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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 21, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00020

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 21, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00020

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text



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1U FREE SPRING MUSIC FEST WITH SOUL

'Bn'Godfather of Soul' James Brown And R&B Singer
Macy Gray Will Perform At The City's Memorial Day
PWeekend Concert On Saturday, May 28
7-At Metropolitan Park
SeelA-6


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


SFLORIDA


TIHE


* Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
S 6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


thefloridastar.com


Man Illegally Blocks Construction Of Florida Star's Building


LEFT AND RIGHT FRAMES: Charter Electric trucks were illegally placed in front of and up against the side of a building located at 5561 Moncrief
preventing demolition of a building on property owned by The Florida Star Publisher.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
-- The Florida Star moved
from Gateway Mall and
acquired property at 5561
Moncrief Road with the
intention of constructing a
new building.
Property value in
Jacksonville is increasing
and many scams or fraudu-
lent acts may respond to this
increase.
The publisher of The
Florida Star, Clara Criswell
acquired the property from a
relative after her husband of


almost, 75 years died in
2002.
In 2004, the relative
made a call for help to a
Goddaughter' (Clara
Criswell) on her husband's
side of the family. She
advised Clara that she
needed to help her get
things together regarding
her assets because "this man
(Nathaniel Richardson of
Charter Electrical) was try-
ing to take" some of her
property. She further
advised Clara that she and


her Goddaughter had.
already talked with
kichardson but he was very
rude and told her that he had
purchased the property from
her husband but could not
provide receipts for pay-
ment of the property or for
the taxes.
The initial search found
that all of the property was
the assets of the elderly rela-
tive and on the morning of
April 23, 2004, Clara visited
the property with a friend.
While there a man.


approached them and
records will show that that
afternoon, unknowing to the
owner or Clara, a Deed of
Trust was filed that
Richardson claimed was
signed by the former


owner's husband in 1994
but was *never filed at the
Court House.
The lady had already
assigned the property to The
Star so that it could do busi-
ness in the spot where her


Two Men Charged With

Strong Armed Robbery

At Orange Park Mall


Man's Body Found In Street


The body of Adrian
Levelle Williams,- 29, was
found lying in the street in
the 7700 block of Federal
Street. A bike was found
near him but the cause of his
death has not been dis-
closed. The incident has
been classified as an appar-


ent homicide by JSO.
Williams was found by a
man who discovered him
while he was on his way to
work. *
Adrian Williams, whose
body was discovered at 6:48
a.m.Wednesday, May 18,
had just celebrated his 29th


birthday four days earlier,
May 14.
The Sheriff's Office
Homicide Unit is asking for
help. Please call 630-0500
or First Coast Crime
Stoppers at 1-866-845-
8477. All calls will be kept
confidential.


Job Fair Brought Real Jobs To Jax
Thousands attended the
Corrine Brown Job Fair
lO lyon Monday at FCCJ
Downtown. Many jobs
were offered, including
opportunities at the U. S.
Postal 'Service, where
SCongresswoman Brown
-A is seen standing in the
long line of applicants,
declaring she was there
.- to guarantee all appli-
cants would receive fair
treatment.

Senator Mel Martinez In Jacksonville
Florida's first
Hispanic U. S.
Senator, Mel
Martinez ( R) met
with African .' .. .
American political .
and business lead- l-.-
ers Monday. The
Senator said he m
wants African
Americans to know
that even those
who may not have
voted for him,
should call him and
take advantage of his ability to help them because, he is their senator.


Aaron Pitts Shontravious Dauphine


Aaron Pitts, 24 and
Shontravious Dauphine, 17,
were arrested and charged
with Strong Armed Robbery
and Aggravated Assault on
an elderly woman while at
the Orange Park Mall
Friday. The victim sustained


serious injuries and was hos-
pitalized. Pitts was the driv-
er in the incident and was
apprehended at the mall.
Shontravious is the suspect
who had contact with the
victim and was found in the
Merrill Road area.


News in brief

FBI Finds Lost Transcript Of 1955 Murder

S The FBI announced
that they have found the
long-lost transcript of the
1955 murder trial of two
Mississippians accused
of killing Emmnett Till.
The Emmett Till mur-
der is one of the most
infamous crimes of the
Civil rights era.
Emmett Till The agent in charge.
,obert Garrity Jr. would not disclose where the tapes were
otund but the Justice Department claims that they have
found new evidence regarding this murder.


late husband had prospered
as a business- for family
sake.
Clara informed
Richardson of The Star's
ownership. This is when he
produced a ten-year-old doc-
ument that was filed at the
Courthouse on April 23,
2004 which he claimed
made him the owner even
though he had never paid the
taxes. What he did not know
was that his document did
not include the building and
some of the land, only a
parking lot. So, he was told
to remove his items from the
building, as well as the vehi-
cles and dogs from the lot.
There were other problems
with his document that pre-
vented Richardson from
legally being the owner of
any of the property.
Last week, over a year
later, ready to begin con-
struction, Clara advised
Richardson that she was
having the building demol-
ished. Two members of JSO
also told the lady in his
office, (told that she is the
wife) that he should remove
his property. She yelled
across the street in front of
the police officers, "We ain't
moving nothing."
Saturday, Charter
Electric trucks were placed
in front and up against the
side of the building so that
the proven owner could not
have access to the building.
Many blacks have
expressed that they have lost
real estate because it was
taken. Often, they say that
such theft of property has
been done by people of other
races but in this case, the
problems these ladies are
experiencing are being done
by a black man who owns
the business directly across
the street from the property.
In addition, the church next
to the property (Philadelphia
Baptist) advised that the
man tried to sell them the
property but their research
showed that he was not the
owner another effort of
real estate fraud.
Citizens need to search
their. properties, especially
the older citizens, to see
what scams have been or
may be used to take posses-
sion of their properties.
Clara will continue her bat-
tle to clear this matter so that
The Florida Star will have
the location base desired.
If you suspect problems
with property you own or
desire and need help, call
The Florida Star. We will
help you get help.


Looking for customers to patronize your ADPRESORTEDTANAED
business or utilize your services? If you U.S. POSTAGE PAID
JACKSONVILLE, FL
answered YES, then you need to place an ad PERMIT NO. 3617
in The Florida Star! CALL 904/766-8834 to E |
place your ad TODAY!! LIBRARY OF I ORIDA HISTORY
S516015 0151 Check, Money Order, Or Credit Cards Accepted S' OF 0 I 1 0 o06 )
S: 0 \ V.L;L ['F!. 2 1 7007 O


IIII I II


Editorial .................... A7
Lifestyle .................. A-3
Church ... ................ A-4
State .................... A-6
National ... ... I ............ A-7
Local ......... ............. B-1
Prep Rap ............... A-3
Jail Or Bail .............. B-5
Sports ........... .......... B-6
Business N(4work..B-7


m







L L S -Z 3 ------ -


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, NOREEN ERCOLINO, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DESIREE SANDLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS-
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS: '
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


VERIFICATION
I M M i


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


*


TO BE EQUAL
By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League
President Fox's Foolish Words


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


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Perhaps Mexico's President
Vicente Fox, who's made
much of his country's com-
mon bonds with the United
States, was just trying to
demonstrate how thoroughly
American-in the worst way-
he could be.
Last Friday in a speech appar-
ently meant to underscore his
dissatisfaction with some
recent U.S. immigration poli-
cies, the leader of Mexico
seemingly sought -to bolster
his argument by denigrating
African Americans.
"There's no doubt," he said,
"that the Mexican men and
women-fully of dignity,
willpower and a capacity for
work-are doing the work that
not even blacks want to do in
the United States."
Now, after several days of
sharp criticism from within
our borders and Mexico's,
too, word comes that
President Fox spoke by tele-
phone with the Rev. Jesse
Jackson and the Rev. Al
Sharpton and said he "regret-
ted" his comment.
Good. But the assertion is still
worth exploring because it
embodies several fundamen-
tal tenets of the racist canon
so familiar to any American
over the age of twelve.
In case President Fox missed
that section of his briefing
papers on American history,
most African Americans


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


It only requires understanding
that when any of us look
beyond our .own ethnic group,
we're looking in a mirror.
If President Fox needs fact-
based proof of that truism,
then let him take note of the
decline during the years 1999
and 2000 of the black unem-
ployment rate in the U.S. to
an historic low of 7 percent.
That decline was certified by
a study of more than 300 met-
ropolitan areas by the
National Bureau of Economic
Research. It determined that
the falloff largely resulted
from poor black males, aged
16 to 24, rushing to take the
low-wage, service-sector jobs
at the bottom of the occupa-
tional ladder that had, finally,
become open to them. That
businesses were hiring
African Americans for these
jobs-the very kind President
Fox declared "not even blacks
want"-meant that America's
job-creation had become so
expansive that employers lit-
erally had no choice but to.
extend "first-rung-on-the-lad-
der" opportunities to blacks
males, too.
Washington Post columnist
E.J. Dionne remarked then
that the historic development
proved "those who argued for
years that the plight of the
poor owed more to what was
wrong with the economy than
to what was wrong with the
poor have been proved right."
The historic, decline of the
black unemployment rate
remains a powerful rebuke to
the "culture of poverty"
claims some continue to out
forward to explain away the
present black unemployment.


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rate-which since the 2001
recession has returned to its
"traditional place" in the dou-
ble digits. It's now at 10.4 per-
cent, twice the national rate.
They want to disguise the fact
that African Americans, par-
ticularly those at the bottom
of the economic ladder, con-
tinue to be victimized by the
"last-hired, first-fired"
dynamic. Why that is so has
very little to do with their
"dignity, willpower and
capacity to work" and every-
thing to do with the intoler-
ance of those doing the hir-
ing.
It's heartening that President
Fox is re-thinking his views. I
would hope that Secretary of
State Condoleezza Rice
would express her own and
her department's willingness
to help President Fox learn
more about all of those who
comprise the citizenry of his
neighbor to the North, espe-
cially those African
Americans who match in eco-
nomic and educational status-
and yes, in "dignity, willpow-
er, and a capacity for work"-
the Mexican immigrants
President Fox was champi-
oning.
That would undoubtedly help
millions more on both sides
.of the border develop minds
more open to seeing humani-
ty's finest qualities in all kinds
of people.


today share a common bond
with America's Mexican-
Americans-whether or not
they possess the proper immi-
gration documents. Most
African Americans today are
either migrants themselves or
the children or grandchildren
of those blacks who left the
American South by the mil-
lions in the first five decades
of the twentieth century.
They were fleeing the brutal
oppression of Jim Crow
racism. True, they-filled with
dignity, willpower and. a
capacity for work-found pleti-
ty of .racism in the North and
West, too. But they also found
a measure of opportunity,
which they seized to build
better lives for themselves
and their children.
Their heroic efforts across the
decades laid the foundation
for the Civil Rights
Movement of the 1950s and
1960s-which proved of enor-
mous benefit to other
Americans of color, including
those from Mexico and the
rest of Latin America, striving
for that full measure of oppor-
tunity the United States has
always proclaimed to be its
gift to humanity.
It's not difficult to understand
that what President Fox
knows to be true of Mexicans
and Mexican-Americans as a
group is true of all peoples,
including African Americans.


