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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
July 2, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00026

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
July 2, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00026

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text













"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


Td~t~lE~


iFLORIDA.


thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


PULY 2,n~6 25JL825. 5N 75CET


Teen Dies From Stabbing;



Foster Sister, Friend Arrested


Reggie Riquay Griffin Latosha Renee Marks
Suspect Suspect


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-
A Missing Person report
was filed on Saturday, June
25 regarding DeShawn
Hutchinson, 15, by his fos-
ter mother even though she
had found a letter from him
stating, "I am not running
away but I have to go out
and do something. Do not
call the police. I will return
home."
Because DeShawn had
not returned, Ms. Drucila
Smith did contact the police.


Ms. Smith later had other
concerns.
Her foster daughter,
Latosha Marks, 14, was
arrested Monday as a mur-
der suspect, along with her
friend, Reggie Riquay
Griffin, 13, who lives in the
neighborhood because of a
body that had been found in
the woods. No one knew
that the victim was
DeShawn.
On Wednesday, the fos-
ter mother received the


DeShawn Hutchinson
Victim
news that the' body that
had been found in a wood-
ed area, near where both
Marks and Griffin lived
was that of her missing fos-
ter son, DeShawn
Hutchinson.
According to records,
police had been led to a
body that had been stabbed
to death by Latosha. Reggie
was present at the scene of
the victim's death and
assisted her in the disposal
of the victim's body, accord-


ing to sources.
The two teens were then
arrested but did not admit at
that time, that the body
found, was DeShawn.
The stabbing death was
really a shock to the resi-
dents of the area since the
foster brother (DeShawn)
and sister (Latosha) often
looked after one another.
Residents of the
Southside housing complex
learned that DeShawn and
Latosha had had a dis-
agreement and, according to
her statement, he had hit her
in the stomach earlier that
day.
However, he was a quiet
boy and it is believed that he
could not imagine that the
punch would lead to retalia-
tion through murder.
Both Marks and Griffin
remain in custody and funds
are being sought for a
memorial service for
DeShawn.


Suspect Arrested In The Murder Of FAMU Student


Dwight Devon Smith
Suspect
Dwight Devon Smith,
26, -roommate of the
deceased FAMU student
from. Jacksonville, 20-year
old Willie James Davis, has
been arrested for Davis'
murder.
On June 19, the body of
20-year-old Willie' James


Davis was discovered in a
retention pond in
Tallahassee. The death was
classified as a homicide but
no suspects were immedi-
ately identified.
Davis died as a result of
one gunshot wound to the
chest, according to the med-
ical examiner.
Investigators believe
that the two were arguing in
their apartment on Fulton
Road in Tallahassee on June
14 when Smith became
angry and shot Davis in the
chest.
A maintenance man at
the complex believes he
heard the gunshot.


News in brief
Pfizer Says Viagra Does Not Cause Blindness

Pfizer Inc. said that a review concluded that Viagra
doesn't increase patients risk of blindness but that it is still
working with federal regulators to update the drug's label to
reflect rare reports of vision loss. Pfizer's chief medical
officer, Joseph Feczko said, "There is no evidence to suggest
a link between Viagra and blindness or other serious ocular
events."

Duval County Health Department
Gets Help From Churches

About 744 men were screened for prostate cancer at 16
area churches last week. "These screenings may be the one
opportunity we get to help save the lives of some men in our
community" said Rev. Tony Hansberry, Pastor of Greater
Grant Memorial A.M.E. Church. With the assistance of
Kappi Alpha Psi and Omega Psi Phi Fraternities, the
International Longshoremen's Association and other organi-
zations, free prostate cancer screenings were provided


Surveillance cameras on
the property observed Smith
.bring a large tarp down from
the apartment, which they
believe contained the body
of the deceased Davis, and
placed the tarp in the trunk
of Davis' car.
Smith then drove to
Airport Drive three days
later and dumped Davis'
body in the retention pond.
He then continued to drive
Davis' car around town and
was also wearing Davis'
jewelry and carrying his cell
phone and ATM card, which
he claims was done with


Davis' permission.
Smith has been
with First Degree
and remains in jail
bail.


charged
Murder
without


Last week, The Florida
Star published the photo-
graph of a Willie James
'Davis but later learned that
they were provided the pic-
ture of another Willie James
Davis who also was 20-
years of age, but was not the
murdered FAMU student.
The Florida Star has not
been provided a picture of
the deceased Willie James
Davis. /


Sunday at several predominantly African American mem-
bership churches.

Getting Grants for College

The Bush administration has had little success in fulfill-
ing a campaign promise to raise Pell Grant awards for low-
income students. The administration recently changed the
formula used to calculate Pell Grant eligibility and as a
result an estimated 81,000 students will lose their opportu-
nity to secure a Pell Grant.

YOU Entertainment Now Led by Clarence Smith

l' Clarence Smith, Co-Founder of
Essence Magazine, is now CEO of YOU
Entertainment who features George
S Benson, Peabo Bryson, Glenn Jones Roy
Ayers and others. The goal is to bring
'"- back quality music that engages people
H emotionally, intellectually and spiritual-
ly," says Clarence Smith.
Smith


Editorial ... ................ A-2
Lifestyle ......... ....... A-3
ClILII-ClI .... .............. A-4
State- ............... -A-6
National ................ -..A-7
Local... ... ......... ... -.13-1
Prop Rap ................ B-3
Jail Or Bail- ..... ...... B-5
Sports ........... ........ -B-6
Business Network-B-7 I


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ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
JACKSONVILLE, FL
PERMIT NO. 3617
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oon fo cusomrs o.atonie3ou
L I


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


.06)


)L.DES-.,L-j JDJ J ),Jj JED i -- I JS?,I -?-E


II


Atlanta Life.

Counting Down

To 100th Anniversary

6

.











Jesse Hill, former president of Atlanta Life; Joseph
Lowery; Xernona Clayton; Henrietta Antoinin, Vice
President of Public Relations for Atlanta Life; Martin
Luther King, III; Mayor Shirley Franklin; former
Governor Roy Barnes; Ron Brown, president of
Atlanta Life Financial Group; and William Clement,
Chairman of the Board of Directors of Atlanta Life
Financial Group.
Atlanta Life, the oldest and largest stock-owned
African American Insurance institution in the United
States marks its 100th years of service to the Atlanta
community, the African American community and the
southern region this year.
This Centennial Celebration will be more than a com-
memoration of 100 years of doing business. It will be a
celebration of Atlanta, a celebration of our ancestors, a
celebration of art, and a celebration of a achievement "
said Henrietta Antoinin, vice president of public rela-
tions of the company. The company now consists of two
operating units: Atlanta Life Insurance Company and
Atlanta Life Investment Advisors.


Graves of Free Blacks
Found on University of Virginia Campus

Archaeologists at the University of Virginia have found
two graves at a campus site, which may contain the remains
of Catherine Kitty Foster and a family member. Foster was
a free black woman who in 1822 bought the two-acre lot
where the graves were found. In the archaeological dig a
cobblestone pathway was found that led to the Foster Home.
Foster was born in the eighteenth century, possibly as a
slave but the 1820 census listed her as a free black head of
household with four children. Foster died in 1863 and her
descendants sold the land to white developers in 1906.

Americans Migrate to Cities in South, West

Skyrocketing housing prices are driving people from
San Francisco, Boston and other big cities. Warm weather
and more affordable living are behind the rapid growth in
midsize cities in Florida, Arizona, Nevada and California.
Census Bureau figures being released Thursday show
no letup in the migration to the South and West, which are
home to all 10 of the fastest-growing cities with at least
100,000 people.
The Phoenix suburb of Gilbert, Ariz., topped the list. The
city grew by more than 46,000 people, or 42 percent, to just
over 156,000 residents in a little over four years.
Next on the list ranked by percentage gain was Miramar,
Fla., followed by North Las Vegas, Nev.; Port St. Lucie,
Fla.; and Roseville, Calif. Rounding out the top 10 were
Hendersoin, Nev.; Chandler, Ariz.; Cape Coral, Fla.; and
Rancho Cucamonga and Irvine, both in California.
Another Florida city, Port St. Lucie, experienced the
largest population growth for a one-year period beginning in
July 2003. It added nearly 13,000 people a 12 percent
jump. Older, industrial cities in the Northeast and Midwest
continued to lose residents. Among them were Detroit,
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and Cleveland.


JUL


IPPY


4T






PA CE A-2


FLORIDA STAR


JULY 2. 2005


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PRELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DeSHAYNE BRYANT, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DANIEL E' NS. DELOREq MINOR WOODS
SALES: RO-ENMR\ THORNTON lND DNIF L E\ AN
GEORGIA BUREAU: (W WRITERS. PHOTOGRAPHER.Sa.LES.)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, C SIE \, ILLIA.M1 %
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER (CON [RIBU T'FOR: DBR MEDI.1, INC.


0," 114) '66-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
'Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glyni Counti .

The Fliorid Si.i Nesp',c"i' i'. 3U.
independent ne'.v.pape[ rulliiled'
,.eekl in lan ckm'. ilIe, Florida

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or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opm,ani h\prs.., columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
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- .ji rl,,l j La 'j,-,j,.r \ ,, ,.,jrii ,
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Publishers Association
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First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
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On the Web:
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.AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN .
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


-M
~ Itq-


Two developments .this
month concerning the impact
of incarceration in American
society-have underscored the
steady, if still far too slow
turning of the wheel away
from Amnericu's foolish
addiction .to :incarceration,
and the great need for more
and faster progress.
In Io6wa, Governor Tom
Vilsack:announced he'll issue
an executive order that will
restore voting rights to all
Iowans who've been convict-
ed of a felony and have com-
pleted their sentences.
"When you've paid your
debt to society, you need to
be re-connected and reen-
gaged to society, the
Governor said June 17. "The
right to vote is the foundation
of our government and serves
as a symbol of opportunity
for our citizens."
The policy, which Gov.
Vilsack said he'll sign. appro-
priately, on July 4, tratns-
forms one .of the nation's
most restricti felony, disen-
franchisement laws, making
an estimated 80,000 ex-;
felons in the state eligible to
vote.
Iowa follows Nebraska
as states which this .year sig-
nificantl.1 chained their\ 0ot-
ing rights policy for ex-
felons. Nebraska repealed its
law imposing a lifetime vot-
ing ban on ex-felons. replac-
ing it with a ta o-,,eai waiting
period after release before
* voting rights are restored.


