<%BANNER%>

Florida star

HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section A: Main continued
 Section C: Local
 Section C continued
 Section C: Around the Area
 Section C: Sports
 Section C continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
October 1, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00038

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
October 1, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00038

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section C: Local
        page C 1
    Section C continued
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Around the Area
        page C 4
    Section C: Sports
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text






I I-.


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


Ifni


iFLORIDAs

thefloridastar.com


~zI7


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
1:00 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


Record Breaking Football Player When Men Murder Women


Arrested After Confrontation,


Mother Worried


He was the first
Georgia running back to
carry the ball 38 times
since Herschel Walker
in 1982. He was a
freshman from
Jacksonville and had
graduated from
University Christian
Academy. When Torin
Kirtsey decided to
attend the University of
Georgia, he did not
think he would become
a starting player but he
was an outstanding ath-
lete.
Kirtsey was
Georgia's leading rusher
in 1995. He became
the starting tailback
when Hines Ward,
presently a wide receiv-
er with the Pittsburgh


Steelers, was moved up
to quarterback.
The extremely tal-
ented Jacksonville
native left the Bulldogs
at the end of the 1997
season to attend Middle
Tennessee State
University. On January
12, 1999, Kertsey made
the list of 35 players
who had been granted
special eligibility for
the NFL draft on April
17-18, 1999. Somehow,
shortly thereafter,
Kirtsey's mental dis-
abilities surfaced and
he returned to
Jacksonville.
Kirtsey's mother,
Mrs. Dareal Harris,
said they are very close


Torin Kirtsey
and last Thursday, he
had not taken his med-
ication, spent time sit-
ting in the sun, and
began to demonstrate
stress. Since this was
not the first time she
had witnessed this
behavior, she attempted
to contact the Crises
Football Star continued on A-7


WASHINGTON, DC -
The Violence Policy
Center (VPC) today
released When Men
Murder Women: An
Analysis of 2003
Homicide Data. This
annual report details
national and state-by-state
information on female
homicides involving one
female murder victim and
one male offender. The
VPC releases the study
each year to coincide with
Domestic Violence
Awareness Month in
October.
Using 2003 data (the
most recent available)
from the Federal Bureau
of Investigation's unpub-
lished Supplementary
Homicide Report, the
study's findings include:
-In 2003, 572 black
females were murdered


by males in single
victim/single offender
homicides.
-In single female vic-
tim/single male offender
homicides reported for
2003, 12 percent of black
female victims were less
than 18 years old (69 vic-
tims) and four percent were
65 years of age or older (22
victims). The average age
of black female homicide
victims was 32 years old.
*Firearms especially
handguns were the most
common weapons used by
males to murder black
females in 2003.
*Where the relationship
could be determined, more
than 90 percent of black
females killed by males in
single victim/single
offender incidents knew
their killers (471 of 515).
More than 10 times as


many black females were
murdered by a male they
knew (471 victims) than
were killed by male
strangers (44 victims) in
single victim/single
offender incidents in
2003. Of black victims
who knew their offenders,
58 percent (273 out of
471) were wives, com-
mon-law wives, ex-wives,
or girlfriends of the
offenders.
Ninety- five percent
(537 out of 567) of the
homicides of black
women where the race of
the male offender was
known were intra-racial.
-The number of black
females shot and killed by
their husband or intimate
acquaintance (139 vic-
tims) was more than three
times as high as the total
Women continued on A-7


- .- a ---.-u,


Longshoremenof Jacksonville Questioning Civil Rights Pioneer, Judge Constance iaKer

Settlement Agreement Motley, Dead At 84


JACKSONVILLE,
Fla. Fourth Judicial
Circuit Court, Duval
County, is expected to
approve an agreement
between Local 1408-
Jacksonvill e s
Longshoreman
Association and two
female plaintiffs repre-
senting a class action suit.
Paul Fields, Jr. Senior
Union Member requested
the judge and the office of
Organized Crime and
Racketeering Section
Strike Force Unit to
review the settlement
before it becomes final
and goes into effect on
October 1, 2005.
Mr. Fields said the

NEWS IN BRIEF
IRS Provides Relief
to Hurricane Katrina
and Rita Victims
The IRS announced
that the deadline for
taxpayers affected by
Hurricane Katrina has
been extended to
February 28 and that
Tax Relief will be
granted for Hurricane
Rita Victims.

Contagious Dog
Virus
A very contagious
virus is spreading


rank file had no documen-
tation of the deal and feels
they were not properly
represented. The major
concern, said Mr. Fields,
is the awarding of
unearned seniority that
Local 1408 constitution
and by-laws does not
address nor does the
working agreement
between management and
labor in which seniority is
addressed. It only men-
tions earned seniority by
obtaining working hours
and 700 hundred hours to
enter a deep-sea category
after continuous qualify-
ing said number of years.
He said the working
agreement between man-

throughout the United
States. It has been
identified in shelters,
humane societies and
clinics. The symptoms
include very high
fever, cough, vomiting,
lethargy and not want-
ing to eat. The condi-
tion has proven fatal in
some dogs and there is
no vaccine. Isolating
your pet is probably
the best protection.

Man Who Shot
Johnnie Mae
Chappell Testified
J. W. Rich, 62, the


Paul Fields, Jr.
agement and labor has not
been amended and there-
fore the agreement in the
lawsuit is not valid
because it constitutes
unearned seniority prior
to the constitution and by-
laws being amended or
ratified.

man who served three
years in prison for
manslaughter because
he killed Johnnie Mae
Chappell while she was
looking for her purse
on New Kings Road,
testified in 1964 that
he, Wayne Chessman,
Elmer Kato and James
Alex Davis were driv-
ing around looking for
a black person to shoot
but only he was indict-
ed. Charges were
dropped against the
other men. Retired
police officers, Lee


Federal Judge
Constance Baker Motley,
who as a young lawyer rep-
resented Martin Luther
King Jr. and played a piv-
otal role in the nation's civil
rights struggle, has died.
She was 84. She became
the first black woman
appointed to the federal
bench in 1966, and began a
distinguished four-decade
span as a judge.
She was born September
14, 1921, in New Haven,
Connecticut, the ninth of
12 children of immigrants
from the Caribbean island
of Nevis. She began col-
lege at Fisk University but
in 1942 transferred to
NYU's Washington Square
College where she earned a

Cody and Donald
Colemen also testified
at the State Attorney's
Office. State Attorney
Harry Shorestein said
these men were com-
pelled to testify. He
said he feels with their
testimonies, the case
may finally be able to
close.

Credit Card Users
Aren't Paying Bills
The American
Bankers Association
reported Wednesday
that the percentage of


-~T -- 1m-~-
Constance Baker Motley, James Meredith and Jack Greenberg
at a courthouse bringing a lawsuit against segregation at the
University of Mississippi in 1962.


degree in economics. She
graduated from Columbia
Law School in 1946.
She started her law
career as the clerk for
Thurgood Marshall, who
later became the first black

credit card accounts 30
or more days past due
climbed to an all-time
high of 4.81 percent in
the April to June period
and feels it could grow
in the months ahead.
Jim Chessen, the asso-
ciation's chief econo-
mist and other analysts
mostly blame high gas
prices on the con-
sumer's difficulty in
paying on time.

Mazda5 Recalled
Mazda Motor Corp.


Supreme Court Justice.
Baker won nine out of
the ten cases she argued
before the Supreme Court.
In 2001, President Bill
Clinton awarded her the
Presidential Citizens
Medal.

has halted the sale and
production of selected
2006 Mazda5 vehicles
because a potential
heat buildup in the
exhaust system could
start a fire. The recall
affects about 5,500
vehicles, 2,700 of
which have been sold
or at dealers.
The car seats six
but is smaller than an
average minivan
became available in
the United States this
past summer.


I5069 0015 1


Looking for customers to patronize your
business or utilize your services? If you
answered YES, then you need to place an ad
in The Florida Star! CALL 904/766-8834 to
place your ad TODAY!!
Check, M/ney Order, Or Credit Cards Accegted


LIPR4 ',' OF FLORIDA HISTORY
2'05 M.A Util' OF FLORIDA
PO 0.' 1 7007 (01 0 )
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


U mj


_ ~ ____ _~_~__~ ~_


E






F inRIDlA STAR


OCTOBER 1. 2005


RON WILI.IAMS, SR.
NEWS EI)ITOR
CHIERYI. COWARD
DESIGN EI)ITOR
BETTY ASQIE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


SAME, (CRISWEI.
ADMINISTR'I'ATIVE AI)VISOR
LIZ IIHILILINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
MARSIIA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTElR/IIIOTlOGRAPIHERi


I)ISrRI'IUrTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEVE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PI IOTOGRAPHIIERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURIENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGIILIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR,,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PIIOTOGRAPIIHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-S33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


National Newspaper
Publishers Association


First African American Inducted Into
Th Flonrida Press Hall Of Fame


The front page of the
Cincinnati Herald, a black
owned newspaper, leaped out
at me, with a quarter-page
photo of Kanye West, and
inset photos of Fantasia and
Pattie LaBelle. The headline
read, "Jazz Fest to offer vari-
ety of performances in
2005."
The list of performers was
a veritable who's who in
R&B. In addition to the ones
I mentioned, there were
many others. Cincinnati,
once again, was on the road
to a weekend of euphoria
during which we could forget
about our troubles and sing
and dance the nights away,
spending millions of dollars
in the process, of course.
An inside look at what is
now called the Macy's Music
Festival, brought to us by Joe
Santangelo and his band of
merry Black men and
women, will reveal an effort
to get Black people to come
back downtown, despite the
three-year boycott, similar to
the Miami boycott during the
early 1990s. It is an effort to
lull Black folks into a stadi-
um that was commandeered
by a White politician who
now works for Mike Brown,
owner of the Cincinnati
Bengals and now "owner"
and controller of the
$500,000 million dollar sta-
dium complete with con-
cession rights.


The stadium is a monu-
ment to the dysfunction of
Cincinnati taxpayers who
voted affirmatively to build
it, but it is an even greater
representation of black dys-
function because of the mea-
ger economic benefits it pro-
vided during its construction
and now during the 30 to 40-
year life of the asset. Black
folks, especially those in
Cincinnati who would now
go there for any occasion are
short-sighted at best. But
everyone has free will.
It's the same with the
entertainers who are sched-
uled to appear at the stadium
for the Macy's Music
Festival (By the way,
Santangelo put the word out
on the radio for Black folks
to buy their festival "outfits"
at Macy's. Yeah, right, big
Joe.) Many of these same
entertainers know about the
boycott; they know the rea-
sons for it and yet they
choose to come to this city
and participate in the eco-
nomic empowerment of folks
that continue to oppress
blacks in Cincinnati. (Let any
them get mistreated, and see
who they call on for support.
That's right, the same broth-
ers and sisters who are fight-
ing for justice here in
Cincinnati.)
A condescending aspect
of the festival that will be
"another step toward healing


(CLARA MIlAUGltIlN (CRISWELL
I'0ItI, S EIIE F


BLACKONOMICS
Sorry Black Entertainers
James Clingman, NNPA


0* N q *


-to


. I


.u



a)
ecu







o
AW


U')
LM.
(1



p Lm



u)


4" 4w
*ldb


0)

z


I
p1


LM
o-a



S*0
0






0(1)
0g.


L*








0



,E

0
L_






4-


*1


BG 55 Blower


Our most popular model for homeowners.
Lightweight, powerful, starts easily!


Jacksonville
Bennett's Ace Hardware
8080 West Beaver Street
904-693-0929


Jacksonville
Ronnie's
Repair Shop
5091 Sunbeam Road
904-636-0739


Neptune Beach
Tucker
Equipment
113 11th Street
904-246-1330


FS 45 Trimmer j


$129 SSESRP
Lightweight and
fast cutting. Comes
standard with STIHL
EasySpoolTM head.


At participating dealers.

Jacksonville
Nichol's Equipment
10237 Beach Blvd.
904-641-2923

Orange Park
Orange Park
Power House
611 Blanding Blvd.
904-272-2272


e hus'~cmA ;o rady or.


- Af V A


our city," according to John
Pace, the Black promoter
working with Santangelo, is
the give-back. Ticket prices
are $48, $68, and $88,
Santangelo has promised to
give $2 of every ticket sold to
a group of "well known"
organizations. That's right; I
said $2. At the highest level
of participation that would
mean a few thousand dollars
to each of the five organiza-
tions he designated.
Isn't it reasonable to think
that, at least for the Black
organizations Santangelo
chose, that blacks could
donate $2 each to them?
Does it make sense for a
White man to collect $2 from
Black people and then dole it
back out to Black organiza-
tions and other social pro-
grams? We could do that our-
selves simply by pooling our
money and taking care of our
own organizations.
Nevertheless, thank you, Mr.
Santangelo; you are a real
saint. Hey, $2 per ticket sold;
thanks a bunch!
The most negative aspect
of this scenario is not Joe
Santangelo and his jaded
philanthropic gesture. He is a
businessman, in this to make
money; no problem there,
folks. So, please don't blame
him; he can only do what we
allow him to do. If no one
goes to the festival he loses
money and will seek other
venues, the way he did at the
height of the Cincinnati boy-
cott. The very sad and dis-
turbing aspect of this situa-
tion involves the entertainers


and the prospective patrons
of the festival,
Again, folks can do what-
ever they want with their
money, and they can sell their
talents to whomever they
choose. But for Black people
to have such a low level of
consciousness when it comes
to standing together for one
another, no matter where
injustice exists, shows how
far we have to go to obtain
even a modicum of econom-
ic, political, social, and edu-
cational success on a collec-
tive level.
Yes, I am ashamed of the
Black entertainers who know
about the struggles of their
brothers and sisters in
Cincinnati and yet are willing
to sing and dance in a stadi-
um that is the symbol of
inequity and unfairness, even
if they do hold their noses in
the process.
I am ashamed of Frankie
Beverly and Pattie LaBelle,
who have been personally
contacted about what is hap-
pening in Cincinnati. I am
ashamed of Kanye West,
Fantasia, and Faith Evans,
although they are relatively
young; I am sure they read
the papers sometime or watch
TV sometime. I am ashamed
of all those Black entertainers
who would take the filthy
lucre offered them to come to
a city that has a reputation of
doing everything it can to
suppress Black economic
empowerment and fairness
for Black people in its crimi-
nal justice system.
Let the party begin!