FLORIDA STAR


MAY 21. 2005


PAGE A-2


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Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque


Davis \
"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
"Sigma Pi Phi's 21st Annual High Potential Youth
Recognition Awards Program"
Cornell L. Moore, Esq., Grand Sire Archon Elect
of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity captivated the audience as
keynote speaker at Gamma Beta Boul6, Sigma Pi Phi
Fraternity's 21st Annual High Potential Youth
Recognition Program honoring an overwhelmingly
vast number of high achieving predominately African
-American 10th, 11th and 12th grade students from
Duval County's public and private schools. He held
the over capacity audience's attention throughout his
speech with 'Cornell's 10 B's' which included: Be
available, Be Fair, Be good, Be human, Be known, Be
needed,, Be ready, Be responsive, Be yourself and Be
Humble. The speech was ultimate advice for both
young and old.
The 2005 Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship can-
didates for direct Scholarships from the fraternity
were: James Barge-Raines, Lanelle Ezzar-Stanton,
Kyrina Moultrie-Mandarin, Nina Oliver-Wolfson,
Joilyn Stephenson-Paxon, Niyat Tesfazgi-Paxon, and
Kai Thompson-Stanton. Their SAT scores ranged
from 1210 to 1525. Kai Thompson was the 2005 win-
ner.
Presented as 2005 Hicks Club Scholars were:
Jessica Harris, Chelsi Henry, Martinaez Johnson,
Sergio Kelsor, Doyvon Montgomery, Sasha
Simmons, Samuel Washington and Travis Williams.
The Hicks Prep Club initiated by the Jacksonville
Housing Authority Resident Opportunities
Department in 1999 for the purpose of motivating
youth residing in public housing and Section 8 housing
to graduate from high school and to inspire them to
seek rewarding careers. Participants in the Hicks' Prep
Club have the opportunity to obtain a scholarship to
the University of North Florida. The scholarships are
made possible through the generous donations of The
Davis Hickses.
Additionally scholarships were offered by
Bethune-Cookman College, University of North
Florida, Florida Memorial University, University of
Florida, Hampton University and Jacksonville
University. The fraternity and its corporate sponsors
of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida, The Dalton
Agency, Wachovia Bank, N.A., Shands Health Care,
Gateway Shopping Center, Republic Parking System
and Paradiese Shops awarded over $22,000 in scholar-
ships.
The Principal's Stars of William M. Raines Senior
High School were acknowledged this year along with
their principal Mrs. Carol Daniels. The Principal's
Stars are students who demonstrate outstanding
accomplishments in academic, special talents, leader-
ship, obstacles overcome or community service.
Presented at the Sigma Phi Pi event were: Michael
Bivens, Krystle Branch, Jamie Brant, Warren
Brown, Stephanie Carmon, Nicholas Carter,
Tiffany Harvey, Crystal Jones, Devin Masline,
Erica McDuffie, Yasmine Spatcher, and Cherrelle
Williams.
Williard Payne is president of the Gamma Beta
Boule Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity. Drs. Ezekial Bryant
and Charles Cline were the co-chairmen of the event.
For scholarship opportunities and information about
Gamma Beta Boule visit www.gammabetaboule.org.
Congratulations to the scholars of Duval County!

"Gamma Rho Omega Chapter Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority Award Scholarships"
Gamma Rho Omega Chapter-Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority recently presented four high school
and two college students with academic scholarships
totally $16,500 at the sorority's Annual Scholarship
Luncheon held at the Holiday Inn-Airport. The recip-
ients were honored for their high academic, SAT/ACT
scores, and their school and community service.
Honored scholars were: Mses. Jessica
Richardson-Ribault High School, $6,000; Markisha
Fonsville-Ribault High School, $5,000; Erica Byrd-
First Coast High School- $1,000; Nina Oliver-
Wolfson High Schoo-$1,000; Ashleigh Heath-
Jacksonville. University, $1,000; and Kimberley
McKinney-Edward Waters College.
The "cultural arts" program featured Gamma Rho
Omega chapter members poet-author Mrs. Betty
Sessions and poet Ms. Tangela Floyd joined by fifth


grade Ruth E. Payne student and creative dancer
Derrionn Anderson and University of North Florida
flautist Ms Jasnine Butler.


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Scholarship committee chairperson -Mrs. Gwen
Flanders was assisted by her able committee members
Mesdames Lois Prime-co-chair, Cassandra Barlow,
Carol Boyd, Wilhelmenia Brown, Jennifer Butler,
Gloria Chapman-Scott, Donna Cobb, Felicia
Cruse, Johnestine Daigeau, Letitia Flanders,
Catherine Mobley, Jimmie Harper, Shirley
Harrison, Rebecca Hobbs, Betty Jones, Joanna
Hendricks, Estelle McKissick, Mari-Esther
Norman, Falencia Prime, Doris Putman, Willetta
Richie, Pamela Seay, Sophia White and Valeria
Williams.

Mark Your Calendar
The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity is presenting its
Omega Celebrity Weekend on June 10-11, 2005 fea-
turing the Lee Elder Golf Tournament, a Welcome
Reception and Gala. The weekend has something for
everyone!

Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming
events. Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me direct-
ly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or
fax (904) 285-7008.
See you in Ihe paper!


Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

Presents

Omega Celebrity Weekend

Supporting

Male Health Care
*Diabetes
*Colon & Prostrate Cancer
*HIV/AIDS
*Hypertension
*Erectile Dysfunction
Lee Elder Golf Tournament
Mill Cove Golf Course
Jacksonville, Florida

Welcome Reception
Adams Mark Hotel
Jacksonville, Florida

GALA
Adams Mark Hotel
Jacksonville, Florida
June 10- 11, 2005
Jacksonville, Florida
HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS
Adams Mark Hotel
Jacksonville, Florida
225 Coast Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32202
Ask for Omega Special Rate!

rThe Readers of the Black Press in America
, are more educated, -
Smake more income
make and have"
i substantial byvinci Dower.
-- / Source: The Media Audit
2004 Black Newspapers Readership Report, nnpa.org
L m umin U


FLORIDA STAR


MAY 21. 2005


DPAG A-3







MAY 21, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services- >
FREE CONFERENCE-New Spirit Full Gospel Word
Church, 4511 Soutel Dr., Pastors Forrest and Wilhelmenia
Gilbert, invite the public to a free conference with "Who
Shall...?" as the theme on Saturday, May 21, 8:30 a.m.-1:00
p.m. Registration and a continental breakfast will be held
from 8:30-9:30 a.m. Speakers include Pastor Wilhemenia
Gilbert, Dr. Vera Goodman (One Accord Gospel Temple),
and Sis. Sandra Waldrop (Mt. Nebo Missionary Baptist).
Lunch and fellowship will be held 12:30-1:00 p.m.
WOMEN'S DAY CELEBRATION-The Women of New
Mt. Calvary Baptist Church, 2328 San Diego Rd., invite the
pubic to attend Annual Women's Day services on Sunday,
May 24, at 11:00 a.m. Sis. Renee Bolden of First
Missionary Baptist Church in Fernandina Beach, Fla. is the
speaker. Sis. Thelma Badger, Chairman.
ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION- -Westside Church, of
Christ will celebrate it's 75th Anniversary. Each night during
the workshop sessions the Jacksonville Strengthening
Families Network will facilitate 7 Habits for Successful
Families and Character Counts for teenagers and young chil-
dren: These classes will also be made available to the
Jacksonville community. The schedule of events include:
May 20 Formal Dinner, Hilton Riverfront Jacksonville,.
7:00 p.m. 9:30p.m., Ticket cost $40; May, 21 Money
Management Workshop, 9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m., Millionaire
University, Estate Planning, Debt Management; Westside
Singers Reunion Concert, 7:00p.m.; May 22 -A.M. Service
- The Keys to Making Your Marriage a Total Quality
Marriage; Evening Workshop The Role of the Man and
Woman in the Home and Church; May 23 Evening
Workshop The Role 'of a Single Christian in the Home and
Church; May 24-Evening Workshop Family
Relationships; May 25 Evening Workshop Maintaining
Christian Standards in the New Millennium; May 26 -
Evening Workshop How to Study the Bible with Your
Family; May 27 Evening Workshop Talking to non-
Christian Relatives about the Church; May 28-
Homecoming Picnic, A. Philip Randolph Park, 10:00 a.m. -
3:00 p.m.; Homecoming Sing-out, Westside Church 'of
Christ, 6:00 p.m.; May 29- Homecoming Sunday.
FAMILY AND FRIENDS DAY- The Pastor and members

Ask us about Our


f' There had been a death
in your .amil lYesterday',
ihati would .rou be doing
today?





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Pre-Need



FORE-

'THOUGHT


funeral

planning


program


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED


ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354


Directors

Jacqueline Y. Barlle)


Alphonso West


of St. Andrew Missionary Baptist Church, 2600 W. 45th St.
invite the public to celebrate with them during Family and
Friend's Day on Sunday, May 29 during the 11:00 a.m. serv-
ice. Elaine Stewart of the Salvation Army Ministry is the
speaker. Rev. L. J. Coleman, Associate pastor. Rev. Henry
Rivers, Interim Pastor.
CHRISTIAN DRAMA-A Christian drama, written by Rev.
Karl V. Smith, Sr. and members of A.M.E. Church of the
Master, will be presented on Sunday, May 21 at. 5:00 p.m. at
the LaVilla School of the Arts located at 501 Davis St. North.
For ticket information call the church at (904) 768-7834.
OUTDOOR WORSHIP-The pubic is invited to worship
with the New Hope A.ME. Church family during an Outdoor
Worship service on Sunday, May 29 beginning at 10:00 a.m.
Dinner will be served. The church is located at 17th and
Davis Streets. Rev. Mary F. Davis, Pastor.
SECOND ANNUAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS FAIR-
The Worship Place, 2627 Spring Glen Rd., will host its
Second Annual Health and Wellness Fair entitled "Walking
In The Light Toward Good Health" on Saturday, June 18,
10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Activities include cholesterol screen-
ing (first 50 people), blood pressure check, mammograms
application, visiting physicians, diabetic screening, ques-
tionnaires, HIV/AIDS screening, mental health screening,
TB screening, and fun for the entire family. Nutritional
information 'and teen/youth information will also be avail-
able. For more information contact the church at (904) 396-
0540.
LAY DAY PROGRAM-Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church,
201 East Beaver St., will hold its Lay day Program on
Sunday, May 22 at 10:00 a.m. Rev. Theopulus Robinson,
Pastor of Saint Lawrence A.M.E. Church in Eatonville, Fla.,
is the speaker. Rev. Frederick D. Richardson, Jr., Pastor.
PRAYER BREAKFAST-The Women's Ministry of First
A.M.E. Church, 91 Old Kings Rd. North in Palm Coast, Fla.
will host a Prayer Breakfast at the church on Saturday, May
21 at 9:00 a.m. For more information contact the church at
(386) 446-5759. Rev. Gillard S. Glover, Pastor.
YOUTH REVIVAL-A Youth revival will be held May 23-
25, nightly at 7:00 p.m. at, Faith Deliverance Tabernacle
Ministries, 220 Mill Creek Rd. "It's A Family Affair:
Churches Connecting Together As One" is the theme. Elder
Kenneth H. Moales, Jr. of Prayer Tabernacle Church of
Bridgeport, CT (Bishop Kenneth H. Moales, Sr., Senior
Pastor) is the guest speaker. Cooperating churches include
Faith Deliverance Tabernacle Ministries (Elder Thomas E.
Grant, Senior Pastor) and Alexander Temple Community
Church (Elder Dwight Follins, Co-Pastor. For more infor-
mation call (904) 724-6016.
CLOSING SERVICE-The concluding service in celebra-
tion of Epiphany Baptist Church 's 21st Anniversary and the
16th of the Pastor, will be held on Sunday, May 22 at 4:30
p.m., "The Great Commission" is the theme. The church is
located at 663 South McDuff Ave. Rev. Dr. Edward Fields,
Jr., Pastor.


Evan el

Temrne
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Sunday NVorship Services
Sun&d.y Sz25 a.m 1 Oz-45 a.m. a 6:00 p.m.
"Have you Received ithe Holy Spirit
Since you Believed?" .\cs- i'.


STlhe Inzliling ofl the Sp
*Thes HI01' Sriva 'ItTL-adli
& Emiposwers~.


