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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section A: Main continued
 Section C: Local
 Section C continued
 Section C: Around the Area
 Section C: Sports
 Section C continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
August 27, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00034

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
August 27, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00034

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section C: Local
        page C 1
    Section C continued
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Around the Area
        page C 4
    Section C: Sports
        page C 5
    Section C continued
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text



ALi
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"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame" FLORIDA

i"OR D


-oerving rnornaa
For 54 Years"


T1HE=


Tune In To IMPACT
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Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
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On WCGL-AM 1360


thefloridastar-com


Another Yoi

Body Found By Fis
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
The community is still
concerned about the num-
ber of young black men
who have mysteriously died
in seemingly violent man-
ners. What is puzzling is
that the murdered young
men have had some type of
an arrest and many of their
bodies have been discov-
ered in areas that appeared
not to be related to the place

Jackonsville

File Seek Fed
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
In a statement to The
Florida Star and in a letter
to Judge Charles 0.
Mitchell, Jr., Longshoremen
Local 1408 said that they
would like a federal labor
attorney or agency to meet
with them and provide them
operational guidelines.
Providing a petition signed
by approximately 100 union
workers, senior union mem-
ber, Paul Fields, Jr. said that
they want to be positive that
their performance and con-
tracts are in line with federal
guidelines before a settle-
ment is signed by the judge
regarding a lawsuit filed by
women who had applied to
join the union but was
denied. According to the
rank and file members, the
agreed settlement is in con-
flict with the local seniority
policy. The agreement was
made by the local leaders

NEWS IN BRIEF


Brock Peters
To Kill A Mockingbird
actor Brock Peters dies
Brock Peters, most
noted for his role in To
Kill a Mockingbird died
Tuesday at his home
after suffering with pan-
creatic cancer since
January. He was 78.
He appeared in
dozens of other movies
in a career spanning half
a century including
episodes of the TV series


ing Black Man Dead Agreement Set At $75 Million For Toxic

Sherman Ash Victims, Families Tell Their Story

of death. JACKSONVILLE, .-- n
BTuesday afternoon on, atioh BFla. They may have a lot |_ g E
approximately 4:00 p.m., a aOTv o
more money in their 'FIFBMPE.MULLET
fisherman found the body of m p ock et Christmas, 2005 heir ~
23-year-old Timothy Bamrnard pocket Christmas, 2005 F
King at 1900 Zoo Parkway 4. $but the money won't stop.
near Heckscher Drive. King the pain they suffer day-f er t.an[e inohs
had arrest offenses in 1992, to-day because of the *HL
1999, 2001, and 2005. His toxic ash sites they were
body was nearly 40 yards exposed to for many years
into the woods beside a nar- some even today. Ont, ,t'i, fn' u h
row dirt path. Earlier this Monday, more than 4,000 325
Black Men continued on A-7 Timothy Barnard King Jacksonville present or
former Northside resi-
A bullet-ridden sign warning residents of the contamination
Longshorem en Rank And dents agreed to accept of Moncrief Creek.
$75 million as settlement

meral Guidance for the incinerator ash
,..contamination exposure
but was not voted for by thec an" r --..
r.-ankd ...mers... to in the area from the.
rank and file members.,192. .s. .o
Such"ar mv e, thef ee", ... W .e" 1920's to the 1960's. The
Such a move, they feel,
lawsuit filed charged the
may possibly jeopardize their las ut it file cagne the
position as it may appear that city with polluting neigh-'
the organization may do borhoods around the
favors rather than follow pol- Brown's Dump, the
icy guidelines. Doeboy Dump, Bessie
Mr. Fields say that it is Circle and incinerators at
imperative that the organiza- Fifth and Cleveland,
tion be given these guidelines J Forest Street and at Toxic ash victims stand in line at the Prime Osborne
because the city is scheduled e Southside, Lonnie C. Convention Center for entrance into the settlement meeting.
to get a heavier load of work Paul Fields, Jr. Miller Park and Crystal Dickerson, who initiated supervisors of the "hole."
and they do not wish for any- Mr. Fields said that he Springs the research and lawsuit She said her family was
thing to deter them for getting personally has been a mem- Many feel that the talked candidly about her poor and scavenged the
the contracts for the jobs they er of Locally has been a morem- learning disabilities, can- childhood around what dump for food and furni-
arhey requested to do. Therefore, than 30 years. His father cer deaths, breathing she refer to as "the hole." ture. Because grocery
Mithell to sign an injunction and grandfather were long- problems and a number of Now a nurse, a pastor, and stores would throw out
Mith a t would prevent the settle- shorement. "Whe wish to be ng- sickness and hardships an articulate historian, their expired items in the
thment from being activated, educated on the guidelines to be they encountered, Mrs. Dickerson remem- dump much food could be
"Went don't want anyone to rules and regulations of fed-s, stemmed from the toxic bers her days with her retrieved as well as other

question our integrity," said eral labor laws," said Mr. ash that their bodies were grandparents. In fact, she items. But the main prob-
Mr. Fields. "For this reason, Fields.. "We have been exposed to. They also said, they literally lived lem was the fact many
we are requesting such steps longshoremen too long to attribute the many infant from the "hole." Her people and companies
be taken so that it will be allow anything to come in deaths and birth deformi- grandparents, because used the dump for dump-
known we are 'whistle and give our competition an ties to the toxic waste. they lived at the edge of ing all types of waste that
known we are 'whistle and give our competition an
clean. upper hand." Mrs. Velma the hole, was the "unpaid" probably made the site

of "'Star Trek" and the black men fronm post-sec- new testing and pro- County branch of the RS'Ps \\ere received
movie versions of the ondary education. Only 8 grams. The suit, which NAACP in the 1930s. from all parts of the
popular science fiction percent of the 250,000 was filed Monday, asks a They did extensive work world. The faked wed-
serial. Georgia's public colleges judge to declare that state to register voters and ding was called
and universities are black and local funds cannot be remove the Jim Crow 'Operation Royal Charm'
Georgia University men compared to 16 per- used to meet the goals of laws. Moore died imme- and named for the yacht.
Reaches Out To Black cent black women, 30 the law. Experts expect diately when the dyna- The bride and groom
Men percent white men and 37 other states could vote to mite that was placed were undercover FBI
Twenty-seven black percent white women. join the lawsuit or file under their home explod- agents. As guest arrived,
freshmen at the The president of the their own. ed. His wife died nine they were arrested. Eight
University of West university said his mis- Florida Established A days later from the of those charged were l
Georgia will work togeth- s ion is to olleget more blakeep $25,000 Reward For injuries received. The arrested on their way to
er, live together, attend men into college and keep Tips To Solve Murder reward money is coming the wedding. Counterfeit
classes together, study them there until gradua- Of 1951 Civil Rights from the Florida money in $100 bills
and learn together as part tion. Pioneers Association of Crime totaled about $4.4 mil-
first le Carrolltoning community' Connecticut Sues A reward up to Stoppers. lion, cigarettes worth
for African-American Federal Government $25,000 has been estab- $42 million and other
men. It is believed that Over No Child Left lished to help Florida All Wedding Guests items such as ecstasy,
this is the only learning Behind Law authorities solve the mur- Arrested met amphetamine and
community for black men Connecticut became ders of Florida civil rights Guest were invited to Viagra worth hundreds
at a historically white the first state to file suit leaders Harry and an early Sunday after- of thousands of dollars
public college or univer- against the federal gov- Harriette Moore, whose noon wedding on a yacht was confiscated. The
sity. ernment over the No home was bombed on docked near Atlantic City affair was seven months
The school's Board of Child Left Behind Act, Christmas night in 1951. but did not get the oppor- in the planning. The
Regents formed a task claiming the Bush admin- The Moores lived in tunity to see a wedding operation was an interna-
force three years ago to istration did not provide Mims, Florida and performed. They were all tional affair that included
idtntif footnrc t~rvninio enough money to nav for formed the Brevard sent invitations and Asians and U. S. citi-


8 5Wt169 00151 0


OiF FL,-iFIDA HISTORY
~ ~ C~j4ifji'' O)F FLilt.IDA
-PO BOX 117007 (01.710,.06)
GAINESV)ILLE FL 32611.7007


_ ___ __1 __ I ~_ 1_1


Nivoi: 11 Ili! W IN


____


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CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
RON WILLIAMS, SR. SAMUEL CRISWELL
NEWS EDITOR ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
CHERYL COWARD LIZ BILLINGSLEA
DESIGN EDITOR ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
COLUMNIST REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of anyt solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0
First African American Induct
The Florida Press Hall Of F









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To Be Equal:
John H. Johnson, American
Marc H. Morial, President
CEO, National Urban League


"I thought my way out
of poverty," said John H.
Johnson, the founder and
publisher of Ebony and Jet
magazines and the busi-
ness empire they spawned
who died August 8 at age
87. "Ebony was my pass-
port."
There can be no doubt
that while Johnson was at
that moment speaking only
for himself, the reference
actually applies much
more broadly.
Ebony magazine, and
all the subsequent products
of the Johnson empire,
were our passport into the
modem era-and by "our"
I mean the whole of
American society.
For what John H.
Johnson did, beginning in
the early 1940s, was to
intensify through his
fledgling publications the
powerful spirit-the pur-
suit of freedom-then
coursing through Black
America. He did that mere-
ly by covering the life of
both ordinary and extraor-
dinary African Americans
in what was then a revolu-
tionary fashion for most
American media: not as
figments of the white-


racist imagination but as
human beings.
Johnson's pursuit and
his impact were only fit-
ting because he himself
was a creation of the
forces that in the early and
middle decades of the
twentieth century forged
modem Black America.
Arkansas-born, Johnson
and his widowed mother,
like millions of blacks,
became part of the great
waves of the Black
Migrations, fleeing the
racially-stultifying South
for the urban north-
Chicago-in the early
1930s.
In many ways, of
course, for African
Americans the North dur-
ing these decades was lit-
tle better than the South.
But in the difference lay
opportunity, and that
would make all the differ-
ence for those African
Americans like Johnson
who were determined to
think their way out of
poverty and discrimina-
tion. For him the "think-
ing" including college at
the University of Chicago,
and, perhaps more impor-
tant, mixing in the vibrant


and still largely-separate rights movement then tak-


black and white communi-
ties of Chicago, and
absorbing the meaning of
the racial ferment occur-
ring throughout the coun-
try during the 1930s and
1940s.
These were the years
when lawyers Charles
Hamilton Houston and
Thurgood Marshall were
crafting the legal strategies
that would ultimately
destroy government sanc-
tioned racial discrimina-
tion; when Jesse Owens
and Joe Louis and, later,
Jackie Robinson, were
compelling whites to see
that blacks, too, could be
"American" sports heroes;
when Marian Anderson
offered dramatic proof that
artistry knows no color
barriers; and when civil
rights activists demanded
during World War Two that
blacks be involved in the
fight against fascism on
equal terms.
Johnson's publications,
Ebony and Jet, reached far-
ther into Black America
than black-owned news-
papers and with their
national coverage, forged
and knit together a much
broader, better-informed
readership.
In this way, these two
"Bibles" of Black America
both helped stimulate the
new mass-action civil


ing shape and signaled
White America to prepare
for the "New Negroes"
coming to claim their full
American citizenship.
Johnson's entrepreneur-
ial vision and his overcom-
ing the odds to start and
build his publications
reflected the interior land-
scape of Black America-
its intelligence and
shrewdness; its toughness
and resourcefulness, and
its determination to grasp
the full measure of its
American citizenship
In a truly American
sense, of course, John
Johnson was a classic
example of that hardy
breed-the entrepreneur-
who sees a consumer need
and moves astutely to
respond to it.
It's America's great for-
tune that the "consumer
need" he focused his atten-
tion on had at its core pur-
pose the expansion of
democracy-the making
of modem-day America.
John H. Johnson, once
poor and bom into a world
in which the larger society
demanded that African
Americans be poor,
became enormously
wealthy. But it's the
United States of America
that is much the richer for
his talents and accomplish-
ments.


