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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
July 16, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00028

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
July 16, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00028

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text


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"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


T'HIEJ


PFLORIDA_

thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


P UL 1 s., 2 05 JU Y 2 2I0O 5 1


PREMIER FOODS CLOSES,

SHOPPERS MOAN AND PRAY


JACKSONVILLE, FL
- Jerry Asker, owner of
Premier Foods was not
available but workers said
he was tired after running
the store for 51 years.
None of them expected
Tuesday's announcement
that the stores would be
closing; everything would
be sold at half price that
day and thereafter, maybe
even less until the shelves
were empty and they, of
course, would need to seek
employment elsewhere.
As The Florida Star
talked with shoppers, it did
not take long to learn that
the closing created fear
because of the many
changes in the world


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Sign on the door of Premier's Edgewood location on July 12.


today, and temporary joy
because of the low prices.
"I am happy about
these one-time low
prices," said Valerie Scott,
"but where am I going to
get my fat back, smoked
neck bones and oxtails


now," she said.
Ms. Mae William
Lillie Haynes anc
Laverne Williams
they were strong bel
in God and losing Pr
their favorite store
continued

DIES IN


Fl-CJ ProTessor manau It
his daughters, his son,
host of relatives and fri<
Viewing will be at W
Holmes Funeral Homt
Edgewood, Friday, Ju
from 4:30 to 7:30 p.n
funeral services will be
11:00 a.m., SaturdE
Woodlawn Presby
Church, 3026 Woo
Road, Jacksonville.


is, Ms.
d Ms.
said


JACKSONVILLE, FL
- The Florida Highway
Patrol reported that
Professor Mandu Peter
Itiat died in a car crash
Thursday morning in
Monticello, Florida, east of
Tallahassee.
Professor Itiat was a
man who touched many
lives according to sources.
He kept a smile on his face
that was considered conta-
gious, as he made others
smile. The FCCJ profes-
sor, according to the report,
ran into a tow truck caus-
ing his car to spin and
eventually stop underneath
a tractor-trailer that was
parked in the emergency
lane. He was pronounced
dead at the scene of the
accident. His passenger,


Thomson Ufot suffered
minor injuries and was
taken to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital.
Itiat was born on
February 28, 1949 in the
Village of Ikot Akpan
Ntembom, Akwa Ibom
State, Nigeria. He grad-
uated from Ibibio State
College in 1966 before
coming to the U.S.
where he obtained two
Master degrees and
became a member of
Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity, Inc.
Mr. Itiat's students,
those who he taught and
those he just met while
walking around campus,
truly loved and admired
him. He is survived by
his wife of over 25 years,


TWO MEN KILLED AND LANDLORD

INJURED


JACKSONVILLE, FL
- John Leonard
McPherson, 21, also
known as JB, went with
his sister, Pamela Beatty
and a cousin, Calvin
Bernard Threadcraft, to
serve an eviction notice to
the tenant. The two-bed-
room house on the
Westside of Jacksonville
had been rented for two
years but during the more
recent months, the rent
had not been paid so the
landlord, Pamela had her


brother and cousin to go
with her to serve the ten-
ant. It is not known how
many tenants lived in the
house but what is known is
that as they knocked at the
door, they were met by
gunfire. John McPherson
and Calvin Treadcraft, died
at the scene. Pamela also
received bullet wounds
that sent her to Shands
Jacksonville in critical
condition. Her condition
has improved and she is no
longer on the critical list.,


The -Sheriff's Office
had provided a picture of a
person wanted for ques-
tioning, but apparently
after he was located and
questioned, he was
released. An investigation
is underway for the
killerss.
McPherson's funeral
service was held on
Wednesday at Inner City
Church on North Pearl
Street. Funeral services
for Threadcraft have not
been announced.


NATION'S OLDEST BLACK CITY
HOSTED TWO U.S. SENATORS


levers EATONVILLE, FL -
remier, Eatonville, Florida, the
, was first and oldest predomi-
on B-8 nantly black city in the U.
S. hosted Florida's
S Senator Bill Nelson and
the only black African
American U. S. Senator,
Barack Obama, of
Illinois, Saturday July 9
in Eatonville at the
Mlacedonia Missionary
Baptist Church. The
overflowing audience
greeted the senators at the
town hall meeting in the
town of about 2,432 resi-
dents, founded around
3I 1865 and is located about
at. six -miles north of
and a Orlando. Eatonville is
nds. known not only for being
the oldest black town but
[endell is also known because it
e, 271 was the childhood home
ily 15 of renowned writer and
n. and cultural anthropologist
held at Zora Neale Hurston.
"Eatonville is an ingredi-
ay at ent in the American
yterian saga," said Senator
idlawn Obama. "It is an honor to
visit."


Florida Representative Bruce Antone of Orlando with
Shaunase Criswell in Eatonville.


The water tower in the historic town of Eatonville, Florida,
the first and oldest predominantly black town in the U. S.


%-'s tg %eq


The chimes of Big Ben boomed
across the city to mark the start
of a two minute silence that was
observed throughout Europe.
.....

"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Sen;
a letter
Revenue
explaim
agency
$20 ir
Choice:
and r:
records
Choice
reveal e
thie\ es


JESTIONS
ACT TO
T INC.
Nelson sent
ie Internal
, asking for
to why the
a five-year
contractt to
,. to "batch
taxpayers
r this year,
publicly
: identity
d sensitive


personal and financial data
from them belonging to
approximately 145,000 con-
sumers.
COUPLE MARRIED
FOR 82 YEARS
John Roccio celebrated
his 101st birthday
Wednesday with his wife
Amelia, whom he married
when she was 17 years of
age. She is now 100-years
of age and they said they
have been happily married
for 82 years, according to
CBS News. The couple
lives in Providence, R.I. and
is believed to be the longest
married couple in the world.
They said they have always
lived in Providence and
they have always stayed in


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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIU OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01. 10.06)
*GA0INESUILLE FL 32611.7007


BIOLOGY PROFESSOR

ACCIDENT


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FI nRIDA STAR


.ILJY 16. 2005


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR

MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTy; ASQL'E DA1 S;
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DeSHAYNE BRYANT, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DANIEL EVANS, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


Protecting the Poor

Against Terrorist Attacks

By Hazel Trice Edney

NNPA Washington Correspondent


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(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,.
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida


SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.5.0
Send check or money order -
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com

On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com



SAAPA


SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


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National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper 1
Publishers Associationn VERIFICATION "
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. VER I
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce lr l
First Coast African American 0
Chamber of Commerce .

Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson "
First African American Inducted Into E
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame *














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AC'lWL FLO2DASTA JUL-Y...16..2


"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"

In the nation 's oldest city
On the borders of the sea
Shedding beams of education
To the whole community
Stands our dear old Alma Mater
Our dear Oh Murray High
To whom we'll always pledge our loyalty
Until I die...
"Richard Murray High School's Golden Year"
Graduates, former students and teachers came from
Alabama, Alaska, California, Georgia, Nevada, Texas,
and throughout Florida to celebrate the 50th
Anniversary of the opening of Richard J. Murray High
School.
Richard J. Murray High School opened in 1955 as
a Cultural and Educational Center due to the out-
growth of Excelsior High School, then the only black
high school in St. Augustine. Achieving a reputation as
a Black educational citadel of academic, athletic and
musical excellence, its final high school class graduat-
ed in 1970.
While all former teachers and administrators were
honored, the special honorees were the late Mr.
Richard J. Murray and the late supervisor of Colored
Schools Mrs. Maude Reddick. "It rained each day yet
spirits were enthusiastically lifted and buoyed by the
speechmaking and entertainment. The dance after the
banquet was quite vigorous with music by Chester
McNorton ranging from the 1950's to the present,"
stated Celebration Chair Gerald Eubanks.
The weekend event kicked off on Friday with a
"Get Acquainted" affair at West St. Augustine's
American Legion Center. On Saturday there was the
Gala Banquet and Dance at the St. Johns County
Agricultural Center. Traveling from Atlanta, Georgia
to preside at the Gala was Henry Thomas. Former St.
Johns County Sheriff Candidate Reverend Ronald
Stafford was the speaker at the event. Sunday provid-
ed an Inspirational Service at R.J. Murray Middle
School Auditorium with featured speaker renowned
Houston, TX minister Reverend Wallace Lockett. A
culminating picnic catered by Lyons and Roberson
with games, entertainment and a tour of the school
made it difficult to bid farewells.
"What is critically important is that everyone left
believing that they must now play a role in preserving
our heritage," stated Mr. Eubanks. "There is a sincere
desire to help contribute to today's school, R.J. Murray
Middle School [R.J. Murray Middle School continues
as a Center For The Performing Arts]. And the staff at
Murray Middle School was so cooperative in assisting.
In fact, the principal, Mrs. Meredith Strickland came
to the picnic and is hopeful for the future of the school
and the possibility of partnering with the community."


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"Volume Burks Is 50"
"Just a good old fashioned party with seasoned
party goers", stated Mrs. Ok Sun Burks wife of the
honoree. Yes, maybe, but the e-invites were all high
tech.
Guests started arriving promptly at 2 p.m. When I
arrived the drummers and dancers were 'getting it on'
on the porch of the Burkses Springfield- home. There
was a bountiful buffet on the inside and crustaceans
and more on the outside.
There were games of chess, horseshoes, backgam-
mon, golf, dodge ball, and cards. However playing
cards was a little too inanimate for these partygoers.
"When the rain came, the drumming got hotter outside
and inside. They then played the game of 'How well
do you know Volume?' There were' first, second and
third place winner", stated Mrs. Burks.
Party Part II: Douglas Pollard and Ms. Frances
Bradley started swinging to the late Luther
Vandross' "Bad boy.' And just when Ms. Bradley
thought she had run out of swing partners, she looked
over to Chief Obailumi and recruited another dance
partner. There was definitely a period of 'real chem-
istry' between these two.
Remember now, the party began at 2 p.m. At 11
p.m. the 'final gasps' of the party that did not want to
die, .ended quite reluctantly.
Throughout the party Volume Burks 'Birthday
Guy' was al smiles especially during the African
birthday serenade. Joining in the celebration were


p------------
Champs Place
SA, lf,..i* Caohi.n

.I -

IW.. r Hours: I
Present
and rece


Volume Burks's parents Volume L. Sr. and Mrs. Ora
Burks, his sister Ms. Angela McMillan, his aunt
Mrs. Nadine McCray, his daughter Ms. Chloe
Burks, his son, Seann M. Burks and nephew
Thaddeus McMillan.
What a wonderful party for such a 'neat' guy!



Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming
events. Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me direct-
ly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or
fax (904) 2J5-7008.
See you in the paper!


-___*----__------
I
DINE-IN ~ TAKE-OUT
I
(904) 355-7772
1347 N. Market Street I
Jacksonville, Florida 32206 I
Monday Sunday 11:00 a.m. until
I
t this coupon
ive a free drink I
I


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FThe Readers of the Black Press'
in America are more educated,"
make more income
a and haves
I substantial buvinal


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Fwe 3.1


Source:.The Media Audit
2004 Black Newspapers Readership"
Report, nnpa org

ADVERTISING DEADLINE:
TUESDAY @ 5 P.M.
Call: 766-8834
email: infobthefloridastar.com


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FLORIDA STAR


JULY16. 2005


PAGE A_-?


