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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State/Nationa...
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
July 30, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00030

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
July 30, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00030

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: State/National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text





A *3A 3 3 A A l AT A-1!V'1 3 V


rIMIRE


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


dFLORIDA


thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


GUNSHOTS AT 3 A.M.


INVOLVE
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-
It was around 3 a.m.
Wednesday morning and one
witness said she heard a
vehicle with a loud muffler
pull up to Building Five of
the 4300 block of Sunbeam
Road. She then heard two
car doors slam and a few
S minutes later she heard gun-
shots. Afterwards she heard
two car doors slanr shut
again and a vehicle leave at a


EIGHT VICTIMS


high rate of speed. Other
witness heard the gunshots
and/or heard a vehicle with a
loud muffler. So, what was it
all about? They are all still
guessing.
The Jacksonville
Sheriffs Office arrived at the
scene about 3:14 a.m. and
observed several gunshots
ha.d penetrated the windows
and the front door of an
apartment. They also


observed 'several spent shell
casings in the hallway in
front of the apartment.
There were eight victims
involved and when the offi-
cers talked with the original
victim, they were advised
that everybody in the apart-
ment was asleep when the
shots were fired around 3:00
a.m. There were eight per-
sons in the apartment, five
continued on A-6


MAN SUSPECTED OF RAPING

13 WOMEN


According to
Jacksonville police,
Milton Boston Jr., 24,
faces 25 charges that
include sexual and aggra-
vated assault, kidnapping,
and robbery. The women
he targeted had a history
of prostitution and there-
fore walked the streets.
Even though none of the
women died, Boston did
strangle them until they
became unconscious
before taking them to a


vacant lot where he sexu-
ally assaulted them.
Boston was arrested on
June 28 for sexual battery.
DNA comparison linked
him to ten' other women
after his arrest in June for
assaulting the first three
women. Sources say all
of the women were
picked up around 195 and
Myrtle Avenue. The
assaults occurred between
March and June 2005.


Milton Boston faces 25
charges including sexual and
aggravated assault, kidnap-
ping and robbery. He target-
ed sex workers.


JACKSONVILLE NATIVE

CELEBRATES 108 YEARS OF LIFE


Miss Lola Scott is
believed to be
Jacksonville's oldest liv-
ing resident and celebrat-
ed her 108th birthday
Friday, July 22, 2005.
Miss Scott was born on
July 2, 1897. She had a
twin sister. Their father
was an AME minister
and they moved from
Ocala to Jacksonville
when she was very
young. Miss Scott grew
up in the Oakland area of
Jacksonville and even
though she never had a
professional career,
never married, and had
no children she was very
active with children in
her family and in the
community. The lady, at
108-years-old, is very
alert and it is apparent
that she is well educated
and says she still reads
constantly.
Attending her birth-
day were family mem-
bers and friends, as well


Miss Lola Scott at 108
years old. She is
Jacksonville's oldest
living resident. She cel-
ebrated her birthday
July 22.


The birthday cake for
Miss Scott's 108th cele-
bration of life. She's
keeping mum on the
secret of her longevity.

.., .. I ..,.


as residents from Clara
White Mission. Miss
Scott has been in good
health most of her life and
has been a resident of
Jacksonville Nursing &
Rehab Center for less
than two years because of
an accident.
Ms. Mary Mungen
Jameson is presently writ-
ing a book about
Jacksonville's long-time


residents that include
Miss Scott. She said that
she and Miss Scott have
become very good
friends and .her book
should be ready for pub-
lication soon.
When asked to tell her
secret for longevity, she
did not answer but it was
speculated, "She is going
to keep the secret to long
life a secret."


BODY OF MAN DROWNED SAVING EWC Gets New VP For Academic

DAUGHTER FOUND Affairs


ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla.
- The Sheriffs Office and
the St. Augustine commu-
nity did not .give up
searching for Maury
Tobler, 41, who could not
swim and lost his life sav-
ing his 9-year-old daugh-
ter, Maureka Tobler.
Tobler's body surfaced at
12:08 a.m. Thursday, July
28, 2005 in the area where
he disappeared. The brave
man was fishing in the
all


area while his daughter
played in the surf Tuesday
afternoon at Vilano
Beach. He observed that
she was knocked down by
a wave and began drifting
into the current of the St.
Augustine Inlet. Maureka
said she was swimming,
and her father, who could
not swim, thought she
was drowning when he
tried to save her but the
water took him away.


Sgt. Chuck Mulligan
told The Florida Star that
he is very grateful that
Tobler was found. He said
that he went to school
with some of his family
members and that the
department's mission was
to bring Tobler back for
his family. Funeral servic-
es had not been
announced at the time of
publication.


Dr. Valdrie Walker has
been appointed vice presi-
dent for the Division of
Academic Affairs at
Edward Waters College
and will begin in this posi-,
tion on August 1, 2005,
according to President
Oswald Bronson, Sr. "Dr.
Walker brings to Edward
Waters College a wealth of
experience in higher edu-
cation both as an adminis-
trator and as a faculty
member specializing in


curriculum and communi-
cation," said Bronson. Dr.
Walker is a graduate of the
University of Virginia and
Saint Paul's College. She
said that she favors a team
approach along ,with
focused leadership that
allows for individual dif-
ferences. She stated that
her "first priority is the
welfare of our members
along with the education
of our students."


LCopyrighted Material


-- Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"
........ ... ...|


S510 9 00151


Looking fo cutomrs o ptroizeyou


busns or utiiz yursericsIfyo
anwee YStenyu ee o laeana


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


I I I


- I .'


- 4








PAGE" A-2 FLRIA TA LY30 20


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
RON WILLIAMS, SR. SAMUEL CRISWELL
NEWS EDITOR ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
CHERYL COWARD LIZ BILLINGSLEA
EDITOR/GRAPHIC DESIGN ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
COLUMNIST REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
. RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DANIEL EVANS, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible for
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail: ..
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION



National Newspaper
Publishers Association


First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


- On the surface, America's
jobs situation looks fine-not
spectacular, but on the uend
from its worrisome condition
of recent years.
The overall unemploy-
ment rate for June slid a per-
centage point to a flat 5 per-
cent, its lowest level in more
than three years, according to
the monthly federal
Department of Labor report.
Employers added 146,000
jobs, close to, the 150,000-
permorith rate many econo-
mists believe necessary to
keep up with the normal
growth rate of the labor force.
Thus far this year, the econo-
my has averaged 181,000
new jobs a month, on par
with last year's pace.
In fact, some declare that
other economic indicators
signal cause for continued
concern. But, at least for the
moment, the prevailing view
is that the economy and labor
market have arrived at amod-
erate, steady rate of expan-
sion that is likely to continue
this way for some time. But if
that's good news for America
as a whole, it is decidedly not
good news for Black
America. The economy's cur-,
rent moderate rate of expan-
sion doesn't represent
progress for African


Americans. It represents a.
turning back of the clock.
The reason is stark: While


the national overall unem-
ployment slid. to 5 percent,
from 5.1 percent in May, and
the white unemployment rate
fell to 4.3 percent, from 4.4
percent, and the unemploy-
ment rate for Latino
Americans declined to 5.8
percent, from 6.0 percent, the
unemployment rate for
African Americans actually
increased-to 10.3 'percent,
from 10.1 percent.
Thus, while unemploy-
ment for other groups of
Americans improved month
to month, it worsened for
African Americans.
In fact, this has been the
pattern of the black unem-
ployment rate since the reces-
sion struck the country in the
spring of 2001 and the slow
recovery began roughly six
months later. For most of
these four years, it has been
stalled between 10 and 11
percent, most often nearly
twice the overall national rate
and always: twice the unem-
ployment rate of whites.
Yes, this is the continua-
tion of a pernicious tradition,
by which African Americans
are both the last-hired-first-
fired and also the not-hired-
at-all.
But America needs to
remember that it hasn't,
always been that way. There
was a recent moment when
the statistic of the black


To Be Equal:
Where Are the Jobs?
Marc H. Morial, President
CEO, National Urban League


unemployment rate gave us
cause to cheer-and illuminat-
ed a fundamental truth about
what the unemployment rate
among African Americans
really means.
I'm referring to the late
spring of 2000 when, as the
white unemployment rate fell
to.4.2 percent, its lowest level
in three decades, the black
unemployment rate sank to
an historic low of 7.0 percent.
It reached that level because
poor blacks, and especially
poor black males, had rushed
to take the low-wage service-
sector jobs. which-thanks to
the powerful dynamic of job-
creation which fueled the
years of economic prosperity
of the 1990s-had, finally,
opened up to them.
That was confirmed by a
national study of more than
300 metropolitan areas by the
National Bureau of
Economic Research, a
Cambridge, Mass.-based
think tank. The report found
that because the nation's long
period of prosperity had
opened up jobs at the bottom
of the occupational ladder,
black males, age 16 to 24
with a high school education
or less, were working in
greater numbers and earning
bigger paychecks than ever
before.
Not surprisingly, the
report also found that levels
of reported crime had fallen
most sharply in those areas of
the country where declines in
joblessness had been greatest.
At the time both
Washington Post columnist


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STHL-:a00 ee.-. Stong


Repair Shop
5091 Sunbeam Road
904-636-0739


Neptune Beach Orange Park
Tucker Orange Park
Equipment Power House
113 11th Street 61,1 Blanding Blvd.
904-246-1330 904-272-2272


stih a- m A ou* ga


E. J. Dionne and government
scholar Jennifer Hochschild
separately noted the impor-
tance of the news. Dionne
wrote that "those who argued
for years that the plight of the
poor owed more to what was
wrong with the economy than
to what was wrong with the
poor have been proved right,"
while Hochschild remarked
that "Poor blacks never lost
faith in work, education and
individual effort. What's dif-
ferent now is that they can do
something about it."
In order for the black poor
to be able to do something
about their unemployment
now, the economy itself must
stimulate an expansive rate of
job growth-which, by the
way, will substantially bene-
fit all Americans, too-so that
the black poor will gain the
opportunity to work.
Thus, the current moder-
ate rate of job growth, one
that just keeps pace with the
natural growth of the labor
force, is not good news for
Black America. It means the
continuation of an unaccept-
ably high unemployment
rate.
As the black poor demon-
.strated in remarkable fashion
just five years ago, they don't
need condescending lectures
about the value of work..
They just need the opportuni-
ty to work-eyen at the lowest
wage levels.
So, while some choose to
try to resurrect the discredited
culture-of-poverty thesis, the
real, urgent question is:
where are the jobs?


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FLORIDIA STAR


JULY30, 2005.


