in tax breaks to
petroleum companies,
instead of providing sub-
stantive relief to alleviate
our country's long term
energy needs. Instead of
attempting to utilize and
explore alternative energy
sources or increase fuel
safety standards, the
habitual response of the
Bush administration has
been to continually attack
our nation's environmen-
tal protection laws. The
Energy bill passed on
Friday, October 7th, is a
perfect example of disas-
trous Republican priori-
ties.
With respect to the
environment, perhaps
most alarming in the
House Republican plan is
a provision in their bill
designed to allow busi-
nesses to maneuver
around what is known as
"New Source Review."
New Source Review
allows the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA)
to ensure that the con-
struction of new or modi-
fied factories, industrial
boilers and power plants
will not significantly
degrade the quality of our
air. To circumvent NSR,
the Republican Party's
energy bill mandates that
the EPA issue regulations
to change the Clean Air
Act's New Source Review
permit process. It also
requires the EPA to use
"maximum legal flexibili-
ty," to allow energy pro-


Females continued from A-1
James was located, arrest-
ed and charged with
aggravated battery and
attempted murder.
It is believed that Janese
had been beaten by her
husband and left to die,
days before she was dis-
covered. He appeared
before the judge Thursday
and bond was set at $1
million dollars
In Clinton, Maryland,
witness advised police
that Roger Hargrave, 33,
walked into a mobile tele-
phone store Monday
where his wife worked
and doused her with gaso-
line.
She immediately ran
out of the store where he
followed her, according to
witness and set her on fire
with a match. Records
show that she had
obtained an Ex Parte order
in July but it was can-
celled in September.
She suffered third-
degree bums over 50 per-
cent of her body, as a cus-
tomer quickly came to her
aid to put the fire out.
Her husband calmly
walked away and was
arrested late that evening.
Hargrave was charged
with attempted murder
and assault.
On Wednesday
Jacksonville's, Fire &


ducers to proceed with
projects that improve their
efficiency, irrespective of
any potentially adverse
environmental conse-
quences. To me this
seems like an obvious
attempt to evade basic
Clear Air protections.
Moreover, in addition
to practically doing away
with New Source Review,
this bill allows the presi-
dent (in consultation with
the EPA and the Energy
Department) to temporari-
ly waive federal or state
regulations that require
the use of any special type
of fuel or fuel additive to
relieve an extreme "sup-
ply emergency" caused by
a natural disaster. Based
on the Bush administra-
tion's environmental
record thus far, I have
very little confidence that
their decision process to
waive regulations will
involve any concerns for
the environment. Rather,
they will likely succumb
to the whims of the ener-
gy industry.
Aside from the delete-
rious environmental pro-
visions in this bill, one
can clearly see that H.R.
3893 is not only about
debasing the environ-
ment, but also about
increasing profits for the
oil industry. In fact, the
House recently passed a
Republican led bill just
two months ago that pro-
vides billions of dollars
in tax breaks for fossil
fuel production. One of
the most salient features
of H.R. 3893 is a provi-
sion entitled "risk insur-
ance," which in reality, is
little more than an
allowance for refineries to
receive taxpayer subsi-
dies. Ironically, these


Rescue Division respond-
ed to a call on Carthage
Drive and found the body
of a black female inside
the residence.
The deceased lady was
Tarnesha J. Ellis, 23-
years-old. Because
Steven W. Montgomery,
28, was seen leaving the
house in a 2004 Suzuki,
he was sought for ques-
tioning and arrested
Thursday morning.
The cause of death is
ongoing and a statement
has not been made about
the charges for
Montgomery's arrest. He
is still a person of interest.
Sheriff John
Rutherford, CEO Ellen
Siler of the Hubbard
House and law enforce-
ment officers from Baker,
Nassau, Clay, St. John
counties and the beaches,
as well as representatives
from the Quigley House,


subsides pay oil compa-
nies for their attempts to
escape legal challenges if
they evade local, state and
federal laws and regula-
tions. This provision
states that the Interior
Department would have
to pay energy conglomer-
ates for the cost of any
delay in opening a new
facility if the delay is
related to a lawsuit that
"could not have been rea-
sonably foreseen."
Obviously, requiring the
federal government to
cover the costs of delays
in the opening of refiner-
ies including court costs
and lost business sets an
extremely dangerous
precedent!
To conclude, even
though I am thankful that
the bill does not include
provisions that would
have lifted the federal ban
on natural gas drilling off
the Outer Continental
Shelf in my state of
Florida, I remain whole-
heartedly opposed to this
bill. Indeed, it does very
little to offset high energy
prices, nor does it do any-
thing to address vehicle
fuel-efficiency standards
or explore alternative
energy sources. What's
more, it does not do any-
thing to assist Americans
with the skyrocketing cost
of gasoline, which ironi-
cally, is its stated purpose.


Betty Griffin House and
Micah's Place held a press
conference to announce
the official launch of
October as Domestic
Violence Month. They
proposed distributing pur-
ple ribbon pins through-
out the community to pro-
mote awareness and raise
funds to help victims of
abuse.
The Avon Foundation
list in their free brochure,
the forms of domestic vio-
lence that include psycho-
logical and emotional
abuse, social abuse, finan-
cial abuse, physical abuse
and sexual abuse.
Domestic violence can
happen to anyone, regard-
less of sex, race, social
status or education.
Those in this week's story
are the serious physical
abuse cases. The goal is
domestic abuse preven-
tion.


Punishment from A-1
ted to put together their resources in order to help this
family finally get justice. State Attorney Harry
Shorstein said that he is doing all that he can, within his
power, to develop the needed evidence for the case to
be tried.

Political Activists continued from A-1

The retired federal employee lived in Atlanta and
had been working on a book about her life. Jones said
her religious beliefs gave her confidence to persist, and
she graduated from UA in 1965.


The City of
Jacksonville is as ready as
any city in America to
handle a hurricane. We
have a superb emergency
management team, and
comprehensive evacua-
tion and disaster response
plans are in place-
including plans for med-
ically dependent citizens
and those with no person-
al transportation. In addi-
tion, both the city and
JEA learned valuable les-
sons on storm cleanup and
repair from last year's
hurricane season and have
implemented changes to
make those efforts more
timely and efficient.
From a municipal stand-
point, we have a deep
bench and we are ready.
Unfortunately, all that
preparation means noth-
ing if families and indi-
viduals do not know what
to do, where to go, and
how to get the help they
need. The most impor-
tant thing you can do to
keep your family safe in
a weather emergency is
to create a personal dis-
aster plan. If you and
your family don't have a
plan, sit down today and
create one.
First, determine
whether or not you live in
an evacuation zone. As a
coastal city crisscrossed
by rivers, streams and
wetlands, Jacksonville is
at high risk for flooding
from heavy rains and
storm surge and the risk
is not limited to the
beaches. A storm surge on
our coastline would affect
Murder continued from A-1
available for comments


much of the city.
If Jacksonville were hit
by a Category 3 hurricane,
for example, the storm
surge alone would cover
Water Street and Bay
Street downtown. The
water would flood The
Landing, the Times Union
Center and many down-
town office buildings and
extend nearly up to City
Hall. That same storm
would submerge the lions
in San Marco Square and
swamp the sports com-
plex and the port. Homes
in the Charter Point area
of Arlington would be
flooded all the way up to
the second floor, and all of
Little Marsh Island would
be underwater. Add
heavy rainfall to that
equation and you can see
why some of the deadliest
hurricanes in U.S. history
have claimed so many
victims inland as well as
on the coast.
To find your evacua-
tion zone status, go to the
City of Jacksonville's
Web site, www.coj.net,
and click on the "Are you
in an evacuation zone?"
link. This will take you to
the city's GIS site, where
you can determine exactly
what your status is under
various hurricane scenar-
ios. You can also get this
information by calling
CityLink, the City of
Jacksonville's customer
service center, at 630-
CITY (630-2489), or from
the reference librarian at
any Jacksonville Public
Library.
Once you know your


Jacksonville
Peyton


mayor John


evacuation status, create a
plan. Where will you go
if you need to evacuate?
How will you contact
family members in the
event of an emergency?
What do you need to take
with you? What steps will
you take to protect your
property? What will you
do with pets? Then,
assemble your emergency
supplies. A complete list
of items you might need is
available in the Hurricane
Guide on www.coj.net,
and in other hurricane
guides produced by local
news organizations and
merchants.
Jacksonville hasn't
experienced a direct hit
since Hurricane Dora, 41
years ago. But our luck
could change at any time.
Think about what would
happen in our city in
your neighborhood if a
storm like Katrina hit the
First Coast. Then, get
your family together, cre-
ate a disaster plan, and
evacuate if you are told to
do so. It could literally
mean the difference
between life and death.


at this time but, an account has been set up at Bank of


America for the children of Michael and Felecia Jenkins and ask that well wishers
please contribute to the Educational Fund, Account #005561664896, for these chil-'
dren, in lieu of flowers.
The funeral services for Michael & Felecia Jenkins, son & daughter-in-law of
Pastor Elwyn W. Jenkins, Tru-Way Church of the Risen Christ will be held this:
Saturday, October 15th at the Cathedral of Faith Church of God in Christ located at
2591 West Beaver Street at 11:00 a.m. where Shepherdess Carrie B. Kinsey is Pastor
and General Overseer. The cortege will assemble at Tru-Way Church of the Risen
Christ located at 2297 Edison Avenue at 10:00 a.m..
Ms. Deborah Davis of SOS (Survivors of Suicide of Northeast Florida) says her
program works to help relatives cope with the suicide of loved ones. For every sui-
cide there are an estimated 8 people whose lives are traumatically impacted. They
help families understand and express the intense feeling they experience while learn-
ing about the causes. The program also helps to provide relief to greatly advance the
healing process. The program is open to the public. Every 43 seconds, someone
attempts suicide in the U.S. and every 18 minutes, someone dies by suicide in the,
U.S., according to the organization. Call SOS at (904) 868-5156 for help or refer-
rals.


Briefs continued from A-1
breast cancer. Women
who join must never have
had breast cancer them-
selves. African-American
women from 65 to 74 are
encouraged to join.

Civil Rights Groups
Demand Answers on
Florida's Overuse of
Zero Tolerance School
Discipline Policies

The NAACP Legal
Defense and Educational
Fund said that Florida
schools, in the name of
safety, have implemented
unforgiving, overly harsh
discipline practices that
remove children from
school and brand them as
criminals for acts that
rarely constitute a crime
even when committed by
an adult.
Through the state,
many public schools have


begun to rely almost
exclusively on suspen-
sions, expulsions and
arrests as the primary
methods of discipline,
turning schools into feed-
ers for the juvenile and
criminal justice system.


Therefore, they are having
hearings around the state,
meeting with parents and
educators.
A hearing was held in
Jacksonville on Thursday
at Edward Waters
College.


Ed tioni Now anc E4 besLater 4(ENABL)




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Southern Women's Show


Presented


by


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October 20-23,2005

Prime F. Osborn Convention Center

Jacksonville, FL

Makeovers Fashion Shows Cooking Schools Health Screenings


Home Accents Jewelry *


Gifts Great Deals Great Shopping and FUN!


SHOW HOURS:
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OCTOBER 15, 2005


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UNF Hosts Annual Haunted Hall As A Safe,
Friendly Environment For Trick-Or- Treating
It's time for the 15th annual Hlaunted Hall held at the Un iersit\ of North Florida. This free spookiacular
event \\ill take place on Thursda., Oct. 27. from p.m. to 8:3(0 p.m at -Ospre Hall. located on campus near park-
ing lot 10.
Kids and their families are in% ited to come trick-or-treat in a safe. friendly environment. Come enjo si\
exquisitely decorated halls, games and festi\ lies, sponsored b\ LUNF student Resident Assistants at (-Ospre\ Hall
Please dress up and come prepared to collect candy' For more information. contact Kathr. n Hill. Ospre\ Hall
area coordinator, at (904 i 620-5433.


