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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
April 16, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00015

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
April 16, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00015

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text




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"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


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teFLORIDA"


thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


Men Questioned On


Ribault Scenic Murders


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School Bus Accident Leaves Deep Pain


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
Wednesday was not easy for
a nine-year-old Gregory
Drive Elementary student.
The child had just stepped
off of the bus as a dump
truck ran into a truck which
then hit the First Student
school bus at 103rd Street at
Chaffee Road.
No children were on the
bus and the driver of .the
Dodge Neon and four others
were taken to the hospital


but did not have life threat-
ening injuries.
The deepest pain
occurred when the grand-
mother of Patrice heard
about the bus accident, ran
out of the house, leaving
food cooking on the stove.
The house caught fire and
now the family is home-
less.
Their joy is that they are
all safe and together. Help
is needed.


The American Red Cross
is coming to their immediate
aid but since they have no
relatives in Jacksonville,
city residents are their next
of kin.
First Student School Bus
Company said they would
set up a fund immediately.
The Florida Star will pro-
vide information on this
fund in the next issue and on
the website:
www.TheFloridaStar.com.


Bertrun Perty Gibson
JACKSONVILLE, Fla --
On September 4, 2004 about
10:41 p.m., Larry Gibson,
34 of Harts Road was found
dead in the 3600 block of
Ribault Scenic Drive. Also
found with a fatal gunshot
wound was King Brookins,
31, of Adams Avenue.
The Sheriff's office was
called in response to an


Marcus Lamar Small


unknown person lying on
the bridge. Since that time,
in spite of a number of
inquiries, no other informa-
tion had been discussed. On
Thursday, the Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office issued pic-
tures with names of Bertrun
Perty Gibson, 19; Kenyon
Lamont Lee, 24 and Marcus
Lamar Small, 18 as persons


of interest.
Bertrun was also sought
for an active warrant relat-
ing to a conspiracy to traf-
ficking cocaine. All three
men were brought in for
questioning but have not
been charged. So, since
September, the case in the
death of two men is still
unsolved.


Raines And Ribault Moving Up

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- School Board members Brenda Priestly Jackson and Betty
Burney sought remedies to get Raines and Ribault High Schools back on
track after both schools received "F"s based on student scores on the FCAT
fj (Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test).
Because students attending schools with failing grades are allowed to
transfer, many of the students who had the ability to bring the schools
grades up, transferred to Mandarin, First Coast High School or other
schools.
Brenda The ladies then began to lobby to return the school students and their
Priestly identity to the community by establishing Duval County's third
Jackson International Baccalaureate program and a magnet program. Such a move
would allow Raines and Ribault High Schools,with such a program, to
attract those students with high achievement abilities to attend the schools as well as get
those who have left to return and encourage others to reach their full potential. The School
Board will vote on this change at the May 3, 2005 meeting. Many expect this change to be
approved.


Real Sense Prosperity Sponsors


April 15 Tax Blitz Day

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.. -- Free
tax preparation, electronic filing
and general tax assistance will be
offered April 15, the filing deadline.
The event will be held at the Real IDolar For rtl People.
Gateway WorkSouree Office, 5000-
2 Norwood Avenue from 10:00 a.m.
through 10:00 p.m. Taxpayers must bring a picture ID, Social Security cards for all persons
listed on their tax return and all pertinent records such as W2s and 1099s. Schedules C and
E will not be prepared. To date, the Real Sense Prosperity Campaign has secured $2.5 mil-
lion in Earned Income Tax Credits for the Jacksonville area. For additional information call
United Way 2-1-1 or 632-0600.