* ~. ~
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a ils~x mAr. radybrST. -"


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


National Newspaper
Publishers Association
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ted Into
Fame


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FrLORIDA STAR


A UGUST 2 7,2005


PAGfE A-2


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FLORIDA STAR


Installation Service Planned Faith In Our Community>

At New First Corinth Church -Schedule of Events and Services-


Installation serv-
ices for Rev. Louis C.
Parker, Jr. will be
held August 25-
"" "Si August 26, nightly at
7:00 p.m. at New
First Corinth
S'.Missionary Baptist


S be installed as Pastor
on Sunday, ALtgust
28 at 3:00 p.m. Local
ministers will partici-
S pate each night. The
Rev. Louis C. Parker, Jr. church is located at
6119 Bagley Rd.


Global Poverty


To Be Addressed

Leaders from a wide range of Christian denominations
worldwide will gather at Washington National Cathedral
September 11 to discuss concrete ways the faith community
can better aid the United Nations in its Millennium
Development Goal of eradicating extreme poverty across the
globe. Following two days of private deliberations, a dele-
gation will travel to New York to present a communique to
the U.N. on the eve of its 60th General Assembly session
beginning September 14.
Among those expected to attend the sessions at the
Cathedral are George Leonard Carey, the retired Archbishop
of Canterbury; Frank Griswold, Presiding Bishop of the
Episcopal Church in the United States; and Archbishop
Andrew Hutchinson, Primate of the Anglican Church of
Canada. Church leaders from numerous African nations
attending include Archbishop Nonjonkulu Ndungane. of
Cape Town; Lubabalo Ngewu, Rector of The College of the
Transfiguration in South Africa; and Ndaba Mazabane,
Chair of World Evangelical Alliance in South Africa.
Religious leaders from Kenya, Botswana and Tanzania will
also be preselit.
'Other world religious leaders attending the -conference
include Angel Furlan, former President of Iglesia Evangleica
Luterana Unida in Brazil; Luis Prado, retired Bishop of the
Province of Brazil; Dorothy Lau, Director of Hong Kong
Sheng Kung Hui Welfare Council; Ishmael Noko, General
Secretary of the Lutheran World Federation in Switzerland;,
Setri Nyomi, General Secretary of World Alliance of
Reformed Churches in Switzerland; Jenny Te Paa, Principal
of the College of Saint John the Evangelist in New Zealand;
Richard Marsh, Director of the International Education
Centre of Canterbury College in the United Kingdom; and
Geoff Tunicliffe, International Director of the World.
Evangelical Alliance of Canada.
The convocation will commence in the Cathedral nave
Sunday, Sept. 11, with a lecture by Dr. Jeffrey Sachs,
Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, at
2:00 p.m. Dr. Sachs, who was recently named by Time mag-
azine one of the 100 most influential leaders in the world, is,
also a special adviser to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan
on the Millennium Development Goals. His address at the
Cathedral will be open to the public.. An interfaith prayer
service, also open to the public, follows 'at 4 p.m.
The convocation, officially called The Consultation of
Religious Leaders on Global Poverty at Washington
National Cathedral, is an initiative of the Cathedral's recent-
ly-established Center for Global Justice and Reconciliation.
The center is directed by John L. Peterson,. an Episcopal
priest and former Secretary General of the Anglican
Communion. The center forges collaborations within the
Anglican Communion, among Christian denominations, and
with interfaith partners, governments, NGOs, and the private
sector.


'/A.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR
After The Funeral


The death of a loved one
comes in many ways, a spouse or
parent you've loved for half a
century, a child you never knew, a,
friend's death by suicide or vio-
lence. However, the death of
someone creates changes.
Relatives, friends and neigh-
bors are supportive at the time of
a death, during the wake and
funeral. Food, flowers and physi-
cal presence are among the many
thoughtful expressions. After the.
funeral, however, many grieving
people wonder what happened to
their friends.
The journey of recovering
from losses and significant life
changes. This is a, process that
-loes not occur overnight, it may


take weeks, months, years, or
even a life time-- depending on
the person and the type of loss.
One doesn't just "get over" loss.
There is no "perfect" or "right"
or "correct" way to process a
loss. Each person's experience,
like each grief experience, will
be unique.
.Once the funeral has been
completed, there are' other mat-
ters which need to be taken care
of as the family adjusts'to their
loss.


A.B. COLEMAN
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
a5660Tnlncrlef Rd.
Tel: '68-05.a07
www.ABColernan.com


RETIREMENT CELEBRATION-A Retirement celebra-
tion honoring Rev. A.B. Cbleman, Jr. will be held Saturday,
August 27, 5:00 p.m. at Philippians Community Church
(multipurpose facility), 7578 New Kings Rd. The donation
for- the occasion is $35. For further information call
904/713-9821 or 904/765-4080.
MUSIC FOR SUNDAY MORNING-The Unitarian
Universalist Church of Jacksonville, 7405 Arlington
Expressway (North Service Road) presents Musical
Celebrations on Sundays at 10:45 a.m. The date of the per-
formance is Sunday, August 28 .
UPLIFT JESUS-The Sword and Shield- Kingdom
Outreach Ministry of The Christian Fellowship Gospel
Chorus will uplift Jesus in praises, preaching and
singing on, Sunday, August 28, 3:45 p.m. at .The
Father's House Conference Center, 1820 Monument
Rd., Building 2. Various Christians from around the
city will participate. Admission is free. Minister Lou
McCormick-Watson, Evangelist Ethel Pritchard, and
Rev. Mattie Freeman invite the public to attend.
WOMEN IN RED CONFERENCE-The 'Greater
Refuge Temple Women's Ministries invites the public
to attend the 500 Women n Red Conference-Women of
Excellent Spirit Anticipating God's Elevation on
Saturday, August 27 at 1:00 p.m. The conference. is
being held to promote fellowship among the Women of
God and raise funds for the installation of an elevator to
assist senior Saints and handicapped persons reach the
second level of the Temple. Special guests include
Mary Demps of Greenville, Christie Thompson of
Orange Park, Patricia Springer of Jacksonville, and the
USS JFK Male Chorus. The church is located at 1317
Rowe Ave. For more information contact the church at
(904) 768-4009.
WOMEN OF THE BIBLE-The New Fountain
Chapel African Methodisr Episcopal Church family
invites all churches and their congregations to attend
The Women of the Bible presentation on Sunday,
August 28. For the time and other information call:
Joyce Jackson at 354-3021 or 358-2258. The church is
located at 737 Jessie St. Rev. Louis Kirkland, Pastor.
EMANUEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
CELEBRATING 72ND ANNIVERSARY WITH
GOSPEL EXPLOSION .2005- Emanuel Missionary
Baptist Church's 72nd Anniversary celebration will fea-
ture the Dynamic Traveling Stars, singing "Pull Over
Let the Lord Drive," Bishop Jefferson and Sons of
Thunder, Shirley and Sons of Harmony, Brother Willie
Miller, Dr. Willie Lee Thomas, and Bro. Kenneth
Smith singing "Walk Around Heaven." The Gospel
Explosion is FREE and will be held on Saturday,
'September 10, 2005 at 6:30 p.m. The church is located
at 1203 NE 8th Avenue, Gainesville, Fla. Rev. Anthony
R. Thomas,Sr., Pastor.
MEMORIAL CELEBRATION AND CANDLE-
LIGHT VIGIL-Greater New Mt. Moriah Missionary
Baptist Church, Rev. Dr. Percy Jackson Sr. and Jr.,
Pastors, invite the public to attend a Memorial
Celebration and Candlelight Vigil on Sunday, August
28 at 4:00 p.m. This program is being held in remem-
brance of departed loved ones.
HOMECOMING CELEBRATION-The Southside
Church of God In Christ will celebrate Homecoming
Thursday, September 1-Saturday, September 3. The
church is located at 2179 Emerson St. Bishop Edward
Robinson, Sr., Pastor.
Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue.
Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@the-
floridastar.com

African Church Files Religious

Discrimination Lawsuit
PLANO, Texas-- An African American church, in a pre-
dominantly white side of town, filed a religious discrimina-
tion lawsuit today against the Wichita County Appraisal
District.
In the lawsuit, the Full Gospel Powerhouse Church of
' God in Christ accuses the appraisal district of violating the
Constitution by denying them tax exempt status on property,
while granting it to other churches in the same geographical
area and under the same circumstances.
"Full Gospel Powerhouse Church is suffering unequal
treatment," said Hiram Sasser, director of litigation for
Liberty Legal Institute. "It is shameful that the appraisal dis-
trict is trying to tax this church out of existence."
Shortly after the Full Gospel Powerhouse Church moved
to their new location, the church sanctuary burnt down.
During the last three years while the church has not had a
building on the property, they had been required by the
appraisal district to pay taxes on the land, despite their tax-
exempt status.
"The church burned, and they tried to rebuild. Right
when they had the money to rebuild for themselves, the tax
collector swooped down and grabbed it," Sasser said.


Other churches in the area have not been penalized
and taxed for uinused land in the city.


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review .......8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


.I'~i ~


/ CHRISTIAN FAMILY

WORSHIP CENTER

S Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
S (Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
; 5 Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service.................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities



Evangel

Temple
/ / (, ..,. t ...
Destiny 1)ranma Nlinistries
p14e..0 .L t s
"Your Final Destination"
Sunday., Aug. 28th
@ 6:00 p.m.
Monday, August 29Lh
@' 7:30 p.m.
([|'Orii lha%'e eer seen Heaven's Gates &
Hell's l-lanies., don't Alis.s this ID)an a)


R75a lamtna Bl d.
Jacks.on ille, FL 2205

90-4-781-9393







Thanks For Reading
And Supporting The Florida Star!


