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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section C: Local
 Section C continued
 Section C: Around the Area
 Section C: Sports
 Section C continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
October 8, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00039

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
October 8, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00039

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section C: Local
        page C 1
    Section C continued
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Around the Area
        page C 4
    Section C: Sports
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text





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"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"


"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


tFLORIDA-

thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
1:00 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


Man In Fatal Hit-And-Run Arrested;


Had


Five Outstanding Warrants Pending


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. He was a 16-year-old
Raines High School student,
crossing Moncrief near Ken
Knight on his bike Monday.
His name was Jason
Aggrey, born January 9,
1989. He was a 21-year-old,
driving a 1986 Buick Regal
traveling westbound in the
4400 block of Moncrief Rd.
West at a high rate of speed
when the two met in a very
disastrous manner. His name
is Donald Lawrence Jones,
Donald Lawrence Jones, Jr Jr., born April 4, 1984.
Supect According to the police
report, Jones' car was traveling at approximately 60
MPH in a 45 MPH speed zone. He was not in his vehi-
cle alone.
When the 16-year-old bicyclist was attempting to


Man Killed While


Fiancee In Labor


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
- Issac Peterson, 20, was
planning to marry the
mother of his unborn son
on Friday. He had spent
time with his fiancee from
the time she went into
labor.


He left the hospital,
according to Chris-Tavia
Dixon, his fiancee to get
her some pajamas when
according to sources, he
was at Park Street and
Cassat Avenue, traveling
west on Park when he col-
lided with a Chevy Impala
that was headed north on
Cassat where he was
killed. The driver of the
other vehicle has not been
charged but an investiga-
tion is still underway.
Chris-Tavia gave birth
to their 7 pound 4 ounce
son and named him
Dixon, in honor of his
father. She said he really
wanted a family. Many
residents of the city
moaned this tragedy.


cross the roadway, the front of the
vehicle struck the bicycle causing
the rider to be ejected into the
windshield and other parts of the
vehicle. The car then left the
roadway, struck a utility pole and
overturned. At that point, the
driver and his passenger immedi-
ately ran from the car and disap-
peared in the nearby Washington
Heights neighborhood.


Jason Aggrey
Victim


Spencer Is King

At 105-Years-Of-Age


James Spencer (seated) is flanked by family members


JACKSONVILLE,
Fla.--James Harvey
Spencer, born October 3,
1900, celebrated 105
years of travel on this
journey as family and
friends gathered on
Monday, October 3 at his
home on West 19th
Street.
Attending the birth-
day celebration were his
children Charles,
George, Larry, Florine,
Birdie, and Doris. Mr.
Spencer has survived
two wives, has over 100
grand and great grand


children, and has a lot of
nieces and nephews.
The conversation with
Florine Jackson, his old-
est daughter, was like a
walk down the halls of
history. Born in
Woodbine Georgia, Mr.
Spencer moved to
Jacksonville when he
was 21.
After spending time in
the Army during World
War II, he was dis-
charged in 1944 and went
to work for Alton Box
Co. Loving God and his
Spencer continued on A-7


The officers closed Moncrief from Cleveland Road:
almost to Soutel as they investigated the accident and:
searched for the driver and passenger of the Buick Regal
that had struck Jason.
Jason Aggrey, whose dream, according to his moth-
er, Ms. Bernice Buckman, was to become a racecar driv-
er, unfortunately, will not be able to realize his dream.
He was taken to Shands Hospital where he later died
from the injuries he received in the accident.
Hit-And-Run continued on A-7

Pulitzer Prize Playwright

August Wilson, Dead At 60
wJacksonville residents
were able to enjoy
st August Wilson's The
Piano Lesson in August,
.2005 at the Ritz Theatre
& LaVilla Museum.


winning playwright
& passed away Sunday at
the age of 60 from liver
August Wilson cancer.
Wilson was born on April 27, 1945 to a German
father and black mother in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He
rose from poverty to become the only playwright to
have more plays produced at the world-renowned
Huntington Theatre in Boston, Massachusetts, than
Shakespeare. Last year, the Huntington premiered
Wilson's play Gem of the Ocean starring Phylicia
Rashad, Lisa Gay Hamilton, Ruben Santiago-Hudson
and Anthony Hamilton.
In August, First Coast's own Ms. Teneese K. Thomas
directed The Piano Lesson which is a story about a fam-
ily set in 1937, which was part of a cycle of plays
Wilson wrote that included the Tony-Award winning,
Fences. Each of his award winning plays was a part of
his artistic ambition, which was to write ten plays, each
set in a different decade of the 20th Century. His plays
aspired to document the black experience.
When he was told he had three to five months to
live, he said "I've lived a blessed life. I'm ready." In
recognition of August Wilson and his remarkable talent,
the Virginia Theater on Broadway will be renamed in
his honor on October 16, 2005.


NEWS IN BRIEF
Rally For The 10th
Anniversary Of
Million Man March
A The Pre-Sendoff
Concert Rally for the
10th Anniversary of
Million Man March
will be held on
Saturday, October 8
from 12:00 noon until
5:00 pm. Rappers
DW8 Musik and oth-
ers will entertain the
audience at 916 N.
Myrtle Ave.
Free food will be
provided and the pub-


lic is invited to this fun
filled event.

Gospel Movie In
Theaters Everywhere
Produced,Directed
By FAMU Grad
A groundbreaking


Sony/Screen





Tamyra Gray
Tamyra Gray


Gems
film
pro -
duced
a n d
directed
b y
FAMU's
o w n


Will Packer and Rob
Hardy will hit theaters


throughout the U. S.
Friday.
The film is about a
young singer who turns
his back on God and
his father's church
when tragedy strikes.
The film is full of
awesome new gospel
music produced by
Kirk Franklin and fea-
tures such artists as
Yolanda Adams,
Donnie McClurkin,
Hezekiah Walker, Fred
Hammond, Martha
Munizzi and Tamyra
Gray.


Minorities Pay More
For Home Loans
Minorities are more
likely to receive a loan
wit" -igher interest
rat y or refinance
at
amination of
20 )rtgage data
foi _: according to
U ty, that home-
pu loans was
32 : tong African-
Ar s, 20.3%
am ispanics and
8.-7 -.~ non-Hispanic


Blacks Nationwide
Help Katrina Victims
The Black commu-
nity across the U. S.
showed that we do care
and made unprecedent-
ed outpour of support
through churches, the
BET telethon and small
community efforts to
gather food, supplies,
and clothes to the vic-
tims of Katrina.
"Something about what
we saw in New Orleans
was burned in our con-
sciousness," said Rev.
Jesse Jackson. "It took


our sense of responsi-
bility and sacrifice to
a higher level."
Tom Joyner said,
"Black people have
always tried to help
each other; it's just
part of our nature."
"Back when we were
brought here as slaves,
we didn't have FEMA
or Red Cross or the
Bush administration
that was supposed to
help us. We had to
help ourselves."

Briefs continued on A-7


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


A


A a .


I I
















CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CIIIEF
RON WILLIAMS, SR, SAMUEL CRISWELL
NEWS EDITOR ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
CHERYL COWARD LIZ 1ILLINGSLEA
DESIGN EDITOR ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
COLUMNIST REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DcSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


5AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association


MEMBERSHIPS: ,
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association W 61
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. VERIFICATION
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce
Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


To Be Equal
Constance Baker Motley and August Wilson:
Restorers of Reality
Marc H. Morial, President/CEO, National Urban League
I


Two giants of the
American scene are dead,
and the world is the poorer
for it.
The reason the deaths of
Constance Baker Motley, the
civil rights legend, former
political officeholder and
longtime federal judge, and
August Wilson, certainly one
of the leading playwrights of
the modem American the-
ater, are being so keenly felt
is because their contributions
to America and the world
were so immense.
In one sense, Constance
Baker Motley and August
Wilson made their mark in
two different fields:
Hers was the fact-based
world of civil rights
activism, political leader-
ship, and legal reality, legal
theory and legal practicality.
His was his own brilliant-
ly conceived world of fiction
that was based on a particu-
lar black neighborhood of
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, his
boyhood home.
But if one looks at their
lives and work from a differ-
ent angle-through the
prism of race and American
society-then one sees pro-
found commonalities.
First, it must be said, both
their lives underscore the
dramatic changes that swept
over American society in
their lifetimes.


Constance Baker Motley
was 84 at her death, 24 years
senior to August Wilson; but
the United States of America
both came of age in was
largely the same. That is, it
was a society laced with a
vicious inequality, one in
which in societal terms the
content of the individual
character of black Americans
(and other Americans of
color) counted for nothing.
If you're black, get back
was the ruling principle of
American society in the
decades before the 1960s.
Yet, by the time August
Wilson was born in 1945,
and Constance Baker (she
would get married to her
husband, Joel Wilson
Motley, Jr., who survives
her, in 1946), a daughter of
black working-class parents,
was in her last year as one of
the few women at Columbia
Law School, the winds of
racial change that we know
as the Civil Rights

Movement of the 1950s and
1960s were just about the
reach gale force.
Those gales would be
blown mightily by the
shrewd maneuvering of the
legal arm of the National
Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People, the NAACP Legal
Defense Fund.
Constance Baker Motley,


who joined the NAACP as a
teenager, signed on with
LDF while still in law school
and soon became one of its
most brilliant and coura-
geous-two requirements
for LDF work, the latter
because most of its legal
cases had to be tried in the
South-practitioners.
The cases she was
involved in, from the land-
mark Brown desegregation
case to voting-rights cases to
attempts to integrate the state
universities of Alabama,
Georgia and Mississippi
themselves mark America's
arduous climb to becoming a
democracy in fact not just
rhetoric.
As legal rights were
secured, Constance Baker
Motley was called on to
serve America in other
capacities: as the first black
woman state senator in New
York, as the first women to
be Borough President of
Manhattan at a time when
the borough presidencies of
New York City exercised
considerable sway in the
city's governance, and, by
President Lyndon Johnson's
appointment in 1966, as
America's first black woman
federal judge.
August Wilson worked a
different side of the street, as
one of the characters in his
rich, ten-part cycle of plays
rooted in Pittsburgh's Hill
District might say.
His was a world where
the raw material of reality
was refined by an extraordi-
narily inventive imagination,


a keenly-observant intellect,
a dead-on ear for both music
and speech, a sense of humor
that was by turns sly and
subtle and bawdy, a right-
eous, relentless sense of
anger about racial injustice,
and, above all, a commit-
ment to the history and tradi-
tions of black people in
America.
His larger artistic agenda,
he said during a speech
given in 1991, was "answer-
ing [the African-American
novelist, essayist and civil
rights activist] James
Baldwin when he called for a
'profound articulation of the
black tradition,' which he
defined as 'that field of man-
ners and ritual of intercourse
that will sustain a man once
he's left his father's house.'"
As individuals,
Constance Baker Motley and
August Wilson embodied the
profound tradition within
Black America of the pursuit
of excellence-what the
writer Albert Murray
referred to as the indelible
"ancestral imperative to do
something and become
something and be some-
body."
It was America's great
fortune that they married that
individual drive to African
Americans' pursuit of their
rightful place in the
American past, present and
future-a pursuit that not
only helped restore the reali-
ty of who African Americans
were and are, but has also
redeemed the American
experience itself.


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Dayspring To Worship r

In New Sanctuary


I \
Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-


The congregation of
Dayspring Baptist Church
will begin worshipping in
their new worship facility
on October 16 at 10:00 a.m.
The 121 year-old church


MEMORIAL

In Memory

Of


Joyce P. Thomas
August 10, 1947-
October 3, 2003
Remembering a well-
loved and respected
Woman of God. Mrs.
Joyce P Thomas, devoted
wife, loving mother, sister,
aunt and friend to many,
quietly and peacefully left
our presence and returned
to our Father two years
ago.

She will forever be
remembered by her Godly
counsel, warm and beauti-
ful spirit, sincere words of
inspiration, joyful laugh-
ter, down to earth person-
ality, her sassy way, proud
walk and genuine love for
people and life itself.

Aunt Joyce, we miss you
so much! Your presence
is forever with us. We fell
you in our hearts, see you
in our dreams and talk
about you and the great
times we've had through-
out our lives all the time.

Laughter quickly becomes
tears of joy and sorrow.
You are not only an aunt,
but more of a big sister to
each of us.
This memorial is from
your loving sister,
Freddie M. Armstead;
four daughters, three sons,
special nieces and
nephews who will all see
you again. "To be absent
from the body is to be
present with the Lord."
Thank you for helping to
raise and mold us to be
the Men and Women of
God that we all are.

So, Rest In Peace Aunt
Joyce. Our Angel. Our
Big Sis. We Love You
Dearly and You are
Forever Missed.


I.' -


is relocating from its down-
town location to 5654 Dunn
Ave.
The vision for the move
came under retired Pastor
Moses Javis in 2000.
According to Interim
Pastor Jeffrey K. Rumlin,
the move is "right on time."
"There's a fresh, warm
spirit at Dayspring and the
congregation is ready to pro-
vide relevant ministries to a
growing community," said
Pastor Rumlin.
Members such as
Aletrice P. Harris feel con-
nected to the Jefferson Street
location, but recognize that
relocating is in the best
interest of the church.
"I've have seen some
good days here, but moving
is sign of progress. When
we can better our conditions
we should do so," said
Harris."
The schedule. of
Dedication Week Activities
and guests include:
Monday, October 17,
7:00 p.m.-Pastor Ernie
Murray (Guest Preacher)
and the St. Thomas Baptist
Church Choir.
Tuesday, October 18,
7:00 p.m.- Pastor H.T. Rhim
(Guest Preacher) and The St.
Joseph Baptist Church
Choir.
Wednesday, October 19-
Churchwide Testimony and
Praise Service.
Thursday, October 20,
7:00 p.m.-Pastor Tom E.
Diamond and The Abyssinia
Baptist Church Choir.
Sunday, October 23
10:00 a.m.-Interim Pastor
Jeffrey K. Rumlin will* be
the speaker.
Sunday, October 23, 3:00
p.m. The Official
Dedication Service will be
held. Pastor 0. L.
Blackshear (Guest Preacher)
and The Mt. Pleasant Baptist
Church Choir of Atlanta,
Ga.


SoetingT



A.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR
WHAT DOES GRIEVING MEAN?


When someone we love
dies, it hurts us. We feel sad
that the person will no longer
be around to talk to or to have
fun with. Their absence
leaves a big hole in our lives.
We need to mourn, or
grieve, over losing people and
animals and other things we
love.
But just like when you
skin your knee, the first,
intense pain will go away
after a while.
It takes time for your knee
to heal, but it hurts less and
less each day. It's the same
. when someboOc dies.