PA GE: A -2 riltfits "I_..--.-l~'- _.


g


4ow Qb 4ow 4b







PAGE A-3


OCTOBER 1, 2005


Hurricane Exposed Unwillingness To Deal The Church Directory

1 .:4.sL D .l. I,wm e. tfi |inif.e. \l Thari nlf ,, f "Come and Worship With Us"


VVILII ri jijiUIIIb WI wiaay vitalhI iU


FORT COLLINS, Colo.
-- The failed evacuation

HAPPY

BIRTHDAY

To My

'Little Angel'





-. .







Earlisha Jones
September 30, 1992-
June 16, 2000

Rembering you,
on your 13th
Birthday.
If tears could build
a staircase and
heartache build a
lane, I would walk
the path to heaven
and birng you
back again.
Oh how we love and
miss you!

Daddy
&
Your Family


plan for Hurricane Katrina
revealed more than govern-
ment incompetence.
It also exposed the
unwillingness of Americans
to confront the structural
problems of class and to
address inequalities on a
person-to-person level, Vital
Theology newsletter reports
in its September 25 special
issue on the hurricane.
Seeing some people
drive off in their SUVs
while others were left
behind reminded him of the
biblical story of Lazarus and
the rich man, said Albert J.
Raboteau, professor of reli-
gion at Princeton University.
People of means aren't
aware of the problems the
poor face, he said.
Laurie Zoloth, an ethicist
and professor of religion at
Northwestern University's
Feinberg School of
Medicine, said there would
have been less suffering if
each city block had formed a
social organization to look
after residents in the imme-
diate area.
"The metaphor of our
society is, 'We're all in this
alone.' That's the tragedy,"
said Zoloth. The hurricane
evacuation, she said, drove
home the point that people
do not believe that their
actions--or inaction-- will
dramatically affect others.


Ask us about Our
If There had been a death
in rour lfnmilretrd.ar. r d aT
what would you be doing Pre-Need
tdaTl? HO GH





THOUGHT


..., ,funeral


Planning

program


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED

ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354


Deborah West


Alphonso West


A 'L A.B. COLEMAN
A C S O DIRECTOR
A CHECKLIST OF THINGS TO DO AFTER THE FUNERAL


1. Obtain copies of the death
certificate. A copy will be
required for a variety of legal
and financial forms.
2. Send thank you notes
for those who sent flowers
and donations or showed a
special kindness.
3. Meet with the
deceased's attorney to discuss
the necessary legal processes.
4. Notify the insurance
companies and file all claims.
5. Apply for the appropri-
ate social security, veterans
benefits and/or pension bene-
fits.
- 6. Notify jur accountant


or tax preparer.
7. Notify the deceased's
stockbroker.
8. Notify the deceased's
bank.
9. Notify the Department
of Motor Vehicles to transfer
titles on all vehicles, mobile
homes and boats registered
in the deceased's name.
10. Notify the credit card
companies of the deceased.
Contact the decease employ-
er.


"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.
wTel: 768-0507
w .ABColeman.com


Also in this special issue, '
Vital Theology surveys 16
theologians on two key
questions:
What do you hope we
learn from Hurricane
Katrina?
Did Katrina raise ques-
tions that are different from
those that arose, for exam-
ple, in relationship to 9/11 or
the December 2004 tsuna-
mi?
The entire issue is avail-
able on the newsletter's Web
site www.vitaltheology.com,
where itcan be accessed free
of charge. Normally, the
newsletter is available only
to paid subscribers.
"Katrina raised a host of
theological questions for
Americans to grapple with,
said Publisher David W.
Reid. "We are pleased to
make. this issue of Vital
Theology available to any-
one who is interested in
acknowledging their impor-
tance."
Vital 'Theology is an


independent, ecumenical,
newsletter that provides the-
ological perspectives on
issues in the news. It has no
ties to any denomination,.
corporation, nonprofit
organization or educational
institution. .
Founded in 2004, Vital
Theology was named "Best
Newsletter" by Associated
Church Press in its inaugural
year of publication.
M embers of the ne\\ slet-
ter's advisory board are:
Stepheni Fowl, Loyola
College in Maryland; Steven
Kepnes, Colgate University;
Frank Macchia, Vanguard
University of Southern
California; Alan Padgett,
Luther Seminary; William
C. Placher, Wabash College;
Cynthia Rigby, Austin
Presbyterian Theological
Seminary; Jeanette
Rodriguez, Seattle
University; and William
Werpehowski, Villanova
University.


EPIPHANY BAPTIST CHURCH INFORMATION
MINISTRY AND CLOTHES GIVE-AWAY-Shands
Hospital will provide a community screenings from 10:00
a.m.- to 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 1 at Epiphany
Baptist Church, 663 South McDuffAve. Suited For Success,
will also provide a workshop at 1:00 p.m. The activities are
being held in conjunction with the regular monthly clothing
give-away.
THIRD CHURCH ANNIVERSARY-Resurrection Baptist
Church, Christian Center, 6046 Moncrief Rd. W. will cele-
brate its Third Church Anniversary Thursday, October 6-
Friday, October 7 nightly at 7:00 p.m. The celebration con-
cludes on Sunday, October 9 at 4:00 p.m. "Putting God's
Word In Action (I John 3:18)" is the theme. Visiting church-
es include; Thursday, October 6- New Mt. Pleasant Baptist
Church (Rev. Bill Coleman, Pastor); Jesus Christ
Deliverance Center (Rev. Kelvin Kelsey, Pastor); Winning
Souls For Christ (Dr. James Mayberry, Pastor); and
Colossians Missionary Baptist Church (Rev. Ambrose
Murchinson, Pastor). Friday, October 7-Faith Temple
C.O.G.W.I.H. .(Bishop Gregory 1Davis, Pastor); Agape
Family Community Church (Rev. Helen Conyers, Pastor);
and Spirit Life C.O.G.W.I.H. (Elder Wallace Taylor, Pastor).
Sunday, October 9-Mt. Lebanon Missionary Baptist Church
(Rev. Lewis Yarber,Pastor). First Lady Cheryl Foreman,
Chairperson. Rev. Glen F. Foreman, Sr., Pastor.
YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULT CONFERENCE-First
New Zion Missionary Baptist Church, 4835 Soutel Dr., will
host a Young and Young Adult Conference Friday, October
7-Sunday, October 9. Evening Worship begins at 7:00 p.m.
on October 7. Pastor Jeffrey Robinson of Mt. Carmel
Baptist.Church in Daytona Beach is the speaker. Minister
Alvin Hodge Associate Minister of First New Zion
Missionary Baptist Church, is the lecturer.. Classes and
speakers for the workshop on Saturday, October 8 are "What
Are you Going To Do" by Pastor Derrick Johnson of New
Covenant Ministries of Orange Park, Fla.; "Who Are You"
by Rev. Patrick Fulton, Associate Pastor of First New Zion
Missionary Baptist Church; and "Walking the Walk" by
Pastor Jerome Robinson of Bethel Baptist in Starke, Fla.
Annual Youth Day will be observed on October 9 at 11:00
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Minister Dwayne Brown of Tru-Way
Church of the Risen Christ is the speaker for the 11:00 a.m.
service. Pastor Lawson J. Boddie of St. Paul Church of
Gainesville, Fla. is the speaker for the 4:00 p.m. program.
Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, Pastor..
CLUB ANNIVERSARY-The Garden of Gethsemane
Fellowship, Inc. invites the public to attend the 27th Club
Anniversary Celebration on October 8, 10:30 a.m. at the
Holiday Inri-Commonwealth at 1-295. Mrs. Monique
Williams, who appeared in the play "Don't Get God
Started," is the speaker. The Elm Street Church of God
Praise Team of Fernandina Beach, Fla. will lead the worship.
Minister Shirley Baker, President.
CHURCH ANNIVERSARY- Faust Temple Church of
God, 2238 Moncrief Rd., will celebrate its 64th Church
Anniversary. Services will be held on Friday, October 21
(Musical) at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, October 22 at 6:00 p.m.
adn will conclude on Sunday, October 23 4:30 p.m. The
pubic is invited to attend. Sis. Sharon Hunter, Committee
Chairperson. BishOp Rushie L. Dixon, Pastor.

Listings areldue the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
submissions preferred. Send to:
info@thefloridastar.com


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School -9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9;30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


S.'.. ,


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


WORSHIP CENTER
S Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
-^ Sunday School 9:15- 10:15-a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
', Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service..................6.6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities



Ey angel



As se'mb y of G od, Infc.
October 2nd
Can Anyone Tell -Me What's
Happening?
What Does the Bible Say About These
Hurricanes?
Are These the Last Days?
LIVING FREE IN CHRIST CONFL RE N CE
with Neil Anderson & his Entire Teanm of International Speakers
October 11-15, 2005
The Potter's House Christian


Thanks For Reading
And Suppor(ing The Florida Star!


Directors

Jacqueline Y. Bartley


- -wi


FLORIDA STAR


Faith In Our Community
>. -Schedule of Events and Services-


~~2~'






PfAjG A-4 ,.----


Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
There 's .4i'ay's Someithing
Happening On The First Coast"
\\oo. Woo, %Wooing \\ ith Jeffrey Osborne
The Ritz Theatre and LaVilla Museum presented
balladeer Jeffrey Osborne in concert last weekend to a
standing-room only audience. The Grammy Award
Winning artist performed his extraordinary blend of
ballads that have defined "slow jams" for the last three
decades. He kept the very diverse and in-motion audi-
ence on their feet as he performed "Let Me Make Sweet
Love Tonight," "Close The Door", "Back In. Love
Again", "Holding On", "On the Wings of Love" and of
course "The Woo Woo." The promotional material stat-
ed, "The Concert will take concertgoers back to places
they can't help but remember" and that it did.
The audience was totally into this concert and with
the concert being held at the intimate Ritz Theatre
being close to Mr. Osborne wherever one was seated,
was an added plus, plus for everyone! From the
youngest to the most mature, (it really didn't matter) we
were all on our feet as we waved, clapped, danced at
our seats having a much needed time for joy and thank-
fulness that we could all be there after seeing so much
devastation.
When Mr. Osborne left the stage looking for 'Woo,
Woo, Wooer' volunteers, the ladies were captivated
with his toned physique. Wow! Among the spirited vol-
unteers was local promoter Bobby Harris who was
very eager to croon to his lovely bride of over two
decades.
Later during the concert Mrs. Pat Harris joined the
Osborne troupe dancers on stage. Talk about 'cutting a
rug', Mrs. Harris 'tore the rug to pieces'. Now tell me
where else could an audience have such close contact
with a renowned performer?
Originally the concert had been planned as the lead-
ing event for Sixth Anniversary Celebration for the ren-
ovated Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum. However with
everyone's attention on the devastation from Hurricane
Katrina and the anticipation of what Hurricane Rita
would bring planners of the event decided to postpone
the complete weekend of activities and to focus on hur-
ricane relief.
On the day of the Jeffrey Osborne Concert the com-
munity was requested to drop by the Ritz and give tax-
deductible donations. Concertgoers were given the
same opportunity during the concert. All donations
received at Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum were
donated to Tom Joyner's Blackamericaweb.com Relief
Fund to provide resources to support families who are
assisting those displace by Hurricane Katrina.
The Ritz Theatre is the place! Congratulations on
your anniversary!

** *
Dr. Cornelius Grant Is One of Four
First Coast native Dr. Cornelius Grant of the Albany,
Georgia Kappa Alpha Psi Alumni chapter joined three others
from the 100,000 membership body of the fraternity when
he received both the second highest and highest awards that
can be bestowed upon Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity members.
Dr. Grant is now one of four having received both the Elder
Watson Diggs award (named for one of the fraternity's
founders) and the Laurel Wreath awards.
Kappa Alpha Psi Southeastern Province historian Willie
L. Todd, Jr. writes, "The names of the Laurel Wreath
awardees read like a Who's Who both in the fraternity and in
our nation. They include Civil Rights Attorney Donald
Hollowell, politician Tom Bradley, tennis professional
Arthur Ashe and famed Attorney Johnnie Cochran. Even
of that impressive roster, none have received BOTH awards.
Dr. C. W. Grant was legendary in the fraternity before
receiving the awards, but now will forever be etched in the
annals of the fraternity's history. Dr. Grant joins an elite and
phenomenally prestigious group of three making him "one
of four."
Congratulations Dr. Cornelius W. Grant, a mighty,
mighty Rattler!


C34


1-



C3


= CLIO

ca 'Aw







C) E
cc
cc,
0>


Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming
events. Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me direct-
ly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or
fax (904) 285-7008.
4 See you in the paper! *


CLM



LIM
am



0













IE



II1


i




01


1o
* -
L-



a.

0~

U
4~fl


* .


m

U





U

m




C-)


OCTOBER 1. 2005


FLORIDA STAR


n I, 7 4


A








OCTOBER 1, 2005 FLORIDA STAR








St. Augustine To Celebrate 100th Anniversary

Of Teddy Roosevelt's Visit; Wreath To Be Laid

On Graves Of Buffalo Soldiers, Others


PAGE A-5


B-CC Wildcats Prepare

For Homecoming 2005


ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. St. Augustine is preparing for a
visit from the President. This
October, our Nation's oldest
city will play host to
President Theodore Roosevelt
l v reenactedd by James Foote, a
I, professional actor who has
made a 25-year career out of
impersonating the irrepress-
ible TR).
A series of public events,
processions and speeches are
planned for the weekend of
October 21 and 22, 2005. The
events will commemorate
Theodore Roosevelt President "Teddy"
Roosevelt's visit to St. Augustine exactly 100 years earlier.
The public is invited to participate in the weekend-long cel-
ebration.
Events are sponsored by the St. Augustine Historical
Society; in partnership with the City of St. Augustine; the
National Park Service; Eastern National Stores; the Florida
National Guard; the Tourism Development Council; Castillo
de San larcos National Monument; Rough Riders, Inc.
Tampa, Florida; Flagler College; Casa Monica Hotel;
Lightner Museum; and, the St. Johns County School District.
Teddy (Foote) will kick off the two-day celebration on
Friday with presentations to area schools. The public por-
tion of his visit begins Friday evening with a presentation at
Flagler College, which willstake place in the Flagler Room
of the former hotel where Roosevelt stayed while in St.
Augustine. There is no admission charge for this event, and
the public is welcome.
Saturday's activities will commence with a brief ceremo-
ny at the St. Augustine City Hall where the President will be
greeted by city officials and given a city coin. From there,
the public procession, led by a color guard, Rough Rider sol-
diers and bag pipers, will proceed to the National Cemetery.


