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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section C: Local
 Section C continued
 Section C: Around the Area
 Section C: Sports
 Section C continued
 Section D: Entertainment
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
September 24, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00037

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
September 24, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00037

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section C: Local
        page C 1
    Section C continued
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Around the Area
        page C 4
    Section C: Sports
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
    Section D: Entertainment
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
Full Text




Elvin.6lt w~'In -K
~afWEDN-WOAWN'R


"Boilhpace Of The
Florida Relgious
Hal Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


'F-iiL


sFLORIDA7A

thefloridastar.com


Five Men Charged In Abduction and

Beating Of Teen


JACKSONVILLE,
Fla.- Fi'e men beat and
tortured him for five hours,
claims 16-year-old Harold
Crooms, because they felt
he had burglarized one of
their homes. According to
the teen, the men who he
recognized from his neigh-
borhood grabbed him off
the street and took him to a
nearby\ house. The men
taped his mouth shut and
immobilized his arms and
legs. The teen told police
he \\as burned with a heat-
ed clothes hanger during
the ordeal. He showed
police a red scar on his
neck that he said was
-caused b\ the hot clothes
hanger.
It appears Harold was
kidnapped because the
men felt he had stolen
from them and therefore
tortured him for five hours,
non-stop. The teen said
that he 'as made to lie
.face down on the floor
while they punched and
kicked him. While in that
position, they used the hot
clothes hanger to burn
him.
Friends of Harold saw


Charles Grimsley


Phillip Lawson
the men take him about
8:30 p.m. Monday and
were able to take the
police by the house where
they were able to identify
the suspects. When two of
the men left the house, the
officers stopped their car.
The men advised the offi-
cers that the boy was in


Michael Groover


Terry Lawson


Teen continued on A-7 Charles McCoy


Councilwoman's Bill Would Save City $7.3 Million


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
NMalor Pei\on advised the
ciN that budget cuts had to
be made. Councilwoman
Glorious Johnson agreed
and began her evaluation of
there cuts could be made
w\ hen she learned that there
are 122 Assistant
M lanageient Improvement
Officers NAMIO), costing
the Cit. o\er $7.3 million
dollars, not including the
benefits. These AMIOs have
no job descriptions, specifi-
cations, or pay ranges.


Johnson's Bill,
Ordinance 2005-1082
would require AMIOs to be
appointed by the mayor and
confirmed by council; limit-
ed to 20; have their qualifi-
cations, job descriptions and
salary ranges addressed; and
create a reporting require-
ment to protecting existing
employees.
She is not requesting that
the present AMIOs be
removed but she is asking
that no new appointments be
made.


Glorious Johnson
She wishes the ordinance
to become effective upon
signature by the Mayor or
approved without the
Mayor's signature.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
- Sponsored by Senator
Tony Hill, The First
Baptist Church of
Mandarin and the City of
Jacksonville, some 350
evacuees from Hurricane
Katrina were provided
food, clothes, employment
and a place to stay rent-
free. The group was wel-
comed through music and
words of encouragement.
But, they did not just hear
words from Jacksonville
clergymen, State Senator
Hill, Pete Jackson from the
Mayor's Office, City
Councilwoman Sharon
Copeland, Debra Maiden,
CEO of WCGL, and Betty
Burney from the School
Board, they were offered
real jobs, housing and
other benefits. Information
was provided from FEMA,
SSA, Red Cross, United
Way. Children & Family
and other organizations.
And while Jacksonville
evacuees gathered their
items and met new friends,
many other evacuees who
were sent to or decided to
go to Houston or return to
New Orleans are now
about to face another hurri-
.cane challenge.
Hurricane Rita was
upgraded to a Category 5
on Wednesday afternoon.
Those returning to New
Orleans were turned
around. Residents and
tourists of Galveston and
Corpus Christi, Texas had
already begun to evacuate
.and the more than four
million residents of
Houston found that many
of their neighbors had
decided not to wait around
Hurricane continued on A-7


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


Evacuees from the Gulf Coast receive advice and assistance
from agencies in Jacksonville.


Dorrie Little, Jackie Boyd, Claud Meyers and Sen. Tony Hill
volunteer at First Baptist Mandarin.


,.qC~ -.. 4.


Clothing, shoes and other material goods at First Baptist
Mandarin.


NEWS IN BRIEF
First Black
Congressman Honored
After 135 Years


Joseph Hayne Rainey
Joseph Hayne Rainey


Joseph Hayne Rainey
became the first black
person in the United
States to be elected to the
House of Representative
in 1870. Wednesday, he
became the first again, as
his portrait was hung in
the House, 135 years
later.
The oil painting of
Congressman Joseph
Rainey, South Carolina,
was unveiled before
many members of the
Congressional Black
Caucus, the Rev. Jesse


Jackson, who is a native
of South Carolina, and
family descendants.
Even though there are
many portraits of mem-
bers of the House, until
Wednesday, none was
that of a black man. Even
though Mr. Rainey was
born into slavery, he
served in the House from
1870 to 1879, during the
Reconstruction Era and
worked diligently to,
advance the civil rights of
newly freed slaves.


West Regional Library
Holds Dedication
Ceremony
The new West
Regional Library of
Jacksonville opened on
August 27, 2005 but the
Dedication Ceremony
was held September 21.
The mayor awarded
library ambassador
library cards to students
from Whitehouse and
Crystal Springs Schools.
"In the short time since
opening on August 27,"
he said, "this library has


already served nearly
19,500 people."

FDA Approves First
Generic Anti-AIDS
Drug
The drug, AZT, also
known as Zidovudine,
used to help prevent the
AIDS virus from repro-
ducing in the body, was
approved Monday in
generic form for avail-
ability in the U. S.
Because of a patent
restriction, the generic
version of the drug was


previously not available.
The patent has now\
expired and the drug.
which is manufactured
in Columbus, Ohio and
India, can now be sold in
the U. S. The generic
drug will help patients
who need it, better afford
it since some of the non-
generic medication runs
about $7.00 per pill. The
drug is normally used in
combination with other
drugs to treat HIV.
Briefs continued o, .4 -


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8 51069 00' 5'
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US..
JACQ MrN. )I' %IW
'PERMITAWO3617-


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


From The Gulf Coast To The


First Coast


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PAGEA-2


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN EDITOR
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


To Be Equal
What Has become Visible:
A Matter of Fairness
Marc H. Morial, President/CEO, National Urban League


SAMUEL CRISWELL"
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER


"Sometimes it takes a nat-
ural disaster to reveal a social
disaster," Jim Wallis, editor
of the evangelical journal
Sojourner's, told a
Washington Post reporter last
week.
He was, of course, refer-
ring to the stunning way the
fury of Hurricane Katrina
and the slow start-up of the
governmental response laid
bare in stark, tragic terms the
profound, corrosive poverty
that still exists in America.
The effects of poverty
there that millions in
America and around the
world could see with their
own eyes thanks to the news
photographs and television
reports were underscored by
two statistical reports that
were published amid the
devastation.
One, released in late
August just before the hurri-
cane struck, was the annual
report of the U.S. Census
Bureau on income, poverty
and health insurance. It
showed that, despite
America's general economic
recovery, the bottom has lit-
erally fallen out from under
millions more Americans in
the past five years,
For example, four million
more Americans were living
in poverty in 2004 than
before the economic reces-
sion of 2001 (1.1 million of


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


whom fell below the poverty
level in 2003 alone), mean-
ing that now there are 37 mil-
lion Americans in poverty.
The import of those figures
was then underscored by the
demographic profile of resi-
dents in the three-dozen
neighborhoods in Alabama,
Mississippi, and Louisiana
hardest-hit by the storm the
Associated Press published
September 4.
Using Census data, the
AP determined that sixty per-
cent of those living in these
neighborhoods were predom-
inantly people of color and
were twice as likely to be
poorer than the national
average and to not own a car:
Nearly 25 percent of these
residents had incomes below
the poverty line, almost dou-
ble the national average; and,
while one in 200 American
households doesn't have ade-
quate indoor plumbing, in
these neighborhoods, the
figure was 1 in 100 house-
holds. The indicators of
poverty were even worse in
some neighborhoods in New
Orleans, in Pascagoula,
Mississippi, and in Mobile,
Alabama.
University of South
Carolina historian Dan Carter
told the AP such figures
shouldn't be surprising, but
that usually there's "not a lot
of interest in (issues of


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poverty), except when there's
something dramatic. By and
large, the poor are simply
out of sight, out of mind."
Philosopher Cornel West
said much the same in an
interview for the British
newspaper, The Observer. "It
takes something as big as
Hurricane Katrina and the
misery we saw among the
poor black people of New
Orleans to get America to
focus on race and poverty,"
he remarked. "It happens
about once every 30 to 40
years." We could say that
some in America have long
been trying to direct
America's attention to the
persistence of poverty.
Now, apparently, more
segments of American socie-
ty have seen what had
become invisible amid the
nation's rising affluence and
overall economic recovery.
President Bush in his speech
in New Orleans last week
pledged "one of the largest
reconstruction efforts the
world has ever seen" for the
Gulf region and declared his
administration "will do what
it takes [and] stay as long as
it takes to help [ its citizens]
rebuild their communities
and their lives."
The task ahead, still yet to
be fully glimpsed, is one of
extraordinary complexity.
But certainly the overriding
principle local, state and fed-
eral governments must
adhere to is fairness-fair-
ness in the distribution of
relief funds to individuals,
families and businesses,


fairness in enabling those-
who want to return to their:
communities do so, and fair-
ness in involving Gulf resi-
dents in every aspect of the
planning and execution-
from strategy to jobs to con-
tracts and procurement-the-
reconstruction effort
requires.
In addition, the National
Urban League has proposed
a Victims Bill of Rights,
which recommends guide-
lines Congress should take to
protect the victims and ease'
their burdens-including a
victims compensation fund
(as was done for the victims
of the 9/11 terrorist attacks)
for the hundreds of thousands
of citizens injured, killed and
displaced as a result of
Hurricane Katrina.
Congress should also pro-
vide meaningful federal dis-
aster unemployment assis-
tance to every worker-esti-
mated to be at least half a
million-left jobless by this
tragedy. And it must ensure
that the hundreds of thou-
sands of displaced Gulf citi-
zens continue to have full.
voting rights in their home,
states and districts, so that
they can have a proper voice
in the rebuilding of their.
communities.
The crisis Hurricane'
Katrina has left in its wake
has ironically also produced:
an extraordinary opportunity
to make life better for all of
its victims and for all
Americans, too. It's an
opportunity our nation can't
afford to waste.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.comni


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


National Newspaper
Publishers Association


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FLORIDA STAR


Episcopal Supervisor th n Our Com unity The Church Director

To Speak At St. Paul AMEC K -Schedule of Events and Services- "Come and Worship With Us"


JACKSONVILLE--The Women of Allen of St. Paul
:A.M.E. Church, 6910 New Kings Rd., will celebrate their
40th Anniversary on Sunday,
September 25, at 4:00 p.m.
Dr. Dorothy Jackson Young,
Episcopal Supervisior of the
.. .'- Eleventh Episcopal Distirct (Florida
S- ;.' and the Bahama Islands), is the
speaker.
i Dr. Young is the wife of Bishop
McKinley Young, Presiding Prelate
of the Eleventh Episcopal District.
The Women's Conference Choir
will also' be featured.
i Dr. Helen Jackson is President of
the Women of .Allen of St. Paul
A.M.E. Church. Rev. Marvin
Dr. Dorothy Zanders, II, Pastor.
Jackson Young



The Living


Word


Do you not know that friendship with the world is hostil-
ity toward God? Therefore whoever wishes to be a friend of
the world makes himself an enemy of God.
Or do you think that the Scripture speaks to no purpose:
"He jealously, desires the Spirit which He has made to dwell
in.us"?
But He gives a greater grace. Therefore it says, "God is
opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble."
Submit therefore to God. Resist the devil and he will flee
from you.

James 4:4-7 NASB


Clothe yourselves, all of you, with humility toward one
another, for "God opposes the proud but gives grace to the
humble."
Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of
-iod so that ai tlhe proper time he may exalt you, casting all
.outr anxieties on him, because he cares for you,.
Be sober-nmided; be watchful. Your adversary the devil
pro\l1s around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to
* devour. Resist him, firm in your faith, knowing that the'same
kinds of suffering are being experienced by your brother-
hood throughout the world.

1 Peter 5:5b-9 ESV


Now this I say, he who sows sparingly will also reap spar-
ingly, and he who sows bountifully will also reap bountiful-
ly.

Each one must do just as he has purposed in his heart, not
grudgingly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful
Sgiver.

: 2 Corinthians 9:6,7 NASB'


I .1: A.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR
CHILD"S DECISION


Much has been said about how a
person might obtain 'closure' attend-
ing the. funeral of a loved one. For a
young child, viewing the body and
attending the funeral is to be encour-
aged but. by no means should it be
forced onto a child who does not wish
to attend. If this circumstance arises,
do not aggressively .pursue the issue
and do not make the child feel guilty
for staying away.
If your child is old enough to
understand what is happening, talk to
them about what they want. Ask them
if they would like to attend the view-
ing and services. Answer any ques-
tions they may .have honestly. The
death of a loved one is an emotional
and trying time and children can be
particularly sensitive to other people's
emotions. Do not feel as if you need
to protect them from Ifhat is happen-


ing. Sharing the experience with a
child will help them to understand
better.
If your child is adamant about
not attending, many people take pho-
tographs of the deceased to send to
relatives who are unable to attend, so
take a photograph for your child too.
If it is possible to videotape the serv-
ice then do so. Having a copy on
videotape will provide your child the
opportunity to watch the service if
and when he/she is ready.
In the meantime, tell your child
all the details that he/she wishes to
know about the funeral service as
well as any other questions they may
.have about the deceased.

"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncriel Rd."
Tel.;; 8-0507
wwAkI1,sman.cori


EVANGELIST TEAM-The James Graham Evangelist
Team will be at Greater Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church, 746 N.
Pine St. in Starke, Fla., on September 22 at 7:00 p.m. For
directions call (904) 964-8350 or (904) 757-1088.
SPIRIT-FILLED SERVICE-The Sword and Shield
Kingdom Outreach Ministry invites the public to attend
"Spirit-Filled" worship service in Building 2 at the Father's
House .Conference Center, 1820 Monument Rd. on
September 25, beginning at 3:45 p.m. Service features Bro.
Ronald Brooks and The United Men for Christ. Speakers
include Evangelist Ethel Pritchard and Minister Keith
Cobbs. Rev. Mattie W. Freeman, Founder/Pastor.
FAMILY, FRIENDS DAY-Family and Friends Day will be
observed at Deliverance Center For All People, 2039
Thomas Ct., on Sunday, September 25. at 4:00 p.m. Apostle
Shirley Brandon of HinesviIle, Ga. is the speaker. The pub-
lic is invited to attend. Minister Kevin Curry, Pastor,
CONCERT-A Concert has been scheduled for Sunday,
September 25, at 5:00 p.m. at Zion Hope Missionary Baptist
Church, 2803 W. Edgewood Ave.. The event features the
Zion Hope Mass Choir and Zion Hope Male Chorus. Jerome
Thomas, Director/Musician; Lizzie Williams, President; and
Violet Stovall; Directress. Rev. Clifford Johnsori, Jr., Pastor.
THIRD CHURCH ANNIVERSARY-Resurrection Baptist
Church, Christian Center, 6046 Moncrief Rd. W. will cele-
brate its .Third Church Anniversary Thursday, October 6-
Friday, October 7 nightly at 7:00 p.m. The celebration con-
cludes on Sunday, October 9 at 4:00 p.m. "Putting God's
Word In Action (I John 3:18)" is the theme. Visiting church-
es include; Thursday, October 6- New Mt. Pleasant Baptist
Church (Rev. Bill Coleman, Pastor); Jesus Christ
Deliverance Center (Rev. Kelvin Kelsey, Pastor); Winning
Souls For Christ ((Dr. James Mayberry, Pastor); and
Colossians Missionary Baptist Church (Rev. Ambrose
Murchinson, Pastor). Friday, October 7-Faith Temple
C.O.G.W.I.H. (Bishop Gregory Davis, Pastor); Agape
Family Community Church (Rev. Helen Conyers, Pastor);
and Spirit Life C.O.G.W.I.H. (Elder Wallace Taylor, Pastor).
Sunday, October 9-Mt. Lebanon Missionary Baptist Church
(Rev. Lewis Yarber,Pastor). First La:dy Cheryl Foreman,
Chairperson. Rev. Glen F. Foreman,, Sr., Pastor.
YOUTH AND YOUNG, ADULT CONFERENCE-First
New Zion Missionary Baptist Church, 4835 Soutel Dr., will
host a Young and Young Adult Conference Friday, October
7-Sunday, October 9. Evening Worship begins at 7:00 p.m.
on October 7. Pastor Jeffrey Robinson of Mt. Carmel
Baptist Church in Daytona Beach is the speaker. Minister
Alvin Hodge Associate Minister of First New Zion
Missionary Baptist Church, is the lecturer.. Classes and
speakers for the workshop on Saturday, October 8 are "What
Are you Going To Do" by Pastor Derrick Johnson of New
Covenant Ministries of Orange Park, Fla.;' "Who Are You"
by Rev. Patrick Fulton, Associate Pastor of First New Zion
Missionary Baptist Church; and."Walking the Walk" by
Pastor Jerome Robinson of Bethel Baptist in Starke, Fla.
Annual Youth Day will be observed on October 9 at 11:00
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Minister Dwayne Brown of Tru-Way
Church of the Risen Chirst is the speaker for the 11:00 a.m.
service. Pastor Lawson J. Boddie of St. Paul Church of
Gainesville, Fla. is,the speaker for the 4:00 p.m. program.
Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, Pastor.
CLUB ANNIVERSARY-The Garden of Gethsemane
Fellowship, Inc. invites the public to attend the 27th Club
Anniversary Celebration on October 8, 10:30 a.m. at the
Holiday Inn-Commonwealth at 1-295. Mrs. Monique
Williams, who appeared in the play "Don't Get God
Started," is the speaker. The Elm, Street Church of God
Praise Team of Femandina Beach, Fla. will lead the worship.
Minister Shirley Baker, President.
Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email
'submissions preferred. Send to:
info@thefloridastar.com



Phone Home


It's Me God!




"And whatever you do, do it heartily, as to the Lord and
not to men, knowing that from the Lord you will
receive the reward of the inheritance; for you serve the
Lord Christ." Colossians 3:23-25

When you perform an act of kindness, do you do it sin-
cerely? Do you do it to emulate Jesus? Or, do you do it
to receive praise from your fellow man?

The deed itself is not the issue. It is what you hold in
your heart when you do it that counts. When you see
someone, in need and reach out, this is good. In doing
so, though, you must sincerely want to be of help with
no thought of what you will receive in return.

That ultimate reward will be yours as has been prom-
ised. In the meantime, emulate Christ and serve Him.


(c) 2005 DBR Media, Inc.


Ti I


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see I Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209 *
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904).358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospel75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org .


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. ,.,
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. -
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m. ". 2
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m. ,
Sunday School Review '8:00 p.m. ,. 1. 1
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun .
(904) 764-5727 Church ."
(904) 768-0272 Home

CHRISTIAN FAMILY



: WORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
/ (Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities


Thanks For Reading
And Supporting The Florida Star!