That doesn't mean you
forget the person who died,
or that you stop missing
them.
After a while, we can go
back to our lives, still loving
them and remembering them
always.
Remembering people we
love who have died is one
way to keep them a part of us.
Pictures help us do this.
Looking at a photo album can
help us remember fun times
'we had together.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
560 Moncrief Rd.*
wwil: 768-0507
w BColeman.com


YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULT CONFERENCE-First
New Zion Missionary Baptist Church, 4835 Soutel Dr., will
host a Young and Young Adult Conference Friday, October
7-Sunday, October 9. Evening Worship begins at 7:00 p.m.
on October 7. .Pastor Jeffrey Robinson of Mt. Carmel
Baptist Church in Daytona Beach is the speaker. Minister
Alvin Hodge Associate Minister of First New Zion
Missionary Baptist Church, is the lecturer.., Classes and
speakers for the workshop on Saturday, October 8 are "What.
Are you Going To Do" by Pastor Derrick Johnson of New
Covenant Ministries of Orange Park, Fla.; "Who Are You"
by Rev. Patrick Fulton, Associate Pastor of First New Zion
Missionary Baptist Church; and "Walking the Walk" by
Pastor Jerome Robinson of Bethel Baptist in Starke, Fla.
Annual Youth Day will be observed on October 9 at 11:00
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Minister Dwayne Brown of Tru-Way
Church of the Risen Christ is the speaker for the 11:00 a.m.
service. Pastor Lawson J. Boddie of St. Paul Church of
Gainesville, Fla. is the speaker for the 4:00 p.m. program.
Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, Pastor.
WOMEN'S DAY CELEBRATION-The Women of
Historic Mount Zion AME Church will observe, their 80th
Women's Day on Sunday, October 9 at 10:00 a.m. "Rejoice,
and Again I Say Rejoice" is the theme. Rev. Joyce J. Moore,
Pastor of Allen Chapel AMEC, New Smyrna Beach, Fla., is
the speaker. Rev. Moore received her call to. the ministry
while attending Greater Grant Memorial AMEC with her
husband Donald B. Moore. She is. a graduate of Edward
Waters College, and Turner Theological Seminary at the
Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Ga.
where she received the Masters of Divinity degree. She is
currently seeking her Doctorate degree at Columbia
Theological Seminary in Decatur, Ga. The public is invited
to attend. Sisters Karen Y. Smithson, Yolanda Blue, Clarence
Brown, Evelyn Whaley, Mary Starling, Annie Vining and the
Women of Zion invite the public to attend. The church is
located at 201 East Beaver St. Rev. F.D. Richardson, Pastor.
FALL HARVEST FAIR-First New Zion Missionary
Baptist Church, 4835 Soutel Dr., invites the public to the
"Fall Harvest fair on Saturday, October 15 from 10:00 a.m.
until 3:00 p.m. The community health fair will feature'
organizations and vendors.There will be free food, free flu
shots, fun activities for kids, uplifting music and preaching.
The Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, Pastor.
FREE HEALTH FAIR-The HOPE Ministry of New Bethel
A.M.E. Church, 1231 Tyler St., will host a Free Health Fair
on Saturday, October 15, 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Free screen-
ings for .Prostrate Cancer, Blood Pressure, STD, Vision,
Dental and Cholesterol will be provided. Vendors will be on
hand to distribute important information. Free food and fun
will be provided. Rev. William Lamar, IV, Pastor.
REVIVAL-Rev. James Graham of James Graham Mortuary,
Inc. will be the guest Evangelist for a revival to be held
October 19-21 at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church.
Services will be held nightly at 7:30 p.m. The public is invit-
ed to attend. The church is located at 271 W. King St. Rev..
Randy Hezekiah, Jr., Pastor.
PASTOR'S ANNIVERSARY-St. Matthew Baptist Church,
'3731 Moncrief Rd., will celebrate the 104th Anniversary of
the church and 42 years of dedicated service of the Pastor,
George A. Price, on Sunday, October 16 at 3:00 p.m. A spe-
cial musical will be presented by the choir at 6:30 p.m.
CONCERT-A free concert featuring the Concert Chorale of
Bethune-Cooknian College, and presented by the Mary
McLeod Bethune Circle #1 (Mrs. Annie Mae McBride,
President), will held at Simpson Memorial United Methodist
Church on October 16, at 4:00 p.m. The public is invited to
attend. The church is located at 1114 'Cleveland St. Rev.
Moses H. Johnson, Pastor.
CHURCH ANNIVERSARY- Faust Temple Church of,
God, 2238 Moncrief Rd., will celebrate its 64th Church
Anniversary. Services will be held on Friday, October 21
(Musical) at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, October 22 at 6:00 p.m.
and will conclude on Sunday, October 23 4:30 p.m. The
pubic is invited to attend. Sis. Sharon Hunter, Committee
Chairperson. Bishop Rushie L. Dixon, Pastor.

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to:
info@thefloridastar.com






<0









C -


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 OF 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Hotne Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning-Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


I."


... CHRISTIAN FAMILY


; WORSHIP CENTER
^ : Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058
-s
Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
'" Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service.................6:Q0-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities


%.."E.N an. Ige Itemp lea,.ori

e% a ni;elj. ,-(. n omLa%rl.net

Thanks For Reading
And Supporting The Florida Star!







I'A-GE A.-4 ... -- .OTB .-2-5


"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
It's All About Kids
There was a fire engine, face painting, an inflatable gym,
cotton candy, hot dogs, drinks and just fun, fun, fun through-
out the Hidden Hills Executive Park complex and especially
at All About Kids Pediatrics for an Open House/Grand
Opening event. All About Kids Pediatrics co-owned by Dr.
Dean M. Cannon and Dr. James A. Joyner, IV was the
'place' recently. And what fun it must have been for the kids
to be at the doctor's office for a good time and not due to ill-
ness.
These young doctors really know how to relate to young
people. And creating pleasant memories of the doctor's
office was the doctor's order of the day. Do you have a mem-
ory of your childhood physician donning a painted face? I
don't think so!
Best Wishes to Drs. Cannon and Joyner, IV!

LINKS, Inc. Takes Action Offers Disaster Assistance
One of this nation's premier Black women's organiza-
tions, The Links, Incorporated, took immediate action fol-
lowing the disaster of hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast.
"It-appears that all of America was caught unprepared for
a disaster of this magnitude," said Dr. Gladys Gary
Vaughn, National President of The Links, Inc. "Therefore,
all of our members were asked to answer a call to action to
assist not only our members but as many survivors of
Hurricane Katrina as possible. At this time, we are happy to
report that chapters throughout the United States are provid-
ing service in a number of ways and through a number of
programs with people and other organizations of good will.
We are 10,000 members who are dedicated to community
service and willing to do our share-and more."
Answering the call to action for members of The Links,
Incorporated meant a consolidated and concerted effort to
save and sustain human life. After reacting to the first
instinct to donate money, The Links, Inc. developed a strat-
egy, conceived by the collective brainpower of its leader-
ship, to provide "Disaster Relief." This across the board dis-
S aster relief plan, the envy of which could attract the US
Government, includes: (1) Communication and
Mobilization communicating with the membership, estab-
lishing command centers within the affected areas, and coor-
dinating chapters as they move into action; (2) Immediate
Relief what needs to done and what can be done with
resources to sustain relief; (3) Stabilization the relief fund;
and (4) Bridging to the Future a task force on disaster
relief; an on-going disaster relief effort using the resources
of all African American organizations working together.
There are 140 members of The Links .from three chapters
located in New Orleans. These women are suffering with
displacement, loss of homes and belongings and, in many
cases, the death of loved-ones. Some of these members have
been accounted for and the national headquarters of The
Links is still looking for others.
"We implore Links chapters from across the United
States to open their homes and their hearts to provide
resources to our Sister Links as well as other persons who
are in need," added Dr. Vaughn.
The Southern Area of The Links, Incorporated, bearing
the brunt of the tragedy, is lead by Mrs. Margaret
Thompson Johnson, Area Director.
"While we reach out to our own, we realize that we are
our brother's keepers; and so we expect to stretch our efforts
where ever we find need," said Ms. Johnson. Therefore,
Mrs. Johnson stated that she has "redirected the upcoming
Southern Area Executive Committee's fall planning meeting
from Jacksonville to Baton Rouge, Louisiana and Jackson,
Mississippi in order to meet with our displaced members and
also to spend a day of hands-on volunteer service in those
two communities."
Editor's note: On the First Coast, there are members of
the Jacksonville Chapter Links, Inc. who were affected
directly by the Katrina hurricane. These Links members are
providing shelter for their evacuated loved ones, feeling
especially blessed that their loved ones were able to get to
them safely in spite of their personal losses. Chapter mem-
bers have 'been there' for their displaced Links sisters who
were welcomed warmly at a recent chapter meeting.
Jacksonville Chapter, Links, Inc. president Mrs. Gloria
Dean has named fellow Links chapter member Mrs.
Johnetta Moore to coordinate the Katrina hurricane initia-
tive for the Jacksonville Chapter Links, Inc.

Bold City Chapter Launches Third "PRAISE" Program
On the local scene with a focus on the Arts, National
Trends and Services, International Services and Services,
Services to Youth, Education and Health, the Bold City
Chapter, Links, Inc. has adopted the Team Up Program at
Highlands for the 2005-06 program with Project "PRAISE"
- Link Up With Team Up. PRAISE whose purpose is to pro-
vide quality out-of-school educational and enrichment expe-
riences and opportunities to supplement the schooling of
middle school students is the acronym for PRIDE and
Physicial Health; Respect And Responsibility; Academic
Achievement and The Arts; International Involvement; Self-
Esteem and Enrichment For Everyone. The Bold City


Chapter, Links, Inc. is presenting j series of activities during
the Team Up program from September through March. And


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this year the parents are invited to participate in PRAISE
activities and are also encouraged with the students to partic-
ipate in out-of-school recommended educational and enrich-
ment activities.
The orientation program held recently at the Highlands
school featured motivational speaker Maurice Hicks, Jr. a
second year student at Florida Community College who is
involved in a variety of school and community activities.
During his speech he stated, "Be somebody. It is possible to
go from being a failing student to a 'straight A' student. It all
depends on you". "He left the students in high spirits and
full of enthusiasm", states activity chairperson, Mrs.
Pamela Grant-Adams.
Bold City chapter members assisting Mrs. Grant-Adams
with the 2005-06 launching activity were: Links Jacquie
Gibbs, Barbara Shuman, Arlinda Adams, Gwen
Mitchell, Diana Spicer, Anita Ford, Deloris Mitchell, Dr.
Norma White-chapter president, Sandra Hull-
Richardson, Ruth Waters McKay, Jean Aikens,
Er lestine Bivens, Pam-la Prier, Madeline 'cales-Taylor,


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and Janice Nelson.

Past Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Present To Speak in St.
Augustine
Dr. Gwendolyn Elizabeth Boyd, past national president
of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority will be the featured speak-
er at the Annual Women's Day program at the St. Paul
A.M.E. Church in St. Augustine on Sunday, October 9, 2005
at 11 a.m. Dr. Boyd, engineer and Executive Assistant of
staff at the John Hopkins University's Applied Physics
Laboratory was the 22nd national president of the 20,000-
plus member sorority with over 950 chapters throughout the
world from 2000-2004.
Mrs. Jacqueline Bryant is serving as chairperson for
this year's event.

Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me directly at ima-
jol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-
7008.
See you in tire paper!


OCTOBER 8, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


tAfi'V A A


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2V1J 9JL l F Lz) ---P-A-G -A --


Second Gas Price Gouging Lawsuit Filed


TALLAHASSEE --
Florida Attorney General
Charlie Crist today filed the
state's second lawsuit over
price gouging from
Hurricane Katrina, accusing
a Tallahassee gas station of
unconscionably raising its
gasoline prices 72 cents per
gallon during the state of
emergency.
Crist's complaint alleges
that Island Food Stores,
Ltd., the Jacksonville-based
fuel retailer that owns the
Tallahassee station, improp-
erly raised its prices even
though the increases were
not forced by market condi-
tions at the time.
Island Food Stores owns
and supplies BP/Amoco fuel
to the station at 3436
Thomasville Road in
Tallahassee. Island sets
prices at its stations' pumps.
Because of the station's con-


venient location adjacent to
a major interstate leading to
and from the hurricane-
impacted area, both
Hurricane Katrina victims
fleeing the storm and emer-
gency personnel trying to
reach the affected areas were
potential victims of the
gouged prices.
Shortly following
Katrina's devastation, the
Attorney General's Office
received more than 1800
complaints about the sky-
rocketing prices of fuel.
These complaints
prompted Attorney General
Crist to launch a statewide
investigation, sending teams
of investigators and sworn
law enforcement personnel
to locations throughout
Florida to determine
whether the rapid rise in gas
prices met the legal defini-
tion of gouging.


Interviews For Judicial

Vacancy Scheduled

TAL LAH ASSEE -- Interviews for the Judicial Vacancy
in the 4th Judicial Circuit will be conducted on Wednesday,
October 19 beginning at 9:00 a.m. in the Chambers of Chief
Judge Donald R. Moran, Jr. in the Duval County
Courthouse, Room 220.
The following applicants will be interviewed: Thomas
Beverly, Kevin Blazs, Judge Tyrie Boyer, Harold Catlin,
Robert Cole, Judge Mallory Cooper, Judge James Ruth,
Tatiana Salvador, Judge Brent Shore, and Robert Wood.
Anyone wishing to comment on the qualifications of any
of the applicants may do so by writing to Mary Bland Love,
Chair, 4th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission, 815
South Main St., Ste. 300, Jacksonville, FL 32207.


While responding to
complaints. in Tallahassee,
investigators noticed the
Island store'ss exceptionally
high prices and discovered
that the station allegedly had
hiked prices more than 70


STUART, Fla.--Attorney
Willie E. Gary, a prominent
attorney and Chairman of
the Black Family CHannel,
recently took supplies to
victims of Hurricane Katrina
and transported families to
be reunited with loved ones
through the United States.
Attorney Gary took


cents per gallon for regular
unleaded gasoline over a
three-day period.
Between August 31 and
September 1, the price of
regular unleaded gas sold at
the Island station increased a


flight aboard his Boeing 737
business jet, appropriately
named the Wings of Justice
to help Katrina victims.
He was joined by base-
ball great Cecil Fielder, box-
ing heavy-weight champion
Evander Holyfield, actor
Tommy Ford and partners
from the Gary Law Firm.
Gary and law firm
employees loaded the
"Wings of Justice" with
thousands of dollars worth
of baby bottles, diapers, toi-
letries, water, and other sup-
plies and took off of on a
two-day mission to help
those displaced by the hurri-
cane.
The mission began at
Witham Field in Stuart, Fla.,
and continued on to
Houston, Texas, where Gary
handed out supplies and vis-
ited families at the George
Brown Convention Center.
Two families, who lost
everything in the aftermath
of the storm, were invited by
Gary to board his private jet
to start a new life in Atlanta,
Ga.
Patrick and Kristen
Behn, a young married cou-
ple, had just moved to New
Orleans two weeks before
Katrina hit, and now found
themselves back in Houston
with thousands of other
homeless evacuees.
The Behn family was
thankful to be offered seats

II^I' I I N


total of 62 cents per gallon,
even though the station had
received no delivery of reg-
ular unleaded gas and
encountered no increase in
total costs.
Midgrade gasoline


aboard the Wings of Justice.
Lucius Bonner, a 23
year-old man from New
Orleans, spent an entire day
floating on a tire until rescue
workers finally returned for
him.
"They kept passing me
saying 'we'll be back.' At
that point I thought I was
going to die," said Bonner.
Bonner was also welcomed
aboard Gary's jet and reunit-
ed with his father in Atlanta.
Gary, Holyfield and
Fielder also handed out sup-
plies and greeted families at
the Houston Astrodome.
Gary felt that it was his
duty to embark on the two-
day mission to help hurri-
cane victims.
"Many of these people
have lost their homes and
their loved ones," stated
Gary. "We must all come
together and aid in the
rebuilding process. Our
brothers and sisters are
counting on us to be there
for them during this trou-
bling time and we don't
have the right to let them
down," continued Gary.
Gary is best known in
legal circles as "The Giant
Killer," is noted for taking
on some of America's most
powerful companies, win-
ning billions of dollars in
verdicts and settlements on
behalf of his clients.


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ACT WITH

lRIDA STAR!


Attorney Gary Uses Wings Of Justice

To Aid Hurricane Katrina Victims


: Samuel: Wil
S'Criswell Co
Prayer SP
"Impact Guest:

October 8, 2005Broadcasting Live
From :The Black Expo


Ron


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2-host
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REAL TOPICS!
REAL ISSUES!
SATURDAYS
NEW TIME: 1:00-1:30 P.M.


__________________________ .4- R ~ ~


increased 72 cents per gal-
lon between August 31 and
September 2, with no deliv-
ery or increase in cost to the
station.
The station's profit mar-
gins tripled for regular
unleaded gas from August
30 to September 1, and more
than doubled for premium
gas and tripled for midgrade
gas from August 30 to
September 2.
Island is charged with
violating Florida's price
gouging statute, which car-
ries a maximum fine of
$1,000 for each occurrence
up to a total of $25,000 for
multiple violations commit-
ted in a single 24-hour peri-
od.
Additionally, the busi-
ness is charged with violat-
ing Florida's Unfair and
Deceptive Trade Practices
Act, which carries a penalty
of $10,000 or $15,000 for
any victims over the age of
60.
As of today, the Attorney
General's Office had
received close to 4,000 com-
plaints about .skyrocketing
gas prices through its toll-
free consumer hotline (1-
866-9-NO-SCAM, or 1-866-
966-7226) and email corre-
spondence.
On September 9,
Attorney General Crist filed
a lawsuit against a Swifty
Stars retail gas station in
Tallahassee, with allegations
similar to those against
Island Food Stores.
As part of his ongoing
investigation into the rising
price of gasoline, Crist has
also subpoenaed four gaso-
line distributors seeking
records of their deliveries
into Florida.
Those companies are
Colonial Oil Industries,
Murphy Oil USA, Motiva
Enterprises (a subsidiary of
Royal Dutch Shell) and Tate
Oil Company.
During the record-setting
2004 hurricane season, the
Attorney General's price
gouging hotline received
8,911 complaints.
After receiving those
complaints, the office initi-
ated 58 formal, investiga-
tions and filed 13 price
gouging lawsuits against
hotels, generator businesses,
tree removal companies and
other businesses.
To date, the Attorney
General's Office has recov-
ered approximately
$725,000 in restitution for
Florida consumers.


Willie Gary (right), Attorney and Chairman of the Black Family Channel comforts a
young boy at the George Brown Convention Center after Hurricane Katrina.