PAGE A-3


)I







F)A ULA -AT


Socially Speaking


Betty Asque
Davis

"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"


Stage Aurora's CROWNS Is Marvelous!
"Our crowns have already been bought and paid for.
All we have to do is wear them." -James Baldwin
The ladies, including my Jacksonville Links sisters
attending Stage Aurora's CROWNS production last
weekend were dressed for the occasion! And you have
one last chance to see the production this weekend
August 26-28, 2005 at FCCJ's Ezekial Bryant
Auditorium on the Northside. This is a must see! Get
those fabulous hats out! Or go sans your chapeau. But
go! You'll be so delighted!
With a stage backdrop adorned with a miscellany of
fabulous hats, in association with The Jacksonville
Chapter, Links, Inc. and WZAZ 1408 Gospel, the
Stage Aurora Theatrical Company put on a fabulous per-
formance last weekend with their CROWNS production!
It was in old-fashioned hand clapping, fan waving and
singing time! It was 'church' on stage and in the audi-
ence. The entire cast was wonderful! I can't say enough
about the brilliance of Stage Aurora's Director Darryl
Reuben Hall.
The musical, written by Regina Taylor based on the
book by Michael Cunningham and Craig Marberry,
gives witness to churchwomen and their hats. The musi-
cal also provides a historical perspective on the roots of
African women and their head adorning. The CROWNS
book authors were absolutely correct when they wrote,
"Countless black women would rather attend church
naked than hatless. For these women, a church hat, flam-
boyant as it may be, is no mere fashion accessory; it's a
cherished African American custom, one observed with
boundless passion by black women of various religious
denominations. A woman's hat speaks long before its
wearer utters a word. It's what Ms. Deirdre Guion calls
'hattitude'....There's a little more strut in your carriage
when you wear a nice hat. There's something special
about you." If a hat says a lot about a person, it says even
more about a people-the customs they observe, the sym-
bols they prize, and the fashions they fashion."
The musical captures the essence of the book beauti-
fully. In 1998, photographer Michael Cunningham was
stirred to photograph African American women in their
stunning church hats. Mr. Cunningham engaged many
enthusiastic women. Later Craig Marberry convinced
Cunningham that oral histories should accompany the
portraits. Published in 2000, the book CROWNS was a
smashing success and Ms. Regina Taylor wrote a stage
adaptation of the book.
The Jacksonville production is superb!

Stanton High School's Class of 1933 Celebrates
The members of Stanton High School's Class of 1933
are examples of 'living life to the fullest." The very spry
seniors celebrated their 73rd class reunion at the
American Beach Villa of Michael and Florida Star
reporter Mrs. Marsha Dean Phelts. Classmate Ms.
Ruth Stewart of Houston, TX called her classmates dur-
ing the reunion at American Beach.
The reunion is always a family affair of classmates
with their children, grandchildren and great grandchil-
dren having fabulous inter-generatiorial fun and the 1933.
class members are already planning for the 74th in 2006!
They are such a beautiful testimony of life!

Footnote from last week: Ms. Kelly Martin, Esq.
who was featured in one of the photos in the' Brooks-
Smith wedding segment was the flower girl in Dr.
Geraldine Williams Smith's (mother of the bride) wed-
ding. Ms. Martin and her mother also featured in last
week's photo are cousins of Dr. Smith and the bride. In
addition to being cousins, the new Mrs. Brooks and Ms.
Martin are good friends.
It is indeed a small world as Ms. Martin and my older
son were classmates from grade school through Bishop
Kenny High School graduation. I recall so well that Ms.
Martin, Esq. was a Spelling Bee champion during both
her grade school and high school years.

Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me directly at ima-
jol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904)
285-7008.
See you in the paper!


The Readers of the Black Press

in America are more educated, I

make more income

and have'

substantial buvina power.
Source: The Media Audit
2004 Black Newspapers Readership Veport, nnpa.orq


0~


ri)


Education Now and Babies Later (ENABL)
Abstinence Only Education to Duval County Youth aged 9-19.
Free to all organizations, including
faith-based and community groups.
The "Managing Pressures Before Marriage" curriculum
teaches youth about:
The risk of early sexual involvement.
Assertive refusal techniques.
Building healthy relationships.
Resisting peer pressures.
Program goals:
to reduce teen pregnancy.
To reduce the rate of sexual activity in adolescents.
To reduce the rate of sexually transmitted diseases
among adolescents.

'HEALTH
River Region Human Services Prevention Dept.
650 Park St., Jacksonville, FL 32204
www.rrhs.orq 904-359-6962

, ADVERTISING DI.AL'L I,:-
TUESDAY (i' 5 P.i l
Coll- 706.-9 3-1


AUGUST 27. 2005


FLORIDA STA R


P A ^ A-


~l~lll*Li~l*







F L O R I D A ZT A P A G A -


Florida A&M Sponsors

Grape Harvest Festival


Glorious Johnson Named To Florida


Judicial Nominating Committee


responsibilities of any
United States Senator. I
look forward to the commis-
sion providing valuable
input to myself and Senator
Nelson for this important
service," said Senator
Martinez.
Councilwoman Johnson


says she is honored by the
appointment and looks for-
ward to taking an active part
in the commission's pro-
ceedings.
She noted that the role of
the courts is fundamental to
the preservation of the rule
of law and the long-standing


system of checks and bal-
ances in government.
Councilwoman Johnson
said she is anxious to play a
part in the all-important
selection of judges who
demonstrate impeccable
character, integrity, and
respect for the law.


TALLAHASSEE, Fla.--The Center for Viticulture
and Small Fruit Research in the Florida A&M University
(FAMU) College of Engineering Sciences, Technology
and Agriculture (CESTA), will host the 2005 Grape
Harvest Festival on September 1, from 8:00 a.m. until
2:00 p.m.
The center is located at 6505 Mahan Dr. Registration
is free to the public. This year's event includes activities
that highlight the significant research conducted by
FAMU's scientists on the muscadine grape as well as
other small fruits at the Center.
Participants will have an opportunity to taste and sam-
ple value-added products made from the muscadine
grape including a variety of juices and jellies.
The activities will include guided tours of the research
facility and vineyard, and biological control research
plots that feature ongoing research.
Other highlights include informative sessions on
grape throwing and home wine-making, grape culinary
display; a grape marathon and grape berry throwing con-
test
The day-long festivity culminates with participants
enjoying an old-fashioned grape stomping competition
for prizes. A barbecue lunch wilt be served and donations
will be accepted for the lunch.
Co-sponsors of this event include FAMU-USDA
Center for Biological Control, Florida Grape Growers
Association, City of Tallahassee, Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the FAMU
College of Engineering Sciences, Technology and
Agriculture.


Glorious Johnson


Jacksonville City
Councilwoman Glorious
Johnson (At-Large, Group
5) has been appointed by
U.S. Senator Mel Martinez
to serve on Florida's Federal
District Court Judicial
Nominating Commission, an
entity created by the Florida
Congressional,Delegation to
provide recommendations
for potential nominees to the
Floirda Federal District
Courts.
The Commission's mem-
bers are divided into geo-
graphic regions correspon-
ding to the three divisions of
the U.S. District Courts in
Florida. Councilwoman
Johnson is a member of the
Middle District Conference.
"Recommending people
of the highest character, intel-
lect, integrity and fair-
mindedness for appointment
to the federal bench is
among the most important


B-CC Names New Chief


Information Officer


DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla. -- Bethune-Cookman
College President Dr. Trudie
Kibbe Reed announces the
appointment of Franklin E.
Patterson as Chief
Information Officer.
Patterson comes to B-CC
from Southern University
(Baton Raton, La.) where he
has served as Director of the
Information Systems
Division since July 2004.
Prior to Southern University,
Patterson worked as
Director of Information
Technology at both Mount
Union College (Ohio) and
Johnson C. Smith University
(NC).


Patterson's management
experience includes knowl-
edge of networking,
telecommunications, dis-
tance education/learning
platforms, and fund-raising
with foundations.
A 1991 graduate of
Johnson C. Smith University
with a BS degree in
Computer Science,
Patterson also has a MBA
from the McColl School of
Business at Queens
University in Charlotte, NC
(2001).
He is currently working
on his Ph.D. in Management
and Organization with a spe-
cialization in Information


Technology Management at
Capella University in
Minneapolis.
He is a member of the
Association of Information
Technology Professionals
(AITP), EDUCAUSE,
HelpDesk 2000, the
National Black MBA
Association, the American
Association of Higher
Education, the Teaching
And Learning Roundtable,
Association of University
Technology Masters and the
Academy of Management.
He is also a member Kappa
Alpha Psi Fraternity.


Florida Baby In Need Of


Life-Saving Transplant


WEST PALM BEACH,
Fla.--Volunteers are needed
to assist with raising funds
for a Florida baby's trans-
plant-related expenses.
Kimyah Jerido, born on
January 13, 2005, is the
focus of a fundraising cam-
paign to assist with her med-
ical expenses. She was
diagnosed with Bilary
Atresia, and doctors at
Jackson Memorial Hospital
in Miami recommended a
life-saving liver transplant.


An estimated $75,000 is
being raised by West Palm
Beach volunteers to assist
Kimyah with her transplant-
related costs.
She is the daughter of
Kimberly Brown and Jerry
Jerido. Her grandparents are
Eddie Mae Mosley, Frankie
Jerido, and Jerry Jerido.
Her parents have asked
for assistance from the
Children's Organ Transplant
Association, Bloomington,
IN, a national charity dedi-


cated to organizing and
guiding families and com-
munities in raising funds for
transplant-needy patients.
The organization's prior-
ity is to assure that no child
is denied a transplant or be
excluded from a transplant
waiting list due to a lack of
funds.
One hundred percent of
all funds raised are used for
transplant-related expenses.
Tax-deductible donations
may be made in person at
any Wachovia Bank branch
location using account num-
ber 3000025424011 or
mailed to the Children's
Organ Transplant
Association, 2501 COTA
Drive, Bloomington, IN
47403.
Check or money orders
should be made payable to
"COTA for Kimya J."
Secure credit card dona-
tionas are also accepted
online at www.cota.org. For
more information call (561)
471-0305 or (561) 842-
0784.


R E A L I r





C lAra 4 l 7 I I 1
McLduohl 1
k itI I ;A l A
-W .L .6' SY


Kimyah Jerido


.9 '.9.


a


- --9 ----- ----~I 1 r Ilr


"JaEcksonville.'s Long-Time- Friend"


6050-6 Moncr~ief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209


PAGE A-5


FLORIDA STAR


A [ICY TINT 2 00


d P.4


Andrea-The People's


;"';~~'.~w~a;,~








JU UljL "1-y 1 ..


First Phase of NAACP Women




In Africa Project Completed


I.-.
'I
w-
~ ~i ~ B F -I ri"- 7
2'
~ II~. I ~"


The delegation gets a first hand view of the work done on the school. The school is
the first phase of Women in the NAACP international project to buidl schools in
Benin.
c


An NAACP delegation stands with children near a new grade school in the Republic
of Benin.