I


I


PAGE A-3







PA UnL-'


Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"

Jones-LeBlanc Celebration
When the invitations were mailed for the party,
Josh and Mrs. Marietta LeBlanc Jones never real-
ized that their newlywed celebration would be not
only a celebration of their recent marriage but also a
time of thankfulness for their family members and
friends who were able to get out of New Orleans safe-
ly and with minimal loss due to the Katrina Hurricane.
Last weekend that's exactly what the tenor of the party
was, a time of celebration and thanksgiving!
Last spring Josh Jones, Esq. and Ms. Marietta
LeBlanc were united in holy matrimony during their
lunch break. Following the civil ceremony, the newly-
weds returned to work (Mr. Jones, Esq. is a partner
with the Bivins, Jones and Associates Law Firm and
Mrs. LeBlanc-Jones is Community Education
Manager with Community Hospice) and if you know
Ms. LeBlanc, you know she's a 'no-nonsense, no-
frills' person and doing it 'her way' came as no sur-
prise.
After getting settled in their lovely University Park
home this summer, they invited family and friends to
celebrate. And celebrate we did! Another newlywed
couple, TV4 News Anchor Rob and Mrs. Millicent
Sweeting joined family members: Brother and sister-
in-law Louis and Mrs. Willie Dean, LeBlanc, Jr.;
nieces and nephews Marietta, Adriennne, Chanel
and Louis LeBlanc, III; and New Orleans cousins for
the fun-filled evening that including a most bountiful
buffet.
When we spoke to Mrs. LeBlanc-Jones' New
Orleans cousin Ms. Yoshi Gaugis she shared that she
had stayed until they had to evacuate. Ms. Gaugis is a
registered nurse and she stayed as. long as she was
allowed as did New Orleans, physicians Drs.
Chancella and Aleicia Jones Donald.
We can't say enough about the Joneses lovely
University Park home. Mrs. LeBlanc-Jones' creative
skills are so evident. She has blended their pre-wed-
ding furnishings so artfully, creating a beautifully
appointed home.
Join me in congratulating this lovely couple!


Fall Fashion/Benefit Show
Mark your calendars for a Fall Fashion/Benefit
Show to provide some assistance and items for the
Katrina Survivors. During the October 1 event, being
held at the Radisson Hotel, local Katrina. survivors in
the audience will be picking up sized shopping bags
the night of the event. The focus of the event is to pro-
vide the women and men with professional attire to
restart their lives here in Jacksonville or elsewhere.
The event will showcase the newest and most stylish
fall fashions, furs and shoes of the season. First Coast.
Choreographer/Model Mrs. Kezia Justice stated, "
Fashions n ill be modeled by professional models from
the Central Florida area, NFL Players Wives and local
celebrities."
For more information on the Saturday, October 1 at
7:00 p.m. event call (904) 463-4529..




Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming
ex ents. Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me direct-
IN at imniajolid'aol.com, telephone (904) 285-977' or
fax (904) 2S5-7008.
See you in the paper!


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Education Now and Babies Later (ENABL)
Abstinence Only Education to Du.al Couna' Youth aged '9-19
Free to all organizations, including
faith-based and conunimir' rouiilps.
The "Managing Pressures Befcre Marriage" curriculum
teaches youth about:
* The risk of early sexual involvement.
* Assertive refusal techniques
* Building healthy relationships
* Resisting peer pressures.
Program goals:
* To reduce teen pregnancy.
* To reduce the rate of sexual activity in adolescents.
* To reduce the rate of sexually transmitted diseases
among adolescents.

HEALTH
River Region Human Services Prevention Dept.
650 Park St., Jacksonville, FL 32204
www.rrhs.orq 904-359-6962

ADVERTISING DEADLINE:
TUESDAY @ 5 P.M.
Call: 766-8834
emal: ad@thefloridaptar.com


A


*.


VTr nI)A CTAR


SEPTEMBE 24.200


DA f^T37 A-4


1









~7PPTPMR1~R 2d 2Ofl~ FLORIDA STAR PAGE A-S


Arrest Made In $3 Million Cocaine Haul Miss B-CC


STALL AHASSEE Florida Agriculture and Consumer
Sern ices Commissioner Charles H. Bronson today
announced the arrest of a California man who allegedly tried
to smuggle $3 million in cocaine into Florida.
Charged with trafficking in cocaine, which carries a max-
imum penalty of life in prison, was Gabriel Hernandez
Ramos, 36, of Oceanside, California.
According to officers with Bronson's Office of
Agricultural Law Enforcement, the suspect was driving a
tractor-trailer of tomatoes heading east on Interstate 10 on
Friday when he pulled into the department's Interdiction
Station located on I-10 in Suwannee County.
After visually inspecting the tractor-trailer and detecting
irregularities in the cargo's paperwork, officers used a
gamma-ray imaging machine that shows the interior of the
trailer and detected several cardboard boxes in the front of
the trailer.
Authorities searched the trailer and found 243 pounds of
cocaine, worth more than $3 million, in four of the boxes.
Ramos was booked into the Suwannee Count\ Jail over
the weekend, where he is being held on $4 million bail.
Bronson credited the Florida Department of Law


Enforcement, the Suwannee County Sheriffs Department,
the State Attorney's Office in Live Oak, the U.S. Drug
Enforcement Administration, and the U.S. Attorney's Office
for the Northern District of Florida for their assistance in the
investigation.
The arrest caps a busy two years at the department's 22
Interdiction Stations, where during that period officers have
recovered an estimated $11 million in narcotics,' stolen
goods and contraband at the locations, including $7 million
in cocaine seizures, $600,000 in stolen medicines, 60 large-
screen televisions and a truckload of pilfered computer chas-
sis.
Designed historically to keep plant and animal pest and
diseases out of Florida by inspecting the 12 million commer-
cial vehicles that enter or leave the state each year, the sta-
tions are playing an increasingly important role in Florida's
homeland security efforts as officers; have detained several
truckloads of illegal aliens in addition to the seizures of
drugs and stolen goods.
As in all criminal cases, suspects charged with a. crime
are presumed innocent until and unless they are proven
guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.


Bethune-Cookman College President Dr. Trudie Kibbe
Reed crowns Ms. Asia-Lige' Arnold as Miss Bethune-
Cookman College 2005-2006 during coronation cere-
monies Thursday, September 15. (PHOTO BY JOHN REEVES)


Touchdown!


Minority Enrc
TALLAIHASSEE
-\,Education Commissioner
S ohn L. Winn and
Community College and
Workforce Education
Chancellor Da\ id
Armstrong ha\e applauded
v- Florida's community col-
leges for their recruitment
; and retention efforts. which h
4 hate resulted in dramatical-
ly increased minority enroll-
ment and completion figtues
o over the last fi\e ears.
Recent Department of
Education reports indicate
:: that the Florida Community
College System (FCCS) has
shown a 29.8 percent
increase in Hispanic student
^ enrollment and a '0.9 per-
- cent increase in A.fncan-


)llment At Community Colleges Increasing


American student enroll-
ment over the last five years.
This represents an enroll-
ment increase among
Hispanic students from
125,050 in 2000-01 to
162.283 in 2004-05.
Similarl, enrollment among
African-American students
increased from 118,522 in
200t-01 to 142,0"9 in 2004-
05.
During the same period,
the FCCS' overall student
enrollment figures grew
from 737,857 to 800,036,
representing an 8.4 percent.
increase.
Also since 2000-01, the
FCCS has shown a 44.3 per-
cent increase in African-
American Ass.ociates in Arts


degree, completers and a
30.3 percent increase in
Hispanic Associates in Arts
degree completers.
The headcount figures
that correspond to these per-
centages show a growth
from 2,743 African-
.American degree completes
in 2000-01 to 3,957 in 2004-
05 and from 4,410 Hispanic
degree completers in 2000-
01 to 5,747 in 2004-05.
The FCCS' overall com-
pletion rate increased from
27,103 to 31,897 over the
same five year period, which
represents a 17.7 percent
growth.
These graduation rates
put the FCCS first among
the sixteen Southern


Regional Education Board
states.
"I congratulate Florida's
community colleges for rec-
ognizing the importance of
providing access to a college
education for a traditionally
underserved population,"
said Commissioner Winn.
S"Identiif.ini ways to bet-
ter recruit and retain minori-
ty students into our commu-
nity college system is vital
from both an educational
and economic standpoint.
Whether students earn a,
degree, continue on to a uni-
*versity or gain career educa-
tion skills, community col-
lege completers are better
prepared to enter the state's
workforce in higher-skill,
highei-pa.) ing jobs."
Florida officials credit
local, state and federal poli-
cies and programs that
encourage recruitment and
retention efforts for, all stu-
dents, especially traditional-
ly underserved populations.
Examples of these programs
include the College Reach
Out Program Gear Up and
Project Stars.
Additionally, there has
been support from private
foundations, such as- the
Lumina .Foundation for
Education' which strives to
help people achieve their
potential by expanding
access and success in educa-
tion beyond high school.
"Community colleges
* increasingly provide all
Floridians, regardless of
color or socioeconomic
background, with an oppor-
tunity to earn a passport to
the American Dream,"
explained David Armstrong,
Chancellor of Florida's
Division of Community
Colleges and Workforce
Education.


Bethune-Cookman College Board of Trustees Chairman
Irving Matthews (far left) and Trustee Margaret
McPhillips (far right) present College President Dr.
Trudie Kibbe Reed the $20,000 they pledged if Dr. Reed
met her weight loss goal. On Monday, September 12
when Mr. Matthews and Ms.McPhillips opened their
checkbooks at the Volusia County fundraiser for the
Football Training Center held at the B-CC Athletic
Department Office Building. Documents rushed in from
the School of Nursing, where Dean Dr. Alma Y. Dixon has
been personally monitoring the President's progress,
confirmed that not only did Dr. Reed reach her goal of 25
pounds, but shattered that mark with almost 28 pounds
loss.

DuPont Fund Awards B-CC
$150,000 For Master's Program


DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla. Bethune-Cookman
College President Dr. Trudie
Kibbe Reed announces the
award of a $150,000 grant
from the duPont Fund to
develop and implement a
master's degree program in
Transformative Leadership.
The program, scheduled
to be launched in the Fall
2006 semester, will offer the
College's first post-graduate
degree and will serve as a
cornerstone of the
International Institute of-
Civic Participation and
Social Responsibility.
With the program,
Bethune-Cookman College
will make a valuable contri-
bution to American higher
education by providing lead-
ership development for both
nonprofit and for-profit
organizations.
The program also contin-


ues the heritage of College
founder Dr. Mar) McLeod
Bethune, who stressed com-
munity involvement and
social responsibilitN along-
side the need for higher edu-
cation.
It will also further the
College's commitment to
continuing education, \ ith
approximately one-third of
the curriculum slated to be
offered online.
Bethune Cookman
College's grant was among
21 awards totaling S2.4 mil-
lion made by the Jessie Ball
duPont Fund trustees during
their August meeting.
The Jessie Ball duPont
Fund has made $229 million
in grants since 1997.
The fund has supported
more than 330 organizations
identified by its namesake in
her will.


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Where Christ Gets Lifted




&0

The Vctory is in the Word & Music



Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.













6050-6 MoncriefRd., Jacksonville, FL 32209

Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214

Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-995

Web address: VWWCGL1360. COM


~- c 1.--- --I-- 1--- 1 4 = ~4


PAGE A-5


FLORIDA STAR


SEPTEBER 2.200


,.




i.l ---


PAGF1 A4-


FLORIDA STAR


AHBAI's Current Chairman,
Cabinet Elected To Serve Second Term
CHICAGO, IL--The American Health and Beauty Aids
Institute .(AHBAI)
Board of Directors,
Srecenity elected the
current chairman,
Clyde Hammond, Sr.
president, Summit
Laboratories, Inc. and
his complete execu-
tive cabinet to serve a
4 ,-, second two-year term
P t. as officers ofAHBAI.
This is the first
time in the history of
SAHBAI that officers
have benn re-elected
Sm ato serve a second
term. Hammond is
k Clyde Hammond, Sr. president of Summit
Laboratories, Inc., a multi-million dollar hair care manufac-
Sturing company based in Harvey, IL. AHBAI is a national
trade association representing the leading manufacturers of
Ethnic hair care and beauty-related products.

Three Outstanding Women Receive McDonald's
Prestigious 365Black Awards
For Lifetime Achievements
OAK BROOK, Ill -- Three outstanding African-
American women will receive McDonald's prestigious
2005 365Black(TM) Award for their lifetime achievements
in business and public service. Dignitaries from across the
country gathered on September 20 to acknowledge the life-
time achievements of McDonald's owner/operator, Frances
R. Jones; Ingrid Saunders Jones, senior vice president, The
Coca-Cola Company and chairperson of The Coca-Cola
Foundation; and congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-CA) at
McDonald's 3rd Annual 365Black Awards: An Evening of
Legends & Legacies.
The celebration was hosted by National Public Radio
personality Ed Gordon of News and Notes, at the National
Museum of Women in the Arts Museum in Washington, DC.
The Lifetime Achievement Awards are a key component of
McDonald's 365Black initiative, created to celebrate the
pride, heritage and achievements of African- Americans.

Panel Suggests Ways to Improve Elections
S t, WASHINGTON A private commission trying to
improve national elections has recommended changes such
as free photo IDs, improved voter registration lists and rotat-
ing regional primaries, while warning that "Americans are
losing confidence in elections."
Former President Carter's co-chair on the private com-
mission, former Secretary of State James Baker, acknowl-
edged that "there is room for improvement" in a system he
believes remains strong. Among the recommendations of
the Commission on Federal Election Reform, organized by
American University:
S*Top elections officials in states should be nonpartisan
and selected by a large majority of the legislature as a way to
cut down on partisanship.
*States should develop registration systems that allow
easy checks of voters from one state to another and the purg-
ing of outdated voter records.
*Congress should pass a law requiring voter-verifiable
paper audit trails on all electronic voting machines.
Carter and Baker presented the plan to President Bush on
Monday and talked about their plan at the Capitol.

National Urban League Calls m
For a "Katrina Victims Bill of Rights"
New York, N.Y. Marc H. Morial, President and CEO of
the National Urban League called on Congress to immedi-
ately pass and fully fund comprehensive disaster assistance
egigslation that protects the rights of the victims of Hurricane
;Katrina., Morial called on Congress to take the following
:eps immediatel)
Create a \ictins Compensation Fund Congress must
irnjdu lel, pass legislation creating a Victims
Comlpe,"-nan Fund for the hundreds of thousands of citi-
zens ini.rcd. killed and displaced as a result of Hurricane
Katrina. Withi days after the terrorist attacks of
September 11, 2001, Congress passed and the president
signed legislation authorizing a 9/11 victims compensation
fund, which eventually provided more than $7 billion in
compensation for the victims of 9/11," Morial said. "As it did
then, Congress must take immediate and decisive action to
begin compensating American citizens whose lives bave
been disrupted by this major national tragedy."
Provide Disaster Unemployment Assistance -
Congress must provide for federal disaster unemployment
assistance to every worker left jobless by this tragedy and
provide a meaningful benefit that meets the needs of unem-
ployed workers and their families. "Half a million hard-
working Americans, through no fault of their own, have been
thrown out of work and, in many cases, have seen their jobs
:disappear altogether," Morial noted. "We owe it to these


workers to help them get back on their feet."
Protect Voting Rights America must ensure that the
,hundreds of thousands of citizens displaced by Hurricane
*Katrina continue to have full voting rights in their home
states.


SEPTEMBER 24, 2005


Congressional Black Caucus



Opposes Roberts Nomination


WASHINGTON, D.C. U.S.
Representative Melvin L. Watt,
Chairman of the Congressional Black
Caucus (CBC), and Congresswoman
Eleanor Holmes Norton, Chair of the
CBC's Judicial Task Force,spoke out
on behalf of the CBC opposing the
:i ; confirmation of Judge John Roberts,
Jr. to be Chief Justice of the United
Melvin L. Watt States Supreme Court:
After doing
their own study of the complete record.
of Judge John Roberts, Jr. and of his
testimony before the Senate Judiciary .
Committee,Watt and Holmes-Norton 1
said the CBC strongly opposes the
confirmation of Judge Roberts as "
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court .
and encourages the Senate to defeat
his nomination for the following rea-
sons: Eleanor
sons: .Holmes-Norton
*CBC's review of his papers
before the Senate hearing showed that the most controversial
.part of Judge Roberts' record was his civil rights record and
views.
The CBC requested that Judge Roberts meet with rep-
resentatives of the CBC to explore the CBC's concerns about
his civil rights record and views. Unfortunately, Judge
Roberts and the White House rejected this request.
Important documents that would have given a fuller
picture of Judge Roberts' civil rights record and views dur-
ing his federal government tenure were withheld from the
Judiciary Committee and the public by the White House.
Withholding documents about civil rights, an immensely
important issue to the nation deeply implicating the Court,
leaves the strong impression that the records would reveal
positions concerning civil rights that the Senate and many
Americans would find unacceptable today.


*Because of CBC's serious concern about those parts of
Judge Roberts' record and about the substantial gap left by
the refusal to release other pertinent documents, the CBC
submitted a list of questions concerning his civil rights
record and views to the 18 members of the Senate Judiciary
Committee, and requested that Judge Roberts be asked to
respond to these or similar questions. The CBC especially
needs clarification concerning John Roberts' repeated
attempts to narrow and limit the effectiveness of the 1965
Voting Rights Act when the Act was last renewed, and an
explanation concerning whether he still opposes affirmative
action.
*CBC is pleased that most of the questions they submit-
ted were asked by various members of the Senate Judiciary
Committee. However, they were very disappointed that
Judge Roberts' chose to avoid responding to the questions
concerning civil rights. Instead, of explaining his views on
civil rights or indicating any changes, Judge Roberts chose
to avoid answering these questions. His evasive responses
mainly focused on his youth as a lawyer at the time and his
claim to have been only a staff lawyer, when in fact through-
out his service, Judge Roberts often advised and recom-
mended Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush
on administration policy and strategic approaches to civil
rights matters, not legal issues or language. His responses
only heightened CBC's concerns.
"Judge Roberts' civil rights record and views remained
the most controversial and unexplained part of his record
when the Judiciary Committee hearing concluded, just as his
civil rights record and views had been the most controversial
part of his record when the hearing began," said Watt and
Holme-Norton in a statement.
"Judge Roberts failed to answer any of our major con-
cerns. Service as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court is far
too critical to people of color to leave these critical concerns
unanswered. Therefore, the CBC strongly opposes the con-
firmation of Judge Roberts and urges all Senators to oppose
his nomination."