PAGE A-2


I


(1) 13







PAGE A-3


FLORIDA STAR


S.ULY30.. 20


Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
" There's Al wars Something
Happening On The First Coast"


VF


"Oceanside Jazz"
The recent Jazz Fest at Jackson\ ille Beach combined
ocean breezes, great jazz and conviviality. Just as impor-
tant as the great jazz music we were listening to was the
additional delight of seeing First Coasters that were so
influentially involved in getting the event to the stage.
First there Tama Broadcasting's Jacksonville General
Manager Ms. Linda Davis-Fructuoso. Ms. Davis-
Fructuoso is well known within the media and jazz com-
munity. She is known for bringing innovative activities to
the First Coast. Do you recall the First Coast African
American Women Awards? That was just one of the
events from her mastermind. Alum of Volunteer
Jacksonville's Blueprint for Leadership program, Ms.
Davis-Fructuoso continues her creative innovations with
Tama Broadcasting that has radio stations that serve both
mainstream and ethnic markets. Tama Broadcasting, with
multiple radio programmin g formats, appeals to a variety
of demographic groups.
Ms. Brenda Frinks another alum of Volunteer
Jacksonville's Blueprint for Leadership and fresh from
her Youth Crisis Center duties is now focusing more
intently with her perftbmiance promotions company BFA.
Through her BFA promotions company jazz enthusiasts
had the opportunity of hearing the performances of
acclaimed jazz musician Fred Johnson. Johnson's vita
includes recording with jazz legends the late Dizzy
Gillespie, the late Miles Davis, George Benson, David
Sanborn, B.B. King, Ramsey Lewis, Patti LaBelle,
Herbie Mann, and many others. BFA states, "In his lat-
est CD Love Notes, Fred's powerful soothing voice com-
pels us to look deeply into our hears and share our love
with each other." Johnson himself says, "My hope is that
the music and creative experiences I share serve as a
shield from fear and a mirror that reflects the essence and
power of love." I Knew I Loved You and Tampa
Turnaround are currently receiving national radio airplay.
The Tampa connection for Johnson includes serving as
VP of Education and Humanities along with being the
Artist-in-Residence for the Tampa Bay Performing Arts
Center.
Another of BFA promotion appearing at the Jazz
Concert was the Traditionspeaks Quintet. The founder
and bandleader of Traditionspeaks is Chicago native
Anthony Chatman. Chatman comes from a family of
musicians and has been a bassist since he was 13 years of
age. Among 'the .long list of performers Chatman has
opened concerts for are: Grover Washington, Jr. the late
Nat 'Cannonball' Adderly, Maynard Ferguson and
Joan Rivers. He is sought after for performances of both
the East and West Coast. Chatman is joined with
Traditionspeaks Quintet members vocalist Howard
Brown; saxophonist/composer Dale Fielder, Douglas
Anderson Performing Arts School alum Mark
McKnight, and guitarist Jimmy Ward. After hearing the
group you can easily understand why they are sought.
after.
Have you wondered sometimes about who provides
the instruments for performers at concerts? Well, one of
the sources for such needs is Michael Bivens
Productions Instrument Rentals. Owner Michael
Bivens a guitarist himself is a local product graduating
from New Stanton Senior High School and is a relative of
Mrs. [nez Bivens founder and leader of The Bivens
Special singing group. He is also the son of James and
Mrs. Thelma Bivens. In the past Bivens has'played with
Kim Floyd, Chaka Khan and Supreme Creme. He is
the only African American on the First Coast to own and
operate back line instrument rentals that include drum
kits. keyboards, Hammond B3 organs and power amps.
For the past five years he has provided instruments for the
Jacksonville Beach Jazz Series and the Martin Luther
King! Holiday Celeliration. He can also boast of having
pro\ ided instruments for the performances of Shirley
Caesar, Donnie McKirland and Bobby Blue Bland. So
no\ \\ e all know.
The jazz experience this particular weekend was
much, much more than music! Wouldn't you agree?
"Brain Harris' Summer 'Gig'"
Just a note from Brian Harris's father-Mr. Harris
\ anted to let the readers know that Brian had the oppor-
riunirt to play this summer at the Hendricks Ave. Players
Grill and that Brian has released a new recording Hit The
Road Ja k. a tribute to the late Ray Charles. If you'd like
to book Brian Harris for a performance, call 904 768-
'('75".
Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me directly at ima-
lola'aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-
SSee you in te paper! .


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(904) 355-7772
1347 N Market Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32206 I
monday Sunday 11:00 a.m. until |
this coupon
ve a free drink


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JULY 30, 2005


PAGE A-4


A Faith-Based


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Rev. Marvin Zanders, II


Rev. Marvin Zanders, II
and the members of Saint
Paul African Methodist
Episcopal Church, 6910 New
Kings Rd., have planned fun
and spirit-filled activities in
observance of Family and
Friends Weekend.
A family picnic and carni-
val will be held on the church
grounds on Saturday, July 30
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
A special Family Worship
Service (one service only)


will be held Sunday, July 31, beginning at 10:00 a.m.
Rev. Zanders will be the speaker. Friends and the pub-
lic are invited to attend.
The church's August calendar includes:
*August 3-Back To School Prayer Vigil
*August 6-Class L.eaders Nuture and Leadership
Development at 7:45 a.m.
*August 14-Sons of Allen Annual Program
at;4:00 p.m.
*August 21 -Pretty Hat Tea sponsored by The
Women's Progressive Club at 4:00 p.m.
For more information contact the church at (904)
764-2755.'


"There isn't a certain
time we should set
aside to talk about
God. God is part of our
every waking moment.


|.i I A.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR -
Coping with Death, Grief, and Loss Part 1


What is Grief?

Grief occurs in response
to the loss of someone or
something. The loss may
involve a loved one, a job, or
possibly a role (student enter-
ing the workplace or employ-
ee entering retirement).
Anyone can experience grief
and loss. '
It can be sudden or expect-
ed; however, individuals are
unique in how they experi-
ence this event. Grief, itself, is
a normal and natural response
to loss. There are a variety of
ways that individuals respond


to loss. Some are healthy cop-
ing mechanisms and some
may hinder the grieving
process. It is important to
realize that acknowledging
the grief promotes the healing
process.
Time and support facili-
tate the grieving process,
allowing an opportunity to
appropriately mourn this loss.
Next Week: Common
Reactions to Loss

A.B. COLEMAN
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.*
Tel: 768-0507
wwwABColeman.com


K Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-

CHAMBER MUSIC SECOND SEASON-The Chamber
Music Society of Good Shepherd's second season of free
concerts includes performances at 6:00 p.m. Sunday, August
21, and Sunday, September 18, all in Craig Hall. Church of
The Good Shepherd is located at Park and Stockton Streets.
Henson Markham, Artistic Director. David Bowen, MM.,
Organist-choirmaster. Rev. James W. Harris, Jr., Rector.
ANNUAL CELEBRATION/GIVEAWAY-
Remembering Mother and Founder, Evangelist Bernice
C. Evans, Faith As A Mustard Seed, I Am Alpha and
Omega will host its Annual Celebration and Give Away
on July 30 and 31 off Lem Turner Road. (behind Jax
Car Wash, travel seven blocks down, make a right on
Droad Street to the old fashion tent service).'The give
awaywill be conducted from 10:00 a.m.-5:0O p.m. on
July 30. Activities include praising, preaching, singing,
face painting and refreshments. A Praise and Worship
Service will be held beginning at 3:00 p.m. on July 31.
Guest speakers include Evangelist Wanda Porter,
Evangelist Beverly Jenkins and Apostle E. L. Small.
The service will also feature special appearances by
The Singing Kings of Joy, the Shiloh Praise Team from
Orlando, and others.
CELEBRATION FOR YEARS OF SERVICE-Rev.
Dr. Richard L. Wilson, Sr. will be honored for 52 years
of service as Pastor of West Friendship Baptist Church
on August 17 through August 19, nightly at, 7:00 p.m.
Pastor Wilson has pastored at West Friendship since
October 12, 1953. Pastors and participating congrega-
tions inlcude Rev. Ernie' L. Murray and St. Thomas
Baptist Church, Rev. Landori L. Williams and
Macedonia Baptist Clhrch, Rev. Tom E. Diamond and
Abyssinia Baptist Church, and the East Florida &
Bethany Association.
COME TOGETHER DAY-First Missionary Baptist
Church of Jacksonville Beach will sponsor it's Annual
Come Together Day on Saturday, August 6 from 10:00
a.m. until 3:00 p.m. Free food, clothes and school sup-
plies will be provided.. The church is located at 810
Third Avenue South. Rev. Dr. Marvin A. McQueen,
Senior Pastor.
MUSICAL EVENT-The Sword and Shield Kingdom
Outreach Ministry of the Christian Fellowship Gospel
Chorus will lift up Jesus with praises, preaching and
singing on Sunday, August 28 at 3:45 p.m. at the
Father's House Conference Center located at 1820
Monument Rd.-Building #2. The public is invited to
attend this free event.
ST. JAMES DEDICATORY SERVICES-St. James
AME Church has built its new foundation at 535
McIntosh Avenue in Orange Park. The church will hold
its Dedicatory Service on Sunday, July 31, 2005 at 4:00
p.m. with the Bishop McKinley Young of the 11th
Episcopal District. For more information,, please con-
tact Mallen Davis at 904-278-7037 or Rev, Alesia Scott'
Ford at 904-563-5761.

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue.
Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@the-
floridastar.com

DAILY BREAD

Teach Your Children
Fix these words of mine in your hearts and minds; tie
them as, symbols on your hands and bind them on
your foreheads.
Teach them to your children, talking about them when
you sit at home and when you walk along the road,
when you lie down and when you get up.
Deuteronomy 11:18,19 NIV



Evangel


EVANGEL TEMPLE 1-

Revival S in-'ices
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JLack-4m ile, IL .52205
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The Church Directory

"Come and Worship With Us"

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see I Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday. School...........3:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell175@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-Q272 Home


'l-) .


CHRISTIAN FAMILY

WORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187' HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor


UI CLaW '.i5L4CfW ~il C~r Yi~t7'%


C. C.


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3,- .


Third Annual

Memorial Program
August 21, 2005
11:00 a.m.
New Bethlehem Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street
Jacksonville, FL 32208-
If you or a deceased family member are former mem-
bers of New Bethlehem, please take this opportuni-
ty to honor them on our Memorial Tree. You may
also prepay for a leaf for yourself. A wonderful spir-
it filled program has been planned with Rev. Articus
Tolliver of Orlando, Florida as the speaker.
A leaf and a 1/2 page ad cost $100.00.
A leaf and a full page ad are $120.00.
Pre-death payment is $110.00
for leaf and 1/2 page ad.
You may also purchase ads in the memory book -
full page $50.00
half page $25.00
quarter page $15.00
For more information, please call 757-7207 or 785-
7732. All monies must be in by August 6, 2005. You
may send checks/money orders and ads to the
church ATTN. Memorial Program Committee.
We look forward to your
participation.
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor.