Thus, both join the move
toward easing restrictions of
state laws throughout the
country which, by continuing
to deprive those convicted of
crimes of their right to vote
once they've been released
from incarceration violates
two fundamental notions of
American 'society: the right
to vote, the basic buildigg-
block of citizenship in a
democracy; and the idea that
once a person convicted of a
crime has served their sen-
tence, they've paid their debt:
to society., .
lo \a's action leaves four
states-Alabania, Kentuck\.
Florida and Virginia-as"'the"
only states in the country'
which bar an. one con icted"
of a felony or aggravated
misdemeanor from ever vot-
ing. Laws in the nation's
other states differ in how and,
-when they allow ex-felons to
Sote again.
This reform effort must
be encouraged. for barring
e.x-felons front noting is';
counter-producti e for both
the individual and the society
as a whole: studies show that
ex-offenders-,who vote are-
.,less' likely to re-commnunit
crimes.
Given the hlgely dispro-
portionate number of
African- and Latino-'
Americans who are incarcer-
ated, there is, not surprising-
ly, a stunning and worrisome
racial element to 'the felony
disenfranchisement issue,


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


TO BE EQUAL
By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League
Ex-Felons and Voting Rights: Democracy Matters


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Nationally, ofthe 4.7 mil-
lion people ineligible to vote
because: of felony convic-
tions, 1.4- million are black
men. In Iowa, where blacks
constitute just two percent of
the total population, blacks
make up 19 percent of ex-
felons who were denied the
right to vote. Similar dispari-
ties can be found in most
states.
The second incarceration-
related development that
occurred recently is equally
important: a study of the job
prospects in New York City
for ex-offenders which found
that white men with prison
records fared far better in
getting job offers than black
men with prison records-and
even than black men who had
never been arrested.
The study, undertaken
earlier this year, used
"testers" who were equipped
with similar resumes and
trained to display to prospec-
.tive employers similar per-
sonalities and interpersonal
skills. The crime used was a
drug offense which had
brought an 18- month prison
sentence. The jobs they pur-
sued ranged across a spec-
trum, including deli clerks,
cashiers, couriers and tele-
marketers.
Yet, according to the
study's authors black men
whose job. applications indi-
cated a prison term were only
one-third as likely as white
men similarly situated to get
positive responses. For every
10 white men without con-
victions who got at least a
callback, 7 white men with
convictions also did.
However, for every 10 black


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men without criminal records
who got callbacks, only 3
with them did.
Martin F. Horn, the New
York City's corrections com-
missioner, and Patricia L.
Gatling, chairwoman of the
city's Commission on Human
Rights, described the report
as a call for action. Ms.
Gatling said her office
intends to work with employ-
ers who've hired ex-offenders
in order to fashion efforts to
eliminate the racial opportu-
nity gap.
These two developments
underscore the imperative
that has led the National
Urban League to plan for a
national commission exam-
ining the successes and chal-
lenges facing black boys and
men. Our commission will be
a five-year effort that will
recommend solutions to the
problems afflicting black
men in numerous areas,
including health, education,
employment, civil rights and
civic engagement.
But a primary area of con-
centration will, of course, be
black males' negative
involvement with the crimi-
nal justice system (while not
ignoring the fact that the neg-
ative involvement of women,
particularly black women,
has become increasingly
more serious as well) and the
extraordinary burden that
imposes on African-
American families and com-
munities.
That burden, and the issue
of felony disenfranchise-
ment, too, is dramatic evi-
dence that we ignore the need
to equip ex-offenders with
two fundamental rights of a
democracy-the vote, and a
job-at their peril, and ours.


".2


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2,


~t~C~4"~






PAGE A-? FLORIDA STAR JULY 2. 2005


Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
"Volunteer Jacksonville's 2005 Blueprint for Leadership
Class Graduates"
Music filled the lobby of The Ritz Theatre & LaVilla
Museum as guests and members of Volunteer Jacksonville's
Blueprint for Leadership 2005 Class gathered for the grad-
uation program. Philanthropist Hugh Jones, speaker for
the occasion inspired the class with vignettes of his own
personal involvement in service to mankind. The thirty-four
individuals who completed fully the required training
began their board internships during the mid-point of the
overall Blueprint training. Utilizing their brand new knowl-
edge of their responsibilities when serving on non-profit
boards, the respective internships will end in December.
Along with the classroom experience of the Blueprint
for Leadership training, there is the expectation to imple-
ment a service project. The 2005 class chose and imple-
mented very successfully the "Makeover Magic" project.
Phase I of the project involved beautifying the Woodland
Acres Boys and Girls Club grounds with plants and green-
ery, preparing the exterior of the building for painting (dur-
ing Phase II and the final portiori of the project), and pro-
viding meaningful activities for the camp participants on
Class Project Day. Being very resourceful, the class sought
and received donations from local home improvement enti-
ties to complete the project.
The 2005 graduates are: Ms. Nila Alejandro Council
of Spanish Speaking Organizations, Inc., Ms. Laurie Allen
-Citi Cards, Paul Arrington Beaver Enterprise Center,
Ms. Eunice Barnum -Retired Teacher, Ms. Benita
Dawson-City of Jacksonville-Community Development
Division, Ms. Yadira Quinones Estrada-State Farm
Insurance Company, Ms. Bobby Evans Riverside
Avondale Development Organization, Ms. Julie Fleurinor
Families First, Ms. Staci Parnes Florencz Volunteer,
Ms. Margaret Jane Ford-Mayo Clinic of Jacksonville,
Ms. Therese Gamble-Jacksonville PAL, Mrs. Christina
and James Chandler Goodell Goodell Group, Inc., Ms.
Rita Hailey-Gateway Community Services, Inc., Ms.
Marva Hilliard-Accenture, Ms. Teresa Hunter- FL Dept.
of Revenue, Michael Jackson-Consultant, Ms. Hillary
Kleinman-SunTrust Bank, Ms. Nancy Knight-Volunteer
Jacksonville, Ms. Anna Marie MacDonald-Habijax,
Brian Murray-Allstate Workplace Division, Ms. Julie
Page University of Phoenix, Ms. D. Renee Pollard-
Consultant, Adekunle Sogbesan Option One Mortgage,
Ms. Stephanie Speights- University of Phoenix, Ms.
Andrea Stanley- Jacksonville Economic Development,
Inc., Don Strickland Citi Cards, Ms. Candace
Thompson- Convergys, Ms. Yolanda Tucker-
Writer/Motivational Speaker, Ms. Gracia 'Gigi' Walker-
Student, Ms. Artrice Weaver-Software Quality
Engineering, Ms. Cherrise Wilks-City of Jacksonville,
Ms. Deborah Williams-State Farm Insurance and Ms.
Robyn Zimmerman-First Choice Marketing.
Participating on'the graduation program along with Mr.
Jones were: Dr. Judy Smith-President/CEO, Volunteer
Jacksonville, Inc.; Blueprint for Leadership Advisory
Committee 2005 Class Representatives Therese Gamble
and Marva Hilliard; Robert Franskousky- President,
Volunteer Jacksonville's Board of Directors; Mari-Esther
Norman-Chairperson, Blueprint for Leadership's Advisory
Committee; 2005 Class member James Chandler Goodell
who was breathtaking as he sang 'The Impossible Dream'
accompanied by his wife/classmate Mrs. Christina Goodell
and the program director. The Blueprint for Leadership
2005 Outstanding Alumni recipients were Henry Johnson
and N. Wyman Winbush. Both honorees have been stead-
fast in their commitment to the Blueprint for Leadership
program as training facilitators and co-chairs of the adviso-
ry committee. The music before during and after the pro-
Sgram created a joyfully melodic evening.
volunteer Jacksonville is Jacksonville's full service vol-
unteer center providing support and assistance to individu-
als interested in volunteering their time to serve their com-
munit\ as well as providing services to support the mission-
'ased organizations in Jacksonville that serve the commu-
litv. Blueprint for Leadership is a volunteer leadership pro-
,ram design to recruit, train and.place community leaders
,n nonprofit boards and other governing or advisory bodies
1 Jacksonville. This columnist serves as the program's
director.
Congratulations to a very deserving alumna and the
305 Class!
Recruitment for the 2005 Blueprint for Leadership Class
bntinues through September 30. For an application visit
:bsie w\vl.\olunteerjacksonville.org or call Volunteer


:kson\ ille at 904 398-7777.

Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
nract us at 904 766-8834 or reach me directly at
qiol 'aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904)
-you in thepaper!.
See you in the paper!


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The Readers of the Black Press
in America are more educated,
make more income[
I and have.
substantial buving power.,



Source: The Media Audit
2004 Black News apers Peadership Report, 'npa org i
'" N a m a smmon a .sislS


OE Cr f 1Hours
(904) 355-7772
Downtown Historic
Springfield


1347 N. Market Street
Jacksonville, Florida
32206


THROUGH OUR EYES 2005 Art Exhibition
RITZ THEATRE & LA VILLA MUSEUM
Summer Programming
Art is Where You Find It! Trash to treasure hands-on art
workshop
Saturday July 16, 10:30 am 12:30 pm
Learn to create art with found or recycled materials with Through
Our Eyes mother and daughter team Billie and Natalie McCray.
Bring your own found and recycled objects or let the artists help
you choose.
Workshop for children and adults. Admission $5. Advance reg-
istration recommended.
Collaborative presentation of Through Our Eyes and
Spoken Word
Thursday June 2, July 7 and August 4, 7-9 pm. "
The First Thursday of every month, the lobby of the Ritz is trans-
formed into a stage for poets and poetry lovers of all ages. Be
inspired by the artwork and show off your own talent for verse,
or just come, listen and soak up the creative atmosphere.
Admission is Free.
For more information on these and other events, please
call Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum at 904-632-5555.
* ADVERTISING DEADLINES: *
* TUESDAYS @ 5 P.M.
a Call: 766-8834
* thefloAidastar. com
**********************************


A L-..
Mow:


FLORIDA STIAR


JULY 2. 2005


PAGE A-3


Ll~f:


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FLORIDA STAR


Victoria FarrieTo Perform

At New Bethel AME Church


The G.W. Bruton
Board Of Ushers of
New Bethel AME
Church, 1231 Tyler
St., present Mrs.
Victoria Farrie of
Titus Harvest Dome
Spectrum in a per-
formance on Sunday, .
July 24, at 5:00 p.m..
Mrs. Farrie is .....'~
releasing her debut "',
album entitled
Majesty featuring the
hit single "Miracles". The public is invited to attend.
Rev. William H. Lamar, IV, Pastor



Ask us about Our


If There had been a death
in your faminiy yehterda.'.
w'hai would you be doing
today?