1; A.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR -
FUNERAL COST REPAYMENT


If you wish, you may
choose not to do anything at all
about prepaying your financial
expenses. Let the moine, come
out ol :otir estate's assets when
you die. It it's obvious that there
will be moneyin your estate--in
the form of sa'.i ng. insilrance,
cashable stocks or bonds, or
other liquid assets-that's proba-
bly all the protection your sur-
vivor needs. The money you
would otherwise tie up for funer-
al payments could be invested or
put into savings instead.
The, disadvantage of this
course is that your estate may
never be so large as to cover the
funeral costs adequately.


Another possibility is that even
if you are well 'off now, your
financial fortunes may change to
such a degree that there won't
be much money in the estate
when-you die., IN such cases,
your survivors would be under
great financial strain to meet the
cost of your funeral and burial.
It may require going into insur-
ance money or other resources
more urgently needed to live on.


A.B. COLEMAN
MORTUARY, INC.
'Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Monclef Rd.'
Tel: 788-0507
S wwwABColemen.com


ies, Cornloirts. Edflem



The Crabb Famnil.,y
S'uivdnNy fkMny 29th,
5~755 Riimuna Blvd.
Jacksonv4ille, FL 32205
904-~781-.93931

ris.,ne II emp Ieag.Org

e,.-nkIj.lj-s4c omcow[Ste[CI


Apostle Faith Miracle Church, Inc.
529 S. McDuff Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32254
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study (Tuesday) 7:30 p.m.
Prayer Service (Thursday) 6:00 p.m.
Prophecy & ... ,.
Deliverance Service (Friday)....... ............ 30 p.m. "
(904) 388-0120
Assistant Pastor: Missionary Murria M, Jones
Pastor-Bishop A.L. Jones, Sr.

URGENT HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY

TRANSPLANT!
for Samuel W. Smith

PLEASE GIVE!

(904) 765-9773


K The Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.ai.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School ..........3:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church.
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday -Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


Su
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New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208

nday School 9:30 a.m.
nday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
nday Afternoon Bible Study
except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m. '
i-d-e aM -irs- Mtsu. 7tn. m


Tuesday rrayer ivIeetnmg .mu p..
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


WORSHIP CENTER

.' Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
;... Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
S(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Pra. er 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesda3y worship Ser ice.............6....:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

2005 Youth

Ifk Summer Camp
Mt. Sinai Community Development Enterprise
2049 North Pearl Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (904) 798-8733

Nine Week Program-May 23-July 29, 2005
6:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Ages 6-15
One Time Non Refundable Registration Fee-$25
Weekly Rate-545
For more information *Arts & Crafts *Computer Literacy
CallMichael Stanfield *Recreation *Field Trips
(904) 798-8733 *Weekly Worship

One Lord One Faith Christian Assembly
"Where Jesus Is Lord"
Elder K.M. Middleton, Sr.-Pastor
5410 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, Fla. 32219
Email: onelordonefaithca@yahoo.com
Church Office: (904) 764-5646 Fax: (904) 764-3613
Sunday Bible Enrichment 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Wonderful Wednesday Worship 7:00 p.m.
Sunday-Hour Of Power Ministry 8:00-9:00a.m.
WYMM-AM 1530, with Faithful Larry


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Deborah West


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First African-American President Inaugurated at Wheelock

College


Jackie Jenkins-Scott became the
thirteenth president of Wheelcok and
the first African-American President in
the College's 116-year history in April.
Wheelock is a small, private college in
Boston nationally recognized as a lead-
ing institution for childhood education.
Jenkins-Scott was awarded an
Honorary Doctorate .aDegree in
Education from Wheelock College in
2003, when she served as the
Commencement speaker. She also
holds Honorary Doctorate Degrees
from Northeastern University, Bentley I
College and Mount Ida College. f
Sheserved as the President and Chief
Executive Officer of the Dimock
Comnunity Health Center in Roxbury,
Mass., from 1983 until 2004. Previous
to that she held several positions w ith
e to Jackie Jenkins-Scofftt became the thirteenth
the Commonwealth of M lassachusetis, president of Wheelcok and the first African-
Departments of Public and Mental American President in the College's 116-year
Health. As community leader, public history in April.
health advocate and innovative admin-
istrator, she has been a nationally known figure for the past twenty-five years.
Jenkins-Sc9tt has served on many civic and community boards. She has
received numerous awards and citations including the 2004 Pinnacle Lifetime
Achievement Award from the Greater Boston C(hamber of Commerce and the. 2004
Alumni Award from Boston University. She received degrees from Eastern
Michigan. University, Boston University and did a Post Graduate Research
Fellow ship at Radcliffe College of Harvard University.
The theme of the inauguration was "Global Reach-Local Touch: A Commitment
, to'i Children and Families." Wheelockt College is online at: www.\h.elock.edu.


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Afterschool


programs


Helping kids find the hero within.




Let us know you want

afterschool programs in your area.


Call 1-800-USA-LEARN.


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Daughter Of Congresswoman



To Wed Philadelphia Businessman




Shantrel Brown Engaged To Tyree L. Fields


Tyree L. Fields on bended knee asks Shantrel Brown
(right) to be his bride. (PHOTOS BY MICHAEL PHELTS AND FRANK
MICHAEL POWELL)


Honorables King and Betty Holzendorf, Reg Hoskin and
Susan Kelly (Tyree's aunt) Shawn and Tyree,
Honorables, Mia Jones and Terry Fields. (PHOTOS BY
MICHAEL PHELTS AND FRANK MICHAEL POWELL)


Shantrel answered yes in view of family and friends. (PHOTOS BY MICHAEL PHELTS AND FRANK MICHAEL POWELL)


By Marsha Dean Phelts

Tyree L. Fields, athletic
entrepreneur of Philadelphia
popped the question to
Shantrel Brown in the pres-
ence of her mother,
Congresswoman Corrine
Brdwn, grandmother Delia
Covington, great grand-
mother Sarah Morris and
over 100 others involved in
their daily lives. Tyree's
sentimental proposal
warmed the hearts of all that
witnessed.
After receiving the bless-
ings from the Brown family


Dr. Reed Honored With NAACP Award


DAYTONA ,BEACH,
Fla. The Volusia County-
Daytona Beach branch of
the NAACP honored
Bethune-Cookman College
President Dr. Trudie Kibbe
Reed with its Humanitarian
Award at its 32nd Annual
Freedom Fund and Awards
Banquet held at Daytona
International Speedway.
Since arriving in
Daytona Beach as the fifth
president of Bethune-
Cookman College last year,
Dr. Reed has strived to make
a difference not only at the
College, but in the surround-
ing community and globally
as well.
In the spirit of College
founder Dr. Mary McLeod
Bethune, Dr. Reed has rein-
stated the monthly commu-
nity meeting attended by
local business and civic
leaders.
Through these meetings,


the inaugural Charles W.
Cherry holiday festival was
created and held last
December on the college
campus that brought the
community together for a
day of fun and fellowship.
Currently, the College has
worked with the community
to launch the TKR Reading
Adventure, a bi-monthly
reading program for area
youth.
"She has only been here
a short time, but Dr. Trudie
Kibbe Reed has made such a
connection with the Daytona
Beach community," said
Cynthia. Slater, NAACP
Volusia County-Daytona
Beach Branch President.
"Dr. Reed is a warm and car-
ing individual, but intensely
committed to educating our
youth and civic participa-
tion. She is just what this
community needed, and I
can think of no one more


Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed
deserving of this award."
Dr. Reed's vision for
Bethune-Cookman College
includes the International
Institute for Civic
Participation and Social
Responsibility, which will
bring the nation's most inno-
vative thinkers together to
foster a sense of community
empowerment through dia-
logue and issue formation
relative to critical social
issues.


and Shan's accepting his
touching proposal of mar-
riage, Tyree announced that
the engagement diamond
would be placed in a setting
of her choosing and the ring
on her finger right away.
The couple will be wed on
September 3, 2005.
Prior to the gathering
Tyree rededicated his life to
Christ during the eight
o'clock morning worship
services at Bethel Baptist
Institutional Church.
The festive celebration
of the couple's engagement
had the combined appear-


ance of a family reunion and
a Congressional Black
Caucus Activity. Local and
out of town relatives from
both families were on hand
as well as long time friends.
Guests, Congressional
staffers, local Black, elected
officials and policy makers
were as striking as the beau-
tiful callalilies and floral
arrangements that adorned
the landscape.
Kenhe Production pro-
vided the smooth jazz enter-
tainment for the event. A
posse of diamond star caters
which included Nee Davis


Catering Services turned out
a smorgasbord of food. For
this gala occasion Mrs.
Davis supplied fresh organic
free produce from the family
farm in Alabama.
The engagement party
that sunny Sunday afternoon
on the banks of,the river at
the Brown's home will be
remembered for a long, long
time.
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE FLORIDA STAR

CALL
(904)766-8834


&F


,-f.


"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted

&

The Victory is in the Word & Music

Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.


Topic For Saturday, May 21, 2005:

Are you seeing RED? The People's
Advocate will discuss how to "rapidly
eliminate debt".


6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW. WCGL1360. COM


- .1-.. .'
'Y '". ,-.* '
^-..',/-- ,


MAY21, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


AGEA- A








IrJLVY 9^flf -l F*n------ -SA


Mexican President Tries Smooth




Relations With Black Community


Vicente Fox tried to
th relations with the U.S.
c community Wednesday
saying Mexican immi-
s take jobs that "not even"
:s want, promising to work
the Rev. Jesse Jackson to
ove labor rights for minori-
n the United States.
he meeting between Fox
Jackson at the presidential
ence was a sharp contrast
a few days ago, when
on called on the Mexican
dent to issue a public apol-
Some 25 million people of
ican heritage live in the


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United States.
Fox met with Jackson for more
than an hour, but didn't participate
in a news conference following the :
talks because he had to leave for a
trip to northern Mexico. Fox has
made no public reference to his
comment Friday, 'instead issuing
*often inconsistent statements
through his aides.
Jackson told reporters Fox was
scheduled to appear on the U.S.
civil rights leader's radio program Rev. Jesse
Sunday. Fox was also invited to Jackson
several U.S. labor forums, although it wasn't clear if he
planned to attend.
Foreign Secretary Luis Ernesto Derbez, who appeared at
the news conference on behalf of Fox, said the meeting was
an opportunity for Mexico to pursue better treatment for
Mexican and other Latino migrants in the United States.
"This relationship, which today became closer for the
Mexican government, is one more avenue, one more process
of mutual support in the search for a common objective that
is integrated, and is a complete migratory reform," Derbez
said. Jackson said Fox's comment Friday was "at best,
insensitive," but that the Mexican president had expressed
regret for any offense he had caused.
"He now realizes the harmful effects of it," Jackson said.
"He seeks to correct it by reaching out."
Jackson said the statement, which angered the U.S. black
community, was a chance for minority groups in the United

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States to begin working together to fight for better treatment
and wages. "It was offensive and inaccurate, but it was a
diversion from the bigger struggle of workers rights,"
Jackson said.
He said Mexicans and blacks in the United States were
the victims of U.S. policies that pit illegal workers against
disenfranchised minority groups. "The Mexican-Americans
must not be pawns in that scheme, and African Americans
must not be scapegoats in that scheme," he said. "We must
work together, fighting for the right to vote, and for health
care and wages."
The controversy came as Mexico fumed over new U.S.
immigration policies, including tightened requirements for
driver's licenses and the extension of a wall along the
California-Mexico border.
The U.S. government initially criticized Fox's statement,
with State Department spokesman Richard Boucher saying
Monday it was "very insensitive and inappropriate." The
next day, White House press secretary Scott McClellan said
Fox "made a public statement regretting his comments, and
I think he's addressed the matter." Jackson criticized
President Bush and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice
for not personally responding to Fox's comment.


