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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
July 9, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00027

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
July 9, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00027

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text














"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

-, 0- l IB' I A -,- WI ,-,


oervingy rluiUd
For 54 Years"


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


thefloridastar.com


WOMAN ARRESTED AFTER


FAKING HER DEATH


TALLAHASSEE -
Golden Marie Cox
Ramdeen Vasquez was
arrested Friday and
charged with one count
each of insurance
fraud, forgery and theft
over $100,000.
Vasquez bought a
$60,000 life insurance
policy in 1996 and
then bought an addi-
tional policy with A
$200,000 in benefits in Gc
2000. Both' policies
were with Prudential
Insurance Company.
In June of 2003 a death
qlaim was filed alleging
that Golden Marie
Ramdeem was killed in a
car accident in Jamaica on
March 26, 2003. The
insurance company
received a Jamaican death
certificate, a bogus police
report from the' Jamaican
constabulary and a death
benefits claim form.
Golden's ex-husband,


olden Marie Cox Ramdeen
asquez
Jerry Ramdeen was the
beneficiary. However,
Prudential did not pay the
claim and referred the
case to the fraud division.
It was determined that
Golden Marie was not
dead. She divorced Jerry
Ramdeen in February
2003; obtained a new
Florida driver license in
March 2003, the day
before she supposedly
died in Jamaica, in her
maiden name of Golden


Marie Cox. Jerry
Ramdeen filed for a legal
name change on April 16,
2003; three weeks after
his ex-wife had died.
Then, Golden Marie Cox
and Jerry Vasquez mar-
ried again on July 11,
2003 and he became Jerry
Vasquez and of course,
Gloria 's new name was
now Gloria Marie
Vasquez.
It was also discovered
that Golden Ramdeen was
the probable writer of the
death claim request
forms. In addition, four
fingerprints were discov-
ered and identified as
belonging to Golden
Marie Ramdeen, who was
supposed to be dead, on
her own death claim and
benefits forms. Vasquez is
now out on bail but faces
up to 15 years in prison
and a $25,000 fine if con-
victed.


The Interim President
of Florida -, A&M
University, Dr. Castell
Vaughn Bryant
announced that the
National Science
Foundation, will begin
restoring its research
funding, including the
funds that were placed on
hold April 2004.
The above is just one
of many improved
changes the University
has witnessed under the
direction of their interim
president Bryant. After it

NEWS IN BRIEF
NEW PRESIDENT FOR
NAACP
Retired Verizon execu-
tive, Bruce S. Gordon will
be the next president of the
NAACP. Chairman Julian
Bond said, ... "we wanted
to move up. And we think
he's going to bring us a
qualitative move up." His
civil rights goals include
working toward greater
economic equality.
Gordon said his first prior-
ies will be to improve the
organization's finances,
build an endowment,
increase the membership
apd push for more efficien-


was reported that the
school could not account
for about $3.1 million in
pay, anaudit and strategy
was performed where in
all employees had to per-
sonally appear to receive
their paychecks or be
fired. At that time, 41
employed were fired and
70 jobs were put in jeop-
ardy. Now, $1.2 million
has been saved. Even
though many positions
have seen changes, it has
been reported that the
"trustees are liking ,what
they have seen thus far."


bruce S. uoraon
cy in operations. He also
said he feels there has to be
some common ground
established between the
White House and the
NAACP, in order to serve
the mutual interests of both
the White House and the


African American
Ministers in Action
(AAMIA) is partnering
with several Jacksonville
area groups for a Town
Hall meeting designed to
educate and inform atten-
dees on the Supreme
Court, Civil Rights,
Social Security, Voting
Rights and issues within
the local Jacksonville
community.
The event entitled
"The Battle for the
Supreme Court and Social
Justice in Jacksonville"
will be held on Monday,
July 11 at 6:00 to 9:00
p.m. at the Bethel.ite
Conference Center locat-
ed at 5865 Arlington
Expressway. Attending
the meeting will be U. S.
Congresswoman Corrine


en Mexico
......._..


Mexico


La Coricaluro
Ien ur xc-


The White House and
the Congressional Black
Caucus calls a recent
series of stamps released
by the Government of
Mexico, insensitive, racist
and an insult to people
everywhere.
The stamps depict
character known as
Memin Pinguin, drawn
with exagerrated features
reminiscent of Jim Crow
caricatures of blacks.
Chairman of the
Caucus, Rep. Melvin L.
Watt, called on President
Vicente Fox to recall the


L e c M-aicCur
en Mixico


stamps immediately with
an additional request for
President Fox to issue an
apology to all people of
African descent. On May
13, President Fox angered
the U. S. black communi-
ty when he said that
Mexican migrants living
in the United States were
willing to take jobs "not
even" blacks want. He
refused to issue a straight-
forward apology for those
remarks, claiming they
had been misinterpreted.
Los Angeles Mayor
Antonio Villaraigosa has


Rev. R.L. Gundy along with other ministers and community
leaders.
Brown, State Senator Tony Ministers Conference,
Hill, State Representative J a c k s o n v i 1 1 e
Audrey Gibson in partner- Interdenominational
ship with Jacksonville Ministerial Alliance,
Leadership Coalition, The C.M.E. Churches, SEIU,
African Methodist People For the American
Episcopal Church, Way, and Jacksonville
Jacksonville Baptist Branch of the NAACP.


MexicooM


La caricnturn
enl Mxico


en Mixi


denounced the stamps and
called them derogatory.
"Any time we have a
caricature of any ethnic
minority, in any way, it's
wrong,' he said.
"This character is a
classic, but it's from
another era," said Elisa
Velazquez, an anthropolo-
gist who studies Mexico's
black communities. "It's a
stereotype and you don't
want to encourage igno-
rance or prejudices."
All 750,000 stamps
sold out in two days.


- r


NAACP. He said he is
looking forward to building
a strong relationship with
this White House adminis-
tration.
SPECIAL HEART PILL
FOR BLACKS
A combination of two
drugs, isosorbide dinitrate
and hydralazine provided a
break through for African-
American heart failure
patients and has now been
approved by the U. S. Food
and Drug Administration.
Even though the original
testing of the combined
drugs was designed to help
other conditions, research
found that the drugs, com-
bined and named BiDil, sig-


nificantly reduce death
among black Americans. It
did not provide the same
result for other racial
groups.
It has been determined
through the Census Bureau
and the Centers for Disease
Control that 750,000
African Americans have
been diagnosed with heart
failure with an expected
increase in growth to
900,000 by 2010. A study
of 1050 African American
heart failure patients
showed that BiDil reduced
deaths by 43 percent.


SUMMER
INCREASES


TIME
MARIJUA-


NA USE
White House Drug Czar
John P. Walters warned par-
ents that first-time marijua-
na use among teens increas-
es dramatically during the
summer. African-American
teens during June, July and
August, compared to the
rest of the year, experience
a 68 percent increase in
marijuana initiation. "It's a
fact that more teens try mar-
ijuana for the first time dur-
ing the summer months.
Parents need to be especial-
ly vigilant over the next few
months and help keep their
kids drug-free," said John P.
Walters, Director of the
Office of National. Drug


Control Policy. "Marijuana
use is especially harmful
for teens, because their
bodies and brains are still
developing."
THE COLOR PURPLE
HEADS TO BROAD-
WAY
"The Color Purple," a
musical version of Alice
Walker's Pulitzer Prize-
winning novel, will open at
the Broadway Theatre on
December 1, 2005.
Preview performances.
begin October 25.
The film adaptation of
The Color Purple starred
Whoopi Goldberg, Oprah
Winfrey and Danny
Glover.


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URGENT TOWN HALL MEETING TO BE

HELD IN JACKSONVILLE MONDAY


FAMU TO GET FUNDING

RESTORED


CBC CALLS MEXICAN STAMPS RACIST

AND INSENSITIVE


i-ionaa A&M inerim
President Dr. Castell V.
Bryant.


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FRrnIrnA .TAR


m Af- A -,


.JULY 9. 2005


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DeSHAYNE BRYANT, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DANIEL EVANS, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


5AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION

''-i -


'VERIFICATION
'aTmsIOsa


L Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


Justice Sandra Day
O'Connor's retirement
from the U.S. Supreme
Court gives President Bush
the opportunity to make
the first new appointment
of a Supreme Court justice
in eleven years.
Who cares?
We should all care, for
the President's choice will
affect the lives of every
single American, no matter
their race, class, age, edu-
cation, or economic status.
African Americans, have
special reasons to scruti-
nize the nominee, whom
the President said he will
name shortly, with the
greatest of concern.
Some might think that it
makes no difference to
them who ends up on the
courts because they them-
selves have never had to
appear before a judge..
They couldn't be more
wrong.
Federal judges have
enormous influence over
all of us because the deci-
sions they make often go
far beyond just the case in
front of them. Their deci-
sions set precedents that
are followed by other
courts, law enforcement,
state legislatures and city
and town councils, busi-
nesses, schools, and other
institutions that touch upon
every facet of our lives.'
These judges are


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


appointed by the President,
confirmed by the Senate
and serve for life the only
federal appointees who
can't be fired or voted out
of office (except through
impeachment) and whose
terms don't end after a set
number of years or when
the president leaves office.
The nine Justices of the
United States Supreme
Court have the most power
because their opinions can-
not be appealed: they rep-
resent the last word on the
issues they decide. Once
"the Supremes" speak,
that's it--unless the
Supreme Court later over-
turns itself, as it did in the
landmark 1954 Brown
school segregation deci-
sion that struck down the
Court's 1896 endorsement
of racial segregation.
The Supreme Court
does most of its work
behind the scenes and out
of the limelight, speaking'
mostly through their writ-
ten opinions. But these
written opinions, even if
we never read them, affect
every aspect of American
society.
They determine
whether affirmative action
stays or goes. They decide
if our right to vote is a
mere concept or is effec-
tively enforced. It's up to
them whether workers dis-
criminated against because


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By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League
The President's Supreme Court Nomination


of race or gender or age or
disability can seek redress
in court or can be turned
away. And on and on.
Because Sandra Day
O'Conndr was the so-
called "swing vote" on
issues that reached the
Court, she was one of its
most important figures.
While clearly a conserva-
tive, Justice O'Connor did-
n't always vote in lockstep
with the Court's right wing,
and she sometimes cast the
vote that "swung" the deci-
sion the other way.
For example, it was
Justice O'Connor who
saved the day for affirma-
tive action two years ago,
tipping the scale in favor of
upholding the constitution-
ality of the University of
Michigan Law School's
affirmative action pro-
gram. Had Justice
O'Connor sided with
Justices Thomas, Scalia,
Rehnquist and Kennedy,
the policy and practice of
affirmative action would
likely be gone today.
We did not always
agree with Justice
O'Connor, however. In our
view, she sometimes cast
the wrong vote, siding with
the Court's extreme right
wing to invalidate or
restrict important civil
rights measures. And it
was her 'vote that decided
the outcome of the 2000
Presidential Election, in
which the Supreme Court
stepped in and stopped the
counting of ballots in
Florida, thereby disenfran-
chising millions of African
American voters.
Thus, Justice


O'Connor's record on th!
Court shows that one jus
tice does make a tremen
dous difference and show;
why the selection of th(
next justice is so impor-
tant.
President Bush has saic
that he wants to appoint
justices in the mold of
Justices Thomas an'
Scalia. But the last thing
this country needs is more
extremist right wing jus-
tices..We need justices who
will respect and uphold
civil rights protections, not,
tear them down. There are
numerous distinguished
men and women of all
races and backgrounds
who would make excellent
justices and we call upon
the President to choose
Justice O'Connor's
replacement from among
that group.
This is a defining
moment for the President
and the U.S. Senate, one
that in significant ways
will determine not only the
law but the political tone
of American society for
years to come.
The National Urban
League will carefully
examine the record of any
nominee the President puts
forward. That nominee
must be open-minded and
fair--and he or she must
have a strong, positive and
demonstrated 'commitment
to upholding the protection
of civil rights in American
society. In that regard,
political ideology cannot
be a license for going
backward.