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JULY 16, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


Celebrating 52 Years


Of Dedicated Service

On August 17-19, at 7:00
p.m. nightly, Rev. Dr. Richard
IL. Wilson, Sr. will be honored
for his years of service as Pastor
of West Friendship Baptist
Church. Pastor Wilson is mod-
erator emeritus of the East
Rev. Dr. Florida & Bethany Baptist
Richard L. Wilson, Sr. Association, Vice President of
Missionary Baptist Fellowship
State Convention of Florida and Secretary of the Board of
Trustees at Florida Memorial University and an inductee
into the Florida Religious Hall of Fame.
Helping him celebrate 52 years of services are Rev.
Ernie L. Murray andSt. Thomas Missionary Baptist
Church, Rev. Landon L. Williams and Macedonia Baptist
Church, Rev. Tom E. Diamond and Abyssinia. Baptist
Church, and the East Florida & Bethany Baptist
Association. Pastor Wilson was called to West Friendship
on October 12, 1953 and holds the longest tenure of pas-
torate in the city. '

Ask us about Our


If There had been a death
in .rouar family' yesterdayy .
i'hait would you be loinog
today






..: '. '


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Pre-Need


FORE-

THOUGHT


funeral

planning

program
FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED

ALPHONSO WEST. MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
Directors


Alphonso West


Jacqueline Y. Bartley

MT. SINAI COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ENTERPRISES, INC
2049 North Pearl St.*
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
(904) 798-8733
Presents Its First Annual Fundraiser And Awards Banquet
"Empowering Our

Youth"
Friday, July 29, 2005
Holiday Inn
1-95 and Airport Road
8:30 p.m.-Reception


Almon Gunter-Speaker
Two-time U.S. Olympic Trial Qualifier
Almon shares his ideas, concepts'and strategies
with youth and teens, as well as corporations.
As a 501c(3) non-profit community service organization, your support is
deductible. All proceeds will be used to provide programs that Continue
to strengthen our families and rebuild our communities.. Tickets are
available for $50 per person, or groups of 10 for $450. For tickets
and/or information on advertisements, or sponsorships, please contact
Mike. Stanfield, Program Manager, at (904) 798-8733.
The mission of the Community Resource Education and Development
Institute (CREDI) is to impact lives through educational, economical,
social and spiritual methods. We provide services for youth, teens,
adults and families.
Darlene Thomas Rivers Pastor R. L. Gundy
Chairperson CEO


Funerals Help People To Remember And Grieve


Because we are so removed from
death, wve don't often acknowledge that
it is a natural part of life and should be
observed with ceremony just as we
observe life's other occasions such as
births, graduations, weddings and
anniversaries: That's why Sheenan
Funeral Home believes a meaningful
funeral to be so important. Ritual is
comforting, connects us to others, offers
a feeling of safety and aids in the griev-
ing process.
Nationally. recognized grief educa-
tor Dr. Alan Wolfeli agrees: "The funer-
al ritual is a public and symbolic means
of expressing our beliefs, thoughts and
feelings about the death of someone
loved." Says Wolfelt, director of the
Colorado based Center for Loss and
Life Transition.
Rich in history and rife with sym-
bolism, the funeral ceremony helps us:
acknowledge the reality of death, gives
testimony to the life of the deceased,


encourages the expression of grief, pro-
vides support to mourners, allows for
the embracing of faith and beliefs about
life and death, and Offers continuity and
hope for the living.
Viewing the body, is one of the
most misunderstood rituals. It allows
people to see and acknowledge death.
Without seeing, it is sometimes hard to
fathom the reality emotionally. Viewing
is especially beneficial after a sudden or
unexpected death.
Personalizing the funeral to reflect
:the life of the deceased also comforts
mourners. It. makes the. ceremony
unique and sometimes, requires partici-
pation which can positively stimulate
emotion.

A.B. COLEMAN
"Our Airh Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncnef Rd.'
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman,com


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services- /


ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION-Minister Louise
Glover, well known soloist and gospel promoter, will cele-
brate her 16th Anniversary during a Gospel Concert on
Saturday, July 23, 7:00 p.m., at 86584 Pinewood Dr. The
concert features Sister Charlene Davis, the Bishop J. Laney
Gospel Choir, Tears of Joy, Sister Shirley Paul, Gethsemane
Baptist Church of Woodwind, and others. The event contin-
ues on July 24 at 4:00 p.m. at First baptist Church of Yulee.
Prophet Victoria Milton of Folkston, GA is the speaker.
PASTORAL ANNIVESARY-The Faust Temple Church of
God In Christ family will celebrate Bishop R.L. Dixon and
First Lady, Missionary Martha Dixon's 29th Pastoral
Anniversary Anniversary on wednesday, July 13-friday, July
15, nightly at 7:30 p.m. The celebration concludes on
'Sunday, July 15 at 4:00 p.m. Minister Clarence Jones,
Committee Chairman. The church is located at 3328
Moncrief Rd.
SUMMER WORSHIP EXPERIENCE-Greater New Mt.
Moriah Missionary Baptist Church, 1953 W. 9th St., will
host a Summer Worship Experience on July 24 at 4:00 p.m.
Special guest include Youth Pastor Derrick Johnson (New
Covenant Minstries of Orange Park, Fla. and Youth Pastor
Phillip Rawls (Mt. Calvary Baptist Church). Rev. Dr. Percy
Jackson, Sr. and Rev. Dr. Percy Jackson Jr., Pastors.
VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL/VICTORIA FARRIE
PERFORMANCE-Children throughout the community are
invited to attend the Spotlight On Jesus Vacation Bible
School at New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 1231 Tyler St:, July
25-July 30 from 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. The theme is "I Am
The Light Of The World" taken from John 8:12. For more
information call (904) 353-1822. The G.W. Bruton Board
Of Ushers of New Bethel AME Church, 1231 Tyler St.,
present Mrs. Victoria Farrie of Titus Harvest Dome
Spectrum in a performance on Sunday, July 24, at 5:00
p.m. Mrs. Farrie is releasing her debut album entitled
Majesty featuring the hit single "Miracles". The public
is invited to attend. Rev. William H.'Lamar, IV, Pastor.



Evan el

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577.5/t2.3 Rmcmu Bl3I d.
Jacjdvc.nvillc. FL 32205

90-4-781-9393

WC-6ilei


Third Annual

Memorial Program
August 21, 2005
11:00 a.m.
New Bethlehem Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street
Jacksonville, FL 32208
If you or a deceased family member are former
members of New Bethlehem, please take this
opportunity to honor them on our Memorial Tree.
You may also prepay for a leaf for yourself. A
wonderful spirit filled program has been planned
with Rev. Articus Tolliver of Orlando, Florida as
the speaker.
A leaf and a 1/2 page ad cost $100.00.
,A leaf and a full page ad are $120.00.
Pre-death payment is $110.00
for leaf and 1/2 page ad.
You may also purchase ads in the memory book:
full page $50.00
half page $25.00
quarter page $15.00
For more information, please call 757-7207 or 785-
7732. All monies must be in by August 6, 2005.
You may send checks/money orders and ads to the
church ATTN. Memorial Program Committee.
We look forward to your
participation.
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor.
m aww roV? wwwwww mw as a wkwarmwww:-nwomwa wwwymwwwnww^


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


WORSHIP CENTER

Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service...............6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities


Violinists Timothy Edwards and
Jonathan Lawrence to play Vivaldi
Concerto for Two Violins













Violinist Timothy Edwards, a former concertmaster of the
Toledo Symphony and the Des Moines Operal has toured
extensively in the U.S: and abroad as a soloist and cham-
ber musician. He is now a Jacksonville resident.
Jacksonville native Jonathan Edwards is a 2003 graduate
of Douglas Anderson School of the Arts and winner of the
Friday Musicale Scholarship competition in violin. He is
now entering his junior year at Stetson University.

Sunday, July 17, 6 p.m. Craig Hall
Free and Open to the Public
Church of the Good Shepherd
Park and Stockton Streets
(904) 387-5691
Rev. James W. Harris, Jr., Rector
( *4


Deborah West


i


I


PAGE A-4


The Church Directory

"Come and Worship With Us"

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........3:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday.School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell175@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


. '







ji-JIV i, .UFoORID STRP .-


NAACP Chairman Bond Accuses Civil Rights Opponents of Using
Lies and Distortions

Milwaukee Julian Bond, Chairman, NAACP.
National Board of Directors, told delegates to the
96th Annual NAACP National Convention that
"today's civil rights movement doesn't suffer from
its imagined excesses, but from the lies and distor-
tions of its opponents."
Speaking at the'convention's July 11 opening pub-
lic mass meeting, Bondl outlined what he calls the
"new racist ideology" used by opponents of civil
rights. In recent years, Bond said "the enemies ofjus-
tice and fair play have whittled away at the compo-
nents of the progressive coalition" that includes the
NAACP.
NAACP Chairman Julian Bond
"They have successfully promoted deeply flawed
economic and foreign policies. They have passed tax cuts that were not only unfair
but unaffordable. Ideas of government that were marginal, even delusional, have
moved to center stage. The wacky has become the reality; the unimaginable is now
taken for everyday truth."
Conservative lawmakers have "restricted access to the courts, capped damages for
even the most egregious practices, eviscerated class action lawsuits, and not coinci-
dentally, shielded industry after industry from legal scrutiny," said Bond. "They've
tried an aggressive campaign to seduce black clergy and create a brand new political
party, whose initials are F-B-G. That stands for the Faith Based Grant Party. Their
hope is to create an alliance of the neo-cons and the theo-cons, all tied together by
federal cash."
Bond called on Congress to reauthorize key provisions of the Voting Rights Act
that is due to expire in 2007. One is the portion which allows federal observers to go
to certain jurisdictions where there is evidence of voter intimidation; second is the
section which provides bilingual assistance to voters; and third is the section which
requires "pre-clearance" of changes to voting, practices and procedures in covered
jurisdictions. These include redistricting, annexation, at-large elections, polling place
changes and new rules for candidate qualifying. He said all of these can be used to
discriminate.
"Anyone who claims that voting rights for minority Americans are now secure
need only look to Florida in 2000 and Ohio in 2004," said Bond. "A recent report
said that 28 percent of all Ohio voters and 52 percent of black voters said they expe-
rienced problems in voting. And a dismal 19 percent of black voters expressed con-
fidence that their votes were properly counted."
"And right here in Milwaukee, a cowardly and non-existent group calling itself
the Milwaukee Black Voter League distributed a leaflet just before last fall's election,
telling black citizens they couldn't vote for President if they'd already voted in an
election that year; that a traffic violation made them ineligible to vote; that convic-
tion for anything by anyone in a voter's family made the voter ineligible and that vio-
lating any of these restrictions would result in a prison term and the seizure of their
children."
On the topic of economic development. Bond said "racial discrimination is a
prime reason why the gaps between black and white life chances remain so wide.
And we believe that to the degree we are able to reduce discrimination and close
these race-catUsed gaps, we will see the lives of our people improve and their pros-
perity increase."
As the nation waits for President Bush to.nominate a candidate for the U.S.,
'Supreme Court, e"We wait in trepidation," said Bond. He added that the NAACP
a"will support any nominee who stands fOr justice and fair play, and oppose any who
is hostile to civil rights and civil liberties." He noted that to date, Bush nominees to
the federal district courts "are some of the most conservative of any recentpresident.
"On racial discrimination, the President's federal district judges score the loest
of any modern chief executim e," he said. "The ideas the\ hold, the rulings they have
made and their speeches place them in a dim and gloomy legal nethern\orld where
fe\\ Americans wish to dwell."
"The ideas they hold, the rulings they have made and their speeches place them
in a dim and gloom\ legal netheri world N\here fes\ Anericans wish to d\\ell."

Los Angeles Blacks Still Fare Poorly, Study Shovs

By Alexandria Sage

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) Blacks in America's second-larnest city fare the \orst
among all major races in education, health, economics, housing and criminal justice.,
according to a study released 'Wednesday.
"The State of Black Los Angeles," prepared by the United Way and the Urban
League" of Los Angeles. said the promise of the American Dreani as still out ofreach
for many blacks in the city.
"At the heart of this shortfall is a fundamental issue of equality -- not simpipl equal-
ity as a right but equality, as a reality' and practice,"' it said.
Los Angeles Ma"or Antonio Villaraigosa \\as joined by religious and community
leaders, including Police Chief William Bratton, at a downtown panel to voice concern
at the sobering picture presented in the study.
The study found that nearly half of black. L.A. high school students don't graduate
within four years, that the median household income ibr blacks is more than $20,000
below that ofi'hite families and that the 14 percent black unemployment rate is more
than double that for -\hites alnd Asins.
"I see it as a call to action. see it as a challenge," said Villaraigosa, the city's first
Latino mayor in more than 100 years. "Because a great city cannot be that great shin-
ing city with so many people left behind."
Blacks, who make up 10 percent of the population of Los Angeles County, scored
the lowest on an "equality index." which measures discrepancies in conditions for indi-
vidual races.
The county's population is about 9.8 million, of whom 3.8 million live in the City.
of Los Angeles. 2003 census figures sho'.


Measured against a benchmark of 1.00 for whites, blacks scored .69, as compared
to ..71 for Latinos and .98.for Asians. The only area in which blacks scored higher than
all other races was in civic engagement, which includes voter participation, military,
'ser ice and English fluency.
Some panelists spoke of a sense of "deja -u". at the report's findings which come 40
years after the city's deadly 1965 Watts riots.
S.. The report's statistics -- for example, that more than 75 percent of black fourth-
graders cannot read proficiently, 'a number that increases to 83 percent by 11th grade -
- "put a chill in your spine." Villaraigosa said.