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"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content l

, Available from Commercial News Providers"


IN IDE:

TOPB OFJ THE CH RT .......................................................................................................... B-8^^^^^^^^^^^H-^fc^^
comics ................................................................................................................................. B-8tt-^^^^^^







Page B-2lOctober 15, 2005 The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Readers Raise
Good Questions
About education


Those of us in the edu-
cation business often talk
about how learning is a
lifetime necessity. We tell
students they'll need to
keep learning after high
school and college to be
'successful in the work-
place. Letters. I've received
recently have certainly
reflected that column read-
ers of all ages have educa-
tion questions. I'll use this
column to share a few let-
ters and responses with.
you.

Making good use of
computer time
Q: One student
wrote, "I.have just recently
decided to quit playing
computer games, loitering
on the computer and surf-
ing the Net with.no reason
other than school research.
The amount:; of time I.
spend on the computer has
decreased to a point of
almost- nonexistence. IT
have high achievement-
goals and want to attend a-
prestigious college. What
kind of computer time is
beneficial, and is my deci-,-
. sion hazardous to my
future plans?"
A: Having .computer
skills is a plus for any.stu-
dent. Good keyboarding
skills and the ability to
research topics on the
Internet are really useful in
college. while e it's O.K. to
use the computer to relax
during downtime. \ou
might waant to think of
ways: to use the computer
to grow, such as using it
for school research or even'


learning. software that
might be of use in college
or a career. My son, for
example, is currently
learning. JAVA program-
ming. The most important
thing to look at is how you
are spending your time -
and to ask yourself if you
could use that time more
productively.
After coursework,
other factors play a part in
your success. Are you
motivated? Do; you spend
enough time doing home-
work? Do you, keep TV-
watching to a minimum?
Do you read outside of
class? Are you exploring
other interests or develop-
ing. other talents, such as
participating' in sports,
playing a musical instru-
-ment. or enjoying. a-
hobby? -There are many
worthwhile things that you
can do outside of school-
work that \\ ill contribute
to a well-rounded life. All
of these things could be-
more important to your
`-future success than using
the computer.

Taking advanced
courses
It's always great to hear
that students are thinking
ahead about their college
and' career plans, and
eighth grade is not too
soon.
Q: A student graduat-
ing from eighth grade
wrote, "I am wondering
how I will be able to regis-
ter in a coinmmunity college
and take ad\ anced courses
so I will be ahead."
A: I recommend that
any student thinking about
taking advanced courses
start by talking to their


COLLEGE"



SRsRCAREERp

| -CORNER
By Rose Rennekamp


high school's counselor.
Counselors can give you
the best advice based on
your academic record and
career goals. They also
know the local colleges, as
well as courses offered
that might be beneficial.
For example, some states
have "dual enrollment"
programs that pay' all or a
portion of the costs of
some classes. Some col-
leges require students to
take a college entrance
exam, such as the ACT
Assessment, prior to
applying to take courses.
Your counselor will know
the policies and proce-
dures for your state and
school district.
More importantly,
school counselors can help
you decide if it is the right
time for you to .take
advanced courses. Much
depends on your educa-,
tional background and
your plans. After talking
with your. counselor, make
an appointment to visit the
local community college.
It will give you a sampling
of the college atmosphere.
Most community colleges


have advisers available to .
work with younger stu-
dents.

Finding teaching
positions
I- also received a letter
from an adult reader who
suggested he might be one
of the missing teachers I
referred to in the column
about the national teacher
shortage.-'
Q: He wrote, "Years
ago I obtained a teaching
certificate but couldn't find
work locally, so I started
my own business.
Recently, I decided to try
again and re-certified; and
once again there were no
additional science teachers
needed where I live. I
guess my only hope is to
relocate. It would be very
helpful -if there was a
national directory of avail-
able teaching positions."
A: Finding good.
teachers, especially ones
in. math and science, is one-
of the most important
issues facing our country.
Unfortunately, the amount
of need varies from region.
to region. If, like this read-


Contest Offers Teens A Chance To Win Up To $750
TALLAHASSEE-Florida's Chief Financial Officer Tom Gallagher today unveiled
an essay contest aimed at encouraging investor education among middle and high
school students in Florida. The contest, "Cash in on Your Money Smarts;" offers teens
a chance at more than $7,500 in prizes state ide, with a top individual award of $750
for one student in each of five geographic regions.
The essay contest is part of Gallagher's stateaw ide public education initiative, Your
Money, Your Life, which is-designed to help Floridians make better informed financial
decisions. Gallagher launched the program in 2004 after learning that many Floridians
put themselves at financial risk by waiting too late to save and by running up debt. The
program includes a comprehensive educational website available at www.yourmoneyy-
ourlife.org.
The essay contest, "Cash in on Your Money Smarts," is open to, Florida teens who
are between the ages of 14 and 18. Students must submit a 1000-word essay to the
Florida Department of Financial Services by January 27, 2006. Essays may be submit-
ted electronically or by mail, inEnglish or Spanish.
Each essay contest participant will be asked to consider and write a comprehensive
response to the following question: "If you had $100,000 to invest,what would you
invest in and \\ h?" The response should address why you would invest in certain com-
panies or products, what information you used to back up your investment decisions,
and how investing can help you meet your money' goals.
Cash prizes will be awarded to each of the top three essays in five regions across
the state, for a total of 15 winners. First place offers a $750 cash reward, second place
garners $500 and third place is $250. For complete contest details, to download an'
essay application or submit an essay electronically, log on to www.fldfs.com and click
"Cash in onYour Money Smarts."


er, a teacher is willing to
relocate, there are several
resources available' on the
Internet. You might want
to start by searching news-
paper sites in regions that
you may want to live, or
search Department of
Education sites for indi-
vidual states.
I look forward to read-
ing your comments and
answering your questions.
They might serve as the
bases for future columns.
You can send me a letter
through this newspaper or
e-mail me at
AskRose@,act.org.



Rose Rennekamp is
the vice president of corn-
munications for ACT She
is a mom and has a mas-
ter's of education in guid-
ance and counseling. For
more college and career-
planning information,
visit www.act.org. Have a
question you. want
answered in a future col-
umn? Send a letter to this
newspaper or e-mail Rose
at A skRose~dact. org.


The Fidrida Star/Prep Rap


-Pa-ge.B-2October 15,- 2005-







The Florida ~tarIPrep Rap P~age B~-~3IOctober 15, 2005


Q)


.0


U.


m %4 --


would make their child's education a top priority.
Cost was by far the most frequently mentioned
obstacle to attending college, cited by half the respon-
dents.
The Sallie Mae Fund, a charitable foundation,
released the poll during the kick off of its Florida
"Paying for College" bus tour at'Tallahassee's Godby
High School where students participated in a workshop
on planning and paying for college.
The bus tour is part of The Sallie Mae Fund's new $-1
million financial aid awareness campaign aimed at clos-
ing the financial-aid information gap that hinders many
low-income and minority Floridians from pursuing a col-
lege education.
The Mason-Dixon survey* was conducted Aug. 1-8.
Five hundred Hispanic and 500 African-American
youths ages 18-24 were randomly selected and inter-
viewed by telephone. In each subgroup, half (250) had
attended or graduated college ("achievers") and half did
not ("potentials").
Respondents said that by far, cost is the largest obsta-
cle to attending college. And there was a strong correla-
tion between awareness of financial aid and the decision
to pursue a college education. The survey has a margin
or error of plus/minus 4.5 percentage points, which
means there is a 95 percent probability that the true fig-
ure would fall within that range if all Hispanic or
African-American youths were surveyed.


New Poll Shows Lack

Of Awareness About

Financial Aid Is Barrier

To College For Minorities
TALLAHASSEE, Fla., October 11, 2005 -Ninety
five percent of Hispanic young people and 80 percent of
African-American young people in Florida not currently
enrolled in college said they would have been more like-
ly to attend college if they had better information about
how to pay for it. That's the result of a new Mason-Dixon
poll released today by The Sallie Mae Fund.
The survey is part of The Sallie Mae Fund's new $1
million financial aid awareness campaign aimed at clos-
ing the financial-aid information gap that hinders many
low-income and minority Floridians from pursuing a col-
lege education. The centerpiece of the campaign is a 10-
i city, seven-county "Paying for College" bus tour in part-
nership with local financial aid experts.
The tour will feature workshops on planning and pay-
ing for college for high school students and their parents
in Spanish. and English, one-on-one counseling, and free
educational materials.
The survey also found that 60 percent respondents
said they would have been better students in high school
if they had known that financial aid was available.
J Other-key findings of the survey include:
An overwhelming majority more than '80 per-
cent of Hispanic and African-American youths sur-
veyed said that a college education is important to an
individual's "future opportunities, financial security and
happiness."
A substantial majority from each eroup said they


Page B-106f~beiri'i6_ 200!


The; F16Ada'a tair/'Pre'p Rapp









filPATS HG HG0CHOOL. FOOTBALL

).. H.IGHL.,IG. HT REEL

*Tune in to IMPACT on Saturdays from 1:00 -1:30 p.m. and hear High School Football Highlights on IMPACT Sports with Ron Williams.
You can also submit your play of the week selections to The Florida Star by email at Info@TheFloridaStar.com. Information is needed by
Monday of each week.
Andrew Jackson's Troy Pollard carrying the ball 22 times for 204 yards and a touchdown (17-yard
run) in a 28-22 win over Ed White on Friday, October 7.
Thomas Gordon of Potter's House running 67 yards for a touchdown and carrying the ball 14 times
for 132 yards in a 12-0 win over Paxon on Friday, October 7.
Potter's House defensive back Darrell Williams sacking the Paxon quarterback two times in a 12-0
Swin on Friday, October 7.
Raines' Greg Pollard intercepting a pass and running 31 yards for the Vikings final score in a 34-21
win over Bolles on Friday, October 7.
Raines quarterback Bruce Robinson completing 5-of 24 passes (had 1 interception) for 112 yards,
passing for two touchdowns (11 and 5 yards), and scoring a touchdown on a 1-yard run in a 34-21 win
over Bolles on Friday, Odtober 7.
Bolles' Randy Hardin completing 17-of-24 yards (had 3 interceptions), passing for a touchdown
(5-yard pass), and scoring a touchdown on a 1-yard run in a 34-21 loss to Raines on Friday, October
7.

Lee running back Bryant Daniels rushing for 101 yards on 17 carries in a 10-7 win over Fletcher on Friday, October 7.
Terry Parker quarterback Jared Simmons completing 7-of-13 passes for 139 (had 1 interception) in a 41-14 win over
Wolfson on Friday, October 7. He completed a pass for a touchdown (10 yards).
Terry Parker's Carlton Johnson intercepting two passes and returning them both for touchdowns (33 and 65 yards) in a 41-
14 win over Wolfson on Friday, October 7.