Conference To Address Crisis In Black America


WASHINGTON, D.C.--
In the aftermath of,
Hurricane Katrina and just
days before Louis
Farrakhan's Millions More
Movement event (October
14-16), BOND, the
Brotherhood Organization
of A New Destiny and The
Heritage Foundation will
host "The .New Black
Vanguard Conference II:
Reclaiming Our Destiny" on
Tuesday, October 11, 1:00 to.
4:00 p.m. EST at The
Heritage Foundation's
Allison Auditorium (214
Massachusetts Avenue, NE,
Washington, DC).
Building on last
February's successful con-
ference (The New Black
Vanguard Conference:
Responding to The Call),
Black conservatives from
across America are expected
gather on one stage to
address critical issues con-
fronting Black Americans
and the country at large.
Participants include: Dr.
Shelby Steele, Senior
Fellow, The Hoover
Institution; Peter Kirsanow,
Member U.S. Civil Rights
Commission; Linda Porter,
Hurricane Katrina Survivor
and Founder of Jochebed
Education Project; Joseph
Phillips, Actor and
Columnist; and Moderator,
Rev.. Jesse Lee. Peterson,
Founder and President of-
BOND.
The following topics will
be addressed at the confer-
ence:
*Is too much govern-
ment dependency destroying
Black families?
*Aftermath of Hurricane
Katrina: did racism play a
role?
*Is Louis Farrakhan's
Millions More Movement a
scam to fleece Black
Americans?
*Why aren't Black
churches addressing the


moral crisis in urban How can Black cess?


America?


Americans achieve true suc-


--------

~01


~LIUY







,)NEF21 AjVIIJ, -14 -I U.31.J1


Post-Katrina Lessons


By Congresswoman Corrine
Brown
The recent tragedy of
Hurricane Katrina clearly
shows that there are two
Americas: one black, one
white, one rich, one poor,
and the poorest Americans
still remain the most vulner-
able.
The federal government
needs to ensure that all
Americans, regardless of
where they live, can find
work to survive and live out
their lives. This hurricane
has put a spotlight on the
tragic situation and the hor-
rific reverse Robin Hood
policies of the Bush-Cheney
administration, robbing from
the poor to give tax breaks to
the rich.
I have two serious ques-
tions for the Bush adminis-
tration: one, in light of the
hurricane, why are we doing
away with Davis Bacon, and
two, why are we doing away
with affirmative action con-
tracting programs in the Gulf
Coast States?
Almost as disturbing as
this administration's lacklus-
ter response to the hurricane,
is their suspension of all
labor rules for hurricane
related contracts. Just like in
the past, the Bush
Administration is taking
every opportunity to destroy
organized labor, but in this
instance, they have taken it
to a new level by suspending
affirmative action programs
in contracting. This new
mandate by the
Administration will do
absolutely nothing to ensure
quicker or better service for
those suffering from the hur-
ricane, but will certainly
ensure that none of them are
involved with rebuilding
their own homes and com-
munities. That said, the very
same people whose tax dol-
lars will be paying for the
reconstruction will be shut
out of participating in the
cleanup. Just like in Iraq,
where there never was any
oversight in the post Iraq
rebuilding effort, we simply
cannot afford to see a repeat
of that situation in the Gulf
States.
If Hurricane Katrina's
high winds, rain and fero-
cious power were not
enough, the federal govern-


Hurricane continued from A-1
for an evacuation order and
quickly loaded the high-
ways headed north, east and
west.
Some learned early that
gas was running low as they
waited in long gas lines.
But what was also heavy on
their minds was the rising
cost of gas since Rita was
gaining steam and headed
straight toward the Oil
Drilling Platforms in the
Gulf of Mexico as oil com-
panies evacuated personnel
from their rigs.
The Nuclear Regulatory
Commission started shut-
ting down two nuclear reac-
tors on the Texas Gulf
Coast also, as they felt they
were in the path of
Hurricane Rita.
It is believed that Rita
may become one of the
most powerful storms to
ever strike the U.S. main-
land.
On Tuesday, the director
of the federal National
Hurricane Center, Max
Mayfield, told a congres-
sional panel that he believes
the Atlantic Ocean is in a
',t cycle of increied hurricane
activity and that several


ment's inadequate response
to this tragedy just adds
gasoline to the fire.
Locally in my congres-
sional district, I am proud to
say that the North Florida
community has come togeth-
er and has been contributing
greatly to the relief efforts. I
want to congratulate Duval
County, Palm Coast, Flagler
and Daytona for coming
together in these trying times
and working to deliver
truckloads of supplies and
funds to the people of the
Gulf Coast.
Yet on another level, I am
saddened to report that what
we have been witnessing in
the Gulf Coast States right
now is the complete melt-
down of the federal govern-
ment, and in particular, the
Department of Homeland
Security.
I traveled down to
Louisiana and Texas with
the President of the Red
Cross, and several Members
of the Congressional Black
Caucus, and what most
struck me was that private
organizations, like The Red
Cross are bring help, but
FEMA is still Missing In
Action.
Given that the federal
government can't even dole
out adequate assistance to
this one area' of the country
during this tragedy, how can
our citizens feel safe at a
time when we are faced with
the threat of a terrorist attack
on a national level?
What I find truly amaz-
ing is that disaster planners
had said for years that a
direct hurricane strike on
New Orleans is one of the
top three worst scenarios
facing our nation. So how is
it that the agencies have
been so slow to respond to
this crisis, claiming to have
been caught off guard? The
President himself said that
the levee breach was not
anticipated...now how can
that possibly be true? In
addition, while the
Superdome has long been
considered as the city's main
hurricane refuge spots, no
supplies. were stocked there
before the storm hit on
Monday. It is simply unbe-
lievable that federal officials
had not deployed equipment
and relief supplies before


more named tropical storms
will hit us this year. He said
that Katrina would not be
the last major hurricane to
hit a vulnerable area. His
predictions of cities or areas
that will be affected by one
or more major hurricane
include Houston and
Galveston, Texas; Tampa,
southern Florida and the
Florida Keys; New York
City and Long Island; and
New England. President
Bush said on Wednesday
that the country must "be
ready for the worst."


Katrina struck land, or even
bothered to mobilize in the
region beforehand. This lack
of response is outright
shameful, an outrage, and an
embarrassment!
This is just one more
example of the complete
failure of the federal govern-
ment under the Republican
led administration. Since
9/11, the Republican led
Congress has given natural
disaster preparedness sec-
ondary status in the federal
budget, undermining agen-
cies like FEMA and the
Coast Guard.
In the post 9/11 reorgani-
zation, FEMA joined 21
other agencies to form the
new Homeland Security
Department, and was
stripped of the Cabinet rank
that had allowed it to report
directly to the president.
Later, back in July, FEMA
lost its mission of working
with state and local govern-
ments on preparedness plans
even before a disaster hits.
FEMA used to be a very
powerful organization, with
veteran staffers, that is, up
until the Bush administration
threw everything together
into one huge department,
ironically labeling it
"Homeland Security." What
the new department should
have been called is the
"Department of Insecurity!"
In closing, it is clear that
we really need. to evaluate
our country's ability to han-
dle national disasters. It is
simply unacceptable for the
federal government to wait
until there are bodies float-
ing down rivers to begin
activating the National
Guard! Again, I would have
hoped that the Bush admin-
istration and FEMA would
have had a contingency plan
in the case of a major hurri-
cane hitting the Gulf Coast.
Yet as has been made clear
by recent events, they don't.


Teen continued from A-1
the house. It has not been
disclosed what was stolen
from the burglarized house
but, Terry Leon Lawson,
31, Charles D. Grimsley,
21, Michael Lee Groover,
53, Phillip A. Lawson, 27,
and Charles Stanley
McCoy, 43, were arrested
and charged with felony
kidnapping and misde-
meanor battery.


The Ash Site Award


From its inception in the
early 1900's until this day in
2005, everything dealing with
the ash sites has reeked of dis-
crimination. It is not a coinci-
dence that the majority of the
people are Black.
Plaintiffs were denied the
right to vote on the proposed
point system.
The point system is dis-
criminatory. The Plaintiffs
were denied the fundamental
due process right to vote upon
the point system that was
implemented to determine the
amount of money each
Plaintiff will receive.
Personal injury should
supercede property. The mer-
its of this suit and its very
foundation is personal injury.
Personal injury is the most
serious of all of the issues.
Absent personal injury there
is no basis to sue. The fami-
lies of citizens who are
deceased are not considered.
There are some families that
still suffer personal injury
(mental) due to the lost of a
loved one.
Attorneys for the Plaintiffs
should have never agreed on a
Settlement that combined per-
sonal injury and property
damages together.
To award ten (10) points
each for property owners and
only ten (10 points) for those
who have suffered personal
injury is in itself discriminato-
ry. The majority of the
Plaintiffs are not property
owners. This suit would not
have gone forward without
personal injury. The basis of


Briefs continued from A-1
NAACP First To
Endorse Floridians For
Youth Tobacco
Education, Inc.
. The Florida State
Conference NAACP is
the first organization to
endorse Floridians for
Youth Tobacco
Education, Inc., adding a
powerful voice to the citi-
zen initiative designed to
protect children from the
deadly health hazards of
tobacco use.
Floridians for Youth
Tobacco Education, Inc.
is a coalition of several of
the state's largest volun-
tary public health organi-
zations. The group is ask-
ing Florida voters to sign
a petition in support of a


this suit is personal injury and
personal injury cannot be
determined for everyone. This
has neglected to face the fact
that there will be personal
injury suffered by some
Plaintiffs in the future.
Plaintiffs with physical
injury and are not property
owners have suffered more
than anyone and will get less
under the point system.
There is no consideration
for the people who did not
attend the schools, but played
as youth on the very grounds
where schools were built (the
playgrounds that exist now
did not exist then). There are
people who as youth ate rab-
bits and crawfish caught on
these sites and chewed the
sour grass as children because
they were just being a child at
that time and making do with
what was provided.
The Covenant Not To Sue
is discriminatory. How many
are dead? Will die? How
many will suffer from
unknown medical and psy-
chological factors?
There is no system that
can show the amount of per-
sonal injury suffered by
everyone exposed to these
atrocities. Many females can-
not bear children and there are
some children born with
deformities; there is a high
rate of cancer (and other life
threatening diseases) within
the parameters of the sites due
to exposure. In good faith,
relocation should be a sepa-
rate issue.
The City, which was the


constitutional amend-
ment that would require
the Florida Legislature to
annually fund a compre-
hensive, statewide tobac-
co education and preven-
tion program focused on
youth.

About 67 Percent Of
Prostate Cancer
Patients Have Erectile
Dysfunction
About two-thirds of
prostate cancer patients
and survivors suffer erec-
tile dysfunction accord-
ing to a study conducted
by the National Prostate
Cancer Coalition
(NPCC), the group that
brought America -
Prostate Cancer
Awareness Month.


Defendant's, and the initial
culprits of this matter have^
agreed with the Plaintiffs
attorneys to jointly sue the,
insurance companies. The1
City has admitted its wrong:
by agreeing to pay $75 mil-
lions to correct this injustice.
If the City is allowed to be
represented:' by o ur ,attorneys
and we are succeSsful, the
City will recover more than
the Plaintiffs when all is done.
The Plaintiffs are not respon-
sible to provide representation,
for the City.
The Plaintiffs should:
object to the Attorneys repre-i
senting the City. The Plaintiffs;
will essentially be paying the
legal fees for the City's repre-:
sentation against the insur-,
ance companies.
The Plaintiffs' attorneys
have written themselves in fo i
44% of $75,000,000 for attor-
ney fees. 44% of $75,000,000
is approximately
$33,000,000; leaving
$42,000,000 for Plaintiffs to
settle their claims..
$42,000,000 divided by 4,500
Plaintiffs equals approximate-
ly $93,000 per person. At the
proposed $17,000 there will
be excess!
This Settlement is not fair
and the so-called group lead-
ers of each site need to call
some meetings without the
attorneys present to discuss a
course of action to correct this
matter.
Carl E. Williams & Leonard
L. Hampton, Jacksonville


The news comes in the
wake of a hotly debated


issue


of whether


Medicare and Medicaid
should reimburse patients
for impotence drugs.
"Erectile dysfunction
drugs are not lifestyle
drugs to prostate cancer
patients," said NPCC
CEO Richard N. Atkins,
M.D. "Men already have
a great reluctance when it
comes to paying attention
to their health signifi-
cantly downsizing access
to the opportunity to fight
side-effects of life-saving
treatments gives them
another excuse."


A ART.

ASK FOR

MORE.



For more information about the
importance of arts education, please contact
www.AmericansForTheArts.org.




A"l AMERjCANS
lor/


III III III III


. I


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-7


PosT-Karina Len sIK


VMS CILURY ----TH CRAM
10 OF US
WILL DROP OUT
IN 7 YEARS






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FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-8


SEPTEMBER 24, 2005


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Jacksonville's Maria Davis Is Kmart,

ELLEgirl 'Model For A Day' Winner


mIs


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WW""


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Maria Davis, 17, was chosen as the Kmart/ELLEgirl Model for a Day contest win-
ner. She will be flown to New York for a professional photo shoot.


JACKSONVILLE,
Fla.--After sorting
through thousands of
entries from aspiring
model nationwide,
ELLEgirl selected
Maria Davis of
Jacksonville to be fea-
tured in an issue of
ELLEgirl magazine as
the winner of the
"Kmart Model for a
Day Contest" made
available to girls by
KOTEX.
Maria stood out
among the thousands
of contestants due to
her beauty, individuali-
ty, style, and overall
unique look
"Maria was the
obvious choice for us
as the Kmart Model
for a Day winner," said
Paul Guyardo, Kmart
Senior Vice President,
Chief Marketing
Officer.
"She fits perfectly
into the style we are
trying to achieve with
our Kmart exclusive
brands like Thalia Sodi
and Route 66 with her
distinct look and atti-
tude."


Ellegirl and Kmart
sent out a call to aspir-
ing models this July in
Ellegirl magazine, on
Ellegirl's Web site and
in the Kmart circular
and online and were
overwhelmed when
they received approxi-
mately 7,900 entries
during the contest's
one month run.

Model continued on B-2


W









Page B-2lSeptember 24, 2005 The Florida StarlPrep Rap


COLLEGE

&

CAREER

By CORNER
By Rose Rennekamp


'Hard Work In
School Really
Does Pay Off
How often do you
think about how hard your
parents work to pay for the
roof over your head and
food on the table? I know
that I gained a lot of
respect for my parents' and
grandparents'- hard work
once I spent some time in
the "real world."
It's a fact of life: to
make money, you have to
work hard.
Some teens who are
raised Xatching MTV and
their favorite NBA stars'
might get the impression
that easy riches lie ahead.
The truth is that those stars
you see .on TV represent a
small number of those
who tried to make it. Most
musicians and athletes
aren't professionally suc-
cessful, and end up pursu-
ing other careers.
To become successful
and earn a big paycheck,
you need to study hard in
school and graduate with
skills that prepare you for
college and work. You
"need high skills to suc-
ceed, whether you wind up
a celebrity or in the busi-
ness world.
A recent study by ACT
researchers confirms that
higher-paying jobs require
workers who have a higher
level of skills.
Researchers compared
starting pay for .various
jobs \iVth skills required to
.perform them, as demon-
strated through WorkKeys
skills tests. Thjy discov-
ered that starting pay for
entry-level jobs could dif-
fer bN as much as $14.000
a year for workers from


the lowest to the highest
skill levels.
That's more than
$1,000 a month. That can
make a big difference
when you're-trying to meet
your monthly bills.
Do you know how
much money you can
expect to make at your
dream job? Are you
preparing for the kind of
work you'll face? Find out
, what kind of skills you'll
need to: make it by talking
to someone in the field
you're interested in.
Ask what it took to get
the job, and what kinds of
skills you would need
every day. You can also
check out the skill levels,
for specific jobs by going
to the WorkKeys website
(http://www.act.org/workk
eys/profiles/occuprof/ww
mprof/).
You may think. you
know everything you need
to know about saving
money. Many teens have
an after-school job, or save
up their allowance to pay
for a class ring or new
clothes, but many don't
truly understand how
much money it takes to
live the way they want.
Cell phones and iPods cost
money.
Have you ever had to
pay the electricity bill,
phone bill and rent? You
may be surprised to see,
how much money .you'll
need.
To get a preview, check
out the cost of life calcula-
tor, available at the non-
profit Employment Policy
Foundation's website
(http ://teen. education-
pays.org). There, you can
enter the kind of home you


want, the kind of car you
expect to drive, even
whether or not you plan to
have cable. The website
will then give you an esti-
mate of how much money
you'd need to earn in order
to enjoy all of the luxuries
you choose.
Making it in. life
requires a lot more hard


work than it appears on
TV. If you work hard now
in high school and in col-
lege, it will really pay
when it comes to your job
in the future.


Rose Rennekamp is
the vice president of com-
munications for ACT She


Model

Continued From Cover

As part of her prize package, Maria will be flown to New York for a professional
photo shoot, including a fashion and beauty tutorial from some of fashion's leading
stylists.
Her photos will be featured in the December/January issue of ELLEgirl magazine.
The photo shoot will also be displayed online at www.ellegirl.com/modelforaday. Ten
runners up. were chosen in the contest and each receive a $100 Kmart gift card.


Ad Agency 'Adopts' 40


Children For A Day



S i.- -.,'*





Forty children from the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Florida program were
matched with the staff of St. John & Partners Advertising & Public Relations for a day
of fun and friendship at Dave & Buster's on Saturday, September 24, from 11:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m. The children spent a carefree afternoon with a new adult friend. All of
these children are on a waiting list for a Big Brother or Sister.
More than 150 children in Jacksonville between the ages of six and 16 are current-
ly on a waiting list for a Big Brother or Big Sister.
Events like this day with St. John & Partners ensure these unmatched children have
opportunities to be involved in the program while also exposing adults to the joy of
being a Big Brother or Big Sister. Children in the program are predominantly from sin-
gle-parent households.
This is the second year the staff of St. John & Partners has hosted unmatched chil-
dren from Big Brothers Big Sisters for a day of fun.
Last year's event included an IMAX movie, mini-golf and ice cream at World Golf
Village. St. John & Partners has also provided pro bono advertising and creative serv-
ices to the organization.
Each year, the agency selects a local nonprofit for a yearlong commitment of sup-
port through creative and communication services and staff involvement. Big Brothers
Big Sisters is committed to making a positive difference in the lives of children and
youth, priniarily through a professionally supported one-to-one relationship with a car-
ing adult, and to assist them in achieving their highest potential as they grow to become
confident, competent and caring individuals, by providing committed volunteers,
national leadership and standards of excellence.
FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN APPEAR IN PREP RAP
CALL 9041766-8834


The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Page B-2/September 24, 2005


is a mom and has a mas-
ter's of education in guid-
ance and counseling. For
more college and career-
planning information,
visit www.act.org. Have a
question you want
answered in a future col-
umn? Send a letter to this
newspaper or e-mail Rose
atAskRose@act.org.