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FinORIDA STAR


"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
"And The Two Became Thirteen"
Sacred! Blessed! Inspiring! Heavenly! Beautiful!
Loving! The adjectives are endless in describing the
50th Wedding Anniversary Celebration for Ernest and
Dr. Lois Davis Gibson.
The St. Paul A. M. E. Church was resplendent as
guests arrived for the 50th Anniversary Celebration for
The Gibsons. As beautiful music filled the St. Paul's
Sanctuary State Representative Ms. Audrey Lynn
Gibson, the eldest of the Gibson children, led the
Gibson Family procession with her children Amar,
Jamaal, and Kwanza and Robert with their children
Haniyah, Taylor and Jalin, that commenced the wed-
ding anniversary celebration. State Representative
Gibson's younger sibling Chick-Fil-A Executive
Ernest Gerard Gibson with his wife Mrs. Barbara
Gibson and their children Ryan, Rachel and Ridge
from Atlanta, GA followed.
Awaiting his bride of fifty years, the elder Ernest
Gibson's brilliant signature smile was luminous. And as
the tune 'You Are So Beautiful' was being played, Dr.
Lois Davis Gibson, wearing an exquisitely designed
gold organza tier skirted gown featuring a beaded
bodice, dazzled everyone as she entered the sanctuary
and advanced to the altar to meet her groom. Their pas-
tor Reverend Marvin Zanders, II and family friend
Reverend Rudolph W. McKissick, Sr., pastor at
Bethel Baptist Institutional Church conducted the
Renewal of Vows Ceremony. Reverend McKissick, Sr.
recalled during the ceremony that he had also partici-
pated in the 25th Anniversary Ceremony in 1980.
When The Gibsons had renewed their vows and the
lighting of the unity candle, each of their children,
grandchildren and great-grandchildren followed in
completing the lighting of thirteen candles, one for each
member of the family. Prayers, blessings and the bene-
diction concluded the church ceremony.
The 'Anniversary Party' moved to the Times Union
Performing Arts Center where they were greeted with
the melodious sounds of Sleepy and The Gang with
soloist William "Sleepy" Gilliard. Guests also feasted
on a bounteous buffet supper with champagne and
anniversary cake. Memorabilia from the first fifty years
of marriage for The Gibsons was on display for guests
to spend time recalling treasured memories and 'G'
stenciled boxes with delicious chocolates was the
'favor' for the celebratory affair.
The Gibsons 50th Anniversary Celebration conclud-
ed several weeks of celebrating for the couple. The ini-
tial fete was the blessing of their palatial home at their
new Orange Park address. The weekend following the
blessing of their home, the couple traveled to
Indianapolis, IN for the 2005 Moles Conclave.
At this writing I was unable to catch up with them.
Perhaps they're off on another trip continuing the cele-
bration. And. after fifty years, why not?

"Let Your Light Shine"
"Let Your Light Shine" was the theme for the Bethel
Baptist. Institutional Church Keenagers' Annual
Luncheon. Keenager member Mrs. Verdell Cruse
engrossed the group 'Looking Back....Down Memory
Lane.' With numerous visual 'props' that included the
washboard, smoothing iron, hand cranked ice cream
churn, boiling pot, laundry aids (bluing for whitening,
Octagon soap and Oxydol detergent), and the kerosene
lamp, Mrs. Cruse captivated everyone with nostalgia.
Others appearing on the program were: Mesdames
Janette Moses, Johnnie Kate.Morris, and Dr. Freda
Gonzales. Mrs. Dorothy Bradley provided entertain-
ment for the event.
The Keenager members remembered deceased
members: Mesdames Elvira Brown, Hettie Mills,
Robie Baker, Josie Crooms, Wilhelmina Brown and
Mr. Thaddeus and Mrs. Dorothy Pinkney during the
luncheon. And following a sumptuous lunch and a mar-
velous program, Keenager members gave reluctant
goodbyes until the Fall.

Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me directly at
imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904)
285-7008.


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The Readers of the Black Press'
in America are more educated,,
I "make more income
and have
I substantial buying power.


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Source: The Media Audit I
2004 Black Newspapers
Readership Report, nnpa.org


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Champs Place
C ,-n, l.,a.,,, DINE-IN TAKE-OUT

Ic .., (904) 355-7772
A-'i1 1347 N. Market Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
S., Hours: Monday Sunday 11:00am until I
Present this coupon
and receive a free drink
_ H pringf


M 112l imF I U A M M No W 4 qt/ 9 -
THROUGH OUR EYES 2005 Art Exhibition
RITZ THEATRE & LA VILLA MUSEUM
Summer Programming
Art is Where You Find It! Trash to treasure hands-on art
workshop
Saturday July 16, 10:30 am 12:30 pm
Learn to create art with found or recycled materials with Through
Our Eyes mother and daughter team Billie and Natalie McCray.
Bring your own found and recycled objects or let the artists help
you choose. *
Workshop for children and adults. Admission $5. Advance reg-
istration recommended.
Collaborative presentation of Through Our Eyes and
Spoken Word
Thursday June 2, July 7 and August 4, 7-9 pm.
The First Thursday of every month, the lobby of the Ritz is trans-
formed into a stage for poets and poetry lovers of all ages. Be
inspired by the artwork and show off your own talent for verse,
or just come, listen and soak up the creative atmosphere.
Admission is Free.
For more information on these and other events, please
call Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum at 904-632-5555.
ADVERTISING DEADLINES: *
TUESDAYS @ 5 PM.
Call: 766-8834
email: info@thefloridastar.com
e ************ *******************e*a


nAr j r A 4


FAI UL A-J


JULY 9.


2i1


See you~in the paper!


.u- '--lr






FLORIDA STAR


Cheryl Martin Is Speaker

For 2005 Women's

Conference In St. Petersburg

-- iSt. Mark Missionary
S, Baptist Church, 1301 37th
St. South will host the
2005 Women's
Conference on. Friday,
August 12 and Saturday,
August 13.
The conference begins
at 6:00 p.m. on August 12
and at 7:30 p.m.' on
August 13.
Cheryl Martin The keynote speaker is
Cheryl Martin, a nationally known motivational and
Christian speaker who has conducted previous speaking
engagements in Jacksonville.
She is the co-host of the radio program, "The
Relationship Fitness Show." In a lively interview for-
mat, she and relationship fitness coach Johnny Parker
provide practical insights to singles and married cou-
ples for building and nurturing strong, lasting relation-
ships.
Ms. Martin serves on the U.S. board of World
Vision, the largest international Christian relief and
development agency dedicated to helping children and
their communities reach their full potential by tackling
the causes of poverty.
She is the author of 1st Class Single: Rules for
Dating and Waiting God's Way. She also writes the col-
umn, "Successfully Single," in GOSPEL TODAY mag-
azine.
Ms. Martin has worked as a reporter and producer
for the NBC-owned and ABC affiliate television sta-
tions in Washington, D.C. For nine years, Cheryl was a
popular News Anchor and Host on the national cable
network, BET.
In 1996, she became the moderator of the network's
signature Sunday news analysis show, "Lead Story,"
interviewing some of the nation's top newsmakers,
including former president Bill Clinton, General Colin
Powell, and Condoleezza Rice.
For more information contact the church office at
(727) 321-6631. Rev. Brian K. Brown, Pastor.



MT. SINAI COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ENTERPRISES, INC
2049 North Pearl St.
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
(904).798-8733
Presents Its First Annual Fundraiser And Awards Banquet
"Empowering Our
Youth"
Friday, July 29, 2005
Holiday Inn
1-95 and Airport Road
8:30 p.m.-Reception


Almon Gunter-Speaker
.,, ,. Two-time'U.S. Olympic Trial Qualifier
.. Almon shares his ideas, concepts and strategies
-. .l with youth and teens, as well as corporations.
As a 501c(3) non-profit community service organization, your support is
deductible., All proceeds will be used to provide programs that continue
to strengthen our families and rebuild our communities.. Tickets are
available for $50 per person, or groups of 10 for $450. For tickets
and/or information on advertisements or sponsorships, please contact
Mike Stanfield, Program Manager, at (904) 798-8733.
The mission of the Community Resource Education and Development
Institute (CREDI) is to impact lives through educational, economical,
social and spiritual methods. We provide services for youth, teens,
adults and families.
Darlene Thomas Rivers Pastor R. L. Gundy
Chairperson CEO


Before you can file for various bene-
fits and take care of other financial mat-
ters, you will need to collect a variety of
-documents:
Death certificate. Available from
your funeral director or county health
department. Purchase at least a dozen cer-
tified copies of the death certificate. Most
companies will want a certified copy, but
use a photocopy when you can to save
money.
Marriage certificate. Available from
the county clerk where the marriage
license was issued.
Birth certificates. For the deceased
and any dependent children. Available at
either the state or county public records
offices where the person was bom.
Social Security numbers. For the
deceased, spouse, and dependent children.
Discharge papers. If the deceased was a
veteran, you will need a copy of the dis-
charge certificate. If you cannot find a
copy, contact National Personnel Records
Center, 9700 Page Boulevard, St. Louis,


MO 63132-5200 (Send it to the attention
of the branch in which the deceased
served).
Original Will. The lawyer who wrote
the will may have it. Or, it may be with
the personal belongings of the deceased or
in a safe deposit box. Some banks have
special procedures before letting anyone
into the safe deposit box. List of proper-
ty. A complete list of what the deceased
owned including real estate, stocks,
bonds, bank accounts, deeds, and person-
al property. Recent income tax returns. If
you cannot locate a copy of the most
recent income tax return, you need to fill
out IRS Form 4506. You will need-to
attach documentation that you are author-
ized to act on behalf of the deceased, such
as letters from the probate court.