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2, Bolles 5-1

3. Lee 5-1

4. Bishop Kenny 4-1

S. First Coast 4-2

6. Potter's House 4-2

7. Ed White 4-3

8. Andrew Jackson 3-1

9. Fletcher 3-2

10. Sandalwood 3-3
Englewood 3-3
Episcopal 3-3


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The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Page B-4/October 15, 2005







The Florida Star/Prep Rap Page B-5lOctober 15, 20&5


Joy Bryant, Curtis '50 Cent"
Jackson, Tory Kitties and
Omar Benson Miller in
Paramount Pictures' Get Rich
or Die Tryin' 2005


most popular stars in hip-hop, is the charismatic
driving force behind "Get Rich or Die Tryin'," a
hard-hitting drama directed by six-time Oscar -
nominee Jim Sheridan about an orphaned street kid
who makes his mark in the drug trade but finally
dares to leave the violence behind and become the
rap artist he was meant to be.
The movie is loosely based on the life story of
50 Cent. Directed by Jim Sheridan from a screen-
play written by Terence Winter, the film is produced
by Jimmy lovine, Paul Rosenberg, Chris Lighty,
and Jim Sheridan. The executive producers are
Gene Kirkwood, Stuart Parr, Van Toffler, David
Gale, Arthur Lappin and Daniel Lupi. The film also
Stars Joy Bryant, Viola Davis, Terrence Dashon
Howard, Rhyon Nicole Brown, Bill Duke,
Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, Omar Benson Miller,
Tory Kittles, Ashley Walters, and Marc John


Jefferies


Rap Superstar Twista Participates In 9th Annual 'Principal For A Day'

CHICAGO, IL-- On Thursday, October 27, Multi-plat-
inum, Grammy-nominated Hip-Hop superstar Twista will
go "back to school" as he hosts the 9th Annual "Principal
for a Day" at the Choir Academy Charter School in the
heart of Chicago. As a part of Chicago Public Schools' ini-
tiative to help inspire and motivate local students in educa-
tion, Twista, along with Mayor Richard Daley, will take -
over Choir Academy and help highlight the importance of .
education and pursuing one's dreams.
As "Principal for a Day," Twista hopes to offer insight Twista
from his experiences in the music industry to inspire the local students at this perform-
ing arts-based school. Twista continues to bring pride to Chicago as his new album, "The
Day After," which released this past week, is already topping the charts and causing a
stir in its first week. As one of hip-hop's most in-demand MCs, working with stars such
as Jay-Z, Ludacris, P. Diddy, Mariah Carey and Kanye West to name a few, Twista hopes
to offer inspiration and advice to students at the Choir Academy.


FIND

OUT

HOW

S/ YOU

- -. ,'-" CAN


APPEAR


IN PREP RAP


CALL


904/ 766-8834


'Get Rich Or Die Tryin' Features All New

Music From 50 Cent, G Unit And More

SANTA MONICA, Calif., -- 50 Cent is putting the finishing touches to what is looking to be another block-
buster release this year, the soundtrack to his film debut "Get Rich Or Die Tryin'". The album, ""Music From And
Inspired By The Motion Picture Get Rich Or Die Tryin"", will be released on November 8. The film, directed by
Jim Sheridan (In America, My Left Foot) will open in theatres on November 9. The soundtrack will be released
on G Unit/Interscope Records and will feature all new music from 50 Cent, and the entire stable of artists on his
G Unit Records Imprint.
The first single, "Window Shopper," is a track that exposes the mentality of a rapper who can't afford to btly
the things he wants and feels he deserves. It also serves as a focal point for some of the movies most poignant
scenes.
Earlier this month, the album track "Hustler's Ambition" was dropped to give people a taste of what to expect
from the soundtrack. Its grimy nature will take you back to where it all began, the hungry streets of Queens. DJ's
across the country are spinning this track uncontrollably in the clubs.
"I created the music for the soundtrack while I was actually filming the movie. I had a studio trailer with me
and would record every day between takes," comments 50 Cent. "I keep telling you, I'm the hardest working man
alive."
50 Cent executive produced the album. Sha Money XL is co-executive producer with Dr. Dre and Hi-Tek pro-
viding further production. Mase, Nate Dogg and newly signed G Unit members Mobb Deep and M.O.P are also
featured on the album.
Currtis "50 Ce2nt" iJackson one of the biggest _aid


Page B-510ctober 15, 20 5~


The Florida Star/Prep Rap







Pa~eB-6~ctber 5, 005The lorda tar!Pre Ra


Clean Kids Jokes

Silly! Silly! Tongue
Ti'Tister

Q. Why did the cowboy die with his boots on? Jack the jailbird jacked a
A.Because he didn't want to stub his toe when he jeep.
kicked the bucket!
The owner of the Inside
Q. If athletes get athlete's foot, what do astronauts Inn Was outside his Instde
get9?, Inn With his inside out-
A. Missile toe! side his Inside Inn.
A woman to her son did
Sutter, "Go my son, and
Q. Where do hamsters come? shut the shutter."
shut the shutter."
A. Hampsterdam! "The shutter's shut," the
son did utter,
Q. What kind of biscuit would you find at the "I cannot shut it any shut-
south pole? ter."
A. A penguin!.
A skunk sat on a stump.
Q. Why is the time in the USA behind that of The* stump thunk the
England? skunk stunk.
A. Because England was discovered before the USA! The skunk thunk the
stump stunk.
Q. What has a bottom at the top?
A. Your legs!

Q. What is a skeleton?
A. Bones, with the person off!

Q. What might you eat in Paris?
A. The trifle tower!

Q. Which Elizabethan sailor could stop bikes?
A. Sir Francis Brake!

Q. Have you ever seen a man eating tiger?
A. No, but in the cafe next door I once saw a man eat-
ing chicken!

Q.' What is the quickest way to double your
money?
A. Fold it in half!

Q. What do you get if you cross a Scottish legend
and a bad egg?
A. The Loch Ness Pongster!

Q. What's the nearest thing to silver?
A. The Lone Raner's bottom!
What's M
Q.. NA Inform
Q. What sort of animal is a slug? i
A. A snail with a housing problem!
TO P
Q. What does "Minimum" mean? ToP
A. A very small mother! -
Call The Flot


Knock Knock
Who's there?
Dawn!
Dawn who?
Dawn leave me


out here in the cold!


Knock Knock
Who's there?
Deduct!
Deduct who?
Donald Deduct!


Knock Knock
Who's there?
Cass!
Cass who?
Cass more flies

Knock Knock
Who's there?


with honey than vinegar!


Cassie!
Cassie who?
Cassie the forest for the trees!


missing From The Above Spot?
nation About Your Business,
Services, Or Goods!
lace Your Advertisement
In This Spot
rida Star Today At (904) 766-8834


KNOCK! KNOCK!


-


Page B-6/Octber 15, 200


The Florida Star/ Prep Rap





F F ORIDA TAR


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Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "Gold Digger" Kanye West Featuring Jamie Foxx (Roc
A Fella/Def Jam) Last Week: No. 2
2. "My Humps" The Black Eyed Peas (A&M) No. 6
3. "Shake It Off' Mariah Carey (Island) No. 1
4. "Like You" Bow Wow Featuring Ciara (Columbia) No. 4
5. "Wake Me Up When September Ends" Green Day
(Reprise) No. 5
6. "Sugar, We're Goin' Down" Fall Out Boy (Fueled By
Ramen/Island) No. 3
7. "Because of You" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) New Entry
8. "We Belong Together" Mariah Carey (Island) No. 7
9. "Outta Control (Remix)" 50 Cent Featuring Mobb
Deep (shady/Aftermath) No. 18
410. "Don't Cha" The Pussycat Dolls Featuring Busta
Rhymes (A&M) No. 9
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
S1. "A Real Fine Place to Start" Sara Evans (RCA) Last
Week: No. 1
2. "Something to Be Proud of' Montgomery Gentry
(Columbia) No. 2
3. "Redneck Yacht Club" Craig Morgan (Broken Bow)
jNo. 4
4. "Somebody's Hero" Jamie O'Neal (Capitol) No. 7
5. "Better Life" Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 9
6. "All Jacked Up" Gretchen Wilson (Epic) No. 5
7. "Probably Wouldn't Be This Way" LeAnn Rimes
(Asylum/Curb) New Entry
8. "As Good as I Once Was" Toby Keith (DreamWorks)
No. 8
9. "Alcohol" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) No. 3
10. "Play Something Country" Brooks & Dunn (Arista
Nashville) No. 6
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Say Hello" Deep Dish (Deep Dish) Last Week: No. 2
2. "Everything U" Superchumbo (Twisted) No. 5
3. "Feels Like It Should" Jamiroquai (Columbia/Promo)
New Entry
4. "I Like It (but I Don't Need It)" Vivian Green (Columbia)
No. 4
5. "Mesmerized (Freemasons/B. Watt/D. Hernandez
Mixes)" Faith Evans (Capitol/Promo) No. 1
6. "Pon de Replay (Norty Cotto Remix)" Rhianna (SRP Def
Jam) No. 3
7. "Bleed Like Me (E. Kupper Mixes)" Garbage (Almo
Sounds/Promo) No. 8
8. "Fascinated" Suzanne Palmer (Star 69) No. 9 '
9. "Back to Basics" Shape: UK (Astralwerks) No. 6 6 p s S o
10. "Jetslream" New Order Featuring Anna Mantron
(Warner Bros.) No. 7 f I ow s ..
qua- qww=* qlw.*w 4b 7wm q40P





"Copyrighted Material


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-B--8/0CTOB E 15, 2005


THE FLORIDA STAR







U(,IL/DLC 1.J), /U.


CAPTIONS


e .il hhI% L 'I i h tlih A.d Lii ,,lo h iJA. r'p i._' I % hli' i t -e'. l' nin'
.'l'ct i 5l.lll.t'll' t i' it J .. kst_, ll A lp ';L llit_" lle'tOl' olll itt /iTi '

CHAPTER MEETING-The Richardson Heights Chapter
4951 lill meet at 10:30 a.m. on W\ednesda,. October 10 at the
Bradham-Brooks North'.est Librar, at 1'55 \\. Edgewood
Ave. F. Bannister of the Social Securiti Administration is the
speaker
NEIGHBORHOOD BEAUTIFICATION EVENT-The
Northv.westem Middle School PTSA %ill host Oasis On 45th
Street on Saturda,. October 15 from S:00 a.m.-12 Noon. The
public is in ited to join the effort to clean-up and beaultifi the
neighborhood in the Nortlhwestern Middle school area.
Participants w ill meet at Northwestern Middle School located
at 210 O W 45th St and .w ill recei\ e a Cir of Jacksonv ille cer-
tificate recognizing "Clean I Lip. Green It Up" Communitt
Serx ice Volunteer hours. The e'ent \kill also feature food.
prizes, and music For more information contact
Northwestern PTSA President Nanc, Jackson at 190i4 o"3-

MAYOR TO HOLD TO\\N HALL MEETING FOR
GREATER ARLINGTON AND THE BEACHES DIS-
TRICT-Jackson\ille NMa\,or John Pe,\ton \Mill hold his 11th
toi. n hall meeting to listen to citizens' concerns on Oct. IS.
The meeting. ,Inch \ ill be held at 6 p.m. in the Nathan H.
\ ilson Center for the Arts at the FCC0J South Campus. 119I01
Beach Bl\d.. \\ill be sponsored b\ the Greater Arlington and
the Beaches Citizens Plannino Adl isor Committee (CPAC .
Residents of the district are inm ted to share their concerns
regarding the comnmtit nir ith the ma\or and other Cirt of
Jackson\ille officials and agency, representatives. The
October IS meeting is open to all Jackson ille residents, not
lust those living in the Greatei Arlington and the Beaches
planning district. For more information or directions. call
James Richardson, neighborhood coordinator. Neighborhood
Ser. ices Di\ vision, i 00)41 631-- 30.
TRANSFORMATION SERIES EV ENT-Crucial \till host a
Transfonnation series e\ent in the Robinson Theater ne\t to
the Fine Arts building at LNF on October 24 at ":30. This
e ict i. ill leatuire performers, singeil, rappers, dancers nd
otliei .rtit _-I. ;'Ie i ,1 i ele\ an message C _fur t,'daN's ILoIt[nig
adults. For more infonration. contact Cedric Ti tllie at 904-
449-454' or e-mail at c.tv illiei'comcast.net.
\ VIOLENCE A\\ARENESS CAMPAIGN-October is
National Domestic violencee Aw areness Month Florida
Community College students are taking a stand against
domestic i olence The 2005 Violence Av.areness Campaign
% ill help raise a \areness of domestic violence and ho,\ it can
be eliminated. In their efforts to promote ata eness. Kent
Campus Sociology students ha e created an e\liibit of "Silent
Witness" silhouetes, in accordance %kith the International
Silent \\ mess Initiative. Each wooden, life-sized red silhou-
ene tells the store\ of a Jackson ille citizen \\ho has died as a
result of domestic homicide. Breastplate shields on the figures
tell the victims' names and their stories. The Silent Witness
display can be % iewed Oct 10-31 I during regular campus oper-
ation hours. A panel discussion on October 1s from 6:00-8:00
p.m. at Florida C'ommunit. College Kent Campus. 3939
Roose\elt Blhd. lin the .Auditorium. Building F ) \\ill feature
representatives from the Justice Coalition as keynote speak-
ers For more information call 904.381.35S4 or email kser-
\ antO'fccj.edu.
ACCORD EVENTS-The 40thtl ACCORD Red Train Ci\il
Rights Landmarks Tour w. ih David Nolan, historian will be
held Saturda\, November 5. at 10:00 a.m. originating from
Historic St. Paul .A.M E. Church in St. Augustine. Fla iSli.
Donation limited seating). Call Mar\ Thomas itii4) 810-l-
0884 for information & reservations. The Second .Annual
Black & white Dinner Dance will be held Saturday.
November 26. 6:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. at the Elks Lodge on
Anastasia Island 1$30 General '50 VIP Donationi.