(News from Press Release and wire services)

CEO Of GE Subsidiary Files Bias Law suit


STAMFORD, Conn. The chief executive of a General
Electric Co. subsidiary filed a lawsuit against the conglom-
erate Tuesday, accusing it of discriminating against him and
other black managers in awarding pay, promotions and
perks.
Marc .Thomas, president and CEO of GE Aviation
Materials LP, charged that GE refused to promote or reward
him despite exemplary sales and profits in the business he
runs, and trying to force him out when he complained of dis-
crimination. GE denied the allegations in the lawsuit, filed in
U.S. District Court in Bridgeport, Conn. "At General
Electric, African-Americans are reluctantly allowed to sit at
the table," Thomas said Tuesday. "They're not allowed to ask
any questions."
His experience at the Fairfield-based industrial, finance
and media company echoes that of many other black man-
agers whose careers have been stymied by cronyism and out-
dated policies, Thomas' lawsuit alleges.
The action, which seeks class action status to represent
thousands of managers, asks the court for at least $450 mil-
lion in damages, as well as back pay, increases in pay and
benefits and broad changes in GE's personnel practices. GE
said -it would seek to dismiss the lawsuit.

FBI: Grenade at Bush Rally Was Live

TBILISI, Georgia A grenade hurled in a crowd during
last week's speech by President Bush in the Georgian cap-
ital was live and considered a threat against the president,
though it failed to explode because of a malfunction, the
FBI said Wednesday.
In Washington, the White House spokesman said Secret
Service agents in Georgia were examining whether security
changes were needed, noting that some people at Freedom
Square were seen getting around metal detectors at Bush's
May 10 speech. Initially Georgian officials said the Soviet-
era grenade was found on thp ground, was inactive and
posed no danger to Bush. But FBI agent Bryan Paarmann
said Wednesday that the grenade, wrapped in a dark hand-
kerchief, fell about 100 feet from the podium where Bush
was speaking and "simply failed to function."

Nigeria Police Kill Youth, Triggering Riot

OGALE, Nigeria Hundreds of youths stormed a police
station and set fire to cars in southeastern Nigeria on
Tuesday after a protester was fatally shot by a police rifle,
officials said. The youths began protesting Tuesday morning
over demands that a local oil refinery and petrochemical
plant employ more people from the area, said police chief
Samuel Adetuyi.
They set fire to part of a police station in the Niger Delta
village of Ogale and burned an SUV in its courtyard. One
protester was killed when he tried to grab a rifle from a
police officer and the gun accidentally went off, he said.
Police fired tear gas to disperse the other protesters, who
were demonstrating outside the ,oil plants, Adetuyi said.
A police official said around 400 protesters then carried
the dead body to the police station before smashing and
burning cars. The local police commander ordered his men
not to open fire "because many lives would have been lost,"
said official, who spoke o, condition of anonymity.
Adetuyi said four people had been arrested


MEXICO CITY President


gp a -..---.-. I
Vicente Fox


PAGE A-7


FLORIDAA STAR


MAY 21 2005






n A fl, A


PAGAj -8 'r A


ENERAIMN


Fri nfRIA STAR


Wassup in Hollywood


Young Design Duo Launches MOSA Clothing Line by Rych McCain
by Rych McCain Record Mogul and J Records owner Clive
Davis will guest on American Idol to render his opin-
At first glance, Breegan Heuer and Jessica Jordan ion on this year's remaining finalist. Comedy Central
(both are 19 years old), may appear to be a couple of attrac-
tive, fun loving, care free young ladies whose biggest .. superstar comedian Dave Chappelle checked himself
dilemma would be what to do on the weekend. But under- nto a outh African mental health facility on May
neath the bright smiles and sexy demeanors lies the cre-
ativity and business savvy of two rising young profession- 12th. The production of the third season of his show
als in the world of fashion design. Thus we have the cre- -, has been put on hold until further notice.
action of the MOSA CLOTHING LINE. MIND HUNTERS (Dimension Films) is a
SBreegan, the African American half of the duo, is a for-
mer child actor and model. She owns her own clothing pretty good, suspenseful thriller with the old pre-
store "Breegan," in downtown Manhattan Beach, i dictable "who gets whacked next," by line. An all-star
California. Her partner Jessica, who is often teased about j .-... cast is headed by Val Kilmer, LL Cool J, Christian
being a Britney Spears look-alike, started as a master cake .
decorator. Although the two young ladies attended Mira Slater, Eion Bailey and Kathryn Morris. The plot is
Costa High at the same time, theyeally didn't hook up about an FBI training program which teaches their
until after graduation through mutual friends. agents how to use psychological profiling to track
Why did they throw their hats in the already crowed
arena of clothing lines? down serial killers. When a group of trainees are
"There is room for something new and we were really .' placed on a remote island, cut off from all communi-
frustrated with what we could find for real women," says cation, one member in the group actually becomes a
Breegan "so we wanted to do something that was forn
Breegan "so we wanted to do s hin t ws f ,; '' real life serial killer and the others have to find out
everyone, not just use pretty clothes that look cute on the real life serial killer and the others have to find out
tiny women." who it is before they all are wiped out. This flick will
Jessica chimes in, "Why did we do it? Because we are keep you guessing and on the edge of your seat.
obsessed with clothing ourselves and rather than go out Lo fef
.. ,.,Look for the June release of the David
and spend all our time and money buying them, we decid- -Lf.h.
ed to produce them." Breegan Hunter and Jessica Jordan (Photo LaChapelle film documentary RIZE! It chronicles
a 1 Breegan Hunter and Jessica Jordan (Photo
What is the concept of their designs? Breegan responds, 2005 Andre' B. Murray/A Bern Agency Photo) the creation of "Clown Dancing," in South Central LA
"Definitely, we are going with flowy, feminine cuts. We
want everything very girly but we use bright bold prints by local hood hero Tommy The Clown, which then
which kind of offsets that and we use lengths that are good for everyone. So nothing too short or too small. gives way to the phenomenon known as "Krump
It's really about being feminine without showing every piece of skin." Dancing" and the South Central LA Krump
"That about sums it up," adds Jessica. "Our stuff really fits every woman from the teenager, who has the .
really thin body, to an older woman that just wants to go to work, look nice, sophisticated and kind of fun
at the same time." we will feature the cast in the near future.
How available is their clothing to the general public? Our heart felt prayers and condolences go out
"Right now, we are trying to keep it selective to go in the right stores. We're doing.most things online
through MOSACLOTHING.COM. We are carried in two stores in Malibu (CA), and my store in Manhattan
Beach and were working with some great distributors to get us in the right stores vs. over producing and not Faison, creator of the MIXTAPE AWARDS, who was
being able to have our hands on the product." killed in a car accident near Richmond, Virginia early
Their motto is "We Are What You Are." Saturday morning, May 14th.
Both of these young ladies enjoy the beach where they grew up and the dress and lifestyle that accom-
panies that location. They are single and look forward to the rewards that hard work will bring in their quest Rych
to make their marks in the fashion world. Maat-Hotep!





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i j "---


Workshop, Book To Educate Families On Tracing Ancestors


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- A local, zealous author has
actually taken the initiative publishing a book recording con-
versations with the elders in her family .
T. F. Young's debut work, a
memoir entitled The Stories
My Foremothers Told Me, pro-
vides a riveting, insightful,
at thought-provoking look at the
trials and triumphs endured by
five Black-Creole Catholic
women living along the
Mississippi-Louisiana Gulf
Coast during the Jim Crow era.
b, The narrative vividly presents
T. F. Young experiences of the author's
blood relatives-her mother
and several women from hter mother's side of the
family-largely in their own words.
"RECAPTURE YOUR FAMILY'S ORAL HISTORY", a
workshop, will be held on Sunday, May 22, 2005 3:00 p.m.
at the Courtyard Marriott Hotel in Jacksonville, located at
4670 Salisbury Rd. The workshop is sponsored in part by
Blacksonville.com and Oral History Publishing. Books will
be available for purchase at the workshop.
Although race relations did play a major role in each of
these women's lives chronicled in her book, Young does not
dwell upon this subject. Instead, the author depicts the intri-
cacies of each character's relationship with her families and
friends, and with the Black community at large. Young's
uncanny ability to address issues such as alcoholism, child-
birth, dysfunctional relationships, religion, and surviving the
death of a spouse is highly engaging. The author has intri-
cately woven each of the character's lives into a captivating.
story of life, love, and loss. What emerges from these heart-
felt narratives is a picture of the complex and rich world
inhabited by Ms. Young's relatives.
It took Young five years to capture her foremothers' sto-
ries-those five years involved long drives from
Jacksonville, Florida to the Gulf Coast where her subjects
were born and reared. The Stories My Foremothers Told Me
chronicles the lives of five women-Nola, Hope, Faith,
Mary, and Marie (actual names have been changed to protect

Bethel Baptist Institutional

Church And FCCJ Offer

Summer High School Classes

For the third consecutive year, Bethel Baptist
Institutional Church is partnering with Florida Community
College to offer summer school to high school students. Six
hundred spaces are available for students needing another
opportunity to obtain passing grades in order to graduate or
advance to the next- grade level.
Summer classes will run for six weeks, June 6-July 17.
Registration will be held May 31-June 2 at Bethel Baptist
Institutional Church, 123 Bethel Baptist Street. Registration
is from 9-a.m.-3 p.m. There is a registration fee of $175.
Registrants must have with them their report card, Social
Security.card and a waiver from their school.
Specialized lab courses are available at Bethel Baptist
and at the College's Downtown Campus. Student attainment
of competencies will be verified by testing and/or portfolio
assessments.
The following courses are available: Algebra I and II;
Geometry; English I, II, III and IV; Biology; Chemistry,
Earth Science, Space Science and Physical Science;
American and World History and American Government.
FCAT Reading Endorsement is offered at an additional
cost of $50.
FCAT Enhancement is also available for 12th graders
who failed the FCAT but have completed all other gradua-
tion requirements. Students will also participate in weekly
motivational and study skills activities, including presenta-
tions by guest life-skills speakers.
This is the third year Bethel Baptist and Florida
Community College have sponsored this program since the
discontinuation of Duval Public Schools' summer school
program.
Bethel Baptist Church is located at 215 Bethel Baptist
St., and may be reached by calling 904.354.1464. The
College's Downtown Campus is located at 101 W. State St.
and may be reached by calling 904.632.5094.


the privacy of those mentioned)-with whom T.F. Young
conducted hours of tape-recorded conversations. The author
initially began her storytelling quest upon receiving an
undergraduate research grant from the University of North
Florida to conduct an oral history project focusing on
Young's foremothers, which is what makes T.F. Young's
book all the more inspiring. Young's efforts have already
been recognized by the University of Southern Mississippi
which recently elected to add these interviews to their
archives for public access.
V


Angela Spears
Donates Kidney
To Her Father


Angela Spears
WTLV NBC 12
anchor/reporter Angela
Spears knows first hand that
family matters.
Spears recently went
home to Texas to donate one
of her kidneys to her father
during a life-saving kidney
transplant.
Doctors reported that
Angela's father's body
instantly accepted the kid-
ney
The surgery reportedly
went well and that both
Angela and her father are
recuperating and should be
able to leave the hospital
soon.
Marie Carter, who has
been in contact with Spears,
says she is in good spirits
and doing well.
Spears is expected to be
in Texas for about six weeks.
She grew up in Corpus
Christi. She attended the
University 'of Texas at
Austin, where she graduated
with a Bachelor of Arts in
Journalism.


THANKS FOR SUPPORTING.

THE FLORIDA STAR!