A.B. COLEMAN
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd."
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABCol[eman.com


CELEBRATING GREAT SERVICE- The Southside
Church of God In Christ will celebrate 26 years of great
service of the pastor, Bishop Edward Robinson, Sr., and First
Lady Cynthia Robinson Wednesday, July 20 through Friday,
July 23 and Sunday, July 24 at 2179 Emerson St. Services
will be held nightly at 7:30 p.m. and at 8:00 a.m. and 11:00
a.m., concluding at 7:00 p.m. on July 24. For more infor-
mation call 398-1625.
BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION-The Grace Baptist Church
of East Springfield invites the public to attend the Birthday
Celebration for Rev. John A. Payne, Pastor Emeritus on July
17 at 4:00 p.m. The church is located at 1553 E. 21 St. Rev.
John Devoe, Jr., Pastor.
CHAMBER MUSIC SECOND SEASON-The Chamber
Music Society of Good Shepherd's second season of free
concerts includes performances at 6:00 p.m. on Saturday,
July 17, Sunday, August 21, and Sunday, September 18, all
in Craig Hall. Church of The Good Shepherd is located at
Park and Stockton Streets. Henson Markham, Artistic
Director. David Bowen, MM., Organist-choirmaster. Rev.
James W. Harris, Jr., Rector.
VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL/VICTORIA FARRIE
PERFORMANCE-Children throughout the community are
invited to. attend the Spotlight On Jesus Vacation Bible
School at New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 1231 Tyler St. July
25-July 30 from 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. The theme is "I Am
The Light Of The World" taken from John 8:12. For more
information call (904) 353-1822. The G.W. Bruton Board
Of Ushers of New Bethel AME Church, 1231 Tyler St.,
present Mrs. Victoria Farrie of Titus Harvest Dome
Spectrum in a performance on Sunday, July 24, at 5:00
p.m. Mrs. Farrie is releasing her debut album entitled
Majesty featuring the hit single "Miracles". The public
is invited to attend. Rev. William H. Lamar, IV, Pastor


Annual Celebration

And Giveaway Planned

Remembering Mother and Founder, Evangelist
Bernice C. Evans, Faith As A Mustard .Seed, I Am
Alpha and Omega will host its Annual Celebration and
Give Away on July 30 and 31 off Lem Turner Road.
(behind Jax Car Wash, travel seven blocks down, make
a right on Droad Street to the old fashion tent service).
The give away will be conducted from 10:00 a.m.-
5:00 p.m. on July 30. Activities include praising,
preaching, singing, face painting and refreshments.
A Praise and Worship Service will be held beginning
at 3:00 p.m. on July 31. Guest speakers include
Evangelist Wanda Porter, Evangelist Beverly Jenkins
and Apostle E. L. Small. The service will also. feature
special appearances by The. Singing Kings of Joy, the
Shiloh Praise Team from Orlando, and others.
Evangelist Bernice C. Evans founded the ministry in
1966. Her work is continued by Evangelist Wanda B.
Evans-Porter
The public can support the ministry of Faith As A
Mustard Seed, I Am Alpha and Omega by donating
goods such as clothing, can goods, paper goods, food,
etc. For updates on upcoming ministry events, you can
join the mailing list by providing your name, address
and contact number.
To make donations and for more information call
(904) 472-7432 or contact Evangelist Porter at (407)
870-0576.


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GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


'1 ir~~;~-~


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


WORSHIP CENTER
I Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL,32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

URGENT HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY

TRANSPLANT!

for Samuel W. Smith
PLEASE GIVE!

(904) 765-9773


JULY9, 2005


PAGE A-4


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JULY 9, 2005 rFL lin
ORIDA STAR


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The Battle for the U.S. Supreme Court

and Social Justice in Jacksonville


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PEOPLE
't FORTH
P,,.,AMERICAN
R WAY
savethecourLorg


Local sponsoring organizations:
Jacksonville Leadership Coalition I The African Methodist Episcopal Church
Jacksonville Baptist Ministers Conference
Jacksonville Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance I C.M.E. Churches
SEIU I Jacksonville Branch NAACP I State Senator Tony Hill


Thank you for reading
THE FLORIDA STAR!
To subcribe
or to advertise
call 904/766-8834


IMPACT



WCGL AM 1360


THE FLORIDA STAR


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Education Nowamid Babies Later (ENABL)


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Deadlines for Ads:


Tuesday @ 5 p. m.


Call: (904) 766-8834


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FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Giveaways 6:30pm 7pm from THE BEAT 92.7 FM


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PAGE A-5


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r/G1EJ /1-0 A A A


Miami Fundraiser Nets $201,800


For B-CC Training Center


JULY 9, 20051


Senator Barack Obama,

Senator Nelson To Meet

With Eatonville Residents


Larry Little (left) talks with supporters during a fundrais-
er in Miami in support of the Bethune-Cookman College
Football Training Center. (PHOTO BY JOHN REEVES)


MIAMI -- Just like he
used to open holes for Larry
Csonka and Mercury Morris
during his playing days for.
the Miami Dolphins, Hall of
Fame lineman Larry Little
helped pave the way for the
Bethune-Cookman College
Football Training Center.
Joined by "Star
Quarterback" and College
President Dr. Trudie Kibbe
Reed, Little hosted a
fundraising reception for the


ambitious $13 million major
gifts initiative for a state-of-
the-art facility to host the
Wildcat football program.
The June 24 event at the
Omega Activity Center in
Miami netted $201,800.
Before his playing days
with the Dolphins, Little
was an All-American defen-
sive end at B-CC. After
playing a major roll in the
Dolphins' two Super Bowl
championships and the per-


fect 17-0 season in 1972,
Little returned to B-CC as
head coach in 1983 and
guided the Wildcats to Mid-
Eastern Athletic Conference
championships in 1984 and'
1988.
Current Wildcat coach
Alvin Wyatt Sr. was Little's
defensive coordinator and
two assistant coaches ---
Greg Ross and Terry
Williams -- played for the
former Dolphin.
"Bethune-Cookman is
always going to be in my
blood," said Little, who is
serving on the 39-person
steering committee for the
initiative. "This is a project
I'm going to do everything I
can to insure its success."
Just like good blocking
sets the stage for a strong
running game, presentations
by Little and Dr. Reed
opened the hole for Miami's
Audley Coakley to "take the
ball and run with it" as the
evening's total grew.
The energetic Coakley, a


B-CC graduate and ardent
supporter, worked the room
and inspired the approxi-
mately 75 attendees that
they could win a competi-
tion among the College's
alumni and booster chapters
to raise money.
"I guarantee a Miami
victory," said Coakley, often
striking a Heisman trophy
poise when a donation was
made.
The Football Training
Center will include locker
rooms and showers, a
weight room, coaches'
offices, meeting and film
rooms and a reception area
featuring a hall of fame. The
19,000 square football
building-will serve the foot-
ball program's approximate-
ly 90 student athletes, 25
coaches and support staff as
well as approximately 600-
700 young student-athletes
throughout Florida partici-
pating in the National Youth
Sports Program and summer
camps hosted by B-CC.


Clay County Seat Safety Programs Helps Save Lives


A Clay County resident speaks with a driver as another
officer inspects her car at a seat belt check point.


The Clay County Car
Seat Safety Program held
another successful car seat
checkpoint Tuesday, June
28, at the Chick-fil-A on CR
220 (in front of Wal-Mart).
The checkpoint was held
from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00
p.m.
The Car Seat Safety
Program provides education
and installation assistance to
parents and care givers of
children.
Florida law requires chil-


dren through age three to be,
secured in a separate carrier.
Capt. Bernita Bush, public
education officer with Clay
County Public Safety
Department, said some care-
givers just aren't properly
educated on the correct use
of car seats. "Florida is not a
state which has .a Booster
Seat law, but studies show
that the best practice for
children 4-8 years-old is to
use a booster seat," Bush
added.


Kim Papke of
Middleburg said she wanted
to make sure her 4-month-
old son Christopher was safe
while in transport. She said
a few months ago she
slammed on brakes to avoid
a bicyclist and his car seat
moved forward.
She said she learned
something she never knew
before about car seats. "I
knew his car seat was old
but I didn't know that car
seats expired," Papke said as
she purchased a new seat for
Christopher.
Lt. Mark Cassano
explained to Papke that it's
important to monitor her
baby's weight to make sure
the safety seat properly sup-
ports him. "You've got to
watch him ...he's a pretty
big boy," Cassano said.
Bush reminded parents
that items like CDs, combs,
brushes and toys become
missiles in the event of a
crash.
Bush also instructed par-
ents to keep the baby in a


ADVETIE NpNDSUSCIB

TOTEFOIASA

CALL STOAY

A T 9 4/ 6 6 83*-


rear-facing position until the
baby turns one year old.
For more information
about Clay County Car Seat
Safety Program, please con-
tact Public Safety at (904)
284-7703.


Sen. Bill Nelson


Sen. Barack Obama


EATONVILLE Barack Obama, the only African-
American currently serving in the U.S. Senate is sched-
uled to visit with residents of Eatonville, the nation's
first incorporated black town, as the guest of U.S. Sen.
Bill Nelson on Saturday, July 9, 10:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m
in Lias Hall at Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church
located at 412 E. Kennedy Blvd. Obama, of Illinois,
along with Nelson, will provide residents with an update
on current issues in Washington, including the Supreme
Court vacancy and its recent decision giving govern-
ments the power to seize people's homes on behalf of
developers. The forum is open to the public.

School Of Nursing Becomes
University's Flagship Program
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--The University of North Florida
has selected the College of Health's School of Nursing as its
first flagship program. A total of $1.75 million dollars has
been set aside for the nursing program and other flagship
programs, to be selected at a future date.
This recognition of excellence will allow the School of
Nursing to expand its innovative baccalaureate program.
Accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting
Commission, UNF's School of Nursing has continually
ranked among the top five nursing programs in the state.
Approximately 110 pre-licensure nursing students graduate
each year, and 90 percent of those students are placed in
local jobs, while other graduates are placed in out-of-state
jobs.


gk


7'v


"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted

&

The Victory is in the Word & Music


Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.
Topic For July 9, 2005:
Free health care for the low income working
uninsured? The People's Advocate
reveals how the working poor can access free
health care in Jacksonville.


