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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
June 25, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00025

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
June 25, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00025

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text


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"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"F

"Srinr Florida


For 54 Years"
For 54 Years"


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
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On WCGL-AM 1360


thefloridastar.com


FAMU STUDENT FROM


JAX FOUND DEAD


On Sunday, June
19, two people
observed a body float-
ing in a storm water
pond in The Lakes
townhouse complex in
Tallahassee. The vic-
tim was wearing a
white T-shirt and sev-
eral fish were swarm-
ing around it, an indi-
cation to observers that
the person had not just
died. Davis was pulled
out of the pond about 7:00
p.m. Sunday but it was not
until Monday, that the vic-
tim was identified as
Willie James Davis of
Jacksonville, born July
25, 1984.
Davis was a sopho-
more student at Florida
A& M University, major-


Willie James Davis
ing in architecture. His
death, according to the
Tallahassee Police
Department, was caused
by a gunshot wound to the
head, based upon the
autopsy and is being
investigated as a homi-
cide.
The Jacksonville
youth is a graduate of
Terry Parker High


School. His father
called the police dc
ment on Saturda:
report that he had
heard from his son.
Workers drained
pond Monday s
Officer John Newlar
hopes of finding
clues regarding L
death.
Dean Henry K
Student Affairs Dir
stated, "We are sad 1
member of the F2
family has died and
prayers and thought
with the family. We
contacted them
offered our condo
and assistance. We
that the family wi
able to successfully
through this trying ti
Funeral Services
not been arranged.


SUSPECT STILL SOUGH]


IN RIBAULT SCENIC


DRIVE MURDERS


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Jacksonville Sheriffs found near a bridge on violent drug network
Office is trying to locate Ribault Scenic Drive and which allegedly also
Danny Vondoria Sellers, Brookins was found in a involved dog fighting,
whose date of birth is ditch on : Thrasher drug trafficking and other
January 3, 1974, as Avenue. Two men have crimes. The FBI along
'accessory after the fact to been arrested as suspects with the Sheriffs Office
murder." in their murders, Lavario and other agencies, named
Larry Gibson, 35, and Ray, 22 and Damontrio the ring, "Operation
ing W. Brookins, 33, Glee, 26. Picket Fence", after the
ing W.e Brookms, 33 The Sheriffs Office Picketville area, based on
Sere found dead on busted a crime ring in their belief that this group
rida\, September 3, 2004 April, 2005 which they had terrorized that area.
vho police believed were felt involved about 17 A warrant has been
illed at the same time. murders, including issued for the arrest of
lowvever, Gibson was Brookins and Gibson, as a Danny Sellers.

4EW REPORT CALLS FOR

LACE GAP TO BE CLOSED IN

EDUCATIONN


kSHINGTON, D.C. -
e Legal Defense Fund
eqs Education Secretary
to undermine historic
iversity of Michigan
ngs. The report said
more African-
ericans are without a
school diploma than
: a college degree,
e whites are nearly
times more likely to
a college degree than
a high school diplo-
In a new report
.ed Thursday mark-


ing the second anniver-
sary of the landmark
Supreme Court rulings in
the University of
Michigan affirmative
action cases, the NAACP
Legal Defense and
Education Fund, Inc.
(LDF) underscores the
need to close this wide
racial gap in educational
opportunity and achieve-
ment by using all legally
permissible means,
including race-conscious
ones.


The report, Closing the
Gap: Moving from
Rhetorio to Reality In
Opening Doors to
Higher Education for
African American
Students, was delivered
to the Secretary of
Education. They urged
the Department to assure
universities that race-con-
scious programs are legal-,
ly permissible instead of
undermining the historic
Supreme Court decisions.


Dr. Oswald Bronson
After about six months
of uncertainty and negoti-
ations, Edward Waters
College and the
Commission on Colleges
of the Southern
Association of Colleges


and Schools, have
resolved the issues that led
the Commission to vote to
remove the College from
membership as an accred-
ited institution. After the
accreditation was
removed, EWC filed a
lawsuit to preserve its
membership. Now both
have filed a joint petition
dismissing the lawsuit with
an agreement for the
school's accreditation to be
retained.
EWC acknowledged its
errors; Dr. Oswald P.
Bronson is staying on as
president and both the
Commission and E\VC


have agreed to work
together toward the mutu-
al goal of delivering quali-
ty education to as many
deserving students as pos-
sible.
If the school's accredi-
tation had not been
returned, many students
Should have lost their abil-
ity to attend the college
since 90 percent of EWC
students receive financial
aid, which is not available
if a school is not accredit-
ed.
Edward Waters College
is a historically black col-
lege that was established
ih 1866 to educate emanci-
pated sla es.


JUNETEENTH 140 YEARS LATER


JACKSONVILLE, FL Juneteenth
had basically been considered a Texas
holiday for black African Americans as it
was given its name based on the fact that
two years after President Lincoln issued
the Emancipation Proclamation on
January 1, 1863, it was not until June 19,
1865 that African Americans in Texas
learned they were no longer slaves.
From. that point on, those living in Texas
considered June 19 as their day of libera-
tion and the date was later recognized as
a state holiday, celebrated with many
events, including parades and a
Juneteenth King and Queen.
Afterwards, many other states recog-
nized Juneteenth as a holiday celebrating
the day that all black Africans in America
were no longer slaves. Florida declared
Juneteeth a legal holiday in 1991 but
many are still not aware of the holiday.
In fact, the First Coast African-American
Chamber of Commerce held only its sec-
ond Juneteenth expo on Friday. About 27
local black owned businesses were in
attendance. Activities included poetry
reading, traditional, dancing and foods
" ith those in attendance dressed to repre-
sent the era.
The 54th Massachusetts Company
"F" and Ladies Auxiliary, representing
the African Americans who fought dur-
ing the Civil War. The unit was made up


Members of the 54th Massachusetts
Reenactors group with Civil War artifacts.

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Infantry


Cecelia Ann Washington, exhibits her creations.
of former slaves from throughout the North. After
more than 100 years, the Company remains the
most recognizable black regiment of the war.


News in brief
DON'T RUN THE LIGHT
The Jacksonville Sheriffs Office has requested the use of video cameras to use for four
months at the most accident-prone intersections for those drivers who are tempted to run'
the red light. If enough drivers are caught, the office will be able to justify the cost of plac-
ing such cameras permanently in such areas to "save lives" said Sheriff Rutherford.
The equipment for such an observation will be installed free,
MOSQUITO POPULATION UP WITH THE RECENT RAINFALL
Heavy spring rainfall has triggered major increases in the state's mosquito population
and resulted in a spike of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) cases among horses, Florida
Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Charles H. Bronson reported today.
As a result, Bronson is urging horse owners to make sure their animals are vaccinated
against the disease and advising all Floridians to take precautions to minimize their expo-
sure to mosquitoes.
FAMILY FILES LAWSUIT ON B.I.G.'S DEATH .
It has been eight years since the Notorious B.I.G. whose real
name was Christopher Wallace, was shot dead while at a stop light
in Los Angeles in 1997. Many feel the murder was related to
Tupac's death but the death of both hip-hop stars are still
unsolved. The family filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the
city of Los Angeles and its police department. A jury has been
selected.


8 5106 00151 o


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIU OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESUILLE FL 32611.7007


EWC BACK ON TRACK
College Retains Accreditation Through Agreement


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RON WILLIAMS, SR. SAMIUEL lCKIWLL
NEWS EDITOR ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
CHERYL COWARD MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR. REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
DISTRIBUTION: LIZ BILLINGSLEA
WILLIAM GREEN ACCOUNTS MANAGER
ABEYE AYELE WORK BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DeSHAYNE BRYANT, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DANIEL EVANS, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND DANIEL EVANS
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, IN(


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper.
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper.
Publishers Association
!Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame

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By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
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The controversy of recent
years about the Confederate
flag-whether it is a symbol of
honor, as some claim, or a
symbol of infamy, as others
do, is a prime example of the
trouble historical ignorance
can produce.
That trouble recently
cropped up in Missouri,
where Governor Matt Blunt
ordered that the Confederate
flag be flown June 5 at a
memorial service some 400
people held at a Confederate
cemetery in that state.
Governor Blunt said he
was acting at the request of a
state legislator who repre-
sents the' district where the
servide-timed 'to coincide
with the June 3rd birthday of
Jefferson Davis, the leader of
the Confederacy-was held.
The Governor's order was
issued quietly. But once lead-
ers of the Missouri National
Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People heard about it, they-
quite properly-registered a
strong objection and staged a
brief march at the Governor's
Mansion to make their objec-
tions more visible.
"We have many, many
pressing issues on our agen-
da-jobs and economic devell
opment, better health care,
,and so on," said Harold
Crumpton, president of the
St. Louis NAACP. "But we
cannot stand by and accept
this objectionable symbol


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CLARA McLAUG
PUBLIC
EDITOR-


being flown on state proper-
ty."
Crumpton emphasized
that the NAACP was not try-
ing to prevent private citizens
from holding a ceremony at
the Confederate cemetery.
Their point is that the state
should not in any way be a
party to it. Referring to
Governor Blunt's Republican
affiliation, he said, "Abraham
Lincoln opposed this flag and
what it represented. How can
any Republican today claim
that he was wrong?"
According to news
reports, a spokesman said the
Governor favored a scholarly
review of whether it would
be appropriate' to fly the
Confederate flag at the site. I
for one welcome more and
more honest scholarship
about the Confederate flag
and the rebellion and leaders
who brought it into being-
precisely because it's become
fashionable once again in
some quarters to pretend
there's no "truth" about what
the various flags of the
Confederacy stand for, that
it's simply an issue about
which reasonable people can
disagree.
This, of course, is non-
sense. We've long known
enough to have no doubt
what the Confederacy and its
various flags represented.
They stand for not just the
maintenance, but the expan-
sion of Negro Slavery, and


the rule of the most despica-
ble concepts of human rela-
tions human beings have ever
devised.
The facts of Negro
Slavery and the words, writ-
ten and spoken, of the leaders
of the Confederate rebellion
make this clear.
One fact is Slavery's
importance to the entire
country's economic founda-
tion. As scholar James Oliver
Horton noted in the recent
Public Broadcasting Service
documentary, "Slavery and
the Making of America," by
1840 the value of cotton
exports was greater than the
combined value of all of the
nation's other exports. That
made slaves the most valu-
able "asset" of the United
States other than the land
itself.
Their value was con-
firmed, for example, by the
five "negro (sic) slavery
clauses" of the Confederate
Constitution of 1861. A utili-
tarian document devoid of
positive principle, its only
true declaration was that pro-
ponents of Slavery must have
the "freedom" to implant it
wherever they choose.-
That sentiment was
expressed in more flowery.
'and poisonous language by'
Alexander H. Stephens, the
Vice President of the
Confederacy, in the infamous
"Cornerstone of the
Confederacy Speech" he
gave in Savannah, Georgia
on March 25, 1861.
"The new constitution,"
he said, speaking of the
Confederate proclamation,
"has put to rest, forever, all
the agitating questions relat-
ing to our peculiar institu-


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
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tion-African slavery, as it
exists among us-the proper
status of the negro (sic) in
our form of civilization. This
was the immediate cause of
the late rupture and present
revolution."
Stephens went on to
assert that the ideas of equal-
ity among human beings pro-
claimed in the U.S.
Constitution were "funda-
mentally wrong ... Our new
government is founded upon
exactly the opposite idea: its
foundations are laid, its cor-
nerstone rests upon the great
truth, that the negro (sic) is
not equal to the white man;
that slavery- subordination to
the superior race-is his natu-
ral and normal condition."
The sentiments that were
the foundation of the
Confederacy did not die with
it, nor with the equally perni-
cious regime of legalized
racism the White South
erected in its place in the late
1800s.
Nor, despite the sea-
,change on race relations in
our public and private sectors
since the 1960s, have they
been completely eradicated
today.
The shocking recent.
burnings of three crosses in
Durham, N.C., is just one of
many examples one could
cite as evidence that some
still follow the evil principles
of the Confederacy-and a
reminder that there are no
words which can exonerate
its proponents or scrub the
stain of evil from its primary
symbol, the Confederate
flag.


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"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"

"A Golden Celebration for The Lawsons"
When Albert 'Al' Brown serenaded Edwin
'Butch' and Mrs. B. Joyce Lawson with the tune
'Unforgettable', not only was he expressing the love
shared between the golden anniversary couple, he
was also describing the magnificent Atlantic Ocean
setting where Mr. and Mrs. Lawson renewed their
golden wedding anniversary vows recently.
It was a day where the heavens smiled on the
anniversary couple and their guests. The day had
begun with torrential rains. However, as the day
approached sunset the heavens beamed with a beau-
tiful sun. and the breezes from the ocean were
enchantingly blissful.
The guests were instructed to wear casual white
for the celebration. Following the apparel instruc-
tions explicitly, when all were assembled they
processed to the ocean for the renewal ceremony. It
was angelically surreal.
The Lawsons began the series of weddings that
were held fifty years ago with their friends, Dr.
Richard and Mrs. Laurice McLean Hunter who
married on June 12 and Dr. and Mrs. Charles B.
McIntosh who married on June 13. "Through the
years we've exchanged anniversary cards between
one another," stated Mrs. Lawson.
Following the ceremony conducted by their pastor
Rev. J.W. Rigsby, the anniversary party returned to
the Lawson American Beach ocean view home for a
sumptuous reception.
Heartfelt congratulation to Edwin "Butch' and
Mrs. B Joyce Lawson! It, was indeed an
'Unforgettable' celebration!