Children From Spanish Oaks Community


To Perform With East Coast Ballet


Twenty-nine youths
from Spanish Oaks, a
Families FIRST affordable
housing community, will
make their dance debut
with Jacksonville's East
Coast Ballet on Saturday,
Sept. 24, at 2 pm, at the
Church of the Messiah,-
8057 Arlington
Expressway.
They will perform
"Hermie," the story of a
common caterpillar, based
on Max Lucado's book
series, "Hermie."
The children are part of
the after-school and sum-
mer camp programs pro-
vided by Families FIRST
for Spanish Oaks resident
children.
The budding ballet
dancers -both boys and
girls-practiced most of the
summer under the guid-
, ance of students of the
East Coast Ballet. Student
volunteers from Douglas
Anderson School of the
Performing Arts will assist,
backstage at the dress
rehearsal and perform-
ance.
"The children have
been so excited about their
dance lessons and now
they can hardly wait for
the curtain to go up," said
Families FIRST Executive


Director Mary-Parker
Lamm. "This wonderful
program has helped intro-
duce the kids to the joy
of the performing arts,
as well as the hard work
and dedication that is
required.
All of us at Families
FIRST are grateful to


Arlington/Beaches CPAC
(Citizens Planning
Advisory Committee) for
donating the funds to
make this program possi-
ble and to East Coast
Ballet Dance Studios for
donating their time, equip-
ment and their tremendous
talent."


Families FIRST is a
non-profit organization in
Duval County that pro-
vides quality affordable
housing, offering opportu-
nity for families in need,
promoting self-esteem and
life skills in children and
families.
They have five afford-


able living communities
that provide a multitude of
services for 1,013 low-
income families, including
765 children.
For more information
about Families FIRST, its
services, and what you can
do to help, please call
353.0891.


Financial Responsibility Guide For Students


(NAPSI)-For many
college freshmen, there
may be more of the third
"R," "'rithmetic," that they
need to know than they
realize. Financial responsi-
bility is an oft-overlooked
priority for college fresh-
men.
As they prepare to
begin their adult lives,
however, learning to han-
dle their finances is just as
important as what they-
learn in the classroom.
With the financial pres-
sures of school and social
life, many students experi-
ence the challenge of deal-


ing with a past-due bill or
unpaid debt at one, time or
another.
When debts like credit
card and cell phone bills
pile up, they can seem
overwhelming but there
are a few important steps
all students can take to
deal with debt responsi-
bly.
"When called about an
unpaid bill, the most
important thing for a
- young person to do is
communicate, not panic,"
said Gary Rippentrop,
CEO of ACA
International, the
Association of Credit and
Collection Professionals.
"If you are having finan-
cial challenges, talk with
the collector and work but
a payment plan that you
can manage."
Working with a collec-
tion agency is an. impor-
tant step in resolving debts
and avoiding financial
challenges in-the future. If
you are contacted by a col-
lector:
Don't avoid the col-
lector: If you have ques-
tions about your bill or
believe you do not owe the
debt, let the collector
know immediately in writ-
ing.
If the first communica-
tion is by phone, the col-
lector will need to send
you a written notification


within five working days
of the amount of the debt
and the name of the credi-
tor who referred the debt
to collection.
Once an initial contact
by a third-party collector
on a debt has been made,
you have 30 days to dis-
pute the debt; otherwise, it
will be deemed valid.
If you dispute the debt,
the collector will then pro-
vide you with a response
to the issues you raise.
If you do owe the bill,
let the collector know
when payment can be
expected. If you are unable
to pay it in full, explain
why and ask the collector'
to work with you on a plan
that works for both of
you.
Ask the collector
about options and pro-
grams: Although collect-
ing past-due accounts is
the collector's business,
collection professionals
are also experienced and
able to work with you in
finding solutions to debt
issues.
If you are having
financial difficulties, ask
about an extended pay-
ment plan or other pay-
ment options.
Act early: Take
action as early as possible
to get your financial situa-
tion under control. If your
debts are mounting, the


most important thing is to
look at your finances. If
your monthly payments
for all your debts, exclud-
ing rent, are greater than
20 percent of your month-
ly income or budget, you
should avoid taking on
more debt and work to pay
.down your existing bal-
ances.
After a few months,
small steps in decreasing
your expenses can make a
big difference.
Pay on time: Bypay-
ing on time, you can avoid
incurring late fees and
other penalties that credit
grantors add to your debt.
Establishing a payment
plan that works for you
will help you avoid these
fees.
If youagree to pay a
certain amount, don't miss
payments or pay late. If
you fail to follow a pay-
ment plan, a creditor may
'be less willing to extend
flexible payment options
in the future.
For incoming college
freshmen, financial
responsibility is an impor-
tant lesson to learn.


FIND

OUT

HOW YOU

CAN APPEAR IN

PREP RAP

CALL

904/766-8834


Page B-3/September 24, 2005


The Florida. Star/Prep Rap











PAWV HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL


jAk-YE-RE IGHLIGHT REEL
*Tune in to IMPACT on Saturdays from 6:30 -7:30 p.m. and hear High School Football Highlights on IMPACT Sports with Ron Williams.
You can also submit your play of the week selections to The Florida Star by email at Info@TheFloridaStar.com. Information is needed by
Monday of each week.
Forrest quarterback Joseph Ballard completing 6 of 13 passes for 109 yards in an 18-14 win over Wolfson
on September 16.

Wolfson's David Jimerson rushing for 143 yards on 20 carries in an 18-14 loss to Forrest.

Fletcher sophomore Amp. Brewton scoring four touchdowns and rushing for 107 yards in a 48-10 district-
opening win over Orange Park on Friday, September 16.

Fletcher linebacker Myles Lococo returning an interception 35 yards for a touchdown for Fletcher's first score.
;6S Lococo made another interception in the second half.

Fletcher quarterback Marty McCann completed four of five passes for 108 yards including a 60-yard touch-
down pass to Elliott Finkley.

Lee's sophomore running back Bryant Daniels carrying the ball 28 times for 145 yards and a 1-yard touch-
down in a 7-6 win over Englewood on September 16.

Raines running back Ray Dukes carrying the ball for 173 yards onl4 carries. He scored two touchdowns 47 and 46 yards in a 26-
2 win over Baker County on September 16.

Andrew Jackson wide receiver Jamal Harvey catching three passes including a 46-yard touchdown all in 10 seconds prior to halftime
inn a 9-7 loss to Bishop Kenny.


PHJACTtP RE` RAPIDS
HIGTH0 -HOL FOOTBALL.
!CR F TH C^X2


1. Raines

2, Bolles


Fletcher

Sandalwood


5. Bishop Kenny

6-, Ed White


4-.0

4-0

4-0



3-0

2-1


7. Episcopal


8. Orange Park

9 Potter's House

10. Englewood


2.....I

24


Potter's House Christian's Thomas Gordon scoring two touchdowns (runs of
19 and 41-yards) and 84 yards in a 36-0 win over Arlington Country Day on
September 16.

Alphonso Waddell of Potter's House Christian getting 7 1/2 tackles in 36-0
over Arlington Country Day.

Alon Haywood scoring a 78-yard touchdown in a 36-0 win over Arlington
Country Day.

Bartram Trail's running back Joel Raggins carrying the ball 12 times for 117
yards, scoring three touchdowns on runs of 1, 14, 5, and returning an intercep-
tion 84 yards for another touchdown in a 48-7 win over Terry Parker on
September 16.

Trinity Christian running back Montel Harris scoring two touchdowns while
carrying the ball 17 times for 106 yards in a 40-15 win over Tallahassee FSU on
September 16.

Trinity Christian's Jamie Harper rushing for 102 yards and a touchdown in a 40-
15 win over Tallahassee FSU.

Sandalwood's Josh Rosa rushing passing for 200 yards completing 12 -of-18
passes including three touchdowns (passes of 45, 14, and yards), and scoring a
touchdown on a 1- yard run in a 48-21 win over Deltona on September 16.


3.

4.,


The Florida Star/Prep Rap


Page- B-4/September 24, 2005


: I .,....._ ::::::








Lyricist Talent Search Winner To Be Announced

During Airing Of VH1 Hip Hop Honors
NEW YORK, NY --- Tune in next week as the second annual "VH 1 Hip
Hop Honors" is broadcast on -
September 26 at 9:00 p.m. This
year's honorees include Big .
Daddy Kane, LL Cool J,
Grandmaster Flash and The
Furious Five, Notorious B.I.G.,
Ice T, Salt -N- Pepa, and the film:
Boyz N The Hood. As a special
bonus feature, the winner of
VHl.com's lyricist talent search
H ccontest, Freestyle 59, will be
announced live during the show.
The winner will be awarded a
$10,000 prize as well as the
opportunity to record a video of
LL Cool J Ice T his or her winning performance. Big Daddy Kane

Big Daddy Kane, who is scheduled to perform
on the show alongside Common, T.I., The Roots
and Biz Markie, recently said that he looks b"k
upon the early days of hip hop with fond memo-
.- ries.
r "We would battle each other onstage and
".,then take the train home together. Battles date
back to the origins of hip hop. They can be com-
petitive. They just don't have to be a contact
S sport." He also put in his bid for next year's hon-
orees, suggesting that the Cold Crush Brothers
Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five and Roxanne Shante be next.
Another person already planning for next
1,- 1 year's 2006 Hip Hop Honors will be the winner of the VH1 / Starbucks
Notorious B.I.G. Hip Hop Honors Sweepstakes. Chosen from entry forms submitted at
nearly 100 Magic Johnson Starbucks locations around the country, the
winner will be flown to next year's event, stay at a luxury hotel, ride to the awards in an SUV limousine, walk
the red carpet and will get to hang out backstage with the honorees and other hip hop stars.
The contest runs until September 26th (the airdate of this year's award show), with the winner selected a few
days afterward. FREESTYLE 59 challenged MC's across the nation to show off their best rhymes in 59 seconds
or less. Beginning on July 12th and running through August 8th, contestants were able to post their videos on
VH1 .com, where viewers watched and voted for who they think should be crowned the 2005 Freestyle 59 King.
A panel of celebrity and music industry judges was assembled to select five finalists to be flown to NYC for. a
taping of their performances. Judges on the panel include hip hop icon Chuck D, Executive Vice President of
Artists and Repertoire (A&R) for Capitol Records Wendy Goldstein, Editor-In-Chief of XXL Magazine Elliot Salt-N-Pepa
Wilson, and DJs from top radio stations across the country including Cipha Sounds (Hot 97 in New York City), DJ Felli Fel (Power 106 in Los
Angeles), Poetess (KKBT in Los Angeles), DJ Vaughn Woods (WGCI in Chicago).



--"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Page B-5/September 24, 20GS:~


The Florida Star/Prep Rap









~'age B-6/September 24, 2005 The Florida Stan Prep Rap


Clean Kids Jokes

Silly!. Silly! Tongue
Twister

Q. What did the hamburger name his daughter? If one doctor doctors
another doctor, does the
A. Patty! doctor who doctors the
doctor doctor the doctor
the way the
doctor he is doctoring
Q. What kind of egg did the bad chicken lay? doctors? Or does he doc-
tor the doctor the way the
A. A deviled egg! doctor who doctors doc-
tors?

Q. What kind of key opens the door on While we were walking,
we were watching window
Thanksgiving? washers
washers .
wash Washington's win-
A. A turkey! dows with warm washing
water.

Q. What kind of cake do you get at a cafeteria? The sawingest saw I ever
saw saw was the sa% I saw
A. A stomach-cake! saw in Arkansas.


Q. Why did the cookie go to the hospital?

A. He felt cruniiny!

Q. What bow can't be tied?

A. A rainbow!


Q. What happens if you eat Neast and shoe polish?

A. Ex ery morning \ou'lt rise and shine!


Q. What does a teddy bear put in his house?.

-A. Fur-nirure!


Q.What season is it when you are on a trampo-
line?

A.Spring time. -

Q. What happens to cows during an earthquake? What'S Mi

A. They give milk shakes! Inform.


Q. Why did the jelly wobble? ToP


A. Because it saw the milk shake!


Call The Flo


DOCTOR! DOCTOR!

Doctor Doctor I keep thinking I'm a caterpillar
Don't worry you 'll soon change!

Doctor, Doctor you've taken out my tonsils, my
adenoids, my gall bladder, my varicose veins and
my appendix, but I still don't feel well.
That's quite enough out of you!

Doctor, Doctor I keep thinking I'm a spider
What a web of lies!

Doctor, Doctor I'm a burglar!
Have you taken anything for it?

Doctor, Doctor my baby is the image of his father
Never mind just so long as he's healthy!

Doctor, Doctor My little boy has just swallowed a
roll of film!
H1m111n,111. Let's hope Wnothing develops.

Doctor, Doctor I feel like a pair of curtains
Well pull yourself together then!


missing From The Above Spot?
3tion About Your Business,
Services, Or Goods!
lace Your Advertisement
In This Spot
rida Star Today At (904) 766-8834


,age, B-6/September -24, 2005


The Florida *Star/ Prep Rap








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!E iSEPTEMBER24, 2005 "" "TH' RIASTAR ......
Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein

TOP SINGLES
1. "Shake It Off'" Mariah Carey (Island) Last Xeek: No. 22
"We Belong Together" Mariah Care) (Island) No. I
*'Don't Cha" The Puss cat Dolls Featuring Buista
RhyNmes (A&M) No. 3
4. "Like You" Bow Wow Featuring Ciara (Columbia) No. 4
5. "Lbse'Control" Missy Elliott Featuring Ciara & Fat
Man Scoop (The Gold Mind) No. 8
6. "Wake Me Up When September Ends" Green Day
SReprise) New Entry
7. "Pon de Replay" Rhianna (SRP Def Jam) No. 6
8. "Just the Girl" The Click Five (Lava) No. 9
9. "Behind These Hazel Eyes" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 10
.141. "You and Me" Lifehouse (Geffen) No. 7
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Nsi-ssippi Girl" Faith I-fill (Warner Bros.) Last
Week: No 3
2. "Play Something Country" Brooks & Dunn (Arista
Nashl ille) No. 2
3 "A Real Fine Place to Start" Sara Evans (RCA) No. 7
4. "Alcohol" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) No. 1
i. "Do You Want -Fries with That" Tim McGraw (Curb)
No. 4 /
6. "All Jacked Up" Gretchen Wilson (Epic) No. 6
7. "Redneck.Yacht Club" Craig Morgan (Broken Bow)
Ne" Entry
'As Good as I Once Was" Toby Keith (DreamWorks)
N o.8
9. "Something More" Sugarland (Mercury) No 5
10. "Help Somebody" Van Zant (Columbia) No.9
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Shout" Sisauwda (Global) Last Week: No. 1
12. "Back to Basics" Shape: UK AsrralI erks) No. 2
3. "Jetsrream" Ne'\ Order Featuring Ana N iantron (Warner
Bros.) No. 3
4. "Say Hello" Deep Dish (Deep Dish) No. 4
5. "MNesmnerized (Freemasons B \Watt D. Hernandez
N lixes-" Faith E\ anis iCapitol Promo) No. s
6. "\\hen the Broken-Hearted Lo\e Again" Danielle
Bolhlnger i.Esntion Silver) No. 12
j"\e Belong Together (P Rauhofer Atlantic Soul _lixes)"
Nlarnah CareN (Island No. 5
8. "Ride the Paul" Juliet iVirgin) No. 6
9."Lose Control Hani RenmxesI" Nliss. Elliott Featurmu a V
Ciara & Fat Nlan Scoop (The Gold Mdind No. 14 s 0 0
10. "Looking for a Ne\\ Love (Renlixesa" Jod \Watley
Peace Bisquit) No. 7 .0mel 0 I am&& *I



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"Copyrighted Material -
6 ".



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MEPTEMBER 24, 2005J '


Jacksonville MAD DAD Reaches


Out To Mississippi Family


TOP LEFT: From left, Elder Donald Foy, President Jax MAD DADS; Chris Smith, 16;
Marcus Smith, 17. MIDDLE LEFT: From left, Mrs. Linda Smith, Mother; Aaron Smith
14. BOTTOM LEFT: From left, Alexius Smith, 10; Eric Smith, 12.


MAD DADS President,
Elder Donald Foy loaded up
the Potter's House Christian
Fellowship Church Van, and
he and his brother Creswell
Foy headed to storm rav-
aged Biloxi, Mississippi.
Waiting to be rescued
was their niece Mrs. Linda
Smith, a life long resident of


DEATH

NOTICES
ADKINS-Walter Sr., died
Sepiemibr 12, 2005.
A LLEN-LulaMae, died September
13. f"i. A. B. Coleman Mortuary,
inc
BESS-Eddie, died September 16,
BROOKS-Dewey, died September
I .. 20 'i
BROOKS-Shirlene, 52, died
September 12, 2005.
GOODMAN-Gloria, died
September 20, 2005.
HICK'.-Carolyn, died September
I $. 2'i, 5
HIGGINBOTHAM-Baby
R.:.dnri Jr., died September 12,
HO1\ RD-Richard, died
SepteiTihcr 17, 2005.
HUDSON-Larry, died September
I -. 5
.JOHNSON-Emma Jane, died
SeperL,-rer 17, 2005.
.JOHN( N-Paul, died September

JON E -Jermaine, diedSeptember
kl',E-hiine, 44, died September 17,

L ESZEK-Carmen, died September
I "_, 21. ):
LE\NIS-Melvin J, 25, died
SepeLiiiber 19, 2005.
AR.- RSHALL-Melvin, died
Sepiiiteber 13, 2005.
McG E EI-Sarah, died September 19,
Me In r re-Dale, died September 13,
2i..
MIONROE-Ronald, 38, died
pSptikn'j1bhr 6, 2005.
POLK-Benjamin F., died
S.-prembirer 20, 2005.
POPE-Frhel L., died September
I -. .. 4
RIVERS-Herman, died September
RE N I E R-Rome Master Dante Lee,
irniar,. died September 15, 2005.
SHIELDS-David, 76, died
Scpierinl-er 13, 2005.
SINCL 2IR-Mary, 108, died
Sr .ictnher 18, 2005.
SMIITH-Mose, died September 17,
TA\ LO)R-Rosa, died September
\\ALTON-Essie, died September
I,. *,.iiI
\ ILLI\ MS-Burnell, died
Sepi.t ii.er 16, 2005. Alphonso
\\.. r Mortuary, Inc.
\\ R IG H -Tara T., died September
i N N M\N-Samuel, 49, died
.lr'nr.er 17, 2005.,


Biloxi and her five children,
Marcus 17, Chris, 16,
Aaron, 14, Eric 12; and
Alexius her only daughter,
10.
Linda's husband of 20
years, Larone Smith, is a
member of the Army
National Guard, stationed in
Seattle, Washington.
Mr. Smith could not get
home before the storm hit
Biloxi. All he could do was
pray!
"It was both the storm
and flood that followed, that
destroyed our home, and
cars, clothes, and everything
we owned!" Mrs. Smith
explained. "We made it
through hurricane Katrina,
but the rising water was too
much to handle." She made
contact with her Uncle,
Elder Donald Foy in
Jacksonville and that was
the beginning of a new life
for the Smith Family.
Elder Foy left
Jacksonville at 5:00 a.m. on


Thursday, September 8.
Arriving in Biloxi, he
loaded up the family, along
with two suit cases of
belongings, and headed to
Jacksonville, arriving at
12:30 a.m. on Friday
September 9.
Creswell Foy described
the area going into Biloxi as
"Looking like a war zone.
Homes, businesses, church-
es, schools were all
destroyed. Water and
destruction everywhere!"
Once in Jacksonville,
Elder Foy and his wife,
Myrtle, opened their home
and hearts to the Smiths.
"No time to waste," said
Elder Foy, as he started
making phone calls across
Jacksonville looking for
help for the Smith Family.
"School is a priority for
these children. These four
boys must get in school as
soon as possible. A solid
education is the only things
that will ensure these young


men will end up in college,
rather than a Florida prison,"
Foy said.
Donald Foy is the
President for the
Jacksonville chapter of
MAD DADS, a not-for-
profit organization charged
with the elimination of drug
abuse, crime, and violence.
Making contact with
Senator Tony Hill's office
was the first order of busi-
ness.
The family was referred
to Evangel Temple
Assembly of God Church
where the Smith family reg-
istered with the Red Cross
and other social service
agencies seeking support for
evacuees coming to the First
Coast.
Elder Foy took his fami-
ly to worship services at
Potter's House Christian
Fellowship on Sunday
morning, and had the oldest
boys registered in First
Coast High School on
Monday morning.
Eric, a sixth grader
enrolled at Highland
Middle, and Alexius a 5th
grader now attends Pine
Estates Elementary.
The Smiths know that
Jacksonville might be home
for quite a while. There is no
rush getting back to
Mississippi, where there are
no schools, stores or homes
left untouched by the storm
in Biloxi.
The Smiths know that at
least for the next year or so,
Jacksonville is home, and
thanks to this Jacksonville
MAD DAD, this family may
decide to make the move to
Jacksonville permanent.