*9,, s .-


Pre-Need



FORE-

^ THOUGHT


funeral


planning

program,


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED

ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354


Directors


Jacquelinie BartleN


Alphonso West


Making The Right Decisions


Thinking ahead can help you make
informed and thoughtful decisions about.
ftinral arrangements. It allows you to
choose the specific items you want and
need and compare the prices offered by
several funeral pro. ;der- it also spares
your survivors the stress of making these
decic;onz. under the pressure of time and
strong emotions.
You can make arrangements direct-
ly with a funeral establishment or
through a funeral planning or memorial
society a nonprofit organization that
'provides information about funerals and
disposition but doesn't offer funeral serv-
ices. If you choose to. contact such a
Eroup, rec,)griz laji b.-.hile ,.:,me funeral
homes r a:. i include i, '.,or.d sc-. lenr" in
their names, they are not nonprofit
organizations.
(One other important ::'rni,,eraion
when planning a funeral pre-need is
where the remains will be buried,
entombed or scattered. In the short time


henr.eer ilhe dejth and burial of a loved
one, many family members find them-
el'. e. ru' h.-r,, to buy a cemetery plot or
r,. e -. ,:.~hr. without careful thought or
a personal visit to the site. That's why
it's in the family's 'best interest to buy
crr,:ierr, pl..i blef:.re you need them.
.',u mrn,. '.%1.h :,to make decisions
about your arrangements in advance, but
not pay for them in advance. Keep in
mind that over time, prices may go up
and businesses may close or change
ownership. However, in some areas
.with increased competition, prices may
go down over time. It's a good idea to
review and revise your decisions every
,few years, and to make sure your family
is aware of your wishes.


"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.V
STel: 768-0507
wwW.ABColemancom


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-


ANNUAL WOMEN"S CONFERENCE-The community
is invited to attend the Third Annual Women's Conference
on Wednesday, July 6 through Friday, July 8 at First A.M.E.
Church, located at 91 Old Kings Rd. North, Palm Coast, Fla.
The conference, with "One Voice In One Place" as its theme,
is sponsored by the Women's Ministry of First A.M.E.
Church. Registration, breakfast and the workshops such as
"No Weapon Will Prosper" and "Christian Women dealing
With Stress"begin at 8:00 a.m. and conclude at noon.
There is a registration fee for the workshop. Call (386) 437-
5142 for more information. Men are invited to the minisit-
ry's nightly services on the above days beginning at 7:00
p.m. and also a breakfast on Saturday, July 9 at 9:00 a.m. A
speaker will be featured nightly and during the breakfast.
Rev. Gillard S. Glover, Pastor.
VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL-Children throughout the
community are invited to attend the Spotlight On Jesus
Vacation Bible School at New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 1231
Tyler St. July 25-July 30 from 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. The
theme is "I Am The Light Of The World" taken from John
8:12. For more information call (904) 353-1822. Rev.
William H. Lamar, IV, Pastor.'
CHAMBER MUSIC SECOND SEASON-The Chamber
Music Society of Good Shepherd's second season of free
concerts includes performances at 6:00 p.m. on Saturday,
July 17, Sunday. August 21, and Sunday, September 18, all
in Craig Hall. Church of The Good Shepherd is located at
Park and Stockton Streets. ; Henson Markham. Artistic
Director. David Bowen, MM., Organist-choirmaster. Rev.
James W. Harris, Jr., Rector.

Phone Home It's Me God!


My little children, let us not love in w ord. neither in
tongue; but in deed and in truth." 1 John 3:18
Words in and of themselves mean nothing. It is easy
for someone to say, "I love you." That doesn't mean it's
true.
Love is something that must be sho\nii, and not just
with hugs or kisses. Love means putting, the other per-
son above yourself, niaking sacrifices, doing what is
necessary to make that person safe and happy and
secure.
There are those \\ho show "love" with their fists.
This is not love. Love is kindness, consideration, true
giving of oneself.,
Before you tell someone you love him or her, be. sure
youl can follow\ this up with deeds that really show it..
There is where the proof lies.

(c) 2005 DBR Media, Inc.



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The Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us" "

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


I..,


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


WWORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m,
Church School 8:45 a.m.
.Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sihai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School.............. 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
S(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundas :
Fellowship Hall ,10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Pra. e r 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service................ 6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

URGENT HELP NEEDED

FOR A KIDNEY
TRANSPLANT!
for Samuel W. Smith
PLEASE GIVE!
(904) 765-9773










Evangel

Temple


Scrmon Sunday
July 3rd
8:25 a-rn. & I 0:45 a.m.
"America. at he Crossbroads"
6;00 p.m.
Special I dealing Service

N'ov Is the 'irtlc- For O()l
Nation lo Call LiUpon the Lor'd.


Deborah West


_1 II L Il


JULY2, 2005


PAGE A-4


^^ *


~








JTJIV2 'F D A-


Fly the Flag Proudly and Properly on Independence Day

(FeatureSource) With the Fourth of
July quickly approaching, here are some
tips to ensure that you fly the flag proud-
ly and properly.
1. The U.S. flag may be displayed 24
hours a day if properly illuminated dur-
ing hours of darkness. Always hoist the
U.S. flag briskly. Lower it ceremonious-

2. When flown at half staff: the U.S.fl
flag should be first hoisted to the peak
for a moment and then lowered to the
half staff position. The flag should be
again raised to the peak before it is lowered for the day.
3. It is generally not desirable to fly the flag outdoors .%\ hen the w\veather is partic-
ularly inclement because exposure to severe winds and rain ma) damage the flag or
the pole on which it is displayed.
4. The U.S. flag should never be displayed with the union down except as a sig-
nal of distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.
5. The U.S. flag .should never touch anything beneath it--ground, floor, water or
merchandise.
6. TheU.S. flag should never be carried horizontallN, but it should always be aloft
and free.
7. Always allow the U.S. flag to fall free--never use the U.S. flag as wearing
apparel, bedding or drapery, festooned, decoration in general, use blue, white, and
red bunting. Always arrange the bunting with blue above, the white in the middle,
and the red below.
8. The U.S. flag should never be fastened, displayed, used or stored in a manner
which will permit it to be easily torn, soiled or damaged in any way.
9. Never use the U.S. flag as a covering or drape for a ceiling.
10. When the U.S. flag is in such condition that is no longer a fitting emblem for
display, it should be destroyed in a dignified ay,. preferable by burning, privately.


Fireworks Look Good

But...

Protect Your Eyesight This
Fourth of July
DuNt' tilhe inonlis ol Juite aind Julv, we would like io
remind ou iaboul the importance of firework safely.
Accoindmg i n the I.aesl sl.ilisics from Ihe U S. Consumer
PIodutu Saleil Coilnil3.-slori ICPSCL). irewLmi...
accounted ior approxim.miel' 9 1110 inuries il 21111. 2 .lh
ii'al\v 14".. o0 those e e itelied These hgures do' not
Ia],e iiO 11110 ouni those who wt re left lunll itv. 'id,
inlull',, llIJI oc0 r ,OCCu 1110 t1 ]l\ o hi l c ildren .i]lld
1bvantlrrs in Ihe hacklyards of Anierio,t

What h [he best option ihis roirilh oi luly.' Check lo.Ical
e\eli! t.leidlr Inr lict Ir ine\p llrii' e hilk o l- di.pl,i', '
betimg olelied it area ails ,r tle.siv3l-. Mainv ilme, ht-.s
shows are proies.ii.]lll\ designed arind nlinnill i-hei
ri>k ior potential ;eenous injuries; .
To help you celebirae L alelv this Fourih ol ,luly, the
Cionullier Produt ':, alely Lommissiloll iid ihe N.illonil
Council on Firetork S.ilelv ofier [the f'nllowing
sa.ilev rips
Alvwa\v' read and follow label direuIons.
Haje an Jdull present.
Always lha.le witer handy Ia garden liose and a.
bucke l.
Never re-light a 'dud" lirework (i all I.o' tI
20 ninlules and theit soak i11 i a huti el i01 iVwalll
Never give fireworks 1to mll children
, Neve lihrow 1.1 pointl firew,'rk .II other people
Never' school lirewlolkn in Imeli or glass coillaners..


WHAT TOOK YOU A 1CIFETIME
TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.






WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.

Learn the warnmin. signs at
StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE.
ATm-'ri nt..rokc
AMA.. M Wt- !I,,ic r-cr v ~ y~It ma -**jj"w &


No Money For College is Biggest Obstacle for Black Students

Colorado Springs, Colo. A new poll of 1,264 youths between the ages of 8 and
18 shows that nearly nine-in-ten (89%) African-American youths plan to go to col-
lege, more than young Whites (79%) or Hispanics (77%).
However, a larger percentage of African-American youths (63%) said "having
enough money" is the greatest challenge to attending college compared to White
(55%) and Hispanics (59%). Harris Interactive conducted the poll in April 2005 for
JA Worldwide (Junior Achievement) and the Diversity Pipeline Alliance (DPA).
The 2005 survey findings are consistent with other DPA research confirming the
aspirations of today's African American youth.
"This survey underscores the strong value that African Americans place on
attaining a college education", says Karen Johns, Executive Director of the Diversity
Pipeline Alliance, "yet the sad reality ,is that most of these students will not realize
their dream of attaining a college degree. We need to provide stronger college
preparation programs to ensure that these young people are fully prepared academ-
ically and receive sufficient financial resources so that.they can attend'college."
As for college majors, African Americans indicate a higher interest in both"pre-
med/biological sciences" and "business/management/accounting" than their White
or Hispanic peers.
In fact, nearly one-in-four (23'.:.) African-Americans youths selected "pre-
med/biological sciences" as their first choice compared to 9 percent of Whites and
11 percent of Hispanics and more than twice as many African Americans (13%) and
Hispanics (11%) choose business compared to Whites (5%).
The third choice of a major by African-American respondents at 11 percent was
"engineering/computer science" which is lower than Whites (13%) and Hispanics
(12%).
The Diversity Pipeline Alliance and the Graduate Management Admission
Council (G IACR) are sponsors of the online JA Education Center located within
the JA Student Center.
The JA Education Center is designed to help students research the many colleges
available to them as \\ell as give them the tools and information to make sound
choices about college. For more information, visit the JA Education Center in the
JA Student Center at www.ja.org ; .