"Our "Class of Fifty" Is Still Nifty and Will
Jump and Jive as We Celebrate '55'"
Stanton High School's Class of 1950 chose the
Embassy Suites Hotel for their 55th Reunion activi-
ties. The weekend kicked off with a 'Reunion Get
Together' on Friday evening. On Saturday following
breakfast, the class members enjoyed themselves
shopping and/or playing games of Bid Whist, Bridge,
PoKeno and just having fun. Later on Saturday the
class members continued their weekend activities
with a marvelous banquet. The toastmasters for the
evening were: Dr. Ezekial Bryant-Mid Term Class
President and Vernon King-June Class President.
Joining the class presidents on the banquet program
were: Reverend William Huggins, Mrs. Gentry
Roberts, Minister Nell Stewart-Coleman, Vincent
Cobb, Mrs. Delphenia Mainor-Carter, Drs. Alvin
G. White and Elizabeth Cobb. The evening con-
cluded with Disco dancing.
Come Sunday as the late maestro Duke Ellington
played, brought the class members together for a
Memorial Breakfast. And then on Monday the class
sailed away on the Caribbean Cruise.
SOur "Class of Fifty: Is Still Nifty and Will Jump
and Jive as We Celebrate "55".Well, I'd say that the
class truly lived up to their reunion theme! Wouldn't
you agree?

i Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming
ents. Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me
-Iirectly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-
777 or fax (904) 285-7008.


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THROUGH OUR EYES 2005 Art Exhibition

Summer Programming
I Can Do That! Children's Hands-on art exploration work-
shop
Saturday, June 25, 10:30 am 12:30 pm
Through Our Eyes artists Daniel Wynn, Marsha Hatcher,
Glendia Cooper and Laurence Walden share their creative tech-
niques with kids of all ages. Participants will get to try their hand
at a variety of different media including painting, collage, clay
and mixed media. Workshop for children 7+. Admission $5.
Advance registration recommended.
Art is Where You Find It! Trash to. treasure hands-on art
workshop
Saturday July 16, 10:30 am 12:30 pm
Learn to create art with found or recycled materials with Through
Our Eyes mother and daughter team Billie and Natalie McCray.
Bring your own found and recycled objects or let the artists help
you choose.
Workshop for children and adults. Admission $5. Advance reg-
istration recommended.
Gallery Talk: Living with Your Collection
Thursday, June 23, 6 8 pm
Join interior designer Jacqueline Williams, ASID and museum
curator Lydia Stewart for a peek inside the homes, interiors, and
corporate collections of some of Jacksonville's most inventive art
patrons. Explore ways to showcase your art at home or at work.
Admission is Free.
Collaborative presentation of Through Our Eyes and
Spoken Word
Thursday June 2, July 7 and August 4, 7-9 pm.
The First Thursday of every month, the lobby of the Ritz is trans-
formed into a stage for poets and poetry lovers of all ages. Be
inspired by the artwork and show off your own talent for verse,
or just come, listen and soak up the creative atmosphere.
Admission is Free.
For more information on these and other events, please
call Ritz Theatre & LaWlla Museum at 904-632-5555.


AAMW


JUNE 25, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


DPAG A-






JUNE 25, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


Men's Health Day


At Local Churches

The Duval County Health Department, Northeast
Florida Medical Society, Healthy Jacksonville Healthy
Men Prostate Cancer program, and others will conduct
Men's Health Day on Sunday, June 26 9:00 a.m.-2:00
p.m. at selected churches throughout the Jacksonville
area.
Free blood pressure, Prostate Cancer Screenings and
health information will be available.
Churches include: Abyssinia Missionary Baptist
Church, 2360 Kings Rd.; Bethel Baptist Institutional
Church, 215 Bethel Baptist St.; Faith Christian
Center, 8050 Lone Star Rd.; First Baptist Church of
Oakland, 1025 Jessie St.; Grace Baptist Church,
1553 E. 21st. St.; Greater Grant Memorial AME
Church, 5533 Gilchrist Rd.; Mt. Olive AME Church,
841 Franklin St.; Mt. Sinai, 2036 Silver St.; New
Bethel AME Church, 1231 Tyler St.; Potter's House
Christian Fellowship, 5119 Normandy Blvd.; St. Paul
AME Church, 6910 New Kings Rd.; Tabernacle
Baptist Church, 903 E. Union St.; Wayman Chapel
AME Church, 8855 Sanchez Rd.; and Westside
Church of Christ, 23 W. 8th St. For more information
call 665-2520.

St. James AME Church Of Orange Park
To Host Dedicatory Service
St. James AME Church, the
oldest church, in Clay County,
Florida, will hold its last wor-
*. ship at 504 McIntosh Ave. in
Orange Park, Fla. on Sunday,
June 26.
The congretaion has built a
new foundation at 535
McIntosh Ave., and will hold
it's Dedicatory Service on
Saturday, January 25 at 9:00
Bishop a.m. with Bishop McKinley
McKinley Young Young, Presiding Prelate of
the ll1th Episcopal District
AME Church (Florida and The Bahamas).
For more information contact Mallen Davis at (904)
278-7037 or Rev. Alesia Scott Ford at (904) 563-5761.


..=. ..-r p
t .. 9".ing i

: A.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR
Pre-Need, Planning


To help relieve their families of
some of these decisions, an increasing
number of people are planning their own
funerals, designating their funeral prefer-
ences, and sometimes even paying for them
in advance. They see funeral planning as an
extension of will and estate planning.
Thinking ahead can help you make
informed and thoughtful decisions about
funeral arrangements. It allows you to
choose the specific items you want and
need and compare the prices offered by
several funeral providers. It also spares
your survivors the stress of making these
decisions under the pressure of time and
strong emotions.
You can make arrangements directly
with a funeral establishment or through a
funeral planning or memorial society a
nonprofit organization that provides.infor-
mation about funerals and disposition but
doesn't offer funeral services. If you choose
to contact such, a group, recognize that
while some funeral, homes may include the
word "society" in their names, they are not


nonprofit organizations.
One other important consideration
when planning a funeral pre-need is where
the remains will be buried, entombed or
scattered. In the" short time between the
death and burial of a loved one, many fam-
ily members find themselves rushing to
buy a cemetery plot or grave often with-
out careful thought or a .personal visit to
the site. That's why it's in the family's best
interest to buy cemetery plots before you
need them.
You may wish to make decisions
about your arrangements in advance, but
not pay for them in advance. Keep in mind
that over time, prices may go up and busi-
nesses may close or change ownership.
However, in some areas with increased
competition, prices may go down- over
time.

"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
566t Moncrlef Rd."
Tel: 768-0507
www,ABColempn.com


r


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-


REVIVAL/SUMMER CONCERT-A Revival will held
June 27-28, 7:00 p.m. nightly at First New Zion Missionary
Baptist Church, 4835 Soutel Dr. Rev. Keith Canady of
Greater Macedonia Baptist Church is the Lecturer. Rev.
Shawn Williams of Greater New Jereusalem Baptist Church
is the Evangelist. The Music Ministry of the church presents
A Summer Concert on Sunday, June 26 at 5:00 p.m. Music
groups from throughout the city are expected to participate.
Bro. Ron Andres, Musician; Rev. James J. Sampson,
Minister of Music. Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, Pastor.
SISTER TO SISTER CONFERENCE 2005-All services
for the Sister to Sister Conference 2005 will be held on
Friday, June 24 and Saturday, June 25 at The Faith
Deliverence Tabernacle located at 220 Mill Creek Rd.
Registration is free and servcies begin nightly at 7:30 p.m
Lady Bridgett M. Battles of The Power and Praise
Tabernacle in High Point, NC and Philadelphia, PA, will be
featured on June 25. Co-Pastor Dianne Barrino of Mercy
Outreach Church of Deliverance of High Point, NC, mother
of recording artist Fantasia, will be featured on June 26.
Pastor Thomas Grant and Lady Twanda Grant are hosts.
MASS CHOIR IN CONCERT-The Mass Choir of Greater
Grant Memorial AME Church, 5533 Gilchrist Rd., will
hosts its 19th Annual Anniversary and Pew Rally on Sunday,
June 26 beginning at 5:00 p.m. The public is invited to
attend. Rev. Tony D. Hansberry, Pastor.
MEMORIAL SERVICES- Memorial Services for Mrs.
Theresa Lockwood will be held at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, June
25 at Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church, 2036 Silver
St. Rev. R.L. Gundy, Pastor.
SERVICE OF ORDINATION-Resurrection Baptist
Church, Christian Center, 6046 Moncrief Rd. W., invites the
public to "The Laying on of Hands" a Service of Ordination
for Bro. Charles Edward Gooden and Bro. Jesse Lee Prince,
Sr. to the Deaconate and Sis. Parthenia Johnson-Gooden to
The Deaconess Minstry. The servcie will be held on Sunday,
June 26 at 4:00 p.m. Rev Glenn F. Foreman, Sr., Pastor.
BUILDING DEDICATION-The Holy Ministries Church
Family, 7541 Lem Turner Rd., invites the pubic to join them
in a celebration to dedicate their new buidling on June 26, at
5:00 p.m. Elder Michael Madison, Pastor. Elder Houston
White, Overseer.
CHAMBER MUSIC SECOND SEASON-The Chamber
Music Society of Good Shepherd's second season of free
concerts includes performances at 6:00 p.m. on Sunday,
June 19, Saturday, July 17, Sunday, August 21, and Sunday,
September 18, all in Craig Hall. Church of The Good
Shepherd is located at Park and Stockton Streets. Henson
Markham, Artistic Director. David Bowen, MM., Organist-
choirmaster. Rev. James W. Harris, Jr., Rector.


Phone Home It's Me God!


"For what profit is it to a man if he gains the whole
world, and lose his own soul? Or what will a man give
in exchange for his soul?" Matthew 16:26
If you knew you could make a lot more money sim-
ply by stepping on a co-worker who also happens to be
a friend, would you? Many people do, reasoning that all
that extra money and success is going to be reward
enough for having to stab someone else in the back.
Ultimately, it's not worth it. In the end, when you
leave this world, you will go out the same way you
came in with nothing but your soul. It is your soul
which will be granted eternal life. However, it could be
eternity in Heaven or not.
If you've "sold your soul," as Matthew says, the
devil will be there waiting to collect. If not, you will
receive the best reward much,. much better than that
fleeting extra money. You will live forever with Me in
paradise.




Evangel
STemple

l h/\ ,,j (, l,,d. I .
June 26th
Revival Service
SJim Raley
Sunday @ 6:00 p.m.
e God is at 1Vork.
Are Yois Desirng More- of His Presence
in Yor f.if' ?
1)0o Youi Nt-ed a 3i-rcakLithiroiiugh?


W75 miLumiaa Bi
Jack-scmn;i~c. FL .

90-4-781 -9%'


e1 t Jr. -IIPI.i'I- g.9


Ilvd.
52205

393



'C[


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


1 l


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


S; WORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship.... 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service.....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

S 2005 Youth

Summer Camp
Mt. Sinai Community Development Enterprise
2049 North Pearl Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (904) 798-8733

Nine Week Program-May 23-July 29, 2005
6:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Ages 6-15
One Time Non Refundable Registration Fee-$25
Weekly Rate-$45


For more information
Call Michael Stanfield
(904) 798-8733


*Afls & C


*Arts & C
*Recreatio


rafts *Computer Literacy
)n *Field Trips
*Weekly Worship


URGENT HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY

TRANSPLANT!

for Samuel W. Smith
PLEASE GIVE!

(904) 765-9773

* S L iz


The Church Directory

"Come and Worship With Us"

Did You Know?
Mt. Charity Missionary Baptist Church
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Telephone: (904) 356-0664
*About 1,200 African-American babies are killed by abortion in the
United States every day.
*Since the legalization of abortion in 1973, 14 million Black children have
been aborted. [U.S. Center for Diseased Control (CDC)]
*Approximately 35% of all abortions in the United States are performed
on African-American women, while they represent only 13% of the
female population of the country. [U.S. CDC, 1999 U.S. Census Bureau]
Jeremiah l:5-"Before I formed thee in the belley I knew thee, and before thou
camest forth out of the womb, I sanctified thee."


GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


I


II


(I


PAGE A-4





JUNE25.200 FLRID


Budget Shortfall, the Offender Program and Taser Talks
BUDGET: The FY 05 city budget shortfall and the -.
bleak forecast for the FY 06 budget year have required
the Sheriffs Office to join all city agencies and depart- "-'. :
ments in a close self-examination of our operation. i
Naturally we have taken a very hard look at all our
departments for every possible "belt-tightening" oppor-
tunity and looked for ways to save even more money
and NOT compromise citizen safety and our effective-
ness as an Agency. At press time for this publication no ,-"
final decisions had been made, but I want to thank
everyone in our Agency for their help with this effort.
We also have found it very gratifying to learn of the
community's confidence that we are operating the JSO Jacksonville Sheriff John
lean and efficiently. I appreciate you all, along with our Rutherford
City Council, supporting our efforts to prevent any
sizeable cuts in funding to the JSO. We'll keep you informed as the situation devel-
ops.
OFFENDER PROGRAM WORKING: On June 15 UNF's Criminology and
Criminal Justice.department chair Dr. Michael Hallett announced the findings of a
study that supports our creation of programs like the Habitual Misdemeanor Offender
Program which diverts repeat non violent offenders in need of drug treatment to
treatment programs. The study substantiates what corrections professionals have
known, that part of the solution for solving the recidivism rate among non-violent
drug users who are frequently arrested is to get them the treatment they need for their
addictions. The decline in re-arrests on similar charges for those who complete the
programs is evident, as well as the overall cost savings as the treatment is more cost
effective than incarceration. The success rate for those who go into a treatment pro-
gram is significantly greater than for those who choose the alternative of remaining
in jail. The complete study is available through the Department of Criminology and
Criminal Justice at UNF.
TASER TALKS: The last two taser town hall meetings will be held in late June.
Follow up meetings are scheduled with the PTA presidents, the Duval Teacher's
union, the School Board and the middle and high school principals. I have also
addressed all the Roll Calls, the annual meeting of the Department of Patrol and
Enforcement, and others both inside the Agency and externally. I appreciate the
response from the civic community to invite me to address their memberships. during
their meetings of the past few months, and all the participation by citizens at our
meetings. Director Rick Lewis is currently reviewing the recommendations of the
Post Restraint Task Force, related to in-custody deaths. He will be incorporating their
recommendations into the protocols for taser use, making necessary revisions to the
Use of Force Matrix and related regulations, and revising our training curriculum for
officers on these subjects..
I appreciate your feedback. You can report suspected.criminal activity to our non-
emergency phone number at 630-0500 or online at www.coj.net/jso, or by calling a
Zone Office, I'd also like to encourage you to .participate in the Sheriffs Advisory
Councils (ShAdCo). Information about the meetings is available by calling 630-2162
or the Zone Office.
Your continued support of the men and women of the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office
is greatly appreciated. Our pledge to this .community is, our foundation: To be men
and women of character, well equipped, properly deployed and skillfully managed.