----I ~-~~--------m-rU*l


PAGE A-5


FLORIDA STAR


OCTOBER 82005


...... ~









PACI PL Wf _."IL-U- FLORI...TA OCTOBER8,


National Urban League Establishes Fund To Assist Katrina Evacuees


NEW YORK-- Marc H. Morial, president and CEO,
National Urban League; Eric Eve, executive director,
Corporate Relations, Citigroup's Global Consumer Group;
Dwight P. Robinson, senior vice president, Corporate
Relations and Housing Outreach, Freddie Mac; and Scott
Syphax, president and CEO, Nehemiah Corporation of
America, today announced the launch of the Urban League
Katrina Fund to assist Katrina evacuees with job
training/placement and housing. The first organizations to



HUD Opens Nation's First Fair Housing
Training Academy At Howard University
WASHINGTON Housing and Urban Development
Secretary Alphonso Jackson opened the nation's first
National Fair Housing Training Academy ownthe historical
campus of Howard University. Joining Jackson was
-Pennsylvania Governor Edward Rendell, D.C. Mayor
Anthony Williams and Howard University President Patrick
* Swygert. The Academy is the first and only institution in the
U.S. that trains advocates, lawyers, investigators and others
invested parties in the prevention and elimination of housing
discrimination. .

Meek Decries 'The Expiration
Of The Ryan White CARE Act
/*WASHINGTON, DC Congressman Kendrick B. Meek
reacted to the expiration of the Ryan
White Comprehensive AIDS
Resources Emergency (CARE) Act,
1-c which has provided for the treatment
and care of hundreds of thousands of
Americans living with HIV and AIDS
since 1990. The Republican leader-
ship has yet to announce any plans to
provide for reauthorization of the leg-
islation, which expired September 30,
Kendrick Meek 2005. ,
"The Ryan White CARE Act pro-
vides a key safety net that targets gaps left by other govern-,
ment programs and private insurance,". Meek said.
"Congress_ must reauthorize the CARE Act immediately to
ensure that those in need aren't left without the critical care
and treatment they need."
Meek noted that, according to the AIDS Alliance, Title
IV of the Act, which provides HIV care and services to
women, children, youth and families, has made a significant
contribution to the tenfold decrease in the transmission of
HIV from mother to child.. Over 53,000 women, children,
and youth access Title IV services each year, and of this
number, 88% are persons of color.
"In virtually every community, we are seeing new HIV
infections continue to rise," Meek said. "The federal govern-
ment must have strong prevention strategies to combat the
new challenges we face with this disease, and I urge the
President and the Republican leadership to make reautho-
rization of the CARE Act an immediate priority."
The Ryan White CARE Act was originally passed in
1990, and reauthorized again in 1996 and 2000, each time
with bipartisan support. It was named after Ryan White, a
13-year-old boy who succumbed to the.disease in 1990.
Over half a million low-income, uninsured or underin-
sured people living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. rely on Ryan
White CARE Act programs' to remain healthy.

CBC Chair Urges Economic Consequences
For Bennett Comments
WASHINGTON,D.C. Representative Melvin L. Watt
(D-N.C.), Chairman of the
Congressional Black Caucus
(CBC), issued a comment on
behalf of the CBC about former I
Republican Secretary of Education -
William Bennett's comments on his
radio show in which he said, "...you
could abort every black baby in this
country and your crime rate would
go down. That would be an impos-
sible, ridiculous, and morally repre- William Bennett
Sensible thing to do, but your crime rate would go down."
"The first inclination is not to dignify William Bennett's
comments with a response. However, it is obvious that these
kinds of outrageous comments will continue unless there are
Economic consequences to those who make them. I, there-
fore, call on all radio station owners who carry Bill Bennett's
show to immediately terminate the show and if they fail to
do so, I call on his sponsors and advertisers to withdraw their
advertising dollars."

Ethiopia, Eritrea Warned On Reignitin'g War
UNITED NATIONS The U.N. Security Council late
Tuesday warned Ethiopia and Eritrea against reigniting their
border war and urged Eritrea to immediately reverse its ban
on all helicopter flights by U.N. peacekeepers. In a tough
statement approved by all 15 council members and read at a
formal meeting, the council called on both countries "to
show maximum restraint and to refrain from any threat of
use of force against each other." Council members expressed
"grave concern" at Eritrea's decision to restrict all helicopter


flights by U.N. peacekeepers in Eritrean airspace effective
Wednesday. The ban violates Security Council resolutions
calling on the country to provide access so the U.N. mission
can perform its duties, the statement said.


contribute to the Urban League Katrina
Fund are Citigroup, donating $1 million
dollars; Freddie Mac, donating $1 mil-
lion dollars; and the Nehemiah
Corporation of America contributing
$100,00 for a total of $2.1 million.
B -Additional information about the
Fund and donations can be made at 1-
877-NUL-GULF and/or
Marc H.,Morial http://www.nul.org.
The Urban League Katrina Fund will
primarily focus on providing direct assistance to displaced,
low-income evacuees of Katrina with job training, job place-
ment and housing through the Urban League affiliates work-
ing in the affected communities. The Executive Committee
of the Board of Trustees of the National Urban League
authorized the establishment of the Urban League Katrina
Fund in September following Hurricane Katrina, and Don


Bowen serves as the Fund's executive director. Bowen is the
CEO of the Urban League of Broward County (Fla.).
The Urban League Katrina Fund will assist short and
long term efforts to help people rebuild their lives. Over one
million of the Gulf Regions displaced citizens are in tempo-
rary housing, and a significant number are expected to reset-
tle in those areas. The newly-created Fund will allow for
timely and direct assistance to ensure that the most disadvan-
taged populations receive the help they need on the ground,
in the communities already served by the Urban League's
network of over 100 affiliates. "The immediate relief effort
is slowing down, and we realize that nearly one million
Americans have been displaced by Hurricane Katrina. That
is why the Urban League Katrina Fund will help evacuees
with jobs and housing to help ensure that the most disadvan-
taged citizens receive the needed assistance to rebuild their
lives," said Marc H. Morial, president and CEO, National'
Urban League.


IRS Warns Consumers Of Possible


Scams Relating Hurricane Katrina


WASHINGTON The
Internal Revenue Service
today issued a consumer
alert,. about possible scams
taking place in the wake of
Hurricane Katrina and other
recent natural disasters.
Such fraudulent schemes
may be perpetrated through
the. telephone, Internet, e-
mail or in-person solicita-
tions. The IRS cautions hur-
ricane victims and people
wishing to make disaster-
related charitable donations
to avoid unscrupulous scam
artists by following these
tips:
The IRS has established
a toll-free disaster assistance
telephone number, 1-866-
562-5227, specifically for
hurricane victims.
Whenever a matter involves
tax relief or tax refunds, the
first step a disaster victim
should take is to call the
IRS. For others, donate to
recognized charities.
Be wary of charities with
names that sound like famil-
iar or nationally known
organizations. Some phony
charities use names or Web
sites that sound or look like
those of respected, legiti-
mate organizations. The IRS
Web site at.IRS.gov has a
search feature that allows
people to find legitimate,
qualified charities to which
donations may be tax-
deductible. Legitimate char-
ities may also be found on
the Federal Emergency
Management Agency
(FEMA) Web site at
fema.gov.
Don't give out personal
financial information.- such
as Social Security numbers
or credit card and bank
account numbers and pass-
words to anyone who solic-
its a contribution from you.
Scam artists use this infor-
mation to steal your identity
and financial resources.
Don't give or send cash.
For security and tax record
purposes, contribute by
check or credit card. Write
the official name of the char-
ity on your check. "We
encourage people to be pru-
dent when they are' solicited
for disaster donations," said
IRS Commissioner Mark W.
Everson. "Ddn't be taken in
by scam artists more inter-
ested in lining their pockets
than helping others."
Scam artists can use a
variety of tactics. For exam-
ple, some scammers operat-
ing bogus charities may con-
tact members of the public
by telephone to solicit
money or financial informa-
tion.' In some cases, they


may contact disaster victims
and, claiming to be working
for or on behalf of.the IRS to
help the victims file amend-
ed tax returns to receive tax
refunds, attempt to get per-
sonal financial information
or Social Security numbers
that can be used to steal the
victims' identities or finan-
cial resources.
The IRS does not ask for
personal identifying or
financial information in
unsolicited telephone calls
or mail or via e-mail.
Call the IRS toll-free
number if you have any
doubts as to whether some-
one is an IRS employee or to
verify any information about
taxes.


Additionally, bogus Web
sites are currently soliciting
fupds for disaster victims,
according to federal law-
enforcement agencies. Such
fraudulent sites frequently
mimic the sites of, or use
names similar to, legitimate
charities, or claim to be
affiliated with legitimate
charities, in order to per-
suade members of the public
to send money or provide
personal financial informa-
tion that can be used to steal
identities or financial
resources.
Members of the public
may also have received e-
mails that steer the recipient
to bogus Web sites that
sound as though they are


affiliated with legitimate
charitable causes.
Taxpayers suspecting
disaster-related frauds can:
Report the fraudulent use. of
the IRS name to the
Treasury Inspector General
for Tax Administration
(TIGTA) at 1-800-366-
4484. Report fraudulent
charity Web sites to ic3.gov.
on the Web. Report other
fraudulent contacts either to
the Federal. Bureau of
Investigation (FBI) at 1-
800-CALL-FBI (1-800-225-
5324) or to the Federal
Trade Commission's (FTC)
Consumer Response Center
at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-
382-4357) (TTY/TDD 202-
326-2502).


COmicUN[TY HOSPICE OF NORTHEAST FLORIDA PRESENTS


Healer: Doctor's and Clergy Helping People Take Control t ofTh ecif'eat


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Keynote Speaker:


Pan~el Di5sIssionTopics:


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OCTOBER 8, 2005-


FLORID-A STARR


PA GEA-6


S,..wrdiy, October 15, 2GQ-5
8 am,- 2 pn,
Radisson R.iverwalk 'Hotel
15 15 Pruclearim' Driw-
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Frpm: wrcntinemm- I breakfast
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Letters on Black-White Relationship
These letters were sent to The Florida Star after appearing in a magazine by a read-
er, Give your thoughts,


Dear Jamie:


I'm sorry but I v
to challenge some
Black male readers
I am a White fe
is engaged to a Bl,
good-looking, educ
loving. I just don


Black women are so
,^. .up in arms about us
being with their men,
why don't they look at
themselves and make
some changes.
.. lam tired of the
dirty looks I get and
..a snide remarks when
we're out in public. I
would like to .hear
from some Black men
about why we are so
appealing and coveted
by them.
Bryant Gumbel left
( his wife of 26 years
for one of us. Charles
Barkley, Scottie
Pippen, the model Tyson
Beckford, Montell Williams,
vould like Quincy Jones, James Earl
of your Jones, Harry Belafonte,
3. Sydney Poitier, Kofi Anan,
male who Cuba Gooding Jr., Don
ack male- Cornelius, Berry Gordy,
cated and Billy Blanks, Larry
i't under- Fishburne, Wesley Snipes...


stand a lot of Black female's
attitudes about our relation-
ship.
My man decided he
wanted me because the pick-
ings amongst Black women
were slim to none. As he said
they were either too fat, too
loud, too mean, too argu-
mentative, too needy, too
materialistic or carrying too
much excess baggage.
Before I became
engaged, whenever I went
out I was constantly
, approached by Black men,
willing to wine and dine me
and give me the world. If


Briefs continued from A-1
Who Will Lead
The King Center?
According to Diversity
Inc., there is a power strug-
gle between Martin Luther
SKing III and his younger
brother Dexter Scott King
as to who will take control
of their father's tomb and
museum.

Tourist Warned About
Florida's Law
Supporters of the Brady
Campaign to Prevent Gun
Violence handed out
Hit-And-run.continuedfrom A-1

Donald Jones was
located the following
*day about 11:30 a.m.
after investigation
. revealed he was the
possible driver of the
vehicle and was located
in the 10500 block of
: Lem Turner Road where
: he was detained on sev-
Seral outstanding war-
: rants that included
domestic battery, tres-
passing, and two counts
: of suspended drivers


License.


I could go on and on.
But, right now, I'm a little
angry and that is why I wrote
this so hurriedly. Don't be
mad with us White women
because so many of your
men want us. Get your acts
together and learn from us
and we may lead you to treat
your men better. If I'm
wrong, Black men, let me
know.

Disgusted White Girl,
Somewhere in VA

RESPONSE


leaflets at the Miami
International Airport warn-
ing tourist that Florida's
new law has a shade of the
Wild West since the new
law gives greater legal pro-
tection to people who
shoot or use other deadly
force when threatened or
attached. The leaflets
begin in bold red type -
"An Important Notice to
Florida Visitors." "Do not
argue unnecessarily with
local people," it says. The
Florida "stand your
ground" law, took effect
The fifth charge was
for leaving the scene of
a crash involving the
fatality.
He was also charged
for driving while his
license was suspended
or revoked. Jones'
local offense record
from 2002 up to the
time of the accident,
included theft, motor
vehicle theft, other
offenses, traffic,
assault a total of 10
offenses. He was
arrested without inci-
dent.


Education Now wand Bies Utter f{ENABL)l




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Rivrv ,Rwgiur Hurrian Sricz Prs-pilljriik, De;A.
060 Pa~rk St., Ja~.ksunvi! 19. FL 3r2204-
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Dear Jamie:

I would like to respond to
the letter written by A
Disgusted White Girl.
Let me start by saying
that I am a 28-year old black
man. I graduated from one of
the most prestigious univer-
sities in Atlanta, Georgia
with a Bachelor of Arts
Degree in Business
Management. I have a good
job at a major corporation
and have recently purchased
a house. So, I consider
myself to be among the
ranks of successful black
men.
I will not use my pre-
cious time to slander white
people. I just want to set the
record straight of why black
men date white women.
Back in the day, one of the
biggest reasons why black
men dated white women
wasbecause they were con-
sidered easy.
The black girls in my
neighborhood were raised in
the church. They were very
strict about when they lost
their virginity and who they
lost it to. Because of our
impatience to wait, brothers
would look for someone
who would give it up easy
without too much hassle. So,
they turned to the white
girls.
Nowadays, in my opin-
ion, a lot of brothers date
white women because they
are docile and easy to con-
trol. A lot of black men,


Saturday, October 1, 2005.
The group is taking out
ads in Detroit, Chicago,
Boston and London about
the new Florida law,
according to the AP report.

New Orleans Loss Is
Jacksonville's Gain
The Jacksonville & the
Beaches Convention and
Visitors Bureau reported
that the area is receiving an
increased group bookings
for Jacksonville as a result
of Hurricanes. Several
organizations have already
moved their meetings to
Jacksonville and begin-
ning Thursday, the Hyatt
will host the Federal
Judges Secretaries
Convention, representing
384 room nights.
Black Expo In
Jacksonville
Black Expo '05 will
kick off Thursday with a
reception at the Carnival
Cruise Terminal by invi-
tation only. On Friday, the
Pre-Expo Jazz Gala Blue
Cross Blue Shield of
Florida and Black Pages
USA will feature the "silky
soulful" artist Frankie
Beverly and Maze at the
Times Union Center from
8 to 11 pm, VIP, $70.00
and general admission
$35.00 and on Saturday
from 11 am to 7 pm. at the
Prime Osborn Convention
Center with gospel sensa-
tion Shirley Caesar, actors
Shemar Moore from the
Young and Restless, and
actor Danny Glover.
A series of seminars
will be provided and be
sure to stop by The Florida
Star's Booth #154.
The Black Expo is the
largest event of its kind
directly) targeting the
Afiicnn-American com-
munity.


because of insecurities, fears,
and overall weaknesses,
have become intimidated by
the strength of our black
women. We are afraid that
our woman will be more suc-
cessful than us, make more
money than us, drive nicer
cars and own bigger houses,
Because of this fear, many
black men look for a more
docile woman. Someone we
can control.
I have talked to numerous
black men and they continu-
ously comment on how easy
it is to control and walk over
their white women. I just
want to set the record
straight. I want A Disgusted
White Girl to know that not
all successful black men date
white women.
Brothers like Ahmad
Rashad, Denzel Washington,
Michael Jordan, Morris
Chestnut, Will Smith, Blair
Underwood, Kenneth
"Babyface" Edmonds,
Samuel L. Jackson, and
Chris Rock all married
strong black women And, to
flip the script, there are
numerous white men, in and
out of the spot light, who
openly or secretly desire
black women over white
women. Ted Danson, Robert
DeNiro, and David Bowie to
name a few.
I just don't want a dis-
gusted white girl to be misin-
formed Stop thinking that
because you are white that
you are some type of god-
dess. Remember, when black
Egyptian Queens like


Spencer continued from A-1
neighbors, Mr. Spencer has
been an active member of
Springhill Baptist Church
for 80 years.
He served as a deacon
and Trustee for 30 years,
forming a relationship with
God and understanding
His salvation.
He lived and raised his


Hatsepshut and Nitorcris
were ruling Dynasties and
armies of men in Egypt, you
were over in the caves of
Europe eating raw meat
and beating each other over
the head with clubs.
Read your history!
It was the black woman
that taught you how to cook
and season your food.
It was the black woman
that taught you how to raise
your children. It was black
women who were breast
feeding and raising your
babies during slavery.
It is the black woman
that had to endure watching
their fathers, husbands, and
children beaten, killed, and
thrown in jail. Black women
were born with two strikes
against them: being black
and being a woman.
And, through all this,
Still They Rise!
It is because of the black
women's strength, elegance,
power, love and beauty that
I could never date anyone
except my black Queen. It is
not just the outer beauty that
captivates and draws me to
them. It is not the fact that
they come in all shapes,
sizes, colors and shades that
I love them.
Their inner beauty is
what I find most appealing
about black women.
Their strong spirit, lov-
ing and nurturing souls,
their integrity, their ability
to overcome great obstacles,
their willingness to stand for
what they believe in, and


family on the eastside of
Jacksonville, where every-
body calls him "Pop
Spencer."
Mr. Spencer's passion
throughout the years has
been hunting and later
watching the Atlanta
Braves play ball. His
favorite ballplayer of all
time is Hank Aaron.


their determination to suc-
ceed and reach their highest
potential while enduring
great pain and suffering is
why I have fallen in love
with black women.
I honestly believe that
your anger is geared more
toward jealousy and envy
more so than snotty looks. If
this were not so, then why
do you continuously go to
tanning salons to darken
your skin? If you are so
proud to be white, then why
don't you just be happy with
your pale skin?
Why do you continue to
inject your lips, hips, and
breasts with unnatural and
dangerous substances so you
can look fuller and more
voluptuous?
I think that your anger is
really a result of you want-
ing to have what the black
woman has.
BOTTOM LINE: If I
were looking for a docile
woman, someone I can walk
over and control, I would
give you a call. But, unfortu-
nately, I am looking for a
Virtuous Woman. Someone
that can be a good wife and
mother to my children.
Someone who can be my
best friend and understands
my struggles. I am looking
for a soul mate. I am looking
for a sister and; unfortunate-
ly, you do not and CANNOT
fit the bill. No offense taken,
none given.