SJobSeekers, Your Ship Has Come In


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Jax MAD DADS; Senator Hill; And Compassionate Families


MAD DADS has joined forces with Compassionate
Families to dedicate a new concept in Jacksonville, as part
of the National Youth Violence Prevention Week's activities,
and Victim Rights' Week 2005. "The Wall" is an effort to '
memorialize Jacksonville residents who have lost their lives
to violence, by placing their names on a specially designed
wall. "The Wall" is portable and can be transported to dif-
ferent events across the city and state. The goal is to never

ews in brief

Rare Jazz Tapes Uncovered
At The Library Of Congress

The Library of Congress announced that historical-
ly significant concert tapes featuring the legendary jazz
ianist and composer Thelonious Monk and iconic
saxophonist John Coltrane, had been uncovered in the
library's recorded sound collection during preparation
for preservation. The 1957 tapes were recorded at
Carnegie Hall by the Voice of America.

Florida Kids 'Kick Butts'

In Florida, 18.1 percent of high school students


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Dedicate 'The Wall


place another name on "The Wall,"
Donald Foy, president of MAD DADS said the goal is to
make every citizen in Jacksonville so outraged that they will
"put fear behind them and get MAD!... MAD enough to
make the-criminals and cowards who terrorize our neighbor-
hoods afraid afraid of the thousands 'of eyes, ears, and
voices who can locate, identify, and testify against those who
have no regard for'human life."

smoke, and 33,900 become daily smokers every year.
wednesday was 'Kick Butts Day' and youth around
he state participated in activities ranging from mock
funerals to rallies at the state capitol, urging state lead-
ers to support tobacco prevention initiatives.

Mariah Carey'is Back

Mariah Carey, at 35, re-
entered the music world with
er CD,The Emancipation of
Mimi. She had already pro-
ided an early track from the
CD, It's Like That, and
received a great response. arey
hopefully, she said, even with suc petition as


Randstad, one of the world's largest workforce solu-
tions companies which employs more than 6,500 peo-
ple in the state of Florida, docked this 152-foot-tall clip-
per ship at the JAXPORT Cruise Terminal for a three-
day symposium on generational workplace trends.
Executives told local business leaders aboard the Stad
Amsterdam how companies across the nation are
preparing for retired Baby Boomers to return to the
workforce.


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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESUILLE FL 32611.7007


:ys out there, the CD will bring
p.

S BET Cancels
Nightly News


BET cancelled its
"Nightly News," saying
it instead will offer news
briefs throughout the day,
"Cousin Jeff specials about newswor-
Jeffrey Johnson thy events and an urban
affairs show, "The
Cousin Jeff Chronicles," that will run four times a
year. Robert Johnson, founder, said the change does
not represent a lessening of BET's news commitment.
This is one of the many changes BET has made since
its purchase from Johnson by Viacom Inc.


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Editorial .................... A
Lifestyle .................. A
Church .................... A-4
State ............. I ...... A-6
National .................... A-7
Loca ............. ...... -.. -- 1
Prep Rap ................ B-3
Jail Or Bail ... .......... B-5
Sports ..................... B-6
Business Network..B I


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CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
RON WILLIAMS, SR. SAMUEL CRISWELL
NEWS EDITOR ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR .


CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, NOREEN ERCOLINO, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DeSHAYNE BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by. columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper
q *. MEMBERSHIPS:,
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


As cardinals begin the
process of selecting a new
pope, the odds are that the
choice will come from
Europe, which is amazing
when you consider most of
the world's Roman Catholics
live in the developing world.
Why not a pope from the
Third World? Why not
Africa? And. if not now,
when?
The name of Cardinal
Francis A. Rinze of Nigeria is
of suggested as the prelate,
who could potentially step
into this role as leader of
more than 1 billion
Christians, making up 17.4
percent of the world's popula-
tion. In fact, Newsweek, in its
April 16, 2001 edition, went
so far as to say Rinze would
become the first Black pope.
Whether a Black cardinal
is advanced to succeed the
venerable Pope John Paul II,
one thing is for sure he will
not be the first Black pope,
since three African popes
have already served in the
apostolic seat beginning with
St. Peter.
Saint Victor I, from
Northern Africa was the last
pope of the second century
and .was -a chronicle of the
invasions and tortures inflict-
ed on the Christians in Rome
by Vandal invaders. He
reigned from 193-202 A.D.,
was declared a martyr of the
-church as is buried in St.
Peter's Basilica in Rome. It
was Victor I,..who fixed the
date for the first celebration