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Epiphany Baptist Churches Issues Resolution to Address
Community Needs

WHEREAS, Epiphany Baptist Church is located at 663 South McDuff Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32205: and
WHEREAS, The Church is sponsoring a Youth and Young Adult Summer
Mentoring Program oneach Friday evening at 6:30 PM, to address some of the
educational, social and cultural needs; and
WHEREAS, Some of the social needs are far reaching and necessary in the lives of
many of our participants; and
WHEREAS, Some of these social needs, need to be addressed across the city, state
and country, especially the need to change the dress code as it relates to how pants
are worn far below the waist by some and including the negativity gold and silver
bridges are within their mouths; and
WHEREAS, we urge the City Government, Health Department and School District
of Jacksonville, Florida to join us by supporting a resolution in addressing this type
of dress code in public and in our schools as we walk together in Unity, Faith and
Love;.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, we recommend that our City Officials,
Health Department, Dental Association and School District, support the concept of
the said resolution; and
NOW FURTHER BE IT RESOLVED, we urge the Health Department to conduct a
study on health issues as it relates to gold and silver teeth and bridges worn by
some of our children/students:

DONE BY ORDER OF
Epiphany Baptist Church
Dr. Edward Fields, Jr., Pastor
Deacon Richard P. Burton, Sr., Mentoring Chairperson

Thank you for reading
THE FLORIDA STAR
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JUNE 25, 2005


U.S. Housing Secretary Alphonso Jackson


Speaks At Juneteenth Luncheon


LEFT FRAME: From left are Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton, United States Housing Secretary Alphonso Jackson, and Ronnie Ferguson. RIGHT FRAME: Jacksonville City
Councilwoman Gloribus Johnson makes a presentation to Lawrence Jefferson, President of the Joseph E. Lee Club.


Juneteenth in Jacksonville, Where Florida begins on the
First Coast is fast becoming a celebrated event. The African-


American Chamber of Commerce also held a citywide
Juneteenth celebration over the weekend.


In observance of the Joseph E. Lee Republican Club's
Community Awards Luncheon and Juneteenth, Celebration
United States Housing Secretary Alphonso Jackson came to
town.
Jackson didn't have much choice as he made time in his
hectic schedule to visit the Black Republican Club at the per-
sonal invitation of State Representative Jennifer Carroll.
Jackson spoke to a packed gathering of over 400 black and
white Republicans at the Radisson Riverwalk Hotel.
In what has become a rare ritual, Mayor John Peyton pre-
sented the Secretary of the United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development with the Key to the City of
Jacksonville.
City Councilwoman Glorious Johnson presented awards
to Mike Hightower, Woodrow Page, Toni Crawford,
Reginald Gaffney and Lawrence Jefferson.
Over the years sporadic observations of Juneteenth have
been observed. However, founding president of the Joseph
E. Lee Republican Club, Lawrence Jefferson noted,
"Juneteenth Celebration will be an annual occurrence of the
local African-American club. Juneteenth has been an offi-
cial holiday in Florida since 1991."
The first Juneteenth Celebration was originated in
Galveston, Texas as enslaved Africans learned of their free-
dom on June 19,1865.
The Honorable Alphonso Jackson a native of Marshall,
Texas stated that since 1865 grand celebrations have been
continuously held in Texas where the Lone Star State cele-
brates this holiday. In his speech Jackson addressed numer-
ous landmark achievements lead by Republicans in interests
of Black Americans. He also elaborated on President Bush's
priorities in education and housing bringing Blacks and
Hispanics into mainstream America.
Several times in his speech Jackson referenced his hum-
ble beginnings. He is the youngest of 12 children. His father
had only a 5th grade education and his mother never gradu-
ated from high school. Both parents are Republicans and
saw to it that all of their children were educated.
Jackson's mother told her children, "It might be insane
to live with a dream, but it is madness to live without one."
Living the dream wasn't always easy for his family, never the
less, Alphonso Jackson dreamed all the while pursuing high-
er education with degrees in political science, educational
administration and law.
Before accepting his former neighbor, President Bush's
appointment as Deputy Secretary of HUD in 2001 and
Secretary in 2004, Alphonso Jackson was president of
American Electric Power-Texas.


Origin Of American Black Church Explored Through Biography


GAINESVILLE, Fla. ---
As blacks and others contin-
ue to celebrate Juneteenth,
the role of the church in the
emancipation of the slaves
will not be forgotten.
A new book by a
University of Florida histo-
ry professor explores the
origins of the black
Protestant 'church in
America through the life of
an 18th-century former
slave named Rebecca
Protten, who converted to
Christianity and later
became a missionary.
Juneteenth, observed on
June 19, commemorates
when the last slaves in
America were freed in Texas
in 1865.
Because of their living
conditions, many slaves
looked to the church for
reassurance and the possibil-
ity of a better life after
death.
The church also was the
one place a slave could
express himself or herself
freely' without the fear of
punishment or death.
In his book, "Rebecca's
Revival," professor John
Sensbach argues that
Protten's conversion to
Christianity and preaching
efforts among enslaved
workers helped lay the
groundwork for what would
become the black church
more than a century before
emancipation in the United
States.


"We know that the black
church- is the vessel of
African-American culture
and has been for several cen-
turies," said Sensbach, who
began researching Protten
and her connection with the
black church in 2001. "The
more I began to look at her,
I realized that she was a very
important figure who can
help us to understand this


larger issue."
Sensbach found informa-
tion on Protten's life in
records kept by the mission-
aries and writers from her'
time, translating them from
German, Dutch and Danish.
Through those records, he
found that Protten was born
around 1718 of mixed racial
descent and was sold into
slavery in the Danish colony


of St. Thomas in the present-
day U.S. Virgin Islands.
Through his research,
Sensbach found that
Christianity became promi-
nent in black society
because it was a religion of
empowerment and spiritual
freedom that sustained them
through the ravages of
racism and slavery.


By Marsha Dean Phelts


.4


2 .


"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted

&

The Victory is in the Word & Music



Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.
Topic For June 25, 2005:
The People's Advocate interviews a mother
who turned the tragic lost
of her son into a thriving community
outreach program for Tots and Teens.




6050-6 AMoncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) '765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
fWeb address: WfI! If CGL 360.COM
\A







JUJN ) 2.u-.A ARA A


NASHVILLE, Tenn. -It
might seem odd for an
'African American to join a
faith that once supported
slavery, but black pastors of
the Southern Baptist
Convention say much has
changed since the issue split
Baptists in America nearly
200 years ago.
"Yesterday and today,
they are different days," said
Robert Anderson, president
of the African American
Fellowship of the Southern
Baptist Convention and pas-
tor of Colonial Baptist
Church in Randallstown,
.Md.
"The convention as a
whole has come a long way,


obviously from the days of
slavery and Jim Crow. We
have a lot more African
Americans involved in the
convention than ever
before."
Anderson will be among
a number of blacks attend-
ing the annual two-day
meeting of the convention
beginning Tuesday in
Nashville.
About 3,000 black
churches are affiliated with
the convention of about 16.2
million members.
It's a far cry from the
denomination's early years
When such incorporation
was unheard of.
During the 1830s ten-


sions among Baptists in the
North and South began to
mount, mainly over slavery.
It was a major economic
resource in the South and
was embraced by Baptists
there. But those in the
North opposed it, contend-
ing God doesn't condone
treating one race superior to
the other.
The bickering came to a
head in May of 1845 when
Baptists in the South met
and organized the Southern
Baptist Convention.
But since then, Anderson
said, Southern Baptists have
taken steps to repair their
tarnished past.
One of the biggest moves
came about 10 years ago
when the convention issued
a resolution apologizing for
slavery. In addition, the
denomination has 23 ethnic
fellowships.
Richard Harris, vice
president of church planning


for the North American
Mission Board of the
Southern Baptist
Convention, said the fellow-
ship groups are an "integral
part of our convention."
They're Southern
Baptists to the core," Harris
said. "They just want to fel-
lowship together because of
their culture and history."
Anderson, who will
usher in a new fellowship
president at this year's con-
vention, agreed. "We wanted
to share what we have in
common as an ethnic body
of people," he said.
Robert Parham, execu-
tive director of the Baptist
Center', for Ethics in
Nashville, said he still finds
it unusual that blacks in par-
ticular would support a
denomination that strongly
supports President Bush,
who received less than 10
percent of the black vote in
the last election.


Black Pastors Say Much



Has Changed In America


(News from Press Release and wire services)

80 Year-old Former Klu Klux Klansman
Found Guilty In 1964 Killings

PHILADELPHIA, Miss. An 80-
year-old former Ku Klux Klansman was
found guilty of manslaughter Tuesday
in a trial that marked Mississippi's latest
attempt to atone for its racist past.
The jury of nine whites and three
| -blacks took less than six hours to clear
Edgar Ray Killen of murder but convict
S....- him of the lesser charges in the 1964
Edgar Ray killings that galvanized the struggle for
Killen equality and helped bring about passage
of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
Killen, a bald figure with owlish bifocals,, sat impassive-
ly in his wheelchair, an oxygen tube up his nose, as he lis-
tened to the verdict.
"Forty-one years after the tragic murders ... justice final-
ly arrives in Philadelphia, Miss," said Rep. Bennie
Thompson, Mississippi's only black congressman. "Yet, the
state.of Mississippi must see to it that the wrongs of yester-
day do not become the albatrosses of today." ,

House GOP Craft Social Security Bill

WASHINGTON--Key Republicans rallied Wednesday
behind a plan to introduce Social Security personal,
accounts on a more modest scale than President Bush favors.
Democrats swiftly accused Republicans of mounting a
fresh attempt to privatize the Depression-era program. "This
is privatization, plain and simple," said Rep. Sander Levin
(news, bio, voting record), D-Mich. "Just like President
Bush's plan, this proposal would take money from Social
Security to set up private accounts."
In a blow to the White -House, Republicans said their
measure will not contain any of the politically painful cost-
cutting steps needed to ,ensure long-term solvency for Social
Security -,higher taxes, an increase in the retirement age or
curbs in benefits. Bush has made solvency and personal
accounts financed from payroll taxes the twin goals of his
call to overhaul the program. Despite an extensive nation-
wide campaign, he has failed to generate significant public
support for his proposals.
Democrats are virtually.united in their opposition and are
preparing to use thie issue in the 2006 midterm elections.,

Darfur Rebel Group Threatens To Quit
Peace Talks, Alleging Government Attacks

BRABUJA, Nigeria (AP) The main rebel movement in
Sudan's troubled Darfur region threatened to quit peace talks
with the government, alleging fresh attacks on its posi-
tions.
It was the latest setback in the effort to bring calm to a
region where a civil war has sparked one of the world's worst
humanitarian disasters.
Tens of thousands of people have'been killed many
from hunger and disease that have taken hold amid the chaos
and more than two million others have been displaced from
,their homes since fighting broke out more than two years
iago.
Mahgoub Hussein, spokesman, for the Sudanese
Liberation Army, said Wednesday that ground attacks that
'morning by Sudanese troops backed by allied militia forces
targeted its strongholds at Manywashi in the west of Darfur
and.Teioshya i the east.


Gains Seen In Felon Voting Laws


NEW YORK advocates
for restoring felons' right to
vote say they are making
progress in rolling back laws
that disproportionately
affect blacks and other
minorities.
As of 2000, almost 5


million Americans couldn't
vote because of laws that
restrict those convicted of a
felony from casting ballots -
- in some cases even after
their sentences and parole
are complete, according to
the Sentencing Project,, a


Washington-based group
that favors alternatives to
prison. Four in 10 of those
disenfranchised were black.
Advocates are now cele-
brating developments such
as Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack's
announcement that he plans


to reverse his state's lifetime
ban on felon voting.
On Wednesday, the full
2nd U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in New York heard
arguments in cases brought
by two prisoners -- one now
freed-- who say that the
1965 Voting Rights Act,
which removed barriers to
black voters, can be used to
argue that the felony laws
are unfair.
Forty-eight states restrict
voting rights for felons
while they are behind bars or
serving parole or probation,
according to the Sentencing
Project. Besides Iowa, four
other states-- Alabama,
Florida, Kentucky and
Virginia-- ban voting for
life, the groups says.
Some argue that such
restrictions are justified.
Massachusetts voters
agreed, and in 2000, barred
prisoners from voting.
(Those on parole and proba-
tion can still cast ballots.)'
Though a few other
states have further restricted
felons from voting in recent
years, more have moved in
the opposite direction.
In 2001, New Mexico
lifted a lifetime ban, and
Nebraska followed suit in
March. In several states,
felons can now apply to
have their voting rights
restored.
Such waivers had
become commonplace in
Iowa, where Vilsack said he
would sign an executive
order allowing those who
complete their sentences and
parole to vote.
In recent years, Florida
has made it easier for felons
to have their voting rights
restored, and in the 12
months ending last June 30,
nearly 56,000 prisoners
regained voting rights,
according to Jane Tillman of
the state's parole commis-
sion.
Gov. Jeb Bush
"believes we have a fair and
good clemency system in
place for the restoration of
civil rights, including vot-
ing," said spokeswoman
Alia Faraj.