The Women in the
NAACP (WIN), a division
of the National Association
for the Advancement of
Colored People (NAACP),
traveled to Africa to official-
ly open a new grade school
in the Republic of Benin.
The school represents the
first phase of WIN's interna-
tional project to build


schools in Benin, a major
NAACP effort to help
Africans build a stronger
community and enhance
educational opportunities
for their children.
Thelma T. Daley,
NAACP National WIN
Director, said: "This interna-
tional effort impacted a
community that has been


void of any educational
institution within a radius of
15 miles.
This humble effort now
allows children in the ele-
mentary grades to attend
school within their village
and not be endangered by
walking miles each morning
to receive a basic fundamen-
tal education."


Chavez Signs Agreement With Jamaica; Bush

Administration Keeps Distance From

Pat Robertson's Assassination Comment


President of Venezuela


Hugo Chavez,

Hugo Chavez







Hugo Chavez


was on a
one-day
working
visit to
Jamaica
o n
Tuesday,
August
23 and
signed the


PetroCaribe Agreement
intended to benefit the
Caribbbean region through
lower energy costs as well as
development of supply
infrastructure.
Jamaica is the first
Caribbean nation to finalize
an agreement with
Venezuela on a new plan for
the South American nation
to supply oil to countries
throughout the region at
below-market prices.
Under the agreement
with Jamaica, Venezuela


will provide oil at a dis-


A.







P.J.
Patterson


counted
rate of $40
per barrel,
compared
to the
more than
$60 that it
now costs
on the
world mar-
k e t ,


Patterson said.
The deal, which takes
effect on August 29, will ini-
tially involve about 22,000
barrels per day, the prime
minister said.
Jamaica will be able to
pay Venezuela in goods and
services as well as through
low-interest, long-term
loans, he said.
Chavez and Prime
Minister P.J. Patterson also
signed a bilateral agreement
committing Venezuela to
upgrading a refinery's pro-


E~TE.1 ~1I1L!~iLI] ~1R 'U
.
~- ~ -
C,,



Cu
U
~, = C,,
U
Cu *
=
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acE


duction capacity from
30,000 barrels a day to
50,000 barrels a day.
Venezuela has also agreed to
contribute $60 million to a
fund for socio-economic
projects in Jamaica.
Venezuela is the world's
fifth-largest oil exporter and
the biggest in the Western
Hemisphere.
Meanwhile, the Bush
administration quickly dis-
tanced itself Tuesday from
the suggestion by religious
broadcaster and Bush backer
Pat Robertson that the
United States assassinate
Chavez.
Speaking on the
Christian Broadcasting
Network show 'The 700
Club', which aired Monday
August 22,
.. Robertson
s s a i d
killing
Chavez
would be
cheaper
,Pat than start-
Robertson ing a war to
oust him. Getting rid of
Chavez would stop
Venezuela from becoming a
"launching pad for commu-
nist influence and Muslim
extremism," Robertson said.
"We have the ability to
take him out, and I think the
time has come that we exer-
cise that ability," Robertson
said. "We don't need another
$200 billion war to get rid of
one, you know, strong-arm
dictator."
State Department
spokesman Sean
McCormack called
Robertson's remarks about
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez "inappropriate," but
stopped short of condemn-
ing them. "This is not the
'policy of the United States
government," McCormack
said. "We do not share his
views."


During the visit to Benin
last month, Daley along with
NAACP National Director
of Education John Jackson
and two WIN members,
Sheila Butler and Norma
Sermon-Boyd, were distin-
guished guests at the
International Gospel &
Roots Festival.
,The festival showcased
reunions with Africa,
Europe, the Caribbean and
America, providing an inter-
national backdrop that high-
lighted the inauguration
ceremony for the NAACP
school in the Yawa
Village.
Benin Ambassador
Cyrille S. Oguin, -said: "I


don't know if WIN measures
its own value the impact of
their action in Yawa.
The school not only fills
a gap which has been there
too long, but above all it
appears as the cement of
unity and the symbol of rec-
onciliation between-the peo-
ple of Yawa who need it so
strongly; many thanks to
you all."
Benin was the major
slave port in the triangular
slave market with Liverpool,
England and Richmond, Va.
Director General Simon-
Pierre Adovelande, of the
Benin Agency for
Reconciliation and
Development, views the


NAACP partnership as a key
development initiative to
assist in rectifying the resid-
ual effects of slavery.
As Benin unveiled its
reconciliation monument
acknowledging and forgiv-
ing the past in reference to
slavery, WIN's educational
effort underscored the
NAACP's mission in carry-
ing civil and human rights
across the Atlantic Ocean.
After attending a
NAACP town hall meeting
in Atlanta, Daley encour-
aged WIN members to
donate money to execute a
vision to build a school in
Africa.


BLUEPRINT



"FoisiL'(, the pe Colp .' t iiicor?,e i, De ( ...rr


BlLwcprinr for Prcespw.rity is z.i i-c.:rship o ic' r acfli~.s [.rtc e I'.Im' ifd '~iovrn-e 'T
entities airned at rai'so per cap m incorre in, Duv~al Colunty, Help develop roui. p"n for the*
hkUrtunAtrecnd one of v~rciia riing LI.P ICOI I 19C011'." &icy rnvelaings listed b~eow and share your
ideas anid c'p'iionm.to implly.e JIQ qLuality Of lrik illCi,%,I COtir~'Call (9,A)I 92441100 iEnter
extemion 5-a.d below) o .A$VP o oi-4g. oni o -em h L rYMII pif.msporj car~r-,kr m-c mornwition

Community Meeting Schedule


August 8 Northsdec Church of Christ 4736 Ave 8

August II 'Jackso'-vilse Sca8 c Church of Christ 422 5iThAve

August IS l irst'i.iochy baptist C'urc", 2 '04 &i-yrync B id

August 18 Ocea-wa.y ;iddc School '_43 Oeewy Avrnue

August 221 Prkwood Baptist Church ?900 Lonestor Rd

August 29 En ytewood Higfh Sc:ncol 44f 2 'irnes P d

August 30 St. Marks Lutheran Churc'. -9 /6 .e4nd'icks A.ve


Time,
6100p~m Reglw adon & Sraacks
6AC3 9:M Op.m. CcrLnIwMt-ing

City Council District Map.
Attetid aa iieng in your Ck-y Cc,.noiI CiStrkt.
DI5riv nrumibers nrm listed to tha loft:in mrarx~c.r:


Us.0 Ext 7 'i

(D i s i3t 3 7Le

PDis, 7 Em 1

'D is, l'?Ext 71) ~

Ext. a,7011)

ioist 4 EAt. M4Y1

(Disc E rxT. 70S.)~


a-,


Be an, Architect


for Jacksonville' s Future
< ^ '1'


A UGUS T 2 7, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


P A 6F A.


i-







/I 77 l U, FL.OI S R G Z 7J


S*Al


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


, soft


Black Men continued from A-1
year, there were a number
of young black men killed,
all under 30-years of age
within a few weeks. After
many community discus-
sions, the mysterious mur-
ders appeared to cease. It is
hoped that this murder is not
connected to any of the oth-
ers or that none of them are
related stated some commu-
nity leaders, but we must, as
a community stop this vio-
lence. MAD DADS and
other organizations have put
much effort in stopping these
crimes and have focused on
black on black crime with a
motto of "Black on Black
Love It is Not a Crime."
Anyone with information
that can lead to solving this
and other murders or crimi-
nal activities, is asked to call
the Jacksonville Sheriffs
Office or Crime Stoppers
Vpd remain anonymous by
calling 1-866-845-8477.


Toxic Ash continued from A-]
even more toxic. Before
the city decided to fill the
hole, people used it for
swimming and fishing.
Her brother drowned in
the hole and afterwards so
did other boys.
Pastor Dickerson said
that as a child, she was
often sick and was
required to leave school
because of her undiag-
nosed sickness. She would
cough up blood and suffer
many painful moments.
Her first child was a full
term birth, born weighing
only three pounds.
Most living in the area
died of cancer and many of
their bodies would change
colors. In some families,
the entire household died
within a few years of each
other. But tpe toxic site did
not only affect the humans,


it also affected the animals
as many pets died and were
thought to have been poi-
soned.
Now, it is known that
the incinerator ash con-
tained toxic chemicals and
heavy metals such as lead,
arsenic, dioxins, and that
PCB's contaminated the air
and soil.
Under the settlement,
the city will pay up to $75
million dollars to settle all
claims. It will pay the first
$25 million about ten days
after City Council
approval, which must be
done by September 5,
2005. The insurance com-
panies will pay the balance
but prior to any disburse-
ments to the residents, the
circuit court must approve
the settlement. If and when
such approval is made, res-
idents would receive their
equitable share of the 4t,-


bursements based upon the
amount of time they lived
in the toxic area and the
amount of exposure. The
settlement also requires the
city to comply with the
Environmental Protection
Agency's plans to remove
and replace contaminated
soil at Brown's Dump,
Lonnie Miller Park, Forest
Street and the 5th and
Cleveland sites.
Residents, who feel that
they should have partici-
pated in the suit now that
they are aware of the settle-
ment, cannot join this suit.
They can file another suit,
bearing in mind that the
f.atute of Limitations may


have already expired and
such a claim may not be
available.
Mrs. Dickerson said she
is very happy about the set-
tlement because this situa-
tion has been neglected too
long. However, even
though they may have the
money before Christmas, it
still will not stop the many
joint pains the victims
endures daily and the sor-
row felt for those who suf-
fered prior to leaving this
world because of the sites.
The law firm that handled
this claim was Alford &
Kalil who also expressed
joy and relief that the suit
is finally settled.


Advertising
Deadline:

TUESDAY
@ 5 p.m.
To place an ad:
CALL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
ad@thefloridastar.com


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-7


AUGUST 272005


!







S AI A-


700 Ironwood DR, Ponte Vedra Beach, FLORIDA, 32082
County: St. Johns


Betty Asque Davis

REALTOR@







IN


Open House
Sunday, August 28, 1 4 PM

Join
Betty Asque Davis, Realtor

On top of the world, living at the beach. Convenient to restaurants,
library, grocery. 2/2 condo has plantation shutters, split bedrooms,
2005 air conditioner and cook top range, 2 year new refrigerator and
water heater, custom closets, garden tub, cathedral ceilings, garage,
fireplace and screened lanai. All appliances stay. Club house, pool,
tennis courts, RV & boat parking.

From JTB, travel south on A1A to Solano Rd. Turn west and proceed
past the shopping center. Ocean Links is on the left on south side of
Solano. #735 is on the right side of building 700.
Price: $229,000


ADVERTISE YOUR REAL ESTATE!
Deadline for Ads
Tuesday @ 5 p.m.
Call: (904) 766-8834
Fax: (904) 765-1673
ad@thefloridastar.com


615 Highway AIA
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082


Office:
Direct:
Fax:
Toll Free:


904-285-6300
904-473-1502
904-285-5330
800-288-6330


Email: badavis@WatsonRealtyCorp.com


ABOUT


RICS


All About Kids is the premiere pedi-
atric facility in Jacksonville, Florida.
We are dedicated to providing chil-
dren with the highest quality of
health care. Our doctors are Board
Certified Pediatricians with years of
Pediatric Emergency Room experi-
ence. With flexible hours, we are
able to accommodate the needs of
families with busy lifestyles. Come
see why so many parents trust All
About Kids Pediatrics with their chil-
dren's health.