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Jacksonville's

Most Heated

Radio Talk Show!

North Florida's Best
Daily Talk Show!


AM 1530

WEEKDAYS -

2-6 P.M. 1 ,


CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http://www.wymm1530.com
J I


Clara White Mission's Ju'Coby Pittman-Peele


Receive Coveted Jessie Ball duPont Award


Mrs. Ju'Cc
Manigault.


This gathering of friends and well wishers include:
Jerry and Wendy Hinton, Sr. E. B. Johnson, Hallie and
Patricia Williams-Bey and Carolyn Deary.


Roslyn "Auntie Roz" Burrough and Brenda Brunson-
Bey.
By Marsha Dean Phelts


Kenneth and Winston Peele.
Two-year old Winston starred
during the reception honoring
his mother but by the time she
was presented with a $10,000
personal check he was tuckered
out in Daddy's arms.


For e\emplary com-
mttnity sert ices as
Chief E\ecutite Officer
and President of the
Clara White lMission
Ju'Coby Pitman-Peele,
wife of Carthage
Chapel Funeral Director
Kenneth Peele. received
the Jessie Ball duPont
Award which included a
personal check for
$ I0,,000. This presti-
gious honor is presented
to individuals "who
demonstrate the
courage, integrity., re-
atiity, perseverance.
and compassion that
philanthropist Jessie
Ball duPont demon-
strated in her lifetime.
OCer three hundred
citizens, friends and


Shown here are Juliette Fields, Gwendolyn Leaphart,
Gerri Walker, Cheryl Winters, Brenda Burnson-Bey,
Marsha Phelts. and Patricia Sampson.

family members %were on hand October 6. 2005 to congratu-
late Ju'Coby Pittman-Peele and celebrate the accomplish-
ments of the Clara \\htite Nlission.
Dr. Sherrn Magyill. President of the duPont Fund AAward
joined .lean Ludlo\, in presenting the NMission and their
Board of Directors v\ ith a check for S40,000 to continue out-
standing programs that providess Jackson\ille's homeless
and disadvantaged ,with food for toda\ and the skills for
life."
For the 12 ears that Pittmnan-Peele has led the Nlission
she abided b\ these words of Clara English \\lite. "Do all
the good )ott can. in all the w\a\s \out can, in all the places
\oun can. for all the people \ou can. w while tou canr."
Annually> the Nission provides educational programs for
youth; family sert ices and jobs training. The Mission and its
volunteers ser\ e 140.000 meals each ear.
For the aw ard program men enrolled in the Nlission's
culinary arts program served a bountiful and delicious meal
in the elegant Ramona Pax ilion Ballroom.
The full coarse meal "\as a treat and so \'as the personal-
ized "Jessie Ball duPont Fund Award Ju'Cob\ Pitnman-Peele
miniature milk chocolate bar. The souvenir photo of the
lionoiee on the w% rapper makes the chocolate bar a keepsake.


New Orleans, one of
America's most beloved
cities, dubbed "The Big
Easy", is facing a dark and
uncertain future, but it's
illutrious past is really
something to talk about.
Coffee, Tea, and History
the Karpeles Museum, a
monthly series of lively lec-
tures and discussion, pres-
ents The History of New
Orleans, Shotgun Houses
and All That Jazz on
Wednesday, October 19,
10:30 a.m.- 12 noon.
The museum is located at
101 W. 1st St. in Historic
Springfield (on the comer of
1st and Laura Streets direct-
ly behind FCCJ's
Downtown Campus).
The program is free and
open to the public. Schools,
civic groups, and other inter-
ested parties Are invited to


attend.
Local Historian, Linda
Mitchell Harper, will pro-
vide a breif overview of the
founding of New Orleans
and the state of Louisiana.
Harper will tell the story
of how New Orleans' ceme-
teries (Cities of The dead)
are used as popular tourist
attractions.
Participants will also
learn about the architectural
and African American cul-
tural conenctions to scores
of intricately adorned row
houses that characterize the
landscape.
Participants will also get
a chance to become
immersed in the city's
homemade music and get a
little taste of New Orleans.
Harper will also provide
a list of recommended read-
ing material, trivia questions


and a quiz to test audience
knowledge about the area..
Joel McEachin, Principle
Planner of the Jacksonville
Historic Preservation
Commission, will share his
expertise on the subject of
Shotgun Houses and other
vernacular dwellings abun-
dantly built in the late 1800s
up until the 1940s.
The multi-talented artist,
Laurence Walden, will per-
form his tribute to Billy
Eckstein entitled "Me and
Mr. B."
A student jazz trio from
Douglas Anderson School of
The Arts, featuring Jonah
Pierre, Nick Hankins and
Jarrett Carter will perform.
Sweet treats will be pro-
vided by Wormans Bakery,
Healthy Bagel Express, and


Gifts By One Of Each.
Coffee, Tea And History
is a unique educational and
entertaining presentation
designed to enlighten the
audience, while engaging
them in discussions about
some of the fascinating
accounts of historic events,
people, places and things.
Well informed guest
speakers and performers are
both amateur and profes-
sional individuals of the
Jacksonville community.
The real creative speakers
come dressed in costumes
and bring props to help bring
their subject matter to life.
For more information
contact Linda Mitchell
Harper at (904) 333-6883.


THANKS FOR SUPPORTING THE FLORIDA STAR! .,


Karpeles Lecture Series To Focus On History

Of New Orleans, Shotgun Houses And All That Jazz


PAGE C-1


FLORIDA STA R


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The Bennett Rule: Abort Every White Baby!
by Justin Felux

Bill Bennett, a prominent right-wing blowhard, has recently come under intense
fire for remarks made on his radio show, in which he stated, "I do know that it's true
that if you wanted to reduce crime, you could ... abort every Black baby in this coun-
try." He quickly backed away from the proposition, saying "That would be an
impossible, ridiculous and morally reprehensible thing to do, but your crime rate
would go down."
It's unfortunate that Bennett chose to be so politically correct, because I think he
may be onto something here. He's just wrong about the target. If we really want to
get tough on crime, it's the white babies who should start getting the coat hanger
treatment.
Consider the fact that whites commit three times as many violent crimes as Blacks
every year, just in raw numbers. This is just for ordinary "street crimes," such as
assault. The numbers become skewed out of this world when you consider "white-
collar" crimes (typically, the collar isn't the only thing that's white).
For instance, job-related accidents and illnesses claimed the lives of 70,000
Americans in 1992, a significant portion of which can be chalked up to white
employers neglecting to comply with occupational health and safety laws.
According to studies, up to 64,000 die every year due to pollution and other environ-
mental hazards produced by industry.
Another 21,700 die due to consumer product deaths, costing the nation $200 bil-
lion a year. Another $200 billion is lost annually due to white-collar embezzlement.
These two statistics alone add up to over 26 times the amount of all the robberies and
petty thefts committed every year combined!
We should also not forget the ravages of the white-owned health care system and
insurance industry. Around 18,000 adults are killed every year as a result of a lack
of medical coverage. Over 25 thousand die as a result of unnecessary prescriptions
and surgeries performed by mostly white doctors.
All in all, corporate criminals take about 10 times as many lives as street crimi-
nals. And I haven't even mentioned the white men who control the apparatus of state,
which through war, sanctions and other means, kills hundreds of thousands, if not
millions more. Over 100,000 civilians have died in Iraq alone, for example.
I don't know about you, but every time I see a white man in a suit, I find a place
to hide. Once I feel safe, I call the Department of Homeland Security to report his
suspicious activity. I simply don't feel safe knowing that all these savage, white
thugs are out walking the streets. After all, from Bob Chambliss to Timothy
McVeigh to Eric Rudolph, by far most of the terrorist attacks in America have been
committed by whites.
Which brings me to my next point: even if a white guy isn't wearing a suit, you
still shouldn't assume that he isn't dangerous. One can find a plethora of deadly and
pathological behaviors uniquely prevalent among whites who look just as ordinary
as you and me. Most notable among them are spree killing, serial murder and can-
nibalism.
About 90 percent of all serial killers are white men. Some other white pastimes
include animal torture, vampirism, Satan worship, witchcraft, self-mutilation, eating
disorders and child sexual molestation. White men engage in child sexual abuse at
twice the rate of Black men.
By aborting all the white babies, we will be protecting a great many children from
the horror of enduring abuse4at the hands of white male sex perverts (pardon *"e


-
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TUNE IN AND LISTEN
TO IMPACT WITH

THE FLORIDA STAR


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- WCGL 1360 AM
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REAL TOPICS!

REAL ISSUES!

SATURDAY

1:00-1:30 P.M.


OCTOBER 15,2005


FLORIDA STAR


ft -MMMO


9


O'ORP


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0l2UDI 1E UUJBO 1 5 !/- -fF. P-A-G.


Concerned Citizens Address Bus Stop



Safety During Meeting With JTA Officials


* I


Members and invited guest attended the meeting of The Jacksonville Concerned Citizens for Improved Bus Passenger Decorum held on Tuesday, October 12 in the
Boardroom of The Jacksonville Transportation Authority. They received updates from JTA officials and addressed the need for improved surveillance of bus stops in certain
neighborhoods of the city. LEFT FRAME: From left, Ms. Corliss Way, Mrs. Virginia Moore (cousin of deceased member Altamese Weaver), and Mr. Willie Alexander. MIDDLE
FRAME: From left, Mrs. Annie Dunn, Mrs. Annie Mae Barlow (Honorary Member and mother of Attorney Arthur Barlow), and Mrs. Daisy Jones Hicks. RIGHT FRAME: From
left, Darlene Smith, visiting from Pensacola, Fla., and JTA Bus Driver Charles Knight.


LEFT FRAME: From left, former State Representative Willye F. Dennis and Robert Flowers. MIDDLE FRAME: Mrs. Hazel Varner, Secretary of the Concerned Citizens; former
City Councilwoman and State Representative E. Denise Lee, and Mr. Dozell Varner, Sr. RIGHT FRAME: From left, Mr. Joseph Johnson, Chairman, Concerned Citizens;,and
Elder Giradeau Franz Nesbitt, Vice Chairman.


By Ron Williams

Charles Knight has been
driving Jacksonville
Transportation Authority
(JTA) buses for a number of
years. What he's seen tak-
ing place at bus stops
throughout the city is


enough to make the average
observer shudder.
- During a meeting with
The Jacksonville Concerned
Citizens For Improved Bus
Passenger Decorum and key
JTA officials on Tuesday,
October 12, Knight said he's
seen individuals engage in


criminal acts ranging from
prostitution to drug traffick-
ing occurring at bus stops sit-
uated along his bus route.
He says the activity is so
profound that frightened bus
passengers move blocks
away from the official bus
stop to safely board the bus.