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,Sha re it, with a kid,


Your experience can inspire the

next generation. Volunteer today!




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www.ja.org.


- II I


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PAGE A-7.


JUNE 25 2005


FLORIDA STAR


. :


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Rides A me-r do






rAtipL' A- I I flRtlA STAR .IIJNE 2.?,200


Tommy The Clown: Innovative Father of Clown Dancing And Krumping!
by Rvch McCain

Lionsgate Films will release the documentary film RIZE this
weekend. The film is an inside look and examination of a single
man who created a persona i.e., "Tommy The Clown," and a
dance style called "clowning" which gave birth to a dance phe-
nomenon that has swept South Central LA called "Krumping!"
This is a 'MUST SEE' film! It exposes a revolutionary form of
artistic expression which was born out of the oppression and
racism purposely orchestrated and targeted to black ghettos
everywhere, particularly in South Central Los Angeles!
The aggressive and visually stunning dance modernizes w
moves indigenous to native African tribal rituals. For non-blacks
out side of the "hood," and its lifestyle, watching the athletic
body moves being performed at warp speed by the Krumpers is
a mind blowing experience to witness. In the film, they run a dis-
claimer that the film dance 'sequences were not speeded up.
Those of us from the hood didn't need that disclaimer. Thomas do .
"Tommy The Clown" Johnson created his character in 1992
when a friend made a desperate phone call to provide entertain- .
ment for her child's birthday party. After which he kept the
clowning going in response to the Rodney King rebellion.
Tommy created clown dancing and added on clown dancers i
to do parties for the children in South Central LA. He would pull ".
his van up, filled with speakers, turn the music up and dance in "Tommy the Clown" (Photo 2005 Andre' B.
front of the house. All the neighbors on the block would come MurraylA Bern Agency Photo)
circle around to. enjoy the dancers. Soon young people started
forming their own dance crews and clowning gave birth to Krumping. From here, Tornmmy realized that he had started
a movement and became a very popular, positive role model for the youth in the community. To keep them engaged
with an alternative to gangs etc., Tommy created the Battle Zone where they could challenge and battle it out on the
dance floor rather than on the streets.
In 2003, Tommy the clown's Battle Zone hosted a sold-out performance at the Los Angeles Forum. Tommy contin-
ues the battles every third Saturday of every month at the Debbie Allen Dance Academy in Culver City, CA. These bat-
tles are performed in a dance ring that looks exactly like a boxing ring with two ropes. A chair is placed on each side
of the ring. Tommy referees with a whistle as opponents get three turns to out dance each other. These battles have the
excitement and high energy of a WWF Wrestlemainia event.
Did Tommy ever envision that his clown creation would grow to the point of a movie and worldwide attention? He
reflects, "Back in 1992, 1 knew I was going to strive in something I love to do. I didn't care what was outcome. I want-
ed it to be something successful. I wanted to move forward in what I was doing. Everybody was saying you got some-
thing, you're on to something, they need to do something. I would hear it, but by me working and doing everything on
my own, taking loses, going through crazyness, I would always pray. What is miy goal, where would I be in five years?
I didn't know. I knew I'd be doing some parties and maybe be the oldest clown that ever lived or something. I didn't
know it was going to turn out to.be a movie. Its amazing man."
In the film Tommy learns that his house had been broken into while he was at the Forum battling. How did that sit-
uation turn out? Tommy answers, "When I found out that they broke in, I started crying. I was sad when they told me
the house was shattered. Every since then, I kept strong, stayed strong and moved into an apartment. My hope value is
still up; I've got God in my life. He's my inspiration of knowing that no matter what you go through, you can rise. That's
why I like the title of the movie."
Tommy and his dancers have been from London and Taiwan demonstrating their Krump style and young people are
loving it worldwide. RIZE should be nominated for a best documentary Oscar hands down and win!


Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
Houston based rapper CHAMILLIONAIRE AKA
The "Mixtape Messiah," has dropped a new mixtape
while his debut Chamilitary/Universal album is set to
be released soon. We featured Chamillionaire back in
February and the brotha is more than ready. The Ying
Yang Twins will be releasing their new CD United State
of Atlanta. Our heart-felt condolences goes out to the
family and friends of the late Oscar Brown Jr., an
incredible vocalist, poet and songwriter who recently
made his transition to our ancestors.
Next Tuesday, June 28, the 2005 BETAWARDS will
broadcast live. Exec producer Stephen Hill strongly
warns the viewers to tune in early as not to miss the
8p.m. sharp opening. Hill warns, "If you get there at
8:05 p.m., you won't have a clue what people are talk-
ing about around the water cooler in the morning. That's
how dope the show is, and that's how hot the opening
is." Will Smith and wife Jada Pinkett Smith will co-
host.
Bonita Entertainment, LLC, an all Black owned and
operated film company, has released a DVD movie,
"Who's Making Tha Rules." It stars Jamal Hamilton
aka J Walq who credits include "The Steve Harvey
Show," "Snoop's Doggie Fizzle Televizzle" MTV Show
and is a member of the hip-hop group "Homeless
Nation," which has a cut on the soundtrack. It also stars
Laura Hayes, formerly of BET's "Comic View," host of
the Queens of Comedy and the movie Beauty Shop. The
cast is rounded out with Kareem Grimes, June Do and
Pimpin Young. If you experience difficulty in getting a
copy, ask your store buyer or go to www.bonitaenter-
tainment.com.
Bewitched (Columbia Tri-Star Pictures), starring
Nicole Kidman, Will Ferrell, Shirley MacLaine and
Michael Caine, is a remake of the 60s sitcom of the
same name. This one is a love story with a different
twist. Kidman plays Isabel, a real witch who attracts the
attention and admiration of bumbling failed actor Jack
Wyatt played by Ferrell. Wyatt is signed to star in the
TV remake of "Bewitched" and insist that Isabel be
hired to play the part of his TV wife Samatha.
Wyatt doesn't know that Isabel is a real witch and
things escalates from there. Michael Caine has an
endearing part as Isabel's warlock dad Nigel Bigelow,
who disapproves of her relationship with Wyatt a mor-
tal. Shirley McLaine rounds out the main cast as Isabel's
TV mom Iris. (This role was Endora on the original TV
series). The plot was cute but is too much of a sleeper
and won't keep your attention if you like a good steady
paced film.
Rych
Maat-Hotep!


Will and Jada to Host 2005 BET Awards

BET celebrates its 5th year of
honoring superlative achievement
in music, entertainment and sports
with a star-studded "live" telecast of
the '05 BET AWARDS the net-
work's top-rated and television's
most-watched awards program
among ....
African-American viewers. ;it
Anchored by Hollywood power
couple Will Smith and Jada Pinkett
Smith, this year's show is guaran-
teed to ignite excitement like never
before! The show format includes
glitzy red carpet arrivals, explosive
show performances, and riveting
tributes by the hottest names in
entertainment.
The show will be telecast live
Tuesday, June 28 at 8 p.m. ET from
the Kodak Theatre in Hollywod.
Award presenters include:
Destiny's Child, Mariah Carey,
Missy Elliott, The Game, Ciara, Will Smith and Jada Pinkett to host the '05 BET
John Legend, Halle Berry, Awards.
Stevie Wonder, Alicia Keys, Steve Harvey, Mario, T.I. and Mary J. Blige.
Special honorees include: Gladys Knight BET Lifetime Achievement Award
Recipient and Denzel and Pauletta Washington BET Humanitarian Award
Recipients.


a a


u was a s a "Nowa SW
The Readers of the Black Press in-I
America are more educated,|
make more income1
and have1
substantial buying
a power.i





6L Source: The Media Audit
iib -. ;,,: .2-"., 2004 Black Newspapers Readership
Report, nnpa.org

U i I Iail n IN a


WEDDING OF A LIFETIME

A lucky couple will win the wedding of a lifetime

on June 30th when two TAMA Broadcasting FM

radio stations, HOT 105.7 and Rejoice! 92.5,

announce a grand-prize winner.



The extravagant grand-prize includes:

*Roundtrip airfare from Orlando to the Bahamas

*Limousine service, seven days at an all inclusive resort

*Professional videotaping of the wedding ceremony.



TAMA Broadcasting, Inc., along with Bahamas Air, Viva

Wyndham Fortuna Beach Resort and the Islands of the

Bahamas is making it possible for a couple to be married

or to renew their vows in the Grand Bahamas.

Register by June 27th to qualify for the

drawing at the following locations:

-- Fashion Star at Gateway Shopping Center

-- La Beauty in Regency Square Mall

-- Jacksonville Beauty Institute on Soutel Drive.
TAMA Broadcasting, Inc., the largest African-American owned and operated
media company in Florida, operating stations in Jacksonville, Tampa, Daytona
and Greenville, South Carolina.
Log on to www.whjx.biz for more information, or tune-in to Hot 105.7 FM and
Rejoice! Musical Soul Food at 92.5FM.


FTLORIDA STAR


.NJNE 2. 2005


.1


DAf A _




PAGE B-1


F nlORnA .TA R


rTTATJ- IC WI


JUNEL 25, ZUU5


"COMMUNITY

CAPTIONS
Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
k events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.,

SUMMER SLAM-The
SFund Raising
Committee of -the
Carnival Organization
of Jacksonville presents
I Summer Slam on
Saturday, June 25, at
9:00 p.m. at Bishop
Kenny, Knights of
Columbus Hall, 1501
Hendricks Ave. The
event features The King
i of Calypso The Mighty
Sparrow and The TNT
The Mighty Sparrow Troubadours along with
the LU and The Legendary Supreme Team. For ticket
information call (904) 465-1989 or (904) 994-3737.
TEACHER CERTIFICATION INFORMATION
SESSION-The American Board for certification of
teacher Excellence will host a teacher certification
information session in Jacksonville on June 29, 2005.
Motivated, knowledgeable individuals with a bache-
lor's degree are cnouraged to attend an information
session to learn how to become a teacher with the
American Board's respected and efficient Passport to
teaching program. For more information, call 1-877-
NOW-ABCTE or visit www.abcte.org.
AUDITIONS-Stage Aurora Theatrical Company, Inc.
in association with the Jacksonville Chapter of The
.Links, Inc. will host audition's for the off-Broadway
Gospel Musical Crowns by Regina Taylor. Auditions
will be' held on Saturday, July 9 from 1:00 p.m.-6:00
p.m. in the FCCJ North Campus Ezekial Bryant Audito
rium located at 4501 Capper Rd. Six women and one
man who are powerful gospel singers are needed for
roles in the production. For more information contact
Stage Aurora Theatrical Company at (904) 765-7373.
AMERICAN LEGION, POST 197 EVENTS-
American Legion, Post 197, located at 2179 Benedict
Rd., will honor Duval teachers during "Teachers
Night" on Friday, July 17 at 9:00 p.m.. The event is
being held in recognition of the outstanding services
and dedication of teachers in Duval County. On July 7,
Larry Douglas (aka) Georgia Boy will present his pro-
duction from 8:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m. The production will
continue until further notice each Sunday thereafter.
TALENT SHOW APPLICATIONS-The
Jacksonville Housing Authority is accepting applica-'
tions for the 14th Annual talent Show Competition and
Pageant for public housing and Section 8 youth. The
show will be held at the Florida Times Union
Performing Arts Center. For more information call
366-6096.
WALKER FAMILY REUNION-The Walker Family
Reunion will be held on June 25, 11:00 a.m. on
Sunbeam Road. Activties include a family barbecue,
fun for the kids, and a video review of family history.
For additional information contact Dolores at 353-
3465.


DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON
Hot!
Timely!

Efficacious!

North Florida's Best .X |
Daily Talk Show! '|



AM 1530
WEEKDAYS
2-6 P.M.

CALL IN PHONE: (904) 786-2400
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http://www.downtobusiness.org/
A


Wynn-Mendes





In New York (


Wed


Ity


v "Copyrighted Material

SSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers'"


By Marsha Dean Phelts


DEATH

NOTICES
ARNOLD-Martha, died June
5, 2005.
BAKER-Bernard G., 42, died
June 1, 2005.
BEAN-Timothy D.,.III, died
June 1, 2005.
BONAPARTE-Melissa, died
June 19, 2005
BORDERS-Deacon Maxie,
died June 15, 2005.
BOYD-David S., 65, died
June 2, 2005.
BRIGHT-Helen, died June
18, 2005.
BRITT-Winona V. died June
2, 2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
BUTLER-Ophelia, 95, died
June 19, 2005.
CLEMONS-Vera, died June
1, 2005.
ESTES-Baby girl Jazmin,
died June 12, 2005.
GETTIS-Riley, 51, died June
17, 2005.
GRANT-Sam, died June 3,
2005.
HALL-Jeanette, died June 16,
2005..
JONES-Ann L., died June 18,
2005.
JONES-Frank, died June 1,
2005.
LAWSON-Susie Mae, 78,
died June 1, 2005.
MADISON-James Allen, died
2,2005.
MITCHELL-Bemell K., died
June 3, 2005.
MOSS-Minnie Lee, died June
3, 2005.
PEEPLES-Annie Mae, 65,
died June 20, 2005.
RICHARDSON-Joseph I.,
43, died June 15, 2005.
SERRANO-Maria D., 47,
died June 15, 2005.
TISB-John, Jr., 77, died June
15, 2005.
TURNER-Master Breyon J.,
died June 13, 2005.
WARTHEN-Alma, died June
15, 2005.