Signed, Black Royalty


His favorite book of the
Bible is "Job".
His favorite mayor was
Jake God bold. 'Pop' says
the secret to long life is to
"Honor your father and
mother, let your love of
God show through your
love for your neighbor, and
treat people right."


Kids under 4'9"

are under-protected.


4 STEPS FOP KlOS


.'. A

Iu. II *U l J eu.,_., .= n ..


Tl-ba P1 ~aIr- of chiiren is


seat. yotir child is riqr,4 e-,
likety to be injured in a ca~r
crash. If they're undor 4 V.
buy Should .bu H1 a biocstu


pmnper lit Ar*ItOwi d htiM


tr*wurm -


a 0 0 0 0 0 0 aSe0.0 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 00 0 0*0660 0 00 0 00 *6Saa
Send us an email @:


Ino@U'heflorldaster~com
0 0 00 0 00 0 00 00 0 00 0 0060 00 0 0a 0 00 a6


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-7


TOBER 8 2005


ell






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OCTOBER 8, 2005








Students From Four Duval Schools


Named National Merit Semifinalists


Twent)-nine seniors at four Du\al Countyn public
high schools ha e qualified as National Merit
Semifinalists, the preliminary step to\\ard possible selec-
tion as a finalist next spring.
The students \ere among 1.3 million students who
took the 2004 Preliminary SAT National Merit
Scholarship Qualiffing Test (PSAT NNISQT) as high
school juniors and the 6,000 students \ho qualified as
semifinalists. The test is used as the initial screening tool
for program entrants.
"We congratulate these students, their parents and
their teachers on achieving this honor," said
Superintendent Nancy Snyder, Ed.D. 'Being named a
National Merit Semifinalist means they belong to a pool
of less than one percent of U.S. high school sen-
iors."
Test officials estimate that 90 percent of the semifi-
nalists will advance to finalists and that about half of
those students \will be selected as Merit Scholarship \ in-
ners.
The number of semifinalists named from each state is
proportional to the state's percentage of the national total
of graduating seniors.
Advancing to finalist status also requires an outstand-
ing academic record throughout high school, the
endorsement and recommendation of the school princi-
pal and SAT scores that confirm the student's perform-
ance on the PSAT NMSQT.
Duval Count.y Public Schools' National Merit
Semifinalists are:

Mandarin High School
Matthew C. McCaul and Jonathan D. Nlizrahi


M


Kristen Yang


Here Comes The Bride!


Terry Parker High School
Stephen A. Beck


Paxon School for Advanced Studies
Alia M. Baughn, Timothy B. Daniel, Neil A. Palmer

Stanton College Preparatory School
Sarah E. Bellemare, Justin A. Brunet.
Daniel NM. Bush, Anne E. Coxe. Lianna A. Gao,
Joachim Hartje Juhi Heda, William Hered.
Colleen E. Kine\an, Yuanlong Liao,
Erica L. Morrison, Tre\or F. Ollar,
Kendnck A. Reinsch, Law rence I. Schumaker,
Khusbu Shakafi.- Daron L. Sharps,
Michael S. Thompson, James S. Tomola.
Adrienne F. Wang. Alex B. Wang.
Theodore A. Weisman, Caroline K. Winegeart,


These youngsters were full of enthusiasm while
participating in the classical wedding of Shantel
Teneshia Jones and Herbert Jeffery Cross, Jr.
TOP FRAME: The Bride's beautiful neice, Aja
Jones, smiled as she prepared the entrance with
creme rose petals. BOTTOM FRAME: Ring
Bearers Patrick McPherson and Shawn Taylor, II
make their entrance. SEE STORY, PHOTOS ON
C-1


m


D


~cr~~







Page B-2lOctober 8, 2005 The Florida Star/Prep Rap


^C COLLEGE

&
CAREER

CORNER
By Rose Rennekamp

Training For look at their earning
The Hot Jobs potential.
Of Tomorrow The American
Association of
One out of every four Community Colleges
new jobs created in the reports that the average
U.S. between 2002 and starting, salary of a regis-
2012 will be in healthcare tered nurse is $38,419.
or education. A computer program-
The U.S. Bureau, of mer can average more than
Labor Statistics calls those $48,000 in starting salary-
two industries the fastest another field the Bureau of
growing sectors .of our Labor Statistics expects to
economy. grow.
Fortunately for a friend It's important to
of mine, she is primed for remember that choosing a
a spot in one of those. She career path simply because
recently decided to it looks "hot" for growth,
become a nurse, and isn't the best thing to. do
turned to the same place either.
tens of thousands of other Consider your
nurses-in-training turn strengths, weaknesses, and
every year-her local com- interests before embarking
munity college. on a two- or four-year edu-
More than 10 million cation.
students enrolled in class- Students who take the
es at community colleges ACT Assessment receive
in 2004, and nearly half of'. with their scores- some
those students reported suggestions for career
that they 'were taking areas that could be a good
courses related to their -fit for them based on their
current job or a future one. scores and their answers
The hottest programs at on an Interest Inventory.
community colleges If you are. planning to
-reflect some of those begin your college' career-
fastest grow ing jobs. Some at a two-year school, you
require earning a certifi- also need to. approach it
cate and others require a the same way that you
two-year associate's would approach any col-
degree. lege or university-by being
Other jobs require stu- academically prepared to
dents to continue their succeed.
education at a four-year, I know too many stu-
college or university. dents who didn't take chal-
In addition to nursing, lenging courses, in high
community colleges have school.
.seen an increase in the They planned to attend
number of students sign- a community college and
ing up for education, infor- thought it would be "easi-
mation technology and er." But they ended up
programs in homeland ,struggling. -and some of
security. them even dropped out.
Nlany of these jobs also: 'College is college, and
.look, .pretty- ,good .if. you.. if..you. aren't .taking chal-


lenging courses in high
school, you will struggle,
whether you're attending a
Big Ten university or the
community college down
the street.
But for students who
are ready, a community
college is a great place to


get a college education,
and a great place to start
on the road to a "hot" job.

Rose Rennekamp is
the vice president of com-
munications for ACT She
is a mom and has a mas-
ter's of education in guid-


ance and counseling. For
more college and career-
planning information,
visit www.act.org. Have a
question you want
answered in a future col-
umn? Send a letter to this
newspaper or e-mail Rose
at AskRose@act. org.


Apple Recipes Kids Love
(FeatureSource) Nothing is more quintessentially "autumn" than apples. Try some
new apple-based recipes that were designed with kids in mind. These favorites are
wholesome and unique, and can usually-be made with common ingredients you're like-
ly to have around the house. Vicki Lansky, author of "Feed Me! I'm Yours!"
(Meadowbrook Press, www.meadowbrookpress.com) recommends these three apple
recipes for kid-friendly fall treats:
Apples in Hand
Peel (optional) and core a whole apple. Mix peanut butter with one of the follow-
ing: raisins, wheat germ or granola. Stuff this mixture into the hole of the cored apple.
Slice in half to serve. Or stick the apple half on a Popsicle stick. It's both novel and neat
that way.

Bite-of-Apple Cookies
Ingredients:
V cup margarine
1 cup brown sugar
2 eggs
1-1/2 cups flour
'/2 cup oatmeal, uncooked
2 teaspoons baking soda
"/2 teaspoon cinnamon
% cup wheat germ
1 cup apples, peeled, cored and finely chopped

Directions:
Cream margarine, sugar and eggs. Mix dry ingredients and combine with creamed
mixture. Add apples. Drop spoonfuls onto a greased cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees
for 10 to 15 minutes.
Apple Fruit Rolls
You can use apples, peaches, pears, nectarines or canned pumpkin to make this
yummy dried "candy." The fruit can be the "too-hard-to-eat' variety or the "too-ripe-
and-the-last-piece" variety. It may even be well-drained canned fruit. If you're using
apples, core and peel them, then slice them into rings. If using another fruit, mash or
puree it. Two methods will work:
Blender method: Peel and core the fruit, blend until smooth and then cook five min-
utes in a saucepan over moderate heat.
Freeze-defrost method: In advance, peel and core fruit, wrap and freeze. Remove
from freezer an hour before using so fruit can begin to defrost. Cook in a saucepan,
mashing with a fork as you go, for 5 to 10 minutes. If the fruit is very watery, drain it.
While cooking, add 1 teaspoon honey for each piecd of fruit you are using. (Cook
different fruits separately, though you can cook one piece or a dozen of the same type
at once.)
Lay out clear plastic wrap (or cut open small plastic bags) on a cookie sheet or broil7
ing tray. Use one piece of plastic for each piece of fruit you're cooking. Spoon the mix-
ture onto the wrap, staying away from its edge. Spread as thin as possible. Spread
another piece of plastic wrap over the mixture and press down with a wide spatula to
make evenly thin. Remove this top sheet of plastic before drying.
Turn oven to its lowest possible heat or just use the pilot light. Place tray in the oven
and leave overnight (6 to 8 hours). The plastic wrap will not melt! If the fruit is dry by
breakfast, remove from the oven. (If not, wait a while longer.) Roll up the plastic wrap
(with the dried fruit) as if it were a jelly roll. Then peel and eat!
Author: FeatureSource Staff/Vicki Lansky


The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Page B-2/October 8, 2005





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PageB-4lctoer 8 205 Th FlridaStal~re Ra


*Tune in to IMPACT on Saturdays from 1:00 -1:30 p.m. and hear High School Football Highlights on IMPACT Sports with Ron Williams.
You can also submit your play of the week selections to The Florida Star by email at Info@TheFloridaStar.com. Information is needed by
Monday of each week
Raines runningback Ray Dukes carrying the ball 16 times for 103 yards in a 33-14 win over Live
Oak Suwannee on Firday, September 30.
Raines quarterback Bruce Robinson completing 11-of-19 passes for 106 yards and throwing three
touchdown passes (2 yards to Kion ilson, 6 yards to Ali Green, and 12 yards to Donsay Hardeman) in
K- a 33-14 win over 'Suwannee. He scored a touchdown on a 1- yard run.
Wolfson runningback David Jimerson rushing for 141 yards on 14 carries and scoring two touch-
downs (1-yard run and a 21-yard pass reception) in a 19-7 win over Fernandina Beach on Friday,
September 30.
Lee runningback Bryant Daniels scoring two touchdowns ( runs of 57 and 13 yards) in a 35-0 win
over Forrest on Friday, September 30. He carried the ball 14 times for 141 yards
SFThe Lee Generals Defense ,holding Forrest to 67 total yards of offense in a 35-0 win over Forrest.
First Coast quarterback Chris Simon carrying the ball'for 50 yards and a 21-yard touchdown run in
a 34-12 win over Englewood on Friday, September 30. Simon completed 10-of-17 passes for 177
yards and threw 2 touchdown passes to (12 and 24-yard pass receptions) to wide receiver Alex Rose.
Andrew Jackson runningback Troy Pollard,carrying the ball 11 times for 133 yards in a 48-6 win over Baker County on
Friday, September 30. He scored 2 touchdowns (runs of 2 and 63 yards).
Fletcher runningback Troy Guidry rushing for 181 yards on 20 carries and scoring 2 touchdowns (runs of 6 and 16 yards)
in a 34-28 loss to Bartram Trail on Friday, September 30.
Mandarin running back Mike Holmes rushing for 106 yards in a 19-7 win over Sandalwood on Friday, September 30.
Ribault's Rashad Butler intercepting the ball twice in a 17-14 win over Interlachen on Friday, September 30.


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The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Page, B-4/October 8, 2005







Get A Big Scholarship Created

Bang Out To Promote Diversity

Of S"'once
Copyrighted Material

Syndi cated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"






Teenager To Debut On Men's
..... Golf Tour In November
TOKYO Michelle Wie will play in a top-tier men's event in November on the
Japanese golf tour. ..
The Hawaiian star turns 16 next
F IDO month when she is expected to turn pro. .
Wie, of Korean heritage, has never .
OUT played in Japan but has a big following
there.
4O Wie will compete in the Nov. 24-27
Casio World Open, one of the richest
SOUt ^events on Japan's men's tour, organizers
said Tuesday. She will be the second
woman to play in a JGTO tour event and
CAN. _the first since Sweden's Sophie Gustafson
failed to make the cut in the 2003 Casio
Au'v' A. World Open. Wie has competed against
men five times, three of those on the PGA
Tour, but-has not made a cut.
She missed the cut in the 2004 Sony
PR F P RAP .Open by one shot at age 14, and this sum-.
mer was inside the cut line with three ... -
CALL holes to play at the John Deere Classic -
until a double bogey on the 16th hole..
Wie, who will play in the Samsung World Championship on the LPGA Tour next
9G / A 6 8 34 month, has finished in the top three at four LPGA events this year, including two
majors. She was runner-up at the LPGA Championship, three shots behind Annika
Sorenstam, and tied for third at the Women's British Open, where she wound up seven
shots behind.


Page B-5/October 8, 2055


The Florida Star/Prep Rap







PageB-6/ctoer 8 205 Th FlridaSta Pre Ra


Clean Kids Jokes

Silly! Silly! Tongue
Twister
A bitter biting bittern
Q. What do computers do when they get hungry? Bit a better brother
bittern, And the bitter
A. They eat chips! better bittern


Q. Why don't you see giraffes in elementary
school?

A. Because they're all in High School!




Q. Which is the longest word in the dictionary?

A. "Smiles", because there is a mile between each


Bit the bitter biter back.
And the bitter bittern,
bitten, By the better bitten
bittern, Said: "I'm a bit-
ter biter bit, alack!"


Three twigs twined tight-
ly.

The blue bluebird blinks.

The bootblack bought the
black boot back.

A box of biscuits, a batch
of mixed biscuits.

Brad's big black bath
brush broke.


.DOCTOR! DOCTOR!


Doctor, Doctor I keep thinking I'm a spider
What a web of lies!

Doctor, Doctor my baby is the image of his father
Never mind just so long as he's-healthy!

Doctor Doctor I swallowed a bone.
Are you choking?
No, I really did!

Doctor, Doctor I think I need glasses
You certainly do, Sir, this is a fish and chip shop!

Doctor, Doctor my son has swallowed my pen,
what should I do?
Use a pencil until I get there

Doctor, Doctor I think I'm suffering from Deja Vu!
Didn't I see you yesterday?

Doctor, Doctor I've got wind! Can you give me
something?
Yes here's a kite!