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Bratton, whose department has struggled to fend off criticism that it unfairly targets
minorities, called improved public safety the catalyst that would spur change in other
areas.
"You cannot educate your child if they live in fear in their schools and their streets,"
Bratton said. "You cannot have economic investment in neighborhoods where crime is
out of control,"
Half of all murder victims in the county are black, Bratton said, and 32 percent of
all black males born in. 2001 would end up in prison, a statistic he called "horrifying."
Other findings in the report include:
Blacks have the highest rate of homelessness, representing more than 30 percent
of the total homeless population.,
The average jail sentence for blacks for violent offenses is 46 months, compared
to 13 months for whites.
Blacks have the highest overall death rate, with deaths from homicide and HIV
and AIDS more than three times higher than other groups.



NOTICE OF


PUBLIC HEARING
JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY
RE: FY 2002 Amended Section 5307 Formula Grant
URBANIZED AREA: Jacksonville, Florida
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT: $9,106,880
RECIPIENT: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority
(JTA) is providing an opportunity for a public hearing to consider its FY
2001/2002 Amended Program of Projects which federal funds are being
requested from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is
generally available on an 80/20 matching basis between federal and
local sources. The public.is encouraged to comment on any and all
projects listed below.


$, 283,202
600,762
422,947
114,156
15,653
'193,211
76,233
181,999
62,500
74,982
90,245
181,665
102,453
257,007
190,000
110,000
4,207,500
855,000
126,000
137,051'
177.949
360,000
0
111,663
1,300,562
0
$ 10,232,740


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing
before 5 p.m. on August 8. 2005 If a request is received by the stated
'time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public notified.
Mail requests to:
Notice of Public Hearing Amended Section 5307 Grant
Jacksoriville Transportation Authority,
Post Office Drawer "0'
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
These projects will be coordinated through the Transportation Improve-
ment Program (TIP) and Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP) of the
First Coast Metropolitan Planning Organization (FCMPO) for the Jack-
sonville Urbanized Area. No business displacements are expected to
occur as a result of project implementation. These projects will have no
substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they adversely
affect service levels to the elderly or disabled. Details of the Program of
Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue
through August 18, 2005 during normal business hours. This notice will
constitute the final publication unless the Program of Projects is
amended.
Kenneth R. Holton
.Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Facility Improvements .
Mass Transit Replacement Vehicles
Associated Capital Maintenance
Shop Equipment
Rehab/Renovate Shop Equipment
Misc. Support Equipment
RehabiRenovate Misc Support Equipment
Computer Hardware
Computer Software
- Surveillance/Security Equipment
8u s Stop Signage & Poles
Satellite Tiansfer Amenities -
Enhancement Projects
Support Vehicles
ADA Vehicle Equipment
Communication Equipment
Preventative Maintenance
Paratransit Service
Program Support Administration
Skyway Misc. Support Equipment'
Skyway Facility Improvement/Rehab Stations
. Skyway Preventative Maintenance
Mass Transit, Expansion Vans/Asset Transfer
CTC Replacement Transit Vehicles
CTC Expansion Transit Vehicles -
CTC Expansion Transit Vans/Asset Transfer
Total Projects:


I I I I


FLORIDAA STAR


PAGE A-5


JULY 162005







,VA EC A- 16-, 0 -i


Jim Haskins

1941-2005

EDITOR"SNOTE: James "Jim" Haskins was a
University of Florida English professor. His book The
Cotton Club inspired the 1984 movie. He died Wednesday,
July 6, 2005 in his Manhattan apartment. He was 63. The
official cause of death was not released. Family members
said he had had emphysema. He was on sabbatical when
he died. His writing credits including 200 books range
from counting books for children to biographies on Rosa
Parks, Stevie Wonder, Spike Lee and many others. At the
time of his death, he was working on a book on Cubs Hall
of Fame shortstop Ernie Banks. The following is a first
person tribute to Haskins from The Florida Star's
Marsha Dean Phelts.

I was born in Demopolis, Alabama, and spent my child-
hood in a household with lots of children, a household
where I felt a great need for privacy. One of the places I
found privacy was in books. I could be anywhere at all, but
if I was reading a book I was by myself. Sometimes it was
hard for me to get books. In the 1940s, when I was a child,
the South was rigidly segregated.
The Demopolis Public Library was for whites; a Black
child could not go there. My mother arranged for a white
friend to get books from the library for me.
Many years later, I returned to Demopolis and gave
some of the books I had written to the library I could not
enter as a child. Some years after that, I was invited to give
an important speech at that same library.
I attended high school in Boston, Massachusetts, and
college in a variety of places. The first college I attended
was Alabama State University in Montgomery.
It was the time of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which
began after a Black woman named Rosa Parks refused to
give up her seat on a city bus to. a white man.
Black people decided to stay off the buses in protest,
and led by a young minister named Martin Luther King, Jr.,
they boycotted the buses for more than a year until the
United States Supreme Court ruled that segregation on pub-
lic buses was unconstitutional.
I helped hand out leaflets urging Black people to stay
off the buses and was expelled from the college for doing
so. Georgetown University, in Washington D. C., then
offered me a scholarship, and I enrolled there.


Study Reveals Child Raising
Toughest On Young
Grandmothers


James Haskins E B .
After graduating from college, I moved to New York,
where I sold newspaper advertising space and worked as a
stock trader on Wall Street before I decided to become a
teacher. I taught music and special education classes in
Harlem. My first book, Diary of a Harlem School Teacher,
was the result of my experiences.
I tried to get my students interested in reading. It was
the 1960s, and college and high school students were aware
of those events and wanted to know more about them. But
there were no books written on their level. So I started writ-
ing books for young people about the various movements-
anti-war, civil rights, Black power, etc.:
After that I began writing biographies of Black people,
because young people-Black and white-like to read about
how successful people grew up and overcame the barriers
of poverty and racial discrimination. Since the early 1970s,
I have taught on the college level, and I have continued to
write books. I have published more than 200 books on
many subjects for children, young adults, and adults. I have
learned a lot from writing books.
I have also met many important people, including Mrs.
Rosa Parks herself, because I helped her write her autobi-
ography, Rosa Parks: My Story.
When I think about that, I am amazed that the woman
who was so important to my experience as a young college
student, not to mention the whole civil rights movement, is
now my friend. Books were once, and still are, way to find
my own, private world. But they have also introduced me
to a world far larger than I would otherwise have experi-
enced. I love books, and I feel very fortunate to have been
able to share this love with so many people.
Haskins is survived by his wife and co-author Kathy,
and by his children, Margaret, Elisa and Michael. Jim
Haskins will be sadly missed. Because of his contributions
he will be long remembered.


GAINESVILLE, Fla. -
Age may work in reverse
when it comes to raising
grandchildren, suggests a
University of Florida study
that finds younger grand-
mothers in this role are
depressed more often than
their older counterparts.
"Unlike older grandpar-
ents who are frequently
retired, middle-aged grand-
parents face problems trying
to balance their newfound
parenting roles with other
responsibilities, including the
demands of careers and per-
sonal interests," said Terry
Mills, a UF sociologist who
did the study, which appeared
in the April issue of the jour-
nal Marriage and Family
Review.
Mills examined psycho-
logical distress in households
where grandparents are rais-
ing grandchildren, with no
biological parent present so
called "skipped-generation
families." The older the
grandmothers were, the study
found, the less likely they
were to experience symptoms
of depression, the study
found.
"Skipped-generation fam-
ilies," are growing because of
a variety of social problems,
Mills said. These include an
increase in drug abuse, teen
pregnancy, divorce, AIDS and
the number of parents being
imprisoned, he said.
"Some historians might
point out that in more tradi-
tional agrarian times it was


not unusual to have multigen-
erational families, such as
those seen on 'Little House on
the Prairie,"' he said. "But
'skipped-generation house-
holds' are a 21 st-century prob-
lem."
U.S. Census data show
nearly 8 percent of all chil-
dren under age 18 (5.5 mil-
lion) currently live in homes
with grandparents, Mills said.
Of these, 1.3 million are
grandparent-headed house-
holds, with roughly half the
children in such families
under age 6, he said. In the
United States, the largestper-
centage of children living in a
grandparent-headed house-
hold.
Other research has found
that black grandparents acting
as parents are more likely
than their white counterparts
to be unemployed, live below
the poverty line and have larg-
er numbers of grandchildren
to care for, he said.
Many re-enter the parent-
ing role when their parenting
skills are rusty, and some find
it difficult to resolve the issues
of whether they are a parent or
a grandparent, he said.
"I don't think society is
aware of the public service
these grandparents provide in
struggling to keep families
intact instead of just shipping
the children off to foster care,"
he said. "Yet foster parents get
a lot more money and support
in terms of social assistance
than these kinds of caregivers
do."


Count on free products and helpful


advice when you join this club.

If you're expecting, or your child is under 24 months, be sure
to sign up for the FREE Publix Baby Club. You'll get:


* Valuable money-saving coupons.
*Coupons for free full-size products.
* The free Publix Baby Club newsletter, full
of helpful tips on baby care and family life.


*(For first-time parents) an indispensable
book from the American Academy of
Pediatrics, Caring For Your Baby and
Young Child, absolutely free.


So hurry to the baby aisle of your neighborhood Publix and join today.
Quick, before that little one grows up!



Publix.
WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE
Number and type of coupons and items in welcome package may change without notice. Book available for first-time parents only.


JULY16, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


PG A 6 A






.1 ~ U. 10, UU.0


FIL nRRIrA TA R


NAACP Releases Business Diversity Report


-- ------------


pi--- ------------;-- -- -- -- --.--- -- -- T-----------I----- ----- .----- ----- ---- -]
,Enroll

SYour Child Now
.. Come in and register for Florida's
Voluntary Prekindergarten
Education Program
WHO: Children who are four (4) years old
Son or before September 1 .2005 and reside
Srin Florida.
Note:All previously pre-registered and currently interested parents, must attend or call for
an appointment at 904-208-2044.
WHAT: Bring with you proof of child's age (birth certificate or other approved
verification of age) and Florida residency (utility bill or driver's license.)
WHEN &WHERE: See below for dates, locations and times. Parents will receive a
list of eligible providers at this registration.
Florida's Voluntary Prekindergarten Education. Program Registration
Schedules and Locations
Bradham Brooks Library Community room downstairs Saturday, July 9 9:30 amn 1:;0 pm
Regency Square Mall Inside near Sears entrance Saturday, July 16 10:00 am 300 pm
Avenues Mall In front of JC Penney Saturday, July 9 10:00 am 3:00 pm
Saturday, July 16 10:00 am 3:00 pm
Regency Square Library Saturday, July 23 10:00 am -2:00 pm
Wolfson High School (Southside) Mondays in July (except 7/4) 5:30 pm 8:30 pm
Raines High School (Northside) Tuesdays in July 5:30 pm 8:30 pm
Ed White High School (Westside) Thursdays in July 5:30 pm 8:30 pm
Early Learning Coalition will give parents a list of eligible providers'. After
registration, parents should contact the child care provider of their
Choice to enroll inr a pre-k program.
For more information, visit our website:WWW.elcofduval.Org
or call: 904-208-2044

-I,


MILWAUKEE When NAACP officials began grading
corporations operating in the U.S. on racial diversity nine
years ago, they had hoped companies would show steady
gains each year.
But the latest report released Monday, July 11 indicates
many of the 55 companies analyzed seem to be stagnating,
with most earning virtually the same grades as last year -
an indication some businesses are. not making much effort to
improve, said Dennis C. Hayes, interim president of the civil
rights group.
The report is "a measuring tool upon which consumers
can rely to make informed choices about where to spend
their dollars," Hayes said. "It is meant to serve as a catalyst
for positive change."
The report cards were released during the annual conven-
tion of the Baltifmore-based National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People, a six-day event that ends
Thursday.
The companies included in the report were in the
telecommunications, lodging, finance, retail and auto indus-
tries. They self-reported their work with blacks in employ-
ment, charitable giving, advertising, contracting and com-
munity service.
Taken together, four industries earned a C grade. Retail
got a D, largely because five of the 11 companies examined
did not respond to the NAACP's request for information.