of Easter, according to the
Original African Heritage
Bible.
Besides Saint Victor I,
there was Militiades, the
32nd pope. During his reign,
the Roman Emperor
Constantine was converted to
Christianity in 313 A.D."and
Militiades received permis-
sion from Constantine for
Christians to worship free of
persecution. He was the last
pope to be buried in. the
famous catacombs.
Saint Gelasius I, the 49th
pope was born in Rome of
African parents and was one
of the most productive popes
of the 5th Century. He settled
the dispute over the use of
wine at Holy Comnunuion.
allowing it as an option. His
writings on papal .authority
are still current.
What better time than now
to correct some of the igno-
rance and major inaccuracies
about Blacks and their contri-,
butions to Christendom by
the selection of a Black pope.
Lies provided ammunition
for slaveholders to treat
Blacks as human animals
without souls. Moreover lies
and half-truths have resulted
in too many Blacks thinking
of Christianity as a "White
man's religion," when from
its very conception in the
Upper. Room in Jerusalem
Africans--as well as women--
participated and continued in
the expansion of the Christian
faith.
Africa, where Judaism


Time for a


Third World Pope

By Rev. Barbara Reynolds


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and Christianity received
such a rich start, offers a great
opportunity for the spread of
Catholicism, although a great
majority of new Christians
are flocking to Pentecostal
churches. In 1900, there were
8.7 million African
Christians, 143 million in
1970, and an estimated 400
million today, which would
mean that about 1 out of five
of all Christians are in Africa,
according, to the World
Christian Encyclopedia. The
majority of Catholics. in the
world are in Latin America,
with 511 million.
While there is an outpour-
ing of hope that the next pope
could come from ;Latin
America or Africa, only 21 of
the cardinals eligible to vote
on the new pontiff are from
Latin American and the
Caribbean and only 11 from
Africa, compared with 58
voting cardinals from Europe
alone.
To their credit, Catholics
celebrate the Black popes and
saints from Africa and Latin
America. It is the many Black
denominations who are either
unaware of this rich history
or do not deem it worthy of
teaching.
Beyond color, the overrid-
ing question is the character
of Athe next pope and the
agenda of the Vatican. I hope
there will not be a transition-
al pope, just a quiet old man
who will keep the lid on
things and maintain the status
quo.
The abominable scandals
of priest molesting young
boys have tainted the
Catholic Church. One way
the Church could fix much of
that problem is to allow
priests to marry and also to


allow women to become
priests. Both the, ban against
women and the vow of
celibacy evolved from rules
made by men, not specifically
sanctioned by the Bible.
Jesus celebrated women.
One major example was His
allowing Mary of Bethany to
anoint him for His burial, a
priestly function. Another
example was when Christ
rose from the dead; He did
not appear first to his male
disciples. Instead he appeared
first to Mary Magdalene, who
preached no doubt the great-
est truth of Christianity, "He
Is Risen."
I would argue that if
women were in the convents,
a different presence could
have prevented the sexual
abuse. In addition, if men
were allowed to marry per-
haps this would have
stemmed the practice of their
violating young boys and
girls.
Whoever follows in the
footsteps of Pope John II has
a difficult task of following in
the footsteps of such an
incredible moral leader. The
selection offers a great oppor-
tunity for the Vatican to sur-
prise us by finding that leader
in Africa, a continent that has
provided popes, saints and
martyrs but has received
almost no recognition for
their contributions.
Rev. Barbara Reynolds,
the religion columnist for
NNPA, is the author of "Out
Of. Hell & Living Well.
Healing from the Inside Out. "
She is a graduate of the
Howard University School of
Divinity and the United
Theological Seminary. She
can be reached at
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FLORIDA STAR