E. Denise Lee


MAD DADS JACKSONVILLE CHAPTER


I OOX THE


PL


DGE


Ccco] i.VrJ y Pfl J0"

OCTOBER 25th 2005 10:00 AM
EVANGEL TEMPLE- 5755 RAMONA Blvd.

SPECIAL GUESTS-
STATE SENATOR TONY HILL"
PETE JACKSON MAYOR'S OFFICE
COUNCILWOMAN GLORIOUS JOHNSON
DUVAL COUNTY SHERIFF JOHN RUTHERFORD
MAURICE WILLIAMS #74 JAX JAGUARS
AKIN AYODELE #51 JAX JAGUARS
PAXON HIGH SCHOOL CHOIR & DRUM UNE


SPONSORED BY'
MAD DADS JACKSONVILLE CHAPTER INC.
FLORIDA DRUG POLICY CONTROL OFFICE
FLORIDA STAR NEWSPAPER
GATEWAY COMMUNITY SERVICES INC
PROJECT SAFE NEIGHBORHOODS


Name

Home Address

City/State/Zip

School


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CL r
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AN


Charlotte Hall
"They (perpetrators) are
.sitting there in plain view.
They are not trying to hide.
They are violent and they
are threatening. I'm a bus
driver. My business is peo-
ple and I'm concerned about
the poeple, said Kight who
named fiver troubled spots
where bus stops are located.
.Some of the bus stops
cited by Knight are located
near the FCCJ Station,
Beaver and Ocean Streets,
Beaver and Liberty Streets,
Newnan and Church Streets,
the Phoenix Avenue near 11
Street, First and Market
Streets, Sevneth and
Hubbard Streets, and Union
and Market Streets.
Former City
Councilwoman and State
representative Denise Lee,
who spoke on Decorum dur-
ing the meeting, applauded
Knight for coming forward
to voice his concerns. She
said that every 'traveler
should be aware of the
unwritten and written rules
of behavior.
"We really have to go
back to the old way of doing
things. We have to tell peo-
ple when they are
wrong...We have to take that
risk," said Lee.


Richard Gentry
Lee and members of the
Concerned Citizens urged
Richard Gentry, JTA's new
Chief of Security, to work
with the Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office to step up
surveilence of the bus stops.
Gentry, a retired law
enforcement official from
Kansas City, MO., provided
an update on things JTA is
doing to make riding the bus
a continued safe experience.
He said plain clothes off
duty police officers are rid-\
ing the buses and buses will
be equipped with video
cameras in the near future.
"I think this (improving
safety measures) is some-
thing we can continue to do
to make people feel safe.
We .have to take a layered
approach. Not just one thing
will work. It's a combina-
tion of everything," said
Gentry.
Gentry said passengers
or citizens who see something
unusual occurring at bus
stops and on buses should
call JTA authorities..
Mrs. Charlotte Hall,
Supervisor of Bus
Operations for JTA provided
additional updates on
progress being made by JTA
to improve its service to pas-
. sengers and the community.
Lee Burner, Vice
President of JTM, also
addressed the group.
During previous efforts
the Concerned Citizens,
under the leadership of
Joseph Johnson, President,
has worked with JTA to
launch the "Don't Cuss On
The Bus" passenger deco-
rum campaign.
The group also urged
JTA to place automated sit'


gage on buses informing
passengers of the JTA Rules
Of The Road.



DEATH

NOTICES
AGGREY-Jason, died October
3, 2005.
BRADLEY-Oretha 0., died
October 8, 2005.
BUTLER-Mamie Lucille
Home, died October 4, 2005.
Alphonso West Mortuary, Inc.
CARTER-Rickey Earl, 48.,
died October 9, 2005.
COVIN-Sally Mae. Died
October 10, 2005.
DAVALT-Clarence Joseph, Sr.
Died October 9, 2005.
DAVIS-Janiea. Died October 8,
2005.
DENNIS-Theola, died October
6, 2005.
FISHBURNE-Xavier Rashad,
Jr. died October 6, 2005.
HICKS- Beverly, died October
8, 2005.
HUDSON-Cary, Sr., died
October 4, 2005.
JENKINS-Felepia H., died
October 9, 2005.
JENKINS-Johnnie F., Sr., died
October 6, 2005.
JENKINS-Michael S., died
October 9, 2005. '
JORDAN-Frederick, died
October 7, 2005.
JOHNSON-Andrew L., Sr.,
died October 4, 2005.
LOWE-Dorrell V., died
October 9, 2005.
MACK-Walker J., died October
9, 2005.
MARTIN-Janet, died
September 29, 2005.
MOORE-Ethel, died October
9, 2005.
NEWMUIS-Ernestine, died
October 7, 2005.
PIGG-Wesley Leonard, 21,
died October 9, 2005.
POWELL-Reverend Thomas,
Sr., died October 7, 2005.
Alphonso West Mortuary, Inc.
PRIME-Jerry Prime, 60, died
October 7, 2005.
SHIELDS-Rudolph D., died
October 9, 2005.
TWIGGS-Beatrice, died
October 9, 2005.
WATSON-Kevin V., died
October 9, 2005.
WEAVER-Kenya, died
October 6, 2005.
WIGGINS-Mary Ann Johnson,
died October 5, 2005. Alphonso
West Mortuary, Inc.
WILLIAMS-Ethel Louise,
died October 6, 2005. Alphonso
West Mortuary, Inc.


a


FiORR~ii ) STAR


PAGE C-3


n'r~TlI^np 7J If *^f







TA ------


Geechee's Fight For Geechee Rights iT .


Elaine Brown, candidate for Mayor of Brunswick
became a registered voter
in the city on November 5,
2004 and considers herself
a part of the Geechee
community. Now her res-
idency in the city, because
of her desire to become
J mayor where 70% of the
population is black, is
being questioned. ,
Georgia Code 21-2-
Elaine Brown 217, 15(b) says: "In deter-
mining a voter's qualifica-
tion to register and vote, the registrars to whom such
application is made shall consider, in addition to the'
applicant's expressed intent, any relevant circumstances
determining the applicant's residence.
The registrars taking such registration may consider
the applicant's financial independence, business pursuits,
employment, income sources, residence for income tax
purposes, age, marital status, residence of parents,
spouse, and children, if any, leaseholds, sites of personal
and real property owned by the applicant, motor vehicle


and other personal property registration, and other such
factors that the registrars may reasonably deem necessary
to determine the qualification of an applicant to vote in a
primary or election. The decision of the registrars to
whom such application is made shall be presumptive evi-
dence of a person's residence for voting purposes."'
After review and a determination is made, the person
may receive registration. Elaine Brown is a registered
voter who would be registered more than the required one
year to be eligible to run for the position of mayor the city
on Election Day, 2005. Why is a hearing necessary?
According to Ms. Browning, the Geechee people and
others in Brunswick have long been denied their rights as
citizens to have a voice in the communities. She said Ms.
Brown is being subjected to a vicious attack from the
power brokers to disallow her qualification on a residen-
cy challenge for the November ballot.
The Geechee community rallied at the Glynn County
Board of Election office on Thursday prior to the Board's
decision, which will be announced on Friday, October 14
at 4:30 p.m.
The Geechee community said, "Keep Elaine Brown on
the Ballot! There is no justification for her not to remain
on the ballot when reading the Georgia Code


Gift Baskets
Handbags
Hats
Gloves
Shoes
T-Shirts
Socks
Monday Thursday Friday
1 p.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday
10 a.m. 6 p.m.
.. | .. ., .. w rw1era a a e .. ..*. .


Sonji Clay-Glover, First Wife of Muhammad Ali Dies


Sonji Clay-Glover, the
first wife of boxing great
Muhammad Ali, has died.
She was 59.
Clay-Glover's body was
found early Tuesday in her


home in Chicago's South
Side, according to the
Cook County medical
examiner's office.
The office on
Wednesday said her death


was reported to them as
being of natural causes so
no autopsy would be per-
formed.
Sonji was introduced to
Ali by his manager when


he was still, known as
Cassius Clay.
. They married 41 days
after their meeting on
August 14, 1964 and
divorced in 1966.


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,. .FOR READING
"-" THE FLORIDA
v .STAR
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and have .,
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Source: The Media Audit ,
2004 Black N4Vspapers Readership Report, nnpa.org :
P I ,'' mm P 4 Baa la i.i'.' 0 A alA P Z M


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OCTOBER 15, 2005


FLORIDAA STAR


PDAGI C r


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qPr'gnsa Ineai~ I~








JL ID2ISEK 1.), -'UW UJA


"As


Cincinnaii wiue receiver Cnada JouhsII ntoo 11 wmiit
jersey) prepares to run a route under the watchful eyes
of Jacksonville cornerback Rashean Mathis (#27 in dark
Jaguar tight end George Wrighster (#87) receives a pass jersey). Mathis and the Jaguar defenders took some
from quarterback Byron Leftwich, runs and leaps across steam out of Johnson's pride with excellent coverage
a Cincinnati defender to score a 26 yard touchdown. A throughout the game. Johnson did score with 5:36 left
PAT kick by Josh Scobee put the Jags ahead 7-0 with in the first quarter after ctaching a 14-yard pass from
10:31 left to play in home game against the Bengals on quarterback Carson Palmer. Jacksonville held on to win
Sunday night October 9. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREEN) 27-21. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREEN)

EWC Wins HBCU Classic With Win Over Clark-Atlanta


Members of the Edward Waters College Fighting Tigers football team savor the sweet
taste of the team's first victory of the 2005 season. The Tigers defeated Clark-Atlanta
20-13 in the HBCU Classic played on Saturday, October 8 in Greenville, S.C. The
Residential Life staff and students treated the team cake and refreshments. (PHOTO BY
JAY BAKER)
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--------------------------------------------------__


A crowd of 7288 at
Sirrine Stadium in
Greenville, S.C. saw the
Edward Waters College
football get their first taste
of victory in the 2005 sea-
son.
The Tigers, 1-6, defeated
Clark-Atlanta University
20-13 for a win in the
HBCU Classic on Saturday,
October 8. The Tigers
savored the win even though
the offense had only 84
yards of total offense ( 70
passing and 14.rushing).
Josh Wade booted two
field goals for the Tigers--
one for 40 yards and another
for 37--to help the Tigers
clinch, the victory. The
Tigers travel to Columbia,
S.C. on October 15, for a
5:00 p.m. Southeast
Atlantic Conference game


HG ~ n I ~ i" Ljr'. '-- ~U-x' 'r Ll


October 6
SC State 35, Norfolk State 21 -
October 8
Edward Waters 20, Clark Atlanta 13 -
Allen 42, Chowan 21
Concord 24, West Virginia State 13 -
Delaware State 17, Bethune-Cookman 0
Mansfield 38, Cheyney 17 -
Glenville State 50, Central State 20 -
Bowie State 13, Elizabeth City State 8 -
Hampton 52, Gardner Webb 21 -Fort
Valley State 22, Kentucky State 12 -
Virginia State 26, Saint Paul's 20 30T
Shaw 48, Virginia Union 41 20T


Alcorn State 22, Prairie View A&M 10 -
Langston 22, Texas College 10 -
Lincoln (MO) 48, Georgia State 0
Benedict 21, Stillman 10 -
Tuskegee 34, Morehouse 24 -
McNeese State 46, Texas Southern 28 -
Miles 28, Lane 14 -
N.C. A&T 40, Morgan State 33 OT
Saint Augustine's 26, Johnson C. Smith 7 -
Alabama State 44, Jackson State 23 -
Winston-Salem State 42, Livingstone 14 -
NC Central 17, Fayetteville State 12 -
Grambling State 37, Miss Valley State 22 -
Alabama A&M 20, Southern 7 -