6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214

Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW WCGL1360. COM


LO nRTnDA STA R


D A d--r1 A K


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JULY 9,2005


CBC Chair Urges Stronger Focus On



Fighting Africa's HIV/AIDS Epidemic


WASHINGTON, D.C. In a letter sent to British Prime
Minister Tony Blair, Rep. Melvin
Watt (D-N.C.), Congressional
Black Caucus Chairman, com-
'; mended his efforts to raise
awareness of African poverty and
i '' requested that a stronger focus be
placed on fighting Africa's
HIV/AIDS epidemic.
The letter, sent as the leaders
from the Group of Eight industri-
alized nations convene for a
U.S. Rep Mel Watt three-day summit in Scotland,
requests that the Prime Minister
consider adopting a policy that addresses the contaminated
blood supply in sub-Saharan Africa by funding and imple-
menting a plan to manage, track and test the millions of
blood transfusions that occur yearly in Africa.
Additionally, the Caucus suggests that an African
Institute of Health be created, which would coordinate the,
activities of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, World


'Health Organization,
African Union for all
sub-Saharan Africa.


s.-
'.'.


Centers for Disease Control and
HIV/AIDS prevention activities in


Prime Minister Blair is the host of this year's G-8 summit;
and has made Africa the central theme of his agenda.
The CBC told Blair that among the most difficult prob-
lems facing Africa is the prevalence of HIV/AIDS.
Statistics show more than 25 million of sub-Saharan
Africa's 700 million people are infected with HIV/AIDS and
life expectancy in the region has fallen to 46 years.
The CBC requests that Blair and the G-8 summit consid-
er adopting a policy that addresses the contaminated blood
supply in sub-Saharan Africa by funding and iniplementing
a plan to manage, track and test the millions of blood trans-
fusions that occur yearly in Africa. The CBC is urging
Summit participants to work for a policy that creates a cen-
tralized, coordinated approach for the collection, testing and
distribution of blood and blood supply products to urban and
rural areas. Construction, renovation and proper manage-,
ment of health care facilities and laboratorN centers and
modernized transfusion and storage equipment will signifi-


Army Honors First African-American Chaplain


LANDOVER, Md., July
5 /U.S. Newswire/ The
Army presented an honor-
able discharge to the family
of its. first African-American
chaplain and dedicated a
new headstone July 1 to
Capt. .Henry Vinton
Plummer, more than 110
years after his court-martial
"'in 1894. .
"Today is a testimony to
the rruth that 'God's mill-
stone, of justice may grind
slowly, but it grinds exceed-


ingly fine,'" said Maj. Gen.
David H. Hicks, Army chief
of chaplains. "I am delighted
,,to be part of this highly. sig-
nificant event as we redress
the injustice done to
Chaplain Plummer...."
Hicks spoke to more than
125 family members and
friends who gathered at
National Harmony
Memorial Park to remember
Plummer's life and legacy.
"I am pleased that the
Army Board for Correction


Henry Vinton Plummer


f


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Love your job?

a Share it with a kid.

Your experience can inspire the
next generation. Volunteer today!





nior Achievemen
www \.ja.org


of Military Records has
restored Chaplain Plummer
to his rightful, deserved
place in history." Hicks said.
"We recognize his serv-
ice during the Civil War, his
ten years of faithful and hon-
orable service with the.
Ninth Cavalry and his
demonstrated patriotism and
love of country."
Plummer's military
career began 30 years prior
to his dismissal from serv-
ice. After being born into
slavery in Prince George's
County, Maryland, 'in 1844,
he escaped from slavery in
1862 to join the U.S. Navy
during the Civil War. He
served aboard the USS
Coeur de Lion.
After being honorably
discharged from the Navy,
he taught himself to read and
write, and attended the
Wayland Seminary to
become a Baptist minister.
Before accepting a comm is-
sion as an Army chaplain in
1884,. he served as a pastor
of several churches in the
District of Columbia.
Hicks explained that
Plummer was the first
African-American clergy-
man to be commissioned as
a chaplain in the regular
Army.
.Plummer, who was
responsible for the pastoral
care and education of the
regiment's troopers and their
families, was dismissed
from service in 1894.
After being accused of
drinking with enlisted men
and an altercation, he faced
a court-martial on the
grounds of conduct unbe-
coming of an officer.
An appeal to Plummer's
case was brought to the
Army Board for Correction
of Military Records by the
Rev. L. Jerome Fowler, a
great grandnephew of
Plummer, and member of
the Committee to Clear
Chaplain Plummer Inc., Feb.
18, 2004.
After reviewing the case,
the Army Board for the
Correction of Military'
Records did not overturn the
court-martial, but deter-
mined that Plummer be
issued an honorable dis-
charge to restore equity. The
committee concluded racism
at that time contributed to
Plummer's dismissal.


cantly reduce the number of newly infected persons with
HIV/AIDS.
"Second, we urge you to work toward the creation of an
African Institute of Health, which would coordinate the
activities of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, World
Health Organization, CDC and African Union for all
HIV/AIDS prevention activities in sub-Saharan Africa. We
feel this collaboration would streamline the activities of
these important organizations to provide more adequate
feedback on how to administer and collect data to improve
the blood supply and other treatment regiments in the
region," wrote Watt.
"Watt further noted that, "While the tasks ahead remain
large, we remain confident that you and the other G-8 lead-
ers, working in close coordination with the leaders in Africa,
will help Africa achieve its full economic potential. By care-
fully and thoughtfully addressing the issue of HIV/AIDS,
you can take a major step to enhance the future of millions
of Africans."






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JULY 9, 2005 FLORIDA STAR PAGE A-7


PAGE A-7


FLORIDA STAR


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PA k?1 AQT- F D SAR JL 9 200


The 2005 BET Awards! Highlights Of The Most Watched Show In Bet's 25 Year History!
by Rych McCain
All Photos 2005 Andre' B. Murray/A Bern Agency Photo


This year's BET
AWARDS Show became
the highest rated, most
watched show in BET's
twenty-five year history!
According to Nielsen
Media Research, 6.6 mil-
lion viewers tuned in for
the three hour broadcast
which represents a whop-
ping 16% double digit
increase from last year's
show of 5.7 million. The
BET Awards Post Show;
THE AFTERSHOCK,
which was hosted by BET
News anchor Jacque Reid
and Entertainment
Tonight's Kevin Frazier
cashed in as well
muscling a hefty 3.4 mil-
lion viewers.
The big surprise of the
night was the opening
with the Fugees reunited
with Lauren Hill perform-
ing their hits including
"Ready or Not," and
"Killing Me Softly." Will
Smith and his lovely wife
Jada Pinkett Smith, host-
ed the telecast will class
and plenty of laughs.
Outstanding performanc-
es were rendered by liv-
ing legend Stevie Wonder,
"Dirty South" rap master
T.I., Mariah Carey,
Destiny's Child, Toni
Braxton, Ludacris, Faith
Evans, Missy Elliott,
Mary J. Blige, Mike
Jones, Fantasia, Tye
Tribbett and The Game.
Celebrity A-List
Presenter included Tom
Cruise, Halle Berry,
Queen Latifah, Steve


Harvey and Vivica A.
Fox.
However, the best per-
formance of the night was
served up by veteran
vocalist and Lifetime
Achievement Award win-
ner Gladys Knight. She
brought the crowd to their
feet with a fiery, spirit
filled set that included
several of her biggest hits
such as "Neither One Of
Us" and "Midnight Train
To Georgia."
Memorial tributes
were paid to actor Ossie
Davis, attorney Johnnie
Cochran, singer Rick
James and rapper 01'
Dirty Bastard, all of
whom made their transi-
tions to our ancestors
since last year's broad-
cast.
As for the winners,
Kanye West led the pack
with two awards, Best
Male Hip Hop Artist and
Video of The Year for
"Jesus Walks." Ciara won
for Best Collaboration
(for her tandem with
Missy. Elliott on "1,2
Step"), and John Legend
scored as Best New
Artist. Both were first
time nominees. Alicia
Keys took home her first
BET Award for Best
Female R&B Artist.
Former B2K front man
and now solo artist
Omarion received the
coveted Viewers' Choice
Award. Actor Denzel
Washington and his love-
ly wife Pauletta were


honored with the BET
Humanitarian Award.
Rounding out the list
of winners were;
Destiny's Child for Best
Group; Remy Martin for
Best Female Hip Hop
Artist; Regina King for
Best Actress; Serena
Williams for Female
Athlete of the Year; Usher
for Best Male R&B
Artist; Donnie McClurkin
for Best Gospel Artist;
Jamie Foxx for Best
Actor and Shaquille
O'Neal for Male Athlete
of the Year. The telecast
was produced by Cossette
Productions.


,Copyrighted Material .

yndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


~JAOt(


Smooth Jazz 105.3 & 105.5

and the

City of Jacksonville Beach

Invite you to a FREE CONCERT


featuring NELSON RANGELL


JULY 17TH

5-9 p.m.