Saint Paul AME Church

To Host Family & Friends

Weekend Celebration


~E~s~


F;LORIDA STAR








JULI MI, .-VUJ


I BL~AM NTH IT


Are You A Prostitute
The movie Hustle and
Flow staring Terrence
Howard as DJay is a
moving story of, love,
dreams, hope and faith. It
uses rap music, poverty
and pain to tell an All-
American story. The All-
American story of
achieving when the odds
are against you is what
grips you in this movie. A
man who has been aban-
doned by his family is
forced into a life in the
sex industry. Terrence
Howard's character DJay
is being pimped as much
as he is playing the role of
a pimp. It is hard get
around his role as pimp
because the exploitation
of women takes center
stage, as it should, but
when you look deeper in
the movie you see how he
is also a victim in the
industry.-
The sex industry is-
inherently oppressive. In,
the end, no one benefits.
Women and' men
involved in the industry
have lives- that are
deemed less than redemp-
tive. In this movie love
and hope triumphs this
abusive industry. DJay
and the women around
him come up together.
DJay's struggle with what
was happening to the
women who worked with
him was a part of his
internal struggle.. He saw
himself and his pain in
them and they reflected
their love back, which in
turn fed their freedom


,f0; 1r0


Reject Privatization Of Social Security


journey. The power of
love and hope prevails in
the movie.
The supporting cast of
Anthony Anderson' and
DJ Qualls, an African
American and white
male, working with DJay
to make his music, is true
to what .we find in hip-
hop. Hip-hop is tran-
scending the old racial
barriers and developing a
new way to work through
racial issues as African
Americans, whites, and
Latinos are working
together to create the art.
They see beyond race for
the love of the art. In
Hustle and Flow the races
come together in a work-
ing-class environment to
create music that reflects
their life. This is where
the movie is true to hip-
hop. As much as people
critique. hip-hop artists
for a myriad of reasons,
for the most part. the
artists are rapping about
situations and environ-
ments of which they have
first-hand knowledge.
The movie Hustle and
Flow is a movie that is
worth the price of admis-
sion. It is a story that
draws you in and makes
you want to dream. It
pushes you to think about
your dream and your God
given gift. It makes you
ask the question: "Am I
being prostituted by not
doing what God created
me to do?"
I remember very
vividly one Sunday when,


black in the





Ur [. P'r 1W ,C ,n 1

my pastor made a state-
ment in a sermon. The
statement went some-
thing like this: "If you
are not doing what God
has divinely designed you
to do and' you are simply
going to work to. get a
paycheck then you are
prostituting yourself."
Wow,! As I watched
Hustle and Flow my pas-
tor's words appeared to.
be printed on the screen. I
asked the question, "How
many folk in this' world
are prostituting them-
selves?" You don't have
to be in the sex industry
to be a prostitute. In the
end the movie makes us
look in the mirror and ask
ourselves the question
"what is our gift and what
has God divinely created
us to do?" The movie
makes us ask the ques-
tion, "Am I a prostitute?"

Dr. Watkins is the
Assistant Dean for
African American Church
Studies at Fuller
Seminary in. Pasadena,
California.


a 40 -414109
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Syndicated Content ,

* Available from Commercial News Providers".

4 -= -*- ,


Nicole C. Mullen
Two-time Grammy nominee
and Dove Award winner for
Female Vocalist of the Year


By Congresswoman
Corrine Brown

The health issues facing
our country at this time are
numerous, and in fact, dif-
ficult to overcome, partic-
ularly when up in
Washington we are forced
to work with a Republican
Congress and the Bush
administration! Here. in
Florida, things are not
much easier, given that
Bush's brother and his
allies are running our state.
From Medicare to
Medicaid, to saving Social
Security, to basic educa-
tion on AIDS and asthma,
issues surrounding health
care are arguably the most
difficult and contentious
our-country is facing at the
present time.
To begin, I would like
to discuss my concern for
the President's plan for
Social Security and how, if
implemented, it could
affect the state of Florida.
Florida is a state with one
of the highest percentages
of retired people in the
nation, and it greatly con-
cerns me that President.
Bush's plan for privatizing
social security could dry
up our country's retirement
savings, and those of the,
senior citizens here in
Florida. This is a plan that
is bad for America, bad for
our senior citizens, and is
especially bad for women,
for minorities and for chil-
dren.
The Republican plan is
based on the ludicrous idea
of allowing younger work-
ers to create private
accounts to invest toward
social security. And even
though the White House
refers to the plan as "own-
ership," in reality, it is
quite obvious that this is a
plan to, privatize the sys-
tem, just like they are
secretly planning to do
with Medicare. and
Medicaid.
For the nearly 5 million
African Americans who,
receive Social Security
this plan could prove to be'
devastating. Without
Social Security, poverty
rates for African American


seniors would more than
double. On average, Social
Security provides about
three-quarters of all retire-
ment income for African
American seniors, and
40% of African American
seniors rely on Social
Security for all of their
income.
On this issue,, my col-
leagues and I back in
Washington are doing
everything we can to pres-
sure the White House to
keep the system as it is. As
the saying goes, "if it ain't
broke, don't fix it." We
need a plan that provides a
secure retirement for the
people of this great nation,
not one that would make
the system even worse!
One other issue I would
like to quickly touch on is
Governor Bush's plan to
overhaul Medicaid here in
the state of Florida.
Medicaid, as I'm sure
many of you know, is a
system that provides
health care for 40 million
Americans nationwide, let
me repeat that, 40 million,
that is, one in six of our cit-
izens. It serves as the safe-
ty net for older Americans
needing long-term care,
the disabled, and for chil-
,dren living in poverty. It is
in fact, often the last resort
for millions of low income
American families whose
wages are so low that they
cannot afford health insur-
ance, essentially serving
the uninsured and those.
that are not insurable
because they are either
priced out of the private
market or pushed out
because of their health sta-
tus. Today, this is even
more important given the
rapidly increasing number
of uninsured Americans.
From my perspective,
Governor Bush's plan to
privatize Medicaid by giv-
ing private managed care
companies more control of
health coverage for nearly
2.3 million poor, elderly
and disabled Floridians. In
fact, the plan is so outra-
geous that it is being ques-
tioned by health care
providers and profession-'
als throughout the entire


nation.
Lastly, let me. make
brief mention of the astro-
nomical prescription drug
prices in our country. Now
I'm sure most everyone
here has been to a pharma-
cy lately to pick up a pre-
scription for one reason or
another. Now even for
those with health insur-
ance, the prices are outra-
geous, and for those of us
without it, buying pre-
scription drugs is outright
prohibitive! What we do
not need is privatization of
the system, and definitely
don't need more power in
the hands of the pharma-
ceutical industry, like the
Bush brothers would like.
Again, we need to lower
the prices and increase
access to prescription
drugs, not put up even
more cost barriers to peo-
ple,,getting their prescrip-
tions by allowing private
industry to control the
prices!
I encourage everyone
here to remain active and
to encourage their senators
and representatives, both
in the State of Florida and
up in Washington, to reject
privatization, and to
encourage them to allow
for drug importation from
Canada and other coun-
tries, which would at least
be a first step in bringing
down prescription drug
prices. I can assure all of
you that I will be up in
Washington doing my part
to put the brakes on the
Bush privatization plan,
and to install a plan that is
good for everyone in the
nation, not just those at the
country clubs.


MIS iFR T RC

10OFU

U .L.DOPOU


adf'


To know about Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) also known as crib death.
African American babies are twice as likely to die from SIDS. Help keep children safe.
Always place babies on their backs to sleep. And don't put soft, stuffed toys in their crib.
To learn more, talk to your healthcare provider.
/ Call 1-800-444-6472.


know what to do for life.
. Sponsored by the U.S. apartment of Health and Human Services, Office of Minorin Health
S www.healthgap.omhrc.gov


4


"Never be afraid to sit awhile and think."
from "A Raisin in the Sun" written by Lorraine Hansberry and
the first drama by a black woman to be produced on Broadway


" ADVERTISEMENTS DUE: :
* Tuesdays @ 5 p.m.
904-766-8834
Email your ad: .
ad@thefloridastar.com
... . .


r. "


. I


.. ..... ... ? .


PAGE A-5


FLORIDA ,STAR


TTTTr T7 2/) WY


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1


fra during


VICTORY WAY CHRISTIAN CENTER

4058 STAUGUSTINE

JACKSON. i


RLU EPRINT


"Roasing the per capital income in Duval County"


Blueprint for Prosperity is a partnership of agencies, private organizations and government
entities aimed at raising per capital income in Duval County. Help develop our plan 'for the
future. Attend one of the 14 upcoming community meetings listed below and share your ideas
and opinions to improve the quality of life in Duval County. Call (904) 924-1100 (Enter extension
listed below) to RSVP or log on to www.blueprintforprosperity.com for more information.
Community Meeting Schedule


August I FCCJ Kent Campus 3939 Roosevelt Blvd
August 4 Evangel Temple 5750 Ramona Blvd
,August 8 Northside Church of Christ 4736 Ave 8


(Dist. 14 Ext. 714)
(Dist. 9 Ext. 709)
(Dist. 10 Ext. 710)


August II Jacksonville Beach Church of Christ 422 5th Ave (Dist 13 Ext. 713)
August 15 First Timothy Baptist Church 12104 Biscayne Blvd (Dist. 7 Ext. 707)
August 18 Oceanway Middle School 143 Oceanway Avenue (Dist II Ext. 711)


August 22 Parkwood Baptist Church 7900 Lonestar Rd
August 29 Englewood High School 4412 Barnes Rd


(Dist. I Ext 701)
(Dist. 4 Ext 704)


August 30 St. Marks Lutheran Church 3976 Hendricks Ave (Dist. 5 Ext 705)


Time
6:00 p.m. Registration & Snacks
6:30 9:30 p.m. Community Meeting
City Council District Map
Attend a meeting in your City Council District.
District numbers are listed to the left in parentheses.


a a ~


1'


Be an Architect


for Jacksonville's Future

*


Almon Gunter
To Speak
Friday In
Jacksonville


Motivational Speaker Almon
Gunter
Acclaimed motivation-
al, inspirational speaker
and author, Almon Gunter
will be the speaker at Mt.
Sinai Community
Development Enterprises,
Inc. First Annual
Fundraiser and Awards
Banquet Friday, June 29 at
7:00 p.m. at the Holiday
Inn located on 195 and
Airport Road.
Mr. Gunter is a two-
time Olympic Trial
Qualifier and will share
his ideas, concepts and
strategies with youth,
teens and corporations at
the banquet. This speaker
has much to offer and
everyone is urged to attend
as well as sponsor some
youth to attend. Almon's
formula for success
involves die-hard dedica-
tion, never-ending enthusi-
asm, hard work, heart and
hustle, with the end result
of becoming a MVP in the
game of life. For more
information or reserva-
tions, call (904)j798-9733.


News In Brief
continued from A-1
Jacksonville Native Makes
It To Next Level On TLC's
Premier Show
Alju Jackson has been
performing in Jacksonville
for many years but the 22-
year-old Jacksonville native
R&B singer was probably,
more nervous than ever
when she stood in compe-
tition on the premier show
"R U The Girl" with T-
Boz & Chili of TLC. In
spite of her nervousness,
she pulled herself together
and made the next level
for the competition and is
now headed to Atlanta.
Her mother, Ju'Coby
Pittman-Peele, longtime
Jacksonville volunteer
and director of the Clara
White Mission along with
her grandmother, attended
the audition to support her
and was also seen on
national TV for the new
UPN Reality series, which
aired Wednesday, July 27
on Fox 30.

Two Caught Stealing While
Family And Friends Attend
Homegoing Services
Samemsha Arkia
Robinson, 18 and Jerald
Lashawn Tubbs, 28, were
stopped and arrested for
auto burglaries. Such
burglaries occurred while
family and friends attend-
ed funeral services,
wakes, burials or visited
cemeteries where rela-
tives or friends rested.
The two relied on news-
paper obituaries to find
dates and times of servic-
es in order to steal items
from those in attendance.