Thank you for reading

THE FLORIDA STAR!

To subscribe

or to advertise

call 904/766-8834


IMPACT


WCGL AM 1360

THE FLORIDA

STAR

REAL TALK

REAL TOPICS

SATURDAY @ 6:30

P.M.




Issues That Address

Concerns Of The

African American

Community In Jacksonville

AndThe World


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
Compelii,.e sealed proprisals will be receded t.y ithe St. Johns River
Water Managenment DiSri :t at 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 32177,
until 2:00 p.m., Friday, July 29. 2005, and publicly opened at that time for:
PROPOSAL NO. SJ409RA
WATER QUALITY SAMPLING AND PLANKTON SAMPLING IN THE
UPPER OCKLAWAHA RIVER BASIN
The Governing Board of the District is inviting sealed Proposals for col-
lection of water quality and plankton samples within the Upper
O.:Plawara River Basin iUCRB i whi'hh will include 65 sites. The estimat-
ed budget for the first term of this project is $150,000. The contract may
be renewed for two (2). additional one (1) year terms contingent upon
Governing Board approval.
A NON-MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE IS SCHED-
ULED FOR 10:00 A.M., THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005
LOCATION: BLUE HOUSE AT SUNNYHILL FARMS
19561 SE Highway 42, Umatilla, Florida 32784-7814
(Directions are included in the Request for Proposal package.)
The pre-proposal conference is intended to provide Proposers the oppor-
lunily to receive clarification of any requirement of this Request For
,Proposal.,
Proposal packages may be obtained on or after July 1, 2005, by contact-
ing DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com star.com/> or by calling (800) 711-1712. Proposal packages may also be
obtained from the District by calling Wendy L. Miller, CPPB, Sr. Contracts
Administrator, at (386) 329-4118.' Proposers (hereafter "Respondent(s)")
requesting packages through the District will be charged copying and
shipping/handling costs as stated at DemandStar by Onvia or as provid-
ed for in Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., whichever is less.
Proposal packages will also be available 31 the Non-Mandalory pre-pro-
posal conference. Attendees may purchase these packages at that time.
for the cost as stated at DemandStar by Onvia. The District requests that
those interested in purchasing a package at the pre-proposal meeting
nave a company or cashier's check, made payable to the St. Johns River
Water Management Districi or, if paying with cash, have the exact
amoun-.
Propbsals received after the day and time stated will not be considered
and will be returned to the Respondent unopened.
Proposals will be evaluated by a staff evaluation committee The evalu-
ation committee will meet at District Headquarters at 10:00 a.m., August
11, 2005, to discuss the evaluations and rank the firms. Following the
evaluation process, contract negotiations may commence with the
.Respondent submitting the proposal most beneficial to the District. After
evaluations and/or negotiations have been completed all respondents will
be notified in writing of the staffs intended recommendation to the
Governing Board at the September 13, 2005 meeting.

if, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate in
any actiir) relating to this Request for Proposals, please contact Wendy
Miller at the above address or telephone number or, if hearing impaired,
by calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5) business days before
the dates and times specified herein.

The District reserves the right to reject any and all Proposals. The District
also reserves the right to waive any minor deviations in an otherwise valid
Proposal, and to accept the proposal that will be in the best interest of the
District.


National

Fireworks

Safety

Month





FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-5


JULY 2 2005






FlAUE A-0A L 1.'YflD LA STAR


Bee Aware! African


Honeybees Becoming


Established In Florida


JULY2, 2005


B-CC Alumni Sparked


By Dr. Reed's Vision


"Copyrighted Material

p Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"




... .. ...... ... .. ..... .
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GAINESVILLE, Fla.---
African honeybees -- also
known as killer bees -- have
entered Florida, and a
University of Florida
researcher says the aggres-
sive insects may eventually
spread throughout the state
and move into other areas of
the southeastern United
States.
. The bees, which tend to
sting in large numbers, have
been found and stopped at
various Florida ports over
the past decade, but now it
lboks like they're here to
stay, said Glenn Hall, an
associate professor of ento-
mology at UF's Institute of
Food and Agricultural
Sciences.
- He said Florida's warm
climate is ideal for the bees,
'which could be bad news for
ihe state's $16 million hon-
eybee industry.
"If African honeybees
become established in large


numbers over the next few
years, they will affect the
beekeeping industry and the
pollination of many crops,"
Hall said. "Public safety,
recreation and tourism may
also be affected, leading to
liability problems."
Hall, a bee geneticist
who developed DNA mark-
ers to identify African hon-
eybees, said that -- to the
untrained eye -- they look
the same as resident
European honeybees.
African bees more
aggressively defend their
nests than European bees.
African bees may swarm as
many as 16 times a. year
while European bees swarm
about three times a year, he
said.
The African bees invad-
ed five southwestern states
in the 1990s and have peri-
odically turned up at
Florida's deep-sea ports


since 1987, Hall said.
Until recently, swarms
entering through ports such
as Jacksonville, Miaini and
Tampa have been success-
fully captured in bait hives
maintained by the Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services.
He said the infestation
around Tampa is still small,
and the bees are not unusual-
ly aggressive.
As isolated swarms enter
one by one through the
ports, daughter African
queens from the swarms
have no choice but to mate
with the resident European
male drones.
Fortunately, the hybrid
offspring are not as aggres-
sive as their African parents.
He said that the arrival of
African bees is not unex-
pected and should not be
viewed with undue alarm at
this time.


Results of Statewide Sex Offender/Predator Sweep


TALLAHASSEE -
Governor Jeb Bush and
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement Commissioner
Quy Tunnell announced pre-
liminary results of a month
long statewide effort to
19cate, and where appropri-
ate, arrest individuals who
have absconded from
Florida's sexual offender
and predator registry.


The Sexual Offender
Apprehension Program
(SOAP) resulted in the loca-
tion of 537 absconders. Of
these absconders, 203 were
arrested and 334 were veri-
fied as deceased, deported,
incarcerated, determined to
be no longer living in
Florida, or located and regis-
tered in accordance with the
law. In addition, addresses


were verified for another
739 sexual predators and
offenders -and 40 arrests
were made on other charges.
The mission of the oper-
ation focused on locating
absconded sexual offenders
and predators, arresting
those who were non-compli-
ant, and verifying the where-
abouts of many others.


Bethune-Cookman College President Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed addressed alumni dur-
ing the 3th annual National Alumni Association convention in Tampa, Fla.


TAMPA, Fla. Hoping
to forge a stronger relation-
ship with alumni of
Bethune-Cookman
College, College President
Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed
addressed the 37th annual
National Alumni
Association convention
here June 17th to share her
plans and vision for the
historic institution.
Dr. Reed's message
resounded many of the
over 100 alumni in atten-
dance. One attendee, Deb
Threet of Atlanta, Ga.,
called the experience a
"life changing event."
"Not only does Dr.
Reed have a vision, but it


is a vision that gives the
alumni 'real' ownership and
self-empowerment," said
Deb Threet. "Her vision is
not what SHE is going to do
for B-CC, but what WE are
going to do together"
"Dr. Reed did a mar-'
velous job of addressing the
alumni," said John Douglas
of Brandon. "It was the per-
fect opportunity for her to
develop a relationship of
trust with the alumni.
There's no doubt that B-CC
will go a long way under her
leadership. She knows how
to get to job done."
During her address, Dr.
Reed touched' upon many
major concerns, including


SACS accreditation,
College staffing, and the
ambitious $13 million gifts
initiative for a training cen-
ter for the Wildcat football
team.
"We really need to
mobilize all the alumni and
make this happen," said
Robert DeLancey of Port
St. Lucie.
"We can not turn our
backs on Bethune-
Cookman ... the more peo-
ple. become involved, the
sooner a change for the
good will come," said
Marilyn Jordan of DeLand.
"Dr. Reed is an awesome
leader and we must get on
board."


"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted




The Victory is in the Word & Music



Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.
Topic For July 2, 2005:
Are your children bi-lingual? The People's
Advocate speaks with "Dr. Spoon"
who had developed instructional Spanish and
French DVD's for children as young
as three months.



6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW WCGL1360. COM
____________(______^ __


rr n oIrA STAd


PAiV A y








JUN 25. 200 FL D STAR PAG A-7


Little Rock Desegregation Coin Okayed By House


WASHINGTON--The House, by voice vote, authorized to civil rights.
the U.S. Treasury to mint commemorative $1 coins in 2007 The Congressional Budget Office estimated the $10 sur-
to mark the 50th anniversary of desegregation at Little Rock charge on coin sales could raise as. much as $5 million for
Central High School, a half-century after nine black students historic preser\ ation and educational programs at the Little
became the first admitted to the high school under escort by. Rock Central High School National Historic Site, adminis-
U.S. Army troops. tered by the National Park Service. The budget office said
"The 1957 crisis in Little Rock, brought about by the recent commemorative coin sales suggest it would probably
desegregation of Little Rock Central High School, was a collect about $1.5 million:
huge part of the march toward freedom and opportuinitN in Integration at the Arkansas high school in 1957 was the
America," said bill sponsor Rep. Vic Snyder (news, bio, \ot- first major test of the Supreme Court's ruling, three years
ing record), D-Ark. earlier, against racial discrimination in public schools. The
The Senate has not yet considered the bill. landmark ci\ il rights case, Brown v. Board of Education of
The 1 1/2-inch silver coins would have a design corn- -Topeka, Kan.. called such segregation unconstitutional.
memorating the school's desegregation and its contribution


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STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTAi IN CIRCUIT COURT
ss
COURT OF MINNEHAHAj SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
*...*... ............................... ........................................
In the Matter of the Termination
of Parental Rights Over AMENDED
J K R G ORDER AND NOTICE
a minor child


To Ashely Jay son Smith or Whom IIt May Concern,

You are hereby notified that a hearing will be held' before the above
named Court The Honorable Judge Stuart L Tiede presiding in the
Courtroom of the Minnehara County Courthouse in the City of Sioux
Falls, South Dakota, on the 25th day of July 2005, at the hour of 2-00 PM
of said day when the Court will hear and determine the above entitled
matter upon a certain Petition filed ih this Court praying that all parental
rights over said child be terminated for the reasons set forth in said
Petition, which Petition was filed wilh the Clerk of the above named Court
at Sioux Fails South Dakota, on May 18, 2005.