Dean M. Cannon, MD
James A. Joyner, IV MD
Both doctors are board certified and
have pediatric ER experience.


904.565.1271

877.560.KIDS
www.allaboutkidspeds.com

12086 Ft. Caroline Rd. Suite N
Located in the new Hidden Hills E
Carolinegand Monument Rd.)


K*


SERVICES
Asthma Therapy
Pain Relief
Hemoglobin/Hematocrit Testing
Mono Screening
Rapid Strep Screening -
Sport and School Participation
Physicals
Urinalysis
Well visits/Immunizations

EMR Technology
Our Electronic Medical Record System
enables us to be more efficient with
less paperwork and allows for:
Direct Pharmacy Link for fast and
convenient prescriptions
Check-in/Check-out process made
quick and efficient
Medical record history inquiries
and transfers that are concise and
easy with electronic database
management
Prompt subspecialty referrals

HOURS
9:00 6:00 M-F; weekend and after hour
care available
All Insurances Accepted

lumber 401 Jacksonville, FL 32225
Executive Park (near the corner of Fort


I TMAWRI3RADCAsrING IN4C.


*Al


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Congratulations to our Bahamas Vacation Winners!!
Delois Harmon Carolyn Byrd
Yvonne Wise John Steffens
Michael Cooper


And To All of Our Listeners
We Appreciate Your Continued Support
Thank You!!


TAMA BWadcasting, Inc. 9550 Regency Square Blvd Ste. #200 JacksonW e,FL 32225
.;.:.- r Off s904480.1050 Fax(S04)690-1051


~"'~"'~-~-~~~~~ Y 14


--------"-


FL~ORIDA STAR


.A UGUST 20, 2001,


DAGF A8_P








AUGUST- 27 00 LOIA TR AE -


Bishop Vaughn McLaughlin And Potter's House


has accomplished under his
leadership. He sa\s that if
he could be credited for an\-


thing, it would be for his
fearless obedience to what
God has called him to do.


NO TW

The Potter's House Multiplex Center, located at 5732
Normandy Blvd., is home to The Potter's House
Administrative Offices and several other businesses.


Customers prepare to enjoy a delicious meal available at
The Potter's House Cafe. Shown in the inset is Pastor
Vaughn McLaughlin of The Potter's House.


LEFT FRAME: Deborah George is an assistant to Regina Williams, P.A. located in the
Potter's House Center. MIDDLE FRAME: Byron Taylor is Director of the Multi-Media
Ministry at The Potter's House. RIGHT FRAME: Ida M. Moore at The Potter's House
Bookstore.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
When many hear the name,
Potter's House, they imme-
diately associate it with
Potter's House in Dallas, led
by Bishop T. D. Jakes. But,
Potter's House Christian
Fellowship of Jacksonville
is led by Pastor Vaughn
McLaughlin who had his
own vision for a ministry
that would not give him tra-*
ditional limitations or
denominational restraints.
So, with a vision and fifty
adult followers, in 1988,
Bishop Vaughn McLaughlin
set on a road paved with
love and Guidance from
God that was initially
housed in a building that
seated 400.
Now, eighteen years
later, this 48-year-old man
of God has a membership of
more than 4,000 servants, of
God, is heard on radio and
television, been featured in
national magazines and has
recently purchased
Normandy Hall, a 400,000
square-foot abandoned facil-
ity to eventually house the
church's headquarters, chil-
dren church, nursery facili-
ties, a bowling center, movie
theaters, a spa and fitness
center, and a 2,000-seat
gymnasium. How did he
do this? What is his formu-
la?
Bishop McLaughlin's
goal was, and still is, to pro-
vide practical teaching of


CORRECTION:

A story appearing on A-3 of
the Saturday, August 20,
2005 issue of The Florida
Star entitled "Full Gospel
Choir of Greater Grant
Memorial Presents 'I Won't
Complain', noted that the
writer, Felenna McCullough,
was inspired to write the
play by a song of the same
name written by her hus-
band Victor McCoullogh.
McCullough did not write the
song. The song is one of his
favorite tunes,. We regret
the inconvenience caused
by this error.


God's word, reach out to the
community, provide genuine
praise and worship and
establish a holistic ministry
that would meet all of the
needs of the people, spiritu-
ally, physically, and socially,
without compromising the
gospel of Jesus Christ. He
said he has no secrets. His
vision from God was for him
to create a type of ministry
that would empower God's
people to bring life into their
communities stress free. In
a recent interview, he said,
he does not rush to complete
projects.
Whenever God supplies
all the resources, he gets it
done. He does not set target
dates and he does not put
God on the line. Because of
this, he said, he is never dis-
appointed. He says,
"Wherever there is vision,
there will be provision."
Bishop McLaughlin says.
that he wishes to bridge the.
gap between the market-
place and the ministry.
"Jesus said we are in the
world but not of the world.
We are the light and salt of


this world. We need to
understand that salt is a pre-
servative, and it also gives
flavor. Light helps things
grow. It shines into dark-
ness so people can find their
way. We are called to be an
influence in this world, and
we have to start with our
local community." "The
church has to be mobile; it
has to be aggressive. As a
church, we should be on the
attack; we should be proac-
tive."
In 1996, the ministry
purchased a 41,000-square-
foot building known as "The
Multiplex." It presently
houses a Christian book-
store, a game room, a cafe; a
barber and hair salon, a
graphic designs office, video
production, Greyhound Bus
Terminal, a financial center,
Federal Credit Union, law
.office, Christian Academy
administrative offices, and
more.. It also has a day care
facility and an outdoor state
of the art basketball facility.
Bishop McLaughlin and
his wife Narlene Jackson
McLaughlin have been mar-


ried for 27 years. They have
two children. He says that
being happily married with
two children is his greatest
accomplishment. He serves
on many boards and com-
mittees and travels exten-
sively.
Bishop Vaughn
McLaughlin has achieved
many accomplishments as a
Jacksonville native that
graduated from William
Raines Senior High and on
to the University of Tampa
and the University of
Tennessee. But, Bishop
McLaughlin refuses to take
glory in what The Potter's
House Christian Fellowship


DEATH

NOTICES
ARMSTEAD-Baby Girl Kayls
Dale, died August 14, 2005.
BARKER-Rosa L., died August
19, 2005.
CAMBELL-James, died August
21, died
CLARK-Lesley "Steve", died
August 21, 2005.
COLEMAN-Evelyn D., died
August 19, 2005.
CROSBY-Henry Lee "Hank",
died August 17, 2005.
CRUMITIE-Baby Jada, died
August 18, 2005.
DAVIS-David, died August 19,
2005.
FAHIE-Annie Priscilla, 52, died
August 19, 2005.
JACKSON-Rosa Lee, died
August 15, 2005.
JACOBS-Emma Mae, died
August 20, 2005.
JONES-Enola, died August 16,
2005.
JOHNSON-William T., died
August 16, 2005.
KING-Verneda, died August 17,
2005.
KITCHENS-William, 98, died
August 22, 2005.
LAWHORNE-Terrance, died
August 20, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
LOVINGS-Ms. Mary L., died
August 20, 2005.
MARTIN-Louise, 79, died
August 19, 2005.
McCLAIN-James Edward Jr.,
died August 22, 2005.
PAUL-Samuel Eugene, died
August 18, 2005.
RICHARDSON-Irvin, died
August 21, 2005.
SHEFFIELD-Blondell, died
August 22, 2005.
SMITH-Richard, died August
19, 2005.
THOMAS-Gregory L., died
August 20, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
WHITE-Hazel Mae, died
August 22, 2005.
WILLAMS-Mary M., died
August 22, 2005.
WOODWARD-George, died
August 21, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc. t


Airbrush Signs Art is located inside of the Potter's
House Multiplex Center.


COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

.-Io n.1 eni mL t I <.thh l''. happenings, a dI c:-'na iioa n'
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.
THE PIANO LESSON-The Ritz Theatre & LaVilla
Museum salutes one of America's most celebrated
African American playwrights with the production of
August Wilson's Pulitzer prize winning play, "The Piano
Lesson" on Friday, August 26, at 7:30 p.m. and
Saturday, August 27, at 2:00 p.m and 7:30 p.m. Set in
Pittsburgh in the 1930s, majestic, yet humble represen-
tation of all that is honorable and sacred to the Charles
family is embodied in an ornately carved wooden
upright piano the most valuable remaining family heir-
loom. Its true value is explored when an argument
erupts between brother and sister Boy Willie and
Berniece over selling the piano. The feud unearths the
tension that surrounds the family's dark history and
shameful present. For more information, call Ritz
Theatre & LaVilla Museum at 904-632-5555.
FALL YARD SALE-American Legion Auxiliary Unit
197 presents a Fall Yard Sale on Saturday, September 3,
10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. at 2179 Benedict Rd. The public
is invited to shop for bargains, register to vote, and
enjoy food.
AMERICAN BEACH 70TH ANNIVERSARY-
Families and friends of American Beach are invited to
join in celebrating American Beach's 70th Anniversary
during Labor day weekend. A Sunday Afternoon at
American Beach will be held at Evans Rendez-Vous on
Sunday evening September 4 from 4:00-8:00 p.m. ($20
donation in advance and $25 at the door). A Back-In-
The Day Picnic will be held on the beach and Evans
Rendez-Vous on Monday, September 5, 2:00-6:00 p.m.
($5 per person). For ticket information call or write
J.M. Smith at (904) 264-7906, ABPOA, P.O. Box 6123,
Fernandina Beach, FL.
EXTENSION SERVICE SEEKS VOLUNTEERS
FOR CHILDREN AND LITERACY PROGRAM-
The Duval County Extension .Family and Consumer
Sciences Program is seeking volunteers to be trained in
the "CAL" Program (Children and Literacy). The pro-
gram, developed by the Florida Cooperative Extension
Service, University of Florida will train community vol-
unteers to read to Pre-K youth and to assist young chil-
dren through eight in developing reading skills.
Volunteers will be asked to give a minimum of four
hours a month to the program. Volunteer training will
be held on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 from 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Extension Learning Center,
1010 North McDuff Ave. Trained volunteers will be
allowed to select a convenient site at which to serve.
This can be an elementary school, daycare facility,
headstart program or church nursery. Those willing to
assist the Extension Service in delivering the CAL
Program to children in Jacksonville should call the
Extension Office by September 12th at 387-8855 to reg-
ister for the training.
ANNUAL MERCEDES-BENZ/MALIVAI WASH-
INGTON GOLF AND TENNIS GALA-Tickets for
the Ninth Annual Mercedes-Benz/MaliVai Washington
Golf and Tennis Gala are going quickly. Less than 30
seats remain for the dinner and auction. The event is
scheduled for Monday, September 12 at Deerwood
Country Club. The gala dinner and auction will take
place Monday night, September 12 at the Sawgrass
Marriott Resort and Spa. Celebrities will include
MaliVai Washington, former world number one Ivan
Lendl, Todd Martin, Rosie Casals, Cliff Drysdale, Zina
Garrison, Brian Gottfried, Luke Jensen, Brenda Schultz
McCarthy and others. For more information or to con-
firm your spot call (904) 301-3786 or e-mail leslie@mal-
washington.com.
f, ^AS


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Jacksonville's

Most Heated

Radio Talk Show!