Q. Which month do soldiers hate most?

A. The month of March!




Q. What did the painter say to the wall?

A. One more crack like that and I'll plaster you!




Q. Why do golfers wear two pairs of pants?

A. In case they get a hole in one!




Q. What did the the tie say to the hat?

A. You go on a head, I'll just hang around!




Q. What would you call two banana skins?


A. A pair of slippers


What's Missing From The Above Spot?
Information About Your Business,
Services, Or Goods!
To Place Your Advertisement
In This Spot
Call The Florida Star Today At (904) 766-8834


Page B-6/October 8, 2005


The Florida Star/ Prep Rap





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BeB/OCTOBER 8, 2005 THE FLORIDA STAR
Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
t 1. "Shake It Off' Mariah Carey (Island) Last Week: No. 1
2. "Gold Digger" Kanye West Featuring Jamie Foxx (Roc
A ella/Def Jam) No. 2
3. "Sugar, We're Goin' Down" Fall Out Boy (Fueled By
iRamen/Island) No. 3
4. "Like You" Bow Wow & Ciara (Columbia) No. 4
5. "Wake Me Up When September Ends" Green Day
(Reprise) No. 6
6. "My Humps" The Black Eyed Peas (A&M) New Entry
7. "We Belong Together" Mariah Carey (Island) No. 7
8. "Lose Control" Missy Elliott Featuring Ciara & Fat
Man Scoop (The Gold Mind) No. 5
"9 !Don't Cha" The Pussycat Dolls Featuring Busta
R. ymes (A&M) No. 8
10. "Pon de Replay" Rhianna (SRP Def Jam) No. 9
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "A Real Fine Place to Start" Sara Evarns (RCA) Last
Week: No. 2
2. "Something to Be Proud Of" Montg6mery Gentry
(Columbia) No. 7
3. "Alcohol" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) No. 4
4. "Redneck Yacht Club" Craig Morgan (Broken Bow)
No. 5
S5. "All Jacked Up" Gretchen Wilson (Epic) No. 6
6. "Play Something Country" Brooks & Dunn (Arista
Nashville) No. 1
""Somebody's Hero" Jamie O'Neal (Capitol) No. 1,1
8. "As Good as I Once Was" Toby Keith (DreamWorks)
No. 9
9. "Better L ife" Keith Urban (Capitol) New Entry
10. "N issitssippi Girl" Faith Hill (Warner Bros.) No. 3
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "N lesmenzed (Freemasons/B. Watt/D. Hemrnandez
N IL\es i" Faith Hill (Capitol/Promo) Last Week: No. 1
2. "Sa Hello" Deep Dish (Deep Dish) No. 4
3. "Pon de Replay (Norty Cotto Remix)" Rhianna (SRP Del'
Jam i No. 3
4. "I Like It IBut I Don't Need It)" Vivian Green
(Columbia) No. 7
5. "Evern thing U" Superchumbo (Twisted) New Entry
6. "Back to Basics" Shape: UK (Astralwerks) No. 2
7.Jetstream" New Order Featuring Anna Mantron (Warner
Bros. No. 5
8. "Bleed Like Me (E. Kupper Mixes)" Garbage (Almo
Sounds/Promo) No. 10 a
9. "Fascinated" Suzanne Palmer (Star 69) No. 20 9 0 w o ~ 4 W 0n ft
10. "\\-hen the Broken Hearted Love Again" Danielle
B0ollinger (Esntion Silver) No. 6 I
*** ,* ~* ** *~S ~ f





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OLCTOBER 8, 2005 .. UUA .l" 3"A


CAPTIONS
Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.
CAR WASH-Edward Waters College's baseball and soft-
ball teams will wash cars at three locations on Saturday,
October 8 from 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. The evnt will be held
at Auto Zones located at 4951 Blanding Blvd., 561 Cassat
Ave., and 1720 W. Edgewood Ave.
NEIGHBORHOOD BEAUTIFICATION EVENT-The
Northwestern Middle School PTSA will host Oasis On 45th
Street on Saturday, October 15 from 8:00 a.m.-12 Noon.
The public is invited to join the effort to clean-up and beau-
tify the neighborhood in the Northwestern Middle school
area. Participants will meet at Northwestern Middle School
located at 2100 W. 45th St. and will receive a City of
Jacksonville certificate recognizing "Clean It Up, Green It
Up" Community Service/Volunteer hours. The event also
featured food, prizes, and music. For more information con-
tact Northwestern PTSA President Nancy Jackson at (904)
673-9208.
MEETING-The Ribault Full Service School Oversight
Committee Meeting will be held at the Ribault Full Service
School located at 3701 Winton Dr. on October 11, at 6:00
p.m.
MAYOR TO HOLD TOWN HALL MEETING FOR
GREATER ARLINGTON AND THE BEACHES DIS-
TRICT-Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton will hold his 11th
town hall meeting to listen to citizens' concerns on Oct. 18.
The meeting, which will be held at 6 p.m. in the Nathan H.
Wilson Center for the Arts at the FCCJ South Campus,
11901 Beach Blvd., will be sponsored by the Greater
Arlington and the Beaches Citizens Planning Advisory
Committee (CPAC). Residents of the district are invited to
share their concerns regarding the community with the
mayor and other City of Jacksonville officials and agency
representatives. The October 18 meeting is open to all
Jacksonville residents, not just those living in the Greater
Arlington and the Beaches planning district. For more infor-
mation or directions, call James Richardson, neighborhood
coordinator, Neighborhood Services Division, (904) 630-
7036.
TRANSFORMATION SERIES EVENT-Crucial will
host a Transformation series event in the Robinson Theater
next to the Fine Arts building at UNF on October 24 at 7:30.
This event will feature performers, singers, rappers, dancers
and other artists delivering a relevant message for today's
young adults. For more information, contact Cedric Twillie
at 904-449-4547 or email at c.twillie@comcast.net.
VIOLENCE AWARENESS CAMPAIGN-October is
National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Florida
Community College students are taking a stand against
domestic violence. The 2005 Violence Awareness Campaign
will help raise awareness of domestic violence and how it
can be eliminated. In their efforts to promote awareness,
Kent Campus Sociology students have created an exhibit of
"Silent Witness" silhouettes, in accordance, with the
International Silent Witness Initiative. Each wooden, life-
sized red silhouette tells the story of a Jacksonville citizen
\\ ho has died as a result of domestic homicide. Breastplate
shields on the figures tell the victims' names and their sto-
ries The Silent Witness display can be viewed Oct. 10-31
during regular campus operation hours. A panel discussion
on October 18 from 6:00-8:00 p.m. at Florida Community
College Kent Campus, 3939 Roosevelt Blvd. (in the
Auditorium, Building F) will feature representatives from
the Justice Coalition as keynote speakers. For more informa-
tion call 904.381.3584 or email kservant@fccj.edu.




DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Jacksonville's

Most Heated

Radio Talk Show!

North Florida's Best
Daily Talk Show!


AM 1530
WEEKDAYS
2-6 P.M.


CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http://www.wymm1530.com
I i


Shantel Jones And Hebert Cross, Jr.


Wed In Classical Marriage Ceremony


A recorded message
from the father of the Bride
to his daughter played
before their ceremonious
walk to the front.
The Bride's brother,
Pastor Arthur T. Jones, Jr.,
presided over the beginning
of the ceremony before
Bishop Jones assumed his
position as wedding offi-
ciant.


0.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
All People International
Church was transformed
into a mecca of classical cel-
ebration fit for a princess
and her prince on Saturday,
September 24.
Shantel Teneshia Jones,
daughter of Bishop Arthur
Jones, Sr. and Elder Sharon
Jones, and Herbert Jeffery
Vross, Jr., son of Deacon
Herbert Cross, Sr. and Mrs.
Lula Cross, were married in
a magnificent backdrop of
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gold, sage, cream and
bronze.
The birde's mother coor-
dinated the lavish event.
The ceremony began
promptly at 3:45 p.m. as The
Magnolia String Quartet ser-
anaded the guest with a
compilation of classical
melodies.
A procession of honored
guest followed, culminating
with the Brde's grandmoth-
er, the Elder Essie M. Jones.
"Bach Air" played as the


The Bride's uncle, Elder
Thomas Davis, served the
couple's first communion.
Bishop Jones presented the
couple with a replica of the
Ark of the Covenant made
by his own hands as a sym-
bol of God's prosperity and
blessings on their lives.
Guest were honored with
two receptions following the
ceremony. They were
planned executed by the
Bride's aunt, Mrs. Evelyn
Kellam.
The church grounds
were transformed as two
white tents, flanked by
palms and other decorative
plants, were beautifully
adorned for the garden
reception.
Guests dined as jazz
music filled the early
evening air.
Inside the Wilbur Holsey
Hall, a formal reception was
underway. As The Magnolia
String Quartet played, the
guest dined in eloquence.
The Bride and Groom
were given toasts of well
wishes by the Matron and
Maid of Honor, Iquana
Jones and Angela Holsey
and the Best Men, Deacon
Herbert Cross, Sr. and
Melvin Johnson.
After cutting the five-tier
wedding cake and tossing
the bouquet and garter, the
happy couple made a dash to
their stretch Lincoln
Towncar. Their enamored
guest tossed handful of
birdseeds to wish them well.
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
Cross, Jr. honeymooned in
the Eastern Carribbean and
will reside in Jacksonville.


mothers entered the sanctu-
ary. the Bride's mother was
elegant in an exquisite
bronze, custom designed
ball gown by Ivonne de la
Vega. The Groom's mother
was equally stunning in a
lovely cream a-line evening
gown by Silk Creations.
"Nadia's Theme" was
the music of the procession-
al. The Bride's neice, Aja
Jones, prepared the entrance
of the bride with creme rose
petals.


JAXPORT
To Host Small
Business Summitt
JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Port Authority
(JAXPORT) will host a free
"Small Business
Opportunities Summit" on
Saturday, October 8th from
10:00 to 11:00 a.m. at the
Prime Osborn Convention
Center as part of the 4th
Annual Florida Black Expo.
The Summit will feature
representatives from local
government agencies,
including JAXPORT, the
Jacksonville Airport
Authority, the Duval County
School Board and others,
discussing how small busi-
nesses may take advantage
of specific contracting
opportunities. The Summit
is free and participants will
receive free tickets to attend
the Black Expo.


PAGE C-1


FLORIDA STAR


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Hollywood star.



Pass It On.


THE FOUNDATION FOR


A BETTER


LIFE


vwww forbetterlife org


V


OCTIOBER 8, 2005


FL.ORID)A STARR


PArV. r 7








OCTOBER 8, 200UUZ5 V PA.E -A CI


Ceremonies To Honor Life And Work Of The 'Beach Lady'


AMELIA ISLAND, Fla. -- The A. L.
Lewis Historical Society and the
family of MaVynee Oshun
Betsch, widely known as the
Beach Lady, will celebrate
her life and spirit at cere-
monies on Saturday and
Sunday, October 22 and 23,
2005. Her niece, Peri
Frances-Betsch said, "It is
so appropriate that the
Beach Lady's courageous
work and indomitable sprit
will be lifted up on the very
beach that she did so much to
preserve."
ay MaVynee Betsch, known
MaVynee Betsch nationwide as an advocate for
American Beach, died on September 5, 2005 at age 70. She
graduated from Oberlin Conservatory in Ohio, studied voice
further in Paris, then spent ten years as an opera singer in
Germany before moving to American Beach, the beach
where she spent weekends as a child. As the Beach Lady,


she became an environmental activist and tireless promoter
of the history and physical integrity of American Beach.
The Saturday, October 22, 2005 celebration of the Beach
Lady's life will be held at American Beach on Amelia Island,
beginning at 4:30 p.m.. At sunset sacred ceremonies will
take place at Nana, the dune,-and the edge of the ocean two
sights deeply loved by the Beach Lady.
A quilt will be sewn in MaVynee's memory. Those who
attend will be given an opportunity to write down their mem-
ories or thoughts about her; these pieces will be sewn into
the quilt.
The Saturday ceremony in honor of the Beach Lady's life
will be held at Lewis Street between Ocean Blvd. and Gregg
St., at American Beach. Look for the tent. The service will
take place rain or shine. Parking will be in Burney Park,
Burney Rd., off SR A1A. For further information contact
Peri Frances-Betsch at 404-964-8342.
On Sunday, October 23, 2005 the Ritz Theatre & LaVilla
Museum, the A. L. Lewis Historical Society and the family
of MaVynee Oshun Betsch welcome all to another celebra-
tion of the Beach Lady's life and work. The afternoon,
beginning at 2 p.m., will include a showing of the film The
Beach Lady, a musical tribute by her brother John Betsch,


and a reception at the Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum, 829
N. Davis St., Jacksonville.
Those attending Sunday are encouraged to participate in
an African ancestral altar ceremony, welcoming MaVynee
among the ancestors by bringing items for the ceremony.
The film The Beach Lady received its world premiere at
three sold-out events in January 2005 on Amelia Island when
both the Beach Lady and American Beach celebrated their
70th birthdays.
For those attending either ceremony, or for others who
wish to honor her, the family respectfully requests that in
lieu of flowers or gifts, donations be made to the A. L. Lewis
Historical Society as a way to continue the Beach Lady's
life's work and to make manifest her vision of an American
Beach Museum. The A. L. Lewis Historical Society, P. 0.
Box 15563, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035, is a 501(c)3 non-
profit organization registered in the state of Florida.
The A. L. Lewis Historical Society is raising funds to
research, design and install the exhibits for the American
Beach Museum. Abraham Lincoln Lewis was the great-
.grandfather of MaVynee Betsch and one of the seven
founders, in 1901, of Jacksonville's Afro-American Life
Insurance Company and, in 1935, of American Beach.


'Fair Winds And Following Seas'


BMCS Roderick A. Ingram, Sr. Retires From Navy


The Ingram family beams with pride during the retirement ceremony held recently for
Senior Chief Boatswain Mate Roderick A. Ingram Sr. United States Navy at The
Potter's House Christian Multi-Plex.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
Leaving a company in the
corporate America you get a
party and maybe a gold
watch. Sometimes it's a pat


- m __ -- ..
BMCM (Surface Warfare) Brian L. Skeete, United States Navy (left) makes a presenta-
tion to Senior Chief Boatswain Mate Roderick A. Ingram Sr. (right)

Westconnet Honored As Blue Ribbon School


The U.S. Department of Education has announced that Wesconnett Elementary School
has been named a Blue Ribbon School for 2005 on the basis of its academic progress under
the federal No Child Left Behind regulations.
Wesconnett is one of 295 Blue Ribbon schools designated across the country for this year.
To be nominated for the award, schools must:
Have at least 40 percent of their students from disadvantaged backgrounds
Show that students, regardless of background, achieve in the top 10 percent of their state
on state tests
"We are very proud of our teachers, students, parents and staff for this great honor," said
Michael Akers, Wesconnett Principal. "This award validates our focus on academics and a
safe and orderly environment. We continue to pursue excellence, viewing the Blue Ribbon
School award as a milestone on that journey rather than the destination."
Under No Child Left Behind, schools must make "adequate yearly progress" (AYP) in
reading and language arts and in mathematics. Previously, the district's Jacksonville Beach
Elementary earned a Blue Ribbon School designation in 2003.
"Our congratulations go out to everyone at Wesconnett on this remarkable achievement,"
said Duval County Public Schools Superintendent Nancy Snyder, Ed.D. "A Blue Ribbon
School designation requires the commitment and hard work of the entire school community.
yesconnett is hoping to set a standard for l11 our schools to attain."


on the back. Sometimes it's
a simple "thank you." But,
when you retire in the Navy
you get a ceremony.
A Retirement Ceremony
was held recently in honor
of Senior Chief Boatswain
Mate Roderick A. Ingram
Sr. United States Navy. The
ceremony was held at The
Potter's House Christian
Multi-Plex.
From the "Arrival of
Official Party to "Post The
Sideboys The Watch Was
Passed. The celebration
highlighted his accomplish-
ments from Boot camp to
retirement.
Among the guests were
Lt. Commander Glenn D.
Bourque, Unites Navy:
(Mayport), and Lt. Reyna
Medina, United States Navy
(Mayport). His wife, chil-
dren, father and mother,
were also there to help
make the occasion memo-
rable.
BMCS Roderick A.
Ingram Sr. was born in
Omaha, Ne. January 19,
1960.
Senior Chief Ingram
enlisted in the United States
Navy December 1977 in the
delayed entry program and
began active duty June 25,
1978.
Boot camp for Senior
Chief began August 1978 at
The Naval Recruit Training
Center in Orlanda, Florida.
As a Seaman Recruit ,
Roderick Ingram was
assigned his first duty on
board the USS Hull DD-
945.
Working hard and paying
attention aboard one of the
greatest Fighting
Destroyers, Roderick
Ingram became Boatswain
Mate Striker. 4


Love. was in the air and
in the summer of 1979,
Miss Renae Jackson caught'
the eye of this daring sailor
and he found his "good
thing." Eight months later a
wedding took place. This
was the beginning of a life-
time love affair.
Boatswain Mate Ingram
did a cross-deck swap to the
USS Peleliu LHA-5 out of
Long Beach California and
on May 1, 1981 a son was
born, Roderick Ingram, II.
Advancement was rapid
and Boatswain Mate Ingram
advanced to BM3, served
until June 1982 receiving an
honorable discharge.
Missing the life of the
Navy and realizing God's
assignment, 15 months after
his honorable discharge,
Roderick Ingram enlisted as
a TAR (Training and
Administration of Reserves)
assigned to the USS Duncan
FFG-10.
He was promoted to
Second Class Petty Officer
in October 1983. From that
point, everywhere his feet
touched was blessed.
During a tour in the sum-
mer of 1986, he became
Leading Petty Officer (LPO)
aboard the USS Opportune
ARS-41.
On June 4, 1988 Renae
C. J. Ingram was born and
in August 1990, he was pro-
moted to 1st Class and
Weekend Shop Master.
Durign a second tour as
Leading Petty Officer, he
received the designation of
Enlisted Surface Warfare
Specialist aboard the
USS McCandless FFT-1084
Still walking out his
assignment, a transfer was
made and he became Mine
Search Unit Two Petty


Officer in charge qualifying
as Craft Master. While
serving aboard the USS
Inchon MCS-12, Senior
Chief Boatswain Mate
Ingram -was selected to the
ranks of Chief Petty Officer.
At the end of the celebra-
tion BMCM (Surface
Warfare) Brian L. Skeete,
United States Navy, read
"The Watch" and Departure
Honors: "For twenty six
years this sailor stood the
watch....' Shipmate... the
watch stands relieved .... WE
HAVE THE WATCH..."
FAIR WINDS and FOL-
LOWING SEAS".