You will please take further notice that the termination of parental
rights is a possible remedy under these proceedings.

WITNESSthe hand and seal bf said Cburt'this 21st day bf June,
2005

S. BTHE COURT:
S Second Judicial Circuit Court Judge

ATTEST:
Charles M Fechner ', '
Clerk of courts %


* S a.
______ S -
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A MINORITYAIDS COALITION
OF JACKSONVILLE, INC.
SP., Presernts the


Riverside

Welcome Center







Services for MSMs/I

* Testing Support groups
* Counseling HIVIAIDS Education
* Risk Reduction Sessions Referral Sources


For additional information....
Services Location Welcome Center
330 W. State Street 915 Kings Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202 Jacksonville, FL 32204-4205
Tel: 904-35-6571 Tel: 9( t-387-0091
Hours: 8:0(a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Hours; 4:00 p.m. to'10:00 p m


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JUNE 2, 200


FLORIDA STAR


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PAGLEA-S A


T nrnR A STAR


JULY2. 2005


RIZE: Triumphant World Premiere!
by Rych McCain
All Photos 2005 Andre' B. Murray/A Bern Agency Photo
Liongate Films held the World Premiere of their new documentary RIZE, June 21, 2005 at the Egyptian
Theater in Hollywood. Only my editors know the "personal inside," story of Andre' and myself bringing this
integral, historical event to you. I say "historic" because the new phenomenon called "Krumping," which was
born out of the black experience of pain and degradation in deep South Central Los Angeles, is the next wave,
from an on-going continuous ocean of black artistic creativeness that will sweep the entire world!
This premiere brings attention not only to the film but also to Tommy the Clown and the masses of young
people who were inspired by him and took up his style of dance and self-expression. Strolling that illustrious
carpet were super stars Pamela Anderson, Christina Aguilera, Gene Simmons, Billy Dee Williams, Katie
Lohmann, Debbie Allen, Cluadia Jordan, Tommy The Clown, Larry The Clown, Lil C, Miss Prissy aka Phoenix,
Tight Eyes, Dragon, Lil Tommy, Lil Momma, Red Ronin Music i.e., Richmond, Fly and Tone, (Richmond and
Tone were also producers of the film), a host of Krump dancers, The director David LaChapelle and other
celebrities. This film comes highly recommended so go check it out!
...1 .......... ....


lCopyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


TAMA BRQADCASTP4NGINC.

R~w~d9RJ5FM

















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Rejoicel 92.5 FM
MUSICAL SOUL FOOD is...
- Contemporary Gospel 95sO0 qwv
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Inspiring and uplifting features. Jackonfle, FL 32225
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Listen live at www.rejoice925.com


Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
RU THE GIRL with T-Boz & Chilli premiers
Wed., July 2nd at 8 p.m. on UPN. This is a dra-
mality TV search for the new third member of
TLC. Next week we will feature the highlights of
the 2005 BET Awards. As always, the pre-BET
Awards parties are in full swing. Whereas, Andre'
and I will cover the action, it won't be necessary
to feature them because the basic same heads and
mugshots will be at them all. Two of the main pre-
ceremony parties will be at the Highlands Club in
Hollywood, hosted by FREE from BET's 106
Park. The other is Lil Zane's live performance
and shindig at Club Aura, also in "H" wood.
A new hip-hop rap trio called MIC CHECK
have an album dropping' July 19th on Ex Records.
The three 17 year olds hail from South Central
LA and yes they can "krump!" You computer
nerds can check their new video out right now on
line at www.exrecords.com. DJ VLAD will be
dropping' his new.DVD "Hot In Here."
REBOUND (20th Century Fox) starring
Martin Lawrence, Wendy Raquel Robinson,
Breckin Meyer, Horatio Sanz and Megan
Mullally. Oren Williams who plays Keith Ellis,
the ball hogging, hot shot, gunning team member
happens to be one of my special Hollywood chil-
dren actors from my brood of Rych's hand picked
black child actors. I'll be featuring him separate-
ly.
This movie is very predictable. You know from
Jump Street that this group of clumsy, nitwit mis-
fits with no athletic get-up-and-go will be
whipped into shape and go on the win the State
titled. How it is done carries no surprises as well.
Lawrence is more serious and subdued in this
movie. It's not the sidesplitting antics that made
Lawrence's fame and rep in comedy. Many of
Lawrence's fans may be disappointed with this
one.
Rych
Maat-Hotep!


Eats flies. Dates a pig.

.Hollywood star.


Pass It On.

THE FOUNDATION FOR A BETTER LIFE
www. forbetterlife. org
t- *(* ^ f.


I 'I -- I ~-P-~C--~ICL---- --I~-~


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, ----


JUL V2Y 2 20


"COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS
Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.


LEARNING CENTER ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TION-The Brewer Learning Center, 1095 Philip A.
Randolph Blhd. is now, accepting applications for ages
6 w eeks-3 ,,ears-old VoluntarN Pre-Kindergarten).
The programs and hours of operation on Monday
through Friday are The Learning Day-8:30 a.m.-3:0()
p.m. and Extended Da\-6:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m. and 3:00
p.m.-6:30 p.m.. For more information call 904.,630-
1268 or stop b, the Brew\er Learning Center between
the hours of 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Monday through
FridaN.
AUlDITIONS-Stage Aurora Theatrical Company. Inc.
in association with the Jackson\ille Chapter of The
Links. Inc. %\ill host auditions for the off-Broadwa\
Gospel lMusical Crow ns b\ Regina Tay lor. Auditions
will be held on Saturday. Jul\ 9 from 1-00 p.m.-6:00
p.m. in the FCC.I North Campus Ezekial Bryant Audito
rium located at 4501 Capper Rd. Six \\omen and one
man who are pow erful gospel singers are needed for
roles in the production. For more information contact
Stage Aurora Theatrical Company at (904- 765-7373.
AMERICAN LEGION. POST 197 EVENTS-
American Legion, Post 197. located at 2179 Benedict
Rd.. will honor Du al teachers during "Teachers
Night" on Frida\. JuI\ 17 at 9:0(0 p.m.. The event is
being held in recognition of the outstanding serx ices
and dedication of teachers in Du\al County. On July 7.
Larr Douglas takai Georgia Boy \\ill present his pro-
duction from 8:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m. The production will
continue until further notice each Sunday thereafter.
TALENT SHOW APPLICATIONS-The
Jackson\ ille Housin A-uthorit, is accepting applica-
tions for the 14th Atmual talent Show Competition and
Pageant for public housing and Section 8 \outh. The
show \\ill be held at the Florida Times Linion
Performing Arts Center. For more information call
366-6096.
MAD DADS FUNDRAISING BANQUET-The
.. I AD D A D S
Jacksonville Chapter.
Inc. will host its Second
Annual Fundraising
Banquet on August 12 at
*' "A .the Jackson\ille
Landing. The
Honorable Dr. Wade F.
Horn, Assistant
Secretary of Children
and Families. U.S.
Department of health
and Human Services, is

Dr. Wade F. Horn banquet was established
for the purpose of honor-
ing comnuunity residents that have committed them-
selves to improving communities within the city of
Jackson\ ille. Ticket donations are $60. For partner-
ship levels and ad donations information contact Tonva
Jackson or Elder Bruce Jones (904) 388-8171.


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON

Hot!

Timely!

Efficacious!


North Florida's Best
Daily Talk Show!


AM 1530
WEEKDAYS

2-6 P.M.

CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR htt.://www.downtobusiness.org/


Bell-Davis Appointed




Assistant Vice President


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-- Dr. Oswald P. Bronson, Sr.,
14 president of Edward
Waters College, announced
on last Friday, the appoint-
ment of Phyllis Bell-Davis
as Assistant Vice President,
of the Division of
Institutional Advancement.
Mrs. Bell-Davis also
series as the Director of
Communications and
Y. Marketing.
,a CNIrs. Bell-Davis has
Worked in the college's
Is t Institutional Advancement
Phylls Bell-Davis office since September
2002 where she was originally hired as Director of
Institutional Effectiveness. She was also employed with the
College in 1987-91 as Mass Communications Instructor and
Program Coordinator. Because of her outstanding teaching
in journalism, she was a Fellow for the prestigious Poynter
Institute in St. Petersburg, FL.


Mrs. Bell-Davis graduated Magna Cum Laude in 1980
from Lane College, Jackson, TN, with a degree in
Communications and was the recipient of the Dean's Award
given to the graduate with the highest GPA.
Mrs. Bell-Davis has worked extensively in the media for
over 15 years as a reporter and news editor, and worked in
Institutional Advancement at Savannah State University as
assistant to the Executive Director of Development, and as
the Public Relations liaison and office manager.
Mrs. Bell-Davis is Vice President and Cultural Arts
Chairperson for the Paxon School of Advanced Studies
PTSA and serves as the Cultural Arts Chairperson for the
Duval County Council of PTAs/PTSAs. For her commitment
to the PTA and to education, she received an Honorary
Lifetime Membership in the Florida PTA. Mrs. Bell-Davis
serves on the board of the American Lung Association of
Florida, Inc., North Area, and is a volunteer with the Ritz
Theatre and LaVilla Museum.
Mrs. Bell-Davis, a member of Cherry Street Church of
Christ, is married to Harold E. Davis, EWC class of 1989
and they have one son, Harold, a senior in the International
Baccalaureate Diploma Program at Paxon.