WILL: Women In Local Leadership


Lee Lomax Vickie Cavey


By Marsha Dean Phelts

Women in Local
Leadership is a powerful
arm of the Northeast Florida
United Way. "Women in
Local Leadership (WILL)
honors the vital role that


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Jacksonville's

Most Heated

Radio Talk Show!

North Florida's Best
Daily Talk Show! ..


AM 1530

WEEKDAYS .

2-6 P.M.


CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
O R http://www.wymm1530.cqpm


women play in our commu-
nity, and is dedicated to sig-
nificantly increasing the
opportunities for women to
fully participate as philan-
thropists."
On Thursday, September
15, this group gathered for
lunch on the Celebration
Cruise Ship at Jaxport.
With Lee Lomax and
Vickie Cavey serving as
WILL Co-Chairs along with
Linda Stein and Pam Paul
Honorary Co-chairs,
$30,000 plus thousands
more was raised at the
Power of the. Purse
Luncheon.
Proceeds from the lunch-
eon will benefit the United
Way's Success\ by 6 initia-
tive. Success By 6 aims to
provide positive develop-
ment experiences for chil-
dren in their early years.
Last Thursday's fund
raiser was a pleasure filled
day with the United Way
presented by Carnival
Cruise Lines and VyStar
Credit Union. Everyone
was a winner.

WILL Continued on C


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.
INTERCOLLEGIATE CORAL FESTIVAL-
Jacksonville University and the University of North
Florida are joining together to offer free a concert on
October 7, at 8:00 p.m. at die Nathan H. Wilson Center
for the Arts at Florida Community College South Campus.
The campus is located at 11901 Beach Blvd. For more
information call Director Wayne Bailey at 904 646-2364.
CULINARY HURRICANE RELIEF BENEFIT- More
than 30 area restaurants and hospitality partners have
teamed up to honor hurricane \ victims at a special benefit
on Tuesday October 4 from 6:30 10 p.m. at the
Saw grass Marriott Resort & Spa. Modeled after the
Jackson% ille Food Fight and the Taste of the NFL. top area
restaurants will offer a taste of their signature cuisine.
Sight & Sound Productions \\ill bring die Big EasN to
Ponte Vedra for the night w ith casinos and festive Net\
Orleans d6cor. Three local bands. 40-WatN Mojo. the Faze
and Retrocats, will perform at variouss times throughout
the night. Additionally, there will be a lix e and silent auc-
tion filled with original art donated by generous local
artists. Tickets are $75 per person and are available at
(904) 448-GIVE (4483). Tickets will also be available for
purchase at the door. Event proceeds will go to the
Hurricane Katrina Disaster Relief Fund via three local
agencies: Lutheran Social Services Second Harvest Food
Bank, the United Way of Northeast Florida and the
American Red Cross of Northeast Florida.
PROJECT C.H.A.S.E.- An innovative program called
Project C.H.A.S.E. is being offered to help indi% iduals
improve their standard of living and quality of life. The
program, Connecting Home and School En\ ironmnents is
housed at New Bethel A.M.E. Chtuch, 1231 T\ ler St. It is
open to any parent of a child between 0-- :, ears of age and
who live in zip code areas 32205 or 3220). The program
is designed to help individuals improx e their educational
opportunities by earning a GED, increase their employa-
bility skills, and improve parenting skills to help their
children become successful in school. Free childcare serv-
ices are provided when participants are in class. A dinner
for the participant and their child is provided.
Transportation is available if needed. For more informa-
tion call (904) 353-1822 or (904) 630-7255.
36TH ANNUAL SICKLE CELL AWARDS/SCHOL-
ARSHIP BANQUET- September is National Sickle Cell
Awareness Month. The pubic is to celebrate the 36th
Annual Sickle Cell Awards/Scholarship Banquet on
September 23, 7:00 p.m. at St. Paul AME Church, 6910
New Kings Rd. Individual tickets are $30. Donations to
the Sickle cell Association of Northeast Florida are
always needed. For more information contact the Sickle
Cell Office at (904) 353-5737.
AUDITIONS FOR MURDER MYSTERY DINNER
THEATER-Professor Plum's Pla\ house, an interactive
Murder kMystery Dinner Theater is holding an open audi-
tion for "A Christmas Caper" on Saturda.. October 1
from 1--00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. at 4578 Blanding Blid.,
Jacksonville. All roles are compensated. Talent should
have good improvasation skills and be prepared to read
sides from the script. Production dates are November 3-
December 3. Headshots and resumes requested but not
required.
IRON GATORS REUNION-All former Marines who
were members of the Unit known as Company B (-) 4th
Assault Amphibian Bn. (also known as the Iron Gators)
are being asked to participate in a reunion. The "Iron
Gators" are planning to hold a reunion with Bravo
Company USMCR during the Marine Corps Birthday Ball
on November 19, 2005. The Marine Corps will be 230
years-old this year and the "Iron Gators" USMCR Unit
will be 50 years-old. For more information visit the web
site www.IRON GATORS.com/mcball.html or contact
Sgt. Klein at (904) 542-1751. Whether you plan to attend
or not, members are asked to visit the web site and enter
your name, address, telephone number/or fax number,
and email address so that they can receive information
concerning future "Iron Gators" events.
COMEDY ZONE FUNDRAISER-Optimum Health and
Well-Being, Inc. is a charitable organization whose client
base includes 70% people with HIV or AIDS and 30%
people with other potentially disabling health issues. The
program components are counseling, education, fitness,
and nutrition. Clients are referred by physicians and serv-
ices are free. Optimum Health and Well-Being, Inc, is
Selling tickets to the Comedy Zone for Wednesday,
September 28, at 8:00 p.m for an incredible show entitled
"A One Man Show Wit 2 Guys". The show, featuring
- John Joseph with Johnny B, incorporates comedy, music,
and theatre for 90 minutes of sheer entertainment. The
300 tickets must be sold by September 15. To purchase
Tickets and for more information call Walter Morrison or
Dr. Valveta Turner at (904/389-3952.
/' -J- .- ^.- -...xy.. ^ A -__ .ar -~,t ._ ..... ...-. -.-.- : ,o ... .... +__ L^l. '"JML^ : '


PAGE C-1


FL nRMAS TAR


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SEPTEMBER 24, 2005:


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,I The LIBRARY of CONGRESS


FnORIDA STA R


Dl A f I


Leave Those Whiskers On Whiskers
Alone
That's the advice of animal experts when it
comes to vibrissae, the technical name for
whiskers. They serve a purpose and it's not a
good idea to cut or trim them, as many pet own-
ers feel they should do.
"It's best to just leave them alone," says Dr.
Bonnie Beaver, an animal behavior expert at
Texas A&M University's College of Veterinary
Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
Some pet owners might get the urge to take L
out some scissors and give some long whiskers
a little trim, but they should not. Whiskers serve a very real purpose they are like
a sensory device for the dog or cat.
Especially in cats, whiskers keep the animal from bumping into things at night,
and help with depth perception. They help the animal decide where it's going, so
it's not a good idea to cut them.
Cats can have whiskers on the sides of their face, under their chin, above their
eyes and on the back of their front legs. The average cat has between 20 and 30
whiskers.
Whiskers are attached to a nerve under the skin, and these whiskers can provide
cats with all sorts of information. They can tell the animal about its immediate sur-
roundings and also help it move in closed-in areas where space is tight.
"Sometimes, whiskers will naturally fall off the animal," Beaver explains. "If this
happens, it's nothing to be alarmed about. Over time, the whisker will eventually
grow back."
Dogs use their whiskers in the same way as cats do, Beaver says, but because cats
are more nocturnal, they tend to rely on their whiskers a little more.
"We know cats can feel breezes by using their whiskers, and they can also use
them to detect such things as high grasses. All of this goes back to their ability to
hunt in the wild. They need whiskers to do certain things."
The slightest touch of a cat's whiskers will result in the blinking or closing of its,
eyes, again a natural reaction that goes back to the animal's hunting background.'
Studies have shown that cats with poor eyesight will use their whiskers much like a
person uses a cane as a sort of guide to help it maneuver through a room or an area.
"That's why it's best to leave the whiskers alone," Beaver adds. "Your cat or dog
will appreciate a nice brushing much more."
Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences,
Texas A&M University. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to
editor@cvm.tamu.edu

Deadline for Ads:

Tuesday @ 5 p.m.

\^J Call: (904) 766-8834


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Delaware Superintendent To Lead Duval Schools


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
Joseph J. Wise, Ed.D.,
Superintendent of
Wilmington, Delaware's
Christina School District,
has been named Duval
County Public Schools'
Superintendent at a special
meeting Tuesday night
September 20.
In a
unani- :" ,
m ous 0'"f
vote, the -
seven
members
of the
D uival ...
County
School Joseph J. Wise
Board,
approved Wise as their
choice for Superintendent
and directed staff to begin
contract negotiations with
him.
Wise, a student for 10
years in the Duval County
public schools and a former
Orange County Public
Schools music teacher, was
selected -for the job from a


field of 77 applicants and a
semifinalist group of six.
During their search,
board members emphasized
the need for a candidate who
could involve all public edu-
cation stakeholders and
close the achievement gap
between minority and white
students.
"We needed to find the
person everyone could rally
around," said Nancy Broner,
school board chairman,
"...and that person emerged
as Dr. Joseph Wise."
Board members uniform-
ly praised Wise on the basis
of his two interviews with
the board and a trip the
board took on Monday to
visit Wise's Wilmington
school district.
If contract negotiations
are successfully concluded,
Wise is expected to begin
his superintendency in mid-
November.
Wise has headed the
20,000-student Wilmington
school district, the largest in
Delaware, since July 2003.


Previously, he worked as
interim Associate
Superintendent for the Anne
Arundel County Public
Schools in Annapolis, Md.,
and interim Senior Assistant
Superintendent for the
Charlotte-Mecklenburg
Schools in Charlotte, N.C.
He also spent four years as
Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer of
eSchool Solutions, Inc., an
educational technology
solutions company in
Orlando.
Wise attended several
Duval County public
schools-Love Grove and
Hogan-Spring Glen elemen-
tary schools, Southside
Middle School and
Englewood High School-
before moving away from
the area.
His higher education
years also were spent prima-
rily in Florida, where he
earned several education
degrees, including a.doctor-
ate from the University of
.Florida, a master's degree


from the University of
Central Florida and a bache-
lor's degree from Florida
State University. He also
completed additional gradu-
ate courses at Northwestern
University. .
Wise began his educa-
tion career as a teacher in the
Cobb County, Georgia,
schools in 1978. From there,
he went onto teach in the
Orange County : (Fla..)
School District, where .he
was named Chairman of the.
Performing Arts Department
and Director of
Bands/Orchestra at Winter
Park High School ...
After seven years as a
teacher, Wise worked in ivar-
ious capacities in education
and private industry, includ-
ing Senior Administrator of
Human Resources, Chief
Negotiator, and Director of
Transportation Services for
the Orange County Public
Schools; Music
Director/Conductor of the
Florida Symphony Youth
Orchestras; Director of


Transportation Services for
the Seminole County Public
Schools; and Director of
Resort Entertainment,
Director of Employment,
and Director of
Organizational
Development for Walt
Disney World.
Wise has earned a variety
of education honors, includ-
ing selection by the Eli
.Broad Institute for School
Boards as a Broad Fellow
for 2005, selection to the Eli
Broad Urban
Superintendents Academy
as a Fellow for 2003, selec-
tion to the academy's
adjunct faculty and advisory
committee, 'and selection as
Winter Park High School's
Teacher of the Year in
1985.
In addition to his profes-
sional accomplishments,
Wise also has an extensive
list of personal and commu-
nity service accomplish-
ments and awards, ranging.:
from music to com1inmunity
theater. Junior Achle ement,


the Boys & Girls Club, com-
munity business organiza-
tions, business and educa-
tion leadership develop-
ment, and community blood
bank services.
In applying to become
Duval County Public
Schools Superintendent,
Wise highlighted his interest
and work in leading change,
improving organizational
effectiveness, increasing
students' academic achieve-
ment and closing the
achievement gap between
students.
Professional colleagues
who recommended him for
the job lauded his leadership
abilities in inspiring others
and bringing disparate
groups to common ground,
his commitment to high aca-
demic standards for all stu-
dents, his knowledge of
sound business practices, his
involvement in the larger
community, and his open-
ness, approachability, and
candor.


Bethune-Cookman College




Recognizes Magnificent Alumni


BCC Faculty graciously receive $50,000 check from the Massey's. Drs. Hurbert and
Michelle Thompson, College President Dr. Trudi Kibbe Reed, The Massey's, Dr.
Oswald Bronson, Mary Alice Cook Smith, Jacquline Mongal and Hiram Powell.


Mr. and Mrs. Robinson beam proudly as their daughter, Dr. Brenda R. Simmons,
Executive Dean of Instruction and Student Services at FCCJ is recognized.


BCC President Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed presents award to
Larry Roziers, principal of Mandarin High School.
Roziers, recognized an outstanding leader, educator and
coach, received the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, Jeff


Mitchell Foundation Award
and services.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--
Arthur Ray Brinson and his
Wife, Gail King Brinson
ivere among the 100
'Magnificent Alumni recog-'
pized by the historically
black Bethune Cookman
College during the Gateway
Classic 2005 held at the
Alltel Stadium.
Mr. Brinson, a 1969
graduate of the college is
president of the B-CC
Duval/Nassau Alumni
Chapter and ably served as
chairman of the Gateway
Classic Committee. The
*',,


for exceptional leadership


college recognized his wife,
Gail King Brinson for her
contributions in education.
Mrs. Brinson was a for-
mer Duval County Teacher
of the Year. She serves as
principal of Englewood
Elementary School where
with her leadership continu-
ous progress has been made
with "No Child Left
Behind."
The' school has earned
the grade of A on the FCAT
continuously since 2003.
One hundred outstanding
BCC Alumni were recog-


nized from all over the
United States and the Virgin
Islands. Seventeen of the
honorees are members of the

Rep. Crenshaw
Comments On
Navy Jet Crash
WASHINGTON, D.C. -
Congressman Ander
Crenshaw (R-FL) issued the
following statement on the
crash of a Navy S-3B Viking
jet on September 21 in
Jacksonville. The jet
crashed in a park on its
approach to Naval Air
Station Jacksonville, killing
two crew members.
"Our thoughts and
prayers are with these crew
members and their families.
This tragedy should serve as,
a constant reminder of the
danger our men and women
in uniform face whether
they are on the frontlines or
in training. Our troops put
their lives on the line each
day to protect our great
nation, we should be eternal-
ly grateful for their sacri-
fices."
"We will work with the
Navy to gather as many
details as possible about
thisaccident and learn what
we can to ensure crews fly-
ing the S-3 in the future are
as safe as possible. The
safety of ,our troops should
always our number one pri-
qrity."


Duval/Nassau Chapter.
They are Willie Mae H.
Ashley, Rev. Randolph
Bracy, Jr., Arthur Brinson,
Gail King Brinson, Dr.


Oswald P. Bronson, Sr.,
Wilhelmina Brown, Dr.
Ezekiel Bryant, Emmitt
Coakley, Nathaniel Davis,-
Lorrain Day, Aaron "Jelly"


Jackson, Jo Ann Jones,
Jacquline Toms Mongal,
Larry Roziers, Dr. Brenda
Simmons, Priscilla
Simmons and Brenda White.


WILL


(Continued From C-1)


From left are, Matthew and Marian Walker, Virginia "BeBe" Mathis, Jane Davis, Shirley
Rivera Kemp, Julia Cordes and Eva C. Lamar enjoyed being guests of Shirley Kemp.

While being wined and dined on board the ship, supporters were thrilled with gifts of
canvas WILL tote bags, sample bags of Channel products, networking opportunities and live
entertainment.
Many were multiple winners at the live and silent auctions and as recipients of door
prizes and gift certificates. Three lucky winners at each dinner table received a bottle of
Chance Perfume by Channel or a year's subscription to Jacksonville Magazine.
If working with a group of corporate, civic and community leaders to improve the qual-
ity of life for family and children in Northeast Florida through leadership, philanthropy and
advocacy, appeals to you please join WILL. For more information please contact Kit
Thomas, Vice President of Leadership Giving at 904-390-3253 or kitt@uwnefl.org


FLORID~A STAR


. PAGE C-3


SEPTEMBERR 24, 2005







InORIDA SSTAR


UI U U-'4


Opus 39 Restaurant, A Sanctuary of Art, Wine And Cuisine


ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla.
- Situated in a charming
building amid the historic
district of St. Augustine,
Florida, the oldest city in
the United States, and
known for its captivating
centuries-old architecture,
it seems fitting that Opus
39 Restaurant and Food
Gallery would be your din-
ing destination if you want
to be romantic, provide the
best for your guest, or just
treat yourself.
From the fresh ingredi-
ents that compose execu-
tive chef Michael
McMillan's creative cui-
sine, and the rare selec-
tions from small produc-
tion boutique wineries
available in the wine room,
to tie market that sells
ingre ients from items on
the enu and the locally
pordu ed works that adorn
the alls, Opus 39 is a
sanc ary 'of imaginative
art, w ne and cuisine.
Th restaurant serves a
five-c urse menu that
includes special wines
with each course. The chef
is committed to providing
a cutting-edge dining
experience and does not
serve the same recipe
twice. He is a Jacksonville
native and is. a graduate of
the prestigious Culinary


Institute of America in
Hyde Park, New York.
As a "five star" restau-
rant, Opus 39 will partici-
pate in the Restaurants for
Relief on Tuesday,
September 27, when
restaurants across the
nation will donate a. por-
tion of their dinner sales to
Share our Strength's
Hurricane Katrina Relief
Fund. You can help the
victims of Katrina .and
have a pleasurable evening
at the same time. Once you
have had the experience of
Opus 39, you. will return,
especially for that special
moment of taking pleasure
in the fine cuisine.


A Grouper dish prepared
Michael McMillan.


Opus 39 Chef Michael McMillan.
*


by Opus 39 Chef


A Red Snapper dish prepared by Opus 39 Chef
Michael McMillan.