1. Whose return to tennis on April 15, 1988 coincided with the Dow Jones Industrial Average
dropping 101 points?
2. What did Cincinnati Red Eric Davis do in nine consecutive at-bats to set a major league
record in 1987?
3. What Mike Tyson opponent did comedian Jackie Mason assert "doesn't need a weigh-in, he
needs a way out"?
4. What male figure skater weighed 108 pounds at the 1984 Winter Olympics?
5. Whom did Ben Johnson glare at triumphantly while crossing the 100-meter finish line at the
1988 Olympics?
6. What future Nike plugger averaged 17.1 points per basketball game at the 1984 Olympics?
7. What's the only country to have been represented at every summer and winter Olympiad?
8. What Cincinnati street was Pete Rose on when he failed to talk his way out of a 1988 traf-
fic ticket?
9. What year saw Waymon Tinsdale and Patrick Ewing playing for the U.S. Olympic basket-
ball team?
10. What Oakland A's slugger was late to 1988 spring training due to attending bubble gum
card shows?
Sports Challenge Answers

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ooosugD
OSOf 0I '017861 "6 '"MA so> d Id "8 'SurlIJU H1 "JD '.up-iof pl-qo'IN "9 'Slm
FED .9 'u011!rH 1 I S "1 "s>tunds I TN." '.o IS '.0oiuao U uqof 'I


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----------


SI


PAGE C-5


FrLnOrnIA cTAR


Running back Fred Taylor takes on on a 41 yard touch-
down run while being chased by two Bengal defenders
with 12:52 remaining in the first quarter at Altell
Stadium. The touchdown was nullified after wide receiv-
er Jimmy Smith was hit with a penalty for offensive
holding. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREEN)

Jaguars Win in Cat Fight

Against Cincinnati Bengals;

Team's Focus Is On Steelers

Defensive end Bobby McCray knocked the ball out of
Cincinnati quarterback Carson Palmer's hand at the
Jacksonville 45-yard line with 1:28 to play.. Akin Ayodele,
who dropped a possible interception the play before, recov-
ered it and the Jaguars knocked the bengals from the unbeat-
en ranks with a 23-20 on Sunday night., October 8 in Altell
Stadium.
A national audience wathced on television as Jaguar
quarterback Byron Leftwich' threw two touchdowns.
Runningback Fred Taylor ran for a season-high 132 yards
and led the Jaguars' rushing attack.
Jaguar place kicker Josh Scobee kicked three field goals,
including a 51-yarder in the second period and a 53-yarder
with 9:45 to play that gave the Jaguars (3-2) a 10-point lead.
The Jaguars will be on the road on Sunday, October 16 to
play the Pittsburgh Steelers. Steeler quarterback Ben
Roethlisberger hurt his knee on the Steelers' final drive
Monday night, October 11 in San Diego.
The Steelers may keep Roethlisberger out of the game
against Jacksonville's tough defense. The Jaguars are sec-
ond in the NFL in passing yards allowed, and fifth in the
AFC with 12 sacks.
Jacksonville's defense is allowing 'only 155.2 passing
yards per game while playing against quality quarterbacks
Peyton Manning, Carson Palmer and Matt Hasselbeck. The
Jaguars knocked out Jets quarterbacks Chad Pennington and
Jay Fiedler for the season in Week 3.







JL.--V -- -.-- -S---


JAIL OR BAIL

EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law: Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
VIOLATION OF INJUNCTION-On Monday,
October 10, 2005 at 2:20 a.m., an officer responded to a
reported battery call. Upon arrival, the officer met with
a 25- year-old female (victim), who was holding the
.back of her head. She had a cut, blood and swelling on
the back of her head as well as a cut and swelling on her
left wrist. She told, the police officer that her husband
(suspect), whom she is separated from and has had an
injunction against him since May 31, 2005, chased her
to her front door, grabbed her and threw her down. The
suspect then struck her several times with his fists and
foot. A witness, who is a neighbor, corroborated the vic-
tim's story and reportedly had to pull the suspect off the
victim. On October 10 at 2:28 a,m. a police officer was
dispatched to 501 E. Bay St. in reference to an individ-
ual turning himself in on a warrant. Upon arrival, the
police officer met with the suspect and the suspect
advised that he had a warrant. The officer verified the
warrant through ID and records. The officer read the
suspect his rights, transported him to jail, and charged
him with a felony.
POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA-On Monday,
October 10, 2005 at 7:10 a.m. an officer working at
Andrew Jackson High School as the school resource
officer, walked across the street to Main Street
Convenience Store in reference to several students loi-
tering. Upon approaching the store, the officer smelled
a strong odor of marijuana proceeding from the area
where the 18-year-old male (suspect) was standing.
When the officer approached the suspect, he attempted
to walk away. When the officer placed an arm out to
keep the suspect from leaving, the suspect threw a bag
of marijuana on the ground. The suspect was arrested,
read his rights, and was charged with a misdemeanor.
The marijuana was placed in the property room for evi-
dence.
PETIT THEFT-On Saturday, October 8, 2005 at 4:27
p.m. a police officer was dispatched to the 9700 block
of Atlantic Boulevard (T J MAXX), in reference to a
shoplifter. Upon arrival, the officer made contact with
the store manager who stated that a 22-year-old female
(suspect), and co-defendant stole items from the busi-
ness. The store manager stated that he observed the sus-
pects enter the store and head to the kid's section. The
officer learned that the suspects defeated the sensors on
the clothes they had selected to steal, and went into the
men's section of the store where they put the items in
their purses. The store manager told the officer that prior
to the suspects leaving the store, they placed their purs-
es ,in the shopping cart and exited the store without pay-
ing for the items. The store manager stated that he then
stopped both suspects and held them until the police
arrived. Both suspects agreed with the store manager as
to what had taken place within the store. Both suspects
had valid identification and a check with ID and records
indicated that the 22-year-old suspect had been arrest-
ed on August 28, 20Q5 and was not eligible for NTA.
Suspect #2 was eligible for an NTA. Suspect #1 was
read her rights, .transported to jail, and charged with a
misdemeanor.
POSSESSION OF CONTROL SUBSTANCE WITH
INTENT TO SELL-On Saturday, October 8, 2005 at
5:15 p.m. two undercover detectives were posing as
drug buyers in the 4200 block of N. Main St. They made
contact with a 21-year-old male (suspect), and engaged
him in conversation about purchasing some crack
cocaine. The suspect directed the detectives to a resi-
dence in the 100 block of E. 42nd Street. The suspect
went into the residence and returned to the undercover
vehicle. The detectives paid the suspect $50.00 for
three pieces of crack cocaine. The take down signal was
given and the suspect fled on foot. One of the detectives
apprehended the suspect after a short foot chase. The
suspect was advised of his rights. The suspect stated
that he knew why he was being arrested, and that he did
not want to talk about it. The suspect was transported to
jail and charged with a felony.
POSSESSION OF CONTROL SUBSTANCE WITH
INTENT TO USE-On Sunday, October 9, 2005 at 4:30
a.m. while on patrol, an officer observed a 39- year-
old female (suspect) walking through a high drug traffic
area in the 3200 block ofJustine Rd, at 4:30 a.m. Upon
making contact with the suspect, the officer asked the
suspect where she was going and the suspect stated that
she was going to her friend's house. The officer checked
for warrants on the suspect. The check revealed nega-
tive results. The officer asked the suspect if she had any-
thing illegal on her such as guns, knives, or drugs, and
the suspect stated no. The officer conducted a pat down
for weapons after observing a bulge in suspect's left
front pocket. While conducting the pat down of the sus-
pect, the officer felt what appeared to be a crack pipe in
the front pocket. The officer asked the suspect if she


would consent to the pipe being removed and she said
"yes". Upon removing the object from the suspect's
pocket, the officer observed the glass crack cocaine pipe
containing a piece of crack cocaine and another piece of
crack cocaine in her front pocket. The substance field
tested positive and was placed into the property room
as evidence. The suspect was read her rights. She stat-
ed that 'the clothes she was wearing were not hers and
that they belonged to a friend. The suspect stated that
her friend does not live in the area, but had left the
clothes at her apartment. The suspect was arrested,
, transported to jail, and charged4with a felony.


Your Weekly Horoscope
(OCTOBER 15, 2005-OCTOBER 21, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19)A busi-
ness deal goes
better than
expected..
Socially, you gad about
quite happily this week.
Take time to catch your
breath over the weekend.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) In
defending a
friend, don't get
into a fight with
your .mate. Sometimes,
you're too involved in oth-
ers' problems. Loved ones.
can take offense.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) A
minor delay in
your plans throws
you off track.
However, things clear up by
midweek. Later, travel and
romance go hand-in-hand.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) Take some time.
D this week to
reconnect with
\our mate. Some
quiet, alone time,
is just what you both, need.
This weekend, tackle some
chores you'd been procrasti-
nating on.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22)
Look for ways to
improve yourself.
Believe it or not,
it can be done. Ultimately,
this aids in your success.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) You're
tempted to give in
to stress. This isn't
good for you
emotionally or
physically. If need be, don't
be afraid to ask for help.
LIBRA .(September
23 to October
22) You've been
somewhat obliyi-
ous to a close
friend's ploy for attention.
Experience will tell you that


you're right to ignore this.
You don't need to be this
person's crutch.
SCORPIO (October
23 to Noiember 21) It's
Unlike you to be
reticent about
I' -I anything you.
have to say. Don't
worry. You can speak your
mind tactfully and still get
your point across.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December. 21)
Financial matters
are favored.
However, domes-
tic matters are another story.
By week's end, you sort
everything through satisfac-
torily.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19)
Sta\ out of the
fray this week on
the home front.
Others will strive mightily
to get you involved.
However, this really has
nothing to do with you, and
you're wise to realize it.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February) 18)
Early in the week,
business meetings
prove frustrating.
Put that mind to work and
come up, with a new plan.
You're certainly up to the
challenge!
PISCES (February
19 to March
20) Friends are
making unfair
demands on your
time. Feel free to say no.
You don't have to attend
every party or event.
CELE BRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Kevin
Kline, October 24; Marion
Ross, October 25; Hillary
Rodham Cjinton, October
26; Roberto Benigni,
October 27; Lauren Holly,


Singing Protesters

Disrupt Pastor's Sermon

PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. A church pastor called
deputies to remove 16 congregants who refused to stop
singing as he tried to begin his sermon, according to a
sheriffs report.
Pastor David Noel reported a disturbance at the
Bethanie Seventh-day Adventist Church to the Charlotte
County Sheriffs Office when the group would not allow
the Saturday morning service to continue.
All 16 church members were issued trespass warn-
ings and left the property without incident, according to
a sheriffs report.
One congregant who received a. warning said the
group was protesting Noel's leadership and alleged mis-
use of insurance money for damage to the church caused
by Hurricane Charley.
"We received $364,000, but he told us we only got
$264,000 because he wanted to give $100,000 to anoth-
er church in Fort Myers," Monique Robert said Monday.
"But this money is for Bethanie. We want all the money
for our church."
Another congregant, Edourd A. Pierrelus,- alleged
that Noel struck his chest and twisted his left earlobe
during an Oct. 1 meeting to elect new church board
members.
"Many things are wrong in the church," Pierrelus told
deputies Saturday. "We don't want him to be the pastor."
Noel declined to comment to reporters Monday. "I
don't have much to tell you, just that we are preaching
the word .here," he said. Milton Sterling, ministerial
director for the Southeastern Conference governing the
region's Adventist congregations, said church officials
were investigating the incidents..