Couple Exchanges Wedding Vows In St. Maarten


Anita Neal Favors of
Tallahassee, Fla. and Larry
Allen Thompson of
Jacksonville, Fla. exchanged
wedding vows on June 4,
2005 in a ceremony .at fie


DEATH

NOTICES
AIKNS-Roland Sr., died June 24,
2005,
BOLDES-Vivian. died June 23,
2005.
BOLTON-Otto, died June 23.2005.
BRITTON-Leonard, died June 20,
2005.
BUSH-Lovell, died June 22,2005.
DICK-Billy, died June 26,2005.
GENTRY-Baby Aidan James, died
June 22,2005,
FOSTER-Gladys, died June 24,
2005.
FUGATE-Brian, 28, died June 17.
2005. A. B. Coleman Mortuary. Inc.
GRANT-Heath Jr., 71, died June
24,2005
GREEN-Henry. died June 22,2005.
GOLSON-William Sr., died June
262005.
HAMILTON-Master Brodie, died
June 21,2005s.
HANSBERRY-Letha, died June
23,2005.
HINES-Wilie, died June 23.2005.,
JENKINS-Moses, died June 23,
2005,
JENNINGS-Nettie, died June 21,
2005,.
JOHNSON-Delialha C, died June
22,2005,
JOHNSON-James, 39, died June
19,2005. Alphpnso West Mortuary.,
Inc
JONES-Jack. 71, died June 23,
2005, A. B. Coleman Mortuary, Inc
JONES-James E., 77, died June 21,
2005,
KETTERLING-Floyd, 72, died
June i15, 2005.
MARTIN-Vgie, 92, died June 24,
2005.
MILIAN-Hoctor, died June 26,
2005,
MIMS-Nesbie, Sr., 69, died June
14,2005,
MORRISSETTE-Ruby, died June
23,2005,
MURPHY-Lucille, died June 24,
2005. Alphbnso West Mortuary, Inc.
PUGH-Baby Girl Angel, died
June 21,2005,
ROBINSON-Patrica, died June 21,
2005,
SANDERS-Janorius, died June 21,
2005,
SMALLS-Markel, died June 23,
2005, Jr,, 70, died June 21,2005,
STEPHENS-David, died June 24,
2005,
WADE-Btlly, 57, died June 23,
2005, A, B, Coleman Mrtuaty, In
-4


Sonesta Maho Resort Hotel,
in St. Maarten, Netherlands
Antilles.
Jocelyn Favors, daughter
of the bride, served as maid
of honor and Brandon
Thompson, son of the
groom, was best man.
The bride was escorted
and given away by the
bride's oldest son, Wayman
Favors, Jr.
The tropical colors of
lavender and apricot provid-
ed the setting for the ocean-I
side ceremony. Guests
retreated to a reception/din-
ner.dance to toast and cele-
brate with the newly married
couple.
Ms. Favors Thompson is
the daughter of Abraham
(deceased) and Barbara Neal


f- ...
' _. 4t


Mr. and Mrs. Larry Allen Thompson


of Kansas City, Kansas and
Mr. Thompson is the son of
William (deceased) and
Marion. Thompson of
Cincinnati, Ohio.
The bride is city manag-


er of Tallahassee, Fla. and
the groom is an educator at
Pinedale Elementary School
in Jacksonville, Fla. The
couple will reside in
Tallahassee.


Roslyn Mixon Phillips

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-
- Mayor John Peyton has
appointed Roslyn Mixon
Phillips as the City of
Jacksonville's Deputy Chief
Administrative Officer.
Ms. Phillips' appoint-
ment was effective Monday,
June 27.
Phillips will retain her
duties as Director of the
Neighborhoods Department
in addition to her new
responsibilities. "In these
times of lean budgets, it is
particularly gratifying to be
able to fill this important job
from within government.
Phillips is a proven pro-
fessional with skills and
experience across govern-
ment. I welcome h& to my


executive team and have
every confidence in her abil-
ities," said Peyton.
Phillips joined the City
of Jacksonville in 1984 as a
staff member in the
Downtown Development
Authority and has served as
Chief of the Community
Development Division and
as Director of Business
Development in the
Jacksonville Economic
Development Commission.
She was appointed by
Mayor Peyton in August,
2003 as director of the
Neighborhoods Department.
Phillips will work directly


with Chief Administrative
Officer Dan Kleman.
"I look forward to work-
ing with Roz and benefiting
from her extensive knowl-
edge of Jacksonville's gov-
ernment.
She has proven herself to
be a fine administrator and
she will be a very positive
addition," said Kleman. Ms.
Phillips is a native of
Jacksonville and received
her undergraduate degree in
accounting from Florida
State University and an
MBA from Jacksonville
University.


THANKS FOR SUPPORTING
THE FLORIDA STAR!
CONTACT US AT 904) 766-8834



,Cha p r. .



C WE DELIVER ) Monday-Sunday
SJ 11:00am-until
1347 N. Market Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
(904) 355-7772
DINE.N // TAKE-OUT


Phillips Named City's Deputy Chief Administrative Officer


PAGE B-1


FLORIDA STAR


I







PAGE B-2 ..


--


-- "Copyrighted Material



- Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers"


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FLORIDA STAR


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Miss Teen Christian Pageant


Showcases Talent And Grace


fl


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'4 .

i ,


From left are LaTonya Taylor; Keshonda Green, and Lashawnda Sade' Casper. (PHOTO BY TIM JENKINS)


By Miarsha Dean Phellts

After an evening of
showcasing talent, grace
and intellect in a Christian
Paueant Lasha\\nda Sade
Casper \\as cro\\ned NlMiss
Teen Christian 2005.
The 5th Annual Nliss
Teen Christian Pageant
\as held in the auditorium
of the Ritz Theatre &
LaVilla Museum. First
Missionary Baptist
Church. Re,. Dr. Marvanin
A. McQueen. Pastor and
Sister Kath\ McQueen.
sponsored the pageant as a
means of supporting teens
\\ho follow \ and keep
Christian principals amid
the challenges of a secular
world
Lasha\xnda a.k.a. Sade


Casper is the multiple tal-
ented daughter of Don and
Sharon Casper. Sade
earned the title of Miss Jr.
Teen Jackson,. ille in 2004.
This past school term
she \\as a member of the
National Jr. Honor Society
at the LaVilla School of
the Arts and in the fall will
be a freshman at Stanton
College Preparatory
School.
In the 2004 Nliss Jr.
Teen and the 2005 Miss
Teen Christian Pageant
her peers voted her Miss
Congeniality.
This gifted youngg lad\
sings in the Youth and
Young Adult Choirs at
Zion Home Nissionary
Baptist Church.
She is also a dramatic


performer of poetry and
has recited poetr. and
danced on First Coast
stages from The Times-
Union Center to Amelia
Island.
As a modern, tap. bal-
let and jazz dancer she has
appeared in half-time
shows at Alltel Stadium
for the Jackson% ille
Jaguars.
Sade received numer-
ous standing orations
throughout her pageant
presentations including
one for her response to the
Question and A-\ nsI\ er
Forum \ here she \\as
asked to express her \ lew s
on the United State's
iniolhement in the \\ar in
Iraq.
Sade's ambition is to


become a pediatrician.
Her first and foremost
goal is to follow \ and
fulfill the \ ord of God.
and to spread the
gospel
Cnrstal Harrir the
Miss Teen Christian of
2004 cro\ ned Sade
Casper SarurdaN night.
The pageant's first
runner-up \\ as
Keshonda Trekenia
Green the talented
daughter of Wallace
and Patricia Green.
Keshonda is the
president of the dance
team of the Higher
Ground C O.G.IC and a
member of the choir.
She is also an honor

(See "Pageant". 8-3.1)





"A'






Page B-3A/July 2, 2005


Teens

(Continued From Cover)


will and can accomplish
any task.
Pageant organizers,
participants and parents
worked untiringly to
produce a pageant sec-
ond to none. Wanda P.


of Gospel 1400 WZAZ
served as commentator.
Shenita Johnson was
the Pageant Coordinator.
Katina Gadson founded
the Pageant.
At the end of the


evening


Committee


Members were recog-
nized: Shajuan
Edwards, Nona Law,
Debbie Washington,
Sheila Douboulay.


Luster 'Sugar N'Spice


Sweepstake Winners


Announced


I-


Lashawnda Sade' Casper, Miss Teen Christian 2005.


(PHOTO BY TIM JENKINS)
student at Stanton
College Preparatory
School and a majorette
for the Stanton Blue
Devil's Marching Band.
Keshonda won the
pageant's essay competi-
tion and wrote the
monologue that intro-
duced her dance routine.
Keshonda -affirms, "I
know that my life serves
a purpose and that with
God in my life, nothing
is impossible.
LaTonya S. Taylor
the creative daughter of
Slayter and Ruth Taylor
was the second runner-
up in the pageant. She is
a visual artist and a tal-
ented dancer as well. In
elementary school her
artwork entitled "My


Flower" won the Grand
Prize, which was for all
elementary schools
throughout the United
States.
The universal compe-
tition was held in the
country of China.
LaTonya is a member of
the Philadelphia Baptist
Church where she is an
alto leader in the Youth
Choir. She is an honor
student at William M.
Raines High School
where she is a member
of the school's marching
band and an officer and
third year veteran on the-
Dance Squad.
LaTonya, a life time
honor student knows
that through God's will
and His grace that she


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CHICAGO-- Eleven-year-old Fastima Brown (center) of Chicago recently won a
$250 shopping spree as one of 10 second-place winners in the first-ever PCJ
Smooth Roots "Sugar N' Spice, Shopping's So Nice Sweepstakes." She is
flanked by her mother, Queen Brown (left), Fred Luster II (rear, from left), vice
president/director of research & development for Luster Products, Inc., Sonja
Luster-Munis, vice president/MIS director for Luster and James Campbell, prod-
uct group manager with Luster. Eleven-year-old Kayla Hughes (not shown) of
Reno, Nevada, was awarded the grand-prize of $1,000..More than 2,200 entries
were received. Luster Products, Inc. is the leading African-American-owned
manufacturer of hair care products for people of African descent worldwide. Its
major brands are PCJ for girls, Pink brand for women, Designer Touch, the prod-
uct line for professional stylists, and S-Curl for men and boys. For more infor-
mation about Luster Products' complete line of hair care products and styles,
visit the Web site at http://www.lusterproducts,com/. (PHOTO BY TOYA WERNER-MAR-
TIN/COURTESY FLOWERS COMMUNICATIONS GROUP


FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN APPEAR
IN PREP RAP CALL 9041766-8834


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Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein

TOP SINGLES
1. "We Belong Together" Mariah Carey (Island) Last
Week: No. 1
*. "Don't Phunk with my Heart" The Black Eyed Peas
(A&M) No. 2
3. "Behind These Hazel Eyes" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No.
3
4. "Hollaback Girl" Gwen Stefani (Interscope) No. 5
5. "Oh" Ciara Featuring Ludacris (Sho'nuff
MusicLine/LaFace) No. 4
6. "Incomplete" Backstreet Boys (Jive) No. 6
7, "Just a Li'l Bit" 50 Cent (Shady Aftermath) No. 7
8. "Switch" Will Smith (Overbrook) No. 8
9. "Mr. Brightside" The Killers (Island) No. 11
t0. "Lonely No More" Rob Thomas (Melisma) No. 9
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Fast Cars and Freedom" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street)
Last Week: No. 3
2. "Something More" Sugarland (Mercury) No. 2 _
3. "You'll Be There" George Strait (MCA Nashville) No.
7
4. "Lot of Leavin' Left to Do" Dierks Bentley (Capitol)
Np. 4.
5.M"aking Memories of Us" Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 5
6. "Keg in the Closet" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 9
7. "Songs about Me" Trace Adkins (Capitol) No. 1
8. "Mississippi Girl" Faith Hill (Warner Bros.) New.