DEATH

NOTICES
ALBERTIE-Joseph T., died
September 28, 2005.
BAKER-Yvonne. Bell, died
September 24, 2005.
BLOCKER-Charlie, .Jr., died
September 15, 2005.
BROCK-Lisa Marie, 33, died
September 29, 2005.
CARLISLE-Alicia, died
September 29, 2005.
DAVIS-Tony D., died
September 30, 2005.
DENNIS-Edward, died October
2, 2005.
EDWARDS-Eric L., died
September 26, 2005.
ERVIN-Pearlene, died
September 26, 2005.
FACEY-Lehua S., 59, died
September 25, 2005
HART-Marva Jean, died
September 28, 2005.
JEFFERSON-Elizabeth, 86,
died October 2, 2005.
JOHNSON-Eugene, 86, died
October 1, 2005.
JOHNSON-Kenneth; 43, died
October 4, 2005.
KENDRIX-Annie Pearl, died
September 28, 2005.
MADISON-Ethel, died
September 29, 2005.
MARSHALL-Earice, died
September 26, 2005.
MIDDLETON-George T., died
September 29, 2005.
MITCHELL-Kenneth, died
October 4, 2005.
MURRAY-Robert, died
October 2, 2005.
PETERSON-Issac, 20, died
October 2, 2005.
PHOENIX-Rev. Leroy R., died
September 30, 2005. A.B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
POLLARD-George Sr., died
October 2, 2005.
QUARTERMAN-Sharon, died
September 29, 2005.
RICHARDSON-Franklin,
died, October 2,.2005.
STEVENS-Walter "Bone",
died September 28, 2005.
SUTTON-Master Willie Earl,
Jr., infant, died September 24,
2005.
TIMMONS-James Everett, 82,
died October 1, 2005. Alphonso
West Mortuary, Inc.
WILLIAMS-Miranda, died
September 28, 2005.
YOUNG-Larry, died
September 30, 2005.


Senior Chief Boatswain Mate Roderick A. Ingram Sr.
United States Navy (right) receives words of praise from
his wife Renae Jackson Ingram (left).


PAGE C-3


FLORIDA STAR


1-ltIV4%n7n 0 IWI





Fr LOrnA STAR


OCTOBER 8, 2005


Annual Celebration Highlights International Trade With

South Africa, Honors Minority Business Leaders -ift I


The nominations are in
and the final preparations
are underway to honor
First Coast small and
minority-owned business-
es in a weeklong celebra-
tion September 19-23,
2005. Thirty-nine busi-
nesses will be vying for
seven awards, including
the top honor of
Entrepreneur of the Year.
The celebration is part
of the 22nd annual
Minority Enterprise
Development Week, or
MEDWeek for short, and
will also feature a visit to
Jacksonville from Her
Excellency Barbara Joyce
Masekela, Ambassador to
the U.S. from The
Republic of South Africa.
According to organiz-
ers, Masekela will discuss
the growth and potential of
small businesses engaged
in international trade on
Thursday, Sept. 22, 2005 at
the MEDWeek Awards
Luncheon. That morning,
the Ambassador is sched-
uled to tour of the JAX-
PORT shipping operations
at Blount Island and meet
small business owners who
ship between Jacksonville
and the ports of South
Africa.
"We are thrilled to have
Her Excellency come and
share her message of hope
and international trade
with small and minority
business leaders here on
the First Coast," said Julia
Fox, president of the First
Coast Business Alliance
Inc. (FCBA), the nonprofit
spearheading MEDWeek.
"Having lived under the
former regime of apartheid
to later working alongside
Nelson Mandela fighting
for South Africa's free-
dom, the Ambassador
knows the struggles small
businesses must overcome
to be successful both at
home and abroad."
Using the theme
"Putting the Pieces
Together for Building a
Successful Business," the
FCBA has teamed up with


the U.S. Small Business
Administration, the Small
Business Development
Center at the University of
North Florida, the Small
Business Center of the
Jacksonville Regional
Chamber of Commerce,
Bethune-Cookman
College, Florida
Community College at
Jacksonville, the
University of North
Florida and numerous
other organizations to put
together the event that
focuses on the accom-
plishments and economic
impact minority business-
es make on the First Coast.
"Each year, the First
Coast celebration brings
together more than 2,000
small and minority enter-
prises, representatives
.from corporations and
state and federal agencies,
all with a common com-
mitment to promoting and
fostering minority busi-
ness growth and develop-
ment," said Ronald Van
Johnson, Economic
Development Specialist
with the Jacksonville SBA
Office.
Hundreds of people
will take part in work-
shops, seminars, trade
fairs, a procurement con-
ference, a golf tournament
and an exciting awards
luncheon.
Since 1983, the U.S.
President has proclaimed a
National MEDWeek
observance to recognize
the outstanding achieve-
ments of Minority
Business Enterprises
(MBEs) and to honor
those corporations and
financial institutions that
support minority business
development. The
Jacksonville celebration is
one of many annual
regional conferences dedi-
cated to honoring small
and minority-owned busi-
nesses.
Masekela received her
education in South Africa
and Zambia, graduating
with a BA (Cum Laude)


'I,','.'
* I


Barbara Masekela. Ambassador to the U.S. from South Africa


from the Ohio University
in 1971. After an academic
career in which she was
Assistant Professor of
English Literature at
Staten Island Community
College, NY, and at
Rutgers University,, NJ,
she founded the African
National Congress Office
of Arts and Culture and
served as its secretary for
seven years. After the
release of Nelson
Mandela, she joined his
office as Chief of Staff, a
position she held until
1994. During that time she
was elected to the National
Executive Committee of
the ANC and to its
National Working
Committee, as well.
President Mandela
appointed Masekela
Ambassador to the
Republic of France as well
as Ambassador to
UNESCO, in 1995. In
1999 when she returned to
South Africa she joined the
corporate world where she
held a number of executive
and non-executive
Directorships. She was a
Director of the Standard
Bank of South Africa, the
South African
Broadcasting Corporation
and the International
Marketing Council, among
others. At this time she


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also became a trustee of
the Nelson Mandela
Children's Fund and the
Nelson Mandela
Foundation. She retired in
March 2003 as Executive Advertising Deadline:
Director for Public and TUESDAYS @ 5 p.m.
Corporate Affairs for De T a .
Beers Consolidated Mines. To place an ad:
President Mbeki appointed: (904) 76
Masekela Ambassador to FAX: (904) 765-1673
the United States of
America in June 2003.
Masekela has two sons,
Mabusha and Selema.
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Friday & Saturday
Disco (featuring DJ Larry "Georgia Boy" Douglas)
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2004 Black Nowspapers Readership Refport, nnpa.org q


S A 17~1- i


PAGE U~ -4








OCTOBER 8 5, 2005JrLuiIl3.1AK


Jaguars Hope Rookie The Right
Decision


Can Help Revamp


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. Khalif Barnes, a second-round
draft pick from
Washington, will make
his first start for the
Jaguars Sunday night
October 9 against the
Cincinnati Bengals.
The Jaguars expect the
move to improve an
offensive line ranking
29th in the league in sacks
allowed per passing play.
"Hopefully I can get
Khalif Barnes better and become a tech-
d k bn cnlxir nhnpnf thp rt.ie l -ft tackles,"Bre


Line


ly every passing play -- mostly from the left side-- and Fred
Taylor found few running lanes.
Del Rio benched. Pearson last Sunday, admrhitting that he
may have returned too soon from a serious knee injury, and
Barnes got in for about a dozen plays. Barnes played well
enough to earn his first start, Del Rio said.
"He is talented. He is athletic. He does bring some tough-
ness, some physical ability," Del Rio said. "What he's lack-
ing right now is experience. If the other guys were playing
well enough to hold him off, then it might be harder to get
him into the game. But at this point, it's time for him to play."
Leftwich has been sacked 13 times this season and
knocked down even more often. Taylor, meanwhile, has
averaged a career-low 3.3 yards per carry.
The line received most of the blame for a revamped


iciIn ancU worL too e one o U e premier IIL LUU e U, -- -- -
said Wednesday. offense -- which has talent with Leftwich, Taylor and Jimmy
Barnes was inactive for Jacksonville's first three games Smith -- that's failed to produce.yards and points through Roy Jones Jr., right, connects on a body punch to
as Mike Pearson and Ephraim Salaam alternated series at left four games. The Jags (2-2) are hoping Barnes will make a Antonio Tate r during the eight, Octob er 1, 2005 in
tackle. difference. Del 'Rio also said the 6-foot-5, 319-pound line- TheavyweightFla. Tarvet Saturda unanimousght O decision, 2005in 12
But quarterback Byron Leftwich was pressured on near- man could start the rest of the season. rounds over Jones. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

Orlando Magic Sign Free Agents; Heat Putting New Pieces Together


ORLANDO, Fla. The
Orlando Magic signed five
free agents recently includ-
ing forwards Matt Freije, Bo
Outlaw and guard Felipe
Lopez.
The Magic open training
camp Tuesday in
Jacksonville at the
University of North Florida.
Freije, a second-round
pick by Miami in 2004,
appeared in 23 games last
season with New Orleans,
averaging 4.0 points and 2.7
rebounds. The 6-foot-10
Freije was waived by the
Hornets in January.
Outlaw, a 12-year NBA
veteran, played for the
Magic from 1997-2001. He
averaged 1.4 rebounds and
0.7 points in 39 games with
Phoenix last season.
Lopez, a former New


York City prep star, spent
parts of five seasons with
Vancouver, Washington and
Minnesota, averaging 5.8
points and 2.4 rebounds.
The Magic also signed
center Ken Johnson and for-
ward Terence Morris.
Johnson, a second-round
pick by Miami in 2001,
played in 34 games last sea-
son with Bourg en Bresse in
France, averaging 11.2
points, 5.2 rebounds and 2.1
blocks. The former Ohio
State standout holds the Big
Ten record for career
blocked shots with 444.
Morris, also a second-
round choice in 2001, aver-
aged 3.7 points and 2.9
rebounds in 117 career NBA
games with Houston.
Gone are two starters
from the Miami Heat's 159-


win club from last season:
Eddie Jones was traded to
Memphis, and Damon Jones
signed with Cleveland as a
free agent.
In their place are four
legitimate starting candi-
dates, whom Miami
acquired without sending
payroll skyrocketing or los-
ing either of its superstars,
Shaquille O'Neal or Dwyane
Wade.
Now, it's time for Miami
to put the new pieces togeth-
er. "We know we can win,"
Wade said. "That's what
we're all here for. ... This is
my third year here and it's
like it's my third different
team, but we can win."
Expectations may be
higher than ever for the Heat
as they pursue their first
NBA title.


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O'Neal-- who signed a
$100 million, five-year deal
this summer -- promises that
Miami will advance further
than it did last year, which
would mean at least reach-
ing the Finals. Wade made a
meteoric rise to superstar-
dom, and insists he'll get


even better.
He and O'Neal will find
plenty of new faces.
In the 13-player, five-
team trade that sent Eddie
Jones to Memphis, the Heat
got point guard Jason
Williams and forward James
Posey and landed forward


Antoine Walker from
Boston. Later in the sum-
mer, free-agent point guard
Gary Payton still seeking
his first title signed a one-
year deal and most likely
will be Williams' backup.
And Miami drafted Kansas
forward Wayne Simien.


Deadline Nearing For Florida Sports

Hall Of Fame Nominations
Florida residents are invited to nominate candidates for the Florida Sports Hall of Fame
between now and October 15, 2005.
Nominees must be Florida natives, attended school in Florida, or resided here during a
major portion of their careers. All nominees must have a sports career spanning a minimum
of 15 years or have been retired for at least one year. Nominations must be in writing and
should include biographical material illustrating the nominee's qualifications for the Hall.
Voters in the Hall of Fame election include members of the Hall, the Florida
SportsWriters Association and the Hall's board of directors. New members elected this year
will comprise the Class of 2006 which will be inducted next year in St. Petersburg where
efforts are underway to build a permanent home for the Hall. Last year's class included
swimmer Nicole Haislett Bacher, FSU baseball coach Mike Martin, tennis great Pete
Sampras, football and baseball star Deion Sanders, Florida Atlantic football coach Howard
Schnellenberger, golfer Payne Stewart and Florida Heisman Trophy Winner Danny Wuerffel.
Nominations should be mailed to: Nominations 2006, Florida Sports Hall of Fame
Foundation, P.O. Box 1630, Lake City, FL 32056 or emailed to sdillard@se.rr.comn

HBCU FOOTBALL"" ROUNDUP


October 1
Webber 44, Edward Waters 0 -
Arkansas-Pine Bluff 17, Alcorn State 7
Winston-Salem State 26, Fayetteville State
24-
Florida International 23, Florida A&M
6-
Hampton 26, Delaware State 8 -
Livingstone 27, Johnson C. Smith 10 -
Kentucky State 24, Lane 21 OT
Norfolk State 58, Savannah State 29 -
Virginia State 26, Elizabeth City State 6 -
Alabama State 45, Southern 35 Final
Albany State 31, Tuskegee 21 Final
Grambling State 50, Prairie View A&M 7 -
Southwestern College 28, Paul Quinn 25 -


Saint Augustine's 22,
NC Central 8 Allen 21,
West Virginia State 14 OT
Shaw 22, Bowie State 20 -
Millersville 31, Cheyney 7 -
Texas College 20, Peru State 17
Saint Paul's 41, Virginia Union 35
Tiffin 31, Central State 0
Howard 27, Charleston Southern 22 -
Fort Valley State 20, Miles 17 OT
Benedict 22, Clark Atlanta 21 Coastal
Carolina 24, SC State 23 -
Stillman 34, Langston 31 -
Texas Southern 17, Alabama A&M 7 -
Bethune-Cookman 44, Morgan State 26 -
NC A&T 16, Tennessee State 3 -


1. What U.S. hoopsters played the most basketball games in China in 1987?
2. What was the last baseball team Tom Seaver tried to pitch for?
3. What former Nebraska football player sued his lawyer to try to regain his Heisman
Trophy?
4. What baseball player said Philadelphia was the only city where you "experience the
thrill of victory and the agony of reading about it"?
5. What boxer said in 1988: "I still feel in my heart that I am the champion, but life must
go on"?
6. What tennis star became the butt of locker room jokes after adding a dog walker to her
sizeable entourage?
7. What sport made an all-star of Ray Bourque?
8. What aging Boston Red Sox slugger confided in 1983: "I still try to do the best I can,
but somehow I know I'm lacking something"?
9. Who was the first man to win the Olympic 1,500-meter run twice?
,10. What 1987 auto race had two mortuaries as lap sponsors?