FAMU Terminates

Two Professors


TALLAHASSEE -
Two more Florida A&M
University professors col-
lecting paychecks while
holding full-time jobs out
of state have been termi-
nated by the financially
strapped school.
School officials also
said they plan to send out
letters next week to as
many as two dozen other
employees telling them to
prove that they worked at
the university, or answer to
state investigators.
School administrators
have refused to release the
entire list of 41 people
fired for payroll irregulari-


ties. The university says
the records are exempt
from Florida's public-
records law.
The latest to be
removed from the school's
payroll were Melva
Thompson-Robinson, co-
director of an HIV preven-
tion research institute and
an assistant professor at
the University of Nevada
at Las Vegas, and Adrienne
Hollis, a public health pro-
fessor in New Jersey, the
Orlando Sentinel reported
Saturday.
Thompson-Robinson,
who was the university's
2004 Teacher of the Year
in the College of
Pharmacy and
Pharmaceutical Sciences,
said she regularly worked
with a pair of graduate
research students, as well
as a number of university
administrators, to manage
federal grant contracts
from the Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention.
Those contracts ended
when she was fired in
May, Thompson-Robinson
said.
Hollis could not be
reached for comment.
A Look Back This Week

On July 13, 1787, the
Continental Congress adopt-
ed the Northwest Ordinance
for the Northwest Territory,
north of the Ohio River,
west of New York, making
rules for statehood, guaran-
teeing the freedom of reli-
gion, support for schools,
and no slavery ... July 11,
1804, Vice President Aaron
Burr shot Alexander
Hamilton in a duel the two
fought in Weehawken, N.J.;
Hamilton died the .following
day ... July 14, 1853,
Commodore Matthew C.
Perry was received in Japan
and negotiated a treaty to
open Japan to U.S. ships ...
July 16, 1863, the draft riots
which began in New York
City three days earlier ended
with 1,000 people having
been killed or wounded.
( ) 2005 DBR Media, Inc.


Those companies received Fs.
NAACP officials said in the future, the group may organ-
ize boycotts of companies that don't supply diversity infor-
mation.
"We will no longer allow folks to just ignore this," said
Nelson Rivers, the group's chief operating officer. "It really
is outrageous."
BellSouth received the highest rank of all the companies,
a 3.3 out of a possible four points. Blacks are well represent-
ed on its work force, including managers and board mem-
bers, the report shows.
"We believe we have to go to many places to find talent
-- we don't limit ourselves," said Valencia Adams, vice pres-
ident of diversity at Atlanta-based BellSouth Corp. "Once
we bring (minorities) in, it's our belief that we have to pro-
vide a culture and environment for them to flourish and
grow."
Among the companies that responded, Mitsubishi Motors
North America got the lowest rank, a 1.18. The NAACP
report said the U.S. branch of the Japanese automaker had
many of its black employees doing either clerical or admin-
istrative work. There were no blacks on the board of direc-
tors or in recruiting, and the company spends no money
advertising with black media, the report said. Log on
tohttp:www.naacp.org to see the results of the report.








(News from Press Release and wire services,)


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President H. Patrick Swygert and alumna Debbie Allen
Nixon (B.F.A. '71) accept the NAB Spirit Award from NAB
President and CEO Edward 0. Fritts.

Howard University Receives Award
From National Association of Broadcasters

WASHINGTON, D.C.--Howard University received the
"Spirit of Broadcasting" award from the National
Association of Broadcasters (NAB) during the All-Industry
Opening Ceremony of its annual meeting in Las Vegas.
President H. Patrick Swygert and alumna Debbie Allen were
on hand to accept the award.
The award is presented periodically to individuals or
organizations in recognition of their general excellence,
leadership and lasting contributions to the broadcast indus-
try. But, Howard University, an academic institution, was
honored this year for its tradition of educating and fostering
the creative talents and leadership skills of people of color
for the many professional facets of the entertainment, broad-
cast and media industries. The NAB's recognition of
Howard is due in part to the Media Sales Institute, created
five years ago to address the shortage of minorities in the
telecommunication industry. An annual 10-day intensive
workshop, the institute seeks to serve as a pipeline for fun-
neling students from the academy into the industry.


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Martin Lawrence:
by Rych McCain
Martin Lawrence is
clad in a beautifully tai-
lored pinstripe suit, com-
plete with shirt and tie.
Most actors show up to
press junket interviews
tacky looking. Lawrence
's appearance is more like
an attorney than an actor.
Even his .-demeanor is
more like an attorney than
an actor as well. To be
around him for more than
ten minutes, one gets the
sense 'that this is not the
Martin Lawrence the pub-
lic has come to know for
his comedic roles and off
screen, potentially self-
destructive episodes. This
is a reformed and serious
updated version of the
man whom millions
adore.
In his latest film
REBOUND (20th Century
Fox Pictures), Lawrence
plays the role of top col-
lege basketball coach Roy
McCormick whose phe-
nomenal success has his
attention more focused on
his next endorsement
rather than the game. In
addition, he exhibits an
out of control temper and
has been banned from
coaching on the college
level until he can demon-
strate compliant behavior.
He ends up taking a
coaching job at a middle
school with a group of
children with "zilch" ath-
letic skills and talent. Of


Rebounds In Film And Life!


course this is Hollywood,
so he whips these hapless
nitwits into shape and wins
the State tournament!
When asked about the
recent NBA championship
series Lawrence replied,
I'm an honorary Piston so I
gotta go with the Pistons.
Did he play basketball in
Junior High or High
School? He laughs, I
never could make the team,
so I can relate to the kids in
the film." Why did
Lawrence do this movie?
He reflects, "When it came
to my attention, I remember
that Eddie Murphy said to
me, you should do a movie
with kids. I wanted to do it
because I thought it would
be a lot of fun for me."
Did Lawrence see any
of his personal self in coach
Roy i.e., the way he was at
the beginning of the film
versus the whole attitude
change at the end of the
film? And Lawrence was
reminded that he has been
through a few situations?
He's upbeat but serious, "I
have, you know. There's
times I might have been a
little temperamental, what-
ever, but that was all part of
my growing up. When I
look at coach McCormick,
I see that side, but I also see
the heart in him, that he is a
decent guy and his knowl-
edge of the game, things
like that."
Lawrence did mention
that he has daughters and


C


the oldest one, a 9 year old,
plays soccer, so he is
involved with children's
sports on the for real side.
For you Big Momma's
House fans, Lawrence is
currently filming a sequel
He really lights up about
this project, "Were going
for the big laughs, a very
funny film but it is demand-
ing, its grueling work. It is
probably the hardest thing
that I've ever done because
it's not normal. You have to
get up at 6 o'clock every
morning and wear this
prosthetic piece that takes
two and a half hours to
apply and get in. I mean,
that's not normal circum-
stances."
Lawrence does have a
business side. He has a pro-


duction company and will
ask to be a producer on
any film in which he has a
role.
"Producing is one of
the things that I ask to be
able to do and to be a part
of because producing
allows me a voice not only
in front of the camera but
behind it," he says.
What does he bring to
the table as a producer?
"I bring things that
enhance the script, I help
with the casting and things
like that," he says. It is a
sure bet that Lawrence
will be around for a long
time and his acting range
will expand to projects
both comical and non
comical that his fans will
enjoy.


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Smooth Jazz 105.3 & 105.5
and the

City of Jacksonville Beach

Invite you to a FREE CONCERT


Keith Sweat Makin
By Marsha Dean Phelts

Rhythm & blues croon-
er Keith Sweat launched a
twenty-one city "Summer
Sweat Tour" July 7 from
the Florida Theatre in
downtown Jacksonville.
From here the tour travels
to Tampa, Tallahassee, and
by all means, Miami. It
also travels to Texas,
Tennessee, Washington,
D.C., Arizona, Minnesota,
Missouri, Georgia, the
Carolinas, Virginia and
ends in Milwaukee,
Wisconsin September 17,
2005. After the tour,
Keith's latest and steamiest
CD "Sweat Hotel" will be
released. To hear some of
the album's new releases
such as "Just in Love For
One Night," "Do Wrong,"
Cowgirl Riding at the
Rodeo and others call Hot
105.7 FM at 904-680-'
1050.
The energy generated
from Sweat's concert tour
singes audiences right


' It Last Forever
away. His show -
had those in the .
Jacksonville audi-
ence climbing the
poles and sizzling
for days after-
wards of the
memories left
behind. The tour
also features one
of the hottest new
groups out of the
Caribbean, the
Elvis White
Band. Special
guests include K -
Ci &JoJo. '^
Sweat was o, %
born in Harlem
began singing Keith Swe
and touring the country
with his parents in a swing
band. He developed into a
prolific writer and actor.
All of the songs he records
are the result of his creative
writing and musical ability.
Before entering the music
industry full-time, he
worked in commodities on
the New York Stock


Exchange.
The "Summer Sweat
Tour" like his hit song title
will easily "Make You
Sweat." The mega plat-
inum artist lives and
records in Atlanta. He
loves hanging out in
Jacksonville and
Jacksonville reciprocates
the warm feelings.


Si ..


featuring NELSON RANGELL


JULY 17TH

5-9 p.m.

Sea Walk Pavilion Jacksonville Beach


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


* IANI


Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
The 2005 ASCAP Rhythm & Soul Music Awards
Gala was recently held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in
Beverly Hills, California. The turnout was at overflow
capacity with a who's who of hit songwriters and publish-
ers in attendance. A red carpet entry provided an elegant
arrival and convergent avenue for celebs to pose and
press to take photos and conduct quickie interviews.
The big winners of the evening included super produc-
ers Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis with the ASCAP Rhythm
& Soul Heritage Award; Smokie Norful, Top Gospel
Artist of the Year Award; Jermaine Dupri and Alicia Keys
sharing the Songwriter of the Year Award; EMI Music
Publishing, Publisher of the Year; "If I Ain't Got You" by
Alicia Keys, Top R&B/Hip Hop Song of the Year; "Lean
Back' by Terror Squad, Top Rap Song of the Year;
"Runnin' (Dying To Live)" from "Tupac Resurrection"
by Tupac featuring The Notorious B.I.G, Top Soundtrack
Song of the Year; "In Da Club" by 50 Cent, Top Ringtone
Song of the Year; and Sean Paul, Top Reggae Artist of the
Year.
Of course you all know that Lil Kim is on her way to
prison for a year and a day. She also received a $50,000
fine and three years probation following a conviction orn
federal perjury and conspiracy charges for her role in a
radio station gun shoot out between her entourage and a
rival camp. Atlanta rapper Tango Redd has signed with
Warner Bros. Records. His new album "The Campaign,"
will drop in the fall. If you want to see a down, street raw
response from Jacki-O regarding her studio bully-lum-
dum with Foxy Brown, go on line to
www.streetdogg.com. If that site is unavailable due to it's
use overage, go to www.allhiphop.com then select news.
You should see the Jacki-O prompt with the street dog
promo.
The critics have blasted it as one of the worst pieces of
garbage to hit television but Bobby Brown and Whitney
Houston's reality TV Show has become the Bravo
Network's number one show with over a million viewers.
Maybe that has some bearing on why the producers of
"American Idol" have asked Whitney to be a judge on the
fifth season of the show as a replacement for Paula Abdul
should she leave to become a judge on Fox's spin-off "So
You Think You Can Dance," reality show.
Rych
Maat-Hotep!





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Mir


.II Y 16. 2005


FLORIDA STAR


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JULY 16, 2005


River Region Suspends Pursuit of Job Corps Building


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-Mayor John Peyton announced
that River Region Human
Services has decided to suspend
S its pursuit of the Job Corps Center
(known formerly as the Jewish
Community Center) in
Jacksonville's historic Springfield
S"-* ~ neighborhood.
ne* The building became available
when the Job Corps moved its
operations to a new facility on
Golfair Boulevard and the build-
ing was declared a surplus federal
John Peyton property.
River Region Services sought
the facility under the McKinney Act, which allows surplus
federal property to be conveyed to homeless providers at no
cost. In a letter to Mayor Peyton dated July 11, 2005, River
Region Human Services' Chief Executive Officer Derya
Williams said, "River Region Human Services Board of
Directors has agreed to suspend its pursuit of the former Job
Corps building based on your commitment to assist us in
finding comparable accommodations for. the services we
provide."
Mayor Peyton has directed his staff to work with River
Region Human Services to identify and facilitate the move
to a new facility where. River Region provides critically
important services.
"It is gratifying to know that the Board of River Region
Human Services and its CEO are willing to be flexible as
they continue their commitment to care for those in our com-
munity who are in need. While the Job Corp Building may


not be the best facil-
ity for their work, I
am committed to
finding a situation
that will more than
adequately meet ,
their needs", said -
Mayor, Peyton.
While supportive Derya Williams
of River Region's
mission, Mayor Peyton opposed the use of the Job Corps
building as being inconsistent with the Springfield Zoning
Overlay' Further, the Mayor believes strongly that reuse of
the Job Corps building is an important redevelopment proj-
ect for the neighborhood and is best suited for an entity with
the capacity to undertake such a project. "This is an aging
structure with historic elements. It needs extensive restora-
tion and renovation. I firmly believe that River Region's use

Dedication Ceremony Held For Library


Mayor John Peyton was
joined by Representative
Audrey Gibson to reopen
the Highlands Branch
Library. During the ceremo-
ny, the mayor awarded cere-
monial "keys to the library"
to students from Highlands,
Garden City and Biscayne
Elementary Schools.
.The Highlands Branch


Local Talent Heat Up




"Gimme The Mike" Show


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-
-Season five of Gimme The
Mike! was launched on
Wednesday, July 13 'on
Channel 4, with exciting
new twists. This season,
contestants will perform
familiar Top 10 tunes with
their own personality.
New hosts Cia Cullen
and Greg Tanner -will take
the audience through this
season's battle for the mike.
And best of all, the Season
Five champion will drive
home in the biggest grand
prize yet, a brand new Scion
xA from Ernie Palmer
Toyota Scion.
Here's information on
the first four singers to face
off for a single spot in the
finals:
Cheri Anne McCance
(Jacksonville, FL) From


the Switzerland area, this
actress and dancer is no
novice when it comes to
singing. She has opened for
big name artists like Randy,
Travis. She has also played
the lead in local plays like
Bye, Bye Birdie.
Isaiah Houston
(Screven, GA) He attends
Edward Waters College on a
choir scholarship. Along
with his studies, he is a
voice coach at John Powers
Talent Agency and has per-
formed onstage with the
great Ray Charles.
Josh Howell
(Jacksonville, FL) Josh
has a passion for singing and
entertaining. He once
worked for Disney where he
. played the Hunchback of
Notre Dame. He hopes to
travel the world.