Senator Barack Obama (D-
III.) introduced a resolution on
September 19 opposing a
recommendation released by
the Carter-Baker Commission
on Federal Election Reform
that would require. all
Americans to show photo
identification before voting.
Georgia recently passed a
law mandating government-
issued photo identification for
voters at the polls.
"Georgia's new photo ID
requirement is a poll tax for
the 21st century," said
Obama. "It's a law that
requires some of the poorest
among us -- those who prob-
ably don't have access to


~rr~i~---- "';'-"En~'lih~nr;~;trw~;~i~i~.l


transportation -- to possibly
travel great distances and pay
up to $35 lust to exercise their
right to be heard."


What's about to


become Florida history?


All the following Scratch-Off Games of the Florida Lottery.




., .

$100.000 Super Ca,'h :Truckload of Cash' Cool Cash
#571 #576 # : 570





Corvette Cash Deuces Wild Double Down
#573 #574 ,. #584




Bullfrog Bucks ., Stash of Cash Spin NI Win
#588 #580 #560






Four Leaf Fortune Royal 7's Crazy'Cash! Emerald Green 7's
#575 #586 #585 #579



.. .. j .-- .

Triple 333 Lots of Luck Glittering Gold
#582 #5.83 #587

All these Scratch-Off games officially end September 30, 2005.
So play these great games now while there are -ijli prizes to -
win. But remember, any winning tickets must be redeemed by i
Tuesday, November 29, 2005. Prizes ile-s Iri, $600 may be V .
redeemed at any Florida L..--'ti retailer. P ,- ill and over MrI
must be claimed at a Florida L:ner., .,fie. F'r t-he office nearest LI
you call 850-487-7777.) Thanks ':,i i.la .ing these and the many Whe a Lottery,
other games ,:t li. Florida Lottery. When you play, we all win,


Q 2005 Florida Lottery. Must be 18 or older. Please play responsibly.

rl.


LOOKING FOR A PLACE WHERE REAL GROWN
FOLKS CAN GO TO RELAX AND UNWIND?

JOIN US AT "THE POST"
2179 Benedict Road

Tuesday Game Night
Bring your game and play cards with some of the best players
in to\\n

Thursday Talent Night
Bring your best song, dance or comedy routine and sho\ us
what you got!


Friday & Saturday
Disco (featuring DJ Lalrv "Georgia Boy" Douglas)
When the pretty people come out to play. dance and hale a
good time.

For l,'/ In 'nainon Cal,7l "6.5-120'6


. .


"l'(r ;i riJr, .-. ,w jwit;] l.rij. ;. rls..< n-,.!tl
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;irid 1.. : !l'rl. fn 1t.iher I.::4Iljy?
Well. you ever know. That's v*-hy I
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r iiu !ln ;dly .;ic:ill' i, ;li-il.
Never smoking o' Jsing duigs.
N :-.:!,' hI ii .i,:lli .| I ,v. ll..iir,
talk '.o you, hea,ithcare providee.
Hedi Srarnriple'


For more information,
call 1-800-444-6472.


Lj.


know what to do for


.


4,


3K


life.
*ew As Wn"ar y


The Readers of the Black Press in America
are more educated,
make more income'.
and have,.
substantial buvina nower.

Source: The Media Audits
2004 Black Newspapers Readership /report, nnpa.org
71 L


17)74'2-c 77


i./ -I --

Gift Baskets
Handbags
Hats


Gloves
Shoes
T-Shirts
Socks
Monday Thursday Friday
1 p.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday
10 a.m. 6 p.m.


a:

L
p.
I

















.1


a~as~eP~was~Ri~Aa~~


R-- YLI.-


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--


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SEPTEMBER 24, 2005


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4-YI








St -iEVjIUV Zt ----* __-_


Klitschko-Rahman


Title Bout Set

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. Hasim Rahman believes
WBC heavyweight champion Vitali Klitschko did every-
thing he could to avoid a title defense against him, possibly
even faking a back injury. Klitschko feels Rahman disre-
spected him by making such an accusation.
Neither pulled many punches Monday at a news confer-
ence to formally announce that the long-awaited 12-round
bout between the two will be Nov. 12 at the Thomas & Mack
Center in Las Vegas. The fight was first scheduled for April
30, but was pushed back twice because of injuries to
Klitschko before the champion's camp announced April 20
he had undergone surgery to remove a small spur from his
spine, sidelining him through ihe summer. Rahman has won
six straight fights since losing a 12-round decision to John
Ruiz in December 2003. Most recently, he \\xon a 12-round
decision over Monte Barrett on Aug. 13. ,
Klitschko has fought only three times since losing to
Lewis. He stopped Kirk Johnson in the second round in
December 2003; stopped Corrie Sanders in the eighth round
in April 2004 to win his WBC belt; and successfully defend-
ed his title last December by scoring a technical knockout
overDanny Williams in the eighth round.


Indianapolis Colts running back Edgerrin James, left, is
tackled by Jacksonville Jaguars' Rashean Mathis, right,,
during the fourth quarter Sunday, September 18, 2005, in
Indianapolis. James ran for 128 yards in the Colts' 10-3
win. (AP Photo/John Harrell)

Darius Out For Season,

Placed On Injured Reserve

JAC KSONVILLE,
Fla.-- Safety Donovin-
Darius tore the anterior
cruciate ligament in his left
knee Sunday, September
18 against Indianapolis and

season. Darius was placed

He is one of the club's
top run-stoppers. Fletcher
Sand iChase were released
eeSeptember third as part of
Donovin Darius the team's final roster cuts.
Fletcher is a fourth-year
pro \\ ho spent last season on Jacksonville's practice squad.
Chase \. as drafted in the fifth round in 1998 and was with
the Nei\ York Giants last year but missed the season with a
knee injury .


r-------------- ------------------------ ----------------------
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El orCredt Car Accpted


VIRGINIA BEACH, Va.
---South Carolina -State
quarterback Cleveland
McCoy was selected the
Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference offensive Player
of the. Week, the league
announced Monday
,September 19.
This is McCoy's second
player of the week honor
this season.
Tyrone McGriff (Florida
A&M) was named defensive
player of the week. Other
winners include the
Bulldogs Marshall
McFadden (Rookie of the
Week) and Ron Darby
(Special Teams performer of
the week) and Chris Cousins
of Morgan State (Offensive
Lineman of the Week).


McCoy (QB, 6-2, 110,
R-So Hollywood, S.C.)
threw three touchdown pass-
es to lead the Bulldogs to a
27-24 win over. Bethune-
Cookman.
McCoy completed 15-
of-27 passes for 213 yards
and touchdown passes of 45,


The New Orleans
Hornets have found a tem-
porary refuge.
The Hornets announced
plans Wednesday,
September 21 to play 35
home games in Oklahoma
City and six others in Baton
Rouge, La., after a reloca-
tion agreement was
approved by the city coun-
cil.
The New Orleans Arena


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36 and seven yards, without
an interception.
McCoy's final touch-
down pass with 7:45 second
remaining proved to be the
game winner for the
Bulldogs.
McGriff (DE, 6-2, 217,
So. -I Tallahassee, Fla.)


recorded five tackles and
one sack from his defense, e
end spot in a -vin over
Howard. McGriff also
recovered two fumbles bN
the Bison.
The Rattler defense held
Howard to 30 yards rushing
in the game.


Hornets To Play Some


Games in Oklahoma City


sustained extensive water
damage from the hurricane
and will take months to
repair. But even if New
Orleans is ready to welcome
the team back before the
2005-06 season ends, the
Hornets are locked into their
35 dates at the 19,675-seat
Ford Center.
The team will alter its
home jerseys so they read
"Hornets" on the front. The


road jerseys will feature the
words "Ne\\ Orleans." but a
patch on the shoulder \\ill
recognize Oklahoma City. In
standings -and statistics, the
NBA plans to call the team
, the New Orleans/Oklahoma
City Hornets.
Playoff. games also
would be played in
Oklahoma City, and the
Hornets will have the option
to stay for an extra year.


HBCU FOOTBALL ROUNDUP


September 15
Hampton 31, NC A&T 14 -
September 17
Tennessee-Martin 42, Tennessee State 20
St. Joseph 41, Lincoln (MO) 13
Bowie State 33, Livingstone 15 -
Fayetteville State 23, Saint Paul's 13
Fairmont State 52, West Virginia State 0
Allen 24, Shorter 20
Morgan State 55, Savannah State 26
Saint Augustine's 44, Virginia State 14 -
Paul Quinn 48, SW Assemblies of God 7
Fort Valley State 20, Clark Atlanta 0
Nicholls State 54, Cheyney 0
Morehouse 50, Edward Waters 28
Kentucky State 28, Central State 0 -


NC Central 37, Shaw 31
Alcorn State 24, Langston 7 -
Alabama State 41, Arkansas-Pine Bluff 10
Tuskegee.31, Benedict 16 .
Jackson State 24, Texas Southern 21
James Madison 65, Qelaware State 7
Virginia Union 15, Johnson C. Smith 7
Albany State 52, Lane 31
Tusculum 20, Miles 14 -
Milsaps 24, Concordia 23 -
Washington State 48, Grambling State 7
Winston-Salem State 24, E izabeth City State 23
Alabama A&M 27, Miss Valley State 13
SC State 27, Bethune-Cookman 24
Florida A&M 33, Howard 20
Southern 38, Prairie View A&M 0


1. What quarterback was the highest paid NFL player in 1988?
2. What skating duo was the first to receive a perfect score from all judges in ice dancing
in Olympic competition?
3. What former New York Knicks guard was inducted into basketball's Hall of Fame in
1984?
4. What hockey star shared the cover of Sports Illustrated with Magic Johnson in the sum-
mer of 1988?
5. What injury troubled trackster Ben Johnson the summer prior to the 1988 Olympics?
6. What Big 8 team was barred by the NCAA from defending its basketball cro\% n in
1989?
7. 'What was the only U.S. pro team to end a 98-year championship drought in the 1980s?
8. What Toronto Blue Jays pitcher lost two consecutive no-hitters in the ninth inning dur-
ing the 1988 season?
9. Who got football's Butkus Award for defense the year he was chosen first team
Academic All-American?
10. What American female tennis star graced a Paraguayan postage stamp in 19SS?
Sports Challenge Answers
Sports Challenge Answers
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FAMU's McGriff, South Carolina State's


McCoy Earn MEAC Honors


PAGE C-5


FLORID~A STAR


SEPTEMBER 242005


,2







P CF A AP E ,


EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
A HABITUAL TRAFFIC OFFENDER-On Monday
September 19, 2005 at 4:25 p.m., a JSO police officer while on
patrol, initiated a traffic stop on a 43-year- old male (suspect)
because the driver did not use a turn signal while making a right
hand turn from 1000 Commonwealth Ave. onto 800 Lane Ave.
The police officer made contact with the driver who stated that
the vehicle was not his. The police officer asked the driver to
produce a driver's license and he replied that he did not have
one because it was suspended. The suspect was detained and
once the suspect identity was revealed, the MDC produced 18
counts of suspensions, from 10/29/ 02 to 4/1/04, for failure to
appear on traffic summons. The vehicle was towed and held for
forfeiture. The suspect was placed under arrest, transported to
jail, and charged with a felony.
POSSESSION OF CONTROLED SUBSTANCE-On
Monday, September 19, 2005 at 4:30 a.m., a JSO police officer
while on patrol, conducted a traffic stop on a 29-year-old male
. (suspect) and his 17-year-old girlfriend (co-defendant), at the
'2 intersection of Mark and John Ave. after he observed that the
A vehicle's metal license tag was obstructed where it was posi-
tioned in the back window. Upon stopping the vehicle, the
police officer made contact with the juvenile driver, who provid-
ed the police officer with a false name, and stated that she was
staying in a nearby hotel room with the suspect. Further
inquiry revealed the that the juvenile had provided the police
officer the name of her adult sister. The suspect and co-defen-
dant were subsequently asked for consent to search their persons
and the vehicle they were in. Both individuals consented to the
searches, which revealed several crack cocaine rocks on the pas-
senger side of the floorboard. A clear yellow plastic baggie
with cocaine residue was also found underneath the suspect's
seat. The suspect and co-defendant were read their rights. The
police officer attempted to contact the co-defendant's parents or
guardians, to inform them that their 17-year-old daughter was
arrested, but was unsuccessful. The 29-year-old male suspect
was transported to jail with multiple felony charges.
CRIMINAL MISCHIEF-On Monday, September 19, 2005 at
6:05 a.m., a police officer was dispatched to 1736 W. 24th
Street in reference to a disturbance. Upon arrival, police offi-
cer met with a 47- year -old male (victim) who stated that he and
his 36-year-old girlfriend (suspect) had been involved in an inti-
mate relationship for the past 6 years, which resulted in no bio-
logical children. Both parties also do not reside together.
Further information revealed the suspect came over to his resi-
dence on this date to retrieve some family belongings. The sus-
pect upon her arrival discovered another female at the victim's
residence and became upset. An argument started between both
patties that soon became physical. When the victim attempted to
remove the suspect from his residence, the suspect began to
resist. After the victim placed the suspect outside of his resi-
dence, the suspect armed herself with an unknown object, which
she used to break a total of 5 windows to the victim's residence.
The victim called the police. The police officer observed the
broken windows, and advised the suspect of her rights. The sus-
pect admitted she damaged the victim's windows because she
was upset with the victim for having another female at the resi-
dence. The suspect alleged that the victim had beaten her. The
police officer did not observed any visible injuries to the sus-
pect. The suspect was taken into custody, arrested, transport-
ed to jail, and charged with a misdemeanor.
UNLAWFUL ID -On Monday, September 19, 2005, at 2:43
a.m. a police officer was dispatched to 3160 Fitzgerald St. in
reference to an auto burglary. Upon arrival, police officer met
with a 24 -year-old male (suspect) who stated that he was at the
listed residence waiting for his friend to take him home. The
police officer asked the suspect if he had any ID on him, and he
stated no, and gave the police officer a false name and date of
birth. To obtain the identity of the suspect, the police officer
was transporting him to jail to have his hands printed and
processed. While en route to the jail, the suspect stated that he
gave me the wrong name and date of birth. The suspect then
told the police officer his real name and date of birth. The police
officer read.the suspect his rights, arrested him, and transported
to jail, and charged with a misdemeanor.
TRESPASSING ON PRIVATE PROPERTY-On Monday,
September 19, 2005 at 6:30 a.m., a JSO police officer was
working off duty at Pacesetters Labor Pool. The manager of the
S property stated that he did not want this 54-year-old male (sus-
pect) on the property. The off duty police officer made contact
with the suspect and asked him for his identification. The sus-
S pect refused to give the off duty police officer his ID, and
refused to leave the property. He was very angry and stated'
"' ,u're white so you're right." The police officer asked the
,u :.pec( his side of the story, and again he refused to answer or
show his ID, and refused to leave the property. The suspect was
read his rights, arrested, transported to jail, and charged ith a
misdemeanor for trespassing.
S ADDICTED ON PRESCRIPTION DRUGS-On M nday,
S September 19, 2005 at 5:40 p.m., a police officer as dis-
patched to a prescription drug fraud at 7790 Blanding Blvd.
(CVS Pharmacy). Upon arrival, police officer met. with the
pharmacist who advised that at 4:26 p.m. a 19-year -old male


(suspect) dropped off a prescription for 18 pills, issued by
Orange Park Medical Center. Upon. investigation of the pre-
scription, it appeared that a (1) had been added to the count of
the pills. The pharmacist contacted Orange Park Medical Center
that advised him that the suspect had been given the prescrip-
tion, but only for 8 pills, not 18. When the suspect returned.to
pick up his- prescription, he was taken into custody and advised
of his rights. The suspect admitted to changing the number of
pills on his prescription, and told the police officer and the
pharmacist that he had an earlier drug addiction to the pills, and
had built up a high tolerance for the medication. The suspect
was arrested, transported to jail, and charged with a misde-
meanor.
[ *i


Your Weekly Horoscope

(SEPTEMBER 24, 2005-SEPTEMBER 30, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) It's a
week of harmony
on the domestic
scene. Those in a
committed relationship find
renewed romance. Singles,
also, could meet their soul-
mates.
TAURUS (April 20 to
S May 20) You're
all brisk and busi-
ness-like as the
week begins. This
soon peters out, which is a
good thing. You don't want
to expend your energy all at
once.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) Travel
is in the works but
at a future time. In
the interim, pay
attention to details at work.
Later in the week, feel free
to enjoy a favorite social
activity.
CANCER (June 21 to
[-- July 22) You
mull over your
career options this,
week. This could
lead to a breakthrough. Be
open to unusual opportuni-
ties.
LEO1 (July 23 to
August 22)
You're more of a
leader than a join-
er. However, this
week, a club or social organ-
ization captures your atten-
tion. Check it out thorough-
ly before making a commit-
Sment.
VIRGO (August 23
to September
22) You're excit-
ed by a career
call en g e .
However, don't jump in right
away. You need to do some
research before taking this
on.
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) You
exude confidence-this week.
This makes your presence


magnetic to. co-
workers. Over the
weekend, a cul-
tural pursuit satis-
fies your intellect.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21) You
spend time early
] in the week tend-
I'. I ing to unfinished
.business. By mid-
week, you've managed to
clear your schedule. In gen-
eral, your optimistic attitude
is infectious.
SAGITTARIUS
(No% ember 22 to
December 21)
You articulate
your intentions
well at work. Co-
workers are motivated, to
follow your lead. This week-
end, romance is favored.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19) It's
a good week to
stick close to
home., Although
you're experiencing some
wanderlust, now is not the
time to indulge. Later, >tio
contemplate making a major
purchase.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18)
Leisure acti\ ities.
could interfere
with what must be done at
work. Try to find the right
balance. By week's end, you
figure out what you want
and how you can achieve it.
PISCES (Februar)
19 to March
20) It's a good
week to ponder
some lifestyle
changes. Diets and fitness
routines are uppermost on
your mind. Once you begin,
you're unstoppable, and the
results are quite positive.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Gwen
Stefani, October 3; Patti


Tiniest Baby Celebrates First Birthday
MAYWOOD, Ill. A baby born weighing less than a
soda can and believed to be the smallest baby ever to
survive has celebrated her first birthday.
Rumaisa Rahman, who weighed just 8.6 ounces at
birth and was less than 10 inches.long, turned a year old
on Monday. She now weighs 13 pounds and is 24 inch-
es tall.
Loyola University Medical Center, the suburban
Chicago hospital'where the girl received treatment until
. she was discharged in February, hosted a birthday party
for Rumaisa and her fraternal twin sister, Hiba. Hiba,
who was discharged from the hospital a month before
Rumaisa, was only 1 pound, 4 ounces at birth. She now
weighs 17 pounds and is 26 inches tall.
Full-term, 1-year-old babies usually weigh around 20
pounds. Doctors who cared for Rumaisa and Hiba said
both are doing well. "I feel very optimistic that I don't
think that either of them will have any significant hand-
icaps," said Dr. Jonathan Muraskas

Wendy's Chili Finger Tipster Has Beef
SAN JOSE, Calif. A man who says he helped
\Wendy's International Inc. unravel the scheme behind a
fingertip slipped into a bowl of chili has a beef with the
fast food chain. He wants the $100,000 reward the com-
pany offered. Mike Casey runs an asphalt plant in Las
Vegas that employed the man who lost the finger, and
the husband of the woman who said she bit into the digit'
while eating at a Wendy's. Casey said he provided the tip
that helped authorities uncover the scheme.
"I did what they wanted and they offered it, so I think
I have it coming," Casey said. Wendy's officials said
TuesdaN they would soon identify the tipster, but would-
n't say whether Casey would get the reward. Anna Ayala,
39, and Jaime Placencia, 43, pleaded guilty Sept. 9 in
Santa Clara County Superior Court to conspiring to file
a false claim and attempted grand theft. Police said
Placencia's co-worker lost the finger in an industrial
accident.