*9. "Homewrecker" Gretchen Wilson (Epic) No. 8
10. "As Good as I Once Was" Toby Keith (DreamWorks)
Ne\% Entry
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Lift It Up' Inmr.a Da.\ hTonni\ Boy Silver*Label) Last'
'Week- No. 2
2. "Krafty" New Order (Warner Bros.) No. 5
3. "One Word (Chris Cox/M. Rizzo Mixes)" Kelly
Osbourne (Sanctuary) No. 1
4. "What Happens Tomorrow (Rauhofer Mixes)" Duran
Duran (Epic) No. 4
5. "Lonely No More (J. Nevins/Francois L Mixes)" Rob
Thomas (Meli-sma) New Entry
6. "I Feel You" Schiller Featuring Heppner (Radikal) No. 6
7. "Mother and Father (P. Rauhofer Remix)" Madonna
Maverick Warner Bros.) New Entry
8. "Most Precious Love" Blaze Presents U.D.A,U.F.L..
Featuring Barbara Tucker (King Street) No. 3
9. "You Are Everything (Vasquez/Ford/Mig Mixes)"
Vanessa Williams (Lava) No. 8
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Rin slde Flawless No. 10


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"Copyrighted Material



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JULY 2, 2005 FLORIDA STAR PAGE B-5


EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter of public record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
A HABITUAL TRAFFIC VIOLATOR-On Sunday,
June 26, 2005 at 9:44 a.m. while on patrol, a police offi-
cer stopped a 24-year-old male (suspect) driver for
unlawful speed of 87 mph in a posted 65 mph zone on
the Buckman Bridge Northbound. Upon making contact
with the driver he advised the officer that his license was
suspended and that he was attempting to get his license
re instated. A check through NCIC revealed that the sus-
pect license was suspended a total of 16 times and that
he was classified as a habitual traffic violator. The sus-
pect was then arrested and transported to the Duval
County jail, and charged with a felony.
BUSTED WHILE TAKING A NAP AT THE BANK-
On Sunday, June 26, 2005 at 8:20 a.m. police officer
notice a 36-year-old male (suspect) sleeping in one of
the driver lanes, under the awning at 50 W. State St. at
Bank of America. Under the teller window, directly
behind where the suspect was sleeping is a sign posted
"No Trespassing, violators will be prosecuted." The sus-
pect was advised of his constitutional right, which he
acknowledged. The police. officer pointed out the sign,
which the suspect could read, and he stated that he did
not see the sign last night when he arrived. The suspect
did not have Florida identification. He was arrested and
taken to jail.
BATTERY DOMESTIC-On Sunday, June 26, 2005 at
6:30 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 1433 .30th
St. East in reference to a battery that had just occurred.
Upon arrival, police officer met with the 20-year-old
female (victim), who advised the police officer that she
and her boyfriend have lived together as a family for the
past two years and have a biological child together. She
is two months pregnant at this time. The victim told the
police officer that the suspect got upset and punched her
in the face and chest and then kicked her in the face
because she had been at her mother's house all day and
he did not know where she was. The police officer spoke
with a witness that was in the front yard. She advised she
did not see' anything, but heard the victim yell "Stop hit-
ting me." The police officer observed the victim left
eye-swollen shut and red marks on the right side of her
face. The police officer then spoke with the suspect. He
stated that he been, at work all day and was returning
home and saw the police at his residence. The suspect
also advised the police officer that he did not touch his
girlfriend, and is not sure how the injuries happened.
The police officer read the suspect his rights, arrested
him for battery to a pregnant. woman, transported the
suspect to jail and charged him with a felony.
DRIVING WHILE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF
ALCOHOL-On Sunday, June 26, 2005 at 7:52 p.m. a
police officer stopped a 41-year-old male driver (sus-
pect) for unlawful speed of 92 mph in a 65 mph zone;
failure to maintain a single lane, and improper passing.
The police officer made contact with the suspect and
asked him for ID. A strong smell of alcoholic beverage
was detected coming from the vehicle and his breath. A
white plastic cup was in plain view in the center console
next to the driver and upon inspection of the cup, it was
determined to be half full of an alcoholic beverage later
identified by the defendant as "Apple Rum". The suspect
speech was slurred and his eyes were red. The suspect
told the police officer that he had been drinking and was
going home from a gathering. A roadside field sobriety
evaluation was administered and the suspect was subse-
quently arrested for DUI and booked into the county jail.
UNLAWFUL FALSE ID OF SELF-On Sunday. June
26, 2005 at 3:00 p.m. a police officer responded to 2306'
Grand. Ave in reference to a wanted person. Upon
arrival, police officer made contact with a 21 year old
female (suspect), who had two outstanding warrants for
her arrest. However, prior to obtaining her real name,
she gave three fake names, in which she misspelled. The
suspect told the police officer she'did hot want to be
arrested, so she lied about her name. She was arrested
and booked into jail.
POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE-
On Sunday, June 26, 2005 at 11:55 a.m. a police officer
was working radar in the 5000 block of Heckscher Dr.
anid observed a vehicle being driven Northbound on
Heckscher Dr. The vehicle appeared to be exceeding the
speed limit of 45mph. The police officer released the
hold button on the radar unit and it emitted a high pitch
Doppler sound that indicated the vehicle was moving at
61mph. The police office conducted a traffic stop at the
main entrance to Blunt Island. He approached the dri-
ver's window and asked to see his driver's license, reg-
istration,. and proof of insurance. When the driver
opened the glove compartment to get his registration, the
police officer observed a plastic bag with white powered
substance in the bag. The driver made an over attempt to
.conceal the bag, and to close the compartment. The
police officer removed the plastic bag from the compart-


meant and, detained all four passengers. Another police
officer responded as an assisting officer. The police offi-
cers read all four suspects their rights. One of the sus-
pects stated that the other three picked him up at around
10:30 a.m. and he had no knowledge of the cocaine in
the vehicle. The other, two suspects stated that the
cocaine belonged to the driver. The police officer field
tested the power cocaine and found it to test positive for
cocaine. The vehicle was released at the scene to a
licensed passenger in the vehicle. The evidence power
cocaine was placed in the property room. The owner
(driver suspect) of the vehicle, was arrested and trans-
ported to jail, and charged with a felony.


Your Weekly Horoscope
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Washington Man Jailed In
Restraining Order Marriage


.SPOKANE, Wash. ---
When Rachel Dunham
took out a restraining
order against her
boyfriend, she didn't
expect to be marrying him
a short time later. So
instead of honeymooning
in Mexico, Rodney
Tomsha sits in the
Spokane County Jail,
accused of violating the
order by getting within
two blocks of Dunham.
He tried to persuade 'a
Spokane judge last week
to lift the restraining order,'
but the judge refused.
The couple were mar-
ried last Thursday in near-
by Coeur d'Alene, Idaho,
Spokane police Detective
Stephanie Barkley said.


Police received a tip
about a Saturday wedding
reception at a Spokane
mansion, waited until the
reception was over and
then arrested Tomsha, 49,
police spokesman Dick
Cottam said.
Dunham, 25, had
obtained the order after
two reports of domestic
violence were investigated
by Barkley last year. In
addition, Dunham was
arrested on June 17 for
investigation of domestic
violence against Tomsha,
police said.
Another court hearing
seeking removal of the
protection order was
scheduled for Wednesday.


Man Accused Of Drunk

Shopping Cart Driving
DEVILS LAKE, N.D. A man is accused of driving
an electric-powered shopping cart around a grocery store
here while drunk, endangering other customers.
Clifford Mattson, 27, was charged with disorderly
conduct, a misdemeanor, Detective Sue Schwab said
Tuesday.
Schwab said police went to the Leevers grocery store
Monday afternoon, after reports of a drunken man driv-
ing the shopping cart into people and nearly knocking
them down."He appeared to be actually driving after
them," Schwab said. No one was hurt, she said.
The maximum penalty for the misdemeanor charge is
30 days in jail and a $500 fine, Schwab said. A court
hearing was set for July 19.


Tara's Bail
24/7 Bonds
Service
931 North Liberty Street jacksonvrile. Florida 32206
356-TARA
(8272) '.




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Teacher Accused

Of Assigning Arson

HOUSTON A chemistry teacher who was at least
three months behind on her car payments gave passing
grades to two failing students who stole and burned her
car so she could collect insurance money, a fire investi-
gator said.
Aldine Senior High School teacher Tramesha Lashon
Fox, 32, was charged with insurance fraud and arson,
and the two students were charged with arson.
Roger Luna, 18, and Darwin Arias, 17, had been fail-
ing Fox's class up to their final exam. But Arias received
a 90 and Luna an 80, grades high enough for them to
pass the semester, said senior fire investigator Dustin
Deutsch of the Harris County Fire Marshal's Office.
Luna was arrested Tuesday. Bail was set at $10,000
and he was expected to be arraigned on Thursday, said
Lt. John Martin, spokeswoman for the Harris County
Sheriffs Department. Neither Fox nor Arias was in cus-
tody early Wednesday afternoon, and they could not
immediately be reached for comment. No phone listings
could be found.