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON
Hot!
Timely!

Efficacious!

North Florida's Best
Daily.Talk Show!



AM 1530
WEEKDAYS
2-6 P.M.

CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http:llwww.downtobusiness.org/


Shawn Hunt (Lake
City, FL) Shawn has
music in her genes. She har-
monized on road trips with
her mother, who performed
with Billy Joe Royal in the
60s. She is a poet, song-
writer and a guitar player
who is currently on hiatus
from her band..
Complete contestant
biographies and show infor-
mation can be found on
News4Jax.com.
An all star cast of local
pros will serve as judges.
Deborah McDuffie
brings her expertise back for
another season. Through
her advertising career with
McCann-Erickson, she has
produced, composed and
performed with greats like
B.B. King, Janet Jackson
and Luther Vandross.
Michael J. Higgins
rejoins the judges this sea-
son. For the past seven
years, Higgins has organized
and managed the largest
thespian conference in the
world, the Florida State
Thespians. With 20 years of
preparing young people for
show biz, Higgins will tell it
like it is on judges' table.
Mark Dorsett won the
grand prize in season two of
"Gimme The Mike!" he has
performed on stage for more
then ten years and has also
gained experience in the
industry through his band
WAMIC.
Channel 4, The Local
station is the original home
of "Gimme The Mike!"
which now airs in cities
coast to coast. WJXT is a
Post-Newsweek station and
the number one independent
television station in the
country. I


library's features include
security upgrades, expanded
adult and children reading
rooms, a new children's
story room, and new circula-
tion and reference desks.
Enhancements also include
interior painting, shelving
improvements and an
expanded workroom for
employees.
In addition, the branch
features a new work of art
commissioned through the
Cultural Council for Art in
Public Places.
"I have passed the library
several times, anxiously
awaiting reopening," said
Gibson.
Located on Dunn'Avenue
near Ray Greene Park, the
Highlands Branch Library is
one of 12 branch libraries
renovated under the voter-
approved Better
Jacksonville Plan.
The Better Jacksonville
Plan also includes 6 new
library branches and a new
300,000-square-foot Main'
Library. "Jacksonville's
libraries serve as keys to lit-
eracy, knowledge, technolo-
gy and community spirit,".
said Peyton.

DEATH

NOTICES
BELL-Kevin L., died
July 5, 2005.
BLAIR-Calvin M. 66,
died July 1, 2005.
BLOUNT-Joseph, died
June 30, 2005.
BROWN-Ja'quan, died
July 4, 2005.
CURRY-Arlena, died
July 4, 2005.
CURRY-James A., 21,
died July 6, 2005.
DARDEN-Wilmer, 77,
died July 7, 2005.
ERVIN-Jennette, died
July 8, 2005.
JACKSON-Elsworth,
61, died July 7, 2005.
MATTHEWS-Kenneth,
died July 5, 2005.
PERRY-Ollie B., 81,
died July 3.
SMITH-Master Joshua,
died July 4, 2005.
TOEPEL-Mariami R.,
died July 8, 2005.
WASHINGTON-Rose
Lue, didd July 5, 2005.


of this building would have become a financial drain and
detracted from their core mission. I am committed to sup-
porting River Region's pursuit of their mission." "As for the
Job Corps building, I remain hopeful that an experienced and
financially viable entity will take on the reuse of this build-
ing."



'COMMUNITY

CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
Events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.


STATE MANDATED TRAINING SERIES-Family
Support Services of North Florida (FSS) and Florida
Community College are partnering in an effort to iden-
tify new, potential foster and adoptive parents to help
approximately 3,000 children in need of safe, caring
homes. .FSS and the College will provide "Model
Approach to Positive Parenting" (MAPP) courses,
training that is a state-required component for almost
anyone wishing to become a foster or adoptive parent.
The 21-hour course will be offered 14 times through
the end of 2005. Classes are available to accommodate
almost any schedule. The first class begins July 18,
with orientation July 15. Classes will initially be
offered at Florida Community College's North
Campus. The classes are offered free of charge, and
child care is available. For more information call 800
96-ADOPT (800.962.3678).
JUVENILE JUSTICE TOURS-Parents who can
accompany their children on the Juvenile Justice Tour
may call the State Attorney's Office and make a reser-
vation for the tour on July 22. The number to call is
630-2075. Limited space is available. Appropriate for
ages 11-16, the tours last from 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. The
State Attorney's Office has provided summer tours of
the juvenile justice system for the last 11 years. This is
an opportunity for parents and their children to be edu-
cated about the criminal justice system.
SKIN & HAIR CARE AFFAIR-TRU Roots Salon &
Emporium will hold a Skin & Hair Care Affair on
Sunday, July 24, 2;00-6:00 p.m. at 1030 Hendricks
Ave. Admission is free. For more information contact
(904) 389-0848.
LEARNING CENTER ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TION-The Brewer Learning Center, 1095 Philip A.
Randolph Blvd. is now accepting applications for ages
6 weeks-3 years-old (Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten).
The programs and hours of operation on Monday
through Friday are The Learning Day-8:30 a.m.-3:00
p.m. and Extended Day-6:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m. and 3:00
p.m.-6:30 p.m.. For more information call 904/630-
1268 or stop by the Brewer Learning Center between
the hours of 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Monday through'
Friday.
AMERICAN LEGION, POST 197 EVENTS-
American Legion, Post 197, located at 2179 Benedict
Rd., will honor Duval teachers during "Teachers
Night" on Friday, July 17 at 9:00 p.m.. The event is
being held in recognition of the outstanding services
and dedication of teachers in Duval County. On July 7,
Larry Douglas (aka) Georgia Boy will present his pro-
duction from 8:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m. The production will
continue until further notice each Sunday thereafter.
MAD DADS FUNDRAISING BANQUET-The
MAD DADS Jacksonville Chapter, Inc. will host its
Second Annual Fundraising Banquet on August 12 at
the Jacksonville Landing. The Honorable Dr. Wade F.
Horn, Assistant Secretary of Children and Families,
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is
the guest speaker. The banquet was established for the
purpose of honoring community residents that have
committed themselves to improving communities
within the city of Jacksonville. Ticket donations are
$60. For partnership levels and ad donations informa-
tion contact Tonya Jackson or Elder Bruce Jones (904)
388-8171.
MATTHEW W. GILBERT ANNUAL REUNION
CELEBRATION-Plans are being made for the 8th
Annual Reunion Celebration of Matthew W. Gilbert
High School. Two representatives from each from
1952-1970 are asked to participate. A meeting will be
held on Tuesday, August 16 and on every other
Thursday thereafter, at 7:00 p.m. at Matthew W.
Gilbert Middle School. For more information contact
Almeyta J. Lodi at (904) 355-7583 or Vivian W.
Williams at (904) 766-2885.
Si... I ,* TV \*~ F -^.-


PAGE B-1


FLORIDA STAR


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TUNE IN '

AND LISTEN

TO IMPACT WITH Deco
THE FLORIDA STAR! Samuel

Prayer


Clara
McLaughlin
Criswell
Host


REAL TOPICS!

REAL ISSUES!

SATURDAY

6:30-7:00 P.M.

WCGL 1360 AM


r --- -------


"The cost of
liberty is less
than the price of
repression."
I I

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"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


WVVhere Christ Gets Lifted

The Vict ry is in the Word M lllc

/ The Victory is in the Word & Music


Andrea

The People's Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.


6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209

Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214

Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955

Web address: WWWWCGL1360.COM
n "____4


Ron
Williams
Co-host/
Sports


III-'--I -- I


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.TITLY 16.M 2005


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4':.*.- 4A-4. s.-.. .-".'.,--.".. -.'-Y '-... ...... ,....... '...... ,.. ..-
4 ,, .= : ,.-k_ ,,, .4. 4,
Students from The Blih, Dove Learning Tree on an educational field trip to ANYTHING ABOUT PLANTS.


The Blue Dole Learning Tree is participating in a free Pre-K Program. Classes \\ill be taught b\ a former
Du\al count> school teachers. The Pre-K program \\ill start on .\ugust ,N at N:3i a.m Parents still ha\e one
chance left to register their four \eat- old child for the free pre-school program.
To register take a cop\ of our child birth certificate and proof of N our home address to the Regenct Square
Mall on Saturda\ July 16 iat the Comlmunit> Room near Sears) from 10:00 a.m. 3.00 p.nm.
For an application or an appointment call '68-5291 or contact the Earl\ Learning Coalition at 201-2044 The
Center is located at 3809 Nloncrief Road \Vest.

Florida's Voluntary Universal PreKindergarten

An\ child \ho \\ ill be 4 \ ears old on or before September 1. 2005 is eligible to attend unniersal 'oluntar\ pre-
kindergarten during the 2005-2006 school \ear.
Florida's Lini ersal Pre-kindergarten Program is \oluntan and consists of 3 hours of high quality, earl\ child-
hood education on a daily\ basis, funded b\ the State of Florida. Classes start .\ugust 2115.
Pri\ ate institutions in Du\ al country that ha\e been appro\ ed b\ the Earl\ Learning Coalition of Dui al Counlt\
\\ill offer the program.
The program is being implemented to enrich the li\es of all pre-school aged children in Florida and prepare
them for kindergarten.
N -_ .II pYou ma\ pre-ieg sister \our chlld on tie state's \ ebsite at t I\.upkflorda. coin Once there. click on the button
called.all Cath Parker at the Earl\ Child Learning Coalition of DI\ al
Count\ t 04 20-20144. e\t. 201 for more information.
- led. "Parel.P.e-.\ppIcIat, at 00 41 'Oh a-) n "'


INSIDE:

TO P O F THE C HA RTS...................................................................................................... B-3C
C O M IC S ............................................................................................................................. B -3C
Ec!


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Page B-3A/July 16, 2005


Talented Youth Development, Inc. Searches

For Talented Black Teens And Pre-Teens


Alexandria Payne

FIRST DAY


OF SCHOOL

Make Sure You

Start The School

Year Off Right By

Having Your

Children In School

On The First

Monday, August 8.


DETROIT, MI The
2005 national finals of
TYDI's National
Talented Pre-Teen &
Teen Princess
S c h o 1 a r s h i p
Competition will be be
held in Detroit,
Michigan, August .11-14.
Talented Youth
Development, Inc.
(TYDI) is inviting all
talented girls age 8-18
gifted in the performing
arts and/or academic to
register and compete for
college scholarships.
Alexandria Payne,
13, of Atlanta, GA is
America's 2004 most
talented Pre-Teen.
She won the first
national title produced
by TYDI last year.
The prizes included a
trip to New York City
and a $1,000 college.
scholarship to the col-
lege of her choice.
Alexandria once


played Young Nala in
Walt Disney's The Lion
King and currently
dances for POP STARZ
Atlanta, Inc.
This year, scholar-
ships will be awarded in
both the Pre-Teen divi-
sion (ages 8-12) and.
Teen division (ages 13-
18).
Categories of compe-
tition include academic
achievement, speech,
interview, and poise.
Competition in the per-
forming arts and com-
munity service are
optional.
To compete, appli-
cants must be female, a
U.S. citizen for at least
six months and meet the
age requirement in each
age division.
The weekend will
include self-esteem and
etiquette workshops; a
visit to historical
Motown Museum; an


Free High Schooll Middle

School Physicals Offered


Free sports physical
for High School and
Middle School students
who wish to participate
in sports during the
2005-06 school year are
available.
The physical for
High School students
will be offered on
Saturday, July 30.
The date for Middle
School students is
Saturday, August 6.
Interested students
should contact their
school for details.