APRIL 16, 2005


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"There's A always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
"Leadership Jacksonville's Tenth Honors Barrett,
Jenkins and Yates"
At its tenth annual Celebration of Leadership Dinner,
Leadership Jacksonville honored Ms. Martha Barrett,
Leerie Jenkins and Alton Yates for their contributions
to the First Coast community. With awards presented by
the Honorable John Peyton and.funds raised benefit-
ing Youth Leadership Jacksonville programs, the event
not only honored three outstanding community leaders
but also provided the revenue for developing leaders of
tomorrow.
School Board Member and past Chairman, Ms.
Martha Barrett said of her award, "I would love to see
everyone in Jacksonville be what Leadership
Jacksonville so well calls a trustee." She encouraged
citizens to "work for the betterment of this community."
Honoree Leerie Jenkins' message encouraged youth to
focus on honesty and integrity as they build their lives.
His wish for the Jacksonville community included a
hope to "understand our differences, build off those dif-
ferences and live in hannony." Alton Yates, honoree and
husband of Councilwoman Gwen Yates, noted that the
power of positive thinking and a wish for peace, justice
and social harmony were keys for future leaders.
The program highlighted students currently complet-
ing the Youth Leadership Jacksonville program. The
celebration dinner benefited three youth initiatives,
Youth Leadership Jacksonville, the School Leadership
Connection and a new program, the Collegiate
Leadership Experience, that will emphasize community
trusteeship to college students from the First Coast.
Chelsea Dygan, Youth Leadership Jacksonville
Class XV presented Alton Yates at the celebration din-
ner. In her closing remarks she stated, Hearing a story
like Alton Yates' begs the question: how can my journey
be as incredible as his? How can -I walk away with
experiences as rich as these, and trust me, the things
I've shared with you are only a snapshot of a life full of
courage, love, and faith. I leave you with Alton Yates'
own words of wisdom: "You cannot be satisfied with
the status quo. Never accept things the way they are. Set
goals, and adopt a positive attitude, and the whole uni-
verse will be opened to you." Literally."
The words certainly apply to Alton Yates and each of
Leadership Jacksonville's tenth Celebration Dinner
honorees. Our congratulations to each of them!

"Tennis Anyone?"
The question was answered for us as we spent our
week and weekend watching great tennis at the Bausch
& Lomb Tennis Tournament at Amelia Island and
except for one rained out sessions on Thursday it was so
beautiful and the tennis was fantastic! It was disap-
pointing of course that Ms. Venus Williams and sister
Ms. Serena Williams didn't make it to the finals and
that Ms. Serena Williams was hurt in her match on
Friday. However fans had the opportunity to see both
sisters play in three matches and the overall field of
players was magnificent! It's reported that this was a
stronger field of tennis player than in previous years.
There was a lot of excitement surrounding the film-
ing of the Williams sisters ABC Reality Show and their
new book for teens. Accompanied by his Journalism
teacher Mrs. Teneshia Bell, First Coast freshman
Journalism student James Malchett was able to not
only get a one-on-one interview with Ms. Serena
Williams, ABC caught his interview on film. He han-
dled the interview like a 'pro.' His mother Mrs. Carlise
Malchett was naturally 'beaming' during all of the
activity, with good reason.
Tennis father Richard Williams remembers us from
previous years and now. waves to us in a crowd. This
year I was able to get Ms. Venus Williams' autograph as
she left the stands following her sister's winning match.
The Williams sisters are very gracious young women
and as former Jaguars VP Michael Huyghue stated
during a break between matches, "Any parent would be
proud to have them as daughters."
I enjoy the tennis and the people watching. Up for
the tournament as they do annually were: Former City
Councilman King and former State Senator Mrs.
Betty Holzendorf; Congressman Corrine Brown,
Mrs. Diana Spicer, Ms. Wanda Ford, Mill Cove
Golf club owners The T. C. Newmans, The Burney
Bivenses, JIA Executive Director John and Mrs.
Hester Clark and their teen daughter; Emmit White
who has quite an album of William family photos;
Malcolm Champion and his friend Ms. Patrician
Hairston; tennis instructor Harrell Thomas and
Madeline Scales-Taylor and her granddaughter


'Coco', just to, name a few.


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This tournament has become a splendid tennis
reunion each year! We've been following this event
since 1980 and we're looking forward to next year, of
course!