Sea Walk Pavilion Jacksonville Beach


"I- -f


1951 2005


Luther Ronzoni Vandross, the silky-voiced R&B crooner who spun romance
into hits like "Here and Now" and "Any Love," died on Friday, July 1 st, 2005 at John
F. Kennedy Medical Center in Edison, NJ. He was 54.
With a smooth yet soulful delivery, the highly admired singer/songwriter/produc-
er has sold in excess of 30 million records worldwide, winning eight Grammy
Awards, numerous Soul Train, BET, NAACP Image and American Music Awards.
He ranked as one of the most successful R& B singers of the 1980's and broke
through to even wider commercial success in 1989 with the Best of Luther Vandross,
the Best of Love, which included the new song "Here and Now," his first Grammy
winning hit which became a signature wedding song.
"There are vocalists, and then there's Luther," Smokey Robinson told Rolling
Stone magazine in 1990.
"Luther's in a class by himself."
Music directors Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis are planning a Vandross tribute
album which will feature Mary J. Blige, Celine Dion and Ruben Studdard.
Funeral services were held at Frank E. Campbell Funeral Chapel in New York
City, Wednesday and Thursday, July 6 and 7. The Memorial Service will be held
Friday, July 8 at Riverside Church, New York City at 12:00pm.
Renaldo "Obie" Benson, who spent five decades as an original member of
Motown's legendary Four Tops died of lung cancer in Detroit's Harper Hospital on
Saturday, July 2, just a day after Vandross passed away. He was 69.
"It was not unexpected. He has been very ill," said Craig Hankenson, president of
Producers Inc., one of the agencies that books dates for the Four Tops.
At Benson's side as he slipped away were his ex-wife, Valaida Benson, and
daughters Eboni and Tobi Benson. Obie's musical family was also there, namely his
Four Tops brothers, Abdul "Duke" Fakir and lead singer Levi Stubbs, who, despite
his limited mobility due to a major stroke he suffered in 2002, insisted on staying
with his lifetime friend to the end.
The love and loyalty between the Four Tops dates back to 1954, the year the group
was formed, and when the guys were still teenagers in high school.
Tributes
Roberta Flack: He [Luther] was a musician who couldn't help but give you all he
had. He was the kind of guy who was born to do what he did musically and let the
world know about it
Patti Labelle: The world is going to remember a gentleman, the best dresser in the
world and the greatest dancer.
Aretha Franklin: I was truly saddened to hear about two very dear and old friends
of mine, Luther Vandross and Obie Benson. Luther, one of the premiere balladeers
of all times and a dear friend and Obie Benson, one of the great showmen of all times
and friend. They have both moved on up a little ifigher. I will truly miss them.


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JULY 9. 2005


FLORIDA STAR


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Daughter Of Famed Florida Political Activist



Lands Big Break Fresh Out Of Grad School


JACKSONVILLE, Fla..--Cassandra Freeman first began
acting at age 14, refined
her talent at Douglas
Anderson School of the
iv Arts in Jacksonville,
received a BFA in acting
.-' at Florida State
University, and followed
that feat with earning an
MFA in acting from

w The talented and
aspiring actress, daughter
of deceased locally
renowned human rights
activist Mack Freeman,
.recently landed a role in
Cassandra Freeman Spike Lee's crime
thriller, The Inside Man, which stars Hollywood heavy-
weights Denzell Washington, Cli% e Owen, and Jodie Foster.
Freeman's first role in a major film finds her cast as the
fiancee of New York police detective, Keith Miller, played


by Denzell Washington.
"I was thrilled when I received the part in The Inisde
Man," Freeman said. "Not only do I have the opportunity
to participate in a major film project, but I have the privilege
of working with veterans of the industry, like Denzell
Washington and with a brilliant generous director, Spike
Lee. I realize that as a young actress making her film debut,
I am very fortunate."
After this film Freeman will move on to the Guthtry
Theatre in Minneapolis, MN..
Vincent Cirrincione one of the industry's most prominent
talent managers, who has managed careers of some of
Hollywood's leading actors, including Halle Berry and
Ruben Santiago Hudson, represents Freeman.
Freeman has faced an incredibly difficult year. She
experienced the death of her father followed by the death of
her grandfather U.N. Kinsey.
"I believe my father must have asked God for a favor,
because to work on this project is a dream, our dream."
The Inside Man takes place during a hostage situation in
which a tough cop matches wits against a clever bank rob-
ber, who sets out to pull the perfect heist. The film began


Franklin Town UMC, Pastor Celebrate Anniversary


TOP FRAME: Mistress of Ceremonies Kathie Jefferson
Carswell shares the pulpit along with Reverends Carlton
D. Jones, Rosella Pellham, R. F. Langford and Franklin
Brown. BOTTOM FRAME: Emma Holley Morgan and
Frances Green.


By Marsha Dean Phelts


Town United Methodist
Church in American Beach


The Historic Franklin on Amelia Island, celebrated

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their 117th Anniversary
along with the observance of
Reverend R. F. Langford's
8th Anniversary as their pas-
tor. Brother George Green,
President of the Trustee
Board served as Chairman
of the Anniversary
Committee and his niece,
Sister Kathie Carswell was
the Assistant Chairman.
One hundred and seven-
teen years ago to the date,
June 26, 1888 that the
church was founded, direct
descendents of church
founder, Gabriel Means and
his wife, Edie Drummond
Means returned. Brother
Green and Sister Carswell
are the great and great-great
grandchildren of the Means'.
The anniversary theme
was "Standing on the
Promises of God."
Reverend Carlton D. Jones,
Associate Minister at Bethel
Baptist Institutional Church


of Jacksonville was the
speaker for the occasion.
Reverend Jones who is also
president of the American
Beach Property Owners'
Association gave a testimo-
ny of the road that led him to
the pulpit.
He spoke from his spirit
rather than the script that he
had prepared.
Maurice Jones Minister
of Music for St. Stephen's
AME Church of
Jacksonville sang and pro-
vided music for the occa-
sion. Rev. Langford called
on Rev. Rufus Walker, a
Franklin Town descendant
to close out the service with
the solo, "Save a Seat For
Me."
The Anniversary
Celebration concluded with
the gathering of family and
friends in the Gabriel Means
Fellowship Hall for a boun-
tiful old fashion feast.


St. Vincent's & Mayo Clinic Transfer
Ownership Of St. Luke's Hospital


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--
St. Vincent's and Mayo
Clinic have completed St.
Vincent's purchase of St.
Luke's Hospital.
The documents for the
purchase were signed
Thursday, June 30, 2005.
The transfer of legal owner-
ship will take effect Friday,
July 1, 2005.
With the transfer of legal
ownership, St. Vincent's
takes title to St. Luke's
Hospital, the two adjoining
physician office buildings
and other tangible assets. St.
Vincent's is leasing the facil-
ities back to Mayo Clinic
until the new Mayo Clinic
Hospital is opened in 2008.
In previous weeks, Mayo
and St. Vincent's completed
the purchase agreement for
St. Luke's Hospital, a signif-
icant transaction that repre-
sents an investment by St.
Vincent's of approximately
$150 million. With the pro-
ceeds from the sale and over
$70 million dollars from


grateful benefactors, Mayo
Clinic will begin construc-
tion of a 214-bed hospital at
its San Pablo Road campus.
When Mayo Clinic Hospital
opens, there will be a second
and final closing that will
transfer operational control
of St. Luke's to St. Vincent's.

DEATH

NOTICES
CICERO-Willie E.., 75, died
June 28, 2005.
CLINCH-Idella, died June
30, 2005.
HUTCHINSON-Deshawn,
15, died June 24, 2005. A.B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
JOHNSON-Andre Lynn, died
June 23, 2005.
PETRIK-Norman, died June
28, 2005. A.B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
PRINCE-Bruce Wayne, Sr.,
died June 29, 2005.
STEWART-Ella Mae, died
June 27, 2005. A.B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
4


shooting June 27 and is scheduled to be released in theaters
in March 2006.

"COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS
Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
Events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area. 2

JUVENILE JUSTICE TOURS-Parents who can
accompany their children on the Juvenile Justice Tour
may call the State Attorney's Office and make a reser-
vation for the tour on July 22. The number to call is
630-2075. Limited space is available. Appropriate for
ages 11-16, the tours last from 9:00 a.m.-1 :00 p.m. The.
State Attorney's Office has provided summer tours of
the juvenile justice system for the last 11 years. This is
an opportunity for parents and their children to be edu-
cated about the criminal justice system.
LEARNING CENTER ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TION-The Brewer Learning Center, 1095 Philip" A.+
Randolph Blvd. is now accepting applications for ages
6 weeks-3 years-old (Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten).
The programs and hours of operation on Monday
through Friday are The Learning Day-8:30 a.m.-3:00
p.m. and Extended Day-6:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m. and 3:00
p.m.-6:30 p.m.. For more information call 904/630-
1268 or stop by the Brewer Learning Center between
the hours of 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
AUDITIONS-Stage Aurora Theatrical Company, Inc.
in association with the Jacksonville Chapter of The
Links, Inc. will host auditions for the off-Broadway
Gospel Musical Crowns by Regina Taylor. Auditions
will be held on Saturday, July 9 from 1:00 p.m.-6:00
p.m. in the FCCJ North Campus Ezekial Bryant Audito
rium located at 4501 Capper Rd. Six women and one
man who are powerful gospel singers are needed for
roles in the production. For more information contact
Stage Aurora Theatrical Company at (904) 765-7373.
AMERICAN LEGION, POST 197 EVENTS-
American Legion, ,Post 197, located at 2179 Benedict
Rd., will honor Duval teachers during "Teachers
Night" on Friday, July 17 at 9:00 p.m.. The event is
being held in recognition of the outstanding services
and dedication of teachers in Duval County. On July 7,
Larry Douglas (aka) Georgia Boy will present his pro-
duction from 8:00 p.m.-2:00 a-m. The production will
continue until further notice each Sunday thereafter.
MAD DADS FUNDRAISING BANQUET-The
MAD DADS Jacksonville Chapter, Inc.. will host its
Second Annual Fundraising Banquet on August 12 at
the Jacksonville Landing. The Honorable Dr. Wade F.
Horn, Assistant Secretary of Children and Families,
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is
the guest speaker. The banquet was established for the
purpose of honoring community residents that have
committed themselves to improving communities
within the city of Jacksonville. Ticket donations are
$60. For partnership levels and ad donations informa-
tion contact Tonya Jackson or Elder Bruce Jones (904)
388-8171.


THANKS

FOR

SUPPORTING

THE FLORIDA

STAR!

CONTACT US

AT 904) 766-8834


PAGE B-1


FLORIDA STAR


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PlA GEB -2


JULY Y 9. 2005


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Our condolences go out to the family; associates, friends and the many devoted
fans of the late LUTHER VANDROSS, who made his transition to our ancestors
on Friday, July 1, 2005. The cause, of death was not released. Vandross had an
unmistakable, unique vocal sound and styling that was all his own. He sold over 30,
million albums. He had a string of eight platinum albums and performnned to
"Standing Room Only," crowds at sold out venues all over the world! His smash hit
"Here and Now," became a wedding song classic. Vandross' place in music history
is assured, regardless of the category!
Cafi Entertainment Studios has formed a new division called "FOXYFILiMS,"
which will specialize in high quality urban feature films. Their debut offering is an
action-thriller titled, "Cross," starring Michael Jai White.
Musician, producer and popular American Idol judge. Randy Jackson's new
three-hour Westwood Syndicated radio show called "Randy Jackson's Hit List,"
will make its debut in September. The show will be available in both the Hot AC
and Urban formats.
This Past weekend, July 2, 2005, over one million fans attended ten concerts
across four continents to raise money and awareness to end the poverty crisis in
Africa. The concerts were held in London, Paris, Berlin, Rome, Barrie, Tokyo,
Moscow, Cornwall, Johannesburg and Philadelphia. The Philly concert was heavy
on the hip hop/R&B end due to the organizational help of music biz mogul Russell
Simmons. He enlisted the participation and performances of Stevie Wonder, Jay-Z,
Alicia Keys, Destiny's Child and Kanye West with Will Smith hosting.