Gunshots
continued from A-1
African Americans and three
Asian/Pacific Islanders,
ranging from 14 to 55 years
of age. One victim stated
that he was lying in bed talk-
ing on the telephone when
the shots began. A bullet
grazed his left upper arm.
Another person in the apart-
ment was asleep on the
couclh in the living room
when she was shot in the
buttocks. She had a bullet
wound to both sides of her
buttocks. None of the
wounds was life threatening
and all of the other occu-
pants said that they were not
injured and cannot explain
what caused someone to shot
up their apartment. Their
only speculation was that a
friend of a 17-year-old in the
targeted apartment had a is-
itor who tried to talk to a 1-1-
year-old. The 14-year old
told the person that she did
not associate with people
from West Jacksonville. The
unknown person appeared to
become very angry and left
the apartment. It was learned
that bullets penetrated t \\o
apartments, the front apart-
ment and the one immediate-
ly behind it. Everyone in the
other apartment was asleep
also but no one was injured
in that apartment. A thor-
ough investigation has been
instigated and names and
phone numbers have been
provided the Sheriffs office.
One witness did see a brol\ n
or gold vehicle with a loud
muffler and the officers con-
fiscated a small amount %,'
cocaine and marijuana from
the targeted aptirtment.


P GE ..4- -"



PRESENT







AGLORIFY GROUP INC, 7YEARANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION


mmvmm


JULY 30, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


n V-









UTVfl JU 9flfl FLOuiAA jjARAPAGE


Self-Employed Floridians Qualify



For Guaranteed Issue Health Coverage


TALLAHASSEE Self-employed Floridians in need of,
health insurance can obtain it through an open enrollment
period during the month of August, Florida's Chief Financial
Officer Tom Gallagher said today.
The open enrollment period requires insurance compa-
nies and Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) to offer
applications for coverage to the self-employed on a guaran-
teed-issue basis from August 1 to August 31 each year, with'


a plan start date of October 1. The open enrollment period
enables individuals without health coverage to obtain insur-
ance.
Additionally, it provides Floridians that currently have
health coverage the opportunity to switch to another insur-
ance plan. "We need to get the word out that the window of
opportunity only comes once a year for the self-employed
seeking guaranteed-issue health coverage," Gallagher said.


FAMU Grad Is Delegate In Miss Black Universe Pageant


The Miss Black Universe
Pageant announced Kimberlee D.
Borland as the Florida delegate
for the 2005 international compe-
tition to be held August 2005 in
Chicago, Ill.
Borland is a graduate of
FAMU'.s Business and
Teclhnolo Education
Department and is currently the
liaison for the FAMU Board of


Trustees.
Borland, born in Anchorage, Ala., moved to Florida for
university studies. Currently, she is pursuing a graduate
degree in Corporate Training and Knowledge Management.
After completion of this program, Borland wishes to pursue
a doctorate degree of Organizational Management.
As the Florida delegate, Borland is focused on uplifting
and encouraging minority females to further their .education
beyond high school and encouraging women to care for their
health and appearance.


SCLC Bringing A-List Crowd To Birmingham


ATLANTA, Ga.--The Southern Christian .Leadership
Conference will old its 47th National Convention, July 30
August 3, 2005.in Birmingham. Ala.
As a kickoff to this four-day event,' the SCLC will host a
Christian Fellowship in Action Program at Hopewell Baptist
Church on Saturday, July 30 at 11:00 a.m.. This event is.
-T --- -- -- --* --i -**-- -_- -


Enroll
Q Your Child Now
S..Come in and register for Florida's
Voluntary Prekindergarten
Education Program
WHO: Children who are four (4) years old
r^ J1 on or before September 1.2005 and reside
S" in Florida.
Note:All previously pre-registered and currently interested parents must attend or call for
an appointment at 904-208-2044.
WHAT: rtr,r .. ,rh you proof of child's age (birth certificate or other approved
verification of age) and Florida residency (utility bill or driver's license.)
WHEN &WHERE: See below for dates, locations and times. Parents will receive a
list of eligible providers at this registration.
Florida's Voluntary Prekindergarten Education Program Registration
Schedules and Locations
Bradham Brooks Library Community room downstairs Saturday, July 9 9:30 am.- 1:00 pm
Regency Square Mall Inside near Sears entrance Saturday, July 16 10:00 am 3:00 pm
Avenues Mall In front of JC Penney Saturday, July 9 10:00 am 3:00 pm
Saturday, July 16 10:00 am 3:00 pin'
Regency Square Library Saturday, July 23 10:00 am 2:00 pm
Wolfson High School (Southside) Mondays in July (except 7/4) 5:30 pm 8:30 pm
Raines High School (Northside) Tuesdays in July 5:30 pm 8:30 pm
Ed White High School (Westside) Thursdays in July 5:30 pm- 8:30 pm
Early Learning Coalition will give parents a list of eligible providers. After
r ;:rrf;,, ,-,:r r_." 1h,:ul -, ,' L: r_': child care provider of their

For more information, visit our website:WWw.eIcofduva.LOrg
or call: 904-208-2044

Early Leaoming Coalition
ofOufvo i
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Love your job?
Share it with a kid.


Yorexp ieccan np .
nextgenrto.Vfne.--


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JirinorAchfievemineii
wwnn.ja.org,


Dr. William Shaw



i-



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" : ..A
Charles Steele .


free and open to the public. The
speaker for this program is the
Reverend Dr. William Shaw,
President of the National
Baptist Convention, the nation's
oldest 'and 'largest African
American religious convention.
Reverend Dr. Shaw has led the
organization since 1999 and.
says that it is the commitment
of the National Baptist
Convention to always operate
1\ith a "Qhrist-centered vision
of ourselves and our mission."
Later that evening at 7:00
p.m., 'a free gospel concert will
be held at Sardis Baptist
Church. The Mississippi Mass
Choir, whose mission is
"Serving God Through Song"
and who has toured the world in
song and ministry for over a
decade, will be featured
On Sunday, July 31, SCLC
National President and CEO
Charles Steele .will present his
President's Address at the his-


toric Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Known for getting
people "fired up" with his speeches, President Steele will
share the renewed vision and spirit of the SCLC, and the
organization's strategic priorities for 2005-2007. He will
also prepare convention attendees for the next three days of
, workshops,. plenary discussions, breakfasts, luncheons, and
the highly anticipated awards galS.

Dellums Commission Begins

Work On Public Polipy Reform
WASHINGTON-The Joint
Center' Health Policy Institute
has commissioned, a panel' of ..
respected experts to examine
the cumulative impact on com-
munity health of evolving
national and state policies that
limit life options for young men
of color. As overall child mor-
tality fell dramatically from Ronald Dellums
1981 to 2001, the only group
that did not experience a reduction in death rates was African
Americans between 15 and 19 years old-mostly because of a
rise in homicide and suicide rates.
Black, Latino, Asian and Native American young men
are incarcerated at disproportionately high rates. Many
young men of color are unable to recover from serious men-
tal illness because they are warehoused in juvenile detention
centers where the availability of community mental health
care services is severely limited.
The Commission Chairman is Ronald V. Dellums, a
Member of Congress representing California from 1971 to
1998 and former chairman of the House Armed Services
Committee and the Congressional Black Caucus. The Joint
Center Health Policy Institute was established in 2002 by the
Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, with a grant
from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The institute's mission is
to ignite a "Fair Health" movement that gives people of color
the inalienable right to equal opportunity for healthy lives.
The Joint Center, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization, con-
ducts research and analyses on public policy issues of con-
cern to African Americans and other minorities, promotes
their involvement in the governance process, and operates
programs that.reate coalitions within the minority, business,
and other diverse communities.


"We want to help ensure that Floridians gain access to health
care coverage. This enrollment period comes only once a
year for the self-employed seeking guaranteed-issue health 0,.
coverage, so now is the time to get insurance or review your ,
current policy."
Small employers are eligible if they have just one ,
employee who qualifies for .coverage, and if they did not go ,
into business primarily for the purpose of buying health ,
insurance. A sole proprietor, independent contractor or self-
employed individual is considered a small employer only if ....
all of the conditions and criteria established in the law are
met. A list'of insurance companies offering coverage is post-
ed on the Department of Financial Services' website at
http://www.fldfs.com/Consumers/small_group market_car-
rirers.htm. For available benefits, go to
http://www.fldfs.com/companies/lh_fr/is_LHFR Small_Em '
pBenefitPlan.htm. .
Guaranteed-issue means insurers and HMOs must offer. .
coverage without regard to health status..: Companies that ,
write coverage for individuals are required to offer only '.
"basic" or "standard" plans. '
With the passage of the Affordable Healthcare. for,
Floridians Act last year, coverage options for employers
include health savings accounts (HSAs) and health reim-
bursement arrangements (HRAs). HSAs, which operate like
Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), allow people to
save their own money in a tax-free account for use on health ,
related expenses. If the money is not spent, it will roll over
annually and continue to accumulate until the policyholder is
age 65 at which time the money can be used for any purpose.
Self-employed Floridians who apply for coverage must
show certain documentation verifying that they are operating.
an active business, including tax forms, license information
and business receipts. Gallagher, encourages consumers to
contact the department's toll-free consumer helpline at 1-
800-342-2762 to request a free copy of our health insurance :
consumer guide. .



Rev. Jesse Jackson And Other Prominent
Leaders Warn That Pending
Legislation Will Harm Audiences of Colors

New York-- Several notable African American commu-
nity leaders and television executives led by Rev. Jesse
Jackson cautioned the Senate Committee on Commerce,
Science and Transportation that legislation requiring man-
dated accreditation of television ratings would harit audi-
ences of color.
Other signatories to the letter were Dorothy Height,
Chair, Executive Committee, National Council of Negro
Women; Marc Morial, President and CEO of the National
Urban League, Debra Lee, President and COO, BET;.
Johnathan Rodgers, President and CEO, TV One; Don
Jackson, Chairman, and CEO Central City Productions, Inc.;
Byron Lewis, Chairman and CEO, Uniworld Group; and
independent filmmaker Warrington Hudlin.
These leaders affirmed their support for the introduction
of advanced ratings systems. Moreover, they warned, that
government regulation "would make it nearly impossible to,
make improvements in TV ratings technology, and would
make it harder ,to more accurately measure people of color
and other tele\ ision audiences."
The bill, which was introduced by Senator Conrad Bums
(R, MT), would give the Media Rating Council the volun-
tary industry association that accredits ,TV ratings the
power to prevent the introduction of new ratings systems.