FLORIDA LOTTO
WINNING NUMBERS
10-42-45-47-52-53
Saturday, September 17
ROLLOVER!!


LaBelle, October 4; Kate Matt Damon, October 8;
Winslet, October 5;
Scott Bakula, October
Elisabeth Shue,. October 6;
Simon Cowell, October 7; 9.2005 DBR Media,Inc.


Tara's Bail

24/7Bonds
Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville, Florida 32206
IL..


356-TARA
(8272)


Your business is always welcome!



REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.
F AM ILY P R A C TICE
3160 Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32209












WE PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR:
*Hypertension
*Diabetes
*Elevated Cholesterol
*Obesity and Weight Management
oWomen's Health
9Childcare and Im unizatuio s
*Preventive Care -.
*Impotence and erectileDysfu.nction ...-."

Dr. Reginald Srke. nelkc es. Di--Tonya Hollinger
1 to the rictice.
NO \ .ACC E.ETING
NEW WPATlIENTS
fie invite y'ou to ct (I, ias your provider
of choice fior let Ithicare needs.
TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT CALL
76'8 122
FAX: 90-1482-0373
WE ACCEPT ALL MAN OR HEALTH PLANS
HNMOs, PPOs, MEDICARE, And MEDICAID
3160 Edgewood AvenueeJacksonville, FL 32209
OFFICE HOURS:
M-F 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. Wed. 2 P. M. TO 5 P.M.

One Hurt, Two Arrested

In Drill Team Brawl
WICHITA, Kan. One person required stitches and a
mother and son were arrested after two drill teams began
brawling during an impromptu "dance off," Wichita
police said. "This is a whole new arena" of crime, said
Wichita police' Lt, Jeff Easter. The Dynamic Steppers,
a Wichita drill team, were practicing routines Saturday
night when members of another 'drill team, the White
Tigers, showed up and challenged the others to a "dance-
off," police said. When the challengers appeared to be
losing, a woman struck a 17-year-old Dynamic Steppers
drummer in the face with a drumstick, Easter said.
The teen, who had left the White Tigers to join the
Dynamic Steppers, punched the 28-year-old woman in
the face. He then ran toward his Ford Explorer and tried
to run over spectators, witnesses told police. The boy's
mother, who is a Dynamic Steppers coach, grabbed a
box cutter and sliced the other woman's right arm, Easter
said. The wound required eight stitches.
An estimated 50 people became involved in the alter-
cation, although only two were facing charges on
Monday.The mother was booked on suspicion of aggra-
vated battery for cutting the other woman, Easter said,
and the son faced charges of simple assault and aggra-
vated assault. More charges are possible, police said.

Crime doesn't
pay but we do!
CRIME STOPPERS
1-866-845-TIPS (8477)
No Names...
No Faces... No Hassles


SEPTEMBER 24,2005


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE C-6/









FLORIDA STAR


SEPTEMBER 24. 2005


EMPLOYMENT

FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at
FCCJ. E.O.E.

Driver/Dedicated Reg. Lane
COASTAL TRANSPORT
HOME EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED
*65% Preloaded/Pretarped
-Avg. $818 $896/wk
Part-time oDening avail.!
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
CDL-A req'd. 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

Want to purchase minerals and
other oil/gas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201

CONSTRUCTION PERSONNEL
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Pipelayers, Excavator Operators,
Loader Operators.
Drug screen req.
Jensen Civil Construction
9100 Philips Hwy. EOE/m/fld/v

JOB LISTING
The University of North Florida
is now accepting applications
for the position of Director of
Research and Proposals.
Apply online at:
http://www.unfjobs.org



SALES POSITIONS
The Florida Star
904-766-8834



CURL QUEEN
"Specials"
Curls -Ages 7-12 ONLY $29.95
Relaxer w/ Roller Set ONLY
$25.00
766-4510

-- -----------n
YOU CAN FIND!
Annette 2
Cosmetiques
Aloe Vera Skin Care
Products
AT: Pecan Park Flea
Market
Booth 162

L--- ----------


SERVICES

Aluminum Awnin


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
*CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764







THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

CALL FOR BIDS

The Haskell Company is solic-
iting bids for the NAS JAX
Naval Hospital
Addition/Alterations project in
Jacksonville, FL from SB, SDB
(SBA Certified), WOSB,
VO/SDVOSB and HUBZone
businesses in Divisions 2-16.
Subcontractors must Pre-
Qualify through a Vendor
Qualification Form (if previous-
ly submitted in last six months
please notify). Plans and spec-
ifications are available on CD
at the Haskell Building, 111
Riverside Avenue,
Jacksonville, FL. Bids are due
no later than 5:00 p.m.
October 20, 2005 to The
Haskell Company Building,
111 Riverside Avenue. All
inquiries should be directed to
Ron Quails, 904-791-4642 or
Olivia Evans, 904-791-4678.
We are an Equal Opportunity
Employer.

To place an ad:


CAII: (904) 766-8834

FAX: (904) 765-1673

Thank you for reading
The Florida Starl


BUSINESS NETWOR


CLAIMS
1-800-882-2525
Free Case Review
Trust Your Case
To A Doctor/Lawyer
Ht '3n I311aI. iroi es.(ril. Ting
f'ln.j alnhavp bren r 3ueiu
b,, I'.I dijug, m tIm3 ,be
trhilm l i1 ( ,:3h r-,nlI'r n [riI 3


INVITATION FOR BIDS
Custom Facility Expansion
Blount Island Marine Terminal
JAXPORT Project
No. B2006-01
JAXPORT Contract
No. C-1137
Sealed bids will be received by the
Jacksonville Port Authority until
2:00 PM, local time, November 1,
2005, at which time they shall be
opened in the Public Meeting Room
of the Port Central Office Building,
2831 Talleyrand Avenue,
Jacksonville, Florida, for Custom
Facility Expansion.
All bids must be submitted in accor-
dance with specifications and draw-
ings for Project No. C-1137, which
may be examined in, or obtained
from the Procurement and Contract
Services Department of the
Jacksonville Port Authority, located
on the third floor of the Port Central
Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand
Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida
32206. (Please telephone 904/630-
3018 for information.)
PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL BE
HELD ON October 13. 2005. AT
10:00iAM, IN THE PUBLIC MEET-
ING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR OF
THE PORT CENTRAL OFFICE
BUILDING LOCATED AT
ADDRESS STATED ABOVE.
ATTENDANCE BY A REPRESEN-
TATIVE OF EACH PROSPECTIVE
BIDDER IS REQUIRED. A BID
WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FROM
ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT REP-
RESENTED AT SUCH CONFER-
ENCE.
Bid and contract bonding are
required.
The mandatory MBE/WBE
Participation Goal established for
this project is 30%.
Louis Naranjo
Director of Procurement and
Contract Services
Jacksonville Port Authority


I


FOR STRUCTURE S1LEr CENTS.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


As seen

on TV.


-f


f >
VKSH A '^
I"
^-a
^h^ |

*^
*m


PUBLIC LEGAL NOTICE
FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS AND CLASSIFICATIONS HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT:
ANY PERSON WISHING TO BE HEARD BEFORE THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD WITH REGARD TO THE
AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION APPLICATIONS MAY PRESENT INFORMATION ON HIS BEHALF
AT THE PRIME OSBORN CENTER, 1000 WATER STREET, 2ND FLOOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, 32204,
OCTOBER 10, 12, 13, 26 & 27, 2005.

A LIST OF ALL APPLICATIONS FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN WHOLLY OR PARTIALLY
APPROVED, AND A LIST OF ALL APPLICATIONS THAT HAVE BEEN DENIED ARE AVAILABLE TO THE PUB-
LIC IN THE INFORMATION CENTER OF THE PROPERTY APPRAISER'S OFFICE, 231 EAST FORSYTH
STREET, FROM 8:00 A.M. TO 5:00 P.M., MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 196.194,
FLORIDA STATUTES, AS AMENDED.

THESE LISTS WILL REFLECT THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF EXEMPTIONS:


HOMESTEAD
WIDOWS
WIDOWERS
DISABILITY
HURRICANE EMERGENCY RELIEF


RELIGIOUS
LITERARY
CHARITABLE
SCIENTIFIC


HOSPITALS
NURSING HOMES
HOMES FOR THE AGED
HOMES FOR SPECIAL SERVICE


IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD WITH
RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING OR HEARING, HE OR SHE WILL NEED A
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS. FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE OR SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A
VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY
AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.


GLORIOUS JOHNSON, CHAIR
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD

CHERYL L. BROWN, CLERK
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD


ELAINE FEBLES, AIDE
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD


Board Members: Council Members Daniel Davis and Art Shad
School Board Members Betty Burney and Vicki Drake
Tommy Hazouri (Alternate)


IMPACT

WCGL AM 1360
THE FLORIDA
STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
SATURDAYS @ 6:30
P.M.


LIIIt lm~~lm~;il hmni U'6E15Ik& IL
T, I -i: :I rivd ad, inwowM R r .f1Ir-ridis new~cpa1wi m; ~-,*.Ilap
X,.-5 Vrfllion readeri -~


v-., k: L4 MNIH u m l'ra 1 .


Announcements


OCTOBER 13EAD FESTS October Ist. 2nd DeLand (Central
Florida) Volusia County Fair Grounds. October 7th, 8th, 9th
Pompano Beach. Elks Lodge. October 15tb. 16th Havana FL.
The Planters Exchange. October 29th, 30th Ft Myers, Clarion
Hotel. Announcing Palm Beach Gardens November 4th. 5th &
6th Amara Shrine Temple. Bead. PMC. & Wire Wrapping Classes
available. Info at www.OctoberBeadFests corn or (866)667-3232.


Auctions


PUBLIC AUCTION. 5 tracts North Carolina mountain prop-
erty. 10+ acres each. Edge of Sparta. 10 acres, Absolute auction.
12:Noon Sat. Oct. 15th. Visit: www pierecauetion comn.
keith/fcarolinaaueidons.com (800)650-2427,

AUCTIONS ONLINE. Surplus & used equipment. Register
FREE. Low SEILL.ER fees. Filter Promto # SWC-091i. Visit our
website for details and personal assistance.
www.surplusontlte NIT (877)215-3010.

Estate Auction 8+/- acres mountain real estate. October 8,
10:0(amn. Rustic cabin. Morton building, Fatint County, GA.
10%BP. Rowell Auctions. Ince. (800)323-8388
www rowellauctins com GAl. AU-C0012594.


Automotive


$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS Cars lronm $500! Tax Repos 1.US
Marshall and IRS sales! Cars, Trucks. SUV's. Toyota's, Honda's,
Chevy's and more! For Listings Call (800)571-0225 Ext C373.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From Manufacturer.
20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.


Business For Sale


Service Business FSBO. Sky's the limit in this large
MILLION DOLLAR business.
http'//landscapeandtreecofsbo homestead coin
For More ino Call (941)485-9212.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you cam rn 800/day? 30 Ma-
chines, Iree Candy All for $9,995. (888)629-9968 1302000033.
CALL US: We will not be undersold!

MONEY MOTIVATED? 27 year old Ft. Lauderdale nutrition
/ infomercial company launches Network Marketing division.
SEEKING Money Motivated Individuals *Patented category*
*killer product* Call (866)861-0706.

A CASH COW! 90 VENDING MACHINE UNITS/ YOU OK LO-
CATIONS ENTIRE BUSINESS $10,670 HURRY! (800)836-
3464 1B02428.

****$500-5100,000++ FREE CASH GRANTS!
2005!**NEVER REPAY! FOR PERSONAL/MEDICAI BILLS,
SCHOOL, NEWIHOMI'BUSINESS,ALMOSTEVERYONEQUIALI-
FIES. BBB LISTED! LIVE OPERATORS (800)270-1213 ext.96.

Professional Vending Route. Brand Name Products. No Gim-
nmicks, Great Equip/Services. $7,500 Down. We Finance.
(877)843-8726 #BO02002-037.


Financial


TOO MUCH Debt? Don't choose the wrong way out. Our scr-
vices have helped millions. Stick to a plan. get out of debt &
save thousands. Free consultation. (866)410-6827. CareOne
Credit Counseling.


****S500-$50,000i++ FREE CASH GRANTS! 2005! NEVERI
REPAY! Personal/Medical Bills. School. New Business-Home.
As seen on T.V. NO CREDIT CHECK! Live Operators!
(800)270-1213 ext.95.


HelpWanted


Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay & Benefits
for Experienced Drivers. 0/0, Solos, Teams & Graduate Stu-
dents. Bonuses Available. Refrigerated Now Available.
(888)MORE PAY (888-667-3729).

GET PRACTICAL WITH CFI...MILES THAT ISt Weekly
Atlanta Orientation. $0.05 NE Bonus Pay! XM Service. Class A
CDL Required. APPIY (800)CFFI-RIVE (1-800-234-3748);
www.cfidrive corn

Now Hiring for 2005 Postal Positions $17.50-$59.00+/hr.
Full Benefits/Paid Training and Vacations No Experience Nec-
essary (800)584-1775 Reference 9 5600.

MOVIE EXTRAS, ACTORS & MODELS! Make $75-$250!,
day. All ages and faces wanted! No exp. Required. FT/PT!
(800)714-7565,

$600 WEEKLY Working through the government part-time.
No Experience. A lot of Opportunities. (800)493-3688
Code .1-14.

S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Drivers. HOME WEEKENDS. Mileage
Pay, Benefits, 401K. Trainees Welcome. Miami area- exp. req. 21
min age/Class-A CDL Cypress Truck Lines (800)545-1351.

0/0 Driver FFE, The F/S is higher here! $1.09 Avg. $2,000
sign-on $2,600 referral bonus. Base plate provided. No truck no
problems,. Low cost lease purchase with payment as low as $299/
Wk. (800)569-9298.

STABLE CAREER. IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! Positions avail-
able for Experienced CDL Holders. Also Company Funded
Truck Driver Training offered. Financial assistance for Hurri-
cane Victims. (877)PRIME-JOB. www orimeine cnm,

Driver- NOW HIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for Central
Florida Local & National OTR positions. Food grade tanker. no
hanmsat, no pumps, great benefits, competitive pay & new equip-
meat. Need 2 years experience. Call Bynim Transport Isr your
opportunity today. (800)741-7950.

DELIVER FEMA RV's FOR PAY! A NATIONAL RV delive''
service has immediate needs for qualified contractors to deliver
"new" RV trailers from factories and dealers to Hurricane relief
sites. This is a great way for you to help the victims. Please log
on today: www horizontransport corn


Home For Sale


BANK FORECLOSURES! omes liom $10.000! 1-3 bedroom
available t HUD. Repos. REO). etc. These homes mast sell! For
Listings Call (800)571-0225 Ext H373.


Legal Services


DIVORCES275-$350*COVERS children. etc. Only one signa-
ture required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays (800)462-
2000, ext.600. (8am-7pm) Alta Divorce. LLC. Established 1977.

NEED A LAWYER? All Criminal Defense & Personal Injury.
*Felonies *Domestic Violence *Misdemeanors *DUI *Traffic
*Auto Accident *Wrongful Death. "Protect Your Rights" A-A-
A Attorney Referral Service (800)733-5342.

Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Medical. 0*Business. *Para-
legal, *Computers, Job Placement Assistunce. Computer &
Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
www onlinelidewatertech.com


Real Estate


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROL NA. ESCAPE TI I1 liEAT IN 'TE It
COOL BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN
NC. Homes. Cabins. Acreage & Investments. Cherokee Moun-
tain Realty OMAC Real Estate. Murphy
www cherokeemountainrealtv corn Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.

NC MOUNTAIN HOMESITES Spectacular new gated
riverfront community, near Asheville. 1+ acre homesites from
the 40s. No time requirement to start building. Call Today:
(866)292-5762.

Lake Lot Sales. Beautiful Lake Russell, Starting from $49,995
with community water. 0/F on selected lots S300 down.
www t, lakerussellproperties cort Call Jimmy (706)213-6734.

NC MOUNTAINS- 100 MILE VIEWS! Grand opening- One Day
Only October 8th! 3+ acres starting at only $49,900. Excellent
financing, paved roads, utilities. Call (800)455-1981. ext. 325.

North Florida Land & Homes For Sale GOING FAST! Call
today for Free Video or clteck out ourn website:
www liveoaklhlouc1s bi, -Results Realty (386)590-0438.

No Hurricanes-on 50,000 acre lake in South Carolina. Homes
& home sites. View at: www..akcMurravProperlv net
(803)3.59-1113.

GRAND OPENING SALE! lake Bargains! Water access from
$34.900 w/FREE Boat Slips. PAY NO CLOSING COSTS! Sat &
Sun Oct. 15 & 16. Huge pre-construction savings on beauti-
folly wooded parcels tit 34.000 acre lake i'ennessee. Enjoy
unlimited water recreation. Surrounded by state forest. ILakefi'tro
available! Excellent lintcing! Call now (800)704-3154
X 658.

NC MOUNTAIN CABIN on mountain top, view. trees, watertl'll
& large public lake nearby. 2 bedroom, I bath. $175,000 owner
(866)789-8535 wwa.NC77.coism.

TENNESSEE -NEW LAKESIDE COMMUNITY Spectacular
homesite- just under an acre. $29.900. Close to downtown
Chattanooga. Lake access from within community. Call Today:
(866)292-5769.

Coastal Southeast Georgia Large wooded water access. marsh
view, lake front, and golf oriented honmesiles from the mid $70's
Live oaks, pool. tennis, golf. (877)266-7376.
www, cooperspoint coit.

Coastal North Carolina Waterfront! 3+/- Acres. $99.900 Beau-
ifuilly wooded parcel on deep beatable water with access to
ICW, Atlantic & sounds. Prime location close to town. Paved
rds. t/g utilities, county water. Excellent financing. Call now
(800)732-66011 x 1405.

North Carolina Gated Lakefront Community 1.5 acres plus.
90 miles of shoreline, Never before offered with 20% pre-
development discounts. 90%"K financing. Call (800)709-5253.

Montana Land Auction: 10/25/05 +/- 1396 acres offered int
three tracts. CRIP provides good income & fantastic wildlife
habitat, great access (406)485-2399 or (406)485-3698
'\www montanalandauctions com

Montana Fine Dining Establishment. Seals -/- 701: Full Li-
quor/Casino license; Operating Evening Ih urs; Established
Clientele: World Class Iliuntinag & Fishing. Montana LaiId
Brokers. (406)485-2399.