North Florida's Best
Daily Talk Show! ,


AM 1530

WEEKDAYS

2-6 P.M.


CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http://www.wymml530.com
1/ J


PAGE C-1


FLORIDA STAR


AUGUIST 27, 20055








PAGE C-2 A-- -1 --


IASKDANNA: Real3Peple', Rea Advie 1


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"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


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WELSH TERRIERS FOR SALE
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AFTER LIFE


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A UGUST 2 7,2005


FLORIDA STAR


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XTIU VU L F R i Z/AR PA/G w -- -


GETTING


TO KNOW US

*Profiles of area businesses and business persons whose ads appear in The Florida
Star. To place your ad and profile call (904) 766-8834.

Introducing...
All About Kids Pediatrics


IF.-I&WV


L''C'


UNF Named Best Southeastern

College By Princeton Review


The Princeton Review
named the University of
North Florida in
Jacksonville, Fla. as a Best
Southeastern College.
UNF is one of 140 col-
leges and universities in the
Southeast receiving this des-
ignation.
"I believe there's no
place like the University of
North Florida," said UNF
President John A. Delaney;
"We're a unique university
and our focus on teaching
students and providing them
with an individualized col-
lege experience is definitely,
putting us on the map.",
Student opinion data
from more than 640 schools
is featured on the Best
Colleges: Region by Region
section of.
PrincetonReview.com. Each


college selected had to meet
two criteria.
First, they had to meet
The Princeton Review's
standards of academic
excellence within their
region. Second, the
Reviewer had to be able to
survey their students anony-
mously, either through an
online survey or through a
paper survey.
In the selection process,
The Princeton Review
avoided using mathematical
calculations or formulas to
determine which colleges
and universities to include in
the Best Colleges: Region
by Region feature.
For each region, they
provided an inclusive mix of
large and small, public and
private, all-male and all-
female, historically, black


colleges and science and
technology-focused institu-
tions, nontraditional col-
leges, highly selective and
virtually open-door admis-
sions, great buys and the
wildly expensive.
The University of North
Florida is nestled among
1,300 acres that include a
nature and wildlife area with
lakes and nature trails.
It has an enrollment of
15,000 students, with 2,500
on-campus residents.
UNF has five colleges of
distinction, including the
College _of Arts and
Sciences, Coggin College of
Business, College of
Computing, Engineering &
Construction, College of
Education and Human
Services and the College of
Health.


Commission's Decision On Cecil Field Lauded


Dr. James Joyner, IV (left) and Dr. Dean Cannon (right).
A ll About Kids Pediatric Associates is the premiere pediatric facility in Jacksonville,
Florida. It is dedicated to providing children with the highest quality of health care.
The doctors are Board certified Pediatricians with years of Pediatric Emergency
Room experience.
With flexible hours, All About Kids Pediatrics Associates is able to accommodate the
needs of families with busy lifestyles.
Dr. James Joyner, IV is a native of Jacksonville, Fla: He attended Bolles High School,
did undergraduate studies at the University of California at Berkeley, attended medical
school and -served residency at the University of Miami School of Medicine and Jackson
Hospital in Miami, Fla. Dr. Joyner has years of both private practice and pediatric ER expe-
rience at Wolfson's Children's Hospital.
Dr. Dean Cannon is originally from Killona, LA. His' undergraduate studies were at
Xavier University.. He attended medical school at LSU School of Medicine and served res-
idency at the University of Florida facility here in Jacksonville, Fla. Dr. Cannon has worked
at Wolfson's Children's pediatric ER for five years.
All About Kids Pediatric Associates is located at 12086 Fort Caroline Rd., Suite 401,
near the corner of Monument Road and Fort Caroline Road in the new Hidden Hills
Executive Park Office Complex. The phone number is (904) 565-1271
Office information and other useful medical information can be obtained on their web site
www.allaboutkidspeds.com..



,PEN POINTS

Letters must include name, address, and phone number. They are due the Tuesday before
the next issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com

Silly Talk Sad Results

1. Jacksonville city government vs Citizens.
For years city government representatives have told its citizens that the
toxic ash is OK, not to worry, we have studied it and it is OK. Well now
reality comes crashing in to events and the city's representatives are
offering the citizens $75 million in damages and will clean up the ash sites.
This is certainly not a prudent use of your tax dollars by the city's
representatives. All the citizens wanted from the beginning was a safe
place to live and enjoy life. The city's representatives failed them.
The city's representatives should have never put the citizens in harms way of
toxic ash.

2. Jacksonville Jaguars is primarily a business.
They are having a problem selling their product. Facts are these: the
stadium is too large for the market (they just realized this and covered
seats), their performance is below the enthusiastic level that draws a
crowd of ticket buyers. These are business problems.
Does the team collectively purchase the tickets not sold and donate
them? No.- They black-out the coverage of the "product," their
performance.

Well, realizing this is a business, do you suppose other businesses will
follow suit? Will Sears close their doors because sales are down? Will
Gate close its stations because business is down? I doubt it.
Only in the business of the GAME of FOOTBALL will this practice be followed.

3.Truth in Government.
There is a comparison between the Lottery and Incentives.
Both promised great things for the state. Both failed.
When the Lottery was "sold" to the state, it was promised that all funds of
the lottery would be in addition to the budgeted public school funds.
Well, that was a lie. Every year since lottery came to Florida the
budgeted amount for public schools has dropped.
Incentives are said to be "a MUST" to bring business to Jacksonville. That
too is a lie.

We have given millions in incentives and received pennies in return.
If a business cannot afford to relocate to Jacksonville without
incentives they are insolvent. We do not want them.

Keith M. Myers
Jacksonville, florida


Congressman Ander
Crenshaw (R-FL), a, mem-
'ber of the House
Appropriations Committee,
commended the decision of
the Defense Base Closure
and realignment (BRAC)
Commission to conditional-
ly close the Naval Air
Station Oceana and realign
all operations to
Jacksonville's Cecil Field,
making it the Navy's
Atlantic Fleet Master Jet
base.,
Cecil Field was closed
during the 1993 BRAC
round and has since been
used for commercial devel-
opment.
"The Commission has
given the Navy and the City
of Virginia Beach one last
opportunity to avoid realign-
ment. Our 'community
stands ready, willing and
able to welcome Navy fight-


ers back to Cecil Field,"
Crenshaw said. In July, the
BRAC Commission -moved
to put Virginia's Naval Air
Station Oceana on its addi-
tion list for possible closure.
The move opened the
door for the Florida delega-
tion to offer up the possibili-
ty of reopening Cecil field at
the July 23 BRAC New
Orleans Regional Hearing.
The recommendation
requires the City of Virginia
Beach to meet a series of
conditions in order to
remain open.


The conditions require
the City to develop a plan,
together with the state of
Virginia, to enact state and
local legislation and ordi-
nances to establish a pro-
gram to condemn and pur-
chase all the property locat-
ed within all the Accident
Potential Zone One areas.
This condition requires
the .condemnation and pur-
chase of approximately
1,200 residential units, 275
commercial properties, one
school, and fifteen houses of
worship.


ADVERTISE IN

AND SUBSCRIBE

TO THE FLORIDA STAR

CALL

(904)766-8834


ltd

o.ro


Love your job?

Share it with a kid.


Your experience can inspire dhe
next generation: Volunteer today!



A

JuniorAchievementf

w.w 'a org


I ~,


PAGE C-3


FLORIDA STAR


AUCYTIN27.200


i~ tear. Irqrti;u 1~~


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FLORIDA STAR AUGUST 20, 2005


Double Celebration: 60 Years of Marriage for

Parents, 40 Years in the Ministry for Husband


SAVANNAH, Ga. -
Mrs. Susie King of
Alexandria, Louisiana
served as host Saturday to
approximately 350 guests
as she honored her par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Morris
(Eliza) Shell for their 60th
Wedding Anniversary. All
of the couple's five chil-
dren attended the grand
occasion. Mr. Shell is an
Elder in the Garden City
Congregation where he
and his wife have served
as members for fifty
years.But, the anniversary
of King's parents was just
a part of the celebration.
Her husband, Elder Larry
King, Circuit Overseer for
Louisiana experienced a
big surprise. His wife
decided to combine her
parents' wedding anniver-
sary with her husband's
40th anniversary commit-
ment to God and the
church as a Jehovah
Witness leader.
The occasion truly sur-
prised Larry. The event
was held in Pooler,
Georgia, ten miles from
Savannah. Unaware of the
surprise, Larry casually
appeared at the hotel
wearing a cap and sneak-
ers to visit his in-laws
prior to what he thought
was a planned anniversary
celebration that he antici-


pated would be held later
in the evening. But that
was not the case, because
more than 300 Jehovah
Witness members and
about twenty-five of his
family members were
there waiting to greet
him, including his three
living aunts, his deceased
father's only sister and his
deceased mother's only
two sisters. He was aston-
ished that his wife could
pull off such a spectacular
surprise that brought
guests from across the U.
S. to share in celebrating
these anniversaries.
Brother King's family
presented him with a
plaque and many other
gifts. He received praises
from his in-laws and
members of his faith. Mr.
& Mrs. Shell were also
presented a gift from
Larry's family as well as
gifts from their children
and relatives in addition
to their church family and
friends. It was truly a
grand celebration.


Brother Larry King flanked by his cousin, Ms. Maggie B.
Sheppard of St. Petersburg, Fla. and his only sister, Ms. Arnetta
K. Brown of Savannah.


Mr. & Mrs. Morris Shell as they celebrate their 60th Wedding
Anniversary.


Thank you for' reading
THE FLORIDA STAR!
To subscribe or to advertise
Call 904/766-8834
info@thefloridastar.com


An intricate hairstyle showcased at the Bronner
Brothers Hair Show in Atlanta last week. Thousands of
stylists and nail technicians descended on the World
Congress Center to learn new techniques, view cutting-
edge products, compete in the myriad of contests and
reunite with colleagues.


;-i :, j J ;' l. *-JJ n J -. ,"i '^

PRESENT


A/r IGROUPINC, I L)9c.