Employer Retirement Plans Could Help
Close the Gap Between White
And Black Stock Market Participation

NEW YORK, NY For African-Americans, who have
historically lagged Whites in stock market participation,
employer-sponsored retirement plans have the potential to
be an effective entree into the world of investing, according
to the 8th Annual Ariel-Schwab Black Investor Survey.
The survey finds that African-Americans who are saving
primarily for retirement are almost twice as likely to be stock
investors as those who are saving for other reasons, such as
to-pay for education. Whites,, however, are equally likely to
be investors regardless of their saving and investment goals..
The percentage of higher income Blacks (households
earning over $50,000 annually) who own stocks or mutual
funds continues to lag behind higher income Whites, with
65% of Blacks vs. 80% of Whites invested in the market.
Black investing has fluctuated over the years from a low of
57% in 1998 to a high of 74% in 2002; the corresponding '
figures for Whites have remained statistically flat, hovering
around 80%.
Carla A. Foster, a vice president with Charles' Schwab.
Corporation, believes that one way to continue to narrow the
investment gap between Blacks and Whites is through
employer-sponsored retirement plans. "We know that retire-
ment planning is a gateway to investing for many individu-
als, but we learned that it js truly the key driver for African-
Americans."


Kimberlee D. Borland


I -Mmm


PA GE A-


FLORIDA .STAR


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PAGE A-8


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A Fundraising Dinner for
Elaine Brown for Mayor
of Brunswick, Georgia

August 6, 2005
7:00 p.m.
Jekyll Island Convention Center
I North Beachview Drive, Jekyll Island, GA
Hartley Auditorium
$50.00 per person
If elected, Elaine will become the first black and the
first woman mayor of Brunswick!
Ekaine Brown for MKiyoO!
Vote November 2005
www.elainebrown.org
(912) 262-9811
Elaine's Platform
Development without displacement
Full employment and self-employment
Community-owned enterprises
Decent housing for all
Complete health coverage for all
Food for every child
Expanded funding for public education
Establishment of public transportation
Clean air and green space
Honor the Gullah/Geechee heritage
139 Altama Connector 9#107 *Crime prevention not mass incarceration
Brunswick Georgia 31525 Sharing regional resources
Telephone 912-262-9811
Facsimile 912-261-9813
Paid Political Advertisement. Elaine Brown for Mayor of Brunswick. Georgia Green Party


OR MAYVI
, ,- A'


Elf.lA TRJLY2.20


FLORIDA STAR


.JULY 23. 2005


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Jax Landing Crowd Wowed By Students From Non-Profit School


LEFT: A dance student from the not-for-profit Jacksonville School of Music performed
Saturday night at the Jacksonville Landing. IlGHT: Two young girls dance at "The
Rhythm & The Blues," a student showcase of the Jacksonville School of Music held
at the Jacksonville Landing Saturday. PHOTOS BY CLENNON L. KING


Fools," Tonya Brown's ren-
dition of Bette Midler's
"Wind Beneath My Wings"
and Megan Isham's version
of "Martha and the
Vandellas' "Heatwave" com-
plete with a trio of backup
dancers.
"Gimme The Mike"
winner Josh Howell closed
out the show with an impres-
sive rendition of Elton
John's "Don't Let the Sun Go
Down On Me."
Between acts, McDuffie
pointed to tables in the
Landing's courtyard manned
by volunteers distributing
enrollment materials.
we'rer e just hoping peo-
ple were impressed with
\what the\ saw\ and t ill


enroll the young and young-
at-heart to help us grow this
arts institution," said
McDuffie.
The school, which is
guided by The Northeast
Florida Foundation of the
Arts, a non-profit arts board,
offers dance, vocal, and
instrument instruction in
both the contemporary and
classical tradition.
The new Jacksonville
School of Music, whose
home is in the Jacksonville
Landing, is thelatest project
of McDuffie's who is no
stranger to the stage and big
names from thk music
indusir\.
The Qhecns. Ne\\ York
nalit\e. \\ho in 1'11 3 ~ as


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-
Recent music school
founder Deborah McDuffie
isn't one to toot her own
horn. But the show she and
her six-member volunteer
team hosted Saturday night
at the Jacksonville Landing
had people stopping in their
tracks.
A young couple on the
Southbank crossed the river
to see the faces behind the
\oices they heard.
An older husband and
wife, who couldn't speak
English, sat with, open
mouths and eyes glued to the
stage.
And children danced to
the music and oices of
"The Rh. thm and The
Blues." a free inusical re\ue
of hits fiiom the '"Os. 'INO
and 'QOs at the Landinc from
8 to 0 p.m. Sartrda\.
"It's great t pla\mg to a
fill house." said MNlcDuffie.
founder of the ne\% not-for-
profit Jackson\ ille School of
Nlusic \here most of the
singers and dancers .ire
enrolled.
The sho\ v.as part enter-
tainment. and part enroll-
ment drit e for the non-prof-
it school of music's fall
classes w, which begin in
September.
NlcDuffie opened the
shovw \ ith a number, before
turning it o\er to her cast of
students \ ho crooned,
danced, and in some cases
belted out a string of chart
toppers.
The hour-long show\ fea-
rured Wendi Flo\d w\ho sanri
Aretha Franklin's "Chain of


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SAURDAYS




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hired to revamp, New York's
Apollo Amateur Night.
knows many on a first name
basis. And well she should.
Even before then, the
former New York-based
advertising exec earned her
name writing and producing
jingles, then hiring music
icons like Luther Vandross,
Janet Jackson, and Patti
Labelle to sing them.
With the music industry
changing, McDuffie found
herself at a career crossroads
in the mid-'90s. While visit-
ing a friend in Jacksonville,
she went to a teachers' job
fair, was hired, and now
teaches music at Paxon
School of Advanced Studies.
Since being in
Jacksonville, McDuffie's

CORRECTION:

The photos that appeared
with the Quality Foods
Plus article on Page B-1
of the July 23, 2005 issue
listed the names of the part-
ners rather than the man-
agers. The managers
shown in the photo were:
Joel Hursey, formerly of
Premier Foods, Beaver St.;
Assistant Manager
Cleveland Wright, formerly
of Premier Foods, Beaver
St.; and Market Manager
Larry Phillips, Formerly of
Premier Foods, Edgewood
Ave.

DEATH
NOTICES
ANDERSON-Mary F., died
July'19, 2005.
ASKEW-Rudolph, died July
24, 2005.
BANNER-Dorrian P., 50, died
July 22, 2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
BERRY-Pearlie, died July 29,
2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
BRITTON-Laverne S., died
July 24, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
DALLAS-Sam,. died July 21,
2005.
EVANS-Alissa, died July 24,
2005.
HARRISON-David Tyrone,
died July 18, 2005.
HARRISON-Theodore, died
July 25, 2005.
HARVEY-Joseph, died July
21, 2005.
HOWELL-Margaret, died July
22, 2005.
JACKSON-Beatrice, died
July 21, 2005.
LAMPKINS-Magnolia, died
July 21, 2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
MOBLEY-Cynthia, died July
21, 2005.
OWENS-Donald E., died July
20, 2005.
PERRY-Davis L., died July
22,2005.
RANDOLPH-Walter B. Jr.,
died July 20, 2005.
SIMMONS-Vivian, died July
20, 2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
SLOCUMB-Charles, died
July 25, 2005.
TATUM-Vernita H., died July
18, 2005.
TUKES-Rollie Lee, 51, died
July 17, 2005.
WEST-Barbara E., died July
20, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
WILLIAMS-Evelyn Marie, 52,
died July 19, 2005.


name has become, synony-
mous with a number of
products she created, includ-
ing Ritz Amateur Night, and
The Ritz Voices, which she
continues to direct.
She also spearheaded
McDonald's Gospelfest
(nowv Florida Gospelfest),
events for the Jacksonville


Landing Jazz Festival, Super
Bowl Gospel Competition,
and the "NFL's Journey: A
Tribute to Black History
Month." "It's clear she
knows her stuff," said one
member of the audience.
Call (904) 665-0084 or
(904) 504-2763 for more
information.


COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.
MAD DADS FUNDRAISING BANQUET-The
MAD DADS Jacksonville Chapter, Inc. will host its
Second Annual Fundraising Banquet on August 12 at
the Jacksonville Landing. The Honorable Dr. Wade F.
Horn, Assistant Secretary of Children and Families,
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is
the guest speaker. The banquet was established for the
purpose of honoring community residents that have
committed themselves to improving communities
within the city of Jacksonville. Ticket donations are
$60. For partnership levels and ad donations informa-
tion contact Tonya Jackson or Elder Bruce Jones (904)
388-8171.
BOYLAN HAVEN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION's
GRAND REUNION-The Boylan-Haven Alumnae
Association invites all graduates, former students and
teachers to attend this year's Grand Reunion. The
Hilton Hotel at 1201 Riverplace Boulevard is the head-
quarters for the three-day event from August 5-7. In
keeping with Boylan-Haven's traditions activities will
include an Island Dininer and Dancing, City Tour,
Worship Services and lots more. During the reunion
weekend former students and teachers will get back to
the 3 R's as they Renew acquaintances, Remember spe-
cial moments and Revive the Boylan-Haven Spirit.
For information and registration please contact
Reunion Chairperson-Linda Pearson Belton at 904-
634-4517.
CLASSES & PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN
OFFERED AT THE CUMMER MUSEUM- The
Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside
Ave., is offering a series of program for children begin-
ning in August. The listing of events include: Drop-In
Art in the Afternoon on Tuesdays, 4 5 p.m.; Ages 4
- 8. This program is a drop-in studio activity for chil-
dren based on the national Start With The Arts pro-
gram. Each week your child will have the opportunity
to explore the galleries or gardens and experiment with
a different art process. No pre-registration. Please
arrive early as class size is limited. Members: $5; Non-
members: $7. Art Adventures on Saturdays, 10 a.m.
12 p.m.; Ages 6 12. Art Connections studio classes in
painting, printmaking, collage and construction with
changing themes. Projects will be completed within
one class period. Class size is limited and pre-registra-
tion is required. Sign up for one class or sign up for
them all! Members: $10 per class; Non-members: $15
per class. Urban Space, August 6. Garden Drawing,
August 20. Art For Two on Tuesdays, 4 5 p.m.; Ages
3 5. Spend a fun-filled hour together with your child
in a class based on the national Start With The Arts pro-
gram. This class provides an infusion of art, movement,
literature and music that will help channel children's
interests, into the development of new skills. Pre-regis-
tration is required. Members: $10 per pair, per class;
Non-members: $15 per pair, per class. 1-2-3 Print!
August 9. The World Around Me, August 23.
AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS-Register Now for
After School Programs atBoys & Girls Clubs of
Northeast Florida. It's three o'clock; do you know
where your children are? Boys & Girls Clubs of
Northeast Florida (BGCNF) is now accepting registra-
tions for children ages 6-18 to attend safe, supervised
after-school programs at its area Clubs and TEAMUps.
Trained, professional staff lead the activities that
include academic assistance, technology centers, arts,
sports leagues and more. Clubs open August 15, while
TEAMUp programs begin August 22, and run every
Monday through Friday (M-F). The only charge is the
annual fee of $10 per child. Please see below for site-
specific scheduling information. For additional infor-
mation, contact the Club nearest you or call the
BGCNF administrative office at (904) 396-4435.
S. ,, .....,-


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Hot!

Timely!

Efficacious!

North Florida's Best .
Daily Talk Show!



AM 1530
WEEKDAYS ,

2-6 P.M.

CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http://www.downtobusiness.org/


PAGE B-1


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Deadline for Ads

/S @Tuesday
@ 5p.m.