TO ADVERTISE AND SUBSCRIBE

, CONTACT US AT (904) 766-Q834


DEATH

NOTICES
ADAMS-Cecil, 69, died May
11,2005.
BAKER-Zehedee, died May
10, 2005.
BARNWELL-Thelma V.,
died May 13, 2005.
BOLDEN-Annie Mae., died
May 10, 2005.
BROWN-Altowese, died
May 13, 2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
BROWN-Georgia Mae, died
May 9, 2005.
BROWN-James A., died
May 12, 2005.
GETHERS-King, 91, died
May 14, 2005.
GORDON-Adam, died
May 15, 2005.
GRAHAM-Christine, 60,
died May 16, 2005.
HAGAN-Gertrude, died
May 9, 2005.
HARDEMAN-Miriam G.,
died May 16, 2005.
HAYES-Diane died May 12,
2005.
HAYES-Julia Mae, 62, died
May 15, 2005.
JACKSON-Albert, died
May 12, 2005.
JACKSON-Florence V., died
May 14, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
JACKSON-Julius, died
May 13, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
JORDAN-Lola Mae, died
May 14, 2005.
KNIGHT-Sam, died May 12,
2005.
MORELAND-Jonnie M.,
died May 10, 2005.
NOBLE-Catherine D., died
May 9, 2005.
ROBINSON-Ronnie, 48,
died May 7, 2005.
SAUNDERS-Arthur Jr., died
May 17, 2005.
SCOTT-Clarence E., died
May 12, 2005.
SNEAD-Arthur Jr., died
May 16, 2005.
WAGNER-Herman Sr., died
May 13, 2005.
WILLIAMS-Annie L., died
May 13, 2005.
WILLIAMS-Elizabeth, died
May 13, 2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
WILLIAMS-Virdie, 66, died
May 13, 2005.
4,


The up-and-coming author discovered a way to bring her
dream into fruition. First, Young stumbled across the means
to finance this noble and ambitious project by researching
the plentiful grants offered by the University of North
Florida. Then, she actively searched for a way to meet the
requirements to apply for these grants. And, after several
rewrites, the author submitted a proposal that would eventu-
ally secure the monetary support needed to give a voice to
her foremothers' stories. And, the rest is, as they say, histo-
ry-or in this case.. .her-story.
If you have a passion for recording your family history
this is a must have for your personal library. To find out
more about T.F. Young's dynamic workshops or to get infor-
mation about how you too can publish your family's mem-
oirs, please call 904-764-7828


'COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.2

-YMCA REALLY CARING CARNIVAL-The
South Metro YMCA, located at the comer of
Emerson and Philips Highway, will host a day of fam-
ily fun on Saturday, May 21, 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
The event features carnival games, rock climbing,
face painting and more. All families, members and
non-members, are invited. For more information
contact Muffy Forsythe or Lee Vartanian at (904)
398-9808.
SPRING DANCE AND FASHION SHOW-The
Bold City Chapter of Blacks in Government is spon-
soring a Spring Dance and Fashion Show on
Saturday, May 21, 9:00 p.m.- 1:00 p.m., at the Scottish
Rites Cathedral, 29 W. 6th St. (6th and Main Streets).
For further information contact Josephine Butler at
998-3932.
DANCE PERFORMANCE-A benefit dance perform-
ance by Jacksonville Centre of the Arts. will be held at
7:00 p.m.on Friday, May 20 at LaVilla School of the
Arts, Theatre. Tickets are $20. You may purchase them
from The Centre at 355-5551. Ticket proceeds will ben-
efit students of The Centre who will travel to summer
(and beyond) dance programs. Some will travel to
Atlanta, some to Miami, others to Broadway and to
Alvin Ailey in New York City.
POST PRODUCTION CELEBRATION-The Public
is invited to join FreshMinistries and NCCJ a post pro-
duction celebration for Jacksonville's spiritually uplift-
ing film "Bridges of Peace", a film premiered during
Super Bowl week. The film recognizes the communi-
ty's unity through appreciation of its diversity. A
screening and reception will be held at 6:00 p.m. on
Thursday, June 2 at Henrietta's at 9th and Main Streets.
The public can also enjoy the first public screening of
the independent short film "The Lagoon" produced and
filmed in Jacksonville by a Douglas Anderson School of
The Arts alumni.
PUBLIC HEARING-A public hearing will be held on
Tuesday, May 24, 5:00 p.m. in the Mary L. Singleton
Center's main auditorium located at 150 E. Ist St. The
public is invited to attend and give their opinions to rep-
resentatives from city agencies concerning the needs of
people infected'with and affected by HIV/AIDS in
Duval, St. Johns, Clay and Nassau counties. For addi-
tional information and/or limited transportation, please
call Maryann Rassi at (904) 7173.
BRIDGE' TOURNAMENT-The Gate City Players
Duplicate Bridge Club will host a Grade "A" bridge
tournament at the Clarion Airport Hotel from May 27 to
May 29. The Club is a member of the American Bridge
Assoc., Inc. (ABA), located in Atlanta, Ga. and founded
in 1934. The local president is Marion A. Gregory.
Tournament co-chairs are Mmes. Demetral Wester and
Doris Swinton. The Grade "A" is the organization's
third highest-ranking duplicate bridge tournament, pre-
ceded by Sectional and national tournaments, respec-
tively. Interested persons may call (904) 744-0567.
PLAN FOR 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF MILLION
MAN MARCH-From Unity To Loyalty, Inc. invite
adults, children, groups, churches and organizations to
travel with them to Washington, D.C. on October 7,
2005 for the 10th Anniversary of the Million Man
march. For information contact Andr'e X Neal or James
Evans Muhammad at (904) 768-2778 or (904) 768-
3332.


PAGE B-1


FLORIDAA STAR


MAY 21 2005










FnnRIDA STAR


MAY21. 2005


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Some Facts About Children in America (source: Children's Defense Fund)
1 in 2 never complete a single year of college.
1 in 2 will live in a single parent family at some point in childhood.
1 in 3 is born to unmarried parents.
1 in 3 will be poor at some point in their childhood.
1 in 3 is behind a year or more in school.
1 in 4 lives with only one parent. Fa ly living arrangements.
1 in 5 is born to a mother who did n graduate from high school.
'1 in 5 was born poor


WHAT TOOK YOU A LIFETIME

TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.









WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.

Learn the warning signs at
StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE.

American Stroke
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200'4 Americon Heart Associoation A Divislon of American
fl Made possible in part by a generous grant from The Bugher Foundation. Hearl Associalon 'VW


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Northwestern Middle School Student

Is Award Winner In Mathematics


JACKSON\ILLE. Fla.--The United States
Achlieement Academi announced thai Joe IH. B\ ird. Jr..
a ilth grade student at Northwestern Nliddle School. has
been named a Uniuted -tates National .A-\ard \\inner in
NMatlhematics.
The Academ\ recognizes fe\\ er than I (I percent of all
American high school students.
Joe is the son of Joe and Ollie Byrd of Jackson\ ille.
He is the -randson of Nlain B\rd and NMi. Maple L and
Estelle Jones of Jacksomn ille
He is a Na\ al Cadet at Northw western and is a member
of Bethel Baptist Intsirutional Church. Joe has been an
A-B Honor Roll student since starting school.
Joe will appear in the United States Achieement
Academy\ Official Yearbook \ which is published national-


He \aas nominated for this national a\\ard b\ Debbie
Simpson. Math instructor at North\\estern.

Jax Student Accepted Into Academic Program


Tezl\n Edwards. daughter of Connie and aince
Edw\ards, a 5th grade student at Hogan Spring
Elementary\ School. has been accepted into the People to
People World leadership Forum.
Tezl\ n \\ ill join a select groups of students in
Washington, D.C.. September 19-25 to earn high school
credit while strud\ ing leadership and exploring some of
the United States" most prominent monuments and insti-
tlition-.
From Capitol Hill to the Smithsonian Institute, and
from Colonial \\ illiamsburg to the National MNuseum of
American Histori., Tezl\ n \ill examine the characteris-
tics of American leadership during times of national
challenge and prosperity.
Forum delegates will also participate in small-group
discussions and exercises to experience first-hand ho\\
successful leaders develop strategies, make decisions.
build consensus, and foster change.
She \was nominated and accepted the honor based on
outstanding scholastic merit, ci\ ic inmvol\ ement and lead-
ership potential.
Tezl\n attends Bethel Baptist Institutional Church
%\here she participates in The Children's Choir. She is
Praise Leader for the Children's Church. a girl scout and
a student at Attitude Performning Arts.
She has been accepted to participate in James \Weldon
Johnson's gifted program.
The leadership forum is coordinated b. People to
People Student Ambassador Programs to fulfill the
vision Dwight D. Etsenho\wer had for fostering world


citizenship \\ hen he founded People during his presi-
denc\ in 1'56.






Page B-3A/May 21, 2005


Jax Children's Commission Honors Outstanding

Local Students At First Do The Right Thing


JACKSONVILLE,
Fla., May 16, 2005 The
Jacksonville Children's
Commission honored the
achievements of more than-
250 outstanding elemen-
tary, middle and high
school students at the first
annual Do the Right
Thing/Young Achiever
awards held May 12, 2005
at the Florida Theatre.
At the request of the
Jewish Community
Alliance, the Children's
Commission took on the
role of organizing the Do
the Right Thing awards.
This year the Do the Right
Thing awards combined
with- the Young Achiever
awards, which has hon-
ored youth in the
Commission's funded
non-profit programs for
the past ten years. "By
merging these two pro-
grams, we hoped to gener-
ate more awareness about
the importance of recog-
nizing and valuing our
, youth, especially those
who often overcome great
challenges to make posi-
tive choices, and I think
we accomplished that"
said Linda Lanier, CEO,
Jacksonville Children's
Commission.

"The Do the Right
Thing/Young Achiever
awards provided a won-
derful opportunity for us
to honor students who are


Foundation
Breanna Parker -
Community Connections
Founded in 1994, the
Jacksonville Children's
Commission strives to cre-
ate positive opportunities
for all children by: 1) help-
ing them to be well pre-
pared for life through


quality early learning,
early literacy, health,
nutrition, summer and
after school programs; 2)
by promoting supportive
and nurturing parenting
through family strengthen-
ing and parent education
programs; and 3) by pro-
viding help when kids


need it through special
needs, behavioral and
mental health, mentoring
and drop-out prevention
programs. For more infor-
mation about the
Jacksonville Children's
Commission, call (904)
630-3647 or visit
www.jaxkids.com.


succeeding as citizens,"
said Mayor Peyton.
"Their efforts are truly
making a difference in our
community."
The first annual Do the
Right Thing/Young
Achiever awards ceremo-
ny featured exciting per-
formances, honored the
250 nominees and cele-
brated the ten most out-
standing youth selected
this year. Rev. Pete
Jackson, Acting
Superintendent Nancy
Snyder, Delores Barr
Weaver, City Council and
School Board members,
and sponsors were there to
pay tribute to the nomi-
nees and their families.
Rahman Johnson,
Jacksonville native and
host of SPLAT on
Nickelodeon, served as
master of ceremonies.
The winners were:

Jerrica Townsend -
Landon Middle/Spring
Park Girls, Inc.

Kimberly ,David -
Volunteer Jacksonville

Erica McDuffie JP
Expression Ministries

Suong Tran -
Community Connections

Trevor Small
Timucuan Elementary

Emily Gleeson James
Weldon Johnson

Matthew Hernandez -
Boys and Girls Clubs of
NE FL

Kelli Huynh Kernan
Trail Elementary

Tiana Raysor TnT
Program/ Ma 1i Va i
Washington Kids


(NAPSI)-A dog's wag-
ging tail and soft, fluffy
ears can be as irresistible
as the forbidden cookie jar
to a. child. But while the
family pet is tolerant and
patient with your child,
other dogs may not be. So
it's important to teach your
child how to behave safely
around all dogs.
"Most of the time dogs
and kids make great com-
panions," says canine
behavior expert Dr. Mary
Burch. "However, some-
times dogs can view a
child as 'one of the pack'
and play rough, or misin-
terpret a child's actions as
threatening."
The American Kennel
Club advises parents to-
teach their young children
how to treat all animals
with care and considera-
tion, and how to steer clear
of potentially dangerous
situations.
What Kids Need To
Know:

Always ask a dog's
owner if you may pet the
dog. Some dogs shouldn't
be touched. He may be "on
duty" as a service dog or
he may be ill or afraid of
children.