A GLORIFY GROUP INC YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
fea tztriing


STURDY, AUGUST 27 2005


VICTORY WAY CHRISTIAN CENTER

4088 STAUGUSTINE r^
114AAIIB 1 i~ r, i t.M.


2-90d INanvi'ch Si1ad
(912) 242-6477
BT-r11n54wwk, Gt'ogi( 3/520 -


Gift Baskets
Handbags
Hats
Gloves
Shoes
T-Shirts
Socks

Monday Thursday Friday
1 p.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday
10 a.m. 6 p.m.
^i5OT^ WW~t

A UGUST 20, 2005


PAGE C- 4


FLORIDA STAR







A TT rT TCT '17 ll


F nRInA .CTAR


2005 EWC Football Team


Has


Look Of Diversity


Edward Waters College
held its 2005 Football Media
Day on Saturday, August 20.
The festivities provided
the local press an opportuni-
ty to meet with the players
and the coaches, and get
their views for the upcoming
season.
EWC also held its Fan
Appreciation Day festivities,
featuring the Fighting Tigers
in a full contact situational
scrimmage.
Some of the focus was
on the outlook for the season
and on players expected to
make an impact.
It was the diverse make-
up of the team that garnered
most of the attention.
The 2005 Fighting Tigers
football team includes sev-
eral non-African American
players who saw "value" in
attending this Historically


- V.
~ -


Black College -& University
(HBCU).
"I transferred here from
Catawba College (NC)
when my mother fell ill, and
I needed to be much closer.
EWC made the transition
easy and I'm having the time
of my life," said QB
Delaney Mills, senior
(Caucasian American)
LB Steven HIammett,
sophomore (Caucasian
American), said "I simply
didn't score very well on my
SAT, but I graduated in the
top 50% of my class". "I see
no color I see great com-
petitors and teammates."
K/P Lary Hurlbut, fresh-
man (Native American) said
he's had his eyes on EWC
for quite some time. "I
have been following EWC
for quite some time. I came
to EWC because of the


excellent coaching sta
desired course of stud
most of all, it is clI
home. I'm from 0
Park."
nrlr Ta\ T%-- AnK


OC marc Mazzora,
freshman (Italian American)
is glad he's at EWC. "I
received a Presidential
Scholarship. No similar
opportunity was presented
to me. I had to take advan-
tage of it to study Biology."
"I chose EWC because
of the great scholarship
package I received, and the
possibility of securing a,
starting position. Even
though I plan to be married
soon, the opportunity to get
my degree took first priority
in order to secure my fami-


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ly's future," assured LB
John Delbrugge, freshman
(Caucasian American).
FS Steven Anderson,
freshman (Caucasian
American) said, "I plan to
L graduate. As a Presidential
^ Scholar, why shouldn't I?"
Head Coach Lamonte
Massie was pleased with his
team's progress at the start
of the season as the team
prepares to travel to
... Durham, NC on Saturday,
August 27, for a game
against North Carolina
Central University..
"I like the enthusiasm of
the players, but especially
our freshmen. They display
an extremely high level of
discipline that I haven't
f, my experienced before in such
y, young men," said Massie.
sey andto "It's nice and refreshing
to know that, in spite of all
range the College has gone
through, we still have stu-


It looks like Jacksonville
native Albert Chester could
be follow-
ing in the
S footsteps
Sof his dad

Chest r,
Sr. playing
Albert Chester the quar-
terback
position at Florida A&M
University
The senior Chester start-
ed for the rattlers and led
FAMU to a Division I-AA
National Championship
title.
Now Chester, who
played locally at Episcopal
High School has a chance to
make Rattler history.
The Rattlers' first foot-
ball scrimmage of the train-
ing camp schedule was held
in the stifling sun on August
20 in Tallahassee, Fla.
Offensively, Chester, a
redshirt sophomore quarter-
back started with the first
team and got most of the
snaps Saturday, directing
three scoring drives, using
his footwork and timely
Mathis To Keep
Hometown Ties
With The Jaguars

Mathis, the
third-year
starting cor-
nerback for
the jack-
Mathis Jaguars has
signed a contract extension.
Terms were not dis-
closed. Mathis, 25, and 6-1,
tied safety Donovin Darius
for the team lead with five
interceptions last season.
Mathis, who played
locally at Englewood High
and for Bethune-Cookman
College, signed a five-year
contract extension, keeping
him with the Jaguars
through 2011. Mathis has
126 career tackles, seven
interceptions, one forced
fumble and a fumble recov-


dents who want to be a part
of Edward Waters College."
The NCCU Eagles
appear to be one of the
favorites in the CIAA
Conference Championship
race.
The season-opener will
be a measuring stick to see
just how good both teams
really are
This, will be the second
meeting between NCCU and
Edward Waters. NCCU won
the first meeting 45-0 on
Sept. 29, 2001, in Durham,
NC.
.North Carolina Central
used every aspect of its team
to score against the Edward
Waters College Tigers en
route to a 45-0 victory in
Durham, NC.
There was a special
teams touchdown (first of
the season) when Kevin
Bonsu's blocked punt late in.
the first quarter was picked.


passing to his advantage.
Senior tailback Rashard
Pompey (Tallahassee)
capped off Chester's second
drive with a 14-yard burst
off right guard; junior split
end Roosevelt Kiser (Fort
Lauderdale) took a short
pass from Chester, shook a
defender and outraced the
defense 66 yards for a TD.
Kiser and Chester
reversed the order later in
the scrimmage, as Kiser
took the handoff from
Chester, then sailed a 28-
yard pass to the quarterback
for a touchdown.
Junior Leon Camel
(Belle Glade), also got some
work, showing off a big arm
despite his' diminutive 5-6
frame.
Senior quarterback Josh
Driscoll (Fort Smith, Ark.)


up by Jonathan Sherrill in
the end zone for the first
score of the game. Next,
Chris Gilmore intercepted
Al Brunson's pass from six
yards out and he raced into
the end zone for a defensive
touchdown (first of the sea-
son).
Then, the offensive
onslaught began for the
Eagles as they rushed for
three straight touchdowns.
NCCU running back Donnie
Pippen found pay dirt first
with a nine-yard scamper,
followed by quarterback
Lamont Alston's two touch-
down runs of 1 and 4 yards
to put NCCU up 35-0 after
three quarters of play.
The Eagle defense,
pitched its first shutout since
Nov. 1, 1997. NCCU held
the Tigers to minus-46 yards
of rushing. EWC only man-
aged to gain 72 yards of total
offense.


continued to battle dehydra-
tion and cramps Saturday.
Driscoll got in about six
series, three with the second
team and three with the first,
before having to leave due to
the onset of cramps.
New Head Coach Rubin .
carter said, "I'm pleased
with where we are right
now, with our intensity and|
tempo." "Our defense start-
ed out slow at the start, but ^
picked it up toward the mid- ;
dle of the scrimmage and!
really finished strong at the ,-
end. They proved that with .
several goal line stands to;n'
end the scrimmage. Chester *
(Albert) did a good job mov- ,
ing the offense up and down
the field... He was consistent :
early on, but got a little I
inconsistent towards the;.
end."

JSAiE


1. Where is the Longchamps racetrack?
2. Who was the manager of the 1969 World
Series winners,-the New York Mets? L
3. What jockey's nickname was "Banana Nose"?
4. What Olympic track star was nicknamed "The
Ebony Express"?
5. What is the "near" side on a horse?
6. What sport sees stones thrown at a house?
7. How many lanes does an Olympic swimming
pool have?
8. Who was the first African-American to be
head coach of a major league pro sports team?
9. Who was the first NHL player to score 50
goals in a season?
10. What are A.C. Milan, Ajax and Real
Madrid?









"Copyrighted Material d

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


PAGE C-5


"Copyrighted Material


4Syndicated Content Iii

Available from Commercial News Providers'


Chester Getting Reps As FAMU QB


AUGUSIUI


-tit


V At








PAGA FRATAG 2


EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
GRAND THEFT-On Sunday, August 21, 2005 at 1:15
a.m. a police officer was dispatched to Wal-Mart Store,
located at 8808 Beach Blvd. in reference to a theft. Upon
arrival, police officer met with a 53 year old female (vic-
tim), who stated that she walked to her car after shopping
inside the Super Wal-Mart Store. She told the police offi-
cer that a 20-year-old male (suspect) approached her next
to her car and asked her if she was interested in selling
her car. The suspect told her his name was "Kendrick."
The suspect then told her that she had a "Spider" in her
hair. As she was shaking her head attempting to remove
a fictitious spider from her hair, the suspect grabbed her
purse from the hood of her car. The suspect then jumped
into his car and fled out of the parking lot with her purse.
The victim positively identified the suspect from a photo
spread. The police officer obtained an arrest Warrant for
the suspect's arrest. The suspect was arrested, transport-
ed to jail, and charged with a felony.
DOMESTIC BATTERY-On Sunday, August 21, 2005
at 1:50 a.m. a police officer responded to 5020 Cleveland
Rd. Apartments in reference to a domestic battery. Upon
arrival, police officer met with a 22-year-old female (vic-
,timi), and a 27-year-old male (suspect) who advised that
both of them were engaged in a physical confrontation.
The suspect and victim had scratches and blood on their
faces. The victim advised that she had injuries from a
week ago. However she also said that her boyfriend had
hit her in the face and chest. The police officer observed
that the phone had been pulled from the wall and the
entire apartment turned over. Both the behaviors of the
victim and suspect lead the police officer to believe that
neither party would separate and there was a likelihood
of continued violence. The police officer was unable to
determine the primary aggressor in this incident. The vic-
tim and suspect have a one-year-old child together who
was present during this incident. The police officer left
thie child in the custody of the victim's sister. The victim
and suspect were read their rights, arrested and transport-
ed to jail.
PETIT THEFT-On Sunday, August 21, 2005 at 3:15
a.m. a police officer was dispatched to 800 Broward Rd.
(Waters Edge Apartments) in reference to a suspicious
person who was messing with a cable television cable
box. Upon arrival, The police officer observed a 48-year
-61d male (suspect), with his back towards the officer and
his hands inside a cable television box on the outside of
building "F" at the above location. The police officer
then walked up behind the suspect and illuminated him
with his flashlight. The suspect became startled and
dropped two of the cable filters on the ground. The police
officer had the suspect sit on the ground. As the suspect
sat on the ground he dropped a knife from his hands. The
officer put handcuffs on the suspect. The police officer
asked the suspect what he was doing. He replied that a
friend lived in one of the apartments complex. The offi-
cer asked the suspect why was he in the cable box. He
replied that he is a handy man, and uses the parts to
repair stuff. He then admitted to stealing the cable tele-
vision services. At that time the police officer placed the
suspect under arrest. A search of the suspect revealed two
cable filters, and two cable connectors. A marijuana
"roach", and a metal crack pipe was found in his right
front pocket. The listed property was placed in the prop-
erty room. The suspect was read his rights, arrested,
transported to jail, and charged with a misdemeanor.
A HABITUAL TRAFFIC OFFENDER-On Sunday,
August 21, 2005 at 2:48 a.m. a JSO police officer con-
ducted a traffic stop on a 1999 green Honda. Upon mak-
ing contact with the 26-year-old female driver (suspect),
the police officer, asked for her driver's license. The sus-
pect stated that she did not have her Florida driver's
license with her. A check through NCIC/FCIC revealed
the following: License suspended indefinite for failure to
pay 12 traffic fines from 7/14/03 to 3/17/05. The suspect
was read her rights, arrested, transported to jail, and
charged with a misdemeanor.
HARASSING TELEPHONE CALLS-On Sunday,
August 21, 2005. At 12:50 a.m. a police officer was dis-
patched to 7004 N. Pearl St. in reference to harassing
phone calls. Upon arrival, police officer met with a 19-
year-old female (victim), who stated that she has been
receiving harassing phone calls from a 23-year-old male
(suspect) her ex-boyfriend. She told the police officer
that ever since 8/20/05 at 8:00 p.m., he has been calling
repeatedly asking her to get back together with him. She
further stated that when other members of her family
picked up the phone, he hangs up on them. She told the
police officer that she used to date him in 2004, but that
it has been over between them for some time now. She
also told the officer that she has an injunction for protec-
tion against him, and that she is pressing charges against
him for destroying her apartment on 8/17/05. The suspect
could not be reached by the police officer from the num-
ber he was calling from. There was no listed account res-


idence for his number. The police officer advised her to
contact her 'telephone provider, and put a block on her
telephone number. MCI office will follow up this case.
CHILD SUPPORT-On Monday, August 22, 2005 at.
2:05 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 10203 Lem
Turner Rd., to serve a warrant on a 29-year-old male
(suspect) for late child support payments, in the amount
of 1,500.00. The police officer contacted the suspect read
him his rights, arrested him, transported him to jail, and
charged him with delinquency child support payments.
< <