Roger "Chip" Wynn of
Jacksonville was united in
marriage to Key Alexandra
Mendes on Sunday, May 29
in the Christ and Saint
Stephen's Episcopal Church
in Manhattan.
Roger's mother, Linda P.
Belton, well known local
wedding consultant and
events planner was there to
apply her special appliques
to the wedding in the Big
Apple. ,
Assisting Mrs. Belton
was her cousin and business
partner Carol Gamble-
Buckman also of
Jacksonville and local pho-
tographer Clarence Evans.
Each reports a magnificent
experience as they carried
out special preparations to
provide the talented couple
the wedding of their dream.
Roger, a graduate of
Ribault High School,
Howard University and the
Fashion Institute of
Technology is a design prod-
uct manager for the Ralph R.
Lauren divisions of Polo
Ralph Lauren in New York.
His bride is an associate
counsel specializing in


employee benefits for the
1199 National Benefit and
Pension Funds in
Manhattan.
Key Mendes graduated
from Amherst College in
Massachusetts with honors.
She received her law degree
from New York's Fordham
University. She is. the
daughter of New Yorkers
Yvonne Marie Clark and
Maxwell Mendes.
During a pre wedding
breakfast in Times Square
members of the wedding
party received gifts from the
couple.
The mothers of the cou-
ple were presented bracelets
from Tiffany Jewelry Store.
The best man, Rodney
Wynn and bridesmaid,
Robin Wynn, brother and
sister of the groom were
most delighted by the per-
sonal gifts they received
from the couple.
The colors for the wed-
ding were hot pink and sil-
ver. The bride was beautiful
in a white strapless A-line
matte gown. Her hair was
styled in an up do with a
sweeping cluster of curls.


She wore a veil adorned
with a pearl and sequined
comb. Her father, Maxwell
Mendes gave the bride
away.
The bride's mother,
Yvonne Marie Clark self
designed and made the pale
yellow suit that she wore.
Linda Belton was outfitted
in a silver brocade tea length
suit.
During, the ceremony
tears of joy ran freely
between the couple Rev.
Terence Gleeson, assistant
priest of the nearly 200 year
old Christ and Saint
Stephen's Chtirch acknowl-
edged that this was the first
wedding that he had per-
formed in the United States.
Rev. Glesson of Australia
remarked that he didn't
know if he should cry too as
the bride and groom shared a
handkerchief to absorb their
tears.
Mr. and Mrs. Roger
Wynn of Brooklyn, New
York HONEYMOONED in
Aruba and will visit with
area family later in the sum-
mer.


Musical Celebrations Planned For Sundays


UUCJ Musical
Celebrations will be held on
Sunday in July beginning at
10:45 a.m. at the Unitarian
Universalist Church of
Jacksonville located at 7405
Arlington Expressway
Sunday, July 3- Sue
Illingworth Barbershop
Quartet.
Sunday, July 10- Peggy
Ezell, soprano; Scott
Watkins, piano. Cycle of
Hdly Songs by contempo-
rary American composer
Ned Rore, Peggy Ezell and
Scott Watkins are JU faculty
members.
Sunday, July 17-Ron


Davis, front porch music
Sunday, July 24-
Sharon Scholl: String
Quartet (first performance),
Timothy Edwards and
Virginia Martin, violin;
Diana Fanders, viola;
Nancy Cohan, cello.
Sharon Scholl takes the
idea of an 18th century suite
of dances as the basis for a
21st century string quartet
whose movements are
Folksong, Slow Drag,
Hopak, Habanera, and
Hoedown.
Sunday, July 31-
Jonathan Lawrence, violin;
Henson Markham, harpsi-


Schord.
-. Sonata
in C
Minor
a n d
t ._ Bach


a Shirley
Jonathan Gr a y,
Lawrence mezzo.
Jonathan Lawrence is a
2003 graduate of Douglas
Anderson and winner of the
Friday Musicale Scholarship
Competition in violin, now
entering his junior year at
Stetson.






FLORIDA STAR


.JUNE 25. 2005


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Hurricane Preparedness


During hurricane season, the line separating safety W.
and endangerment for your family is drawn by prepared-
ness. The First Coast has a long history of dodging hur- ,
ricane disaster, but the potential for danger in our area is
very real; and the secret to weathering a disaster is plan-
ning in advance.
Hurricane preparedness is a hot topic this year
because of the devastation many experienced from last
season's storms. In spite of the propensity for past
storms to bypass Jacksonville, it is wise to remember
that every storm is a potential threat that We should take
seriously.
One of the best ways to prepare for this hurricane season is to have a plan in
place to protect your self from the surge of water associated with many major
storms. Storm surge is one of the most dangerous threats facing our residents. The
flooding it brings, to coastal areas causes nine out of every ten hurricane-related
deaths. I encourage you to find out your evacuation zone and determine whether
or not you live in an area susceptible to damage from storm surge. And, when
evacuation orders are issued, it is extremely important to listen to the experts'
instructions. As unsettling as it is to leave behind your home and personal belong-
ings, having a hurricane evacuation plan will make the process much easier and
utilizing it may even save a life.
Evacuation zones and more tips to help you and your family prepare for this
hurricane season can be found in the Office of Emergency Preparedness' Hurricane
Planning Guide, a copy of which can be obtained by calling (904) 630-2472 or by
visiting www.coj.net. But, the guide does no good unless you read it and take the
time now to prepare. The information this comprehensive guide contains can
make a drastic difference in the safety and comfort of our citizens should we expe-
rience disaster here on the First Coast. Please read it thoroughly and help us make
2005 one of the safest hurricane seasons, ever.


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Summer Reading Program Continues


NMonda\. June 20. \\as
the first dav of Summer


Reading School for Du\al students \\ho iust attend
CountI Public Schools in order to be promoted to


.5. .


Teens Are Declaring Financial Independence


(NAPSI I-American
teens want credit \\hen
credit is due. That's a ke\
finding of a ne\x poll that
shows that man\ teens are
establishing credit at an
earl\ age.
Ele\en percent of teens
ha\e credit cards in their
name, \with the percentage
of credit card omnershlip
increasing %\ith age. from
just o\er si\ percent for
ages 13 to 1 4 to 2 1 percent
for ages I S, and up.
The poll. "Teens and
Personal Finance." con-
ducted b\ JA \\orld\\ ide
(Junioi Achie\ement) and
The Allstate Foundation.
11hows\\ that emplo\ ment
alo affects the rate at


',;4- i


w\ Inch teens o\ in their o\w n
credit card. with 16 per-
cent of employed teens
holding their oxwn credit
cards compared to onl\
se\ en percent of teens
\\ without jobs possessing
charge cards.
The latest poll in an
on12going l estigation of
teen opinions about bust-
ness and financial issues
shows that teens \\with
credit cards are conscien-
tious about sern icing their
monthl\ debt. \\with 2 per-
cent indicating that their
monthly balance is paid in
full
Teens are also sa\ intg,
wx ith nearly\ three-quarters
of them reporting the\


ha'e dollars set aside in a
sa wings account. \hile
almost one-third of those
polled report the\ hal\e
money\ in a checking
account
"Understanding credit
is important for all indi-
xiduals and essential for
one's financial stabilit\."
notes Jan Ep.tein. e\ecu-
tixe director. The Allstate
Foundation.
According to Dr.
Darrell Luzzo. senior \ ice
president of education for
JA worldd% \ ide. the ieed is-
greater than e\er to edu-
cate students at an earl\
age about responsible
budgeting and the impor-
tance of a ing. Iniesltinl


and \\ise spending
practices.
Said Luzzo. "This
need is being addressed
b\ our latest program
for middle-grade srtu-
dent's. JA\ Economic's
for Success. Hopefully .
not onl\ \\ ill teens use
the credit and banking
resources available to
them. but prole to be
more financially sa \\
and independent than
pre\ ious gelnerations- "
The Allstate
Foundation is an inde-
pendent. charitable
organization made pos-
s.ible b\ The Allstate

(See "Teens". B-3.4)


the ilne\t rade.
Students required to
attend the I X-dai ses-
-o eI J Ile those \\ I1h
' eCe In iiird throw iglii
Ii IIIh Lade;s duin2 the
past school .earji and
\\ho met all other
requlrellentll for pro-
iol ion bill \\ ho '.cored
.i lexel I on the reading
portion of the Florida
C o Im p r e h e n s i \ e
Achle\ eimenit Test
I. F C AT .).
Parents shIiould call
the child's "home"
school for elncibilit\
information, a list of
lsulinnei reading school
sites and transportation
inforilat ioll.
\ll re listrjti n11
should be completed at
the site \\ here the ,tu-
denit \\ill attend
Summer Readin'
School.


.pM-


14.1:"


- ----;- --- -- -- -- --


''' '


ms&


\"-.t.y *
*:.. ,- .l ',





Page B-3A/June 25, 2005


Teens See Summer Jobs As A Way To Pay For College


( NAP S ) -
'Increasingly, young peo-
ple are turning to sum-
mer jobs as a way to pay
for higher education. For
the first time in six
years, teens say saving
for college has become
the number-one reason
they will be working this
summer.
According to the
2005 Junior
Achievement Interprise
PollTM on Teens and
Summer Jobs, just over
33 percent of teens iden-
tified "save for college"
as their primary motiva-
tion for summer employ-
ment. "Extra spending
money," the top reason
in prior JA Interprise
Polls, garnered 31.2 per-
cent. A total of 1,155
teens participated in this
year's national poll, with
79 percent indicating
that they planned to
work this summer.


"Rising tuition costs
-may be one reason why
a larger percentage of
teens are working to pay
for college this summer
than simply for dispos-
able income," said Dr.
Darrell Luzzo, senior
vice president of educa-
tion for JA Worldwide.
According to the non-
profit group The College
Board, tuition at public
universities increased
nearly 11 percent this
year.
Added Luzzo,
"Fortunately for teens,
the recent employment
situation is still very
favorable for those seek-
ing summer jobs, and
these poll numbers show
that a vast majority of
the nation's youth plan
to work this summer."
The particular types
of jobs teens say they
will be seeking follow-
the typical areas of teens


Teens

(Continued From Cover)
"Corporation.
JA Worldwide is the world's largest organization
dedicated to educating young people about business,
economics and entrepreneurship. Today, 145 offices
reach four million students in the United States, with
more than 2.6 million students served by operations
in 97 countries worldwide.
For more information, or for a copy of the survey,
visit the Web site at www.ja.org.
American teens are saving, with nearly three-
quarters of them reporting they have dollars set aside
in a savings account.


and summer employ-
ment including:
*Restaurants/fast
food (25.3 percent),
*retail/sales (24.2
percent),
*bBbysitting (11.3
percent),
*Office/clerical (8.9
percent),
*Lifeguard/recreation
(8.3 percent), and
*Lawn care/landscap-
ing (4.4 percent).
Another 17.6 percent
chose "other."
Regarding wages,
just over 26 percent of
teens expect to earn
more than $7.50 per
hour in their summer
jobs, which ,is compara-
ble to last year's expecta-
tions.
The 2005 Junior
Achievement Interprise
PollTM on Teens and
Summer Jobs was con-
ducted in classrooms
nationwide in February
through early April. This
is the sixth time JA has
conducted a poll of teens
and summer jobs. To
read full details of this
poll, visit the Research
Center on www.ja.org
under "Student Center."
JA Worldwide is the
world's largest organiza-
tion dedicated to educat-
ing young people about
business, economics and
entrepreneurship.
Today, 145 offices
reach four million stu-


dents in the United
States, with more than
2.6 million students
served by operations in
97 countries worldwide.
For more informa-
tion, or for a copy of the


survey, visit the Web site
at www.ja.org.
Teens say saving for
college has become the
number-one reason why
they will be working this
summer.


COLLEGE



CAREER

ff CORNER
By Rose Rennekamp

Dive Into Reading This Summer
What's one of the best ways to prepare for college? Read, read,
then read some more. When you get bored of watching reruns inside
this summer, try heading outside with a really good book. During the
school year, you may not get to choose what you want to read and
when, but in the summer, it's entirely up to you.
Check out what movies are coming out in the next few months.
See if any of them are adapted from books. Then read the book before
heading to the theater to catch it on the big screen. This summer, you
can catch The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. Or, if you are into
Star Wars, there are plenty of novels based on the movies.
If you like something funny, before The Hitchhiker's Guide to the
Galaxy comes out on video read the paperback, then rent it. You can
also do that for some of your favorites already lining the video store
shelves. There are the classics, like Gone with the Wind or To Kill a
'Mockingbird, or something you may not expect, like Shrek. For a
detailed list of movies based on books check out the website:
www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies.
Some students have particular interests that can create a love for
reading. I work with a man who was so inspired by the movie
Houdini that even at age 11:he read every book about the legendary
magician that he could get his hands on. Or if you're going on a road
trip with the family this summer, an audio book can make the drive
go faster. Choose something you think both you and your parents
would enjoy, and let them choose a book or two.
Maybe you can convince your parents to take you on a short trip
close to home in exchange for reading a book about the subject. A trip
to -the Mississippi River is a great way to cap off reading The
Adventures of Tom Sawyer. One couple I know encouraged their
children to read about a foreign country and study the language, with
the reward being a trip to that country the following summer. That's
beyond my budget, but it's a great idea.
Remember, too, that reading isn't just about books. Read maga-
zines or newspapers. You can pick them up at the library, and some
you can even read or subscribe to online. Many public libraries offer
summer reading programs for all ages of young people, and some
even offer them for adults. My local library offers prizes and parties
for readers who meet certain reading goals. If your library doesn't
offer a program, check online for a library that does, or see if you can
convince your parents to offer you some incentive.
It's never too late to find a love of reading, and summer is the per-
fect time to get started. The books that are required during the school
year can sit on the shelf for a few months while you dive in to sub-
jects you really want to read about.