Approach a dog from
the front or side-not from
behind. Hold your hands
low and speak softly. Do
not surprise a dog, force


him into a corner, wave'
your hands or scream at
him.

Dogs may get defen-
sive at the food dish. Don't
interfere when a dog is eat-
ing and never put your
hands, between a dog's-
mouth and his bowl.

Some dogs are very
protective of their balls or
chew toys. Never take, a
bone or toy from a dog's
mouth unless he's trained
to drop it or give it to you.

Avoid teasing, rough
wrestling, or tug-of-war
games. Dogs may get too
enthusiastic and forget you
are not a dog. Fetch, fris-
bee and agility are better
outlets for your dog's ener-
gy.

Respect a dog's space.
Dogs naturally defend
their territories. Do not
stick your hand inside a
strange dog's crate or car
window.

Never try to break up
a dogfight. Trying to sepa-
rate fighting dogs may
make them more excited,
and they might turn on you
or accidentally bite you.
Call an adult for help.

Observe canine body
language. Beware of a dog
that is barking, growling


or showing his teeth. Stay
away if his ears are back or
his hair is standing up on
his back. Say "NO" firmly
and slowly walk away
with your arms by your
side. Do not scream, stare
into his eyes or run away.
Teaching parents and
children how to behave
safely around dogs is at the
heart of AKC Responsible
Dog Ownership Day.
Please join the AKC and
more than 400 affiliated
clubs and organizations in
September to celebrate.
Visit www.akc.org to find
an event near you.
Children should
always ask the owner's.
permission before touch-
ing a dog.



FIND OUT

HOW YOU

CAN

APPEAR

IN

PREP RAP



CALL

904/

766-8834


Students Hit The Mark With Winning Designs




B-3B/MAY 21, 2005
^-^^ ^^^ ^^^-^^^ -^^ r----------------


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B-3C/MAY 21, 2005


Chart Busters by Allan
Ornstein
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Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 3
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No. 5
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7l'fAVl 2R SP E


EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
SPOUSE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On Saturday, May 14, 2005
at 6:05 p.m. a police officer responded to 5258 Norwood Ave. in ref-
erence to a domestic battery call. Upon arrival, police officer met
with the wife (victim), who stated that she and her husband (suspect)
have been together for over 10 years but have been married for one
year. The victim said that she and the suspect are the mother and
father of two children. The victim also told the police officer that
she was involved in an argument with the suspect that escalated to
violence. The victim said the suspect was intoxicated and he began
calling her names, pushed her down, and slapped her on the face.
The victim said the suspect left the residence and she was taken to a
safe 'location by a relative. The police officer did not observe any
visible signs of injuries to the victim. The victim was issued a state
attorney card and advised on how to follow-up filing charges.
POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE-On Sunday,
May 15, 2005 at 12:45 am. A police officer was Eastbound in the
10200 block of Atlantic Blvd. when the officer ran into a large field
of broken glass and debris in the roadway. The officer stopped and
activated the emergency equipment to warn other motorists, and
began removing the items from the roadway. That's when the offi-
cer noticed a female (suspect), standing in an adjoining parking lot
next to a pickup truck. The police officer asked the suspect for her
license in order to issue her a citation for an unsecured load. She
began to dig in her purse. Then stated "All I have is an ID card."
The officer asked the suspect if she had any weapons in her purse,
and she replied' "No, only pills." The suspect then told the police
officer that her driver's license was suspended, and that she had only
driven tonight because she was moving. A check revealed the sus-
pect's Florida driver's license was suspended 2/14/05 for failure to
pay a traffic fine. The suspect was placed into custody, and a search
of the suspect's purse revealed a small plastic container of crack
cocaine, along with a large blow torch style lighter, a small case
containing four unknown pills and burned brillo from a crack pipe
with burned residue on one end. The suspect admitted possession of
these items. All items were placed into evidence. The suspect was
read her rights, arrested, taken to jail and booked on felony charges.
A 17-YEAR-OLD FEMALE ACQUAINTANCE VANDALIZED
AN 84-YEAR-OLD FEMALE'S VEHICLE-On Saturday, May
14, 2005 at 1:41 p.m. a police officer was. dispatched to 1433
Madison Ave. to investigate the report of criminal mischief to an 84
year old female's (victim) vehicle by a 17 year old female (suspect).
Upon arrival, police officer met with the daughter who stated that
the listed suspect vandalized her mother's car. The daughter told the-
police officer that she was in a fight earlier on Friday 05/13/05 with
the 17-year-old female suspect, that came to her mother's house and
threw a large cement block at her mother's vehicle. The suspect then
fled in a blue car (no other description). The suspect returned a few
minutes later while the daughter was outside the residence. The
daughter then ran back inside their residence and she heard three or
four shots fired from an unknown firearm in an unknown direction.
The suspect fled the scene in the same blue'car:again. The police
officer observed several new scratches on the top of the.84-year-old
female victim's vehicle. Also several new scratches and a dent on
the hood of the listed vehicle. The police officer will contact the
assistant state attorney's office to attempt to acquire a warrant for the
arrest of the listed suspect.
SUICIDE ATTEMPTED-On Sunday, May 15, 2005 at 1:43 p.m. a
police officer % as dispatched to 3529 Andrews Street in reference to
an anempted oierdose call. Upon arrival, the police officer
observed the 44-year-old female (victim), lying on her bed being
treated by JFRD (Rescue, #10). The victim was conscious and was
not cooperating with Rescue. JFRD personnel found several empty
bottles of medication. Zoloft 100mg, Mirtazapine 300mg, and
Fluphenazine 10mg. Based upon the medication being prescribed
two weeks ago, they believe she took 26 Zolofts, 13 Mirtazapine,
and 1f3 Fluphenazine. The \ ticim refused to tell how many pills sbp
took. The wicim's brother advised the police officer that his sister
had been going through some hard times "mentally" lately. When he
called her today she told him she took a bunch of pills because she
was "tired". He said she didn't specifically say she wanted to kill
herself, however he believes that was her intention. The victim was
"Baker Acted" due to the following: the police officer believed that
the victim was unable to determine for herself whether an examina-
tion was necessary. There is also a substantial likelihood that 11nh1-
out care and treatment the victim would cause serious bodily harm
to herself. The victim was transported to Shands Hospital by Rescue
#10. The victim's brother was given a case information card.
A 13 YEAR OLD STUDENT BATTERS A 48 YEAR OLD
TEACHER-On Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 11:47 a.m. a police offi-
cer responded to Ribault Middle School located'at 3610 Ribault
Scenic Dr. in reference to a battery to a teacher. Upbn arrival, police
officer met with the Vice Principal, who reported that one of his 13-
year-old male student (suspect) struck one of his teachers (victim),
causing injury to her arm. The police officer was introduced to the
student. who identified himself. The suspect was arrested and read
his rights. He said he understood his rights. The police officer as
then introduced to the victim. She reported that, at approximately
11:30 a.m. the suspect \\as attempting to approach the backside of
her desk. She told htm to stop, but he refused. She said she put her
arm up as if to block his access to the area behind her desk and the
suspect slapped her left arm, causing a visibly swollen bruise. She
said, after he struck her, he threatened, her saying, "I will kick your
a**.'t A witness, the class Para-professional said that she was in the
class with the students when the incident occurred. She said that the
suspect was attempting to get behind the victim's desk, and when
,he tried to stop him, the suspect struck her on the left arm. He then'
said, "You don't tell me what to do. I will kick your a**." The
police officer interviewed the suspect. He said the incident occurred
when he was, attempting to change the movie that was being shown
to the class. Concerning the victim, hlie said, "She started pushing me
from behind the desk and started yelling. I slapped her hand from off
me." The suspect was booked at PTDF without incident. His foster
mother was notified by phone at 1:15 p.m.
A 14 YEAR-OLD BOY WAS ROBBED BY A 28 YEAR OLD


MAN-On Friday, May 13,.2005 ,at 11:30 a.m. a police officer was
dispatched to the corner of East 16th and Main Street in reference to
an armed robbery. Upon armval, police officer met with the boy
(victim) and his mother. The victim stated while on his way home
from the store, he was pushed off his bicycle by a 28-year-old male
dressed in women's clothing. The boy's mother also told the police
officer that the suspect pointed a silver box cutter at her son and
demanded his money. The suspect took the victim's money.'The sus-
pect told -the victim; if he yelled or called the police, he would tell
the police that he wanted to pay for sex. In fear for his life the vic-
tim complied with the suspect's demands. The victim then ran home
to get his mother. The suspect fled in an unknown direction. An area
canvass did not reveal any suspect information. The victim and his
,mother %\ ere gi e' a case information card. CaL- not cleared. Patrol
effotts suspended.,


Your Weekly Horoscope

(APRIL 30, 2005-MAY 6, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) You
could be in the
market for a big-
ticket item, such
as a car. If so, shop around
for the best deal. Don't fall
for a slick salesman's pitch.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) It seems you're the
calm in the center
of a domestic
storm this week.
Not to worry -
your personal magnetism
wins the day. Later in the
week, your judgment is a bit
off where finances are con-
cerned.
GEMINI (lMay 21 to
June 20) You --
feel stuck in a rut
this week.
However, don't
give into that sense of bore-
dom. Things perk up for'you"
soon enough.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) You're a whirl-
D wind of energy on
the job this week.
This doesn't
escape the notice
of bigwigs. Feel free to bask
in their praise.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22)
You're being a bit
too hard on a fam-
ily member who
disappointed you.
Remember, no one's perfect.
Try to be more understand-
ingi
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) It's a
good week to take
stock, of your
long-term goals.
Be sure to ham-
mer these out with your
mate. You'll both benefit
from being on the same
page.
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) You're
in an impatient mood this
week. Try to curb this.


Otherwise, you
end up making
sloppy mistakes
on the job.
SCORPIO (October
23 tO November 21) You
D- need to pay more
attention to the
needs of your
mate. Perhaps
you can plan a romantic
evening for just the two of
you. The weekend is best for
that.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December 21)
Co-workers come
up with innova-
tive ideas this
week. This leads to more
productivity and a sense of
accomplishment. Over the
weekend, enjoy, ah outdoors
outing with loved ones.
CAPRICORN
D (December 22 to
January 19) You
come up with a
new plan this
week to achieve a certain
goal. However, you need to
fine-tune the details first.
Later in the week, you make
an important decision on a
domestic matter.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18)
You need to be on
your toes this week.
Although your energy isn't
up to its normal level, try to
shake this off. Later in the
week, you connect with an
important person.
PISCES (February
19 'to March
20) You've got a
good grip on the
big. picture this
week. This enables you to
implement important plans.
A family member gives you
good advice, so be sure to,
listen carefully.
CELE BRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Ted


Woman Charged With

Cutting Husband's Penis

WAUPACA,. Wis. A rural woman was charged with
substantial battery for alleged\ cutting her husband's penis
with scissors --an injury that required 15 stitches to repair. A
criminal complaint said the husband let his wife, Theresa L.
Hedtke, bind his hands with duct tape. Hedtke then used the
scissors in an effort to get him to confess to having an affair,
according to the complaint.
Hedtke, 42, allegedly told police she didn't intend to cut
her husband. He was treated at New London Family Medical
Center. Hedtke appeared' Monday in Waupaca County
Circuit Court, where Judge Raymond Huber released her on
a $5,000 signature bond. The substantial battery charge car-
ries maximum three and a-half years in prison upon convic-
tion. ,
Man Used Pastor's Computer For Porn
CHARLESTON, W.Va. A man,has been accused of
breaking into a church and using the pastor's computer to
look at Internet pornography. Donald R. Kendrick, 29,
was arrested Tuesday night after a scuffle with
Charleston police Cpl. T. George, who was responding
to a report that a light was on inside the First
Presbyterian Church.
George found the, suspect hiding under a desk. The
man fled down a hallway, spraying George with pepper
spray as he ran. The two men tumbled down a flight of
stone steps during the chase, Lt. Jim Sands said.
Kendrick, a resident of a Charleston' shelter, suffered a
broken ankle and lacerations to the head. George was
treated for a knee injury and abrasions. Ken.drick faces
charges of charges of breaking and entering, battery on
an officer and fleeing, Sands said.