Looking good on the outside begins by
being strong on the inside That's
because later in life. especially for
women, strong bones help prevent
fractures and height
loss Your window
to build maximum
bone density is now, *" .... '*" '.v' .
during your late
[eens and early twenties. So eat
wisely. gec plenty of calcium and
viramin D. and do weight-bearing
exercises every day
To devise a plan that's
right for you, go to -,
aaos.org or rios.org.


I Send email to: i

I info@thefloridastar.com I

L *- -(-- -- -- -- -- -- .*.*...-


The Urbanworld Film Festival

By Dwight Brown, NNPA
Opening night at the Urbanworld Film Festival 2005, New York's top multi-ethnic
film fest. started on a roll aiid closing night flowed with good vibrations.
Roll Bounce, director Mlalcolm Lee's (Best Man) new family/comedy/drama,
jump-started the festivities on June 22 on a positive uplifting note. It's a heartwarm-
ing storv about a young teen (Bo\\ Wo\\ in a breakthrough performance) and his bud-
dies who are forced to go to a new\ upscale roller rink when their neighborhood rink
closes. Set in the '70s \\ ith a toe-tapping musical soundtrack featuring hot groups like
Chic, Lee's new movie (scheduled for a September theatrical release) was a great
opening night choice and screened at Harlem's' Magic Johnson Theater.
Over the next three days feature films, documentaries, shorts, music videos and
Nickelodeon's special family programming screened to attentive audiences. The
strongest documentary, Through The Fire, follow ed the life of Sebastien Telfair, a star
high school basketball player from Cone\ Island. Ne\\ York who stands at a crossroad:
'College or the NBA? Those quick to say the kid needs higher education will want to
see how and why his decision, is made, based on his families' needs and dreams.
Exciting basketball footage, stirring family drama -this documnentarv ov'er-shadowed
most of the features.
Ossie Davis' last performance is in Proud, a pedantic movie that focuses on young
men who learn from their father (Davis) what it was like to serve on the first Naval
vessel crewed by black enlistees, circa World War II. It screened in the Drama
Competition, but dispenses so many historic facts it should have been a documentary
not a narrative feature. Ving Rhames and Terence Howard starred in Animal. a story
about an ex-convict looking for redemption, and a special screening of the hip-hop
dance movie Rize was a real audience pleaser. The, music video Keep On Movin'
chronicles the life of a Native American young man who journeys from the reserva-
tion to the inner city. The short documentary Chan: Part of the Nation chronicles the
rise of a promising.Chinese rapper, Roy Kim.
Closing Night featured Hustle & Flow, a new John Singleton-produced movie star-
ring Terence Howard. Howard plays a Tennessee pimp trying to get out of the life and
become a rapper. It's a gritty, gutter level drama and Howard gives his best perform-
ance to date.
Next year marks the 10th Anniversary of Urbanworld. Founder and Chairman
Stacey Spikes have developed this unique festival into a much-anticipated New York
institution.
Winners:
Best Feature Film
The Hero, Directed. By Zeze Gamboa, Written By Carla Baptista, & Produced By
Fernando Vendrell
Best Documentary Film (Feature Length)
Through The Fire, Directed By Jonathan Hock, Produced By Diane Houslin &
Phillip Aromando
Best Short Documentary Film
Foster Stories, Directed By Sasha Isaac-Young, Produced By Chen-Hsi Wong &
Jacqueline Schaeffer
Best Short Film
The Other American Dream, Written & Directed By Enrique Arroyo
Best Music Video
Keep On Moving, Written & Directed By Len Peterson, Produced By Brenden
Sawatsky &,Len Peterson


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From left are First Prize winner Cecelia Lenox and Second Prize winner Shanikqua McBride. Both par-
ticipated in the "Real Fathers Real Men" Essay Contest at Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist Church. In the
rear is Sis. Earline Malpress. Coordinator.

Winners Recognized In Real

Fathers, Real Men Essay Contest

Area youth sho, cased their essa\ writing talent in the "Real Fathers. Real len'" Essa\ Contest held June 19.
at Nit. Sinai N!Misionary Baptist Church
The contest \\as sponsored ',.N Sinai Sisters-in-Christ. Sis. Wallette Gund\. President. Re'. R. L Gund\.
Pastor.
The \winners are: Frist Place. Cecelia Lenox. daughter of Bro. Robert Lew is: Second Prize. ShankqLua
IMcBride. daughter of Minister Garrett NMcBride: and Third Prize. Jamar Cooper.
Certificates of Appreciation \\ere presented to Gar\ Cooper. AlIsse Lenox. Robert Le1 wis. Kenn\ NlcClain.
Daai\ah N cCra\. Glad\s IMcDoucal. Jonnnelle NlcDoiual. Kamia N cDougal.Timoth\ MIcGhee. Nadia
Quaintance. Ceola West. O'Sheage \\West. and Kimberlee Young.


Kids Voice Their Career Choices
(NAPS I-Young people report that family members \\ field a lot of influence w\ hen it comes to choosing a career.
The\ also think super hero. w hale trainer and princess are still some of the coolest .obs around.
These are just some of the ke\ findings re\ sealed in a surx e\ conducted bN Adecco, the \w world's largest staftfing
company. The sur\ e\ asked 245 children ages 6 to 14 about their career expectations
The coolest job in the unilerse? The more intriguing choices include Disne\ world d employee. super hero.
\\hale trainer, roller coaster designer and princess. One family\ -oi iented bo\ thought the coolest job is being a dad.
Ianl\ irls 13-14 are dra\\n to the health sciences 142 percent), especiallN physical therapy\ and \eterinarv
medicine. Teenaged bo\ s opted for such pursuits as ps" chiatr\. herpetolog_. and acting
Girls 10 to 12 are interested in medicine (3' percent), teaching (33 percent. and the performing arts i 10 per-
cents. The most popular choice for bo\s H1 to 12 is athlete i23 percent.
Bo\ s 6 to 9 have varied goals, the largest block I I' percent) opting for police work. Sports and acting \were
popular choices, and possible\ reflecting world events. several plan to join the Arm\ A budding paleontologist is
(See "Career Choices ". B-3. 4)


'




Page B-3A/July 9, 2005


Career Choices
i (Continued From Cover)
preparing for his job by "digging the chips out of
chocolate chip cookies."
For 42 percent of girls 6 to 9 years old, teaching
was the winner. Medicine, the most popular choice
in the previous survey, was runner-up in this survey.
Since President of the United States is perhaps
the biggest job there is, the survey asked children the
most important things they would do as president.
Priorities included housing the homeless, ending
world hunger, and protecting the environment.
Homeland Security issues such as "making sure that
everyone in the country is safe" and "ending all
.- mars" were mentioned.
Other answers included "make healthcare free for
everyone," "build more Krispy Kreme doughnut
shops," and "try to be ready for everything."
This survey, while not the most scientific, clearly
shows that career considerations begin early. Based
on this survey, Adecco foresees that tomorrow's
workforce will contribute greatly to society with
their intelligence and wit, and that they understand
the importance of balance between work and family.
In a recent survey of young people's opinions
about careers, one boy thought the coolest job is
being a dad.


FIND OUT
HOW YOU
CAN
APPEAR
IN
PREP RAP
CALL
904 766-8834


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B-3C/JULY 9, 2005
Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein

TOP SINGLES
1. "Don't Phunk with my Heart" The Black Eyed Peas
(A&M) Last Week: No. 4
2. "Behind These Hazel Eyes" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No.
2
3. "We Belong Together" Mariah Carey (Island) No. 3
4. "Speed of Sound" Coldplay (Capitol) No. 12
5. "Don't Cha" The Pussycat Dolls Featuring Busta
Rhymes (A&M) New Entry
6. "GrindT with Me" Pretty Ricky (Atlantic) No. 7
7. "Hollaback Girl" Gwen Stefani (Interscope) No. 5
8. "Inside Your Heaven" Carrie Underwood (Arista) No. 1
9. "Oh" Ciara Featuring Ludacris (Sho'nuff
MusicLine/LaFace) No. 8
10. "Just A Li'l Bit" 50 Cent (Shady Aftermath) No. 6
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Something More" Sugarland (Mefcury) Last Week:
No. 2
2. "Fast Cars and Freedom" Rascal Flatts (Lyric .Street)
No. 1
3. "You'll Be There" George Strait (MCA Nashville) No. 3
4. "Making Memories of Us" Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 5
5.. "As Good as I Once Was" Toby Keith (DreamWorks)
No. 8
6. "Lot of Leavin' Left to Do" Dierks Bentley (Capitol)
No. 4
7. "Mississippi Girl" Faith Hill (Warner Bros.) No. 7
8. "Keg in the Closet" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 6
9. "If Something Should Happen" Darryl Worley
(DreamWorks) No. 9
10. "Alcohol" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) New Entry
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Lonely No More (J. Nevins/Francois L/Scumfrog
Mixes)" Rob Thomas (Melisma) Last Week: No. 2
2. "Don't Cha (R. Rosario/Kaskade/DJ Dan Mixes)" The
Pussycat Dolls Featuring Busta Rhymes (A&M) No. 3
3. "Krafty (DJ Dan/E. Kupper/Morel Mixes)" New Order
(Warner Bros.) No. 1
4. "I Feel You" Schiller Featuring Heppner (Radikal) No. 4
5. "Hollywood Swingin'" Kool & The Gang Featuring
Jamiroquai (Sanctuary Urban) No. 6
6. "Doesn't Really Matter" Murk (Tommy Boy Silver
Label) No. 10
7. "Live You All Over" Tony Moran Presents Deborah
Cooper (Tommy Boy Silver Label) New Entry
8. '"Lift It Up" Inaya Day (Tommy Boy Silver Label) No. 5
9. "One Word (Chris Cox/M. Rizzo Mixes)" Kelly
Osbourne (Sanctuary) No. 7
10. "What Happens Tomorrow (Rauhofer Mixes)" Duran
Duran (Epic) No. 8


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JU.JLV f 7 l, fl'J .1, J fl A ST. PAGEB-S