MIDDLE-'
BURG, Fla.-- A
stabbing
occurred at
approximately
1:30 a.m. on
August 23 at a
mobile home
located at 4376
Osceola Trail in
Middleburg.
Clay County
Sheriffs Office
detectives
believe a -fight
took place
involving sus-
pect Kit Taylor
and victim
Jonathon Green.


Your Weekly Horoscope
(AUGUST 27, 2005-SEPTEMBER 2, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) You
can't put your fin- -
ger on the reason
for it, but you're
not in the best of moods this
week. It seems every little
thing irritates you. You may
want to take some time off
to get yourself back on
track.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) The situation you
m- find yourself in
this week requires
a great deal of
sensitivity.
Fortunately, you can do this.
Tap into your empathetic
side.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) A sur-
prise is headed
your way this
week. It could be
in the form of a
gift or in the arrival of some-
one you haven't seen in a
while. The weekend looks
good for travel plans.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) Your focus this
week is on hearth
and home. Family
members relish
this extra atten-
tion. Later, it's back to busi-
ness as usual.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22)
Before you attend
that anticipated
social outing, be
sure to take care of matters
at home. A loved one comes
to your aid. Between the two
of you, the chores are done
in no time.
VIRGO (August 23 to
September 22) There's so
much to do, you
feel over-
-d whelmed.' This
could cause you
to rush around from task to
task, not really getting any-
thing done. If you prioritize,
you'll do much better.


LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) You're
a bit shocked by
what a friend tells
you this week. It's
a side of this per-
son you'd never seen before.
Try to take it in stride and be
more understanding.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21) You
feel the need to get away by
yourself this week. It may
mi not be possible,
though, due to
L your schedule.
Instead, spehd
some quiet time in the
evenings just meditating and
chilling out.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov ember 22 to
December 21)
You're in a
buoyant mood
this week. This
affects everyone around
you. People will seek you
out just to be near you.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19) Work matters,
press on your
mind this week.
Remember,
there's a solution
to every problem. You just
have to dig deeply and find
it.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18)
You enlarge your
circle of friends
this week. This
suits you just fine, since you
are gregarious by nature.
Later in the week, your ener-
gy lags a bit.
PISCES (February
19 to March
2,0) You're able to
come to the aid of
someone in trou-
ble this week. This person
will be very grateful as a
result. Just don't expect
reciprocation; -do it out of


the goodness of your heart.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Bob
Newhart, September 5; Jeff
Foxworthy, September 6;
Peggy Noonan, September
7; David Arquette,
September 8; Micha'el
Keaton, September 9; Colin


Firth, September 10; Harry
Connick, Jr., September 11.


2005 DBR Media,Inc.
THANKS
FOR SUPPORTING
THE FLORIDA STAR!


Tara's Bail

24/7 Bonds
Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville, Florida 32206
-.1,-


356-TARA
(8272)


Iij


Your business is always welcome!



REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.
FAMILY PRACTICE
3160 Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32209












WE PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR:
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OFFICE HOURS:
M-F 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. Wed. 2 P. M. TO 5 P.M.


Man, 79, Charged In Cleaver

Attack On Younger Wife

ALAMEDA, Calif. A 79-year-old man. who sus-
pected his younger wife was having an affair hacked at
her with a meat cleaver Tuesday and nearly chopped off
her right hand, police said.
The suspect was being held in an Alameda jail, on
suspicion of attempted murder and assault with a deadly
weapon. His name was not immediately released.
A hysterical girl called police Tuesday morning and
said that her father had gone crazy and lopped off her
mother's hand, police said.
The suspect allegedly struck his 54-year-old wife in
the head and face with the cleaver, leaving deep cuts. He
chopped off her right index finger and nearly severed her
hand.
The 17-year-old daughter was cut on her left thumb
trying to stop her father from hitting her mother, police
Lt. Robert Cranford said.
The mother was taken to Highland Hospital in
Oakland for surgery and the daughter was taken. to
Alameda Hospital for stitches


Crime doesn't pay but we do!


CRIME STOPPERS
1-866-845-TIPS (8477)


No Names...
No Faces... No Hasqles


Kit Taylor


Detectives
believe Kit Taylor obtained a knife and stabbed at Green,
cutting him across the face. Green was transported to
Orange Park Medical Center and treated for his wound.
He remains in good condition.
The suspect, 42-year-old Kit Taylor, is at large and is
wanted by the Robbery-Homicide Unit for Aggravated
Battery. Taylor is a registered convicted felon who has
been arrested sixteen times in Clay County. His prior
charges include DUI, aggravated battery on law enforce-
ment, aggravated assault, tampering with a witness, and
shooting into a dwelling.
Anyone who knows the location of Kit Taylor is
asked to call the Clay County Sheriffs Office at (904)
264-6512.

FLORIDA LOTTO
WINNING NUMBERS
22-30-37-42-44-51
Saturday, August 20
ROLLOVER!! ,


CCSO Detectives Search

For Stabbing Suspect



PAGE C-6i


A UGUST 27, 2005


FLORIDA STAR








FLORIDA STAR


nDAI r'7


AUGUST27, 2005


BUIES EWR


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t.Nm N.,I .p. r, i, .I ..I ,.p,.ri n.i .. n ,,. ,' -3688
Code.1-14.

WHYNOTDRIVE FOR CFI?Atlanta orientation. $0.05
NEBoinus Pay! Think annual earnings! XM Service. Class
A CIL[. required. (800)CFI-DlRIVE (800-234-3748) or
www.clidriveconm.

S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Drivers. HIOM1.E WEEKENDS.
Mileage Pay, Benefits, 40 lK. Trainees Welcome. Miami
area-exp.req.21 minage/Class-A CDL Cypress Truck Lines
(800)545-1351.

Home For Sale

BANK FORECLOSURES! Homes from $10.000! 1-3
bedroom available! IlUlD. Repos, REO. etc. These homes
must sell! For Listings Call (800)571-0225 xl 1295.

Legal Services

DIVORCE$175-$350*COVERSehil(ren, etc. Only one
, ,-..i, c ,.1.11. I', *Excludes govt. teesl Call weekdays
(800)462-2000. ext.600, (am-7pm) Divorce Tceh. Estab-
lished 1977.

ARRESTEDOR INJUREDNeed a Lawyer?AllCriminal
defensee & Personal Injury. *Felonies *Misdemeanors *DU1)1
I*Dlomestic Violence Traffic AutoAccident* Wrongfil
Death. "Protect YourRights" A-A-A Attorney Referral
Service (800)733-5342.

Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREEonline from home. *Medical. *Business.
*Paralegal, *Computers. Job Placement Assistance. Com-
puter & Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
.owlindewv.a.lctReal Estate

Real Estate


NEW RELEASE 20% discount for Reservation Holders
tnt, l '.r i ...I ..._, ,r i. ..k .111. p W after Access. W ooded,
Lagoon and Golf Course homesites. Call for Reservation
Information (877)266-7376.

S* f


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. ESCAPE THE
HEAT INTIIECOOLBEAUITIFUL PEACEFULMOUN-
TAINS OF WEST1'RN NC MOUNTAINS. Homes, Cabins.
Acreage & Investments. Cherokee Mountain Realty GMAC
RealEstate. Murphy www.cherokeemountainrealtv.com Call
for Free Brochure (800)841-5868.

SPECIAL OFFERS Pre-Construction opportunities- AL..
TX. MS. GA. FL.. NV, SC- from $199K $2M
www.,DgciClubinvestnments,c.om(877)BCI-5020 Flexible
Financial optionsprovidedby wwwv,allpointe.com Free Pre-
Qualification.

GEORGIA COAST- Large wooded access,
marshfront & golf course homesites. Gated with
tennis, kayaking. & canoeing. Limited availability-
mid $70's & up, Call today (877)266-7376.

NORTH CAROLINA MTNS 3.43 acres on moun-
tain ltop, view, trees, waterfall and large public lake
nearby $49,500 owner (866)789-8535
.www.,.NCl..7,...o,

WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS- Extraordinary Home
Sites in Gated Fall Branch Estates. Wooded Lots,
Panoramic Mountain Views, From $60k. Current
phase: Pre-construction pricing. (877)774-3437,
www.R idgeslif'econm.

RVs/Campers

2005 RVCLOSE-OUTSALE- *Nation'.s#1 SellingRV's
Sl*Hundreds ofRV's*Save Thousands ofiDollars *Florida'si
Motorhotme-'Towablelleadquarters. GIANTIRECREATION
WORLD,31 locations : Melbourne-(800)700-1021. Daytona-
(800)893-2552.Orlando-(800)654-8475.www grwrv.com.


Steel Buildings


3-WEEK BUILDING SALE! 20x24Now$2320:25x30,
$3490. 30x40. $5170. 40x50., $8380. 40x60. $10.700.
50x100.$15.244.Others. Ends/accessoriesoptional."Priced
toSell!" Piotcer(800)668-5422.


IMPACT

WCGL

AM 1360














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Presents:


Edward Waters College
TIGERS


vs


Shaw University
BEARS


Earl Kitchings Stadium/Raines High School
Saturday, September 10th
5:00 p.m. Kick off
Tickets: $5 Student w/ID $15 Regular Admission $20 Reserved Seating
Tickets on sale at EWC, Office of the Cashier or call either 904-553-0016 or 904-470-8045
Tickets also available game day at Earl Kitchings Stadiumrn beginning at 8 a.m.
foo U., / II

College Day 10 a.m. 2 p.m. at Prime Osborn Center
Guests include Attorney Willie E. Gary, Dr. Oswald P. Bronson, Sr., EWC President
Dr. Clarence Newsome, Shaw University President
The first 700 students receive tickets to the Willie E. Gary Classic
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