.Sports Challenge Answers

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PAGE C-5


Ir fDrnT A CTA


--"71YV 0 'IAAAr







PAE FOID TA OTBE ,20


JAIL OR BAIL I

EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
FORGING BAD CHECKS-On Saturday, October 1,
2005 at 8:43 a.m. a police officer while on patrol just
East of 195, on Union Street, 'made contact with a 41-
year-old male driver (suspect) for a traffic stop. The
police officer ran the suspect's information through
FCIC. Data revealed that the suspect had a warrant in
Duval County, for passing bad checks. The police offi-
cer arrested the suspect, transported him to the County
jail, and charged him with a felony.
UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION FRAUD-
On Saturday, October 1, 2005 at 7:50 a.m., a police
officer while on patrol at McDuffAve S., made contact
with a 30-year-old male driver (suspect) during a traffic
stop. The police officer checked the suspect's name
and found he was wanted for Unemployment
Compensation fraud. The suspect was arrested, advised
of his rights, transported to jail, and charged with a
felony.
TRESPASSING ON PROPERTY- On September 26
a police officer advised a 20-year-old male (a known
drug dealer suspect) not to trespass at the Liberty Street
Apartments property, since he did not live there. On
Saturday, October 1, 2005 at 10:25 a.m. around 10:26
a.m, the police officer observed the suspect trespassing
again at the Liberty Street Apartments. The suspect was
arrested, transported to jail, and charged with a misde-
meanor.
VIOLATION OF INJUNCTION-On Saturday,
October 1, 2005 at 5:30 a.m. a police officer responded
to the 6400 block of Paragon Street to a report of an
unwelcomed person. Upon arrival, the police officer
met with an 80-year-old male parent (victim), who
advised that he had an injunction for protection against
his 54- year- old son (suspect) for domestic violence.
Upon arrival, the police officer observed the suspect at
the front porch of the listed address. The suspect has an
injunction for domestic violence served against him.
The police officer verified the injunction through ID
and records. The police officer read the suspect his
.rights, transported him to jail, and charged him with a
misdemeanor.
POSSESSION OF.CRACK COCAINE-On Saturday,
October 1, 2005 at 9:30 p.m. a police officer while on
patrol, observed a vehicle driving in the parking lot of
1057 Broward Road (Executive Inn). A check of the
license plate displayed on the vehicle revealed that the
license plate was expired for over a year. The police
S officer conducted a traffic stop on the 24-year-old
female driver (suspect) for the infractions, and asked
the suspect if she had any illegal narcotics inside her
vehicle. The suspect replied that she did not. The offi-
;cer asked the suspect if she would consent to a search
of her vehicle and purse. The suspect verbally agreed to
a search of her vehicle and purse. During the search of
the vehicle, the officer located a red purse lying
'between the front seats containing a clear plastic baggie
with what looked like powder cocaine. The substance
field-tested positive for cocaine. The suspect was read
. ;her rights and admitted ownership of the cocaine. The
;suspect told the officer that she recently had a medical
procedure, and she had been using the cocaine for pain
management. The suspect was placed under arrest,
transported to jail, and charged with a felony.
,POSSESSION OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA-On
: Saturday, October 1, 2005 at 11:00 p.m. a police officer
S responded to a call in reference to a 50- year-old female
(suspect), soliciting cars in the 2900 block of Edison
Ave. The area is known for prostitution and drug sales.
Upon arrival, the police officer observed the suspect
S standing in the 2800 Block of Edison Ave. The officer
asked the suspect for her identification and she said that
she was just waiting on her boyfriend. The officer
asked the suspect for her name and date of birth. The
officer could not find any verification of the suspect's
name or birthdate that she had provided. The suspect
was asked if she had anything illegal in a small black
S bag that she was holding. The suspect stated that she
had a crack pipe in the bag. Inside the black bag were
two crack pipes. The suspect was read her rights. The
suspect stated that shejust smoked crack cocaine about
an hour earlier. The suspect also stated that she had
been doing heroin for about 32 years. The officer took
the suspect to jail and charged her with a misdemeanor.
The crack pipes were placed in the property room for
evidence.

Doctor Sued For Sex Treatment For Back Pain

SEATTLE An Oregon woman whose doctor con-
S vinced her that he could cure her lower back pain by
S having sex with her is suing him and his medical clinic


for $4 million, according to legal documents obtained on
Monday.
The doctor, Randall Smith, who was 50 ,at the time,
was stripped of his license and sent to jail for 60 days
last year for charging the state's Oregon Health Plan
$5,000 for his 45-minute "treatments" involving the
,woman. "Dr. Smith's medical treatment included inter-
course in which he told plaintiff was needed to help alle-
viate plaintiffs lower back and lower extremity pain,"
the former patient said in the lawsuit. The lawsuit, which
charges battery, negligence and intentional and negligent
infliction of emotional distress, was filed on Friday in
Multnomah County court.


Your Weekly Horoscope
(OCTOBER 1, 2005-OCTOBER 7, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19)You'll
need to slow
down a bit this
week. Remember
the old adage: Haste makes
waste. While you're doing a
lot of juggling, everything
eventually gets done.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) An
introspective
mood hits you the
beginning of the
Week. Try to avoid letting
this lead you into a minor
depression. Focus on the
positive instead.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) You get
a welcome
breather midweek
from the usual -
grind. Use the time to mere-
ly relax and recharge your
energies. Over the weekend,
a group outing is most pleas-
ant.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) You're tempted to
i be a couch potato
tiis week. Get up
and get moving!
There's much to
be done before you can rest.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22) Any
legal dealings
should be handled
with care. Be sure
to read all propositions care-
fully. You don't want to sign
onto anything you're not
aware of.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) You set-
tle into your rou-
.f tine quite nicely
this week. Don't
let a minor
mishap spoil this. That's just
what it is trivial!
LIBRA (September
23 to October
22) Take advan-
tage of an
upswing in your
energy. You'll be


able to tackle those tasks
you've been dreading and
putting off. This weekend, a
family visit keeps you hop-
ping.
SCORPIO (October
S23 to
I November 21)
You're pleased
this week at the
cooperation you get on the
job. Co-workers are more
than willing to pitch in.
Later, a personal matter
takes precedence.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22
to December
21) You have a
tendency this
week to indulge in day-
dreaming, This could cause
you to make careless errors
on the job. Tap into those
powers of concentration
with some self-discipline.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19)
\\ hi Ie things don't
go exactly as
you'd planned,
they still fall into place quite
nicely. Adapt to what's going
on, and you're more success-
ful. A weekend social event
is formal, so be sure to dress
properly.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18)
You're reading too
much into what's
really an unimportant matter
in the long run. Sometimes,
that awesome mind of yours
can see problems where
there are none. Avoid this!
PISCES (Februar)
19 to March 20) You
rightfully feel that you've
been burning the l
candle at both ,./
ends. Take some .[ L
time this week to
rest. Your mind and your
body will thank you.
CELEBRITY


Large Elusive Rodent

Found Dead In Ohio

SPRINGFIELD, Ohio -- An elusive kangaroo-like
animal that was on the run in west-central Ohio for near-
ly two weeks was found dead along a rural road, the
apparent victim of a hit-and-run driver.
Clark County Sheriff Gene Kelly said the animal, a
Patagonian cavy, was found along state Route 41 south-
east of Springfield on Monday.
Much of Clark County had been on a round-the-clock
cavy watch after a woman reported seeing the long-
legged animal, the world's second-largest rodent and a
native of South America, hopping along her street in
South Charleston on Sept. 21.
Live traps were baited with bits of melon, but .the
cavy remained free.
Kelly was close enough to throw a blanket over the
elusive critter one night last week but didn't know how
to proceed. Kelly said he didn't want to just throw him-
self -- at 185 pounds -- on the animal that stood about 3
feet tall and weighed about 30 pounds.
When he hesitated, the cavy got away.
But Kelly, who was skeptical about the sightings at
first, became a believer.
"It didn't run away; it sprang away," Kelly said. "It
did, for all of the world, look just like a kangaroo bound-
ing away, its head bobbing up every now and then from
the soybean field."
The cavy had escaped from an exotic animal farm
whose owner hasn't been identified by authorities.
The cavy's carcass was turned over to him, Kelly
said.
Springfield is about 43 miles west of Columbus.


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ROLLOVER!!


BIRTHDAYS: George
Wendt, October 17; Joe
Morton, October 18;
Richard Dreyfuss, October
19; Tom Petty, October 20;


Judge Judy, October 21; Jeff
Goldblum, October 22;
Doug Flutie, October 23.
2005 DBR Media,Inc.


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\ to tie >r tice.
N O \V C.C -PT I N G
N E \ PA T: fiE NTS
ieI invite you to C ifas your provider
of choice lfo o edIdthcare needs.
TO SCHEDULE AN P. POINTNIENT CALL
76848222
FAX: 90 ,482-0373
W\E ACCEPT ALL MAJOR HEALTH PLANS
HMOs, PPOs, NIEDICAURE, And MEDICAID
3160 Edgewood Avenue*Jacksonville, FL 32209
OFFICE HOURS:
M-F 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. Wed. 2 P. M. TO 5 P.M.

Prison Employee Ringer

Lands In Prison
SNEADS, Fla. A former minor league baseball
player who worked for the state Department of
Corrections for enough time to help prison guards win a
softball tournament has been arrested, a Department of
Law Enforcement warrant showed.
The warrant from FDLE Inspector Travis Lawson
alleges Mark Guerra, 33, was paid $1,247 for four
weeks as a library employee at the Apalachee
Correctional Institution, but was not required to show up
for work.
Guerra told investigators he was hired to work at the
prison library, but later said he was hired to play softball
for the Apalachee Correctional Institution.
He said he played in 'the 24th annual Florida
Department of Correction Secretary's Tournament in
Jacksonville, which the prison team won.
Guerra, of Grand Ridge, was arrested Monday night
and booked into a Jackson County jail on a charge of
grand theft. Jail records show Guerra was released on his
own recognizance.
There was no telephone listing for Guerra and no
information on whether he had legal representation.
Robby Cunningham, a spokesman for the
Department of Corrections, said he could not comment
on the ongoing investigation. Guerra no longer works
with the department.

Crime doesn't pay but we do!
CRIME STOPPERS
1-866-845-TIPS (8477)
No Names...
No Faces... No Hassles


Tara 's

24/7


OCTOBER 8, 2005


F;LORIDA STAR


PAGE C-6


L








FI ORIDA .VTA R


rAGEr VI e-


EMPLOYMENT |

Change Your Life.
Your Future.
You have the power to change
your future. And you can do it
right here at Florida
Community College at
Jacksonvile. To learn about
employment opportunities that
are available please visit our
website at Jobs.FCCJ.edu.

CONSTRUCTION PERSONNEL
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Pipelayers, Excavator Operators,
Loader Operators.
Drug screen req.
Jensen Civil Construction
9100 Philips Hwy. EOE/m/f/d/v

HELP WANTED
Helpers, Trainees, Plumbers
Must have a driver's license.
Excellent pay. Apply:
9020 Cocoa Ave.
Econo-Rooter Inc.

Huddle House Franchise
Opportunity available in
Jacksonville, FL. Huddle
House is a 24-hur family
restaurant with 41 years expe-
rience and 385 units. We cred-
it our 40 years of consecutive
same store sales growth to an
innovative design and appeal-
ing menu, as well as a strong
brand with constant corporate
support. We are currently
seeking franchise-operating
partners to join our winning
team! For more information,
visit our website at www.hud-
diehouse.com or call us at 1-
800-868-5700. A HOUSE is a
great investment.

Driver CDL-A req'd.
Home Every Night &
Weekend Guaranteed


Avg. $888 $1018/wk
No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
Sunday calls welcome!
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

To place an ad:
CAII: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673


Thank you for reading
The Florida Star!


Announcements


OCTOBERBEAD FESTS October 7th,8tlh,9tbl)Pompano Beach, ElLs
Lodge. October 15th, 16th HIlavana FL, The Planters Exchange. October
29th, 30th FtMyers, Clarion Hotel. Announcing Palm Beach Gardens
November 4th, 5th & 6th Amara Shrine Temple. Bead. PMC. & Wire
Wrapping Classes available. Info at www OctoberBeadFests coni or
(866)667-3232.

Auctions

AUCTION!!CASHIERS,NCOctober21.2005CommercialBuildingon
Hwy l07N Lot37A Sapphire LakesGolfCommunity I 0:00A.M.Miscel-
laneous Items 11:00 A.M. Real Estate 10% Buyers Premium, I0% down,
30DayClosingSavageReal Fstate&AuctionCo. Inc. NC#7189GAL3 125
Kenneth Savage(888)983-0066 Toll-free(770)718-8297.

AUCTIONS ONLINE. Used Trucks & Equipment. RegisterFREE. Low
SELLER fees. Promo. Code SWC- 103. Visit our websitc fordetails and
personal assistance., www surplusonthe NFT (877)215-3010.

Estate Auction ]67 +/-,acres- Divided. homesites, hunting, timberland.
October29. I 0:00amiClaxton. EvansCounly,GA. I 0%buyer's premium.
Rowevll Auctions. Inc, (800)323-8388 .acGa.lotkS.L.ctiIg1,.oe.m GAL
AU-C002594.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE 555 Buy Direct From Manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with tll Accessories. Quick turnaround! Delivery Avail-
able Toll Free(888)393-0335.


Business For Sale


Service Business FSBO. Sky's thelimit Inlthls large MILLION DOILL.A tR
buininess. I rl eo.lsalltiil utoli 2ta1t ihoJm leltL8m.ic .ori, Mor M e Info
Cuall(941i)85-9212,

Business Opportunities

ALLCASHICANDYROUT CaindyAll fir$9,995,.(888)629-9968BO200003.;CAI,t.l.US: Wewillntol
be undersold l

$2000 PER WEEK NOW Own your own travel business, iEnter ithe
excllltlg.worldot f'tr vol, Turnkey rhtinlnggprtovldedP. PlFT$249nllrntiint
lnvstainnt 'oll-a (800)64-792110,

IDATA ENTRY, Work ftron nltywhstre. FlaixblI t lours. $S Ori'eil Puy $$
Personal Conputurlequlreid. Serolru InquirlesiOrly,. (800)873-03,15 lil,
499,

LOCAI ,VEN DING ROU )'li, Sodat, wneks, eundy,julces, walter, greltt
equip. inid locatlonn, intlticlntg nvlltilble w/$7,S00tl(own, CUtll
(877)843-8726.- #32002-0137,

ALLC, ASlH IIISINESSt Itocrl Canldy VendilngRouttlel IJtllited Iatiriing
Potentill,l.Includes .)0 ALl. Metal Machlitoswll(,ittihldy, tlhlihtt mWar.
rtlly, $9,895, (800)70,1'.5414,

Financial

IMMEDIATE (ASHI!!US Puatlotnn Fdinlltg pysneitsh nowltbrHy years
of your Ititure pension paiyienlts. Call (800)}86i-1325 for a ltoREr, 1o.
otbllloiioe(inleu.'wwitaBtlnat uillotlidig cmt.

t***$10-5 50,000++FREEl ',CASHI(;I ANTS'12005! NINEVERRI-'ItAYI
'ersiunil/Medlcal iiL. School. New IBuc nstiM-Home. As seenonT.V, N(O
CRIIT(rH<'C1:K! live Opnirlorsl (800)270-J12 213 ext.95,

Help Wanted

DELIVER FEMARV'sTFORPAYI A NATIONAL RVdolivery service
hiLs imtnedte needs fbr qtalitfied conraetors toCodlivei'"now" RIVltrailers
roIto rtcltories id dailara toHl t tirricanc llcelsitles lrL Oisrate pre'iy 'or
you to help lie victims, Pleas log on today: www itnr()rl/ttrins|porl rcotm.


SERVICES

Ami Ains


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764







THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

CURL QUEEN
"Specials"
Curls -Ages 7-12 ONLY $29.95
Relaxer w/ Roller Set ONLY
$25.00
766-4510

Want to purchase minerals and
other oil/gas Interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201

Auto For Sale

1994 Buick Station Wagon.

Good Condition, $1500. Call:
355-6007

Rooms for Rent
Adults preferred
Nice clean quiet area
Call: Mike or Cynt
722-3830


IMPACT

WCGL AM

1360

THE FLORIDA
STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 1:00 p.m.


BUSINESS NETWO


1 pm Sat., Oct. 22 6 pm Thurs., Oct. 27

Lake Placid, FL. Ocala, FL.

100t Florida Homesites 57 t PRIME ACRES 0.,0.,.0
Offlrodt o ett aclst adl t loonlng Gotlh S Fl l Fttt l Incalod I n,
In Highlands, Okeechobee & Polk Counties ntlfr Equilne Fadttlly otWekeind ut-Ays lVty&PtlmnaCotIlS

IIIGGENBOTHAM
BMTWoN M 800.257.4161
wNATl7ONaT INC ME Higgenbotham, CAlI
u"A"- m d FL LIU#AU305AB158 www.higgenbotham.com


I


OCTOBER 8, 2005


SA AOkeechobee
County, FL

. Home Site Buyers Jr & a# s
* Investors/Developers
* Farmers/Ranchers 3


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L ----------------------- J


ABSOLUTE AUCTIO


800.451.2709 Thursday, Novem
800-451w2R709aAnB For info. visit: .,ov
,nih, www.schraderauction.com




CAvfSHfNOW As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


PUBLIC LEGAL NOTICE
FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS AND CLASSIFICATIONS HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT:
ANY PERSON WISHING TO BE HEARD BEFORE THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD WITH REGARD TO THE
AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION APPLICATIONS MAY PRESENT INFORMATION ON HIS BEHALF
AT THE PRIME OSBORN CENTER, 1000 WATER STREET, 2ND FLOOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, 32204,
OCTOBER 10, 12, 13, 26 & 27, 2005.