You can also down-
load the Pre-
Participation Athletic


screening form by log-
ging on to www.educa-
tioncentral.org.


Back To School Celebration
Includes School Supplies Give Away
A Back To School Celebration will be held on
Saturday, July 16, 9:00 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. at New
Bethel A.M.E. Church located at 1231 Tyler St.
Hosted by the church's HOPE Ministry, the cele-
bration will include a free school supplies giveaway,
clothing give away, free breakfast, spiritual growth,
arts & and crafts, games and prizes, and a cook out.
Rev. William H. Lamar, IV, Pastor.

in 9ghe6 idsta. -


appearance in the
Detroit Carbbean
Carnival parade, and
many production
rehearsals.
First time pageant
contestants and veterans
are encouraged to com-
pete and meet other
youth from around the
country.
TYDI is a non-profit,
tax-exempt organization
providing scholarship
opportunities to youth
gifted in academics and
the performing arts.
Since 2000, over
$20,000 in scholarships
and prizes have been
awarded to participants
through its programs and
affiliations on the state
and international levels.
To compete, become
a state director for 2006,
sponsor, volunteer, or
for more information,
visit www.TYDI.org or
call (313) .492-0946.




B-3B/JULY 16, 2005


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a-3C/JULY 16, 2005
Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES Ao f
1. "Don't Phunk with my Heart" The Black Eyed Peas
(A&M) Last Week: No. 4
-- "Behind These Hazel Eyes" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 2
3. "We Belong Together" Mariah Carey (Island) No. 3 lo
4. "Speed of Sound" Coldplay (Capitol) No. 12
5. "Don't Cha" The Pussycat Dolls Featuring Busta N -Raw
Rhymes (A&M) New Entry
6. "Grind with Me" Pretty Ricky (Atlantic) No. 7
7. "Hollaback Girl" Gwen Stefani (Interscope) No. 5
8. "Inside Your Heaven" Carrie Underwood (Arista) No. 1
9. "Oh" Ciara Featuring Ludacris (Sho'nuff
MusicLine/LaFace) No. 8
0. "Just A Li'l Bit" 50 Cent (Shady Aftermath) No. 6
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Something More" Sugarland (Mercury) Last Week:
No. 2
2. "Fast Cars and Freedom" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street)
No. 1
3. "You'll Be There" George Strait (MCA Nashville) No. 3
4. "Making Memories of Us" Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 5
5. "As Good as I Once Was" Toby Keith (DreamWorks)
No.8
6. "Lot of Leavin' Left to Do" Dierks Bentley (Capitol) N
No. 4
7.. "Mississippi Girl" Faith Hill (Warner Bros.) No. 7
8. "Keg in the Closet" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 6
"If Something Should Happen" Darryl Worley
(DreamWorks) No. 9
10. "Alcohol" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) New Entry
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Lonely No More (J. Nevins/Francois L/Scumfrog
Mixes)" Rob Thomas (Melisma) Last Week: No. 2
2. "Don't Cha (R. Rosario/Kaskade/DJ Dan Mixes)" The
Pussycat Dolls Featuring Busta Rhymes (A&M) No. 3
3. "Krafty (DJ Dan/E. Kupper/Morel Mixes)" New Order
(Warner Bros.) No. 1
4. "I Feel You" Schiller Featuring Heppner (Radikal) No. 4
5. "Hollywood Swingin'" Kool & The Gang Featuring
Jamiroquai (Sanctuary Urban) No. 6
6. "Doesn't Really Matter" Murk (Tommy Boy Silver
Label) No. 10
'7. "Live You All Over" Tony Moran Presents Deborah
Cooper (Tommy Boy Silver Label) New Entry
8. "Lift It Up" Inaya Day (Tommy Boy Silver Label) No. 5
9. "One Word (ChrisCox/M. Rizzo Mixes)" Kelly | 8 & Vf 0
Osbourne (Sanqtuary) No. 7
10. "What Happens Tomorrow (Rauhofer Mixes)" Duran .* o a 6. S
Duran (Epic) No.8 o 0 s a g .0 61 )
S.o 0 &Wpm** *,4Oh10 r .%810664 V so OW140"




"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content -


Available from Commercial News Providers"


w ___ro "






7tiNivl ofzuPE


JAIL OR BAIL


EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
CONTRIBUTING TO'THE DELINQUENCY OF A
MINOR While patrolling the parking lot at a Motel 6,
the officer saw a vehicle that matched the description of
a possible drug dealer. The officer knocked on the room
door and one of the suspects opened the door where a
strong smell of burnt marijuana came from the room.
When the officer asked if anyone else was in the room.
The suspect stated, his cousin was in the bathroom.
When the officer went to the bathroom he found suspect
#2 in the bathroom and the 17-year-old female victim.
A search was done but the burnt marijuana was not
located. Suspect #1 said the marijuana was in his pock-
et. The officer retrieved it and also found 5 empty beer
bottles, one opened bottled and several unopened along
with marijuana being smoked while the 17-year-old'
female was in the room who said she had been drinking
and smoking willingly. The officer also found a gun in
the tank of the toilet, wrapped in a towel. The two sus-
pects were arrested and booked.
CRIMINAL MISCHIEF The victim stated that he
was driving down Edgewood when he observed the sus-
pect riding his bicycle in the roadway. The victim
honked his horn to warn the bicyclist/suspect that he was
approaching and the suspect jumped off his bike. The
victim stopped immediately and the suspect then kicked
the passenger side door and fled north on Edgewood.
The victim followed the suspect, flagged down an offi-
cer and advised him of the incident and that he was
afraid of the suspect. The officer located the suspect in
the Kangaroo store, observed a dent in the passenger
side of the victim's car with a dirt footprint, listened to
the suspect's side of the story, read the suspect his rights,
and arrested him.
FALSE '911' CALLS The officer,, in response to a.
,domestic violence call went to the Fishing Pen Creek
apartment. He was met by the witness who stated that
she did not call the police, that her husband dialed 911t
and handed her the plione. When the suspect was asked
if he made the call, he answered yes that he did dial 911
and gaxe her the phone. A similar call had been made
earlier that same day. The suspect said he made the call
for his wife. on himself. He was very intoxicated, read
his rights and arrested.
FLEEING/ATTEMPTED TO ELUDE Two detec-
tives were conducting stirveillance for a robbery suspect
and sa\\ the suspect driving a 1999 blue Dodge pick up.
One of the detectives attempted to block the suspect
from the front and rear but he got away and the other
officer took over the primary position in the p u rsuit with
his lights and siren going but the suspect refused to stop.
The suspect eventually stopped around the 4600 block of
Moncrief Rd., threw some unknown objects from the
vehicle and then bailed from the vehicle. The suspect
was apprehended ai the Palm Terrance Apartments
where he had offered a tenant $300 if she %would let him
,inside because he was running from the police. She did
let him in and he managed to change his original clothes
and \\as apprehended \\earing a dress and a wig, which
belonged to the apartment tenant. Investigation revealed
that as the suspect and his female passenger pulled up to
the house on W. 2nd Street, he saw the vehicles in front
and behind him and said. "Oh S---, detectives." The \\it-
ness also revealed the suspect threw his drugs out of the
driver and passenger \\indo\ws. The property was pho-
tographed and the suspect -was arrested.
COUNTERFEITING A PAYMENT INSTRUMENT
- Police was dispatched to Lenox Courts Apartments in
reference to a dispute. Upon arrival, the officer met with
suspect #2 who stated that Suspect #1 ran him from his
apartment. He did not have a key so he had the inainte-
nance man to let him back in. When the door was
unlocked, suspect #2 asked the officer to go in with him.
The officer entered the apartment and observed several
business checks being printed. When he told suspect #1
that she should not be printing the checks, she sponta-
neously answered, "I would not have been printing the
checks if I knew the police, were at the door"' .
Along with the printer w as a desktop computer system
that took up the entire kitchen counter top. Suspect #2
said he knew nothing about checks being counterfeited
inside of his apartment. He \\as then ad\ ised of his'
Constitutional Rights and stated that he was not involved
in the printing of the counterfeit checks but had allowed
suspect #1 and her children to bring her computer sys-
tem into his apartment. U.S. Secret Sen ice Special
Agent came to the scene to follow up on the in estiga-
tion.
BATTERY ON A CORRECTIONAL OFFICER -
The police officer was called in reference to a barter)' on
a correctional officer at 500 Adams Street. The
Correctional sergeant (complainant) stated that the sus-
pect grabbed him by the neck while he was attempting to
change him from civ ilianm clothes into the red jail attire.
The suspect was uncooperative and refused to change.


The' suspect grabbed the officer (victim) by the neck and
began to squeeze.. The victim took the suspect to the
ground and another officer assisted in detaining the sus-
pect. The suspect. was pepper sprayed and placed in a
restraint chair. The victim did not receive any injuries.
The physician examined the suspect and stated that he
appeared to be suffering from 'excited delirium.' The.
suspect was transported to 'Shands Hospital. Post
Miranda,, the suspect stated that he did not remember
anything or why he was at the hospital. The suspect was
arrested and received an add-on charge.
." 4


Your Weekly Horoscope
(JULY 16, 2005-JULY 22, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) You'll
find yourself mix-
ing business with
pleasure. Later in
the week, the accent is
decidedly on romance. Do
avoid a tendency, though, to
overly idealize this person.
TAURUS (_April 20 to
May 20) You're upset by a
Minor spat early
in the week.
However, -this
ultimately leads
to renewed intimacy. Travel
could be on the schedule for
the latter part of the week.
GEMINI (Max 21 to
June 20)
Someone close to
you is being
unreasonable and
stubborn. Don't waste your
time trying to persuade this
person to see it your way.
Instead, go about your owri
business, and it all sorts out
in the long run.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) Friends take cen-
Ster stage this
eek. Social
plans fall neatly
into place as a
result. Be sure, though, to
clear your work schedule
before kicking up your
heels.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22) You
need to set aside
some time this
week just for you
and your mate. Career ven-
tures can be sidelined for
now. It's not the time to pur-
sue them.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) You're
not up- to your
usual cheery self.
Perhaps the prob-
lem is physical.
Make sure to get enough
rest.
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) You


have a lot on your
schedule early in
the week.
However, the
opposite is true as the week
wanes. Take full advantage
of this unexpected, but wel-
come, down time.
SCORPIO (October
23 to No% ember 21) You
D win the week with
your charm.
Despite some sur-
rounding you who
are pessimistic and gloomy,
you can snap them out of it.,
This weekend, shopping is
favored.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December 21)
Progress is
stymied a bit
early in the week.
Later, the opposite is true,
By week's end, you've
accomplished even more
than you originally set out to
do.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19) You're upset
when you can't
easily solve a
[ problem at work.
However, you're
up to the challenge, so don't
despair. Entertaining is
favored for the w weekend.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18) Co-workers
are not on the
same page as you.
However, that
doesn't mean you
should go it alone. Use your
powers of persuasion to get
the cooperation you need.
PISCES -(February
-- 19 to March
20) You find your
routine running
L smoothly this
week. There are no interrup-
tions to speak of. Over the
"weekend, though, a family


member's surprise
announcement knocks you
off kilter.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Matt
LeBlanc, July 25; Kate
Beckinsale, July 26; Peggy


Fleming, July 27; Sally
Struthers, July 28; Martina
McBride, July 29; Vivica A.
Fox, July 30; J.K. Rowling,
July 31
.(c) 2005 DBR Media,Inc.


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FLORIDA LOTTO
WINNING NUMBERS
06-08-18-32-38-45
Saturday, July 9
ONE DINNER!!


EAST CHICAGO, Ind.
---City officials have
turned off a streetlight that
drew more than 250 peo-
ple to see a shadow' that
some say. resembles the
image of Jesus Christ.
East Chicago Police
Chief Angelo Machuca
called an emergency meet-,
ing Sunday to recommend
the light be turned off in
the interest of public safe-
ty after nearby residents
complained about blocked
cars and visitors congre-
gating until 5 a.m.
Several arrests were
made Friday night after a
large fight broke out in the
area.
"The city respects

Man Tries To


everyone's religious
beliefs, but it's getting to
the point now where it's
almost too dangerous" to
leave the light on, said
Damian Rico, the city's
public relations director.
People have flocked to
the site since Wednesday,
when a woman first
claimed to see the image
on the side of a tree.
The image is only visi-
ble at night when the
streetlight near the tree is
illuminated.
Machuca said his
department doesn't have
the manpower to maintain
regular patrols and control
the crowd.