"Jacksonville and all that Jazz"
We were able to get the last set of the 2005 Jazz
Festival at the Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum and
I'd say they saved the 'best' for last. The Ellis Marsalis
'Set' playing to an SRO crowd at the Ritz was superb!
It was New Orleans Jazz at its best! Joined by two of his
sons Delfeayo on trombone, and Jason on drums play-
ing original compositions of Mr. Ellis Marsalis and the
late Charlie Parker our feet and heads were moving to
the 'beat.'
The lobby setting at the Ritz was so 'fan' friendly.
There was an area to get autographs, an area to purchase
jazz memorabilia and Ellis Marsalis CD's and of course,
good food. The Marsalis group was very accommodat-
ing to the fans for autographs, photos and dialogue. And
somehow that is rare nowadays.'I'm sure the venue
helped tremendously.
********
Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me directly at ima-
jol@aoi.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904)
285-7008.
See you i the paper!


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Education Now and Babies Later (ENABL)
Abstinence Only Education to Duval County Youth aged 9-19.
Free to all organizations, including
faith-based and community groups.
The "Managing Pressures Before Marriage" curriculum
teaches youth about:
The risk of early sexual involvement.
Assertive refusal techniques.
Building healthy relationships.
Resisting peer pressures.
Program goals:
To reduce teen pregnancy.
To reduce the rate of sexual activity in adolescents.
To reduce the rate of sexually transmitted diseases
among adolescents.

IHEALTHI
River Region Human Services Prevention Dept.
650 Park St., Jacksonville, FL 32204
www.rrhs.orq 904-359-6962

SThe Readers of the Black Press in America are
more educated, i
make more income!
and haveJ
substantial buvina nower. '!
Source: The Media Audit
.2004 Black Newspapers Readership Report, nnpa.org,
.- .. .. = -_'- -'=-- = 0


A PRIL 16, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


" AflI- 0


m















Suffering For God's Glory In Our Comunity
rFaith In Our Communty


Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it
comes upon you to test you, as though something strange
were happening to you. But rejoice insofar as you share
Christ's sufferings, that you may also rejoice and be glad
when his glory is revealed.
If you are insulted for the name of Christ, you are
blessed, because the Spirit of glory and of God rests upon
you. But let none of you suffer as a murderer or a thief or an
evildoer or as a-meddler. Yet if anyone suffers as a Christian,
let him not be ashamed, but let him glorify God in that name.
For it is time for judgment to begin at the household of
God; and if it begins with us, what will be the outcome for
those who do not obey the gospel of God?

1 Peter 4:12-17 ESV

Why are you anxious about clothing?
Consider the lilies of the field, how they qrow.
They don't toil, neither do they spin
Matthew 6:28


Ask us about Our
If There had been a death


ur family yesterday, ; '- P N e
would.o be doingPre-Need
,9



FORE-

S THOUGHT


funeral


planning

Program


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED

ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354


Directors

Jacqueline Y. Bartley


Alphonso West


WzjttD


I

j


U.,
Leh
2


Should Children Attend Funerals?


Attending the funeral allow, s
the child to be a part of the fami-
ly at a time when-they need love
and attention the most. If the
child is leery of the funeral, per-
haps you can arrange a private
moment before or after the serv-
ice for the child to say goodbye.
Or ask your funeral. director if
their facility has a playroom
where that child could stay until
the service is complete.
The important thing is that
the child is-with friends and fam-
ily and not isolated from the situ-
ation. Do children need an
advance explanation of what to
expect at a funeral?
Learning what to expect at


the funeral is very reassuring for
children. Be honest and clear
when explaining the details.
Remember, children take things
very literally so try not to use
euphemisms in your explana-
tions.
For young children, simple
statements are sufficient. For
example, explanations like a
funeral is a way to say "good-
bye" or a casket is a nice box that
holds the body, will help them
understand.