JAIL OR BAIL


EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
GRAND THEFT AUTO-On Tuesday, July 5, 2005 at 12:02 a.m. while
on patrol a JSO police officer noticed a vehicle stopped at a yellow flash-
ing light at the 3100 block of N. Edgewood Ave. The police officer
pulled up alongside the vehicle and activated his emergency lights in
order to see if the driver needed any assistance, and to find out why he
was blocking the road. As he pulled alongside the vehicle the driver (sus-
pect) began to speed away in the vehicle. The driver was facing south on
Edgewood Ave., but he began driving erratically into the northbound
lanes of Edgewood Ave. The suspect jumped out of the vehicle immedi-
ately and left it in reverse, backing up north on Edgewood Ave. The vehi-
cle was stopped and secured. The driver fled on foot. He refused to com-
ply with the police officer's commands to stop. The suspect was captured
a few moments later. The police officer noticed that the vehicle had a
cracked steering column, the police officer read the suspect his rights, and
asked the driver where he had gotten the vehicle. He told the police offi-
cer that he stole the vehicle from a junkyard down the street. The driver
(suspect) also did not have a drivers license. He was arrested and taken
to jail.
POSSESSION OF CONTROL SUBSTANCE WITH INTENT TO
SELL-On Monday, July 4, 2005 at 11:40 a.m. a JSO police officer
arrested a 30-year-old male (suspect), for retail theft at 6643 New Kings
Rd. at (Advance Discount Auto Parts). A check of the suspect's identifi-
cation revealed the listed warrant for his arrest was active. The warrant
stated that on 10-6-04, a police officer made contact with the suspect at
4643 Wrico Dr., and purchased $40.00 worth of crack cocaine from the
suspect. On 10-25-04, another police officer made contact with the sus-
pect and purchased $20.00 worth of crack cocaine and $60.00 worth of
marijuana. On 11-16-04, another police officer made contact with the sus-
pect and purchased $60.00 worth of marijuana. On 11-23-04, a search
warrant was obtained for his residence. On 12-2-04, a police officer made
contact with the same suspect and purchased $20.00 worth of crack
cocaine. Narcotics detectives executed the search warrant at the resi-
dence. Marijuana, crack cocaine, and firearms were discovered. The sus-
pect was convicted of two felonies (Grand Theft in 1992 and Burglary in
1998. The police officer arrested the suspect and transported him to.jail.
TWO MEN SHOT WHILE GAMBLING-On Monday, July 4,2005 at
2:50 a.m. a police officer was dispatched to 2501 Phoenix Ave. in refer-
ence to a shooting incident on 7-3-05, at 9:42 p.m. Upon arrival, police
officer made contact with a 24 year old male (suspect), who stated that he
wanted to talk to him concerning the shooting incident that occurred
today. The police officer met the suspect at'his grandmother's house at
2906 Jones St. The police officer read the suspect his rights. He was
interviewed by homicide. The suspect stated that on 7-3-05 he v as ins ide
the building at 2501 Phoenix Ave. gambling with both a 29 year old, and
a 54 year old male (victims). The suspect told the police officer that he
won a total of $80.00 from both victims. He then attempted to leave and
victim #2 stated he Wanted a chance to win his money back. They began
to gamble again. He then w@n a total of $500.00 from both victims. The
suspect told the police officer that both victims are known to cheat. While
they are gambling, they use several different dices to play with. The sus-
pect attempted to leave the building again but became involved in a phys-
ical confrontation when victim #1 pushed him from behind. The suspect
then observed that victim#1 had a small silver revolver in his right hand.
The suspect attempted to grab the gun when the gun was fired twice strik-
ing victim #2 in the head. The suspect and victim #1 continued to have a
physical confrontation and victim #1 fell to the ground. The suspect then
picked up the gun and fired one shot at victim #1 striking him once in the
head. The suspect stated that he then fled the, scene, and went to his
grandmother's house. The suspect was arrested and transported to jail,
and charged with a felony. ,
BROTHER/SISTER FIGHTING OVER TELEVISION-On Tuesday,
July 5, 2005 at 1:45 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 5020
Cleveland Rd. in reference to a domestic battery. Upon arrival, police
officer met with the father,who stated that, his son and daughter (sus-
pects) became engaged in a fight after a brief argument concerning his
son's bedroom. The father told the police officer that his daughter would
not cease fighting her brotherafter he had stopped. The father further stat-
ed that he grabbed his daughter in an attempt to vet her to stop, to no.
avail. The father also stated that his daughter became upset with him and.
smashed the rear windshield of his vehicle. The police officer spoke with
the daughter who said that she .got mad with her brother because he con-
tinuously pushed the buttons on the television and refused to leave her
room, and that he'struck her in the face, and that her father held her. The
police officer observed swelling under her left eye and redness on the side
of her neck. The police officer spoke with the brother, who stated that his
sister came into his room and.started the incident with him. He further
stated that she struck him on the arm and hand. The police officer
observed several scratches, a broken skin and a swollen knot on his left.
arm. Both Suspects were read their rights, arrested and taken to jail.
-HABITUAL TRAFFIC OFFENDER-On Monday, July 4, 2005 at 7:30
p.m. while on patrol a JSO police officer observed a vehicle traveling
S i St. and BeaverSt. by failing to stop at the traffic signal/that was inopera-
tive at the time. The officer, conducted a traffic stop of the listed vehicle
*and made contact with the driver (Isuspeci The police officer asked the
suspect for his driver's license and registration. The suspect advised the
police officer that his license is suspended and he was driving due to his
wife being pregnant. A computer check of the suspect's driver license
'revealed they are suspended and have been suspended since 7-29-02 to 7-
'4-05, with (8 Traffic Violations). The police officer read the suspect his
Rights, arrested him, transported him to jail and charged him with a
'felony.
DAUGHTER STEALS MOTHER'S VEHICLE-On Tuesday, July 5,
2005 at 7:30 a.m., a police officer was dispatched to 5430 Julington
'Creek Rd. in reference to an "Unauthorized Use" of a vehicle. Upon


''arrival, police officer met with the mother (victim), who told the police
-officer her daughter (suspect), took her car last night with out her permis-
sion. Shetold the police officer that her daughter has a crack cocaine
problem. She has allowed her and her kids to live at her house so long as
-her daughter' was attending a drug rehab program. Last night, while
"everyone was asleep, her daughter ransacked through her son's clothes,
found the keys to her car, and took it. When she woke up this morning the
i ar and her daughter were gone. The police officer gave the victim a state
attorney's card and advised her how and when to file charges against the
'suspect. Case not cleared.


PITTSBURGH James
Henry Smith was a zeal-
ous Pittsburgh Steelers
fan in life, and even death
could not keep him from
his favorite spot: in a
recliner, in front of a TV
showing his beloved team
in action.
Smith, 55, of
Pittsburgh, died of
prostate cancer Thursday.
Because his death wasn't
unexpected, his family
was able to plan for an
unusual viewing Tuesday
night.
The Samuel E. Coston
Funeral Home erected a
small stage in a viewing
room, and arranged furni-
ture on it much as it was in


Your Weekly Horoscope

(JULY 9, 2005-JULY 15, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) You're
ready to get on
the road and just
go wherever your
nose leads you. That's fine.
However, before taking off,
be sure all tasks are tended
to at work.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) For some reason,
I money is burning
a hole in your
pocket this week.
Be vvery careful. If
you indulge yourself, you
could accumulate more debt
than you can handle.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) You
have a lot going

week. Just be sure
you don't neglect your rest.
You won't be any good to
anyone if you're dragging
yourself around.
CANCER (June 21 to
- July 22) It's
ready-set-go for
you this week.
You know what
.you want to do, and you
won't be distracted.
Ultimately, you achieve
what you've set out to do.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22)
You're on top of
your game at
work this week.
The opposite is true at home.
Tread carefully with family
members.
VIRGO (August 23
to September
22) It's best to
clean up unfin-
ished business
early in the week. This frees
up your time later for social
'outings. Romantically,
things are rolling along nice-
ly.
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) It's not
a good time to neglect loved
ones. You may want to con-


centrate on work,
but this isn't the /
week. Reconnect -
with your family.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21) Your
energy is at a peak
level this week.
That doesn't
mean, though,
you can bum the candle at
both ends. You'd be wise to
pace yourself.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22
to December
21) Two people
you're very fond
of are at odds
with each other. However,
you can't step into the role of
peacemaker. These two will
have to sort it out for them-
selves.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
D January 19)
You make more
of a concerted
effort this week to
push ahead in your career.
Bigwigs take note of this.
Later in the week, you find a
new outlet or area of interest
to pursue.
A AQUARI US
(January 20 to
February 18)
You feel the need
!to get away from
it all. If you can, this will
clear your head and recharge
your energies. Over the
weekend, be sure you're on
time for appointments.
PISCES (February
19 to March 20) A certain
project assigned
to you presents a
dilemma. Don't,
be shy about ask-
ing for, help. You can't
always be the one to take the
lead.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Vin Diesel,
July 18; Anthony Edwards,


July 19; Carlos Santana,
July 20; Isaac Stern, July
21; Alex Trebek, July 22;


Don Imus, July 23; Jennifer
Lopez, July 24.
(c) 2005 DBR Media,Inc.


Tara's Bail

24/7 Bonds
Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville. Florida 32206


356-TARA
(8272)


REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.
FAMILY PRACTICE
3160 Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32209












WE PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR:
*Hypertension
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*Women's Health
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Dr. Reginald Sr-'lieveko#hies tr-onya Hollinger
to te r ice. '
NO .XCCJ OPTINGG
NE W N A T-IENTS
Ife invite rou to '1- Ult p iais your provider
of choice for l /ehth'care needs.
TO SCHEDULE AN. PPOINTNIENT CALL
768 822
FAX: 90-1482-0373
NVE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR HEALTH PLANS
HMOs, PPOs, INIEDICARE, And MEDICAID
3160 Edgewood Avenue*Jacksonville, FL 32209
OFFICE HOURS:
M-F 8 A.M. ,TO 5 P.M. Wed. 2 P. M. TO 5 P.M.


Teen Nudist Law

Challenge Reinstated

RICHMOND, Va. A federal appeals court Tuesday
reinstated a lawsuit challenging a 2004 Virginia law
requiring parental supervision at a nudist camp for juve-
niles.
A three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals ruled the American Association for Nude
Recreation can pursue its claim that the law violates its
free speech rights, crimping its ability to spread its nud-
ism philosophy.
The organization claims it had to cancel last sum-
mer's camp because only 1 1of the 35 youths who signed
up would have been able to bring a parent.
"A regulation that reduces the size of a speaker's
audience can constitute an invasion of a legally protect-
ed interest," Judge William B. Traxler Jr. wrote in the
unanimous,ruling.
A lower court judge ruled last August the lawsuit was
moot because organizers of the camp at White Tail Park
surrendered their permit after the state law took effect.
Emily Lucier, spokeswoman for the Virginia attorney
general's office, said prosecutors were disappointed "but
we expect to win at trial." The 2003 summer nudist
camp for children 11 through 17 was the first in Virginia
--and only the third in the country, according to its spon-
sors.