Rob Same


California Bank Five Times
OAKLAND, Calif. Stephen Holloday has a familiar
face -- at least to tellers at one downtown Oakland bank.
Police say he robbed the same bank four times between
March 9 and May 23, but on his fifth attempt this month,
a teller recognized him and alerted another co-worker
who had been robbed previouslN by Holloday.
The two confronted the man, who panicked and fled,
Oakland police Sgt. George Phillips. He was arrested a
short time later on a street not far from the Summit
Bank, the evidence a demand note still in his pock-
et. "He was a creature of habit," Phillips said. "He had a
penchant for doing the same bank over and over."
Holloday also is a suspect in at least seven San Francisco
bank robberies, including one branch he allegedly hit
five times, authorities said.


Chicago Officials

Turn Off 'Jesus Light'


Y_'w -


FLORIDA S.TARR


PAGE B-5


rTTTT V 7X a 7X






PAGE B-6 rE\jIu/a .-I


MEAC TV Package Includes FAMU-B-CC Football Classic


GREENSBORO, N.C. -- The Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference 2005 Football Schedule features nine televised
games on ESPNU and ESPN2 including the big matchup
between state rivals Florida A&M University and bethune


Adam 'Pac Man' Jones Arrested
NASHVILLE, Tenn. The
Tennessee Titans' top draft pick, cor-
nerback Adam "Pacman" Jones, surren-
dered to police Wednesday on charges
of assault and vandalism stemming
from a nightclub altercation.
Jones surrendered to Nashville -
police at Titans headquarters
Wednesday morning. Jones' lawyer
Roger May said he had not seen the
arrest warrants but has been told the
charges are simple assault and vandalism. Both are misde-
meanors. -
A team spokesman said the Titans were aware of the sit-
uatiqn and were monitoring it but had no immediate com-
ment. Nightclub owner Robert Gatti appeared in court before
down to swear out the complaint against Jones. Gatti told the
court that Jones grabbed his shirt and later struck him.
In April, Georgia authorities investigated a report that
Jones was involved in a fight in a nightclub near Atlanta in
April, but no charges were filed against him in that case. The
5-foot-10 Jones, who played for West Virginia, was the first
defensive player taken in the NFL Draft in April.
He hurt himself in the Titans' rookie orientation on April
29 and couldn't practice with the team until June 14.


Cookman College in November.
.--. The season
7 .. : opens on
T Thursday,
,: -" 1September 1 as
a p Morgan State
a. .. plays at Towson
at 7:00 p.m.
Labor Day Weekend kicks-off with the league's first tel-
evised games. The first annual MEAC/SWAC with MEAC
co-Champion South Carolina State Challenge vs. SWAC

Five Finalists Named In Search
For Football Coach.At FAMU

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Florida A&M University on
Thursday afternoon announced the five finalists recom-
mended by a search committee to interview for the head
football coaching position. The quintet was chosen by the
search committee after paring down a pool of 58 applicants
during a two-day process.
The five finalists are: Alex Wood the former head coach
at James Madison (1995-98) and NFL assistant coach for
past six seasons; Kent Schoolfield a 1970 graduate of
Florida A&M and presently the offensive coordinator at
North Carolina A&T; Rubin Carter the defensive line coach
at Temple (Pa.) University and an All-America selection at
the University of Miami in the 1970s; Deondri Clark the
head football coach at Shaw (N.C.) University; and Linwood
S. Ferguson an East Carolina graduate who is currently an
assistant coach at Winston-Salem (N.C.) State University.


Champion Alabama State will be televised live from
Birmingham's (Ala.) Legion Field on ESPN2 at 3:30 p.m.
(EST). The MEAC/SWAC Challenge will be followed by
the league's first conference match-up of the season, as
Delaware State faces Florida A&M in Tallahassee, Fla. on
ESPNU at 7 p.m.
Other televised games include two classics, the annual
Battle of the Bay Classic between Hampton and Norfolk
State (Oct. 15) and the annual Florida Classic in Orlando,
Fla. between Bethune-Cookman and Florida A&M (Nov.
19). The television package also includes three Thursday
night match-ups with Hampton and N.C. A&T on Sept. 15,
and two for S.C. State (Oct. 6 vs. Norfolk State and Nov. 10
vs. Morgan State).


Sexton Suffering From Lyme Disease Former Andrew
Jackson Player
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. versity would seek a sixth The disease is curable, Agrees To Deal
W y a tt year of eligibility for but the estimated recovery grees To Deal
.... Sexton, Sextonri, who has already time for his advanced stage With Miami Heat


t h e

.State
Florida

Squarter-
back who
w. a s
Wyatt Sexton found d
disheveled and disoriented
on a city street last month,
has been diagnosed with
Lyme disease and will miss
the upcoming season, the
university reported
Saturday.
Florida State coach
Bobby Bowden said the uni-


used his' redshirt season. He
is the Seminoles' only expe-
rienced quarterback.
"It looks like Wyatt will
need several months of
treatment and will have to
miss the season," Bowden
said in a statement.
A specialist in the field
of Lyme disease, Dr. S.
Chandra Swami from
Hermitage, Pa., said
Sexton's organs have been
infected and recommended
intensive antibiotic therapy
over a period of months.


of infection is several
months. If untreated, the dis-
ease can cause joint swelling
and brain inflammation.
The Seminoles will now
choose between a pair of
redshirt freshmen, Drew
Weatherford and Xavier
Lee, as the starting quarter-
back for their nationally tel-
evised season opener Sept. 5
against Miami.
The team begins its pre-
season practice Aug. 9.


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Jacksonville, FL 32203-40629
a-a Cash, Check, Money Order ---.
-j ^Mor Credit Card Accepted. :..
\ ------_---------.---------------.---------_-----.5


Udonis Haslem


MIAMI With work on
Shaquille O'Neal's multiyear
deal to stay in Miami pro-
gressing nicely, the Heat have
completed another of their top
offseason tasks.
Starting power forward
Udonis Haslem a Miami
native who wanted to stay in
his hometown so badly that he
apparently turned down more
lucrative offers from other
clubs has agreed to a five-
year contract that could be
worth more than $33 million,
his agent, Jason Levien said.
The exact amount of the
deal, which cannot be signed
until at least July 22, won't be
known for a few more days.
Haslem will receive $5.5 mil-
lion next season and then a
10.5 percent raise in each sub-
sequent year.
"He's thrilled to be back,"
Levien said Wednesday. "He
had opportunities elsewhere,
but his heart is in Miami. We
had a couple conversations
about what the possibility of
more money elsewhere would
mean to him, but he conclud-
ed ultimately that he wanted
to be here."
Haslem, an undrafted free
agent who nobody wanted
two years ago, started all 80
regular-season games in
which he appeared this past
season for the Heat, averaging
10.9 points and 9.1 rebounds
on 54 percent shooting -- the
fourth-best percentage in the
league.
In two seasons with
Miami, Haslem has averaged
9.2 points and 7.7 rebounds.
He often said he wanted to
remain loyal to the Heat
because they too a chance on
him two years ag'.


1. What 7-year-old girl often practiced with 8-
year-old Boris Becker?
2. What Dallas Cowboys' running back received
rave reviews after an appearance with the Fort
Worth ballet?
3. What were the match scores when Ivan Lendl
flattened Barry Moir in the 1987 U.S. Open?
4. How many times did Hank Aaron hit 50 or
more home runs .in a season?
5. What Minnesota Vikings quarterback threw a
record 345 completions in 1978?
6. What former heavyweight boxing champ
claimed he'd spotted UFOs seven different times?
7. In the famous baseball poem, "Casey at the
Bat", which team is the loser?
8. Who retired for 12 days after being named
NBA Rookie of the Year and league MVP?
1 9. Who won the first women's marathon con-
tested during Olympic competition?
10. Who was the first left-handed golfer to win
more than one tournament in a single PGA Tour
season?

Sports Challentge Answers
UOS133pIA0

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*L '!IV ptuIuiqnWA9 "9 'uoluXIl uJA *" 3oJ7z
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(c) 2005 DBRMledia, Inc.


JUL Y16, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


n A el 77 Z






FLORIDA STAR


JULY16, 2005


FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at FCCJ.
E.O.E.

Driver CDL-A req'd
Home Every Night &
Weekend Guaranteed



Avg. $888 $1018/wk
No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
Sunday calls welcome!
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

SALES POSITIONS
The Florida Star
904-766-8834


Mechanic
Fueler Needed
for the Jacksonville area.
Duties include basic vehicle
services: fueling, washing;
record keeping, minor mechan-
ical work & grounds keeping.
Must have own tools & valid
drivers license. Must be avail-
- able to work every other wknd.
www.mailcontractors.com
Call: 1-800-251-4301
EOE/F/M



NOW ENROLLING
Grades K -12th
Berean Christian Academy
826 reynolds Ln
(off Commonwealth)
at Hope Baptist Church
904-651-5350 or 234-6106
For a Change in Your Child's
Future, Ask About Discount
on tuitions. We. Accept
Heroes, McKay and
Opportunity Scholarships

BOOTHS FOR RENT
Stylists, Barbers & Nail Tech.
New Salon
Off Blanding & 103rd.,
Westside
$75.00/week
904-234-6101,
...o.............................:
ADVERTISEMENTS DUE: :
Tuesday @ 5 p.m.
......................oe ..........


Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Readl DIANETICS by Ron
L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99 to Dianetics.
3102 N. Habana Ave.. Tampa FL 33607.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From Manu-
facturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn
around! Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.


Business Opportunities


ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL US: We will not be undersold!

ABSOLUTELY FREE INFO ONLINE! Work from any
location! Put yourPC to work! C.. 1 ir.i'i ., :. ; -- II1
PT/FT..Grow with expanding International Company!
www.SuccessSoGreat.conm/?Refid=ANF.

#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine units/You OK
Locations Entire Business $10.670 Hurry! (800)836-3464
#B02428.

$800 POSSIBLE weekly income mailing, brochures. Free
,,i''li.. ,:.cr.n .- ..]f', u,, I ,,:q.- ,[ i .... '(708)536-
7030.

$5.9 Trillion Industry Needs YOU. Earn $ 1000/sale, We
do 95% and Youjust place ads like this. $1995 fee. (866)961 -
5031: (877)82"1-2420 (jk1391).

$50.,000 FREE CASH GRANTS*****- 2005! Never Re-
pay! For personal bills. school, new business. $49 BILLION
Left unclaimed from 2004. Live Operators! (800)856-9591
Ext #113.

Financial

$50,000 FREE CASH GRANTS*****- 2005! Never Re-
pay! For personal bills, school, tew business. $49 BILLION
Left unclaimed from 2004. Live Operators! (800)785-6360
Ext #75.

FREE $$ CASH $$ GRANTS! For 2005. Never repay, For
Personal Bills! Home buying! School! New Business!
$5,000-, ,4.' 'i I e ,fp.. ii.t,a.;.' .i,,. 21 7Ext l #116.

Help Wanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams &
Graduate Students. Bonuses Available. Refrigerated Now
Available. (888)MORE'PAY (888-667-3729).

$600 WEEKLY Working through the government part-
time. No Experience, A lot of Opportunities. (800)493-3688
.Code J-14.

ALL TRADESMEN: PF/PW/BK/MC. CR/EL/TW/MW/
EO/RG/SM/IW/ & PA/TB/PL/CO/CW/W. Work out of
state with top pay & per diem. Resume to: Craft Network,
Box 137472. Clermont. FL 34713.

Now Hiring for 2005 Postal Positions $17.50-$59.00+/hr.
Full Benefits/Paid Training and Vacations No Experience
Necessary (800)584-1775 Reference# 5600.


Almiu A nig


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764







THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

Want to purchase minerals and
other oillgas interests
Send details to:
PO. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201

Thank you for reading
The Florida Star!


I


IA UTO INSURANCE


EMPLOYMENT I I SERVICES


NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
I he administration or he estate of W.Lui LEiE JONES, o'k a WIL IX.iE MITCIE1.1l. JONES,
deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court t r Duval County, Florida. Probate Division, the address of which
is 330 East Bay Street, Jacksonville. lortida 32202. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and thepe sonad represenllivdte's ltiorney are set tonrh below.
ALL. INTER STED I'PRSONS ARE NOTIFIEtD THAT:
All persons upon whom this notice is served who have objections that riulenge tihe qualilcalions ol tile
ielsotllal represn active, e oine, r jurisdiction of this Court are required to tile their objections wvh this
Counrt WITHIN T ilt I.'ATER Or THiRE MONTHS Al'ER ilTlH DATE 01-F THLE FIRST
lU'BLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE 01: SERVICE, OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors ofi the decedent anti other persons having claims or demands against deedent's estate on
whomit it copy of this notice is served vilthin three months after the date of ile first publication tf this
notice must file their claims vith this Court WITHIN THE LATEIR OF THREtE MONTHS AMRlTh THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THilS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER TIE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS'NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of [lie decedent and persnms having claims or demands against the decedent's estate
must ile their claims with lis eourt win W IIlt THREE MONTHS AFrER TiH r DATEI OF T111E FIRST
PUBLIC TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL .CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO ILEf) WI.LL .B FORIEVIlVR BARRED.
The date of 'tirst publication of this Notice is July t16, 005.