'A.B. COLEMAN
MORTUARY, INC.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
6SBO Moncrlef Rd,'
,Tel: 768.0507
m www.ABColeman.com


-Schedule of Events and Services-

BAZAAR AND FISH FRY-The James L. Williams Lay
Organization of Saint Paul AME Church, 6910 new Kings
Rd., will sponsor a "Best Bazaar ever" and "Fantastic Fish
Fry" on Saturday, April 16 from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Ms.
Maria Pearson is president. Rev. Marvin Zanders, Pastor.
WOMEN DAY CELEBRATION-The Women of Grace
will observe their 2005 Women Day Celebration on Sunday,
April 17 at Grace Baptist Church of East Springfield, 1553
E. 21st St. "Women Of Grace Walking Into Their Destiny"
is the theme. Dr. Carolyn Love, Truth For Living
Ministries, is the speaker for the 11:00 a.m. service. Dr.
Zelma Dickerson, Peiez Ministries International, is the
speaker for the 5:00 p.m. service.
PRETTY HAT TEA-The Deaconess Board of West St.
Mark Baptist Church, 1435 W. State St., will host a Pretty
Hat Tea on Sunday, April 17, at 4:00 p.m. Rev. Alexie Kelly,
Pastor of Little Rock Baptist Church, will. deliver a
Sermonette. Ladies are encouraged to wear hats. Prizes will
be awarded for the prettiest hat. A prize will be awarded to
each contestant. The public is invited to attend.
SPRING REVIVAL-Blakely Memorial Church of Christ
Written In Heaven, 1430 Kings Rd., invites the public to
attend a Spring Revival April 12 through April 16, nightly at
7:30 p.m. Evangelist Dorothy Yant from Gretna, Fla, presid-
ing. Bishop Thomas Brown, Pastor.
WOMEN OF THE BIBLE-The Missionary Board of New
Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church, 1824 Prospect St.
presents "Women of the Bible" on Sunday, April 17 at 5:00
p.m. The pubic is invited to come out and watch the ladies
of New Bethlehem present Martha, Mary, Ruth, Jezebel,
Delilah, Deborah and others in song, dramatic and dance
presentations. Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor.




DALLY BREAD


Pride goes before
destruction,
a haughty spirit
before a fall.

Better to be lowly
in spirit
and among the
oppressed
than to share plun-
der with the proud.


N --- r



ii..


MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall;, Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
ChurchTelephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m. ,
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m. '
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m. .:1 flL
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


.4 .' .*



220 NE. 1st
P.O. Box 218
High Springs


Proverbs 16:18-19 KJV




Your heart became proud on account of your beauty,
and you corrupted your wisdom because of your
splendor

Ezekiel 28:17 NIV




He may be puffed up with conceit and fall into the
condemnation of the devil;

1 Timothy 3:6 RSV




Clothe yourselves with humility toward one another,
for God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the
humble.

Therefore humble yourselves under the mighty hand
of God, that He may exalt you at the proper time,

1 Peter 5:5,6 NASB




We need a Saviour because we are sinners...
And the wages of sin is death.

Thanks be unto God for his unspeakable gift:
Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God
is the object of our faith; the only faith
that saves is faith in Him.


HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT!
Call 904/765-9773
Give to: The Samuel W. Smith Fund Raiser
for Kidney Transplant,
Account #234-5528-5
Compass Bank
Y Jackronville, FL V


WORSHIP CENTER


Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
17 HOME-(386) 454-8251
s, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church .
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
SBaptism-Praise & Worship
S(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
oA Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration WednesdayWorship Service...................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

Mount Sinai Community Development Enterprise
Community Resource Education
And Development Institute
2049 North Pearl Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 798-8733

GED Program, FCAT, Tutoring, Mentoring, After School,
Job Skills Training, National Parenting Program, Ex-Offenders,
Computer Skills Training for Youth and Adults.

For More Information
Call (904) 798-8722 or 798-8733.