WANT CUSTOMERS?
ADVERTISE IN
THE FLORIDA STAR!
TO PLACE YOUR AD CALL US
TODAY AT 904/766-8834

FLORIDA LOTTO
WINNING NUMBERS
06-08-16-28-46-48
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PAGE A F"v SAJUE2,


Local Umpire, Olympic


Track


Star/Track Coach Inducted


FHSAA Hall Of Fame


Induction Ceremony and Awards Banquet was held at the
Wyndham Westshore Hotel in Tampa.
Napoleon, 67, has been officiating for 40 years. He has
officiated 40 years in Basketball and 29 years in Softball.
Born and raised off Old St. Augustine Road in
Jacksonville, Napoleon was the first African-American to


Beryl Napoleon
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--Beryl Napoleon, a local umpire,
and Chandra Cheeseborough an Olympic Sprinter and col-
lege track coach, are two of 10 Floridians named into the
2005 Florida High School Athletic Association Hall of
Fame.
The 2005 Florida High School Athletic Hall of Fame


become part of the Southern Association of Basketball
Officials (SABO) after joining in 1968.
He later became the first African-American to officiate
the FHSAA state playoffs. Napoleon, who attended
Matthew W. Gilbert High School but graduated from
Douglas Anderson High School, has officiated 26 state bas-
ketball championships (10 girls and 16 boys)
He serves as a basketball evaluator for SABO and on the
state level for the FHSAA, and is one of four elected mem-
bers representing basketball on the FHSAA's 28-member
Officials Advisory Committee.


Napoleon, a Rank One Official, has received a meritori-
ous achievement award in basketball and softball.
He is an active member of Greater Grant Memorial AME
Church where her served on the Usher Board and volunteers
with the church's Boy Scout troop.
Napoleon retired after a 31-year career as a carrier with
the. United States Postal Service. While working in the
Postal Service he earned the nickname "The Pillar" for his
strength of character and dedication to the community.
Napoleon and his wife, Eartha, reside in Jacksonville and
. have three children and four grandchildren.
Chandra Cheeseborugh was a track star at Ribault High
School before moving on to Tennessee State University and
becoming a member of the famed Tigerbelles track steam.
At Ribault, she was the state champion and record hold-
er for the 100-yard dash and 220-yard dash in 1977 and also
was captain of the basketball team, averaging 26 points and
13 rebounds per game and making the Parade All-America
team.
She won a gold medal in the 200-meter dash at the 1975
Pan American Games, and was a member of the record-set-
ting 400-meter relay at the AAU Junior Women's Track &
Field Championships. As a member of the U.S. Olympic
team in 1976, Cheesborough placed sixth in the 100-meter
dash.
During the 1984 Olympics, she won two gold medals
and one silver in Los Angeles. Cheesborough qualified for
the 1980 Olympic team but the United States did not partic-
ipate due to a boycott against the Soviet Union.
Cheeseborough was inducted into the Tennessee Sports
Hall of Fame in 2002. She is also a member of the TSU
Sports Hall of Fame, National Track & Field Hall of Fame
and the National High School Hall of Fame.


Utah's Bogut Is Top Pick In 2005 NBA Draft


NEW YORK -Andrew
Bogut a 7-foot center from
Australia, was chosen No. 1


Tuesday night in the NBA
draft by the Milwaukee
Bucks, becoming the first


player in five years with
U.S. college experience to
be drafted No. 1 overall.


I --------------------------------------------------
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Four players from North
Carolina were chosen
among the first 14 picks on a
night when the usual ava-
lanche of trades was only a
trickle by the time the first
round ended.
The 20-year-old Bogut,
who played two seasons at
Utah and was the college
player of the year, straight-

Serena Williams
Won't Play In
U.S. Fed Cup
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -
Serena Williams won't play
for the U.S. Fed Cup team in
the semifinals against
Russia at Moscow on July 9-
10.
The team announced
Wednesday includes top-
ranked Lindsay Davenport,
Venus Williams, Corina
Morariu and Mashona
Washington, making her Fed
Cup debut at age 29.
Seven-time Grand Slam
champion Serena Williams
was upset in the third round
Saturday at Wimbledon,
then said she needed to prac-
tice more. She has been
hampered in recent weeks
by a left ankle injury.
The defending champion
Russians have yet to
announce their team, which
could include three top-10
players-- U.S. Open cham-
pion Svetlana Kuznetsova,
Elena Dementieva and
Anastasia Myskina.
The United States will
play Russia indoors on clay,
and the winner will advance
to the final against France or
Spain on Sept. 17-18. The
Americans are seeking their
first title since 2000.
t


ened his tie, adjusted his suit
jacket and took a deep
breath in the moments
before commissioner David
Stern summoned him to the
podium onstage at Madison
Square Garden.
When his name was
called, Bogut raised a
clenched right fist.
Utah became the first
school to have players


picked first in the NBA
and NFL drafts in the same
year. Quarterback Alex
Smith was drafted No. 1 by
the San Francisco 49ers in
April.
"I was confident, but I
wasn't 100 percent," Bogut
said. "Now that I'm here, it's
a great honor."
There were 18 .interna-
tional players among the 60


1. What golfer observed: "Pressure is playing for
$10 when you don't have a dime in your pocket"?
2. How many entrants signed up to compete in the
first-ever auto race in Paris in 1887?
3. What fugitive did Bobby Murcer suggest the FBI
look for in Candlestick Park's upper deck, after seeing
1975 attendance figures?
4. What did NBA basketball player Mack Calvin
sink at a record 95.8 percent pace during the 1980-81
season?
5. Who was working as the Giants' offensive coach
when he got a call from the Packers?
6. What position put the most players into the Pro
Football Hall of Fame in its first year?
7. Who gave sports fanatic Fidel Castro a satellite
dish so he could watch American baseball games?
8. Who was the leading scorer of the 1992 Olympic
"Dream Team"?
9. How many points are needed to win a game of
handball?
10. Who was 57 years old when he stepped to the
plate as a designated hitter for the White Sox in 1980?



Sports Challenge Answers
osou1W 31uu1W "01 '.I 6 'XaPNtug sopeqD -8
'.jtunL poi'" '-Vq.IJIH "9 !pieqtuoq o3UiA "5 *SAMOJiq
-. j"7 'sJ1eH Ald u 'Qou!AaJ oq I


(c) 2005 DBR Media, Inc.


Into


JUNE 25, 2005


FLORIDA; STAR


PAGE R-6






r nl[DTInA TTA R


rA(OL 15-! I t'ALA.L.C U 1- -------


JULY2. 2005


EMPLOYMENT
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: ....... 'h'LEAU'T' ....... i

July 26, 2005 at 8:00 a.m.
Place: Pope Automotive
445 Tresca Rd., Suite 301
Jacksonville, FL 32225
:Vehicle: 1999 Chevrolet S10:
:Vin#GCCT14W5XK124840
:We-cannot guarantee the title.
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Announcements .

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read D IANETICS by Ron
L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7,99 to Dianetics.
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Auctions

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www,cherokeemountainrcallycom Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868,

WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS North CarolinaWhere there
is: Cool Mouitain Air, Views & Stream, Homes. Cabins &
Acreage. CALLFORFREEBROCHUREOFMOUNTAIN
PROPERTY SALES. (800)642-5333. Realty 01f Murphy
317 Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofinurphy.com.
Tennessee Lake Property from $24,900! 6-1/2 Acre lot
$59.90). 27 Acre lake Eslate $124.900. Lake Parcel and
Cabin Package Available $64,900. (866)770-5263 cxt 8 for
details.


ASHEVILLE. NC MOUNTAINS Gated Community.
Spectacular View & River Homesites. Clubhouse, Mountain
Spas, Paved Roads, View Tower. Riverwalk. NEW PHASE
JUSTSTARTED! wws.,bqai.yerl ,lge.,!. (866)411-5263.

Montana Land Auction: July 22, 2005. +/- 577 acres,
Jefferson River frontage. world-class huniing/fishing,
awesome mountain views. +/- 1 hour froin Bozeman.
RK Auction (406)485-2548, (406)485-2399
www.MontanaiLan dAuctiionis.qir.


VIEWS VIEWS VIEWS Helena Montana 4.7 Acres
$79,990. Ride out your backdoor to millions of acres of
national forest! Awesome lake & mountain views, close to
Cn.'l, [.n re-a7. L jA ,: imni l,. I. HOL'i S- ..i.I.. iL.dJ uJ ldiL '
ready to build on. Call owner (888)770-2240.

LAKEFRONT BARGAINS Starting at $89,900.
Gorgeous lakefront parcels. Gently sloping, pristine shore-
line, spectacular views. Acrossfromnationalforeston 35.000
.8:rl. f 'iL i e t'.n ,ll k inF ..ITT l a i .1 I. .. I.r. r .. i.'.1
J ijII I ,I '.." .- I I I .. I .- -U1 h F .ll.,1 l I-In.r ... r.1 C jll i- .
(800)704-3154 ext 617, Sunset Bay, LL.C.


ATTENTION INVESTORS: Waterfront lots in the
Foothills of NC. Deep waterlake with 90 miles ofshoreline.
20% redevelopment discounts and 90% financing. NO
'PAYMENTS for 1 year. Call now for best selection.
,'k -,, rk 16 r 'I %I N -T f.LLj.i_'.P" 1071' 1, I I.-NKF


"MAKE THIS SUMMER THE BEST" E Tennessee's
Norris Lake & Golf properties make every year special.
SStarting at only $24,900- Call Lakeside Realty
(423)626-5820www.lakesiderealty-t.colm.

NEW MEXICO-20 Acres $34,990.,Scenic region, views.
canyons, trees, rolling hills.' IlJi. Fr.i,., i ,, ,iI i kiii..
horses, greatclimate.Power. great access, 100% Financing.
Call(877)822-LAND!

NC MOUNTAIN PROPERTY, Gated community with
privateriverand lakeaccess, Swim. fish. hike. From $20,000
to $70,000, Perfect for log cabin. (800)699-1289 or
www.riverbendlakelure com.

Steel Buildings

BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bottom Prices!" 20x30 Now
$2900.30x40 $5170.40x50 $8380.40x60 $10,700.50x 100
$15,244. Others.Ends/accessoriesoptional. "Priced toSell!"
Pioneer (800)668-5422.

Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine SteelMaster Buildings,
factory direct at HUGE Savings! 20x24. 30x60, 35x50.
Perfect Garage/Workshop/Barn. Call (800)341-7007.
www SteelMasterUSA com.

FLORIDA BUILDING BLOWOUT' FL PRODUCT
APPROVED 30X40.40X60.40X 100 LIMITED OFFER
(800)300-2470 EXT 4 allbldcom.

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ANF


Advertising Networks of Florida
Week of June 27, 2005
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