McGinley, May 30; Sharon
Gless, May 31; Alanis
Morrissette, June 1; Wayne
Brady, June 2; Deniece
Williams, June 3; Angelina


Jolie, June 4; Kenny G, June
5.

(c) 2005 DBR Media,
Inc.


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FLORIDA L9TTO WINNING NUMBERS
05-10-16-21-47-53 -Saturday, May 14 ONE WINNEW!


PAGE B-5


FLORIDA STAR


MAY 21 2005








T A ,-' P


PIA UL B-0


FtnlR DA STAR


Darnell Cookman Student Named MWKF Player Of The Year


MaliVai Washington (MWKF President) and Player of the
Year Keanna Bell at the award ceremony.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--
It is never too early to start
planning for college. And
that's exactly what Darnell
Cookman student Keanna
Bell will have the opportuni-
ty to.do. Bell, a sixth-grad-
er, earned a $500 scholar-
ship for being named Player
of the Year by the MaliVai
Washington Kid's
Foundation.
Bell was chosen by
MWKF's program staff and
coaches as best all-around
achiever for the year. She
excelled not only on the ten-


nis court, but in the class-
room and community as
well.
The award ceremony
was held at the Emmett
Reed Community Center on
April 25th. Bell's mother,
Paula Anderson, was present
to see her accept the scholar-
ship.
The Foundation's lead
program is Tennis and
Tutoring (TnT), a compre-
hensive after-school pro-
gram which Bell has been a
participant of since third
grade. Prior to TnT, she had
never played tennis. She has


since won Grand Prix and
USTA tournaments and par-
ticipated in USA Team
Tennis.
Though often challeng-
ing to balance tennis and
school, Bell maintains a 3.2
GPA. This will be her third
straight year to win a schol-
arship.
"I like that everybody
looks up to me and expects
me to do well," Bell said. "I
really feel like my efforts
have finally paid off."
"Keanna is a natural
leader, both on and off the
court. She is a beautiful
young lady with a great atti-
tude, which helps her excel
at most anything," said
MaliVai Washington,
Foundation founder and
president. "She serves as an
outstanding role model for
the other kids."
As this year's Player of
the Year, Bell will speak at
the Mercedes-Benz/MaliVai
Washington Golf and Tennis
Gala September 12-13,
2005.
Several students were
also presented awards for
their achievements. Marc
Atkinson, a 10th-grader at
Lee High School, received


the President's Award and
Keshell Brown, a 5th grader
at John E. Ford Elementary,
was Player of the Year
Runner-up. Extra Effort
Awards were given to the
following: Markevius'
Collier, Wolfson High
School, 10th grade; Syreeta
Smith, Butler Middle
School, 8th grade;


Alexandria Smith, Victory
Point Boys & Girls Club,
7th-grade; Barresha Bell,
Kirby Smith Middle School,
6th grade; Donte Fleming
and Jazzauria Williams,
John E. Ford Elementary,
5th grade.
MWKF was established
in 1994 to introduce tennis
as a tool to develop positive


life skills and encourage
academic achievement in
youth who otherwise might
not be exposed to the sport.
MWKF runs a comprehen-
sive five-day-a-week after
school program in
Durkeeville and has intro-
duced tennis into the lives of
more than 12,000 local chil-
dren.


Tougher Drug Policies Sought


By Major Sports Leaders


CL


Donovin Darius Practicing With Jags


Donovan Darius prac-
ticed with the Jaguars on
Tuesday, rejoining the team
after skipping a mandatory
minicamp last month and
getting fined by coach Jack
Del Rio.
Darius had been unhappy
since the Jags. designated
him their franchise player
for a third consecutive year
in February.
He publicly ripped the
team for the decision, then
got permission from owner


Wayne Weaver to pursue a
trade.
"This is a business. This
is a short-term opportunity
for us to make as much
money as we can," Darius
said Tuesday. "Our window
of opportunity is a lot short-
er than a lot of other careers
out there. It is our job and
our personal obligation to
try to do whatever we can to
(make money)."
The league's franchise
rule allows teams to keep


one player off the free-agent
market in exchange for a
one-year tender worth the
average of the top five play-
ers at his position.
If a player doesn't sign,
the only way he can leave is
if another team is willing to
part with two first-round
draft picks.
Despite his displeasure
with the franchise tag,
Darius signed the tender that
guaranteed him $4.97 mil-
lion this fall.


r----------------------------------------------------
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WASHINGTON The
commissioners of Major
League Baseball, the NBA
and the NHL told Congress
they want to toughen their
steroid policies, drawing
praise Wednesday from law-
makers intent on legislating
standardized drug-testing
across U.S. pro sports.
In an unusual gathering
of some of the most power-
ful people in American
sports, the heads of manage-
ment and unions from that


-a~i


trio of leagues plus Major
League Soccer testified
before the House Commerce
trade and consumer protec-
tion subcommittee .about the
proposed Drug Free Sports
Act.
The bill's strongest advo-
cate appeared to be baseball
commissioner Bud Selig.
His sport's steroids program
drpw strong criticism from
lawmakers at a March 17
hearing held by the
Government Reform


Committee, which is carry-
ing out a separate inquiry.
As subcommittee chair-
man Cliff Steams, R-Fla.,
put it: "Commissioner Selig
has come out in support of
the bill, and that might be
out of frustration."
Since his earlier trip to
Capitol, Hill, Selig asked
Major League Baseball
Players Association execu-
tive director Donald Fehr to
agree to increase penalties
for positive tests-- including
a lifetime suspension for a
third offense-- and ban
amphetamines.
"I have one objective in
all of *this, and I've told
Don this a lot, and I've
told everybody else, and I
told the owners last week:
My job is to rid this sport of
steroids and rid any suspi-
cion," Selig said outside the
wood-paneled hearing
room.,
"I'm very comfortable
telling you today that my
program will rid the sport of
steroids. I spent a lot of time
talking to trainers, doctors,
general managers, man-
agers, players. I've devoted
my life to this now."
Several lawmakers laud-
ed Selig during the five-hour
session, reserving their
toughest questions for Fehr
and NBA union head Billy
Hunter.


Brewster Prepares To Defend Boxing Title


Heavyweight boxing
champion Lamon
Brewster throws out the
first pitch before the start
of the Chicago White Sox
game against the Texas
Rangers Tuesday, May 17,
2005 in Chicago. (AP
Photo/Jeff Roberson)
CHICAGO Some of
Lamon Brewster's critics say
that the heavyweight cham-
pion is too nice. And it's
easy to understand how
they draw that conclusion.
He doesn't want to kill or
cripple opponents. Nor does
he threaten to eat their chil-
dren.
Brewster seems, well,
nice.
And Saturday night at
the United Center, Brewster
is scheduled to defend his
World Boxing Organization
1


heavyweight championship
against Andrew Golota, a,
man whose reputation is not
so nice.
"I'm not going to growl
and talk about eating some-
body's kids," Brewster said,
alluding to Mike Tyson,
after Tuesday's workout.
Brewster talked about his
recovery from a knee injury
five years ago.
Brewster (31-2, 27
knockouts) strained the
meniscus in his left knee
during a loss to Clifford
Etienne and did everything
he could to avoid surgery
because he was afraid he
would be out a year. So, he
sought other rehabilitation
options and never went
under the knife.
Running was part of


/ I


3rewster's training regimen
for this fight; that hasn't hap-
pened often since the injury.
So that's one reason
Brewster is confident he can
beat Golota. He's healthy
and feels strong.
"I got on God's nerves
enough about healing my
knee," Brewster said.
In some ways, Brewster
seems like an outcast as a
boxer. He doesn't talk trash.
He doesn't make outrageous
boasts or threats.
He sounds more like a
youth counselor than the
stereotypical boxer.
This is about as close as
Brewster came Tuesday to
bombast: "All the pressure's
on Golota. This is his front
room, but I can't worry
about that."


MAY21, 2005


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F.nRIDA STAR


MAY 21. 2005


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*Avg. $777 $1017/week
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
Sunday Callers Welcome!
CDL -A req'd. 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com


CONSTRUCTION
Project Managers,
Project Engineers
& Superintendents
Balfour Beatty Construction Inc.
is now acception applications
for the Jacksonville area.
Florida Dept. of Transportation
& structures experience are a
mandatory req. Email resumes
or letters of interest' to
jyounk@bbciusa.com or fax to
(904) 781-5393.
BBCI is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.



Are You In Need Of A Car?
Bad Credit, No Credit
Must Be Employed!
Cars from 1996 2002
Give "Big AL" A Call
714-6519


THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852


Want to purchase minerals and
other oillgas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201


SERVICES

Aluinu ng


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764









*Restrictions Anolv*


Check Us Out!


MOVE-IN SPECIAL
*1ST MONTHS RENT AND UTILI-
TIES ARE ON USI
*During May and June, 2005, we
are offering everyone a special
deal.
A FAMILY COMMUNITY, PALM
TERRACE APARTMENTS CONVE-
NIENTLY LOCATED NEAR
SCHOOLS, SHOPPING, PARKS,
CHURCHES, HOSPITALSICLINICS
AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!
"CHOOSE YOUR NEIGHBORS"
*Restrictions Apply*
Palm Terrace Apartments
4813 Moncrief Road
Jax., FL. 32209
Ph#: (904) 766-7256
Fax #: (904) 766-3239
Email: palmterl@bellsouth.net


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L -J
.. Timely Tips by Kate Worth

:RECYCLE I've found a great use for an old diaper wipe con-:
:tainer. It's the perfect size. I store my cancelled checks in one of.
:them. When the bank returns them, I immediately file them in my:
:container. This keeps them all together, makes it easy to flip:
:through them if I need to, and makes it so much easier to find the:
:checks I need when I'm getting my taxes together at the end of:
:the year. Gianna L.


:COVER IT Sandboxes that are open and poorly maintained can:
:make a child prone to contracting contagious viruses and bacte-i
:ria. What can you do to prevent this? Simply buy a weatherproof:
:cover and use it to protect the sand from insects, animals and the:
:weather. Nate F.


:PROPER PLACEMENT You may think that setting up a:
:swingset on' the grass is a good and safe choice but grass can't:
:absorb an impact well, so falling can be just as dangerous as on:
:cement. A good choice would be to install it over wood chips if
:possible. If not, grass would be the next best thing. Mary Anne G.:

:HARDWOOD FLOORS To remove scuff marks from a hard:
:wood floor, cut open a tennis ball, place it on the bottom of a:
:broom handle and rub THE stain until it is removed. It's that:
:easy! Lisa B.


:Share your special Timely Tip with our readers. Send it to Kate:
:c/o DBR Media, Inc., P.O. Box 21, Hopewell Jet., NY 12533, or:
:e-mail: deckert@dbrmedia.com. (c) 2005 DBR Media, Inc.i
... .. .. ... .. .. .. ... .. .o. .


i..-- "America's Auction
SMarketing Group"

IPI'bhState
__ ._ I. .. ,, r .... ,:

GAL#2550.
Lance D. Kearce, CAI, Auctioneer


FLORIDA


Albany, Georgia
Toll-Free 1-866-300-SOLD (7653)
E-mail: info@land2auction.com
For More Information On This And Other
Upcoming Auctions Visit Us On-line @
www.land2auction.com
10% BUYERS PREMIUM


frtt.t. Is Ii du DISI,.mr r ..c I


FOLK FESTIVAL i'shlmtr.. Spmr'sz. FL
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p i~ I IIIiirid i iio-in Ki m, i~cint.-rI t r -ll MI x.~ F l
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As seen


FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS


(800) 794-7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


SUBCONTRACTORS
The Haskell Company Wants To Meet You
Join us and OK Consulting, Representative for Metropolitan Parking Solutions
for refreshments, prizes and networking. Learn about construction projects and
workshops to be held in the future.
Date: June 7, 2005
Time: 5:30 7:30 p.m.
Location: The Haskell Building
111 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, FL 32202
RSVP by June 2, 2005 to (904) 791-4600. Only confirmed RSVPs admitted.