SCall: (904) 766-8834
S- Fax: (904) 765-1673

ad@thefloridastar.com

""Time is important to me because I want to*
sing long enough to leave a message. I'm
[used to singing in churches where nobody
would dare stop me until the Lord arrives!"

| Mahalia Jackson I
*' "/ift.L-f. UJ f JU.^


QVueen uj fuyospe
p (1911- 1972)
S .! E E 5 55 S S


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Marian Wright Edelman


FLO~RIDA SrTAR


JULY30, 2005


PA/GF R


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STeacheing Children To Be Good
s port* Hp* T hem Avoid Steroid





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Information On School Meals

In Duval County Schools
Did you know that all school menus are planned according to the US
Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient standards? That is a school meal
fact. Did you know that at many Duval County elementary schools, all students
eat breakfast FREE?

Pay for School Meals Online

Using www.myLunchMoney.com, parents can log on and prepay for school
meals using a MasterCard or Visa credit card. This new service is free, easy-to-
use, convenient, private and secure. Simply go to www.myLunchMoney.com to
enroll and start using the site to deposit funds into your child's account. For more
information, call (800) 479-3531 or visit www.myLunchMoney.com.

To set up an account, you will need:
*Your child's student I.D. number which you may get from their report card
- or by contacting your school.

- *The name and the zip- ode of the school which your child attends.


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Lunch
- Elementary student is $1.30
Secondary student is $1.45
"Reduced meal" student is 40 cents (Click here for info)
Adult is $2.10


National School Lunch Program (Free and Reduced Meals for Students)

Duval County Public Schools participate in the National School Lunch
Program. Under federal guidelines, some students qualify' for free or reduced
breakfasts and lunch. For additional information, call the Food Service Office at
(904) 732-5117.


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Once you enter this information and establish an
account, you can deposit money anytime from your
computer. Parents can also check balances allow-
ing you to always make sure your child has money
for school meals.

Parents without Internet access may still access
this service by calling (800) 479-3531, toll free.


How much do school meals cost?

Breakfast
Elementary student is 75 cents
Secondary student is 75 cents
"Reduced meal" student is 30 cents (Click here
for info)
Adult is $1.00


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Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "Behind These Hazel Eyes" Kelly Clarkson (RCA)
Last Week: No. 1
"Inside Your Heaven" Carrie Underwood (Arista) No. 2
3. "Inside Your Heaven" Bo Bice (RCA) New Entry
4. "Don't Cha" The Pussycat Dolls Featuring Busta
Rhymes (A&M) No. 5
5. "Don't Phunk with my Heart" The Black Eyed Peas
(A&M) No. 3
6. "We Belong Together" Mariah Carey (Island) No. 6
7. "Pon de Replay" Rhianna (SRP Def Jam) No. 9
8. "Hollaback Girl" Gwen Stefani (Interscope) No. 7
9. "Lose Control" Missy Elliott Featuring Ciara & Fat
Man Scoop (The Gold Mind) New Entry
1. "Oh" Ciara Featuring Ludacris (Sho'nuff
MusicLine/LaFace) No. 10
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Fast Cars and Freedom" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street)
Last Week: No. 1
2. "As Good as I once Was" Toby Keith (DreamWorks)
No. 2
3. "If Something Should Happen" Darryl Worley
(DreamWorks) No. 8
4. "Something More" Sugarland (Mercury) No. 4
5. "Making Memories ofUs" Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 5
6. "Mississippi Girl" Faith Hill (Warner Bros.) No. 6
7. "Keg in the Closet" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 7
S"You'll Be There" George Strait (MCA Nashville) No. 3
9. "Alcohol" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) No. 10
10. "Lot Of Leavin' Left to Do" Dierks Bentley (Capitol)
No. 9
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Don't Cha (R. Rossario/Kaskade/DJ Dan Mixes)" The
Pussycat Dolls Featuring Busta Rhymes (A&M) Last
Week: No. 1
2. "Live You All Over" Tony Moran Presents Deborah
Cooper (Tommy Boy Silver Label) No. 2
3. "As I Am" Deepa Soul (JVM/Promo) No. 3
4. "Summer Moon" Africanism All Stars (Yellow) No. 5
5. "Accept Me" Vernessa Mitchell (JVM) New Entry
6. "Gotta Go, Gotta Leave (Tired)" Vivian Green
iColumbia) No. 6
"Movin' On" Chris The Greek Panaghi (DJG) No. 7
8. "Doesn't Really Matter" Murk (Tommy Boy Silver
Label) No. 4
9. "Killin' Me (Where Did I Go Wrong)" Jenna Drey so IW% 0
(Audio One) No. 14
10. "Krafty(DJDan/E. Kupper/MorelMixes)"New A 1 o b 1* 0 a W
Order (Warner Bros.) No. 9 IN I "Vn0 3 O N %IW
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STA E -B------------


" JAIL OR BAIL
t.. ...... ... .:.Y :-. '2 :- *;"' ,,"... : ': '' ";'.': v. "- -? -. ,,.: '.'. -* !' .?.'2')
EDITOR'S NOTE: A/l .*'/,'. .i are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. .iA,... .,i',.'' Sheriff','i Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
BURGLARY TO A DWELLING-On Saturday, July
23, 2005 at 9:17 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to
4320 Sunbeam Rd. in reference to. a possible burglary
to a dwelling. Upon arrival, police officer made contact
with the mother (victim), who advised that her resi-
dence had been burglarize between the hours of 7:45
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. The then unknown (suspect) broke
through the victim's front door and stole a "television
set, and VCR." The mother advised the police officer
that her daughter is on drugs and should be considered
the suspect in this case. The victim told the police offi-
cer that she made her daughter move out a few weeks
prior to the burglary. At no time did the suspect have
any rights to the property or permission to be inside the
victim's residence. A judge signed and issued a warrant
for the suspect arrest. On 7/23/05 at approximately 2:24
p.m. a police officer was dispatched to a dispute at 9541
Regency Square Blvd. A check revealed that one of the
persons involved in the dispute was the suspect of
whom the warrant had been issued for burglarizing her
mother's house. The suspect was arrested for stealing
personal property, transported to jail, and charged with
a felony.
POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED' SUBSTANCE
WITH INTENT TO SELL-On Saturday, July 23,
2005 an undercover police officer was posing as a drug
buyer in the 1800 block of John Street. The undercover
police officer made contact with a 39 year old male
(suspect). and engaged him in a conversation in regards
to purchasing $20.00 worth of crack cocaine. The sus-
pect told the undercover police officer that his boy had
some, referring to the co-defendant. The undercover
police officer paid the suspect $20.00 of marked JSO
funds and the suspect walked up stairs and met with the
co-defendant. The suspect and co-defendant came
down the stairs and walked around the comer. A few
seconds later the suspect walked back to the undercov-
er police officer and handed him one piece of crack
cocaine. The take down signal was given. The suspect
and co-deflendait were read their rights, transported to
jail, and charged with a felony.
THREATENING PHONE CALLS-On Sunday, July
24, 2005 at 1:10 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to
8012 TZrlitun Ave. in reference to threatening phone
calls. Upon arrival, police officer spoke to the 23-year-
old male (victim). He advised that the 27-year-old
female (suspect), his ex-girlfriend, has been leaving
threatening messages on his cellular phone. He told the
police officer that the suspect is jealous because he has
a relationship with a "new woman." The victim played
a cellular phone message; he said that the voice on the
phone was his ex-girlfriend who was threatening, "to
get him." The victim and suspect have a child in com-
mon. He told the police officer that he wanted to speak
to a state attorney in reference to the threats allegedly.
made by the suspect. The victim was given a state attor-
ney's card and advised accordingly.
A HABITUAL TRAFFIC OFFENDER-On Sunday,
July 24, 2005 at 11:15 p.m. at approximately 11:04 p.m.
hours, a JSO police officer observed a 30 year old male
(suspect) traveling at a high rate of speed, (86 mph in a
65 mph zone). The police officer conducted a traffic
stop on the suspect and asked the subject for his driver's
license. The police officer then ran the suspect informa-
tion through F. C. I. C. and came back as suspended.
The suspect's D. L. was suspended on 7/20/05 as a
habitual traffic offender. The suspect was placed under
arrest, transported to jail, and charged with a felony.
BUSTED TRYING TO CASH A COUNTERFEIT
CHECK-On Saturday, July 23, 2005 at 11:00 p.m. a
JSO police officer while on patrol, conducted a traffic
stop of a 44 year old female (suspect), which revealed
that the suspect had an outstanding warrant for her
arrest dated 12/20/2004. The, suspect had walked into
the Bank Of America located at 2011 San Marco Blvd.
She presented a counterfeit check to the teller. The sus-
pect had endorsed the check. She presented a Florida
drivers license to the teller. The incident was captured
on the bank surveillance camera. When questioned
about the counterfeit check by the bank teller, the sus-
pect fled the scene. The check was made payable to the
suspect. The company had problems with prior inci-
dents of counterfeit checks, therefore, the account was
flagged. The suspect attempted to flee and counterfeit
checks were found in her vehicle. Tle suspect was
arrested read her rights, transported to jail, and charged
with a felony.
SPOUSES FAMILY DISTURBANCE-On Sunday,
July 24, 2005 at 9:15 p.m. a JSO police officer was


investigating a family disturbance call at 2160 Mayport
Rd. Once at the scene, the police officer came in con-
tact with the husband/wife (victim/suspect), and
through the police officer's investigation, it was
revealed that no violence had taken place. The suspect
and his wife were just a.-ruini.'. \iii each police officer checked for warrants/capias on l,11i sub-
jects and it was revealed that the suspect had an out-
standing capias for his arrest in Jacksonville, It was also
revealed that the suspect had an .-li Ainjii;' warrant for
his arrest for late "( ii Si '|In,,ii" payments in i .
County.. The suspect ;wI, taken into cuLsh'l,,. ;ac.Lcd,
transported to jail, and charged with nisdciicanor 'ci\ il
charges.
1 +1 .