Roosevelt will speak on his experiences in Cuba during
the Spanish-American War and lay wreaths at the graves of
four veterans two members of the Rough Riders and two
"Buffalo Soldiers", members of the 10th U.S. Cavalry, an
African-American unit that also participated in the famous
action at San Juan Hill with Teddy Roosevelt.
The President will be well attended during his proces-
sion, accompanied by re-enactors playing his daughter Alice,
Booker T. Washington, Henry Flagler and a contingent of
Rough Riders in full regalia. The Rough Riders, a re-enact-
ment group from the Tampa Bay, Florida area, are famous
for their parades and processions; a lively group that seems
to channel TR's own indomitable persona in their fun-spirit-
-ed modern-day parades.
The President's procession
will then move through the
city to the Castillo Green (the
Fort) where Teddy will deliv-
er excerpts of the speech
President Roosevelt delivered
from the same location 100
years earlier. Musicians from
area high schools will play
music of the period as Teddy
T- .. arrives via horse and carriage
Booker T. Washington to the site.
Saturday's events will be
rounded off with an evening party in the Lobby of the
Lightner Museum. The public is invited to attend and "meet
President Roosevelt" and his cohorts up close and personal
and to hear him give one last brief speech. Door prizes will
be awarded.
The historical society is rich with information on the
President's original visit to St. Augustine. While some activ-
ities, such as the President's skinny-dip at North Beach, will
not be re-enacted, James Foote and his fellow re-enactors
hope to capture and convey some of the feverish energy and
enthusiasm Roosevelt and his associates were famous for.


Hospice Of North central Florida Receives Natio
GAINESVILLE, Fla.-- Florida has been selected to ery of hospice care to rural
Hospice of North Central lead the nation in the deliv- areas by the Centers for


nal Distinction
Medicare and Medicaid
Services.
When the federal gov-
ernment looks for a way to
improve services, it looks to
those agencies that are cur-
rently providing excellent
services in a cost efficient
manner. According to CMS,
Hospice of North Central
Florida (HNCF) is one of
those agencies and was
awarded the opportunity
based on the quality of serx-
ices they pro\ ide.
According to federal
guidelines. the demonstra-
tion grant "\as a\\arded to
onl\ t\\o hospices nation-
kwide. HNCF received the
top score for all hospices
appl.\ing from across the
nation, a CMNS spokesperson
said. The goal is to impro, e
access to hospice care for


Natalya Sharpe and Bobby Marshall will reign over
festivities at Bethune-Cookman College as the 2005
Homecoming Queen and King.
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. "Wildcat World Relive
The Magic" is the theme for 2005 homecoming festivities
at Bethune-Cookman College, culminating on Saturday,
October 1 with a parade, a football game between
Bethune-Cookman College and Morgan State University
and post-game concert featuring Jeffrey Osborne at the
Mary McLeod Bethune Performing Arts Center.
Miami attorney Larry Handfield, a 1978 B-CC gradu-
ate, will serve as Grand Marshal for the parade, which
takes place at 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, October 1 along
Mary McLeod Bethune Blvd. Handfield is a former mem-
ber of B-CC's Board of Trustees, where he served as the
Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds Committee. He
oversaw the construction of four new buildings and major
renovations of three others. The Music Annex, home to
the B-CC marching band's practice rooms, bears his
name.
This year's football game will pit the Wildcats against
Morgan State in a game vital to both team's hopes for a
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference championship.
Parking gates at Municipal Stadium will open at 8:00
a.m. There will be no overnight parking. Once the stadi-
um parking areas are full, vehicles will be routed to the
LPGA Golf Club north of Municipal Stadium.
Large commercial type smokers, commercial type
deep barrel fryers, and commercial type grills will not be
permitted. That evening, R&B star Jeffrey Osborne will
brings his distinctive baritone voice to the Mary McLeod
Bethune Performing Arts Center. A recipient of five gold
and platinum albums, Osborne scored an international hit
single with "On The Wings of Love" in 1982. His latest
release, "From The Soul," showcasing classic songs by
Teddy Pendergrass, Aretha Franklin and Curtis Mayfield,
is scheduled to hit stores October 6.
The concert's 9:00 p.m. start will allow fans attending
the game ample time to beat the traffic and enjoy an out-
standing evening of music.






FLORIDA STAR


OCTOBER 1, 2005


Bishop T. D. Jakes Leads Humanitarian Mission To Africa


DALLAS -- With the recent initia-
tive set into motion by worldwide
organizations and socioeconomic
groups, Bishop T.D. Jakes, globally rec-
ognized as the leader of The Potter's
House, an international church of
30,000 members located in Dallas,
.. '' Texas, launched an extensive outreach
in Kenya September 26 October 2,
Bishop culminating in Uhuru Park in Nairobi.
T. D. Jakes "African-Americans may have left in
slave ships," Bishop Jakes said, "but we're returning in

Leading African American

Religious Channel Sues

Sirus Satellite Radio


NEW YORK--The Word
Network, a mainstream
media broadcaster for
African-American min-
istries and gospel music to
millions in the United States
and across the world, has
sued Sirius Satellite Radio,
alleging racial discrimina-
tion and breach of contract
over its decision to cancel
their contract.
Sirius dropped The Word
Network from its program-
ming in mid- September
despite backing from mem-
bers of Congress, African-
American religious leaders,
and tens of thousands of lis-
teners and other interested
Americans.
"We did not want to file
suit, but Sirius gave us no
choice," said Lewis Gibbs,
The Word Network's vice
president of operations. "We
were dropped without warn-
ing and when pressed as to
why, Sirius said ratings were
poor. However, Sirius
refused to say what the rat-
ings were or if others with
supposedly similar ratings
were also unceremoniously
dropped. We feel that was a
pretext for racial and reli-
gious discrimination, and
neither we nor our support-
ers will stand for it."
Among those who have
spoken against Sirius' deci-
sion to drop The Word
Network are:
*Members of Congress
who sent letters of disap-
proval to Sirius, including
Elijah E. Cummings (D-
MD.), the immediate past
chair of the Congressional
Black Caucus; Reps.
Corrine Brown (D- FL.),
Albert R. Wynn (D-MD.),
and Joseph R. Pitts (R-PA.),
and Sen. Debbie Stabenow
(D-Mich.);
*Leaders of the African-
American religious and
gospel communities, includ-
ing the Rev. Jesse Jackson,
Dr. Bobby Jones and Bishop
Paul Morton;
*Fifteen thaousand
Americans who wrote letters
of protest that were hand-
delivered to Jay Clark,
Sirius' vice president of pro-
gramming;
*Nearly 3,000
Americans who sent e-mails
to Sirius; and
*Countless other
Americans who made tele-
phone calls to Sirius.
The suit alleges that The
Word Network was the only
programming on Sirius that
combined religious pro-
gramming and ministry to
an African-American audi-
ence, and Sirius does not
now carry, and has no plans
to carry, programming simi-
lar to it on its satellite. Sirius
was therefore, the suit
alleges, "motivated by racial


and religious discrimination
when it refused to renew its
contract."
The Word Network pro-
vides religious and gospel
programming to 37 million
American households in the
United States.
The Word Network is
also available in 140 coun-
tries via satellite TV, and is
carried on The Armed
Forces Network, which
makes
The Word Network's
programming is available to
approximately one million
men and women in the
armed forces stationed in
165 countries throughout the
world.
The thousands of people
who protested the decision
made it clear to Sirius that
they had a duty to find room
on their dial for wholesome
broadcasting that serves the
public interest.


747s."
These 747s touched down in Kenya with a skilled team
of 120 medical professionals and hundreds of thousands of
dollars in medical supplies; a 140-member church choir to
record an original album; an ambitious well-digging project;
food, medicine, and hopes to stir new business opportunities
for Kenyans. On October 1 and October 2, Bishop Jakes led
worship services from 2 to 5:00 p.m. in Nairobi's Uhuru
Park. A crowd of at least 350,000 worshippers from across
Kenya and neighboring countries participated.
"Faith For Africa: Kenya Mission," comprised of as
many as 300 African Americans, may represent the largest-
ever single group of slave descendents to visit Africa as U.S.

J.semeg rThe o rrIwtrk


-6


2-






-dbCWp

-~26-

L.



M- m- m%am 0 -m-

ft *-
ft & 1 a g = -W-_


missionaries.
Bishop Jakes received word about the dearth of available
drinking water two years ago when The Potter's House sent
large shipments of food to Kenya. "African Americans have
reached the point that they can go back and help brothers and
sisters," said Bishop Jakes. "Water is the source of life, and
for thousands of families living in Kenya, and in much of
rural Africa, that life source is held hostage by plague and
pestilence as they are forced to bathe in and drink what
amounts to liquid disease. Our focus is to ensure that in order
to quench their thirst and feed their children, parents are no
longer pressed into these unimaginable circumstances."


NATI N&WORLD


Hiromi Wada


Savannah State
Student Receives
Julius M.
Johnson Memorial
Scholarship
SAVANNAH-
Savannah State
University student
Hiromi Wada is the
recipient of the Julius
M. Johnson
M e m o r i al
Scholarship in the
amount of $5,000
from the Educational
Foundation of the
Georgia Society of
Certified Public


Accountants, Inc. #
The Julius M. Johnson Memorial Scholarship is con-
tributed by J. Sam Johnson in memory of his father who was
a past president of the Georgia Society of CPAs, Inc.
Wada, a native of Osaka, Japan, is a senior accounting
major at SSU. She received a bachelor's degree in English
from Kobe City University of Foreign Studies in Japan. She
moved to Savannah in 2002 and plans to graduate from SSU
in December and take the CPA exam. Established in 1890,
Savannah State University is the oldest public historically
black college or university (HBCU) in the state. The univer-
sity's 2,800 students are enrolled in 22 undergraduate and
four graduate degree programs in three colleges: Liberal Arts
and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Sciences
and Technology.

Kerry Urges Immediate Assistance
For Faster Response To Small
Businesses In Gulf Region
WASHINGTON -- Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) is push-
ing the administration to act quickly to help small business
owners impacted by Hurricane Katrina. In the four weeks
since the hurricane struck the Gulf Coast, the Small Business
Administration (SBA) has approved only four loans for
small businesses -- none of which are in Louisiana.
"First FEMA was asleep at the switch and now the SBA
is telling businesses to wait. The Administration has to give
the SBA more resources -- and must coordinate agencies --
so that small businesses and the Gulf Coast economy can get
back to work now," said Kerry, lead Democrat on the Small
Business and Entrepreneurship Committee.
Of the 26,103 applications received by the SBA, just 142
,have been approved -- none of them to small businesses in
Louisiana, the state with the most number of small business-
es affected. Of the 142 loans approved by the SBA, only
four were actually for small businesses -- two in Mississippi
and two in Alabama. The rest of the loans were made to
homeowners. Kerry also heard from witnesses at a hearing
last week that small businesses are being told it will take
months to get disaster loan assistance.

Black Health Empowerment Program' Designed
To Educate African Americans About Obesity
And Related Chronic Health Conditions
WASHINGTON--AstraZenecl one of the world's lead-
ing pharmaceutical companies, and the Congressional Black
Caucus Foundation (CBCF) have announced the launch of
the Black Health Empowerment Program (BHEP), an initia-
tive designed to educate African Americans about the rela-
tionship between obesity and the chronic health conditions
that disproportionately plague communities of color.
Although awareness of the issues related to obesity is one of
the principal goals of BHEP, the program is also intended to
motivate African Americans to adopt healthy eating habits
and participate in regular physical activity, as well as
empower the African American community to take advan-
tage of health care options available through their physician
and other local health care professionals.
"African Americans are severely affected by the current
obesity epidemic with an estimated 61% of men and 77% of
women overweight or obese. Combined with the link
between obesity and diseases such as heart disease, diabetes,
depression afid cancer, the impact on the African American
community is devastating," said Catherine Bonuccelli, MD,
Vice President of External Scientific Affairs, AstraZeneca
US. "The Black Health Empowerment Program is an impor-
tant step not only in raising awareness of obesity, but also
equipping the African American community with the
resources to combat this major health problem."


rAf-' A ,


PAiULA- IJE /






tfJtflA RI1. 2005-FLORIDA STAR PAGE-A-7


S ft I w g% &4 sot o ts%


k of fsee


Cc



cc



Cu>


I-





C-)
0)


C#


a)



COn














-E
0~



Cu




-

C-)









"Cu


Kids under 4'9"
are under-protected.


4 STEPS FOR KIDS


INFANT TODDLER BOOSTER SAFETY BELT



,* The #1 killer of children is
-. car crashes With a booster
seat, your child is 59'. less
li kely to be injured in a car
S': crash If they're under 4'9"
'P" ;thev should be in a booster
seat It raises them up for a
proper fit And the right fit
maelh their future,


Afterschool
programs
Helping kids find the hero within.
Let us know you want
afterschool programs in your area.
Call 1-800-USA-LEARN.


Send us an email @:
." *** ** *** o**** ."


a e. *lb


r


7MISS OdLEARY 5TTH GRADE
10 OF, US
u
WILL DROP OUT
IN 7 YEARS.


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-7


OCTOBER 1. 2005


IL






PA ULE AF-0


Mar


STATE ;AR C


.4..,' -.