A LIST OF ALL APPLICATIONS FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN WHOLLY OR PARTIALLY
APPROVED, AND A LIST OF ALL APPLICATIONS THAT HAVE BEEN DENIED ARE AVAILABLE TO THE PUB-
LIC IN THE INFORMATION CENTER OF THE PROPERTY APPRAISER'S OFFICE, 231 EAST FORSYTH
STREET, FROM 8:00 A.M. TO 5:00 P.M., MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 196.194,
FLORIDA STATUTES, AS AMENDED.

THESE LISTS WILL REFLECT THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF EXEMPTIONS:


HOMESTEAD
WIDOWS
WIDOWERS
DISABILITY
HURRICANE EMERGENCY RELIEF


RELIGIOUS
LITERARY
CHARITABLE
SCIENTIFIC


HOSPITALS
NURSING HOMES
HOMES FOR THE AGED
HOMES FOR SPECIAL SERVICE


IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD WITH
RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING OR HEARING, HE OR SHE WILL NEED A
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS. FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE OR SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A
VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY
AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.


O .





Physical activity Is a great way
for kids to build strength and
stay healthy. .Unfortunately,
it can sometimes lead to
Injury. Broken bones require
immediate attention. but
what about sore shoulders or.
swollen knees? If not taken
seriously, many youth injuries
can become chronic later' in
life. So before youK child gers
hurt, visit aaos org or nata org.
Practice prevention and give
all injuries proper attention-



wo ;.|O A H _. r *, .,, -
Oa)HO~~~~rl(DIC~~ ~ fl hB rli i M W M .
Gru Cr' uQ" r ^ ____ "r ..g ^


CDLAOTRDRIVERS'TEAMS .50CIPMSOLOS.34CPM I 00%DROPt
&HOOK llFAI.TlInBENEFITSASSIGNED EQUIPMENTREQUIRE-
1 YEAR OTR HAZMAT & DOUBLES (321 )202-4406,.

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay & Benelils for
Experienced Drivers. 0/0. Solos, Teams & (radualteSldems. Bonuses
Available. Refrigerated Now Available.(888)MORE IPAY
(888-667-3729).

Now Hiringfor2005PostalP ositions$17.50-$59.00-/hr. Full Bencfit's
Paid Training and Vacations No Lxperience Necessar (800)584-1775
Reference # 5600.

MOVIE EXTRAS,ACTORS & MODELS! Make $75-$250/day.All
ages and faces wNanted! No exp. Required. FT/PT! (800)714-7565.

S6(00WEEKIY Workingthrough the governmentpart-time.No Experi-
ence. A lot of Opportunities. (800)493-3688 CodeJ- 14.

S/E&3-State Run: T'I Drivers. HOME V t '- ..i i
Benelits, 401K. Trainees Welcomne. Miami... ,
Class-A CDL Cypress IrruckLines(800)545-1351,

STABLE CAREER.IMMEDIATEOPENINGS! Positionsavailable for
ExpericncedCDLIlolders.AlsoCompany F'undedT'riickDriverTraliningi
offered, Financial assistance for Hurricane Victims. (877)PRI ME-JIOl.
WwR.prilcimclornm.

Driver- NOW HI RING QUALIFIED DRIVERS Ibr Central Floor Ida
Local & National OTR positions, Food grade tanker, no halny.m. atno putrps,
great benefits, coinpetlivc pay & ne\v eqtlipn1ent. Need 2 years experi-
ence, Call l3yrtn 'Transport for youropportunily today. (800)741-7950,

Company and 0/0 Neteded 87 ceents per mile till Dead heid paid + fsc.
Call Don SalltaianCTC Truckinginc. (321)639-1522,

Legal Services

ALLAccideln&i1mn&h iuryClnims.AiUTOMOnItIt ,KftiIEI.l /HO1AT/l1.lUS.
ANIMAL BI1TES, WORKERS COMPII-NSATION, WRONGFUl.,
DIuA I'H,NI IRSINO HOME INJUIRII$S. "'roiectl ourRights" A-A-A
ATTORNEY Ref'erral Service((800)733-5342.

NEIDA IAiAWVI ? All Crlinill Defense& IPersuirolil litnry.*' eolornles
"DIomitctlc VIolence *Mindenanurt, '.I "Il'Triffle *Auto Acldunt
*Wronglil Dutah. 'rotuel YVor Rightsll" A-A-A Atinrtey Riferrual
Service(t800)733-5.42,

IIVOIRCES275.S3S0*COVIiIS children, etc., Only onie slignturei ri.
quItrcdl "lExcliudes, govt. tecsl Ctill watlkdays (900)462.2001t,. ext,0O,
(8nlt-7pml)Alia Dlvorce,.Ll ,C.itm llablilhed 1977.


Miscellaneous


,JoIlliteLofinvei'ml(7),18" x 100" x I/4"ait$ 115.00 einch: (92"x 100"
x 1I" nl/.i $165,00 nochi. WIldeildelvr, an Ins (itl, l'.vcrythliiig MUlST (1iO
(,'till Now! H88l)30(.9046,

EARN )DEt(IGREoilit ne ftoiil omi, *Medilc, *li'.ilesnoa, *tPiralri'tul,
C'Cotilputura, Jobl 'llu itnllenl AsSlittinice, Compliler I'& Flatiitcllid lld I1'


Real Estate


North ',rotliiti Gtedlill ikeh'tCoiinitnulty 1,5 acres Iplui.,90 itllesIof
lihorellne, Never beafor otlffi'ed wlth 20% pre'-developiTiiil dticouiiiitS,
90% Iinaiicing., nll (800)709-5253.

1BEAUTI FUL NORT'IH CAROLINA, E SCAI.'I TIII i llAT IN T'I I
COOI., 13A U.rTIIUL 1' PEACITI,, MOUNTAINSt 01' WIlS I'.l(N NC.
Home, Cabinsl. Acre ne & h lmnesltmet, C ltherokee Mountain Ralenliy
IMACI' Rioul EIstilef, M urtp hyvtye.rslk.ot11lsflul CI.OAll (tCill for
I'ree lh'clhrct(t00)841-.S868.

EIsnAt lbaitna MountahlnProperty ForSnle Otte hour westtol'Allanta lit
Piedmont, AL Great foreIb loyment or investment 16 actes;-$57.750.00
More InfortnationCall-Gary McCurdy (256)239-8001,


(Week of October 10, 2005)


GLORIOUS JOHNSON, CHAIR
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD

CHERYL L. BROWN, CLERK
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD


ELAINE FEBLES, AIDE
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD


Board Members: Council Members Daniel Davis and Art Shad
School Board Members Betty Burney and Vicki Drake
Tommy Hazouri (Alternate)


INVITATION TO SUBMIT RESPONSES TO THE
ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
The Governing Board of the District requests that interested parties respond to the
solicitation below by 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, November 8, 2005. Further information is
available through DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com (800) 711-1712], or
the District's website at www.sjrwmd.com, Bid packages may be obtained from
DemandStar by Onvia or the District by calling Rose Dugger, Contracts Administrator
at (386) 329-43321.

BID NUMBER SJ423AA (SECOND CALL)
SEBASTIAN STORMWATER PARK PUMP STATION
Construction of the Sebastian Stormwater Park Pump station, Sebastian, Florida.
Respondents shall possess a current active Florida Underground Utility and
Evacuation Contractor's License.
The estimated budget for this project is $650,000.
A MANDATORY Pre-Bid Conference is scheduled for 10:00 a.m., Wednesday,
October 19, 2005
District's Palm Bay Service Center, 525 Community College Parkway, S.E. Palm
Bay, Florida 32909

The pre-bid conference is intended to provide bidders the opportunity to receive clar-
ification of any requirement of this Invitation for Bid. DISTRICT will only accept bids
from those attending the pre-bid conference.

Staffs recommendations will be presented to the Governing Board at its December
13, 2005, meeting.
Special accommodations for disabilities may be requested through Rose Dugger or by
calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5) business days before the date needed'.

INVITATION TO SUBMIT RESPONSES TO THE
ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
The Governing Board of the District requests that interested parties respond to the
solicitation below by 2:00 p.m., Wednesday, October 26, 2005. Further information is
available through DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com (800) 711-1712], or
the District's website at www.sjrwmd.com. Bid packages may be obtained from
DemandStar by Onvia or the District by calling Jill R. Williams, CPPB, Contracts
Administrator at (386) 329-4133.
BID NUMBER SJ611XA
Timber Harvest & Sale Moses Creek Conservation Area
Located In St. Johns County, bid is for approximately 426 acres of sand pine pulpwood
and sand pine ply logs on a per ton basis.
Staffs recommendation will be presented to the District's Executive Director.
Special accommodations for disabilities may be requested through Jill R. Williams,
CPPB, Contracts Administrator or by calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5)
business days before the date needed.


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Proposal Number 06-05

Employee Satlefaction Survey

For the

JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY

Proposals will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority (JAXPORT) until 2:00 P.M.
local time on Thursday, November 10, 2005 at which time they will be opened in the First
Floor Conference Room, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206,

A MANDATOBY Pre-proposal meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday,
October 27, 2005 at the above location.

All Proposals must be submitted In accordance with Specification Number 06-05, which
may be obtained after 8:30 a,m.,October 14, 2005, from:

JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY
Procurement & Contract Services Department
P. 0. Box 3005
(2831 Talleyrand Avenue) '
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
904/630-3058




THE LOAN CORPORATION'
Retire Your Old Fashioned Mortgage with an Asset Manager Loan.""
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With rates as low as 1.20% and up to 40 Years To Pay,
No Lender Closing Costs. No Points. No Broker Fee.
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Cash out for debt consol., home improvement or investments.
Free No Obligation Approval-Refinance or Purchase Loans
Call Toll Free 800-957-7622
Rates stibject o cimhngec iltd tmay tnot ie vnilhbl, t contule tilt elat or closing. Eq,,l HIlsitng Lentder. APR I 5.768%.


NCMOUNTAINS- 10+Acres!Streamn/$390,900. Grand Opening-Octo-
bet 22-23 Specacular longrange views! Near Blue RidgeParkway and
Boone. Excellent financing. roads &utilities. (800)455-1981. ext. 210..

ENDOISEASON BLOWOUT SALE!CANYONFERRY CROSSING.
IHELE INA. MONTANA.Only 8 parcelsletllin thismagnificentdevelop-
mnent. Awesome lake and inountain views, close to Canyon Ferry Lake,
minutes to Helena. Ownertopay closingcosts. Call (888)770-224)0.

GRANDIOPENING SALE! Lake Bargains! Wateraccess fi'on.S34.900
w/FREEBoat Slips. PAYNOCLOSING COSTS! Sat &Sun Oct. 15& 16.
Huge pre-construction savings on beautifully wooded parcels at 34,000
acre lake Tennessee. Enjoy unlimited water recreation. Surrounded by
state forest. Lakefront available! Excellent financing! Callnow
(800)704-3154X 658.

NC MOUNTAIN CABIN unfiurnished inside, on mountain top, view,
trecs, waterfall & large public lake nearby. $89,900 owner
(866)789-8535 ss.N7l7.on.

TENNESSEE-NEW LAKESIDE COMMUNITY I + acre homesites
from the 30's. Private boitslips- limited availability. Close to downtownrt
Chattanooga/Knoxville. Lake access Ironm cornm unity. (866)292-5769.

ASHEVI.,IE NC AREA- WATERFRONT & MOUNTAIN
HOMES[TrS gorgeouss riverfront, river view & wounded homesites. I +
acres li'on thet40's, Guted community witilh amenities CALL
(866)292-5762,

FLORI DA LANI) FOR SALE- Buildting Lots starting at $24,900 F'Iast
growing treas. Great itveslrtent opportutlnity. For,.iees, photos. prices go
tow.Fl oridl o l5SA .c orcall(877)983-6600.

"TENNESSEELA'KIEPIOI'ERITIES" IoclatedonpritlncNotrrisLtke.
TVA's irst Ireservoir, ,lakeltronts, tlke & mountailnt views, homitand land.
CAl.,I.,BLkesideRooallty(423l62t6-5820wsw.olahi..ktsld'llyi8.U.toI.

Serene Mountaiin Golf Ilomeite $342/ month, Breathltaking views,
Upsncalgo lf'oeinunittlyse tutlcd )yodi1lgined 18hIot0ieourAlseinCarolina

wde.cli rcliglcyai.gonti Price: $69,900. 10% i dowti.hairtItile nced
at ,.91% iSotlked. 24iittlorttihnlloon. OAC.

NEW MIiXICO -20 ttcrets $39,9(0 Scenie region, views, citlyoia, trees.,
rollin illls,w vildll'el.', Enjoy luiitintlklng.r i'sr .grar teliullnte.ow 'wo ,
great c cets, 100% ftitainiClt ('nilt (914)232-100,

Co(niil North Crtolhit Witerl'rotl 3.+/- Aerta, $99,.)00 t ttriiiftlly
wooded ptircel nn deap bolntmit wsitt' lilt access it ICW, Ahtnttic &
Aitltln. ritn e ltoeiillOll d tlo tiowit, taveid ir, u/B lillltle,, cortaty wate',


SOUT'I'ItHCOASTALGIEOIRGIIAS1I9,900POtI!1A2++AC(II.IRtDI;tPWNA''li
MARSI I,(l' $2.*4,00l FOR( A 3+AC.tf(OV[RSItZl-l I"PIVWA'TR i
1,L'OT,4 mInl Ironti .iieksonvillel /15 iln II'ont St. Slih ot '., Cull lodaty thr
)p|llinhh ll',Ixcellenill amellinl,,vaillable.l(877)AIA-OCl'ANx708.

SOUTC (OASTAL (GEORGIA34+,AcreD ctpwllterOceanAccessl.ot
tl' onjull l$2410 p1'r oenhi* *I, minIl tionl Jacktonvilleo/ IS miln from St.
Slinoll'ls C(lltitodylbrtur poltlt enlt Excellenthtli ntttlg valltlte.(877)(iA-
OCRAN x703 *nilliltlypnIl'$20.32b1tlsed on $5,900 pturhalep'irle i
w/10'%Idown tlItytyIIIl or1$53.990l(.$53,910 I1 Atetnedilnt .519% I1Xned (AI't


Steel Buildings

I.l LI)DING SALEli "l,,st (,itttncel" 2110x26 Nowt $395,5.25,a3l7, $57100.
.l3s'I40, $830t0', 060$ 12,9(10 Many ()litrs, Meela 'I0 M.I'.H. Hlighar
avatlt ble,Oir, l le niti lettled,I 'lonuier(800)(68l-t3.522.








ANF

Advertising Network of Florida


ADVERTISEMENTS:

DUE:

Tuesday @ 5 p.m.

904-766-8834

Email your ad:

ad@thefloridastar.com
................................


1


Callfor Inspection Dates
A V.,F lCrin l B huro


I 4 T1,ktS Fom3 o 10 crs


~_~_ __________ __ ___


...............................


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families with busy lifestyles. Come
see why so many parents trust All
About Kids Pediatrics with their chil-
dren's health.



Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and
have pediatric ER experience.


904.565.1271

877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com

12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite N
Located in the new Hidden Hills I
Caroline and Monument Rd.)


SERVICES
Asthma Therapy
Pain Relief
Hemoglobin/Hematocrit Testing
Mono Screening
Rapid Strep Screening
Sport and School Participation
Physicals
Urinalysis
Well visits/Immunizations

EMR Technology
Our Electronic Medical Record System
enables us to be more efficient with
less paperwork and allows for:
Direct Pharmacy Link for fast and
convenient prescriptions
Check-in/Check-out process made
quick and efficient
Medical record history inquiries
and transfers that are concise and
easy with electronic database
management
Prompt subspecialty referrals

HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F; weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted

Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225
Executive Park (near the corner of Fort


Betty Asque Davis

REALTOR


Wamto ReaW"MUMS*


615 Highway AIA
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082


Office:
Direct:
Fax:
Toll Free:


904-285-6300
904-473-1502
904-285-5330
800-288-6330


Email: badavis@WatsonRealtyCorp.com


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President and CEQ, American Red Cross
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