SAN FRANCISCO A
California prison inmate
has sued after finding a
fingertip in his frozen din-
ner -- and this time the
food company is not cry-
ing fraud.
Pelican Bay State
Prison inmate Felipe
Rocha was eating dinner
in March when he
"chewed on a crunchy
object" in his cornbread
and discovered the finger-
tip, according to the law-
suit .filed against GA Food
Services Inc.
The Florida company
wrote a letter of apology to
the prison regarding the
"foreign object" in the
food, and acknowledged a
worker "severed" the tip of
a finger while cleaning
machinery when the corn-
bread was produced last
July.
"There's probably some
substance to Mr. Rocha's


Your Weekly Horoscope
(JULY 30, 2005-AUGUST 5, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) You
begin the week
.dwelling on .a
domestic prob-
lem. However, this distracts
you from work at hand. Try
to focus more.
TAURUS (April 20 to
lMay 20) Someone.you
thought was a friend turns
S out to be a bit
jealous where
you're concerned.
Re-evaluate this
relationship. It could be
toxic in the long run.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20)
Opportunity
comes your way
this week, but,it's
disguised. Keep your eyes
and ears open so you don't
miss it. Later in the week,
you're a bit cranky from lack
of rest.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) You need to pace
D yourself more this
week. Rushing
through tasks will
only. result 'in
careless mistakes. Take a
deep breath and try to relax
more.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22)
You're brimming i
with inno\ atlie
ideas this week.
However, these need to be
fleshed out before present-
ing them. Get to that prover-
bial drawing board!
VIRGO (August 23
to S'eptember
22) It's follow-
the-leader this
week, and you're
it. You're up for this respon-
sibility and challenge.
However, avoid a tendency
to be a bit bossy.
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) You've
got the big picture in mind.
The trouble is, you're not


sure of the details.
Enlist someone's
aid in this matter,
preferably some-
one who can think more log-
ically than you.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21) You
1 don't have to push
to get what you
j want done. Those
:around you are
being cooperative. See it for
what it is, and take full
advantage.
SAGITTAR.I US
(November 22 to
December 21)
Slow but steady
wins the' race for
you this week.
Impatience, though, can set
a trap for you. By week's
'end,. though, you're sitting
pretty.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19) You and a
D loved one are on
opposite sides this
week. While you
feel strongly
about the issue, so does this
person. Try to air each oth-
ers' viewpoints in a civil
manner.
AQUARI US
(January. 20 to
February 18)
You take stock of
where you stand
this week.
Perhaps it's time to stop
obsessing over material
things. Keep in mind what's
really important in life.
PISCES (February
19 to March 20) Someone
---- disappoints you
this week. Don't
allow this setback
to feed your natu-
ral cynicism., Not everyone
is deceptive and out to get
you.


CELEBR
BIRTHDAYS:


ITY
Keith


Carradine, August 8;
Whitney Houston,
August 9; Riddick Bowe,
August 10; Hulk Hogan,
August 11; George


Hamilton,


Augi


Dan Fogelberg,
13; Halle Berry,


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WINNING NUMBERS
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Saturday, July 23
ROLLOVER!!


claims," John Hale, chief
operating officer of GA
Food Services, told the
Associated Press on
Friday.
"We're red-faced about
it. We're apologetic about.
it," he said..
Rocha's attorney; said
his client is a Buddhist -
and a vegetarian. Rocha,
who is serving time, on a
drug conviction, lost 15'
pounds in six days
because he could not eat
and is still in counseling,
.his lawyer said.
In March, a Las Vegas
woman claimed she bit
into a fingertip in a bowl
of 'chili at a Wendy's
restaurant in San Jose.
Wendy's officials' insisted
the digit had been planted,.
and the woman was
charged last month with
conspiracy to commit
fraud and grand theft


ust 12;
August
August


2005 DBR


Inmate Sues Over

Fingertip In Prison Food


WANT

CUSTOMERS?

ADVERTISE IN

THE FLORIDA STAR!

TO PLACE YOUR

AD, CALL US TODAY

AT 9041766-8834


PAGE B-5


FLORIDA STAR


JULY 30 2005






rI nlIDA STAR


JULY30, 2005


"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted

-&

The Victory is in the Word & Music





Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.






-6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW. WCGL1360. COM


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TO YOU
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Please donate 10% of my paid Subscription to the
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A TRADITION OF

f EXCELLENCE
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\i A(K %R ))lT!. V i A Rki l R I




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NCAA Regional Softball

Champs Honored


AA7--w


(,i


The City of Daytona Beach honored the NCAA regional champion softball team recent-
ly by officially proclaiming the week of July 17-23, 2005 "Bethune-Cookman College
Lady Wildcats Week." Daytona Beach Mayor Yvonne Scarlett-Golden, a B-CC alum-
nus, is shown with Head Coach Laura Watten and members of the team with the
proclamation.

Ricky Williams Is A Dolphin Again


Ricky Williams
DAVIE, Fla.
back Ricky
returned from
and joined the


-Running
Williams
retirement
Miami


Dolphins for their first train-
ing camp practice Monday,
July 25.
At a team meeting
Sunday, July 24 after players
reported for camp, Williams
spoke briefly and apolo-
gized for the impact caused
by his retirement a year ago.
The Dolphins went on to fin-
ish 4-12, their worst season
since the 1960s.
"There were things about
life that I wanted to explore
outside of football, and I had
never had the chance," he
said. "I realize by making
that decision, I affected the


team in a negative way and
upset a lot of fans. I'm very
regretful that people were
hurt in the process of me
doing that. I do realize that
to a lot of people it comes
off as being very selfish. So
I do offer an apology to all
the people who were nega-
tively impacted."
Williams said he no
longer smokes marijuana
but declined to discuss the
subject further. He faces a
four-game suspension at the
start of the season for violat-
ing the NFL substance abuse
policy.


New Football Coach To Lead

Mississippi Valley State


ITTA BENA, Miss. -
James Green was hired as
men's basketball coach at
Mississippi Valley State on
Wednesday.
Green replaces Lafayette
Stribling, who left earlier
this year after 22 seasons at
the school.
Green went 123-109 in


eight seasons at Southern
Miss but resigned during the
2003-Q4 season. He didn't
coach last season.
Mississippi Valley State
made three NCAA tourna-
ment appearances under
Stribling. The school fin-
ished 13-15 last season.


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James Green

Big 12 Adds

Gator Bowl
DALLAS The Gator
Bowl will invite a Big 12
team to its New Year's Day
game twice during a four-
year agreement that starts
with the 2006 regular sea-
son, the conference
announced.
Under the arrangement,
the Big 12 will have two
bids each to the Gator Bowl
and the Sun Bowl and will
face a Big East opponent.
The Gator Bowl in
Jacksonville., Fla., will have
the first choice but must
select a Big 12 team in two
of those seasons.
The Sun Bowl is tradi-
tionally played on New
Year's Eve in El P.a,o Texas.
Big 12 Commissioner
Kevin Weiberg said he
hopes to strike a deal with
one or two more bowl
games.
The conference renewed
four-year agreements with
the Cotton, Holiday and
Alamo bowls while adding
the Gator, Sun and insight.
Weiberg would only say that
he was t.ilkiiic with bowls
that have past relationships
with the conference, a hint
that the Big 12 may renew its
deal with the Houston Bowl.


I f 1


FAi DfP12B-0 r) i -


..,.








DA'2 c p


FIl IJL0-/


EMPLOYMENT


FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE
Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at
FCCJ. E.O.E.

Driver CDL-A req'd
COASTAL TRANSPORT
Home Every Night &
Weekend Guaranteed


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,No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
Part-time opening avail-
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Jacksonville, FL Terminal
877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

CONSTRUCTION PERSONNEL
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Pipelayers, excavator operators,
loader operators. Drug screen req.
Jensen Civil Construction,
9100 Philips Hwy. EOE m/f/d/vv

QUALIFICATIONS for HUMAN
RESOURCES/ACCOUNTING
CLERK 1:
A high school diploma with college
coursework towards a Busn.
Admn. degree; two years experi-
ence in Human Resources or sim-
ilar position, and two years as an
Accounting Clerk or Bookkeeper;
Must have familiarity with 10-key
calculator, typing, data entry, and
Microsoft Office applications;
Apply in person: NCFAA 421 W.
Church St. Ste. 705, Jacksonville,
FL 32202 or fax resume to: (904)
791-9299 Attn: Human Resources
Dept:; Resumes/Applications
accepted until Thursday, Aug. 4,
2005.
NOW HIRING!
Start immediately! Petition
Circulators needed, must be 18,
bring photo ID and SS card. NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Call
Larry at CSI 904-765-5572.
SALES POSITIONS |
The Florida.Star
904-766-8834

BOOTHS FOR RENT
Stylists, Barbers & Nail
Tech.
New Salon
Off Blanding & 103rd.,
Westside
$75.00/week
904-234-6101


Announcements


Bead Show & Sale Meet Venetian Bead Master Luigi
Cattelan from Murano Italy. 26+ vendors in Tampa on August
5th, 6th, & 7th at Marriott Hotel on. Westshore Blvd.
Information www.iLoveBeads.com or (866)667-3232.

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by Ron
I Hl- n (. I' 2? i,', -.l 2 o-' .'.r .ea.1 S7.99to Dianetics,
31i i lb r,, N. Tin,p i F_ ...

Auctions

Auction August 13,1:00PM.Magnificent, spacious custom
built log home in one ofthe most prestigious neighborhoods
in village of Blowing Rock, NC. Offered atpublic-auction.
On-line bidding. www.rogersrealty.com (336)789-2926.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE SSS Buy Direct From Manu-
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A CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine units/You OK
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Financial


IMMEDIATE CASH!!! US Pension Funding pays cash
now for 8 years of your future pension payments. Call
(800)586-1325 'for a FREE, no-obligation estimate.
www.uspensionfunding com.

Help Wanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits foi Experienced Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams &
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Available. (888)MORE PAY (888-667-3729).

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**Sales Reps**, SAI..ES MANAGERS $4,000 per week is
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co. expanding, Will train. .Call Jay (800)685-8004.

S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Drivers. HOME WEEKENDS.
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0/0 Driver- FFE.TheF/S ishigherhere! $1.09 Avg. $2,000
sign-on $2,600 referral bonus. Base plate provided. No truck
no problem. Low cost lease purchase with payment as low
as $299/Wk. (800)569-9298.

Now Hiring for 2005 Postal Positions $ 17.50-$59.00+/hr.
Full Benefits/Paid Training and Vacations No Experience
Necessary (800)584-1775 Reference # 5600.

(Weekof July 25, 2005)


SERVICES


u A ings


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
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MARQUEES & CANOPIES
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THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

Want to purchase minerals and
other oillgas interests
Send details to:'
P.O. Bqx 13557
Denver, CO 80201

ROOMS FOR RENT
Good, quiet area,
Adults only
904-725-4359

BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIALS
Braids Locs Relaxers
Norwood Flea Market
904-535-0009

LEGAL NOTICE
WorkSource has posted a draft of
the WIA 2 Year Plan for Region 8.
A copy of the draft plan is available
at www.worksourcefl.com/2year-
plan or at 2141 Loch Rane Blvd.,
Suite 107, Orange Park, FL
32073. Deadline to submit com-
ments at 2yearplan@worksource-
fl.com is through september 15th
by 5:00 p.m. For additional infor-
mation contact: D. Nevison,
904/213-3800, ext. 2010.

ADVERTISEMENTS DUE:
Tuesday @ 5 p.m.

Call for specifications
904-766-8834

Email your ad:
ad@thefloridastar.com


FLO(RIDA STAR


__~~~___


$600 WEEKLY Working through the government part-
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Code J-i4.

Drive?- NOW HIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for
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equipment. Need 2 years experience. Call Bynum Transport
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Legal Services )

Cash For Your Accident! Injured in an accident? Lawsuit
pending? Need Cash NOW? We provide cash advances for
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Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Business, *Paralegal,
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Real Estate

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. MUST SEE THE
BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN
NC MOUNTAINS.Homes, Cabins, Acreage & Investments.
Cherokee Mountain Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.

WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS North Carolina Where there
. is: Cool Mountain Air, Views & Stream, Homes, Cabins &
Acreage. CAL. FORFREEBROCHUREOFMOUNTAIN
PROPERTY SALES. (800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy
317 Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtvofmurpphy.com.

New Tennessee Lake Property from $19,900! 7 Acre parcel
$34,900. Lake Parcel and LogCabin Package $54,900.
(866)770-5263 ext 8 for details.