Steel Buildings

4 STEEL BUILDINGS! 24x36 $4.497. 36x48 $6.980. 40x64
$9,Q93. 50x131 $13.986. Must Selll!! Call E13N (800)863-9469.


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A COMCAR
Industries Company
EOE

INVITATION TO SUBMIT RESPONSES TO THE
ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
The Governing Board of the District requests that interested parties respond to the
solicitation below by 5:00 p.m., October 11, 2005. Further information is available
through DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com [(800) 711-1712], or the
District's website at www.sjrwmd.com. Bid packages may be obtained from
DemandStar by Onvia or the District by calling Connie Rozier, Contracts Administrator
at (386) 329-4211.
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS NUMBER SJ31413
FLAGLER COUNTY WATER SUPPLY PLAN DEVELOPMENT
Requires a Professional Engineer (PE) to develop a Water Supply Plan for the Flagler
County Area, identifying alternatives to ensure future demands are met.
The estimated budget for this project is $350,000.
The Evaluation Committee will meet at the Flagler County Cooperative Extension
Service Auditorium, 150 Sawgrass Road, Bunnell, FL 32110 at 9:30 a.m., October 25,
2005, to evaluate and rank Letters of Interest. The evaluation committee may request
that some or all respondents make an oral presentation in advance of finalizing the
rankings. If requested, oral presentations will be made at the Palm Coast Community
Center, 305 Palm Coast Parkway NE, Palm Coast, Florida 32137 on November 4,
2005. Respondents selected for oral presentations will be notified in advance of the
presentation date. Staff's recommendation will be presented to the Governing Board
at its December 13, 2005, meeting.
Special accommodations for disabilities may be requested through Connie Rozier,
Contracts Administrator or by calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5) business
days before the date needed.


THE FLORIDA STAR

REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS

RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 6:30 P.M.


DAL r,


r~iV~j


A U T INSRANC


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L - - -


Primary Residence No Income Verification
' Second Homes No Asset Verification
' Investment Property First & Second Mortgages


S -irsI Choice -'
, .T.i i. Ar,, S K, .,. 0,-,- r. .
Arini ~ Di 5C'AM" A-^D-"=L9(- ^'I


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PACP C~~~~~ FELORDASTAR ETMER2,20


Hints For Hormebuyers


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Betty Asque Davis

REALTOR





?ArT, t7w

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615 Highway AIA
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082


ADVERTISE YOUR REAL ESTATE!
Deadline for Ads
Tuesday @ 5 p.m.
Call: (904) 766-8834
Fax: (904) 765-1673
ad@thefloridastar.com


Email: badavis@WatsonRealtyCorp.com


.. I A-B 0 U T


I ATR IC S


SERVICES


*1*


Hope is more powerful than a hurricane.




Help victims of Hurricane Katrina and thousands of other disasters across the I American
country each year by donating to the Disaster Relief Fund, which enables the Red Red Cross
Cross to provide food, shelter, counseling and other assistance to those in need.
1-800-HELP NOW
redcross.org


All About Kids is the premiere pedi-
atric facility in Jacksonville, Florida.
We are dedicated to providing chil-
dren with the highest quality of
health care. Our doctors are Board
Certified Pediatricians with years of
Pediatric Emergency Room experi-
ence. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of
families with busy lifestyles. Come
see why so many parents trust All
About Kids Pediatrics with their chil-
dren's health.



Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and
have pediatric ER experience.


904.565.1271

877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com


Asthma Therapy
Pain Relief
Hemoglobin/Hematocrit Testing
Mono Screening
Rapid Strep Screening
Sport and School Participation
Physicals
Urinalysis
Well visits/Immunizations

EMR Technology
Our Electronic Medical Record System
enables us to be more efficient with
less paperwork and allows for:
Direct Pharmacy Link for fast and
convenient prescriptions
Check-in/Check-out process made
quick and efficient
Medical record history inquiries
and transfers that are concise and
easy with electronic database
management
Prompt subspecialty referrals

HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F; weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted


12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225
Located in the new Hidden. Hills Executive Park (near the corner of Fort
Caroline and Monument Rd.) 4 '


-WOE





Cam


Office:
Direct:
Fax:
Toll Free:


904-285-6300
904-473-1502
904-285-5330
800-288-6330


SEPTEMBER 24, 2005''


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE C-8,


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Daniel Curtis Lee: Young And Scoring Success On

His Own Terms


By Rych McCain

He is your everyday
kind of middle school
student who loves
what other youth his
age love i.e., hanging
out with friends and
being a typical 14 year
old. However, the nor-
mality ends with his
ex-curricular activi-
ties. Meet Daniel
Curtis Lee actor/ath-
lete.
Lee is a native of
Clinton, Mississippi
(close to Jackson). A
few years back, his
family decided to pull
up stakes and relocate
to Los Angeles to sup-
port his older brother
Nathaniel's fledging
acting career. At the
time, Lee was strictly
into football but used
to tag along with his
brother when he went
to auditions. He inad-
vertently found him-
self pulled into casting
directors' offices. His
dad told him,
"They've got their eye
on you too." So he
honed his craft via var-
ious workshops and
classes. Shortly after,
he landed his first part


in a feature film Friday
After Next, and guest
stints on TV's "First
Monday" and "The
Shield."
Currently, he has his
biggest role to date as
"Cookie" on "Ned's
Declassified School
Survival Guide," for
The Nickelodeon chan-
nel. Cookie is a com-
puter whiz whose glass-
es are connected to a
hard drive. He thinks
he's cool, but he's not.
Lee is also a star full-
back in the Long
Beach, California Pop
Warner League, while
attending a public
Junior High.
What really made
him get into acting
when football was his
only focus?
"I saw my brother,
getting all of those
checks rollin' in and
everything and I was
like aw, wow, cool!," he
energetically responds.
"But of course, he's not
going to give me his
money, so I was like,
you know what, I think
I better start doing this.
I really didn't want to,
but my mom and dad
kind of pressured me


' 4 :


Daniel Curtis Lee is "Cookie" on Nickelodeon's "Ned's
Declassified School Survival Guide. (2005 Andre' B.


Murray/A Bern Agency Photo)
into it. I got the acting
bug."
What was the transi-
tion like coming from a
small Mississippi town
to Long Beach? Lee
lights up again, "It was
really crazy. What I
thought of California
was way different when
I was back in
Mississippi. I thought it
was just a different
place. We would call


people here 'city
boys,"' back in
Mississippi, so I really
didn't want to come
out. There were a lot of
sights to see on the
way because we drove
out the first time. That
was really nice. We
drove through Arizona
and everything and it
was like dry. No
humidity and that real-

Lee continued on D-4


Wa su In Soy oS


By Rych McCain


Music
Houston based rap-
per Chamillionaire
has released the
single "Southern
Takeover featuring
Killa Mike and Pastor
Troy. Look for him on
a stage near you on the


with dates on campus at
Jackson State U., Clark
Atlanta U., Grambling
State U., and the Austin
Music Hall among oth-
ers. His "Sound of
Revenge, album will
drop October 25.
Stevie Wonder will
be releasing his long
anticipated new album


BET College Tour this month on the


Motown label.
American Idol, George
Huff, who is a native of
New Orleans, along
with his family, was a
victim and survivors of
Hurricane Katrina. His
family lost their homes.
.Huff, his mother and
sister evacuated to
Dallas where they now
Wassup continued on D-8


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Tupac Shakur First Rap Star Ever Immortalized In Bronze


ATLANTA Nine years to
the day after Tupac Shakur's
passing, the official unveiling
ceremony for a brand new
memorial bronze statue of the
late rap legend proved to be a
rousing celebration of life.
Over 1,000 people turned out
for. the unveiling, which was
held at the Peace Garden at the
Tupac Amaru Shakur Center
for the Arts (TASCA) on
Tuesday, September 13.
Ms. Afeni Shakur, Tupac's
mother and founder of the
Tupac Amaru Shakur
Foundation (TASF), found the
ceremony to be an emotional,
yet joyful, experience. Ms.
Shakur was overwhelmed by
the turnout for the latest addi-
tion to the Tupac Center,
which recently opened the
first of three phases of con-
struction, and will ultimately.
represent the legacy left
behind as Tupac's vision, fully
realized through his mother's.
efforts.
The statue will occupy the
center of the 6-acre Peace
Garden, surrounded by poetry
and quotations from Tupac.
The seven-foot sculpture sits
atop a three-foot base and fea-
tures rap's top-selling super-
star adorned in a suit (based
on an outfit actually worn by
Tupac) and holding a copy of
his famous book of poetry
penned when he was only 19,
The Rose that Grew from
Concrete.
Reverend Minister Server
led the attendees in an exhila-
rating, heartening prayer, fol-
lowed by- a moment of silence
in memory of Tupac and "all
the other fallen souls."
The statue was designed by
noted sculptor Tina Allen,
who has earned a reputation
immortalizing great figures
from African-American histo-


Tupac Amaru Shakur sculpture.
ry ranging from Nat King Cole
to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Tupac is the first rap star ever to
be memorialized in bronze.
"I was deeply moved to see
so many people brought to tears
upon first seeing the sculpture,"
said Ms. Allen. "It was clear
that something very special had
come into all of our lives
through this remarkable young
poet. Usually, people will
applaud or cheer -- but these
people were reacting to Tupac's
statue on an entirely different
level. Every generation picks
their own heroes -- and from the
incredible display of emotion I
was blessed to witness on
Tuesday, this generation's hero
is clearly Tupac Shakur."
On September 20, Tupac
Shakur's poetry is celebrated by
some of hip hop's finest with
the release of The Rose, Vol. 2,
a collection of songs inspired
by the poems Tupac wrote as a
teenager. The tracks on The
Rose, Vol. 2 are original songs
written and performed by an
impressive list of guests --
including Bone Thugs 'N
Harmony, Ludacris, Talib
Kwali, Outlawz, Lyfe Jennings
and Digital Underground's
Tupac continued on D-8


Lee continued
ly threw me off. Then I saw
the big buildings for the first
time when we got to Los
Angeles and I said 'wow!'
The people are really differ-
ent. Even their slang is differ-
ent from the South. There
were a lot of different things I
had to change with and adapt
to."
What about the difference
in the music?
"I was still a little' kid
when I came out so I really
didn't notice much of it," he
says. "My parents kind of had
me still listening to jazz. They
liked jazz, blues, R&B and
stuff. So the rap wasn't much
of a change. But the chopped
and screwed sound that they
have now, they didn't have


A 1. 1. ABO U T


A T R I C S


that when we first moved
out."
What is it like being a TV
star attending a public Junior
High in Long Beach? Lee
smiles, "Its great. It's pretty
much the same thing. A lot of
kids ask me for my autograph
or either want to talk to me
and ask questions about the
show. I don't have too much
trouble with that but I'm try-
ing to stay as normal as I can,
keep going to regular school
and just hang out with my
friends."
Check out Lee's show on
TV. You can bet your bottom
dollar that this positive, fun
loving young man is going
places either in front of a
camera, on the gridiron or
both.


All About Kids is the premiere pediatric facility in
Jacksonville, Florida. We are dedicated to provid-
ing children with the highest quality of health
care. Our doctors are Board Certified
Pediatricians with years of Pediatric Emergency
Room experience. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of families with
busy lifestyles. Come see why so many parents
trust All About Kids Pediatrics with their children's
health.
Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and have pediatric
ER experience.
904.565.1271
877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com


SERVICES
* Asthma Therapy
* Pain Relief
* Hemoglobin/Hematocrit
Testing
* Mono Screening
* Rapid Strep Screening
* Sport and School
Participation Physicals
* Urinalysis
* Well visits/Immunizations

HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F;
weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted


12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite Number 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225


The Florida Star


Page D-4/September 24, 2005








The Florida SrgIe


Independent Musicians Contribute To Relief Album


Music legend Burning Spear joins 18 other inde-
pendent artists in an album project to help Hurricane
Katrina victims. The effort, sponsored jointly by
Disc Makers, CD Baby, Taxi, Just Plain Folks, and
Sonicbids, seeks to raise $100,000 for the Red Cross
Disaster Relief fund. One hundred percent of the
proceeds from the CD "Gulf Coast Healing" will go
towards disaster relief. The artists and companies
have donated their talent, recordings, materials,
services, and promotional services at no charge -
every dollar raised through the sale of the disc will
be donated to the American Red Cross.


7i~L>


Burning Spear


TV IN BACK-


HIGHLIGHTS
WEEK OF 9/17/05:

TV ONE
(Jacksonville Comcast
Channel 160)

* Weekdays, 7 a.m. & 4
a.m. Get fit and feel
fabulous with the Donna
Richardson Joyner Show,
"Mind, Body, & Spirit."
* Weekdays, 10 a.m.
"Good Times"
* Weekdays, 2 p.m. &
3pm "I'll Fly Away"
* Weekdays, 6 p.m.
"Roc"
* Tuesday, 9 a.m. & 4
p.m. "B. Smith With
Style"'
* Tuesday, 8 p.m. -
"Living It Up With Patti
LaBelle"
* Saturday, 9/24, 8 p.m,
Bill Cosby's back on TV
One starring in the movie
Ghost Dad alongside
Denise Nicholas and
Kimberly Russell. The
movie was directed by
Sidney Poitier.
*It's an Alfre Woodard
Weekend on TV One -
celebrating the actress
joining television's
hottest series "Desperate'
Housewives." On Friday
9/23 at 9 p.m., Alfre co-
stars in the TV One pre-
miere of Spike Lee's


semi-autobiographical
feature film Crooklyn
alongside Delroy Lindo.
Crooklyn replays on
Sunday 9/25 at 3 p.m.
and 12midnight. And,
Sunday night 9/25 at 8
p.m. Woodard is the lead
actress in the vintage
telefilm The Child Saver,
co-starring Michael
Warren and Mario Van
Peebles.
*Sunday,9/25/05, 8 p.m.
"The Tom Joyner Sky
Show"
*Starting Monday 9/26 at
6 p.m., two of the most
popular African-American
sitcoms of the late-1980s
are back, as TV One
launches its run of Amen
side-by-side with 227 in a
nightly 6 p.m. -10 p.m.
"Back Together Again"
Marathon.

BET
* Daily, 6:00 a.m. -
BET's Morning
Inspiration with Brother
Gerard BET showcases
top ministers in the
African-American com-
munity, along with BET
personality, Gerard
Henry who provides
updates on gospel and
religious events.
* Weekdays, 11 a.m., 6
p.m. "106 & Park" -


Hang out with the indus-
try's hottest talents and
count down the day's top
videos voted on by you.
* Tuesday & Thursdays,
9 p.m. "Soul Food," the
award-winning series.
* Saturday, 9/24 An all
marathon of "The
Parkers."* Saturday,
9/17, 7:00 p.m. "Black
College Football" It's
the return of Black
College Footbal, and
BET is the place to be for
all the hard-hitting
action, excitement and
classic rivalries. Don't
miss one minute of these
intense gridiron battles
and the amazing half-
time performances of the
high-stepping Black col-
lege marching bands.
This week's .match-up
features the highly-antic-
ipated New York Urban
League Classic pitting
Morgan State University
vs. Hampton University.
* Sunday, 9/25, 9:00
a.m., "Bobby Jones
Gospel" Dr. Bobby
Jones hosts a soulful hour
of spiritual performances
featuring the Nashville
Super Choir. This- week:
Tye Tribbet & Greater
Anointed, J Moss, Corey
Red and Precise
* Sunday, 9/25, 10:00


Hope
tha


is more powerful
n a hurricane.


American
Red Cross

1-800-HELP NOW
redcross.org


1Org Thk, --qso. bro-ght t. yo. .y fhe A-e6-oo Red Co-e end the Ad Co.n.6l


a.m., "Video Gospel"
* Sunday, 9/25, 11:00
a.m. "Lift Every Voice"
with Floyd Flake.
* Sunday, 9/25, Noon,
"Celebration of Gospel"
BET's popular
"Celebration of Gospel"
is back for 2005 with
another round of soul-
stirring, hand-clapping
and inspiring gospel
music. Hosted once again
by actor/comedian Steve
Harvey, catch spirited
performances and mov-
ing renditions by some of
today's hottest and most-
talented artists from the
worlds of gospel, R&B
and hip-hop. Joining in
the celebration are Kirk
Franklin, Pastor Shirley
Caesar, BeBe Winans,
Pastor Donnie


McClurkin, Mary Mary,
Fred Hammond, Smokie
Norful, Tye Tribbett,
Angie Stone, Yolanda
Adams, Dr. Bobby Jones,
Ruben Studdard, Kiki
Sheard, .The Clark
Sisters, Deitrick Haddon,
J. Moss and Fantasia.

Black Family Channel
* Saturday, 9 a.m. until
noon Programming for
children including "Aqua
Kids" and "Fun!".
* Sunday, 7:00 p.m. -
Black Family Channel
Gospel Video
Countdown.
* Mon., Wed., Thurs.
7:30 p.m. "Ethnic
Health America."
* Saturday, 9/24 12 p.m.
- Black Family Channel
TV in Black continued on D-7


The Florida Star


Page D-5/lSeptember 24, 200Cj


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Whasiup continued from D-1
reside. His father and
other sister were
trapped for several days
in another home. His
dad is recovering in a
Baton Rouge hospital
where they were reunit-
ed last weekend. Huff is
donating the proceeds
from his current single,
"Brighter Day, to the-
storm survivors. -Rap
artist DeLon will
release his new album
"The Connection, on
September 27.
Movies


Transporter 2 (20th
'Century Fox Pictures)
stars Jason Statham,
Alessandro Gassman,
Amber Valletta, Kate
Nauta, Matthew
Modine and Jason
Flemyng. The opening
scene gets right to the.
point. Frank Martin (the
ex-Special Forces oper-
ative who hires himself
out as mercenary
"transporter"). Played
by Statham, Martin
beats the daylights out
of several street thugs in
a high rise parking lot.


17


,Statham is a wee bit too
stiff and stoic emotion-
ally and physically
throughout the entire
film. The scriptwriter
apparently equates
toughness with a ridged
robot mentality. His
nemesis, Lola (Nauta) is
'a worthy opponent in
that she shoots up
everything that can be
shot while karate kick-
ing the rest. This movie
has the usual high-
speed car chases, explo-
sions- and plenty of
fighting.


Tupac continued from D-4
Shock G (AKA Humpty
Hump), the man most
responsible for launch-
ing 2Pac's solo career.
In order to complete
the Tupac Center, the
Foundation is still in
need of an additional $3
million. For those wish-
ing to contribute, infor-
mation can be found at
these websites:
www.2PAClegacy.com
www.TASF.org


Monday
'9 p.m. on
ABC M
NFL Football:
The Denver
Broncos es-
sentially ruined
the Kansas
L .. City Chiefs'
season a year
ago. It happened in the very first
game, a. 34-24 Broncos win in
which quarterback Jake Plum-
mer threw for 230 yards and two
scores. Another early-season
encounter with Denver awaits
tonight, and K.C. hopes addi-
tions like cornerback Patrick Sur-
tain can thwart Plummer's effec-
tiveness.

Help Those In Need
To contribute online to
the Katrina relief efforts
go to:
blackamericaweb.com


- -- --


-- ---


_ __ __


7Page D-8/Septeimber 24, 2005


The Florida Star


dlll m