FLORIDA LOTTO
WINNING NUMBERS
01- 15-22-30-48-51

Saturday, July 2
ROLLOVER!!


Smith's home on game day
Sunday.
Smith's body was on
the recliner, his feet
crossed and a remote in his
hand. He wore black and
gold silk pajamas, slippers
and a robe. A pack of ciga-
rettes and a; beer Nwere at
his side, while a high-defi-
nition TV played a contin-
uous, loop of Steelers high-
lights.
"I couldn't stop crying
after looking at the Steeler
blanket in his lap," said his
sister, MaryAnn Nails, 58.
"He loved football and
nobody did (anything)
until the game went off. It
was just like he was at
home."


Texas Man Arrested


After Heroic Rescue
SAN MARCOS, Texas -- A man who rescued a
swimmer caught in swirling currents of the San Marcos
River found himself in trouble soon afterward when he
was arrested by authorities who claimed he was interfer-
ing.
Dave Newman, 48, disobeyed repeated orders by
emergency personnel to leave the water, police said. He
was charged with interfering with public duties. The
police report does not mention Newman's rescue Sunday
afternoon of 35-year-old Abed Duamni. "I was amazed,"
Newman said Monday after his release on $2,000 bail. "I
had a very uncomfortable night after saving that guy's
life. He thanked me for it in front of the police, and then
they took me to jail."
A


Steeler Fan's Body


Viewed In Recliner


__~_~~_


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JULY 9, 2005


Jaguars Open Training Camp On July 29

The Jacksonville Jaguars' 2005 training camp begins on
Friday, July 29. All 88 players on the team's roster are
expected to report. The first practice session will be held on
Saturday, July 30 at 10:15 a.m. on the practice fields north-
west of ALLTEL Stadium.
Training camp will be open to the public and media for
viewing through August 12 and features 23 practice ses-
sions over two weeks before the start of the Jaguars' presea-
son on August 13. There is no admission charge for training
camp. Parking will be available in the parking lots sur-
rounding the stadium.
Beginning Monday, July 25, fans may call the Jaguars
Fans Training Camp Hotline for a recorded message, which
gives the daily practice schedule. The phone number is (904)
633-6525.
The message will be updated daily --and as any changes
are made to the practice schedule -- beginning July 30
through the end of training camp on August 12.


Copyrighted Material* 0.w


SSyndicated Content,


: Available from Commercial News Providers'


WIMBLEDON, England Venus Williams jumped
back into the top 10 in the WTA Tour rankings Monday by
winning Wimbledon, rising from No. 16 to No. 8.
The woman she edged 9-7 in the third set of Saturday's
epic final, Lindsay Davenport, increased her hold on No.
1, while Williams' sister Serena dropped from No. 4 to
No. 6 because she was upset in the third round at the All
England Club. Venus Williams was at No. 1 for a total of
11 weeks in 2002, then was surpassed by Serena, begin-
ning a slow slide down the rankings.
Venus was No. 9 at the end of last season, then dipped
to 13th this spring, and then went all the way down to 16th
after losing in the third round of the French Open to 15-
year-old Sesil Karatantcheva.
She" was seeded 14th at Wimbledon, the lowest ever
for a women's champion. Top-ranked Lindsay Davenport
withdrew from the United States' Fed Cup team
Wednesday for its semifinal matchup against Russia due
to a back injury.
Williams will now lead the U.S team. "It's a little bit
unfortunate," team captain Zina Garrison said. "Lindsay
was playing against Venus in the (Wimbledon) final and
she came over with an injury. There's something wrong
with her back."


...........


. ... ..... .-.......


SEATTLE All-Star


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L ---------- --------------------------------------.1
Al


guard Ray Allen agreed to a
five-year, $85 million con-
tract extension with Seattle
on Tuesday, his agent said.
The contract includes $80
million in salary and $5 mil-
lion in bonuses, although
terms of the bonuses and the
yearly breakdown of salary
hasn't been determined.
The 30-year-old shooting
guard coming off his best
season is worth about $17
million a year.
Allen became a free
agent on July 1, and cannot
sign the deal until the free-
agent signing period begins
on July 22.
His agent, Lon Babby,
said Allen plans to sign the
contract at the first available
'moment. Allen will turn 30
on July 20.
Allen earned about $14
million last season, and
Seattle could have given
him a maximum $97 mil-
lion, -five-year extension.
The two sides tried to nego-
tiate a new deal during the
regular season, and started
talks again after the play-
offs.
"It took a long, long
time, but except for momen-
tary lapses, it was a com-
pletely amicable process,"
Babby said. "I think Ray
comes back to Seattle with a
peace of mind now that he's
seen what is out there and
decided the best place for
him is in Seattle."
Expected to be among
the worst teams in the NBA
last season, Seattle instead
shocked the league, winning
52 games and the Northwest
Division title -- a year after
winning just 37 games.


Player Faces Domestic Battery Charge

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Florida State junior linebacker
Ernie Sims was arrested early Wednesday for allegedly
throwing his girlfriend to the ground.
Sims, 20, was arrested by Tallahassee Police after the
fight with his live-in girlfriend, Brooke McGriff, who
refused to press charges. He was charged with domestic bat-
tery and resisting arrest without violence, both misde-
meanors. The 6-foot, 225-pound Sims was released from jail
after a court appearance before Leon County Judge Donald
S. Mondesitt.
"Our athletic department discipline policy for a misde-
meanor goes into effect with Ernie and he will be subject to
that until I have all the facts," coach Bobby Bowden said in
a statement.





1. What 17-year-old tennis star became the youngest
men's French Open winner ever, in 1989?
2. What new franchise set the major league baseball
attendance record in 1993?
3. What body of water was the setting for the Sodom
and Gomorrah Golfing ,Society's course, the lowest in
the world?
4. What was the first prime-time sports series to hit
the Top 10 ratings since "The Gillette Cavalcade of
Sports" in 1950?
5. What golfer won the first Women's Open?
6. What year saw the Chicago White Sox throw the
World Series?
7. What golfer wears a wide-brimmed black hat with
a stylized shark on it?
8. What major league baseball player collected the
most hits during the 1960s?
9. Who was the first National League player to lead
the league in doubles three straight years?
10. What team won the first two indoor games
played in World Series history?




Sports Challenge Answers

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(c) 2005 DBR Media, Inc.


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EMPLOYMENT

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INU I IULU I -l 0 K.* IJ* 1 U ItlUir WUavr m uNo
The St. Johns River Water Management District (the "District") is initiating a "Request
for Bids Two Step Process," whereby the District will procure through competitive bid-
ding the contract described below. The first step in this process involves the submittal
by prospective respondents of information pertaining to their qualifications to success-
fully perform the work required by this contract. The second step involves the submit-
tal of competitive sealed-bids by qualified respondents who receive an Invitation for Bid
from the District at the conclusion of the first step.
Responses to this Request for Bids Two Step Process will be received by the St.
Johns River Management District, 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 32177, until 5:00
p.m., Wednesday, August 5, 2005 for:
CONTRACT NO. SJ414AA: SEBASTIAN RIVER DREDGING PHASES 1 AND 2
The proposed work involves the removal of approximately 2.0 million cubic yards of
sediments from,the Sebastian River. The sediments removed during the dredging will
be placed in a dredge material containment area (DMCA), which is designed to contain
all sediments dredged from the Sebastian River. Phase 1 will consist of dredging
approximately 1.2 million cubic yards of sediments from the Main Branch of the
Sebastian River. Phase 2 will consist of dredging approximately 0.8 million cubic yards
of sediments located within te remaining section of the Main Branch of the Sebastian
River, the South Prong the Sebastian River, and the C-54 canal.
In accordance with the Public Records Law, Chapter 119.07(6)(m), Fla. Stat. (as
amended), the District's project budgets are a matter of public record. As a cour-
tesy to the interested respondents on this project, this information is being pro-
vided with the Request for Qualifications package. The estimated budget for this
project is $10,000,000 (estimated budget for Phase 1 is $6, 066,990 for the
District's Fiscal Year 2005-2006 and the estimated budget for Phase 2 is
$3,933,010, which will be contingent upon project funding approval of the appro-
priate District fiscal year budget. Respondents are cautioned that these amounts
are estimates only and poses no limitation on the District. In addition, these
amounts are contingent upon Governing Board approval for each fiscal year
budget appropriation.
Request for Bids Two Step Process packages may be obtained by contacting
DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com or by calling (800) 711-1712.
Packages may also be obtained from the District by calling Wendy L. Miller,
CPPB, Contracts Administrator at (386) 329-4118. Firms requesting packages
through the District will be charged copying and shipping/handling costs as stat-
ed at DemandStar by Onvia or as provided for in Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., whichev-
er is less. If hearing impaired please call (386) 329-4450 (TDD).
The District's Governing Board or its designee will appoint a review committee
(Committee) to review the qualification packages. Selected respondents deter-
mined to be the most qualified'will receive an Invitation to bid on the subject proj-
ect. the Committee will endeavor to select a minimum of three (3) Respondents
to receive an Invitation to Bid. The Committee will meet at 10:00 a.m. on August
16, 2005, to develop questions to be used at the oral presentations.
All firms who submit qualifications packages, shall appear before the Committee
beginning at 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, August 17, 2005 and if an additional day
is needed, Thursday,.August 18, 2005. Each Respondent will be allowed 30 min-
utes for oral presentations for oral presentations and to answer questions from
the Committee (presentation 15 minutes and questions/answers 15 minutes).
The appearances are for the purpose of clarifying submitted materials and ensur-
ing that all necessary information has been provided. A lot drawing will determine
the order of appearance before the Committee and each Respondent will be noti-
fied of their day and time for appearance at least 48 business hours after the date
responses are due.
The Committee will meet at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, August 19, 2005, to discuss the
evaluations and rank the firms. However, if appearances are completed on
August 17, 2005, the Committee will meet at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, August 18,
2005, to discuss the evaluations and rank the firms. After evaluations have been
completed, all respondents will be notified in writing of the staff's intended recom-
mendation to the Governing Board at the September 13, 2005 meeting.
If, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate, contact
the above address or either of the above telephone numbers at least five (5) busi-
ness days before the date and time specified.



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