Auctions


SMOKYMOUNTAINS/GATLINBURG.ForeclosureAtuction.
4 chalets. 2 mountain lots,'I office building. June 3. 12:0)
rioon. Furrow Auction Company (80(0)4FURROW:
www.furrow,conm.TNLic#62. ,


Automotive


DONATEYOURCAR,FURNITURE,REALESTATETODAY-
Help eliminate poverty housing and. homelessness. FRtEE
Towing, Tax Deductible, Life Council ict. www lifecouncil org
(877)734-LIFE or (877)734-5433.

Building Materials

METALROOF[INGSAVEI$$$BuyDirect From Manufacturer.
20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn around
Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.


Business Opportunities


ALLCASH CANDYROUTE Doyouearn$S800/day'?30
Machines, Free, Candy All for $9.995. (8 00)814-6323
B02000033. CALLUS: We will not he undersold!

HELP WANTED Earn Extraincome assembling Key Chains
from any location. Noexperience necessary. Start immediately!
(800()405-7619 ext 750 wwi.casywork-grtatpay.1on.

THOlISANI)SOIFBUStINIESSES ForSale ByOwners
Nationwide. Preview Business for free! Interested In Buying or
Selling A Business Call: GW Merger (877)217.8231 or visit
www, owmergercotn-

#1 CASH COW! 90VendinggMaichine units/You OK Locations
Entire Business S10,670 Hurry! (8001)836-3464 #B02428.

Electronic

ANEWCOMPUI'ER- BUTNOCASl ? You're APPROVED -
Guaranteed!" NO CREDIT CHECK- Bad Credit Bankruptcy
OK. (800)319-886010A-9P EST-Mon-Fri*Checking Account
Req'dwww.ocs4all.com. '


Financial


$50,000 FREE CASH GRANTS*'***- 20051 Never Repay!
For personal bills, school. 'new business. $49 BILLION Left
unclaimed from 2004. Live Operators! (800)785-6360 Ext#75.

IMMEDIATE CASH!!! US PensionFlundingpayscaslh now for
8 years of your future pension payments. Call (800)586-1325
foraFREE.no-obligationestimate.wwtv.uspensionftindin coming

Loans by phone. Up to $t1000 in 2-Ihrs. No Credit Check! Bank
Account Req. (888)350-3722 www pavchecktoday corn


For Sale


SIA. Must Sell. 7 Person Deluxe. Never Used. Includes Cover.
Will Deliver. Full Warranty. Can Finance W.A.C. Payments
Under S 100 per Month. In a. Hurry. Call (800)980-7727.

Health Care

Discount Dental Plans from DcntalPlans.com Save 60% ont
mental Care. Call Toll-Free (888)632-5353 10% off with
couLpon Code: Paper l10.

Help Wanted ,

Driver- COVENANTTRANSPORT.ExcIllent Pay & Benefits
forExperienced Drivers, O/O Solos.Jreants & Graduate
Students. Bonuses Paid Weekly. Equal Opportunity Employer.
(888)MORE PAY (888-667-3729).-
,


SUNCO CARRIERS-$.I(XX)SIGN-ONBONUS! *Owner.
Operator* Run Instate Florida* SE Regional" I Iome Weekly*
i iq ,r .., .. ., -. I ..,r, .-- ..j ". r, H .,i
DedicatedDispatcher* Own lightweight late-model tiactor. Call
Cammy @ (800)237-8288. .

Driver-GREAT & PLENTY!Tearns Start upto .47c. Company
Singles- .39c Students ,31c. Owner Operators $1.05 loaded
mile. KLLM-CDL-A. (866)323-2181. EOE.

S/IE&3-State Run: T/TDrivers. HOMEWEEKENDS. Mileage
Pay, Benefits, 401K. Trainees Welcome/ Miami area- exp. req.
21 min age/Class-A CDL Cypress Truck Lines (800)545-1351,

DATA ENTRY WorkON YOUROWN. lexibleliHours!S$SSeatl
. ., l' .. ,..,., ,,i.,, ... .. i.-.i ..-.1' ~-0345 ext #300.

Now hiring qualified drivers for OTR positions. Food grade
tanker. No hazmat. No pumps. Great Benefits. Competitive Pay
and new equipment. Need 2 years OTR experience. Call Bynum
Transport for your opportunity today; '(800)741-7950.

Legal Services

DIVORCE & INCORP$99-$199 Pluspaternity &other tami ly
law forms. Fast, reliable & accurate. Call (888)Speed-44 or
(888)773-3344, Legal Expedia lin, 8am-6pm weekdays.

DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS children.,etc. Onlyone
signature required! "Excludes govt, fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000,. ext.600. (8am-7pm) Di vorce Tech.
Established 1977.


Miscellaneous


EARN DEGREE online from home. *Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers. Job Placement Assistance,. Computer & Financial
aid if qualify. (866)858-2121 www.tidewatertechonline com.

FREE4-ROOM DIRECTVSYSTEMincludingstandtard
installation. 140+ Channels $29.99/mo, for 3 months. Access
to over 225 channels! Limited time. S&H. Restrictions Apply.
(866)500-4056,


Real Estate


WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS'North Carolina Whorethereis:
Cool Mountain Air. Views &AStream, Homes, Cabins &Acreage.
CAI1tFOR tFREEBROCHUREOFMOUNrTAINPROPERTY
SALES. (800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy 317 Peachtree St:
Murphy, N.C. 28906. www realtyofmurpliv.com.

BEAU]IFULNORTHICAROLINA.MUSTSEETHE
BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN NC
MOUNTAINS. IHomles, Cabins, Acreage&Investments.
Cherokee Mountain Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www cherokeemountainrealty corn Call for' Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.

Tennessee Lake Property Sale! Parcels from $24.900. 6 1/2
Acre lot$59.900. 27 Acre Lake Estate $124,900. Cabins
Available. Call toll-fiee (866)770-5263 ext 8 for details.

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS! Springs bloomingand
is beautiful! A wonderful time to look for real estate. See
Photos: www NorthCarolifiaMountainRealty comn or call
(800)293-1998. Free Brochure.

NCMOUNTAINS- Panoramic views and mountain streams in
high elevation between Boone and Asheville. Tracts range 1-5
acres with access and utilities from $49,900. (800)455-1981,
x.148. '

ATrrENTION INVESTORS: Waterfrontlots in the Foothillsof
NC. Deep water lake with 90 miles of shoreline. 20%
piedevelopment discountstand90% financing. NO PAYMENTS
for 1 year. Call now for best selection.
.ww 'nllakelfrontpropertics corn (800)709-LAKE.


VIEWSVIEWS VIEWS-HelenaMontana-4.7 Acres $79,990.
', m ,,',rr. I,. r ,, it- /L ake.
minutes to Helena. Soils tested, utilities, ready to buildon. Call
owner (888)770-2240.

GRANDOPENING! May21 &22 Ocala/Gainesvi lleArea. 20
Acres front $195,000. 100 Acres from $450.000. New semi-
private gated community featuring parcels w/v frontage on the
Wacassassa River. Gorgeous woodlands teeming w/ deer &
turkey. SAVE $10.000. Plus get up to $10.000 toward closing
costs! Great financing, little down. Call toll-free
(866)352-2249, x 436 or www.fllandbargains cora.

(4.a dulilp L, i'lrrl.r ," ,r i.rl 1 o, ,l 1 '*, 111 I, .
Hill Country locatis ..., i 3 ... ,,, r .... i,
trees, panorama icvi: r...... ir. i nI ,
(800)609-7042, x 122 Brokers & Agents welcome.

LAKEFRONT BARGAINS Starting at $89,900. Gorgeous
lakefront parcels. Gently sloping, pristine shoreline,
spectacular views. Across from national forest on 35,000 acre
recreational lake in East Tenn. Paved roads, underground
utilities. central water. sewer, Excellent financing. Call now
(800)704-3145 ext 617. Sunset Bay. L..C.

\ IIII\ s .-1'M M I. 1 111. I SI" I -, ,,,.
$24.900- Call Lakeside Realty (423)626-5820
www lakesidlerealt-tn.com'.

5 minutes to G;reenbrier Resort MTN LAND BARGAINS 20
Acres &'UpwAyJ.ibtsdj aic!Bn.

COASTAL GEORGIA- Water access marshfront homesites.
Gated community, tennis, golf, kayaking & canoeing.
Reconstruction discounts, limited time, From the mid-70's.
(877)266-7376 www,cooperspoint com.

NEWMEXICO-20 AcresS29,900. Scenicregion.views,
canyons, trees, rolling hills, wildlife. Enjoy hunting, hiking,-
horses, great climate. Power, great access. 100% Financing. Call
(877)813-LAND!

Steel Buildings

STEELBUILDINGS. Factory Deals* Save$$SS40x60 to 100
x 200'. Example: 50 100 x 12' = S3.60/sq ft. (800)658-2885
www rigidbuildint corn.

BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bottom Prices!" 20x30 Now 52900.
30x40 $5170(. 40x50 $8380. 40x60 $10,700. 50x 100 $15.244.
Others. Ends/accessories optional. "Priced to Sell!" Pioneer
(800)668-5422.

Your Ad Could Be Here

Run your ad STATEWIDE!!! For only S450 you can place
your 25 word classified ad in over 150 newspapers throughout
the statereachi ng over 5 MILEONrceaders. Call this newspaper
or Advertising Networks of Florida at (866)742-1373. Visit us
online at www.florida-classifieds com. Display ads also
available.





ANF


Advertising Networks of Florida



Week of May 16, 2005
L


S We are born with limitless potential. Help us make sure that we all
have the chance to achieve. Please visit uncf.org or call 1-800-332-8623,
rg Give to the United Negro College Fund. Cc





IMPACT


WCGL

AM 1360


















THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 6:30 P.M.






Place a classified ad in over 160 Florida newspapers and reach
over 5 Million readers for just $450.

Place a display 2x2 or 2x4 in 113 Florida newspapers and reach
over 4 Million readers. -


www.florida-classifieds.com


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Get online@0:


DAfF 7


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- I ~---~- ~I --


I I I


JOHNSON COUNTY, GA





SATURDAY '
MAY 21ST 10:15A.M. SHARP


GENTLY ROLLING FARMLAND AND TIMBER PARCELS FOUR
HOMES IN QUIET COUNTRY SETTING HOME & MINI-FARM
SITES OFFERED IN PARCELS AND IN IT'S ENTIRETY

"tRiAucteio 1-'114 ll =,


First
Month
I Free I







PREMIER FOODS
1 OF JACKSONVILLE


:4.] .-3Ljmr-q:4&i] a I a&


First Coast African American Chamber of Commerce Inc.

ANNUAL JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION


Friday, June 17, 2005


6:00 P.M.


- 10:00 P.M.


Celeb's Corner
736 A. Phillip Randolph Road
Jacksonville, FL 32203

Join us for a celebration of fellowship and remembrance
Share in the festivities with friends and business associates
Purchase food and beverages from vendors

*Door Prizes
*Ethnic Attire
*Booths Available @ $35.00

Questions or additional information, call the Chamber at 904-358-9090 or
visit our Web site at www.fcaacc.org


Itc~lli~;r~r~ ~a~C~~ ~Lli~~


-~----~-