'_ ..


I


8, 2!0 5


11AM-7PM The Prime Osborn Convention Center


904.727.7451 www.blackexpousa.com www.blacksonville.com 800.419.2417


lViteCrorss Kluh w ~ied ofPorida &Presents
-~The Pre-Expo 4iaIda
](-alltri7f Slg ikyjSoiu~ful -Frankic-BererlyJ and A Io--,(


SPONlSORED eB
* BueCros. Blueshi'?ld
* or Florida


Friday, October 7, 2005 8pm- 11pm
The Times Union Center Tickets: $35.00
Times Union Box Office, the Black Pages Office, P & L Seafood and any Ticketmaster location


f~BlueCross Blue$Mped :
Pf *Flortd Fite, & /A*
Ar


LW.f


IVAN


IT


1it


FLORIDA STAR


OCTOBER 1, 2005


GAE-7 A 8


rl J~11711:









IL11JDLA 1 1,.ZUvJ -- --


Time For Tea In Lydia Estates


By Marsha Dean Phelts
Last Wednesday the Lydia
Estates Brunch Bunch met
for tea at the home of Helen
Holloway.
The tea is an annual cel-
ebration; the ladies dressed
in formal daytime apparel
and wore their snazziest
hats.
Mrs. Holloway's daugh-
ter, LaShonda a Washington,
D.C. attorney was in town to
assist her mother as well as
to celebrate her father's
(Jimmy Holloway) birthday
that same week.
Both Holloways, mother
and daughter are renowned
for their travels.
The d6cor of the lovely
home aesthetically and artis-
tically reflect the continents
and countries they have vis-
ited.
Six thematic tables held
porcelain cups, teapots and
chinaware collected from
throughout Europe, Africa
and Asia.
The Brunch began with
the serving of an assortment
of white, green, black and
oolong teas along with
homemade freshly baked
scones.
As guests dined on
delectable foods LaShonda
gave a brief history of tea
tracing its popularity from
China 5000 years ago to
Elizabeth I Queen of
England and on to the cele-
brated Boston Tea Party in
America.
The hostesses gave
guests Tea Beauty Remedies
fact sheets, which reads in
part, "Pamper yourself with-
out breaking the bank, or
leaving the comforts of your
own home. Everything you
need for a spa experience is
in your box of tea. Modern
day tea infused formulas can
be inexpensive and best of
all, effective." The Tea
Beauty Remedies fact sheet
was well received
During tea time it was
not a cute kid, neither a mis-
chievous kitten nor a pre-
cious puppy dog that caught
the attention of the Ladies of
the Lydia Estates Brunch


Left to right: Mmes. Gerrie Denson, Catherine Harris, Ada Standford, Jacqueline Bell,
Terri Williams, Anna Lee, seated, Gloria Roberson, Opal M. Brown, Linda Jones, Sadie
Esco, Judy Hubbard, Ida Maude Coleman, Dorothy Ervin, Nelsa Molina and seated the
hostesses, Helen and LaShonda Holloway.
$ W


Left to right, Terri Williams, Jacqueline Bell, Mrs. A. B. Coleman, Jr. and Anna Lee.


Bunch, but rather Helen
Holloway's pet fish, Bubba.
Nineteen year old Bubba,
has the 100 gallon fish tank
to himself.
Bubba welcomed atten-
tion from passersby as he
approached the front of the
tank waiting to be feed.
With razor blade sharp teeth
of a piranha and mouth wide
open, only Helen hand feed
the vegetarian huge pacu
fish his diet of fresh carrots
and fruits while the ladies
looked on in amazement.
The Lydia Estates
Brunch Bunch is a
Homeowners Association
organized for the empower-
ment of their civic, social
and cultural well being.
They received the good
news this week of the
Association's Community
Development Block Grant
from the Mayor's
Neighborhood Matching
Grants Program to further


beautify their gorgeous com-
munity.
They were one of eleven
communities on the


Northside to receive this
grant. Life in Lydia Estates
is the ultimate.


Ada Standford, Opal M. Brown and Gerri Denson.


'3'


- It,


..r
,

g|''


Hostess Helen Holloway takes a moment to set up tables
for guests.

ADVERTISE IN

AND SUBSCRIBE

TO THE FLORIDA STAR

CALL


S(904)766-8834


COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS


Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.
TRANSFORMATION SERIES EVENT-Crucial will
host a Transformation series event in the Robinson Theater
next to the Fine Arts building at UNF on October 24 at
7:30. This event will feature performers, singers, rappers,
dancers and other artists delivering a relevant message for
today's young adults. For more information, contact
Cedric Twillie at 904-449-4547 or email at c.twillie@com-
cast.net.
EQUESTRIAN COMPETITION & TRADE SHOW-
The Northeast Florida Dressage Association (NFDA) will
be hosting a 3-day equestrian competition and trade show
to be held Friday, October 7 until Sunday, October 9 at the
Jacksonville Equestrian Center, 13611 C Normandy Blvd.
Events begin at 8:00 a.m. Admission is free and open to
the public. Approximately 300 horse and rider participants
from Florida, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, and
Tennessee will compete in dressage events including the
Great American Insurance Group/United States Dressage
Federation Region 3 Championships. A musical freestyle
event will be held on Saturday, October 8 at 3:00 p.m.
VIOLENCE AWARENESS CAMPAIGN-October is
National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Florida
Community College students are taking a stand against
domestic violence. The 2005 Violence Awareness
Campaign will help raise awareness of domestic violence
and how it can be eliminated. In their efforts to promote
awareness, Kent Campus Sociology students have created
an exhibit of "Silent Witness" silhouettes, in accordance
with the International Silent Witness Initiative. Each
wooden, life-sized red silhouette tells the story of a
Jacksonville citizen who has died as a result of domestic
homicide. Breastplate shields on the figures tell the vic-
tims' names and their stories. The Silent Witness display
can be viewed Oct. 10-31 during regular campus operation
hours. A panel discussion on October 18 from 6:00-8:00
p.m. at Florida Community College Kent Campus, 3939
Roosevelt Blvd. (in the Auditorium, Building F) will fea-
ture representatives from the Justice Coalition as keynote
speakers. For more information call 904.381.3584 or email
kservant@fccj.edu.
INTERCOLLEGIATE CHORAL FESTIVAL-
Jacksonville University and the University of North
Florida are joining together to offer free a concert on
October 7, at 8:00 p.m. at the Nathan H. Wilson Center for
the Arts at Florida Community College South Campus.
The campus is located at 11901 Beach Blvd. For more
information call Director Wayne Bailey at 904/646-2364.
CULINARY HURRICANE RELIEF BENEFIT- More
than 30 area restaurants and hospitality partners have
teamed up to honor hurricane victims at a special benefit
on Tuesday, October 4 from 6:30 10 p.m. at the Sawgrass
Marriott Resort & Spa. Modeled after the Jacksonville
Food Fight and the Taste of the NFL, top area restaurants
will offer a taste of their signature cuisine. Sight & Sound
Productions will bring the Big Easy to Ponte Vedra for the
night with casinos and festive New Orleans d6cor. Three
local bands, 40-Watt Mojo, the Faze and Retrocats, will
perform at various times throughout the night.
Additionally, there will be a live and silent auction filled
with original art donated by generous local artists. Tickets
are $75 per person and are available at (904) 448-GIVE
(4483). Tickets will also be available for purchase at the
door. Event proceeds will go to the Hurricane Katrina
Disaster Relief Fund via three local agencies: Lutheran
Social Services Second Harvest Food Bank, the United
Way of Northeast Florida and the American Red Cross of
Northeast Florida.
PROJECT C.H.A.S.E.- An innovative program called
Project C.H.A.S.E. is being offered to help individuals
improve their standard of living and quality of life. The
program, Connecting Home and School Environments is
housed at New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 1231 Tyler St. It is
open to any parent of a child between 0-7 years of age and
who live in zip code areas 32205 or 32209. The program is
designed to help individuals improve their educational
opportunities by earning a GED, increase their employa-
bility skills, and improve parenting skills to help their chil-
dren become successful in school. Free childcare services
are provided when participants are in class. A dinner for
the participant and their child is provided. Transportation
is available if needed. For more information call (904)
353-1822 or (904) 630-7255.
FMPTA-JFC'S QUARTERLY SHOWING OF
NORTH FLORIDA FILMS- On Wednesday, October
12, the Florida Motion Picture & Television Association's
Jacksonville First Coast (FMPTA-JFC) chapter will hold
its quarterly open-to-the public film screening event. The
screenings will include a selection of films produced by

both state and local membership. The total program will
run about 90 minutes. Many of the filmmakers and actors
will be on hand to answer audience and media questions.

-rV,..J.l,..-Sl\: *S~ -4 T V -.- .:- -. ^ ^ .:.. V I^-: .-':-, F ~~S' U.i-- I_


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Jacksonville's

Most Heated

Radio Talk Show!

North Florida's Best
Daily Talk Show!


AM 1530

WEEKDAYS

2-6 P.M.


CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR,http://www.wymml530.com


PAGE Glcl


FLORIDA STAR


f/- R- rv r7n I 1 In l)


-** .^'






rOPARIDEi CT-/ OCTOBER12005


PE AL


I __ASKDEANNA: Rel PepleRealAdvie


om -.&- 0


-


4-


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content___

-'Available from Commercial News Providers"


laa -w~t 0 0-S


1 0 1


OCTOBER .1, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


PnAu C r


41oh.-

40bqp qmmn_


a*_ o

4mb.. 4bw 40








UILDLIA. 1, .UUVJ


Mayoral Proclamation


On September 20, Mayor Peyton proclaimed September as National Alcohol and Drug
Recovery Month for the City of Jacksonville. After signing the proclamation, Mayor
Peyton formally presented it to River Region's Executive Council at City Hall. From
left to right: Ed McCall (V.P. of Finance), Minerva Bryant (V.P. of Clinical Operations),
Mayor John Peyton, Derya Williams (CEO and Executive Director), Susan Cochran
(V.P. of Operations), and Connie Sanders (Director of Prevention Services).



UNF Hosts 4th Annual


African American


AMATEUR NIGHT At The RITZ


Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum presents *Amateur Night at the Ritz*, Friday, October
7. Amateur Night presents some of the hottest talent in Jacksonville. Like the
Apollo's show in Harlem, contestants compete for cash prizes and let the audience be
the judge. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. Modeled after the Amateur Night at the famed Apollo
Theatre in Harlem, N.Y., Amateur Night has been a hit since the Ritz's Grand Opening
in October 1999. Like the Apollo's show, contestants compete for cash prizes on the
Ritz stage and the cheers or jeers of the audience decide who goes home with the
cash. Amateur Night is the first Friday of every month. This months Amateur Night
show features the best local talent, the Ritz Amateur Night Band, and *Step up to the
Mic*, where someone from the audience is selected at random to perform on the leg-
endary Ritz stage. Cash prizes are awarded in 1st, 2nd and 3rd place categories. For
more information, please call 904-632-5555.


Professionals Conference A Tribute To The Legacy Of My Friends


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
The University of North
Florida's Division of
Continuing Education will
host the 4th Annual African-
American Professionals
Conference from 8:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
October 26 at the University
Center.
The program is designed


DEATH

NOTICES
BAILEY-Lucile, died September 20,
2005. Alphonso West Mortuary, Inc.
BLAKE-LCDR Thomas R., died
September 21, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
BRACHER-LCDR Scott T., died
September 21, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
BOCK-John Charles, 57, died
September 17, 2005.
BRIDGES-Mamie Ruth, 86, died
September 25, 2005.
CLAYTON-Meruin, 79, died
September 24, 2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
DINGLE-Baby Jadyn, died
September 18, 2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
DIXON-Cynthia A., died September
22,2005.
EDWARD-Merric, died September
26, 2005.
GATES-Sidney, Jr., 84, died
September 24, 2005.
GRIER-Deandrd, died September 25,
2005.
HARPER-Warren, died September
26, 2005.
HEARMAN-Jean, 66, died
September 2005.
HINTON-Joann, 62, died September
21, 2005.
HOWE-Carol A., died September 22,
2005.
JACOBS-Ellis, died September 22,
2005.
JACKSON-Edward L., died
September 27, 2005.
JIMERSON-Marie, died September
26, 2005.
JORDAN-Roosevelt, died September
23,2005.
LLOYD-Corvid, 105, died
September 26, 2005.
MARSHALL-Rubin F. Sr., died
September 25, 2005.
McNEAL-Catherine, died
September 19, 2005.
PLUMMER-Willie, died September
26, 2005.
SANDERS-Betty J., died September
25,2005.
THOMAS-Lori, 40, died September
16,2005.
THOMAS-Rometa, died September
24,2005.
WADE-Emrnestine, died September 22,
2005.
WARD-Austin, died September 23,
2005.
WESTBERRY-Charles, died
September 21, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
WHEATON-Richard, died
September 21, 2005.
WILLIAMS-Cedric, died September
23,2005.
WILLIAMS-Laura Bell, died
September 20, 2005.
YOUNG-Jeanette, died September
22,2005.


to meet the career goals and
challenges of the African-
American community in
Northeast Florida, empow-
ering participants and'
encouraging networking.
The event, first held in
April 2002, will deliver new
tools, tips and techniques to
enhance professional and
personal development.
"Learning in all forms
keeps us mentally agile and
helps us to be continuous
leaders," said Elizabeth
Cline, conference keynote
speaker and president of
iMPACT Personal &
Professional Development,
Inc. "The conference agenda
unfailingly forces partici-
pants to rethink themselves
and their individual possibil-
ities by providing tools,
techniques and inspiration
necessary to envision per-
sonal and career excel-
lence."
The one-day conference
features five breakout ses-
sions, including Managing
Your Money Wisely: What
You Don't Know Can Hurt
You, Beyond Networking:
How to Move Your Career
to the Next Level, Effective
Non-Defensive
Communication: Getting
Your Message Across
Effectively, Good. Skills
Gone Bad: How to Balance
Your Strengths &
Weaknesses, Planning Your
Financial Future and Long
Term Care.
Cline will deliver the
keynote message on
"Conscious Work,
Conscious Living: Mind,
Body and Soul Connection".
Additionally, there will
be a panel discussion featur-
ing several community
experts.
To register for the event,
go to
nage.html> Click on
"review courses and to reg-'
ister" or call (904) 620-
4270. The fee for the events.
is $i49 and includes work-
.book materials, continental
breakfast and lunch.
The 4th Annual African-
American Professionals
Conference is sponsored by
Blue Cross Blue Shield of
Florida, Mary --ay


Cosmetics, PHH Mortgage,
State Farm Insurance and
the St: Johns Press.