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Teen Finds Razor In

Chicken Sandiwch

PALM COAST, Fla. A 16-year-old student bit into
a razor blade while eating a chicken sandwich he pur-
chased at his high school, authorities said.
Craig Beat was not injured when he found the blade
in his chicken patty Sept. 21, the Flagler County
Sheriffs Office said.
Beat told school officials that he bought the sandwich
at Flagler Palm Coast High School and sat down to eat it
in the school's lunchroom, according to a sheriffs
report.
Investigators did not know how the razor blade got
into the sandwich.
A spokeswoman for the Atlanta-based company that
prepares and distributes the sandwiches said an internal
investigation concluded that the razor blade must have
been inserted into the chicken patty after it left the plant
were it was cooked and frozen.
No razors are used in the manufacturing process, and
all food leaving the company's plants pass through metal
detectors, said Gold Kist Inc. spokeswoman Karla
Harvill.
Gold Kist products have since been removed from all
cafeterias in the school district, officials said.

Crime doesn't
pay but we do!
CRIME STOPPERS
1-866-845-TIPS (8477)
No Names...
No Faces... No Hassles


OCTOBER 15, 2005


FLORIDAA STARR


PAGE r-







FLORIDA STAR


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PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
*CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764







THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

CURL QUEEN
"Specials"
Curls -Ages 7-12 ONLY $29.95
Relaxer w/ Roller Set ONLY
$25.00
766-4510

Want to purchase minerals and
other oillgas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201

Rooms for Rent
Adults preferred
Nice clean quiet area
Call: Mike or Cynt
722-3830


NOTICE OF ACTION


BEFORE THE FLORIDA REAL ESTATE
APPRAISAL BOARD
IN RE: The license to practice Real Estate of: Robert
E. Lee, 345 North Fletcher, Fernandina Beach, Florida
32034. Case No. 2004009729. The Department of
Business and Professional Regulation, has filed an
Administrative Complaint against you, a copy of which
may be obtained by contacting the Division of Real
Estate, 400 W. Robinson St., Suite N801, Orlando,
Florida 32801-1757, (407) 481-5632. If no contact has
been made by December 9, 2005, the matter will be
presented at an ensuing meeting of the Florida Real
Estate Appraisal Board in an informal proceeding.


Announcements

OCTOBER BEAD FESTS October7t, 8tl.9th Pompano Bcach.Elks
Lodge. October 15th, 16thHavana FL. The Planters Exchange. October
29th. 30th Ft Myers. Clarion Hotel. Announcing Palm Beach Gardens
November 4th, 5th & 6th Amara Shrine Temple. Bead, PMC, & Wire
Wrapping Classes available. Info at w.\LwOcLQberlei.dEstc.Sotm or
(866)667-3232.


Auctions


AUCTION;!CASIIIERS,NCOctober21.2005 Commercial Buildingot
Hwy 107NLot37A Sapphire Lakes GolfCommunity 10:00A.M.Miscel-
lanceous teams 11:00 A.M. Real Estate 10% Buyers Premium, 10% down.
30DayClosingSavageRealEstate&AuctionCo.inc.NC#7189CiAL#3125
Kenneth Savage (888)983-0066'Toll-free (770)718-8297.

AUCTIONS ONLINE. Used Trucks & Equipment. Register FREE. Low
SELLER fees. Promo, Code SWC-103. Visit ourwebsitebor details and
personal assistance.wwwsurplusonthe NET (877)215-3010.

EstateAuction 167+/- acres- Divided, homesites. hunting timberland.
October29,10:00am C'lxton, EvansCounty, GA. 10%tbuyer's premium,
Rowell Auctions, Inc. (800)323-8388 wsv rowcllauction's corn GAL
AU-C002594.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$S Buy Direct From ManLtfacturer. 20
colors in stock with all Accessories. Quicktum around! Delivery Avail-
ableTollFree 1888)1393-0335.

Business For Sale

ServiceBusines FSBO. Sky'stheliimitiinthis large MILLION DOLLAR
business. htlp'/landscapeandtreecofsho homestead coin, For More Info
Call(941)485-9212.


Business Opportunities


A LLCASH CANDYROUTE Doyou earn S800/day?30 Machines, Free
Candy Allfor$9.995.(888)629-9968 BO2000033.CAtLLUS: Wewill not
be undersold!

$2000 PER WEEK NOW Own your own travel business, Enter the
excitingworldoftravel. Turnkey trainingprovided-"PTYFT$249nminimumn
investment Toll-free(800)684-7920.

DATA ENTRY. Work from anywhere. FlexibleaHours. $$Great Pay $$
Personal Computer Required. Serious Inquiries Only. (800)873-0345 Ext.
499.

LOCALVENDING ROUTE. Soda, snacks, candy, juices,water,great
equip. and locations, fimnancingavailable w/$7,500 down. Call
(877)843-8726- #BO2002-037.

ALLCASH BUSINESS! Local Candy VendingRoutol UnlimitedEarning
Potential. Includes 30 ALL Metal Machines with Candy, Lifetime War-
rantty.$9,895.<800)704.5414.


Financial


IMMEDIATE CASH!!! USPensioniFundingpayscashnowfor8years
of your future pension payments. Call (800()586-1325 for a FREE, no-
obligationestlinale. wwwuspcnsionfundinge om

*.*$500-$50,000++FREE CASH GRANTS!2005!NEVER REPAYI
PersonsalMedicalBills. School,NewBusiness-Home. AsseenonT.V.NO
CREDIiTCHItCK! LiveOperalorsl (800)270-1213 ext.95,

Help Wanted

DELIVERFEMA RV's FOR PAY! NATIONAL RVdelivery service
has immediate needs lrqualified contractorstodeliver"new" RV trailers
from factories and dealers to hurricane reliefsites. This is a great wayfor
youlohelpthevictims.Please logontoday: www horlrontransporl cornm.


T:::]l
BUSINESS NETWORK


1 pm Sat., Oct. 22

Lake Placid, FL.

100 Florida Homesites
in Highlands, Okeechobee & Polk Counties


6 pm Thurs., Oct. 27

Ocala, FL.


57 t PRIME ACRES
Olfoed In nabis adjolnIn Gut Stale Forest
Great lor it uFsdllll or Weeken dIetIAtay


Rural OD lopntal
Track & Homesiti
Locateidin Mition,
Levy & ut m Contie
ItftgimRili


MEE Mienbotham, CAI 800-257.4161
IN. FLi tTU05AB58 1 www.higgenbotham.com


OCTOBER 15, 2005


I I "n"


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L- - - -----------


~1 ABSOLUTE j AUCION [


PUBLIC LEGAL NOTICE
FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS AND CLASSIFICATIONS HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT:
ANY PERSON WISHING TO BE HEARD BEFORE THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD WITH REGARD TO THE
AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION APPLICATIONS MAY PRESENT INFORMATION ON HIS BEHALF
AT THE PRIME OSBORN CENTER, 1000 WATER STREET, 2ND FLOOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, 32204,
OCTOBER 10, 12, 13, 26 & 27, 2005.

A LIST OF ALL APPLICATIONS FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN WHOLLY OR PARTIALLY
APPROVED, AND A LIST OF ALL APPLICATIONS THAT HAVE BEEN DENIED ARE AVAILABLE TO THE PUB-
LIC IN THE INFORMATION CENTER OF THE PROPERTY APPRAISER'S OFFICE, 231 EAST FORSYTH
STREET, FROM 8:00 A.M. TO 5:00 P.M., MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 196.194,
FLORIDA STATUTES, AS AMENDED.

THESE LISTS WILL REFLECT THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF EXEMPTIONS:


HOMESTEAD
WIDOWS
WIDOWERS
DISABILITY
HURRICANE EMERGENCY RELIEF


RELIGIOUS
LITERARY
CHARITABLE
SCIENTIFIC


HOSPITALS
NURSING HOMES
HOMES FOR THE AGED
HOMES FOR SPECIAL SERVICE


IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEALANY DECISION MADE BY THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD WITH
RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING OR HEARING, HE OR SHE WILL NEED A
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS. FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE OR SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT
VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY
AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.


Physical activity Is a great way
for kids to build strength and
stay healthy Unfortunately.
it can sometimes lead to
injury. Broken bones require
immediate attention, but
what about sore shoulders or
swollen knees? If nor taken
seriously many youth injuries
can become chronic later In
life. So before your child gets
hurt. visit aaos.org or nata.org.
Practice prevention and give
all injuries proper attention


fRM HItR J4 A4aDIMY ,,,OMA, IYOl rh C


CDLAOTRDRIVERSTEAMS.50CPM SOLOS.34 CPM 100% DROP
&HOOKHEALTIEH}3BENEFIT' SASSIGNEDEQUIPMENTREQUIRE--
1 YEAR OTRHAZMAT&DOUBLES (321)202-4406.

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay & Benefits for
Experienced Drivers, 0/0. Solos, Teams& Graduate Students. Bonuses
Available. Rlefiigerated Now Available. (888)MORE PAY
(888-667-3729).

NowHiringfor200SPostalPositions$17.50-$59.00+/hlr.Fuill Benefits/
Paid Training and Vacations No Experience Necessary (800)584-1775
Reference #5600.

MOVIE EXTRAS,ACTORS&MODELSI Make$75-$250/day. All
ages and faces wanted! No oxp. Required. FT/PT! (800)714-7565.

$600WEEKLYWorkingthrough the government part-time. No Experi-
ence. A lot ofOpportunities. (800)493-3688 Code J- 14.

S/E & 3-State Run: fDT Drivers. HOME WEEKENDS. Mileage Pay,
Benefits. 401 K. "Trainees Welcome. Miami area- exp. req. 21t min age/
Class-A CDLCypressTrick Lines(800)545-.1351.

STABLECAREER.IMMEDIATE OPENINGS:tPositionsavailable tor
ExperiencedCD I Holders. Also Conpaty FundedTruck DriverTraining
offered. Financial assistance for Hurricane Victims. (877)PRIME-JOB.
www primeine como

Driver- NOW HIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for Central Florida
Local & National OTR positions. Food grade tanker, nolhaznat,nopuntmps,
great benefits, competitive pay & new equipment. Need 2 years experi-
ence. Call Bynurm Transportf ioryouropportunity today. (800)741-7950.

Companyandy 0/0 Needed 87 cents per mile all Dead head paid + fsc.
Call Don SaltsmanCTC Truckinglnc. (321)630-1522.


Legal Services


ALLAccidents& fInjury Ctinms. AU'OMOBILE. BIKE/BOAT/BUS,
ANIMAL BITES, WORKERS COMPENSATION. WRONGFUL
DEATH, NURSING HOME INJURIES. "ProtectYour Rights" A-A-A
ATTORNEY ReferralService (800)733-5342.

NEEDALAWYER?All CriminialDeOfese& Personal Injury, *Felonies
*Domestic Violence *Misdemeanors *DUI *Traffie *Auto Accident
*Wrongful Death. "Protect Your Rights" A-A-A Attorney Referral
Service (800)733-5342.

DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS children, etc. Only one signature re-
quired!s *Excludes govtl fees Call weekdays (800)462-2000, ext,600.
(8am-7pm)Al taDivorce, .LLC. Established 1977.

Miscellaneous

Jobsite Lef'tovers! (7) 48" x 100" ,s I/4" at $ 115.00each: (9) 72" x 100"
x I/4" at $165.00 each. Will deliver, can Install, Everything MUSTOOI
Call Now! (888)306-9046.

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Medical, *Business, *P0aralegul,
*'Computers,. Job Placement Assistance. Computer & Financial aid if
qualify. (866)858-2121 sw ,.o.tli.t is).l rt, hi iom).

Real Estate

North Carolina Gated LiakefriontCommutnlty1l.5acres plus,90 milesof
shoreline, Never before offered with 20% pre-development discounts,
90% lnianclng,Call(800)709-5253.


ELAINE FEBLES, AIDE
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD


GLORIOUS JOHNSON, CHAIR
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD

CHERYL L. BROWN, CLERK
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD


Board Members: Council Members Daniel Davis and Art Shad
School Board Members Betty Burney and Vicki Drake
Tommy Hazouri (Alternate)


ADVERTISEMENTS:

DUE: a

Tuesday @ 5 p.m.