ATTENTION.INVESTORS: Waterfront lots in the Foot-
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redevelopment discounts and 90% financing. NO PAY-
MENTS for 1 year. Call now for best selection.
..j.. i ,! I_. .r.. .rr., ..,n., ", ,",r LA K E .


Closeout Sale! LAKEVIEW BARGAINS from $39,900
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Highelevation, beautifully wooded lakeviewparcels. Across
from national forest on Norris Lake in Eastern Tenn. Call now
(800)704-3154, ext 625 Sunset Bay, LLC.

GRAND OPENING! Winding River Preserve I1 July 30 &
31. Ocala/Gainesville Area. 20 Acres from $195,000. 100
Acres from $450,000. New senmi- private gated community
featuring parcels w/ frontage on the Wacassassa River.
Gorgeous woodlands teeming w/ deer & turkey. SAVE up
to $20,000! Great financing. Call toll-free (866)352-2249, x
517 or www.fllandbargains.com.

NCMOUNTAIN PROPERTY 2 Private communities with
hardwood trees, views, creeks, river and lake access. Swim,
fish, hike. Lots from $20,000 to $85,000. (800)699-1289 or
www riverbendlakelure.com.

NORTH CAROLINA MTNS 4 acres on mountain top,
view, trees, waterfall and large public lake nearby $49,500
owner (866)789-8535 www.NC77 corn.

Coastal North Carolina Waterfront Pre- Construction
Grand Opening! 1.56 Acres $199,900. Deep boatablewater-
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ground utilities. Aug 13 & 14 only call (800)732-6601 X.
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GEORGIA COAST- Large wooded access, marshfront &
golf course homesites. Gated ,with tennis, kayaking, &
canoeing. Limited availability- mid $70's & up. Call today
(877)266-7376.

NEW MEXICO-20 Acres $34,990. Scenic region, views,
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Call(877)822-LAND!

NEW RELEASE 20% discount for Reservation Holders
only. Coastal Georgia Gated Deep Water Access. Wooded,
Lagoon and Golf Course homesites. Call for Reservation
Information (877)266-7376.

Steel Buildings

FLORIDA BUILDING BLOWOUT ,
FL PRODUCT APPROVED
30 X 40,40 X 60, 40 X 100
,IMITED OFFER (800)300-2470 EXT 4
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NEW ALL STEEL BLDGS. 30x50, 40x80, 80x150. Up
to 50% Off. Call Now! Judy (800)839-1075.

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Display ads also available.



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FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on
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J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


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.


I


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ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP

Timely Tips by Kate Worth

MOVING DAY Everything you pack does not have to be
unpacked the first day in your new home. If it contains
essential items, mark it PRIORITY A. If the contents are
important, but not crucial, mark the box PRIORITY B. If the
box contains out-of-season items, holiday items, and other
things you won't need right away, mark the box PRIORITY
C. Then, unpack in A, B, C order. Jane G.

SPILL PREVENTION To prevent a paint can from tipping
over, cut out a circle on the side of an old cereal box and
place the paint can inside. This will also catch your paint
drippings. For easy clean-up, fub petroleum jelly on the
hinges and doorknobs before you paint a door. If you get
paint on them, they will wipe off easily. Kent D.

KIDDIE CAKES Candy Lifesavers make wonderful can-
dieholders for a kids' birthday cake. They're colorful, edi-
ble, and they're a lot less expensive than regular candle
holders. They also help decorate the cake. Theresa V.

CLEANING WICKER To preserve wicker, spray it with
water. This will remove dust and keep reeds from drying
and cracking. Cold water will not harm real wicker, varnish
or paint. Wicker furniture may be brightened with furniture
wash and wiped dry. Clean with soft brushes in deeper
cracks, and wipe dry. You may put the furniture in the bath-
tub for easy. spraying. Joanne P.

GREASE AWAY Keep a small plastic bag in your can of
vegetable shortening. When you're baking or need a pan
greased, just slip your hand in the bag, scoop out what you
need, and spread it on the pan. Alicia M.

SNOWY WHITE POTATOES To get snowy white pota-
toes, and keep them from turning brown, add a teaspoon
of vinegar or fresh lemon juice to the boiling water. Lysette
0.

Share your special Timely Tip with our readers. Send it to Kate c/o
DBR Media, Inc., P.O. Box 21, Hopewell Jct., NY 12533, or e-mail:
deckert@dbrmedia.com.
(c) 2005 DBR Media, Inc.
-Y
I am not tragically colored There ,.
is no great sorrow dammed up in
my soul nor lurking behind my
eyes I do not mind at all I do not
belong to the sobbing school of
Negrohood who hold Ihatl nature
has somehow given them a low-
down dirly deal and wriose feel- .
wings are all hurt about it No. I do .
not weep at the world I am too -"
busy sharpening my oyster knife ...
Zora Neale Hurston


JULY30, 2005



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Advertising Deadline:

TUESDAYS @ 5 p.m.
To place an ad:
CAII: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673


INVITATION FOR BIDS
Competitive sealed Bids will be received by the St. Johns River Water Management
District (hereafter "the District") at 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 32177, until 2:00
p.m., Tuesday, August 16, 2005, and publicly opened at that time for:
BID NUMBER SJ604RA
ANNUAL SECURITY SERVICES FOR DISTRICT LANDS
The Governing Board of the District is inviting sealed ,bids to provide professional,
armed, certified law enforcement security for patrol and surveillance of District-owned
lands within 18 counties. These services will involve enforcement of the land manage-
ment rules, patrol of conservation areas, and protection of improvements. The
District's intent.is to deter illegal activities by the physical presence of uniformed law
enforcement officers and, patrol vehicles, by issuance of citations and by apprehen-
sion and arrest of violators by the officers. Approximately 7,000 hours of service will
be needed annually. The Contractor is responsible for supplying certified law enforce-
ment officers, vehicles, and equipment. The estimated budget for the first term of this
project, October 1, 2005, through September 30, 2006, is $275,000. The contract may
be renewed for two (2) additional one (1) year terms contingent upon approval by the
Governing. Board
A NON-MANDATORY Pre-Bid Conference is scheduled for 10:00 a.m.,
Thursday, August 4, 2005 District Headquarters, 4049 Reid Street, Palatka,
Florida 32177
The pre-bid conference is intended to provide bidders the opportunity to receive
clarification of any requirement of this Invitation For Bid.
Bid packages may be obtained on or after July 26, 2005, by contacting
DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com or by calling (800) 711-1712.
Bid packages may also be obtained from the District by calling Jill R. Williams,
CPPB, Contracts Administrator at (386) 329-4133. Bidders (hereafter
"Respondent(s)") requesting packages through the District will be charged copy-
ing and shipping/handling costs as stated at DemandStar by Onvia or as provid-
ed for in Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., whichever is less.
Bid packages will also be available at the non-mandatory pre-bid conference.
Attendees may purchase these packages at that time for the cost as stated at
DemandStar by Onvia. The District requests that those interested in purchasing
a package at the pre-Bid meeting have a company or cashier's check, made
payable to the St. Johns River Water Management District or, if paying with
cash, have the exact amount.
If, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate in any
activity relating to this Bid, please contact Jill R. Williams, CPPB, Contracts
Administrator at the above address or telephone number or, if hearing impaired,
by calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5) business days before the dates
and times specified herein.
After evaluations have been completed all respondents will be notified in writing
of the staffs intended recommendation to' the Governing Board at the
September 13, 2005 meeting. The District reserves the right to reject any and
all Bids. The District also reserves the right to waive any minor deviations in an
otherwise valid Bid and to accept the Bid that will be in the best interest of the
District.


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rTflR!DA STAR JULY 30, 2005


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I'N-i-x; o'ricaibds EdtW Ani.]\ rs Coi 3vaU-r

I s Wmy prnvaJfg as nh3 2t "' rW.idan o Edward Waters (O'ka' EWO hLan@ ? u tha od t t ws
&nwm- da fir k Sx-n.m o.iroen t of Colgo a. S& i.6As SACSfi that our acerediatim ha toen
rtijulautd. WiA .,w a fmfll ac'crditdl mehion. W.e, \ bv sa 1 liw ma' wihs% a& i wer \ r Jkey cr 4si
te r is nw iwops i di aiw l im Sfare vi fkrida's oklst p-aiate istaitunin of higher cdmucatina A .Aprit
ofi reared hope penrmewate the eatae canapes I are peaMNd to repoC that w'ee tarc Lo m on mkL as% one the
finest- hiwwion. tghtar dAic-arian in Flcnmd, the teIgson and index dei% NatiV N It all k gians- wh 0 a -k
a-1 g*rai nviaoni. mn\ -grwni iukfndakiikng, a g Khtlk.w a ni --- mst tax.e kn; and .- En C is a Ca-kz -
wath a compct.Iha xision

We az waunesswic ilk da'an via new day with se stan o& thc .2t^t05-fl tcattmic w'ar at F'%C. ibis expzeateS
trm4nfiimanwi will he undeisirbed % the Doumble F Priniple: Ex cellen & Ethics. This inaciplec enat ase
gradalc '. ih higk cntlicai y adinamasniw\,, hosc g uramur and e' S os rf-iprent c-lkeg. ki ci educathoU.
Flursi-.i t.uh~T e c. i aic ip'i JN h l r tCindc i and amiv niu k niiund I1 atNio- mwral and SpaliI al %ah% t'. riA
chm-akneitet a mantav, reu, nsible, and w.el-rouialw indisiduala who prx'riCs honesty andl whcrcei.

The' Double- Principle will al" guide our day-sto-da operations las wn interact internally and eernall toW
csiare a ctomn-er-frindi l sphere governed im oh 's cmendluc ad mn-as The Principke also k'ctAes osn
Wrigjh' bhwior and on uc thtl is honest, accurate and dependable. In this context. ethics enlique Ohe
L'icio I "hiAch infcriti fk'M daiuugh oke'ir ckraaci and pjrffnanoc. FhiLs. aherenfke. k.eps Exeirkac
authenCc and on tcarte. and etre to ilts mnhen i naturn,

The -Dsion i:;1\\<". the rising star in Northeast Fmlorida, s still a reality. Proiditng a quality education
thas is seeped in e oxilece and ethics.

Final\. we are cacicd wAith tUe schedukd AnTival of naw stumdents on August 13 and remuning students on
Aautus 21. Ifin therm uas .ibhing I can assist 1i w iu, please call S4k44 l2 Pll abo kltnw that we alAL
imcdinWg our disringuahed ani on' Tr s i's, thank po for your support, and I-ior investing i. E\C w lip
iuite dr snail o0 a dyn;mic n1w 6a 5 at ltb King-s Road.

Rcspcltfullh


Osow.dd P. Bmonson, Sr.. Ph.D.
President

(888) 898-3191 or (904) 470-8200

www.ewc.edu


EWC expresses gratitude to its community,

the City ofJacksonville, and the State of Florida

for their continued prayers and support.


Now Accepting Applications

Financial Aid Available


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Service
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/. C(' receives $23
fobr each ,plaii sold,


'd wa;rd W'atrs .' lgeI '(omlrilny Sporlts and Muic Center


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JULY30, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


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