JUL Seeking

Nominations

For EO Awards
The Jacksonville Urban
League is seeking nomina-
tions for its Annual Equal
Opportunity Awards.
Corporations and
Individuals who have made
significant efforts 'in the
areas of diversity and equal
opportunity will be consid-
ered.
Awards will be present-
ed during the Urban
League's Annual Equal
Opportunity Luncheon on
October 26, 12 Noon at the
Hyatt Regency Riverfront
Jacksonville. Nominations
must be received by October
14.
The Jacksonville Urban
League presents four equal
opportunity awards two
individual and two corpo-
rate.
The nominee should
have demonstrated support,
assistance or has made sig-
nificant inroads in furthering'
equal opportunity.
Individuals and corpora-
tions nominated should have
an extensive record of con-
tributing to the improvement
of equal opportunity among
diverse groups.
Nominees must not have
been the recipients of any
award from the Jacksonville
Urban League in the last
three (3) years.
Only one nomination can
be submitted per form.
Nominations must include at
least a one page typed state-
ment of the nominee's
record' of efforts made to
champion the cause of
equality.
Nominations must be
received by the Jacksonville
Urban League on or before
October 14.
They may be mailed to:
Jacksonville Urban League,
c/o Equal Opportunity
Awards, 903 W. Union
Street, Jacksonville, FL
32204 or faxed to (904) 356-
8369.

A


EDITORS NOTE: The following article was submitted by Joseph
Johnson, Associate Trustee Emeritus of Bethune-Cookman College
and President of the Jacksonville Concerned Citizens For Improved
Bus Passenger Decorum. In this article Mr. Johnson offers his
personal reflections of the lives of the late Ms. Marvyne Betsch,
Mrs. Azzie Lee childs, Mr. Maurice H. Barnett, and Mr. Clifford L.
Bartley.
By Joseph Johnson


MARVYNE ELIZABETH BETSCH "THE BEACH LADY":
NMs. Marvyne Betsch will long be remembered as one of my staunch
.,' ^ supporters in the field of music. When Marvyne returned from Italy,
she taught me interpret Italian and German songs. She had a deep
S,-,. appreciation for Negro Spirituals such as Deep River, and Swing
?"' Low, Sweet Chariot. As President of the R. L. Brown School PTA,
S. I invited her to present a travelogue of her trips abroad. Ms..
Betsch, known as "The Beach Lady", tutored me in her home on
'West 8th Street. Her mother, the late Mary Lewis Betsch, served as
my accompanist during several recitals. Marvyne's grandfather, Dr.
A. L. Lewis, was the founder of the Afro-American Life Insurance
Company. He made it possible for blacks to have a beach (American Beach) in Fernandina,
Fla. It was an island that Marvyne cherished until her passing a few weeks ago at Amelia
Island. Her sister, Dr. Johnetta B. Cole, serves as President of Bennett College for Women
in Greensboro, N.C. Marvyne was one who could appreciate the beautiful creations of
nature.
MR. MAURICE H. BARNETT-Mr. Barnett was one of Du al
County's retired educators. He was one of my mentors and we served /
together on the Executive Board of the Lincoln-Douglas
Emancipation Proclamation Association. Mr. Barnett was appointed .
to this board by the late Mr. James S. Genwright, Sr., who was
President at that time. He was also- an Honorary Member of the .
Jacksonville Concerned Citizens for Improved Bus Passenger deco-
rum. Mr. Barnett earned his Masters Degree from Tuskegee -
University and a Specialist Degree in Elementary Education and "
Administration which was conferred at New York University.
MRS.AZZIE LEE CHILDS-The late Mrs. Azzie Lee
Childs and I served as Trustees on the Board of Trustees at Bethune-
Cookman College in Daytona Beach, Fla. during the Presidency of
the late Dr. Richard V. Moore and Dr. Oswald P. Bronson who cur-
r rently serves as President of Edward Waters College. She was the
widow of the late Dr. Lincoln B. Childs. Mrs. Childs enrolled one
of her granddaughters, Brittney Childs, in my Maxie Johnson Home
of the Performing Arts. Mrs. Childs was an icon of dignity. Maya
Angelou's poem, "Phenomenal Woman," fits Mrs.
Childs perfectly during her lifetime.
-.', MR. CLIFFORD LEROY BARTLEY-
Mr. Clifford Leroy Bartley was a resident of the ,.
Arlington area long before it became a part of
Jacksonville. Many wealthy blacks in the area
owned most of the land, especially the Regency Square area. Mr. -
Bartley was a Christian gentleman. I loved him and admired him for .
his consul as a Spiritual Advisor on the Emancipation Proclamation
Board. He was deeply interested in the performing arts and support-
ed my efforts teach neighborhood children to have an appreciation foi I
the Fine Arts. Mr. Bartley received his formal education in Duval County
Schools.. He was drafted into the United States Army and served in World War II. Mr.
.Bartley was honorably discharged from the Army in 1946. He returned to Jacksonville and
continued his education and graduated from Stanton High School. Mr. Bartley met Lillian
Tyson and they were married in June 1948. He and his wife became the proud parents of
nine children. They were blessed with 15 grandchildren and 13 great-grand children. He
loved his children dearly and instilled in them his strong work ethic and the value of a good
education. Mr. Bartley had been involved with the U.S. Postal Service. He was a Deacon
in the Regency Seventh Day Adventist Church and was active in nursing home visitation and
prison ministries.
In closing, I leave a quote from the Psalm of Life in remembrance of my four departed
friends--Marvyne Betsch, Maurice H. Barnett, Azzie Lee Childs, and Clifford Leroy
Bartley. "Lives of great men all remind us that we should live our life sublime and parting
leaves behind us footprints on the sands of time."
T$


PAGE C-3


FL.ORInA STA R


nd-kInpf7v I MIK







nAUL C-4fliA -2AR--


Iok


A Cultural Heritage Weekend in Nassau County


Marquetta Goodwine,
a.k.a. Queen Quet the
Chieftess of the
Gullah/Geechee Nation
will lead an annual cele-
bration of Cultural
Heritage Weekend in
Nassau County, September
30-October 2, 2005.
Queen Quet is a noted
author and -historian. She
graduated in the top ten of
her class with degrees in
mathematics and computer
science from New York's
Fordham and Columbia
Universities.
Heritage Weekend
activities will take place
throughout Nassau County
starting in Nassauville at
the Historic. Little Mount
Olive Church and ending
on American Beach.
Nassauville is located
along the western bank of
the Amelia River that
seperates Amelia Island
from the Atlantic shore-
line. The program begins
at 7:00 p.m., Friday,


September 30 with a fel-
lowship circle, Saturday's
activities will leave .from
Little Mount Olive Church
making stops in O'Neal,
Yulee, Piney, Callahan and
at Kings Ferry concluding
with worship on the St.
Mary's River at 4:00 p.m..
A "Wailing Women
Worship by the Sea" in
memory of Marvyne
Betsch "The Beach Lady"
will conclude the weekend
activities at 4:00 p.m..,
Sunday on American
Beach.
The Beach Lady was an
active member of the
Gullah/hee National, a
coalition of ancestral Sea
Island African Americans
from the coasts of the
Carolinas, Georgia and
Florida. For additional
information please call,
904-277-2606. All activi-
ties are free and open to
the public.


Marquetta Goodwine "Queen Quet"


Get Ready For The Stone Crab Season,


One of Florida's most
prized seafood delicacies,
stone crab claws, will be
available at your local
seafood retailer beginning
October 15.
Stone crab season
opens October 15th each
year and runs through
May 15.The majority of
Florida stone crab claws
are commercially harvest-
ed off the southern tip of
Florida's peninsula from
Sarasota to Fort
Lauderdale.
Stone crabs are har-
vested for their mouth-
watering claws and only
the claws of the stone crab
are removed. The stone
crab is then returned to
the water where it will
regenerate new claws
within 18 months. In
2004, nearly three million
pounds of stone crab
claws with a dockside
value of more than $26
million were harvested in
Florida waters.


Stone crab claws are
cooked immediately after
harvest, and sold either
fresh cooked or frozen.
Fresh cooked can be
eaten within three to four
days if packed in ice or
stored in the coldest part
of a refrigerator. Be sure
to freeze only claws that
are completely intact and
free from cracks in the
shell. The thick shell will
protect the meat for up to
six months in a home
freezer. Thaw the claws in
the refrigerator, allowing
12 to 18 hours for them to
thaw completely. The
quality will be compro-
mised if they are thawed
under running water or at
room temperature.
The sweet tasting meat
of Florida stone crab
claws is delicious unsea-
soned, with melted butter
or your favorite sauce. To
crack the shell, use a.crab
cracker, a tool you can
purchase at your local
kitchen supply or depart-


ment store, or the back of
a heavy spoon. Remove
the cracked shell pieces,
leaving the meat attached
to the moveable pincer.
Don't forget there is plen-
ty of delicious meat in the
knuckle of the claw. The
meat can also be picked
from the claws and used
as an ingredient in other
recipes. Approximately
2.5 pounds of cooked
stone crab claws yield 1
pound of meat.
Florida stone crabs can
be purchased at your local
seafood market, super-
market or from suppliers
and fishermen that sell on-
line. Many restaurants
also feature this crab
treasure during the sea-
son. When shopping for
stone crab claws, make
sure you ask for FLORI-
DA stone crab claws.
While there are other crab
claws similar in appear-
ance, they do not have the
delicious flavor of Florida
stone crab claws. It is hard


PLUMBING REPAIRS
Repipes (5 Year Wananty)

^r B$ Shower Pans Replaced
S* Water Heaiers (Repaired and Replaced)
Bathrwnirs Remodeled CFC051652
l Drains Cleaned
NO Etra For Wekeii1.;

MW*A 10% MI AD

EconoRooter No Call 904Maxim727um Di70count 50

Econo-Rooter Inc. Call 904-727-7008


Thank you for reading
THE FLORIDA STAR!
To subscribe
or to advertise
call: 904/766-8834
e-mail: info@thefloridastar.com
,cor


to resist something that
tastes this good and
requires so little prepara-
tion. Try the, following
recipe for a true Florida
treat.


The National Action
Network, the New York-based
organization run by activist
and former presidential candi-
date Al Sharpton, has with-
drawn two "Dream Keepers"
awards originally earmarked
for Tyson Foods and Wal-
Mart, after learning of race
discrimination charges
against Tyson.
Tyson allege segregated
bathrooms with a "Whites
Only" sign, the pervasive use
of the n-word, "monkey," "boy"
and "watermelon" insults of
Black people and a threat with
a noose.
Wal-Mart Corporation, the
world's largest retailer, with


know what to do for life,
Sdl t I US, ,,",tm ,t ... m. n Si" 5? M H?, W


4,717 stores worldwide, 3,422
in the U.S., and 1.2 million
U.S. employees, opposes
unions and is the target of
multiple civil rights lawsuits
alleging violations.


4


The Readers of the Black Press in America
are more educated,
make more income
and have
gp stantiol buvinq power.

Source: The Media Audit
1 4-. X 2004 Black Newspapers Readership Report, nnpa.org-


OCTOBER 1,2005


2906 Norwich Street
(912) 242-6477
Brunswick, Georgia 31520



^- -
S. .. .,

Gift Baskets
Handbags
Hats
Gloves
Shoes
T-Shirts
Socks
Monday Thursday Friday
1 p.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday
10 a.m. 6. p.m.


FO 1 K S C N('1N0( 10ToRFIP4LAX AN1) tVNW I ND?


JOIN US AT "THE POST"
2179 Benedict Road


Tuesday Game Night
Bring your game and play cards with some of the best players
in town


Thursday Talent Night
Bring your best song, dance or comedy routine and show us
what you got!

Friday & Saturday
Disco (featuring DJ Larry "Georgia Boy" Douglas)
When the pretty people come out to play, dance and have a


good time.

For More Information Call 768-1206


Gvpertrznrt.- rndc
pnMs oW ft

"I'n ;i 'm rur;.., Sorigwriluo and OM
of five active lids-four boys
and toe girl. Another Wimly?
Well, you never know. That' why I
ta e stops to stay as healthy as I can.
Eating pLmty of fruits and vegetables.
Ghig pjjhyskalty active,
Never smoking or using drugs.
Q d 11ici rp .ttia1g lllhir'r,
talk to your healthcare provider."



For M re information ,
call 1-800-444-6472...,a '''"


FLORIDA STA R


PH -- j 1-


- -----"








%,,p A 13,200UUFLORIDA STARP E-


Jags Will Try To Ride Broncos After Downing Jets


Quarterback Byron
Leftwich went 16-of-23 for
2-.177 yards with one touch-
H "..-- down and one interception to
lead the Jacksonville Jaguars
past the New York Jets 26-20
Sunday, September 25 in
East Rutherford, N.J.


touchdown to Jimmy Smith in
overtime for the win. Smith
got past David Barrett on the
S, winning score, his second
yron Leftwich catch of the day.
Fred Taylor had a career-high 37 carries for 98 yards and


a touchdown for the
Jaguars (2-1).
The Jets relied
on their defense to
havekeep. them in the
game, converting
,"two turnovers into
-2: 10 points.
After playing
mistake-free foot-
ball in the first two
games, Jacksonville
had three turnovers,
Jimmy Smith including one when
they seemed to
have the game in hand.
With a 20-17 lead, Jacksonville got a drive going, but


David Barrett changed everything with 3:17 remaining in
regulation. After Leftwich completed a 3-yard pass to
Reggie Williams, Barrett stripped the ball and Barrett
scooped it up, racing 30 yards to the Jacksonville 21 to set
up the tying field goal.
Mike Nugent's 25-yard field goal to knotted the game at
20. The kick came after an officials review overturned a
called touchdown-- replays showed Wayne Chrebet bobbled
the 7-yard pass from Pennington
The Jaguars have sold their remaining non-premium tick-
ets for Sunday's regular season game against the Denver
Broncos, allowing the game to be televised locally on
WTEV-47. Kickoff is scheduled for 1:00.
There are still a limited number of Club Seats and visit-
ing team allocated tickets are available. The Jaguars ticket
office will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday
and 10:00 a.m. until kickoff on Sunday.