Altorney for Personal Representative!:
Ront Weaver, EsquiNr
Florida Bar No 486316
Post Office Box 5675
Douglasville, Gwtorgia 30154
Telephone: 678.690.4256


FOR SALE
11 Cemetary Plots,
Restlawn Park, Section L-
495 in groups of 2, 3 and 4.
$550 each.
386-925-5637


Personal Representative:
Barbara Jones,
212 West 45' Street
Jacksontille, orida 32308
Telephone: 904,765.1838


.---------------------------

If you reach an admirable end'
through the wrong means, the:
ends ultimately turn to dust in your
hands.
Stephen R. Covey

--- -7 -


DATA ENTRY Work ON YOUR OWN. Flexible Hours! GATED MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY NEAR
'$$$Greatl Pay !$S$ Personal Computer required. ASHEVILLENCSpectacular view&riverlots. Clubhouse,
(800)873-0345 ext #300. :J., .'- t,-l 1,, h i,., { .. ltr.. s '. ;, i, -v- 15.
Huge Incentives! (866)411-5263 www. BearRiverLodre.net.


I ISAIAH RUMLIM I
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L- -----------------------


10 1.


Why work for someone else's business,
when you can build your own?
Comprehensive Training
Direct Manufacturer Acets.
Professional Marketing
Low Investment / Overhead

I r E R 1 0 R S
1-800-DEC-DENS b rair. Den
,,j b rt gD n


Legal Services


DIVORCE$275-$350 COVERS children, etc. Only one
signature required! "Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext.600. (Sam-7pnm) ',, ..r .. ,.h..i
Established 1977.

Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Business,.
*Paralegal. *Computers. Job Placement Assistance. Com-
puter & Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
www.tidewatertechonline coin.

Pools

DemoHomesites Wanted in yourarea fortheNEW Kayak
Pool. Take'Advantage of this Unique Opportunity. Save $
"..........Available. For Details Call (866)348-7560.


Real Estate


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. MIIST SEE THE
BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN
1i 1 fh N NJ .IN,,ir.J .11 ,, I ,l ,lat .. .. .n-., ,.. >.I, ....i ,ne i
Cherokee Mountain Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.

ATTENTION INVESTORS: Waterfronit lots in the Foot-
hills ofNC. Deep water lake with 90 miles of shoreline. 20%
redevelopment discounts and 90% financing. NO PAY-
MENTS for I year. Call now for best selection.
www.nclakefrontproperties coin (800)709-LAKE.

WESTERNNCMOUNTAINSNorth Carolina Where there
is: Cool Mountain Air. Views & Stream. Homes, Cabins &
Acreage. CALLFOR FREE BROCHUREOFMOUNTAIN
PROPERTY' SALES. (800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy
317 Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyvofmurphy.com.

Need Help Buying a Home? CarePlus Financial will gel
,'-i .. h ..i-..r.m.., m .down financing- Guaranteed!
Callnow foraffee consultation (866)262-PLUS. Fair/Poor
credit welcome.

Closeout Sale! LAKEVIEW BARGAINS from $39,900
with Free Boat Slip! 10% OFF plus Pay NO Closing Costs!
High elevation, beautifully wooded lake view parcels. Across
from national forest on NorrisLakein Eastern Tenn. Call now
(800)704-3154. ext 625 Sunset Bay, LLC.

GRAND OPENING! Winding River Preserve II July 30 &
31. Ocala/Gainesville Area. 20 Acres from $195.000. 100
Acres from $450,000. New semi- private gated community
featuring parcels w/ frontage on the Wacassassa River.
Gorgeous woodlands teeming w/ deer & turkey. SAVE up
to k20.000! Great financing. Call toll-free (866)352-2249. x
517 or www fllandbargains.com.

NC MOUNTAINPROPERTY,2.75 acresw/50mileview
or 1 ,acre lakefront lot only $85,000. Private communities
with views. creeks, river and lake access. Swim. fish. hike.
Other lots from $20.000- $85.000. (800)699-1289 or
www.riverbendlakelure.com.


(.r.midOp nir np! L .-.-.If-. r,; i,,.r, '.- '* PayNO
Closing Costs*'! July 30 & 31. Spectacular new waterfront
community on oneof the largest & cleanest mountain lakes
.. %, ,cr. ,'L ,L .. c i .1 it -sizeparcels, gentleslope to water.
gorgeous woods, panoramic views. Paved roads, county
water, utilities. Lake access from $29.900. Low financing.
Call now (800)564-5092 x 215 -. tr,,..,. tr-.' /".

GEORGIA COAST- Large wooded access, marshfront &
golf course homesites. Gated with tennis, kayaking. &
canoeing. Limited availability- mid S70's & up. Call today
(877)266-7376.

NEW MEXICO-20 Acres $34,990. Scenic region, views,
canyons, trees, rolling hills, wildlife. Enjoy hunting, hiking,
horses, greatclimate. Power, greataccess.-,r it, ir, .
Call (877)822-LAND!

New Tennessee Lake Property from $19,900!7 Acre parcel
$34.900. Lake Parcel and LogCabin Package $54.900.
(866)770-5263 ext. 8 for,details.

Attention Homeowners Free $300.00 Value Place your ad,
on www.floridarealestateteorsalebvowner,com Affiliates
wanted!

Steel Buildings


FLORIDA BUILDING BLOWOUT
FL PRODUCT APPROVED
.30 X 40.40 X 60,40 X 100
LIMITED OFFER (800)300-2470 EXT 4
www.allblde.com

Your Ad Could Be Here


n, RurnN- ,mlIs \ W 11D'I"!!i Foronly$450you canplace
your25 word classifiedadin over 150newspapers throughout
.the state reaching over 5 MILIHON -readers, Call this
newspaper or Advertising Networks of Florida at (866)742-
1373. Visit us online at www.florida-classifieds coam
Display ads also available.


ANF

Advertising Networks of Florida


Week of July 11, 2005
J-


ESPN, Discovery, USA, plus local ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX
and more included! p.


*I Pause and rewind shows anytime- do all this,all included!
No equipment to buy and no installation fees
Multiple rooms connected in plan

Call today in Northern Florida
for all this together.
iS Good for just a short time more!
SW- 1-888-882-DISH

-.1 1 -M *. .. Credt resncionsapply. S t9.99 a oau po ee apps i-ovale njo e '. is



IMPACT

WCGL

AM 1360


THE FLORIDA STAR

REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS

RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 6:30 P.M.


Advertising Deadline:
TUESDAY @ 5 p.m.
To place an ad:
CAll: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (104) 765-1673


DACF1R -_7


f>A {f\ Asseen*.


FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T V. .:
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 7947310 1vi

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Stmctured Settlements!




Place a classified ad in over 160 Florida newspapers and reach
over 5. Million readers for just $450.

Place a display 2x2 or 2x4 in 113 Florida newspapers and reach
over 4 Million readers.
www.florida-classifieds.com





INVITATION FOR BIDS
Competitive sealed Bids will be received by the St. Johns River Water Management
District (hereafter "the District") at 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 32177, until 2:00
p.m., Thursday, July 28, 2005, and publicly opened at that time for:
BID NUMBER SJ603AA
PURCHASE OF HERBICIDES
The Governing Board of the District is inviting sealed bids for the purchase of herbi-
cides. Bids on alternate or substitute products will not be accepted. The estimated
budget for these products is $608,270 through September 30, 2006. Prices are to be
F.O.B., 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 32177 and/or 525 Community College
Parkway SE, Palm Bay, Florida 32909.
Bid packages may be obtained by contacting DemandStar by Onvia at
www.demandstar.com or by calling (800) 711-1712. Bid packages may also be
obtained from the District by calling Jill R. Williams, CPPB, Contracts
Administrator at (386) 329-4133. Bidders (hereafter "Respondent(s)") requesting
packages through the District will be charged copying and shipping/handling
costs as stated at DemandStar by Onvia or as provided for in Chapter 119, Fla.
Stat., whichever is less.
If, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate in any
activity relating to this Bid, please contact Jill R. Williams, CPPB, Contracts
Administrator at the above address or telephone number or, if hearing impaired,
by calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5) business days before the dates
and times specified herein.
After evaluations have been completed all Respondents will be notified in writing
of the staffs intended recommendation to the Governing Board at the September
13, 2005, meeting. The District reserves the right to reject any and all Bids. The
District also reserves the right to waive any minor deviations in an otherwise valid
Bid and to accept the Bid that will be in the best interest of the District.

SRestaurant & Machine Shop Equipment
Business Liquidation Sale Everything Must Go!!!

1 PM Friday July 15

500 & 520 S. Maple Ave, Sanford, Florida
Miscellaneous Restaurant/Pizza Equipment & Parts Machine Shop Equipment
Stainless Steel Oven Conveyors Conveyor Ovens 10 ton hydraulic press
Manitowac & Hozisaki Ice Salad Bar Equipment 4' 12 ton Connecticut Press
Machines *New & Microwave ovens Brake Model# 25B818
SBeaver Milling Machine
a Kg'l IBB0BHHB-B BB-?^


M i, A Aff zl yf.. ----




DAIY12 1?PPflUl TA Il16 (


- vi2.69


*Formerly
Premier Foods of
in the old Pic &
Building


7th St.
Save


Store Hours:
Mon-Thurs.-7am-8pm
Fri. & Sat.-7am-8:30pm
Sunday 7am-7pm


-" -27 East 7
WE'RE HERE Jacksonvi 1 le
TO STAY! Phone (904)
..T Fax (904)


th Street
, FL 32206
356-0972
356-9943


ACCEPTING: WIC, EBT, DEBIT
CREDIT (MC & VISA)


PRICES GOOD THROUGH WEDNESDAY JULY 20, 2005
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES AND CORRECT PRINTING ERRORS. SOME ITEMS M V\' N' I HI- .\\ \11 \13L- .. 1 \I11111 ,0


Gold Kist Grade A |
Whole Fryers I- 9u


Rogerwood Lumberjack
Sausage Regular or Hot
1 rlb. 199


Farm Fresh Collard Greens 1C I


Expanded
Meat Dept.
With Variety


Stores located in:
Polk City
Clermont
Tavares
Daytona Beach
Bushnell


Farm Fresh
Produce


Friendly Service
With Smiles


Crystal Geyser
Spring Water
SAVE $2.000


Tasty; Meaty 199
Beef Oxtails LB


3A99
CASE


Just Arrived
Joel Hursey


Our Premier Pharmacy is store uirec
Still Open And Ready Formerly o
To Fill Your Orders Premier Fo<
Stop In and See Beaver Si
"Doc" and Susan L

REMEMBER WE'RE HERE TO STAY!


tor
)f
)ds
t.
J


Pi, illie 1 F:,,.,J E ,,'iti'1 ,,:n .4-1
just another indication to
them that "we are in our
last days and Christ is com-
ing soon. We must pray."
They drove off the store lot
singing and praising.
Other shoppers fault
Wal-Mart for the closing of
Premier and Winn Dixie's
problems. But they said,
Premier is more different
than Winn Dixie because
Wal-Mart does not carry
the products or the prices
that the people in the black
African American commu-
nity wish to purchase.
Evangelist Hill said she
was able, on her low budg-
et, purchase a basket full of
meats and can goods at the
close .out sale, for about
$50.00 at the Edgewood
Premier.
Floyd Scott said that he
has been working at
Premier for 17 years and
this is certainly a lost for
him but he can understand
that "Jerry is tired."
Quality Foods Plus pur-
chased the Premier in
Springfield a few months
ago, and said that they still
carry the basic products
that Premier provided
along with good prices.
The new owner, Bill
Confer, said he welcomes
the shoppers to his store for
food and pharmacy prod-
ucts at Premier Pharmacy,
located inside of the store.
Wednesday was
Premier's last day of oper-
ation
"I did my shopping and
was able to get my meats at
a price lower than I can
remember," said
Evangelist Hill, "but I did
so with sadness in my
heart. I am certainly going
to miss shopping at
Premier."


Wa r'uta usw


bNr"*sd


P004 01 K.hV


Shoppers snapping up bargains at Premier July 12.


* -
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A Premier customer appreciation sign at the Edgewood
store.


Emptying shelves at the Premier Edgewood location July 12.

:, Faith is the first factor in a life devoted to ,
;service. Without it, nothing is possible.
2With it, nothing is impossible.
MaryMcLeod Bethune


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