904-766-8834

a Email your ad:

ad@thefloridastar.com:


NC MOUNTAINS-10+ Acres/Stream/$39,900. Grand Opening- Octo-
ber 22-23. Spectacular long rangeviews! Near BluieRidgeParkway and
Boone. Excellentfinancing. roads& utilities. (800)455-1981, ext.210.

ENDOFSEASON BLOWOUTSALE!CANYONFERRYCROSSING,
HELENA, MONTANA. Only8t parcels left in thisntagnificentdovelop-
ment. Awesome lake and mountain views, closet Canyon Ferry Lake,
minutes to Ielena. Ownertopay closingcosts, Call (888)770-2240.

GRANDOPENINGSALE! Lake Bargains! Wateraccessfrom$34,900
w/FREEBoat Slips.PAYNOCLOSING COSTS Sat&Sun).n I 5& 16.
SHuge pre-construction savings on beautifully wooded parcels at 34,000
acre lake Tennessee., Enjoy unlimited water recreation. Surrounded by
state forest. Lakefront available! Excellent financing! Call now
(800)704-3154X658.

NC MOUNTAIN CABIN unfurnished inside., on mountain top, view,
trees, waterfall & large public lake nearby. $89.900 owner
(866)789-8535 oss:,N.C77..ots

TENNESSEE -NEW LAKESIDE COMMUNITY I- acre homnesites
from the 30's. Private boatslips-limited availability. Close to downtown
Chattanooga/Knoxville. Lakeaccess from comnuntmity.(866)292-5769.

ASHEVILLE NC AREA- WATERFRONT & MOUNTAIN
IHOMESITES Gorgeous riverfront, river view & wooded homesiles.1
acres ion ithe 40's. Gated community withamenities CALL
(866)292-5762.

FLORIDA LANI FOR SAL.E- Building Lots starting alt$2'.900t Fast
growingaretis.Orettinvestmentopportunity. Forsizes,photos, pricesgo
to:w5.a.,.EoI|.p.5iltlU.SA,..o..lor call (877)983-6600.

"TENNESSEE LAKE PROPERTIES" LocatedonpristineNoTrisl.ake.
TVA's first reservoir. Lakefronts, lake& mountainviews, homes and land,
CA LL lakeside Realty(423)626-5820 www lakcsiderealr-tn cout

Serene Mountain Gulf Homesite $342/ month. Breathtaking views.
Upscalegolfceontunitysetan d Dyedesigned 18holecourseinCarollna
Moauntains.NearAshevilleNC. A sanctioned Gol fDigestSchnols tacih-
Ing Ifacilityl Call toll-'rcc (800)334-3253 X 974
ww\y clI trokecytlvsec camn Price: $609,900 10%d own balance litna cd
at 4.94% lxed,24 itonitlballaont. OA'C.

NEW MEXICO-20 acres$39,900 Scenic region, views. canyons, trees,
rolling hills, wildlife. Enjoy huttling, hiking, horses ,greatclimate. Power,
great access. 100% financing Call (914)232-5100.

Cotistal North Carolina Wiaterfront! 3+/- Acres. $99.900 Beautifitilly
wooded parcel on deep beatable water with access to ICW, Atlantic &
sounds. Prime location close to town, Paved rds., ugutilities, county water.
Excellent financing.Callnow(800)732-6601 x 1405.

SO ITHCOASTALGEORGIA$l 49,9100FOR A2+ACREDE(PitWA TER
MARSH LOT$224,900 FOR A3+ACRE OVERSIZED DIEIP)WATlER
I.-OT45 minl from Jacksonville /15 nt from St. Simhnon's., Call today for
appointment. Excellent Financing available. (877)OA-OCEANx708.

SOUTH COASTALGEORGIA3+ Acres DeepwaterOceantAccess Lot
from just $240 per month!* 45 min from Jacksonville/ 15 min from St.
Simon'sCttlllodaytforappointment.Excellentianintclngavailable.(877)GA-
OCEAN x703 t*mtonthlypmntof$240.32baseLd on $59,900purchaseprice
w/l 0% down paymenitol'$5,990, $53,910 lifanced at 5,19% fixed (APR
.. .nh ... h ,, W t .. ... ... ,,n ,

Steel Buildings

BUILDING SALEI "Last Chancel" 20x26 Now $3955.25x30, $5700.
30x40, $8300A40x60, $$12,900 Many iOthers. Mees 140MP.H. Higher
available, One end Includtled, Pioneer (800)668-5422,


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. ESCAPE THE HEAT IN THE
COOL BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN NC.
Homes. Cabins. Acreage & Investments. Chberokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real state. Murphy www.cherokenmountiainrtealty.com Call for
Free Brochure(800)841-5868,

East AlabamniMountaln Property 'or SleOne housrwestofAtltalntin A N
Piedmont, Al. Great for enjoyment or Investment 16acres-$57,7.50.00
More information Call- GaryMcCurdy (256)239-8001, |NF


CWeek of October 10, 2005) Advertising Network of Florida


-


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Proposal Number 06-04
Maintenance and Repair
Services on Air
ConditioninglHeating Equipment
For the
JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY

Proposals will be received by the
Jacksonville Port Authority (JAX-
PORT) until 2:00 PM, local time, on
Tuesday, November 8, 2005, at
which time they shall be opened in
the First Floor Conference Room,
2831 Talleyrand Avenue,
Jacksonville, Florida, for
Maintenance and Repair on Air
Conditioning/Heating Equipment at
JAXPORT's Talleyrand Marine
Terminal, Blount Island Marine
Terminal, Dames Point Cruise
Terminal and Port Central Office
Building (PCOB). A MANDATORY
pre-proposal conference will be
held at 10:00 A.M. on Tuesday,
October 25, 2005, First Floor
Conference Room PCOB located at
2831 Talleyrand Avenue,
Jacksonville, Florida.

All Proposals must be submitted in
accordance with Specification
Number 06-04, which may obtained
after 8:30 a.m. on October 13,
2005, from:
Procurement & Contract Service
Department
P.O. Box 3005
(2831 Talleyrand Avenue)
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
904/630-3058


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Proposal Number 06-03
Plumbing Maintenance and
Repair Services
For the
JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY

Proposals will be received by the
Jacksonville Port Authority (JAX-
PORT) until 2:00 PM, local time, on
Tuesday, November 3, 2005, at
which time they shall be opened in
the First Floor Conference Room,
2831 Talleyrand Avenue,
Jacksonville, Florida, for Plumbing
Maintenance and Repair Services
at Port Central Office Building,
JAXPORT's Talleyrand Marine
Terminal, Blount Island Marine
Terminal (BIMT) and Dames Point
Cruise Terminal. A MANDATORY
pre-proposal conference will be
held at 10:00 A.M. on Thursday,
October 20, 2005, First Floor
Conference Room PCOB located at
2831 Talleyrand Avenue,
Jacksonville, Florida.

All Proposals must be submitted in
accordance with Specification
Number 06-03, which may obtained
after 8:30 a.m. on October 11,
2005, from:
Procurement & Contract Service
Department
P.O. Box 3005
(2831 Talleyrand Avenue)
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
904/630-3058


Aidvertstment
ti t ,"

Homeowners with

money worries may qualify

for low-interest loans


Have you been turned
down for a loan? Do you
need more than $10,000 for
any reason? Are you paying
more than 10% interest on
any other loans or credit
cards?
If you are a homeowner
and answered 'yes' to any of
these questions, they can tell
you over the phone and
without obligation if you
qualify.
High credit card debt?
Less-than-perfect credit?
Self-employed? Late house


payments? Medical bills?
IRS liens? It doesn't matter!
If you are a homeowner
with sufficient equity,
there's an excellent chance
you will qualify for a loan-
usually within 24 hours.
You can find out over the
phone-and free of
charge--if you qualify.
Honey Mac Home Loans
is licensed by the Florida De-
partment of Financial Ser-
vices. Open 7 days for your
convenience.
1-800-700-1242, ext. 211


r


HIIURRIOfiNE

nfiCwup POWER

No Fuel No Noise Safe Indoors

Under $500

678-494-2035
www.powerpal.us


THE LOAN CORPORATION
Home of the 1.45% Asset Manager Loan"'
* Cut Your Mortgage Payment In Halfl
With rates as low as 1.45% and up to 40 years to pay.
* No Lender Closing Costs. No Points. No Broker Fee.
Loan amounts $250,000 to $5,000,000. We are a direct lender.
* Borrow: $250,000 for $686 /mo, $500,000 for $1,373/mo
Cash out for debt consol., home improvement or investments.
Free No Obligation Approval-Refinance or Purchase Loans
Call Toll Free 800-957-7622
Rntes subject to change and nimy not be available at c.imitment or closing. Equal Housiro Lander, APR is 5,768%.


'A UE U -


^~X;/^jQ[ 1As see

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements! i


Nt if


'aAf_ f i~






tPAGr. L.-O .


L rfAEM al


All About Kids is the premiere pedi-
atric facility in Jacksonville, Florida.
We are dedicated to providing chil-
dren with the highest quality of
health care. Our doctors are Board
Certified Pediatricians with years of
Pediatric Emergency Room experi-
ence. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of
families with busy lifestyles. Come
see why so many parents trust All
About Kids Pediatrics with their chil-
dren's health.


Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and
have pediatric ER experience.


904.565.1271

877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com

12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite I
Located in the new Hidden Hills
Caroline and Monument Rd.)


SERVICES
Asthma Therapy
Pain Relief
Hemoglobin/Hematocrit Testing
Mono Screening
Rapid Strep Screening
Sport and School Participation
Physicals
Urinalysis
Well visits/Immunizations

EMR Technology
Our Electronic Medical Record System
enables us to be more efficient with
less paperwork and allows for:
Direct Pharmacy Link for fast and
convenient prescriptions
Check-in/Check-out process made
quick and efficient
Medical record history inquiries
and transfers that are concise and
easy with electronic database
management
Prompt subspecialty referrals

HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F; weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted

Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225
Executive Park (near the corner of Fort


Betty Asque Davis

REALTOR


'%*son RE-Atv Corp. FAtaTORS'S


615 Highway AIA
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082


Office:
Direct:
Fax:
Toll Free:


904-285-6300
904-473-1502
904-285-5330
800-288-6330


Email: badavis@WatsonRealtyCorp.com


TAMA BRIcVcASTING, INC

















10517 FM




SEAGRAM'S LIVE PRESENTS

LIL MO, XSCAPE, TELA
RAHEEM DE VAUGHN
Tuesday, Oct 18, 2005 @ 9:00pm
***PLUSH***
845 University Blvd N. Jacksonville, FL

LISTEN TO
THE PEOPLE'S STATION TO WIN!!!
Must be 21 years of age to enter
SnRegecy Square Blvd. Suite #200 Jckomle, Fl 32225 Off (914) 4-040 Fi (94) ~80-1051
ww .,oiiilrrti^!,tf'i .!!


Be a Disaster


Relief Hero



Srm Marsha Evans, retired Rear Admiral in the U.S. Navy,
and President and CEO of the American Red Cross.
The Red Cross is there to help you and your family
prepare to meet the challenges of military life.
We're also there to provide security for your family and families
across America when there's a disaster.
Make a financial contribution to the Disaster Relief Fund, which
allows the Red Cross to provide shelter, food, counseling and more
to victims of thousands of disasters across the country each year.
Together, we can save a life.




Marsha 3. "Marty" Evans
President and CEO, American Red Cross
Re AdrArt, US (et..)












+ American
Red Cross
Together, *e cam sw a lift


Pl A d"-r 0


I


_ _


---~ "


FLO0RIDA STAR


OCTOBER 15, 2005