Women's Basketball Player
Collapses And Dies In Arizona Nevada Officials Studying Fighter Safety


TUCSON, Ariz..--
Shawntinice Polk a
center and a top
women's basketball
player at the University
of Arizona, collapsed at
the McKale Center in
Tucson, Ariz., on
Monday, September 26
and died university
officials said.
Polk,, a three-time i
all-Pac-10 selection
and two-time honor-
able mention all- .
American selection,
had not been working
out or practicing Shawntinice Polk
when she collapsed
about midmorning Monday.
"There was not a workout involved, there was not a prag-
tice involved, she just was not feeling well" when she arrived
at the McKale Center, athletic director Jim Livengood said.
The 22-year-old Polk, a 6-foot-5, 225-pound senior, had
asthma, Livengood said, declining to say whether the col-
lapse was related to that ailment. He said it was premature to
talk about a cause of death. Polk's body was taken to the
Pima County Medical Examiner's office for an autopsy, a
spokeswoman said.
"We lost a dear, dear friend in Shawntinice Polk this
morning," university president Peter Likins said, his voice
breaking. Polk is survived by her mother, Johnny Little, four
older brothers and two older sisters.


U,









C.>




- 'p.-p- ".-". ~ CD-
-~ -S-SE


-w-


LAS VEGAS Nevada
boxing officials have formed
a panel to look into the death
this week of Leavander


LET THE POST OFFICE
DELIVER THE FLORIDA STAR
TO YOU

[E I want a One Year Subscription to The Florida Star!
Please donate 10% of my paid Subscription to the
church or non-profit organization listed below.

Name Of Organization:

Please send my Subscription to:
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE ZIP CODE


SA TTRADITION OF "


S EX CELLENC E
I I



I FLORJD,- suR'Tr-MAR 2'Y r ,- -'......



I .- ., I, ,. I. tI- ,,.f. ...
I ... ..' t. '
(( ) Y ( )- 2 a $ 5.0 ;



P.O Box 40629
Ja ko-.v' F'2 0 .
I r .. -, I '






() h 6 Monthsr-$18.50
-_. ()Year-$33.00 () 2Years $65.QO



P.O. Box 40629

Cash, Check, Money Order
or Credit Card Accepted.ar
----------------f ----------------------
(.---._-___P.O Box__ __ 40629---- __ ,, __ _


Johnson, as
ring injuries
three years.


well as other
within the past


The head of the Nevada
State Athletic Commission
said the panel --composed of
three former commission
chairmen, a state assembly-.
man and a doctor-- will


September 24
Lincoln (MO) 17, Edward Waters 13
Bethune-Cookman 63, Norfolk State 61 40T
Florida A&M 12, Tennessee State 7
Charleston (WV) 17, West Virginia State 14 -
Clark Atlanta 52, Lane 20 -
Tuskegee 13, Arkansas-Pine Bluff 9
Webber International 49, Concordia 7 -
Jackson State 33, Miss Valley State 14
Shaw 49, Livingstone 27
Hampton 44, Morgan State 14
NC Central 38, Bowie State 19
Fort Valley State 35, Benedict 24 -
Saint Augustine's 7, Elizabeth City State 0 -
Elon 12, NC A&T 9 Final
Virginia State 22, Fayetteville State 14


study recent injuries in the
ring and try to come up with
ways to make the sport safer.
"We want to make
absolutely sure our proce-
dures and protocols reflect
the lbest possible thinking
regarding the health and
safety of fighters while in
the ring," said commission
chairman Raymond
Avansino.
Former chairman Sig
Rogich will serve as chair-
man of the panel. Avansino
asked the committee to meet
within 30 days and report
findings to him by April 1,
2006.


The panel was formed in
the wake of Johnson's death
Thursday, five days after he
was seriously injured in a
lightweight title fight at the
MGM Grand hotel-casino.
His death was the sixth in
the ring in Las Vegas since
1994. In the last four
-months, two boxers have
died and two others had
brain injuries.
Avansino said the com-
mittee will discuss proce-
dures involving fight stop-
pages, and will consider new
medical technologies and
better equipment to protect
fighters.


UNF Hosts Free Scrimmage

For Orlando Magic Fans

In The Campus Arena

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--It's tip-off time for basket-
ball at the University of North Florida.
UNF will host a free Orlando Magic scrimmage at
6:30 p.m. on Saturday, October 8 at the campus Arena.
Public parking is $3.
The scrimmage will be the culmination of a six-day
training camp for the Orlando Magic, marking the eighth
time that the Magic have held camp at UNF. Practices
will be held at the UNF Arena October 4-9 and are closed
to the public.


Saint Paul's 27, Johnson C. Smith 7 -
Langston 49, Paul Quinn 13 Final
Howard 39, Savannah State 21 -
Winston-Salem State 31, Virginia Union 0 -
Alabama A&M 42, Allen 0 -
Alabama State 38, Alcorn State 3
Coastal Carolina 24, Delaware State 6 -
Kentucky State 31, Morehouse 22 -
Texas College 47, Georgia State 0
West Chester 64, Cheyney 0
Northwestern (LA) State vs. Texas Southern -
Natchitoches, LA cancelled
Southern vs. Albany State Baton Rouge, LA -
cancelled
September 25
Miles 13, Stillman 10 -


1. What bodies of water was Canadian Vicki Keith the first to swim across?
2. How many national football championships did Woody Hayes take to the grave with
him?
3. What dapper golfer inked a $675,000 contract with NFL Properties to wear NFL duds?
4. What Super Bowl winning team's best-selling poster pictured its tuxedo-clad offensive
line with a huge hog?
5. How many games did the Minnesota Twins take to beat the St. Louis Cardinals in the
1987 World Series?
6. What four women won all the Wimbledon singles titles from 1978 to 1988?
7. What Heisman Trophy winner once struck out 21 times in a row playing baseball for
Auburn?
8. What Olympic hockey coach told his 1980 team: "Gentlemen, you don't have enough
talent to win on talent alone"?
9. What country's athletes won the gold, silver and bronze medals in the 1500-meter final
at the 1980 Summer Olympics?
10. What American League baseball team's 1988 roster included the names Lemon,
Nokes and Walewander?
Sports Challenge Answers
"uIl 'iIpal IaI So00Z (a)
,sJofii 11o0-4Q oq "01 '.s,uei!.g wJo
"6 'slojg qJjH "8 'uosNOLUf o09 L 'JIJ '1OAg 'SuogqooD 'tAOliJAXN -9 'UAOS
"( ',suptspv'a uoliAqs,3A 1qJ "t7 'ttAjj SI M u~ :dANL "-Z '.s3 I 1O-1D 3ui *q


PAGE C-5


FLORIDA STARR


OCTOBER 1. 2005


!~ 7"".1 1;







.l t, V -- A R TA O 1 2 ..


JAIL OR BAIL

EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
BURGLARY-On Sunday, September 25, 2005 at 11:30 p.m. a police offi-
cer was dispatched to the 200 block of May Street (R. W. Townsend
Construction), in reference to a burglary of a business. Upon arrival,
police officer observed a 63-year-old male (suspect), inside the fenced
construction trailer. The suspect was throwing a silver portable stereo
out of the broken window. Two officers jumped the fence and went to
the front of the construction trailer. The suspect was still inside the
trailer. The K-9 officer commanded the suspect to come out and the
suspect crawled out of the window. The suspect was read his rights. He
stated that he crawled under the fence to get to the construction trailer.
The suspect refused to say anything else about the incident. It appeared
the suspect broke the glass window on the construction trailer and
crawled into the window, The suspect was arrested, and transported to
jail, and charged with a felony.
POSSESSION OF A CONCEALED FIRE ARM-On Sunday,
September 25, 2005 at 9:45 p.m. While on patrol, a JSO officer
observed a vehicle traveling north in the 2900 block of N. Liberty St.
The vehicle made a left turn into the Shell convenience store parking
lot at 3020 N. Liberty St., without using a turn signal. The police offi-
cer also noticed the vehicle had no tag lights. The police officer then
conducted a traffic stop on the vehicle in the parking lot. As the offi-
cer approached the vehicle, he discovered that neither the driver or the
passenger were wearing their seat belts. The police"officer then
observed a "Remington UMC" ammunition box under the driver's left
leg. The officer then called for assistance, and two other officers
arrived. The officer then removed the passenger from the vehicle, and
he told the officer there was a gun under the seat. The driver was then
removed from the vehicle, and detained because he did not have a con-
cealed weapon permit. One of the assisting officers retrieved two
firearms and a box of ammunition from under the driver's seat. One of
the guns was fully loaded with a round in the chamber. The co-defen-
dant and suspect, told the police officer the do not belong to them and
they do not know how they go under their seats. The suspect and co-
defendant were read their rights, arrested, transported to jail, and
charged with a felony.
ARRESTED FOR STEALING MAD-DOG 20/20 WINE-On
Sunday, September 25, 2005 at 11:36 a police officer responded to a
burglary call at 2854 Phillips Highway, to a locked storage shed where
merchandise was stored. Upon arrival, a witness told the police officer
that he observed a 36-yeai-old male (suspect) break into the business,
and take a large amount soft drinks, bottle water, and M/D 20/20 wine.
The suspect's nickname is "Real" and "New York." The witness told
the police officer that he would be willing to testify against the suspect.
The suspect was observed walking down the street next to the City
Center Motel with a shopping cart full of beer, water, wine, sodas, and
cigarettes. The suspect was trying to sell the items to numerous people.
The police officer observed the suspect walking in the parking lot of
City Center Motel at 2414 Phillips Highway. The suspect was taken
into custody, and advised of his rights. When questioned about the
offense, the suspect denied being involved in the burglary. The wit-
ness told the police officer that he knows the suspect, and that he saw
him take the items. The suspect was arrested, and transported to a pre-
trial detention facility, pending a felony charge.
POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE-On Sunday,
September 25, 2005 at 11:58 p.m., a police officer was dispatched to
226 6th St. Avenue South in reference to a possible drug activity. Upon
arrival, police officer made contact with a 30- year- old female (sus-
pect), who was a passenger in a vehicle parked in the driveway. During
contact with the suspect the officer asked if she had any drugs and
weapons ori her and she replied "no." The police officer then asked the
suspect if she would allow her purse to be searched. She replied, "No,
go ahead." A search of the suspect's purse revealed a marijuana ciga-
rette. When the suspect observed the officer remove the marijuana cig-
arette from her purse she stated, "oh well I smoke weed." The suspect
was arrested for possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, transport-
ed to jail, and charged with a misdemeanor. The marijuana was placed
in the property room for evidence.
CASHING WORTHLESS CHECKS-On Monday, September 26,
2005 at 12:28 a. m. a JSO officer while on patrol, conducted a traffic
stop for unlawful speed on a 30-year-old female (suspect) driving a
vehicle in the 13700 block of Atlantic Blvd. A subsequent check on
the suspect revealed an outstanding warrant for a worthless' check of
$150.00. ECO Durham confirmed the warrant with the Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office. The police officer placed the suspect under arrest for
the outstanding warrants The suspect's vehicle was towed by Auto
Store Towing. The suspect was arrested, transported to jail, and
charged with a misdemeanor.
ASSAULT WITH A DEADLY WEAPON-On Sunday, September 25,
2005 at 8:26 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 7500 103rd St.
(Hollywood Video), in reference to an aggravated assault. Upon
arrival, police officer met with a 39-year-old female (victim #1), who
said that a 49 -year-old male (suspect) approached her as she exited her
vehicle at the store. She told the police officer that the suspect asked
her had she seen a set of keys. She replied no and continued walking
toward the store. The suspect then asked victim #1 if she could let him
borrow fifty cents to use the pay phone. She replied no, and continued
walking toward the store. Victim #2 then exited the vehicle and asked
the suspect to leave victim #1 alone. The suspect and victim #2 then got
into a confrontation on the parking lot. The suspect told victim #2 the
he would be back. The suspect then left the scene on a bicycle and
returned to the store in about one minute with a brown handle gun in
his front waist The suspect opened the door of the 'business and told
victim #2, "come outside, I'm back. I'm gonna kill you." Victim #1


walked outside the store and asked the suspect to leave them alone. The
suspect then pulled out a revolver and said, "I'm gonna kill that nigga."
The suspect waved the gun in victim #2's face and continued yelling,
"I'm gonna kill you nigga." The victims felt threatened when they saw
the gun, and thought the suspect was going to shoot them. A witness
saw the suspect with the gun as he placed it in a wooded area behind
the store. A search for the gun in the area yielded negative results. The
victims and the witness positively identified the suspect. The police
officer read the suspect his rights, He said that victim #2 called him a
"P ._____ Nigga" and he thought that victim #2 wanted to fight. He
said the he never had a gun. The suspect was arrested, and transported
to jail, and charged with a felony.


Your Weekly Horoscope

(OCTOBER 1, 2005-OCTOBER 7, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19)This is
a week of happy
surprises .
Whether personal
or professional, you'll be
pleased. Later in the week,
remember to answer e-mails
and other correspondence.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) Your
inquisitive mind
leads you to take
up a new hobby.
This could easily become a
profitable venture. Perfect
your craft.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) When I
you're tempted to
lose your temper,
take a deep
breath. Meditation helps as
well. Whatever you do,
avoid a major blow-up with
that certain annoying co-
worker.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) You
tackle a new task
\\ithli gusto. This
enthusiasm takes
you through the week. Over
the weekend, a friendly
sports competition is satisfy-
ing.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22) You
make major
career strides this
week. This is fol-
lowed by a temporary set-
back. Relax; this is over-
come easily.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) You
Concentrate this
f T l week on back-to-
school shopping
for the kiddies.
You'll be pleased when you
won't have to blow the
budget. This weekend, a
short trip pleases the entire
family.
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) Don't
give in to gloom and doom.