Rose Rennekamp is the vice president of communications for
ACT She is a mom and has a master's of education in guidance and
counseling. For more college and career-planning information,
visit www.act.org. Have a question you want answered in a future
column?, Send a letter to this newspaper or e-mail Rose at
AskRose@act.org.


FIND OUT HOW YOU

CAN APPEAR

IN PREP RAP

CALL 9041 766-8834




B-3B/JUNE 25, 2005.


B-3J U. a 25, 200.


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13-3C/JUNE 25, 2005
Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "We Belong Together" Mariah Carey (Island) Last
_Week: No. 1
2. "Don't Phunk with my Heart" The Black Eyed Peas
(AM) No. 6
3. "Behind These Hazel Eyes" Kelly Clarkson (RCA)
New Entry
4. "Oh" Ciara Featuring Ludacris (Sho'nuff
MusicLine/LaFace) No. 2
5. "Hollaback Girl" Gwen Stefani (Interscope) No. 3
6. "Incomplete" Backstreet Boys (Jive) No. 7
7. "Just a Li'l Bit" 50 Cent (Shady Aftermath) No. 4
8. "Switch" Will Smith (Qverbrook) No. 9
_9. "Lonely No More" Rob Thomas (Melisma) No. 5
10. "Beverly Hills" Weezer (Geffen) No. 10
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Songs about Me" Trace Adkins (Capitol) Last Week:
No. 5
2. "Something More" Sugarland (Mercury) No. 2
3. "Fast Cars and Freedom" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street)
No. 6
4. "Lot of Leavin' Left to Do" Dierks Bentley (Capitol)
No. 3
5. "Making Memories of Us" Keith Urban (Capitol) No.
1
6. "What's a Guy Gotta Do" Joe Nichols (Universal
South) No. 4
7. "You'll Be There" George Strait (MCA Nashville) New
lEntry
8. "Homewrecker" Gretchen Wilson, (Epic) No. 7
9. "Keg in the Closet" Kenny Chesney (BNA) New Entry
10. "My Give a Damn's Busted" Jo Dee Messina (Curb)
No. 8
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "One Word (Cox/Rizzo Mixes)" Kelly Osbourne
(Sancthary) Last Week: No. 2
2. "Lift It Up" Inaya Day (Tommy Boy Silver Label) No.
5
3. "Most Precious Love" Blaze Presents U.D.A.U.F.L.
Featuring Barbara Tucker (King Street) No. 1
4. "What Happens Tomorrow (Rauhofer Mixes)" Duran
Duran (Epic/Promo) No. 6
5. "Krafty" New Order (Warner Bros.) No. 9
6.-"I Feel You" Schiller Featuring Heppner (Radikal)
'Ne\\ Entry
7. "I'll Be Your Freak" Norty Cotto Presents Sinsation!
(Definitive) No. 3
8. "You Are Everything (Vasquez/Ford/Mig Mixes)"
.Vanessa Williams (Lava) No. 11
9. "WorkOut" RuPaul (RuCo) No., 4
10. "Tired of Being Sorry (Dummies/Photek Remixes)"
Ringside (Flawless/Promo) No. 12


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JAIL OR BAIL


EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law, Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
FALSE IMPRISONMENT AND DOMESTIC
ASSAULT-On June 12, 2005 at 5:56 p.m. an officer
responded to a domestic dispute. Upon arrival, the offi-
cer was met by the son of the victim, the 43 year-old
husband of a woman who engaged in threatening behav-
ior with knives. The husband told the officer that his 34
year-old wife would not let him leave a walk-in closet
where he was packing his belongings to leave. The wife
came into the couple's bedroom and shut the door. She
stood by the door of the closet with two knives and
would not let him leave the residence. The officer read
the wife her Miranda Rights and then she stated that she
and her husband were engaged in an argument. In the
argument she told her husband he'could not leave unless
he gave her clothes. She claimed that she and her hus-
band were. arguing until the police arrived and that she
never had any' knives. However, the testimony of one of
the children contradicted her account as the child stated
that the mother went into the kitchen to get a knife dur-
ing the argument. The officer confiscated kitchen knives
to be used as evidence. The officer arrested the wife. She
was charged with a felony.
ARMED DOMESTIC BATTERY-On May 29, 2005
at 9:47 p.m. an officer was dispatched to an armed
domestic battery call. Upon arrival, the officer met the
victim who informed him that the father of her child was
at her residence when she arrived home that day,
grabbed her by the hair and began beating her. The vic-
tim had previously secured an injunction for protection
against domestic violence from the suspect. During this
incident, the suspect hit her several times with his fist
and also once in the head with a handgun. The suspect
threatened to kill her and then himself. She was able to
escape when the suspect's brother came to the, apartment
and then she ran to a friend's apartment and called the
police. When the officer interviewed the victim she
showed him her injunction for protection that prohibited
the suspect from having contact with the victim unless it
was for child visitation. The officer observed scratches
on the victim's neck, a swollen right hand, and a bloody
and swollen lip. The victim went to the hospital for treat-
ment. An arrest wNarrant was issued for the suspect. He
was arrested and charged \with a felony.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AGAINST PARENTS-On
June 13, 2005 at 7:02 a.m. an officer was dispatched to
a battery call. Upon his arrival, he met the 38 year-old
victim who stated that the suspect, her 21 year-old son
and her 70 ear-old mother were talking about the tele-
vision. She told her son that she could not believe that he
,did not want to hear the word gospel. She said her son
replied, "You come out of that room and I'm going to
bust the [expletive] out of you." Her son punched her
one time on the left side of her face when she exited her
room. She then left the house and called the police from'
a nearby payphone. She told the officer that this was the
second time her son had battered her. She did not have
any visible injuries. The officer gave her a domestic vio-
lence pamphlet. She refused to go to a safe location. The
suspect was not present at the time of the officer's inter-
view with the victim. According to the police report, a
warrant was to be issued for the suspect's arrest.
UNAUTHORIZED AUTO USE-On June 12, 2004 at
4:55 p.m. an officer was dispatched to a call regarding
unauthorized use of a vehicle. The victim told the officer
that he loaned the vehicle to the suspect the day before.
The victim said he had made se\ eral attempts to contact
the suspect that morning to retrieve his vehicle. When he
Went to the suspect's home, the victim told him that he
did not have his vehicle. The victim then called the
police. When the officer arrived, the suspect said that he
had slept at an "unknown hotel/motel behind a,strip club
somewhere on Uni \ersity Blvd. W."' He told the officer
that between 6:30 a.m. and 7:00 a.m. that morning, some
unknown individuals entered his room and "hit him over
the head and pointed a gun at him." He stated that one of
the suspects w1as a "tat" black male nearing a navy blue
T-shirt who grabbed only the vehicle keys. He'said no
other items were taken. He stated he did not know how
Sthe men got inside his hotel room. He was unable topro-
vide a hotel room number to the police officer. He said
he did not ,call the police when the incident happened
because he "\as drunk." When questioned about this,
the suspect became angry and stated he "didn't have to
call the police and he didn't care if we didn't believe his
Storyy" The victim was advised on filing procedures.


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) It's
not a good week
to partner up with
anyone. You're
better off working on your
own. Pay attention to your
wardrobe as well because
how you present yourself is
important.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) You're feeling a
bit nostalgic as
40 J the week begins.
However, don't let,
this distract you
from tasks at hand. Later in
the week, romance hits a
rough patch.
GEMNINI (May 21 to
June 20) An
opportunity to do I '
something new
and exciting aris- .
es. Thus, it's not the time to
argue about money. Feel
free to spend a bit and enjoy.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) You need to exer-
cise caution this
week. at a busi-
ness/social event.
Avoid indulging
in too many adult beverages.
You just may make an,
embarrassing slip of the
tongue if you do.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22)
You've been
working hard all
year, and now
you're .ready to party. Be
sure family members are on
the same page with you as to
vacation plans. This way,
everyone can have a good
time.
VIRGO (August 23
to September
22) The news
you've been wait-'
ing for arrives.this
week. As fate would have it,
it's good, too! Feel free to
spend the weekend celebrat-
ing.
LIBRA (September


Your Weekly Horoscope
(JUNE 25, 2005-JULY 2, 2005)


23 to October
22) It's always
good when you
have the coopera-
tion of others. This allows
you to branch out and
explore new interests. Later
in the week, you're called on
to host a party, which you
excel at.
SCORPIO (October
23 to
I November 21)
It seems everyone
around you has an
opinion. However, ultimate-
ly, the decision is up to you.
Try to weed out the good
advice from the bad.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December 21),
It's fine to want to
get along with
others. However,
you don't need to compro-
mise your principles in order
to do so. Stand firm on
something you believe in.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19)
This is a week
when you should
just leave your
credit cards at home. You're
tempted to overindulge this
week money-wise. Later in
the week, you need to think
before speaking.
AQUARIUS (January
20 to February
18) If you're look-
ing for a pat on
the back, this isn't
the week to receive it. Just
take comfort in a job well
done. The kudos will come
in time.
PISCES (February
19 to March
20) A close friend
really has your
best interests at
heart. Instead of being skep-
tical, learn to.trust more.
This weekend, avoid being


Jax Man Wakes Up With

Bullet In His Tongue
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Police say a man who
woke up with a serious headache walked 12 blocks to a
hospital \\ith a swollen lip and powder bums. Doctors
discovered the problem. 47-year-old Wendell Coleman
had a bullet lodged in his tongue. Coleman told police
that a woman stuck a gun barrel in his mouth during a
dispute around 2:30 Tuesday morning and that he heard
the gun go off.Police say Coleman then went home to
sleep.What authorities did with the bullet wasn't clear..

Marijuana-Flavored Candy Blasted


ATLANTA -
Marijuana-flavored lol-
lipops:with names such as
Purple Haze, Acapulco
Gold and Rasta are 'show-
ing up on the shelves of
convenience stores around
the country, angering anti-
drug advocates.
"It's nothing but dope
cand', and that's nothing,
we need to be training our'
children to do," said
Georgia state Sen. Vincent


National HIV Testing Day Event
June 27, 2005
10:00 a.m. 7:30 p.m. ,

1V Rc 1,i i r
Located on the corner of
Kings Rd. and Powhattan St.
Sponsoring Aaencv(s):


Minority AIDS Coalition
of Jacksonville, Inc.
Contact Frances Lynch
(904) .58-1622 x230
fclynclin, bellss uth notl


River Region
Human Services, Inc.
Contact Lolita Hill
.(904) 899-6300 x4470
lhllI((rTi hs orq


NorthlSouth Florida
Human Services, Inc.
Contact. Geno Hampton
(904) 301-1145
(904; 301-1148 fax


Fort, who has persuaded
some convenience stores
to stop selling the treats.
The confections are
legal, because they are
made with hemp oil, a
common ingredient in
health food, beauty sup-
plies and other household
products. The oil imparts a
marijuana's. grassy taste
but not the high.
Merchants call them a
harmless novelty for
adults and insist they
advise stores to sell only to
people 18 and older.:
"There are more than
70 million people in the
United States who smoke
marijuana. We're catering
to the audience of people
who are in that smoking
culture," said Rick
Watkins, marketing direc-
tor for Corona, Calif.-
based Chronic Candy,
which uses the slogan
"Every lick is like taking a
hit."


overly competitive in sports
or outdoor activities.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Ralph
Waite, July 4; Edie Falco,
July 5; Nancy Reagan, July
6; Ringo Starr, July 7;


Jeffrey Tambor, July 8;
Brian Dennehy, July 9; Ron
Glass, July 10.

(c) 2005 DBR Media,
Inc.


Tara's Bail

24/7 Bonds
Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville. Florida 32206


356-TARA
(8272)


a Vt1 Y') ,


REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.


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PRAC TWICE
Jacksonville, FL 32209


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OFFICE HOURS:
M-F 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. Wed. 2 P. M. TO 5 P.M.

Pizza Shop Robber

Leaves Job Application

LAS VEGAS A man accused of holding up a pizza
parlor left behind a job application with his real name
and address, authorities said. "I would chalk it up to
either inexperience or plain stupidity," Clark County
prosecutor Frank Coumou told the Las Vegas Review-
Journal for a Wednesday report.
Alejandro Martinez, 23, of Las Vegas, was being held
Wednesday at the Clark County jail pending a Monday
appearance in Clark County District Court. He faces
felony burglary and robbery with a weapon charges in
.the May 25 heist.
Authorities said Martinez ordered, a pizza and started
filling out the application before displaying a gun and
demanding money. The clerk handed over $200.
Outside, a witness wrote down the license plate num-
ber of a getaway car, leading police to Martinez' home.
Martinez' lawyer, Deputy Public Defender James
Ruggeroli, said authorities have the wrong man. He said
the pizza shop clerk couldn't identify Martinez as the
robber, and the job application was not presented as evi-
dence at a preliminary hearing.