Your mood is
only temporary.
You're pleased
when things turn
around by week's end.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21)
Something that
was worrying you
proves trivial.
Once you', realize
that, you're on a productive
roll. Later in the week, you
achieve a leadership posi-
tion at work.
SAGITTARIUS
(Noiember 22 to
December 21)
While domestic
matters are still a
priority, you still
accomplish much at work.
You get a welcome break
midweek, though. Enjoy it;
you deserve it!
CAPRICORN
S(December 22
to January 19)
Take your time
plotting a course
of action on that work .proj-
ect. Be sure all the details
are in place. Then you can
proceed with confidence.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18)
Sometimes, you
feel as though you
live out of a suit-
case. Travel, though, is nec-
essary for what you want to
accomplish. Over the week-
end, pay attention to a
child's needs.
PISCES (February
19 to March
20) Feel free to
celebrate. The
news you receive
is good and benefits the
whole family. Later, it's back
to the old grind.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Ben
Vereen, October 10; Joan
Cusack, October 11; Hugh
Jackman, October 12;


Kenyan Man Takes Iowa

Citizenship Oath, Wins Lottery
DES MOINES, Iowa A man who immigrated from
Kenya to the United States found prosperity beyond his
expectations on the day he became a U.S. citizen.
Shortly after Moses Bittok, of West Des Moines, took
the oath of citizenship on Friday, he discovered he had a
$1.89 million winning ticket from the Iowa Lottery's Hot
Lotto game.
"It's almost like you adopted a country and then they
netted you $1.8 million," Bittok said Monday as he
cashed in his ticket. "It doesn't happen anywhere I
guess only in America."
Bittok said he took the citizenship oath at the federal
building in Des Moines Friday then went shopping with
his family. They stopped at a gas station to check his lot-
tery ticket from the Sept. 21 drawing.
"For some reason, I'm calm," he said. His wife,
Leonida, screamed.
Bittok, 40, an officer at the Iowa Correctional
Institute for Women in Mitchellville, said he doesn't
know exactly what he will do with his winnings, but a
college fund for the couples 4-year-old daughter, Mindy,
is top priority.
Bittok chose to receive his winnings in 25. annual
payments of about $52,920 after taxes.
He came to the U.S. to attend college in Minnesota,
then moved to Iowa to take the job at the women's
prison.
He had purchased the winning ticket at a West Des
Moines grocery store, where he once worked part time.
Hot Lotto tickets are sold in Iowa, Minnesota,
Montana, New Hampshire, South Dakota and West
Virginia.


WANT CUSTOMERS? ADVERTISE IN
THE FLORIDA STAR! TO PLACE YOUR AD CALL
US TODAY AT 904/766-8834


FLORIDA LOTTO
WINNING NUMBERS
09-11-18-27-38-39
Saturday, September 24
TWO WINNERS!!
~A


Ashanti, October 13; Ralph 16.
Lauren, October 14; Emeril
Lagasse, October 15;
Angela Lansbury, October 2005 DBR MediaIne.


THANKS FOR SUPPORTING

THE FLORIDA STAR!


Tara's Bail

24/7 Bonds
Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville, Florida 32206
qI. .I


356-TARA

(8272)


Your business is always welcome!



REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.
FAM I LY PRAC TICE
3160 Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32209






AL -





WE PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR:
*Hypertension
*Diabetes

*Elevated Cholesterol
*Obesity and Weight Management
*Women's Health
9Childcare and Im unizatios s
*Preventive Care -
*Impotence and erectilefDysfunction

Dr. Reginald Sy.r !,elco ies ..Ts-Tonya Hollinger
I to the r, rice.
N 0 \V C EPT ING
NEW PATI ENTS
We invite you to he1 c; u' }as your provider
of choice fjr l ae lthcure needs.
TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENTT CALL
76'8 8l'22

FAX: 90 J-182-0373
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR HEALTH PLANS
HMOs, PPOs, MEDICARE, And MEDICAID
3160 Edgewood Avenue*Jacksonville, FL 32209
OFFICE HOURS:
M-F 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. Wed. 2 P. M. TO 5 P.M.


Cop With Two Wives

In South Carolina Fired
COLUMBIA, S.C. A Sumter County sheriffs
deputy was fired for being married to two women at the
same time, and his second wife was married to another
man at the time of their wedding, according to a depart-
ment investigation.
Jay Follin, 27, was separated but not divorced from
his first wife when he married Melissa McLeod on July
20 last year in Georgia, according to an internal investi-
gation by the Sumter County Sheriffs Department.
Sheriffs Maj. 'Gary Metts said Follin was fired
Wednesday. Metts said Follin knew he was still legally
married when he wed Melissa McLeod, 28. Follin spent
some time as a Sumter police officer before moving
away, but after returning, Metts hired him as a sheriffs
deputy.
"He's a great officer. I didn't ever have a problem
with him," Metts said, adding that the incident comes as
a "total shock." McLeod's first husband is Kelly
McLeod, 32, who lives in Sumter. The couple had sepa-
rated, but Kelly .McLeod filed a complaint with the sher-
iffs department after his wife told him she and Follin
had married.
The State Law Enforcement Division is investigating
the case at the request of Sumter County Sheriff
Anthony Dennis, SLED spokesman Lt. Mike Brown
said.

Crime doesn't pay but we do!
CRIME STOPPERS
1-866-845-TIPS (8477)
No Names...
No Faces... No Hassles
A A :


OCTOBER 1, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


PAGF r-6;








IfnIORAA CTAR


OCTOBER 1. 2005


AUO NSRAC


EMPLOYMENT

FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at
FCCJ. E.O.E.

Driver/Dedicated Reg. Lane
COASTAL TRANSPORT
HOME EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED
.65% Preloaded/Pretarped
*Avg. $818 $896/wk
Part-time opening avail.!
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
CDL-A req'd. 877-428-6627
www.ctdrivers.com

CONSTRUCTION PERSONNEL
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Pipelayers, Excavator Operators,
Loader Operators.
Drug screen req.
Jensen Civil Construction
9100 Philips Hwy. EOE/m/f/d/v

HELP WANTED
Helpers, Trainers, Plumbers
Must have a driver's license.
Excellent pay. Apply:
9020 Cocoa Ave.
Econo-Rooter Inc.

Owner Operators Needed
S.E. Regional container carrier
in Jacksonville needs drivers.
Daily runs local Jacksonville
and Fernandina Beach road
short and long. Florida area
domestic account is available
if I have enough interest.
Home most weekends, com-
petitive pay package with a
stable company. Need a Class
A CDL w/3 yrs. T/T exp. or 2
yrs. w/school. Call: Intermodal
Cartage Company @ 800-951-
0333

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that
commencing at: JESSIE'S
UNION 76, 2423 Edison Ave.,
at 9:30 AM on October 21,
2005. We will sell the following
vehicle for cash to the highest
bidder above repairs and stor-
age charges. Sealed bids
accepted. The following vehi-
cle is junk and inoperable. AS
IS where is: 2000 Jeep Grand
C h e r o k e e
(1 J4G248N6YC 156015)
MVR#MV16898


CAll: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673


I SERVICES


BUSINESS NETWORK


AB2387


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764


THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

CURL QUEEN
"Specials"
Curls -Ages 7-12 ONLY $29.95
Relaxer w/ Roller Set ONLY
$25.00
766-4510
r ------------

YOU CAN FIND!
Annette 2
Cosmetiques
Aloe Vera Skin Care
Products
AT: Pecan Park Flea
Market
Booth 162

L-----------J
Want to purchase minerals and
other oil/gas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201

NEED A CAR?

GOT BAD CREDIT?

CALL: SAM

(904) 791-0001


Thank you for reading
The Florida Star!


Adoption

ADOPTION A childless couple (in our 30s) seeks to adopt. Will provide
lifetime of love & security. Expenses paid, Karen & Keith 1-800-955-
9517.pit 05,


Announcements


OCTOBER BEAD FESTS October 7th. 8th. 9th Pompano Beach. Elks
Lodge. October 15th, 16th Hiavana FL. The Planters Exchange. October
29th. 30th Ft Myers. Clarion Hotel. Announcing Pahn Beach Gardens
November 4th. 5th & 6th Amira Shrine Teiple, Bead. PMC. & Wire
Wrapping Classes available. lnfo at ws\t.OctoherBeadFesi corn or
(866)667-3232.


Auctions


PUBLIC AUCTION. 5 tracts North Carolina mountain property. t10
acres each. Edge ofSparta. 10 acres. Absolute auction, 12:Noon Sat. Oct.
15ih. Visit: wwwopierceauciinn coin keithtcarolinaauctions.come
(800)650-2427.

553-/- Acre LAND AUCTION I IAM Sat.. Oct. 15 Development Land
& Citsru Grove, Central Florida Income & Development Real Estate
offered in2 6 Parcels. Foul miles ofroad frontage including I mile on U.S.
27, Parcels range from 8.7 --AC tto 504-AC. Higgenbothamn Auctioneers
international. Ltd. Inc, M.F. tiggenbothai, CA IF Ljic AU305/AB 158.
(800)257-,1161 www.hii,"cnbotham corn.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$t Buy Direct From Manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn around! Delivery Avail-
able Toll Free (888)393-0335.

Business For Sale

Service Business FSBO. Sky's the limit in this large MILLION DOLLAR
business. http !landscapeandireeco'sbo e homestead com For Morte Inf
Call (941)485-9212.

Business Opportunities

PRIVATE MONEY AVAILABLE Easy qualifying. Rapid, Funding,
Flexible terms on Real [-.state Secured Properties. MIccaill Mortgage

Company Call Thomas (954)578-7735 (866)895-4502
www mccallmorteaellc con

A CASH COW! 90 VENDING MACHINE UNITS/ YOU OK LOCA-
TIONS ENTIRE BUSINESS- $10.6701 IURRY! (800)836-34640 #B02428.

DATA ENTRY. Work from anywhere. Flexible Hours, SS Great Pay $$
Personal Computer Required. Serious Inquiries Only. (800)873-0345
Ext. 499.

$SS OWN & OPERATE SSS Your Own CASH Candy Vending Route!
Unlimited Earning Potential. includes 30 Metal Machines with Candy,
Lifetime Warranty. S9,895. (800)704-5414.

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE D you earn $800/day? 30 Machines. Free
Candy All lfrS99,095. (888)629-9068 BO2000033. CALL US: We will not
be undersold!

PROFESSIONAL VENDING ROUTE Cola. All Chips. Candles, Juices,
Water. NO GIMMICKS. GREAT IEQUIP/SERVICI. financing avail, w/
$7.500 down (877)843-8726, #0B2002-037.


Financial


TOO MUCH Debt? Don't choose thile wrong way ot., Our services have
helped millions. Stick to a plan. get out of debt & save thousands. Free
consultation. (866),410-6827. CareOne Credit Counseling,

Help Wanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay & Benefits for
Experienced Drivers. 0(,/O. Solos, Ieans & Graduate Students, Bonuses
Available. Refrigerated Now Available. (888)MORE PAY
(888-667-372O).


CLAIMS
1-800-882-2525
Free Case Review
Trust Your Case .
To A Doctor/Lawyer
He)n r l3113tL il Trrjl, ie 1 l10
.,t ,l l, Ihnr '.e bpru i:jul T
I,, Or; ,aii lru9 ,,u ii,ti, '.
eri el I j, j i u3 :.,fm -.: nho l ni

INVITATION FOR BIDS
Custom Facility Expansion
Blount Island Marine Terminal
JAXPORT Project
No. B2006-01
JAXPORT Contract
No. C-1137
Sealed bids will be received by the
Jacksonville Port Authority until
2:00 PM, local time, November 1,
2005, at which time they shall be
opened in the Public Meeting Room
of the Port Central Office Building,
2831 Talleyrand Avenue,
Jacksonville, Florida, for Custom
Facility Expansion..
All bids must be submitted in accor-
dance with specifications and draw-
ings for Project No. C-1137, which
may be examined in, or obtained
from the Procurement and Contract
Services Department of the
Jacksonville Port Authority, located
on the third floor of the Port Central
Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand
Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida
32206. (Please telephone 904/630-
3018 for information.)
PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL BE
HELD ON October 13, 2005. AT
10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC MEET-
ING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR OF
THE PORT CENTRAL OFFICE
BUILDING LOCATED AT
ADDRESS STATED ABOVE.
ATTENDANCE BY A REPRESEN-
TATIVE OF EACH PROSPECTIVE
BIDDER IS REQUIRED. A BID
WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FROM
ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT REP-
RESENTED AT SUCH CONFER-
ENCE.
Bid and contract bonding are
required.
The mandatory MBE/WBE
Participation Goal established for
this project is 30%.
Louis Naranjo
Director of Procurement and
Contract Services
Jacksonville Port Authority


DELIVER FNMA RV's FOR PAY! A NATIONAL RV delivery service
has immediate needs for qualified contractors to deliver "new" RV trailers
front factories and dealers to Hurrncane relief sites. This is a greal way for
you to help the victims. Please log on today: www horionltranspoj corn.

CDLA OTR DRIVERS TEAMS .50CPM SOLOS ,34 CPM 100% DROP
& H10OK HIEA LTH BENEFITS ASSIGNED EQUIPMENT REQUIRE-
I YEAR OTR IIAZMAI & DOUBLES (321)202-4406.

S600 WEEKLY Working through the governmentpart-titre. No Experi-
ence. A lot of Opportunities. (800)493-3688 Code J-14.

MOVIE EXTRAS. ACTORS & MODELS! Make S75-S250/day. All
aees and laces wanted! No exp. Required. Fr'PT! (800)714-7565.

Now Hiring for 2005 Postal Positions S17.50-S59.00I i r. Full Benefits'!
Paid Training and Vacations No Experience Necessary (800)584-1775
Refeience i 5600.

S/E & 3-State Run: T.T Drivers. HOME WEEKENDS. Mileage Pay,
Benefits, 401K. Trainees Welcome. Miami area- exp. req. 21 mini age/
Class-A CDL Cypress Truck Lines (800)545-135 1.

STABLE CAREER. IMMEDIA I'i OPENINGS! Positions available for
Experienced CDL I holders. Also Company Funded Truck Driver Training
olTered. financial assistance tlir Hurricane Victims. (877)PRIME-JOB.
www.primneine.coun.

Driver- NOW HIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for Central Florida
I local & National OTR positions. Food grade tanker. Ino hatmat, no pumps.
grecal benefits, competitive pay & new equipment. Need 2 years expert.
ence, Call Byitm Transport for your opportunity today. (00)741-7950,.

Sales

55,500 Weekly Goal Potential If someone did it, so can you! 2-3
confirmed appointments daily! Benefits Available... Call Catherine
McFarland (888)563-3188.

Kayak Pools Seeks Closers Sales Pros Earnt opCommitssiont S I ronts's
and Incentives. Some Travel Required. 6 Figure Potential Realistic. Call
(866)348-7560 for Sales Manager.

Hunting

HUNT ELK, Red Stag, Whitetail, Buffalo season opens 5/31/06. Guar-
anteed turning license, 55.00. We have a no-game, ino-pay policy. Call
days (314)209-0800 ctenilgs (314)293-06 10.

Legal Services

DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS children, etc. Only one signalture re-
quired! '*Excludes govt. feefl Call weekdays (800)462-2000, ext.600.
(8ntm-7Tpm) Alita Divorce, LLC. Established 1977.

ALL Accidents & Injury Claims. AUTOMOBIIIi, BIKEi'IOATIBUS,
ANIMAL tI'IFS, WORKi.RS COMPI''NSATION. WRONuFULt
DEATH, NURSINGi HOME INJI IRIIS. "Pritect Your Rights" A-A-A
ATTORNEY Referral Service (800)733-5342.

NEED A LAWYER? All Criminal Defense& Personal Ihjury. *Felonies
*Domestic Violence *Misdemneanors 1*D)II *'Traffic *Auto Accident
*Wrongful Death. "Protect Your Rights" A-A-A Attorney Referral
Service (8011)733-5342.

Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Mediciil. *Business. *P1arealegl
*Conputters. Job Placetent Assistance, Computer & Financial aid if
quality. (866)858-2121 tww. onflnetidclcrlo eel.cotm.

OXYGEN USERS: Enjiy frieedoil Travel without canisters No more
bottles! OxilfC's lightweight. OygCen concentrators run off your car and
in your home, U.S.A.- made Warranleed (800)780-2616
www.oxliilnc.com.

Pools

Demo Hoinesites Wanted In your area for the NEW Kayak Pool. Take
Advantage of this Unique Opportunity. Save S Financing Available.
Details (866)348-7560,


jt .






Physical acuvntay s a greac way
for kids to build strength and
stay he.altny Unrortunarely.
i[ can sometimes lead to
Injury Broken bones require
immediate attention, but
wnat about sore should, s or
swollen krees? If not taken
seriously. many youth injuries
catn become chronic later In
lire. So before your child gets
hurt., visit aaos.org or nata.org.
Practice prevenrnon and give
all injuries proper attention



D1gflO lOnC S.URBIO ItRINIR. I.DaOInIAON


Real Estate


North Carolina Gated Lakefront Coimmunity 1.5 acres plus. 90 miles of
shoreline. Never before offered with 20% pre-development discounts,
90% financing. Call (8300)709-5253.

Land & Lots SupplyDlemandi-tlorida Land Boom! Cheap 1/4. I,2. 1
Acre Lots. 5-10-13-20 Acre Parcels. Highlands. Hlendry. Hardee.
Okecchobee ask for Lawrence (800)796-6569,

GRAND OPENING SALE! Lake Bargains! Water access from $34.900
wv FREE Boat Slips. PAY NOCLOSING COSTS! Sat & Sun Oct. 15& 16.
Huge pre-construction savings on beautifiull y wooded parcels at 34,000
acre lake Tennessee. Enjoy iunlimilted after recreation, Surrounded hby
state forest. Lakefront available! Excellent financing! Call nosw
(800)704-3154 X658.

NC MOUNTAIN CABIN on mountain top, view. trees, waterfall & large
public lake nearby, 2 bedroom. I bath. S 175.000 owner (866)789-8535
v,,w.NC77.com.

TENNESSEE -NEWLAKESIDE COMMUNITY Spectacutlarhomesites
from the S30's. Private boat slips- limited availability. Close to downtown
Chattanooga. Lake access from community. Call Today: (866)202-5769.

ASHEVILLE NC AREA- MOUNTAIN HOMESITES Gorgeous
riverfront, river view and wooded privacy homesites. 1 acres liom the
40's. Gated community ith amentties CALL TODAY: (866)292-5762.

Coastal Southeast Georgia Large wooded water access, marsh view.
lake front, and golf rented homeses fro the mid $70's Live oaks, pool,
tennis, golf. (877)266-7376. wuw.N cooespointt-cm .

t1 I I I is % I N 11 I n l I I i l It l 1 1114 ." I I 1I,, ,,i ... I I
owner. Log nHomeis, Lots Acreage near Pigeon Forge- Gatlinburg. Call
Ricky Bryant (423)623-2537.

Coastal Northll Crolinn Waterrronet! 3- Acres. S9.900 0Beautiltully
wooded parcel on deep boaltable vater with access to ICW, Atlantic &
sounds. Prime localton lose Io town. Pived rds, tig utilities, county water.
Excellent financing. Call now (800)732-6601 x 1,405,

WHITEWATER LIVING IN THE SMOKIES Gatod Water Itont Comi-
munity Riverfiotnt and Miounntaini Viewys Available, Prices Strtling low as
$46.900, FinilPase Limited Lois Cal Now! No Closing Costs tiy Direct
From Developer SAVI: THOUSANDS SS$ (800)559-3095 cxl 327
www rivercrest coi *Some restrictions apply,

WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS- Extraordinary I Home Sites in iGated Fall
Branch Estates, Wooded Lots, Panoramic Mountain Views. From n$601k.
Curreot phase: Pre-Constrctlion pricing. (877)77.4-3437
_vww Ridgesl.it corn

WESTERN NorthCarolina Mountains Cool Air. Views,Streams. Ilomes.
Cabins. Acreage FRET,' BROCHURE OF MOUNTAIN PROPI RTY
(800)6,2-5333. Realty OtIMur"phy 317 Peachtrec St. Murphy. N.C. 28906.
1.wahrCimilythEttltly,.tilc8).

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. ESCAPE lTHE HEAT IN THE
COOL BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUl, MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN NC.
IHomes. Cabins. Acreage & Investments. Cherokee Mountain Reatly
GMAC Real Estate, Mitrphy www cherokeemonuntainrenlty com Call for
Free Brochure (800)841-5868.

NC MOUNTAINS- 10, Acies titot $30.900. Grind Opening October
22,23. Spectacular long range views! Near Blue Ridge Parkway and
Boone. Excellent filnucinig, roads & utilities, (800)455-1981, ext. 210.

MOUNTAIN LAND FOR SALE IY OWNER. Beautiful Mountain
Views in North Georgia. 1,5-3 AC Parcels. Commons area on Trout
Streamt. Call (706)636-20,140.

Steel Buildings

ALL STEEL BLD)GSI UP TO 501% OFF!! i:ngineered for Hlurricane
Coast! Ship Factory Direct for quick delivery. 2-1x30 Up to 100"200! Call
Now! (800)4099-6401 liddie.

BUlIDINGC SALE! "L.ast Clance!" 20x26 Now 53955. 25x30). S5710.
30x40. $8300. 40x60. $12.900 Many Others. Meets 1.10 itM.lIP. Higher
available. One end included. Pioneer (800)668-5422.

Advertising Networks of Floridal
t Week of October 3, 2005


"7


II


AUCTION
www.abalauctioncompany.com

Commercial Real Estate
2.73 AC with two buildings

October 26, 2005 10:00 A.M.
Crawfordville, FL


I ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L---------*-----------*---


AU3239


S S.S [ As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310 N
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


PUBLIC HEARINGS
The Planning and Development Department, C.,r-inrruri, Development
Division (COD), will hold public hearings concerning ihe Jacksonville
C.:o-.:,u.j.I. ed Plan that includes the following Federal Grant r,.:'? a,,.
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
Emergency Shelter Grants (ESG)
HOME Investment Partnerships (HOME)
Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA)
Citizens are encouraged to participate in the development of the Consolidated
Plan and to attend the hearings to receive information about current year
activities, to express 'u",;ir... and community development needs, and to
make recommendations for activities to be undertaken during the October
2006 September 2007 program year,
Hearings will be held on:


Tuesday, October 4, 2005 6 PM
Beaver Street Enterprise Center
1225 West Beaver Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32204


Thursday, October 6, 2005- 6 PM
Small Business Center
5000-3 Norwood Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32208


All applicants for Consolidated Plan program funds will be required to
attend a mandatory technical assistance workshop. Workshop dates will
be advertised at a later date. Visit our website at www.coi.net, search word
"CDBG' for more information.
If any non-English speaking persons or persons with mobility, visual or hearing
impairments wish to attend the public hearing and have special needs, please
notify the Community Development Division at 630-7030 in advance so that
accommodations may be made.


JOHN PEYTON
MAYOR


Jeannie L. Fewell, Director
Planning & Development Dept


Adlerisoemetl
Homeowners with money worries
may qualify for low-interest loans
Have you been turned down for a house payments? Medical bills? IRS
loan? Do you need more than liens? It doesn't matter!
$ 10,000 for any reason? Are you pay- if you are a homeowner with suf-
ing more than 10% interest on any ficient equity, there's an excellent
other loans or credit cards? chance you will qualify for a loan-
If you are a homeowner and an- usually within 24 hours.
swered 'yes' to any of these ques- You can find out over the phone-..-
tions, they c n. i.... i... r.l..... and free of charge-if you qualify.
and without .... .... iii Honey Mae Home Loans is licensed
High credit card debt? Less-than- by the FL Dept. of Fin, Services. Open
perfect credit? Self-employed? Late 7 days. 1-800-700-1242, ext. 205




NO COST Driver Training with
Immediate job placement with
CTL TODAY!
NO MONEY DOWN!
-NO TUITION
-NO FINANCING
No cost Driver Training... We Want
your commitment, NOT your
$$$ MONEY $$$


Have A CDL? Start Work Today!
Recent Driving School Grads
are needed NOW!
Call CTL 24/7 to find out more:

53 1 New ingsR





Jakov llreF


=


A COMCAR
Industries Company
EOE


St. Augustine Beach Oceanfront Resort









lo rida bc I a n
I. r 6 \ .r i









from just $240 per m''"' onth!
| 3+Acr es a, ter Oicea A s ,.ot. | ..















45 min from Jacksonville/15 mi from St. Simon's
Call today for appointment e Excellent Financing available
*monthly payment of $240.32 based on $59,900 purchase price
with 10% down payment of $5,990. $53,910 financed @ 5.19% fixed
(APR of 5.55% includes 1% origination fee) for 3 yrs. 35 monthly
payments of $240.32 with final payment of $53,910.
Offer void where prohibited by law.




Send us e-mail!
info@theforidasta sor.com
froI just $240 per month!












i info@thef oridastar'com


PAGE C-7 A -Un~~..."A 3 AflA


I Aluminum Awnings


I


Info Package (850)926-9160

Abal Auction & Real Estate


C


- I --







jr- -o


UT


CS


All About Kids is the premiere pedi-
atric facility in Jacksonville, Florida.
We are dedicated to providing chil-
dren with the highest quality of
health care. Our doctors are Board
Certified Pediatricians with years of
Pediatric Emergency Room experi-
ence. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of
families with busy lifestyles. Come
see why so many parents trust All
About Kids Pediatrics with their chil-
dren's health.



Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and
have pediatric ER experience.



904.565.1271

877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com


SERVICES
Asthma Therapy
Pain Relief
Hemoglobin/Hematocrit Testing
Mono Screening
Rapid Strep Screening
Sport and School Participation
Physicals
Urinalysis
Well visits/Immunizations

EMR Technology
Our Electronic Medical Record System
enables us to be more efficient with
less paperwork and allows for:
Direct Pharmacy Link for fast and
convenient prescriptions
Check-in/Check-out process made
quick and efficient
Medical record history inquiries
and transfers that are concise and
easy with electronic database
management
Prompt subspecialty referrals

HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F; weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted


Betty Asque Davis

REALTOR









',i .,' Kr,, ^ 0d \.'-.\' ('''


615 Highway AIA
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082


Office:
Direct:
Fax:
Toll Free:


904-285-6300
904-473,1502
904-285-5330
800-288-6330


Email: badavis@WatsonRealtyCorp.com


12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225
Located in the new Hidden Hills Executive Park (near the corner of Fort
Caroline and Monument Rd.)


I.,.'.


.2~.h


i b L IX


Count on free products and helpfu

advice when you join this club.

If you're expecting, or your child is under 24 months, be sure
to sign up for the FREE Publix Baby Club. You'll get:


* Valuable money-saving coupons.
*Coupons for free full-size products.
* The free Publix Baby Club newsletter, full
of helpful tips on baby care and family life.


*(For first-time parents) an indispensable
book from the American Academy of
Pediatrics, Caring For Your Baby and
Young Child, absolutely free.


So hurry to the baby aisle of your neighborhood Publix and join today.
Quick, before that little one grows up!


Publix.

Number and type of coupons and items in welcome package may change without notice, Book available for firsttimno parents only.


FLORIDA STAR


OCTOBER 1, 2005


PAG' C8


;**.?-- .-*