WANT CUSTOMERS?
ADVERTISE IN
THE FLORIDA STAR!
TO PLACE YOUR AD CALL US
TODAY AT 904/766-8834

FLORIDA LOTTO
WINNING NUMBERS
01-05-18-20-22-47
Saturday, June 18 TWO WINNERS!!


iA


~B~Z~Pb~B$l~e~X~a$QS~8~~


~_~_~___


PAGE B-5



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"TrrrATrI 75 2nn


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Woeful Bucks



Fire Black Coach


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6


ST. FRANCIS, Wis. -
Terry Porter was fired as
coach of the Milwaukee
Bucks on Wednesday, two
months after the team fin-
ished its worst season in
almost a decade.
General manager Larry
Harris said the move was
necessary after the Bucks
were' 30-52 in 2004-05.
They also were plagued by


cc




3-5 C
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injuries.
"Certainly


I


for


tion of this francl
ing forward, we
need to make


Harris said \\ednesda he
thought that vas ithe right
decision at the tmie, bit
"everybody's allowed to
change their mind."
Milwaukee was 41-41 in
Porter's first season as
coach, making the playoffs,
but losing in the first round
to Detroit. A native of the
Area, Porter played basket-
ball at Milwaukee South
Division High School and at
Wisconsin-Stevens Point.
He played 17 seasons in the
NBA.
There were reports that
Porter and Harris didn't
agree on who the Bucks
should take atop the draft,
but Harris denied them.
The Bucks are consider-
ing Utah center Andrew
SBogut, an Australian who
left college early, as their
first pick.
Porter was a standout
guard for 17 season in the
NBA, so if the Bucks choose
one of the outstanding back-
the direc- court prospects such as
hise head- Chris Paul or Raymond
certainly Felton, keeping Porter as
a move." coach would have made


Harris said..
Last month, Harris said
Porter would return.
"I told him, 'You 'know
we're going to sink or swim
together on this.'"
Apparently not. And


sense.
Harris believes the
vacant head coaching job
will attract plenty of interest
because of the team's young
players and the top draft
pick.


"- -- ....-' l
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ww


Mayweather Walking


Tall Before Bout


NEW YORK -WBC
super lightweight champion
Arturo Gatti looked on,
watching through sunglasses
as a smiling Floyd
Mayweather and his
entourage noisily announced
their presence at a news con-
ference Wednesday to hype
their fight on June 25.
After Mayweather made
a show of leaving the dais to
go to the buffet line, Gatti
stepped to the microphone.
He cursed at his opponent,
vowed to knock him out


Saturday and walked out.
The moment summed up
both fighters: Mayweather,
the brash, charismatic chal-
lenger who feels it's as much
his job as that of any pro-
moter to hype a bout, and
Gatti, the battle-tested war-
rior in the ring, known for
his ability to absorb punish-
ment and his belief that
"talk is cheap."
This weekend's fight at
Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic
City, N.J., which will be
broadcast live on HBO pay-


Jaguars Claim Kight, Signed Rookie Robertson


Rookie cornerback Chris
'Roberson, a seventh round
selection and one of eight
players selected in the 2005


NFL Draft in April, is the
first Jaguars draft pick to
sign a contract.
Roberson, 22, was the


237th overall selection in
the draft. Roberson, 22, a
5-11, 185-pounder from
Farmington Hills, Mich.,


r------------- ----------------------------
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was the 237th overall selec-
tion in the draft.
He started his final sea-
son at Eastern Michigan as
cornerback after starting
three seasons as a running
back and wide receiver and
recorded 66 tackles and a
sack as a senior.
Kight, 22, joined the
Packers on waivers from St.
Louis in 2004 training camp
after signing with the'Rams
as an undrafted rookie.


He was allocated to
Frankfurt this spring and
spent most of the NFL
Europe season on the
Galaxy's injured reserve list.
The 6-0, 213-pound
wideout spent four weeks on
the active roster and played
in one game last season. The
Jaguars have 88 players on
their roster. All are under
contract except for this
year's first seven draft picks.


1. From what two countries did the four tennis pros
who earned over $1 million each in prizes in 1987
come?
2. What NFL football player's treatment for an eat-
ing disorder caused him to miss 1988 pre-season prac-
tices?
3. Who became the first U.S. athlete to make four
Olympic diving teams?
4. What Super Bowl team had a set of wide receivers
nicknamed "The Smurfs"?
5. What bald-headed 42-year-old heavyweight came
out of retirement in 1987 to knock out Larry Sims in the
second round?
6. Who broke Don Drysdale's record of 58 2/3 con-
secutive scoreless innings pitched in 1988?
7. What college football coach delivered the second
nominating speech for George H.W. Bush at the 1988
Republican Convention?
8. Who won the most money in the first-ever "skins"
bowling tournament?
9. What former heavyweight champ ran the 1983
New York City Marathon in 3 1/2 hours?
10. What Russian composer's tape did Tigers players
force pitcher Jack Morris to turn off in the Detroit lock-
er room!

Sports Challenge Answers

s,AX)SAO5[.![3i '01 uosJo 'c d
PXOI -6 3uemlOH IIqsv *8 '.ouaed oof "L 'jIasqs.IaH \1O
*9 'SiaALqs !itu "g suilspOa' uo>IuiqsvAA qI. "t7 '.siunoq'
2jO 'E tuWl uT HIM l7 tuapONS 't31eAosolSOzO 'I


per-view, is being billed as
"Thunder vs. Lightning" and
it's one of the most anticipat-
ed bouts of the year. Gatti
(39-6, 29 knockouts) is the
140-pound champion, but
Mayweather comes in unde-
feated in 33 fights with 22
knockouts.
Mayweather has been
outspoken in the time lead-
ing up to, the fight, saying
Gatti is no better'than a glo-
rified club pro.
On Wednesday, he called
Gatti a "paper champion"
and questioned his reputa-
tion as one of the sport's
most exciting fighters,
earned through bruising
bouts such as his trilogy
with Micky Ward.
The crowd Saturday will
have a definite pro-Gatti
feel. The fighter, who lives
in Jersey City, has become a
favorite in Atlantic City, but
neither he nor Mayweather
expects the crowd to play
much of a role in the out-
come.
And when the fight is
over, despite all the pre-fight
rancor, Mayweather expects
to walk across the ring to
acknowledge Gatti.
Ricky Williams
To Apply
For Reinstatement
MIAMI Ricky
Williams will apply for rein-
statement with the Miami
Dolphins toward the end of
next month.
The star running 'back's
agent, Leigh Steinberg, said
Friday that Williams would
file the application on July
23 or shortly thereafter.
Steinberg considers that date
the one-year anniversary of
Williams' retirement.
Williams, who has
acknowledged that he tested
positive for marijuana a
third time last July, has to
stay retired for a year to
avoid a full season's suspen-
sion under the league's drug
policy.
He is still subject to a
four-game ban. Williams,
who turned 28 last month,
rushed for 1,853 yards in
2003, his first year in Miami
after being traded from New
Orleans, then ran for 1,372
the next season. A court
later found the Heisman
Trophy winner in breach of
contract by retiring, and
ordered him to repay the4
team $8.6 million.


JUNE 25, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


DPAG R 6






FLORIDA STAR


JUNE 25. 2005


EMPLOYMENT
FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE
Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at FCCJ.
E.O.E.

The Family and Youth
Development Specialist II
reports to the Program Director
and is responsible for planning,
organizing and coordinating the
activities for providing Social
Services and assistance to
improve tle Social and
Psychological functioning of chil-
dren and their families; Applicant
must possess a degree in
Sociology or Psychology, with a
minimum of five years experi-
ence in Social Service or an
acceptable combination of edu-
cation and experience; Must
have computer skills and knowl-
edge of various software. Apply
in person at: 421 W. Church St.,
Ste. 705, Jacksonville, FL 32202
or Fax resume to: (904) 791-
9299: Applications accepted
until 6/30/05.

APPRENTICESHIP
*CARPENTRY
*ELECTRICAL
*PLUMBING
*HEATING, A/C & REF.

Must be at least 18 by 7/1/05, be
HS grad or GED by 7/1/05, have
driver's lic. & transportation.
Apply in person on MONDAYS,
JUNE 6, 13, 20 & 27 AT 7:00
P.M. promptly.
Northeast Florida
Builders Assn.
103 Century 21 Drive,
Suite #100
EOE

Heavy Equipment Operators &
Pipelayers
Immediate Openings for experi-
enced applicants! Drug screen
req'd. Apply at 9100 Phillips Hwy.
Women & minorities encouraged to
apply. EOE m/f/d/v
JENSEN CIVIL CONSTRUCTION
Driver CDL-A req'd
'Home Every Night &
Weekend Guaranteed



Avg. $888 $1018/wk
No Touch Freight
85% Preloaded/Pretarped
Sunday calls welcome!
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com


I SERVICES

Aluminum Awnings


BUSINESS NETWOR


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764









*Restrictions Apply*.


Check Us Outl


MOVE-IN SPECIAL
*1ST MONTHS RENT AND
UTILITIES ARE ON US!
*During May and June, 2005, we
are offering everyone a special
deal.-
A FAMILY COMMUNITY, PALM
TERRACE APARTMENTS CONVE-
NIENTLY LOCATED. NEAR
SCHOOLS, SHOPPING, PARKS,
CHURCHES, HOSPITALS/CLINICS
AND MUCH, MUCH MORE
"CHOOSE YOUR NEIGHBORS"
*Restrictions Apply*
Palm Terrace Apartmenti
4813 Moncrief Road
Jax., FL. 32209
Ph#: (904) 766-7256
Fax #: (904) 766-3239
Email: palmterl@bellsouth.net





Are You In Need Of A Car?
Bad Credit, No Credit
Must Be Employed!
Cars from 1996 2002
Give "Big AL" A Call
714-6519

AAA Locs and Braid Shop
Free Relaxer with Wrap or Roller
Set. Ask For Linda.
904-535-0009


Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by
Ron L. HuIbbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99
to Dianetics, 3102 N. Habara Ave., Tampa FL
'33607.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ IB,. Dni..i From
Manufacturer. 20 colorsin stock with all Accessories.
Quick turn around Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/
day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033. CA,.L US: We will' not
be undersoldl

Prol sonall % ending Route ni I .qulilpienit B.lnd
mlllin pl, l jn ll- 11l -I In-hllh. ll e naldol.L.
w/$7,500 Down. (877)843-8726 (B02002-37).

$50,000 FREE CASH GRANTS*' **- 20051 Never
Repay! t-,,r p ri i..il bills, school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from 2004. Live
Operators! (800)856-9591 Ext #113.

PROFIT NOWI With Your own Landscape Curbing
[u.nne ,. Itill l] .iitL-suppo't Complete Business
System CURB APPEAL USA. INC. (800)710-2872
Distributors Needed! (Se Habla'Espanol),.

HELP WANTED Earn Extra income assembling CD
cases from any location. No Experience Necessary.
(800)267-3944 ext 175
'ww.epsywork-greatpay.co n

#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine units/You
OK Locations Entire Business $10,670 Hurry!
(800)836-3464 #802428,

Financial

TOP DOLLAR CASH PAID. Seller-Held REAL
ESTATE Notes.OldorNew. Residential & Commer-
cial. FREE Analysis & quote. FAST, professional
service. LINDIEMAE INC. (386)517-6777
E-mail: lindiemae@aol.com.

$50,000 FREE CASH GRANTS*****- 2005! Never
Repay! For personal bills, school, new business. $49
BILION Left unclaimed from 2004. Live
Operators! (800)785-6360 Ext #75.

FREE $$ CASH $$ GRANTS! For 2005. Never
repay. For Personal Bills! Home buying! School!
New Business! $5,000-$500,000. Live Operators!
(800)860-2187 Ext #116.


L


Fr Tf in
AUC .- uTyI'ON


IN Livrss' 2
PaV n aowI W


200= zAcm-s
WMll SallA fit.5-.t /, .sArs Tsm'


S"rti nn f4eomnngr f 0. Mas~k t., .-,.P
-m- "rns, I snriq (Yrrtoct
www.rog4E.rsrealty.com or
Call 336-789-2926


--------------------------

HURRICANE PROOF PAINT?:
I "One year and 3 hurricanes later, my neighbors suffered
I water intrusion into their homes. I attribute my lack of I
Damage to the Liquid Ceramiccoating on my house."
I-- -Ann R,, Melbourne, FL
'wgLiguo lWhat is Liquid Ceramic?
L IQ I S(a so sold as Emirodbatings Ceramic Insulcoat")
I ERAM IC" High performance paint wilh unbelievable life span
I Goes on virtually any type of exterior wall surface
Buy DirDct: 800-466-2691 Keep storm rains from penetrating walls of your house I
I VbMas erard-Amex-D s0vr Last 3-5 tirnes longer than store-bought paint
DI tais at LiquidCemimlcDrect.com Buy it yourself/ Do it yourself/ Hire your own painter!
order now... bo te season" hits Use "619" as COUPON CODE at website (exp. 9/1/05)
I --




F -. :. 'i.. *,.r ii MPFlrina wmffa"pelrs r.nd endlh
:*,, I~ lhnrc reandert -:. I:- -

,. ,! ,. .,' 1 i ,, ; .. .'."'- -
.... "w.r 4, .4M fllf rdikianl ....-*


V.


ft uair Lon0) md lifflifim-s. CtPo~itEs : Callouw a Illta V W


HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT


Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators'
Next Class: July 11th
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com


Help Wanted


Driver- COVENANTTRANSPORT. ExcellentPay
& Benefits for Experienced Drivers, 0/0, Solos,
Teams & Graduate Students. Bonuses Paid Weekly.
? I'i,,.i )Oii.l,.i=i nil m l,,,crl (.'4.. lMORI PAY


S/E & 3-State Runt T/T Drivers. HOME
F' F k1F NI)s MilcinL- P'\, Heftn..401.K., rainees
Welcome, Miami area- exp. req. 21 willn sagc'Cl,.,i-A
CDI., (* pr- Truck Lines (800)545-1351.

Auto Transport, rhe uaggoner 'rrucking: Hiring
,.Exp s. Ni .i '-. 'I pe ii e-d dLi i'.t1,.rs I.rII AuLh I'ransport
in South East Regions, Must have valid Class A CDL
and verifiable 2 yrs OR 200K miles OTR. Need stable
work history and.clean MVR, High Earning,
Potential, Great Benefits and matching 401K.
CONTACT Susan at (866)413-3074 HOE,

DATA ENTRY Work ON YOUR OWN. Flexible
Hours! $$$Great I',., Isl .Personal Cimpuiecr
required (800)873-0345 ext #300.

Now hiring qualified drivers for OTR positions.
Food grade tanker, No hazmat. No pumps. Great
l[c]nfi.. .pcCiiprtiti-'. '.y aud tnew equipment. Need
2 years OTR experience. Call Bynum Transport for
your opportunity today; (800)741-7950,

$600 WEEKLY Working through the government
part-time. No Experience. A lot' of Opportunities.
(800)493-3688 Code J-14.

Legal Services

DIVORCE$275.$350*COVERS children. etc. Only
one signature required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call
weekdays (800)462-2000, ext.600. (8am-7pm)
Divorce Tech, Established 1977.

Miscellaneous

The Lowest Prescription Prices LESS THAN
CANADA. Global Medicines. Arizona Physician
owned. Free phone call to verify. (866)634-0720
*www.global medicines.net.

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Business,
*Paralegal, "Computers. Job Placement Assistance.
Computer & Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
www,tidewaterrechonline.com.


RealEstate


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. MUST SEE
THE BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS. Homes. Cabins,
Acreage & Investments. Cherokee Mountain
Realty OMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainrealtv.com Call for Free
Brochure (800)841-5868.

Tennessee Lake Property from $24,90016-1/2 Acre
lot $59,900, 27 Acre Lake Estate $124,900. Lake
Parcel and Cabin Package Available $64.900.
(866)770-5263 ext 8 for details.


0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 V'


* To place an ad:

CAll:
(904) 766-8834

* 765-167FAX:
(904) 765-1673


THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

Want to purchase minerals and
other oil/gas interests
Send details to:
,P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201


East Alabama Mountain Property For Sale One
hour west of Atlanta in Piedmont, AL Great for
enjoyment or investment 15-acres-$54.250,00
512-acres-$1,485,000.00 More information
Call Gary McCurdy (256)239-800.1.


Grand Openiing! I.ukc.iorii Acreage ii..-n i,, t,,'., ii
Spectacular new waterfront community on one of the
largest & cleanest mountain lakes in America! Large,
estate-size parcels, gentle-slope to water, gorgeous
woods, panoramic views. Paved rolhds, county water,
utilities. Low financing. Call now
(800)564-5092 x 1,98.

L.AKF:RONT BARGAINS Starting at $89.900.
Gorgeous lakefront parcels. Gently sloping, pristine
shoreline, spectacular views. Across from national
forest on 35,000 acre recreational lake in East Tenn.
Paved roads, underground utilities, central water.
.,.w'cl F cellcit 1iIianuin Call now (800)704-3145
ext 617, Sunset Bay, LLC.

GEORGIA COAST- Large wooded access,
tnarshfront & gblf course homesites. Gated with
tennis, kayaking, & canoeing. Limited availability-
mid $70's & up. Call today (877)266-7376,

NEW MIE\ICO.211 Acres $34,900., Scenic region,
views, canyons. trees, rolling hills, wildlife. Enjoy
hunting, hiking, horses, great climate.. Power, great
access. 100% Financing. Call (877)822-LANDI

NC MOUNTAIN PROPERTY, Gated community
with,private river and lake access. Swim, fish, hike.
From $20,000 to $70,000. Perfect for log cabin.
(800)699-1289 or www,rlverbendlakelhtr&,som..


Steel Buildings


BUILDING SALEI "Rock Bottom Prices!" 20x30
Now $2900. 30x40 $5170. 40x50 $8380. 40x60
$10,700. 50x1.00 $15,244. Others. Ends/accessories
optional, "Priced to Sell!" Pioneer (800)668-5422.

Your Ad Could Be Here

Run your ad STATEWIDE!!! For only $450 you
can place your 25 word classified ad in over 150
newspapers throughout the. state reaching over 5
MILLION readers. Call this newspaper or
Advertising Networks of Florida at (866)742-1373.
Visit us online at www florida-classifieds com.
Display ads also available.






ANF


Advertising Networks of Florida

Week of June 20, 2005


A .4


IIV 1 l4ulr rui DImJO
Competitive sealed Bids will be received by the St. Johns River Water Management
District (hereafter "the District") at 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida
32177, until 2:00 p.m., Wednesday, July 13, 2005, and publicly opened at that
time for:
BID NUMBER SI488AA
THE PURCHASE, DELIVERY, AND SET-UP OF THREE (3) LABORATORY AUTO-
ANALYZERS
The Governing Board of the District is inviting sealed bids for the purchase, delivery,
and set-up of three (3) new laboratory autoanalyzers for environmental water analyses.
The estimated budget for these analyzers is $174,000. ,Prices.are to be F.O.B.
Destination District Headquarters, 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, FL 32177.
Bid packages may be obtained by contacting DemandStar by Onvia at
www.demandstar.com or by calling (800) 711-1712. Bid packages may also be
obtained from the District by calling Randy Wallis, CPPB, Contracts Administrator
at (386) 312-2337. Bidders (hereafter "Respondent(s)") requesting packages
through the District will be charged copying and shipping/handling costs as stat-
ed at DemandStar by Onvia or as provided for in Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., whichev-
er is less.
If, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate in any
activity relating to this Bid, please contact Randy Wallis, CPPB, Contracts
Administrator at the above address or telephone'number or, if hearing impaired,
by .calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5) business days before the dates
and times specified herein.
After evaluations have been completed, all Respondents will be notified in writing
of the staff's intended recommendation to the Governing Board at the August 9,
2005 ,meeting. The District reserves the right to reject any and all Bids. The
District also reserves the right to waive any minor deviations in an otherwise valid
Bid and to accept the Bid that will be in the best interest of the District.
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
Letters of Interest will be received by the St. Johns River Water Management District
(hereinafter "the District") at 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 32177, until 5:00 p.m.,
July 15, 2005.
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS NO. SJ305RA
ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT ASSISTANCE
The District is requesting letters of Interest from professional firms licensed in the State
of Florida to provide expert analysis of the economic Implications of potential District
permitting actions and of projects that may be proposed, supported or encouraged by
the District. The firm selected shall, be required to execute a contract for a period of 12
months. This contract may be renewed for two additional one-year periods..Award of
this contract does not preclude the firm from submitting a letter of Interest for any other
projects advertised by the District.
In accordance with the Public Records Law, Chapter 119.07(6)(m), Fla: Stat. (as
amended), the District's project budgets are a matter of public record. As a cour-
tesy to the Interested respondents on this project, this Information Is being pro-
vided with the Request for Qualifications package. The estimated budget for the
period beginning October 1, 2005, through September 30, 2006, Is $50,000. The
estimated budget for each subsequent term Is $50,000. Respondents are cau-
tioned that this amount Is an estimate only and poses no limitation on the District.
Interested firms may obtain a project Information package by contacting
DemandStar by Onvia at www,demandstar.com or by calling (800) 711-1712.
Packages may also be obtained from the District by calling Carol Taylor Miller,
CPPB, Contracts Administrator at (386) 329-4170. Firms requesting packages
through the District will be charged copying and shipping/handling costs as stat-
ed at DemandStar by Onvia or as provided for In Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., whichev-
er is less. If hearing Impaired please call (386) 329-4450 (TDD).
Evaluation of submitted letters of Interest and subsequent negotiations will be
pursuant to Section 287.055, Fla. Stat. Letters of Interest will be evaluated by a
District staff evaluation committee. The Evaluation Committee will meet at
District Headquarters at 2:00 p.m., July 28, 2005 to discuss the evaluations and
finalize its short list. The Evaluation Committee may determine that it will assist
their evaluation for some or all respondents to make an oral presentation of their
qualifications and credentials. In such event the District will schedule such pre-
sentations at the District's Headquarters on August 16, 2005. Respondents who
have been selected for such presentations shall be notified in advance of said
date. After evaluations have been completed all respondents will be notified In
writing of the staff's intended recommendation to the Governing Board at the
September 13, 2005 meeting. Following approval of the top-selected
Respondent, contractual negotiations will commence with the top-ranked firm.
If, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate, contact
Carol Taylor Miller, CPPB, Contracts Administrator at the above address or either
of the above telephone numbers at least five (5) business days before the date
and time specified.

Education Now and Babies Later (ENABL)
Absttriuw, fIriyi-eiir~rirn in a In anI cvnalty st4th a et p !-Ita .

/ilith-hct''d and t~wrm.fzity trtnYup..
The 'Mansling Preissres. Before Marriage'" curficum
teaches Jzh absj':
Tthe litr n f s:f iti cy -wntXf i!wrslviistirnl.
S Asserrive refuse~ techniques.
R ikib"liq b'm:;illihy rtpl::3i: ;"^-. :';* .
RsBihbg peer pressuref.
I:rogrfsni goals:
To reduce icor, progriancy.
Toh f -r*ut1 ihe ralk os e ext al .:*.:Ii .iy & iadjleSOfvitm.
To reduce the rate cS s=iLall'y tran rr-ted diseases
among ado sents

HEALTH Fill

River Reaior- Human Services- Prev'entiar DepL
650 :=ark 5t.. J "0sc.--.i 'a FL 32204
,,,'.,,.-.,-.''i..--.%,rg 004-3:.:9-6962


PAGE R-7


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10

L ------------- -----------i


FOR STHUCVUJED FETLE/EA TS, Oil T



(800) 794-7310
JAG Ww~twwrth rnemi CASH NHOW


V.


1 /71 %JA "- / I I -


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11






FLORIDA STAR


JUNE 25, 2005


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-t"Jk foIro lZ(P R I
N cvspapery wn-. ,v



Edgewc
PH--- (904
FAX: (94
STORE
MON-THI
FRI-SAT
SUN. 7



Swmmaner of1
Savingst~

Kraft
-Barbecue
tSauce
16.25-18-OZ.
CARBWELL & ASSTD. VAR.
V BUY ONE-GET ONE
PREE
S urFresh
Ice Creami
4.50T.-ASSORTED VARIETIES -
3 99
LIMIT 1 1000ORDER
S ALC Lo RV TICKE i Mayonnaise
REGULAR OF BIG MOUTH OR
Kraft
Miracle Whip
r 32-OZ.-ASSORTED VARIETIES


7._ aundry Detergent -
5.8LB. POWER OR 128-OZ. LIOUI
Nice'n Fluffyl
-_ taFabric Softener STOCK
S128-OZ.-ASSORTED VARIETIES ." UP ON
YOUR
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FOR



-. ^ .. 1FA M IL Y P A C K
m / r [ Fresh
w \ --WHOLE ONLY ^ lr Turkey Wings..........
S moked FAMILY PACK
SPicnic- iamn Fresh Pork
Neck Bones ..............
9 GOOD FOR BBO-MEAT
r "Beef
Spare Ribs................
SLICED SMOKED a
PICNIC HAMS .....LB. 9... 9
4 ASSORTED l
Punch rt
2/r CoO 2/4
aEGAL. Jk 10 ;

GOLDEN i FRESH
FRaipe a ,. / Sweet Potatoes ..
SBainanas -- uFRESM CRISP
L13S. SCucumbers ......


OF JACKSONVILLE


o1824
West Beaver Street
PH: (904) 354-0665
FAX: (904) 354-4543 MC
STORE HOURS: FO
MON-THURS 7AM-8PM
FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM


We
Government
WE A
DEBIT
OST MAJOR
DOD STAMP
-BEAVER S
CASHE
PAYROLL


-I "ILI


FAMILY PACK

BONE-IN".
SFirst Cut
Chuck Roast -4 *L B. .

LI B.


FAMILY PACK FAMILY PACK BONE-IN
FAMLBeef Chuck or
Country Style 4 7 Shoulder Steaks
Pork Ribs....................LB 1 41 111
FAMILY PACK FRESH CHICKEN 9 w
Drumsticks or LB.
Thighs.............. LB.

y rt it; "s resfer thran ours \-

TROPICAL UREA
Peaches
LB. A-.'

B T O atoes







3-LITER BTLS.
LStars & Stripes Sodas

..99



ad Paper Little Hug j 9
To weIs Fruit Drinks........... 24 PACK
o 21 fo BUMBLE BEE .
0 2Pink RE1F 2 /200
Salmon...........14.75-Z. CANS 1.
S;: MILLER
...LBS. High Life
... Beer...........12PK/12-OZ. CANS/'BTLS5 99


A F&~-.. t V.


WHAT TOOK YOU A LIFETIME
TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.





WITH A STROKE, TIME. LOST IS BRAIN LOST.
Learn the warning signs' at
StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE.
Amerian Sn.kc
yjl Association,
PooSrl l.CtXA

PAGE R-8


.,'

Cash
ent Checks'
%CCEPT.
CARDS &
CREDIT CARDS.
S & EBT CARDS
STREET STORE
ES ONLY
*L CHECKS
2*


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