One Lord And One Faith Assembly
5410 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, Fla. 32208
Ken Milliton, Pastor Faithful Larry, Associate
PH: 713-9343 or 545-6925
"Where The Holy Ghost Makes The Difference"
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Church Service 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday-Bible study 7:00 p.m.
Sunday-Hour Of Power Ministry 8:00-9:00a.m.
WYMM-AM 1530, with Faithful Larry


God loves you tco Li-fel
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lijul


Deborah West


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I RMTH AIONS APIAL


EPA Nomination on Hold
CHEERS Study Nothing to Shout About

Washington, DC, April 8, 2005 On Wednesday, April 6,
2005, Stephen Johnson, a Bush nominee for EPA Director
and acting director since late January 2005, went before the 4 -
Senate as a part of a series of confirmation hearings to deter-
mine his eligibility to fill the top seat at the Environment
Protection Agency (EPA). With his science background and
24 years with the EPA, Johnson seems like the natural choice w.
to fill EPA's top slot, but is he really a wolf in sheep's cloth- .
ing? His stance on controversial programs such as CHEERS
(Children's Environmental Exposure Research Study) is
another illustration of this administration's lack of regard for
our youth.
Senator Bill Nelson acted quickly putting a hold on Rep. Corrine Brown
Johnson's nomination process pending the investigation of
the CHEERS program. The program had undertones reminiscent of Nazi Germany trading
$970, a camcorder and a t-shirt for the health and well being of Duval County's future, our chil-
dren. The' study would "monitor" the effects of indoor pesticides on babies 0-3 years of age,
yet there was no reason to believe that the participants would be informed about incorrect use
of pesticides that would abnormally affect the children. As a standard practice EPA recom-
mends that all children are kept away from all pesticides because the ingredients pose some
health risks. However, participants in this study would actually be encouraged to continue use
of these harmful chemicals.. This is in direct contradiction to these principals.
What was equally as unsettling as the nature of the study itself was the revelation that the
study was quietly funded, in large part, by the American Chemistry Council, a chemical indus-
try front group that includes members such as Dow, Exxon, and Monsanto. In October, the
EPA received $2.1 million to do the study. Critics of the research, including some EPA scien-
tists, agree that that given the source of funds for the study, the results will be biased in favor
of the chemical industry, at the expense of the health of the impoverished children serving as
test subjects.
I challenge the wisdom of even considering the appointment of some who would even con-
sider moving forward with a study such as this one. Following a conference call that includ-
ed Senator Nelson, local ministers and the media and a subsequent call to DCHD, all the com-
munity leaders were unified and in agreement about putting an end to the program and possi-
bly challenging Johnson's nomination. Through this combined effort, I am please to say that
the EPA was forced to change their position on continuing the CHEERS program and on April
8, 2005 the EPA announced that they were canceling the study. However, Duval narrowly
escaped by the skin of its teeth.
What we need is some environmental justice! I recall the lessons of the Tuskegee trials.
Many members of the African American and low income communities agreed to participate in
the study believing that they were doing their civic duty providing valuable data and receiving
competent care. While the argument could be made that an adult can rationally make their
choice, we should not be playing Russian roulette with our children's lives. I fear that although
CHEERS was halted in the early stages, some damage may have already been done.
The people of Duval County, the Third Congressional District and this great nation count
on elected officials to be their watchdogs and champions. The biggest damage that came out
of the Tuskegee study was the complete breakdown of the covenant between government and
its citizens. We are going the extra mile to contact any families that may have signed up or
may have been approached to participate. If there are any questions about programs like this
in the future, I want Duval residents to know my door is always open. Contact us on 904-354-
1652.


Thanks for various news reports from the Florida Star. Your newspaper is help-
ing make a difference and we need continued objectivity so our city can really
become a "Better Jacksonville".; In terms of the case of a local pastor convicted
recently of having sex with a 13-year-old child, it is surmised that your paper, per-
haps, had already gone to press just before the conviction was announced.
Nevertheless, in terms of equity and justice, we at Mt. Charity Missionary
Baptist Church are also appalled that Minister Kelley received such a light sen-
tence when others who have committed such crimes against children, communi-
ty, and or church received much longer sentences. Yes, we were also equally sad-
dened that members of the respective church actually supported their disqualified
preacher (see I Timothy 3:1-8) rather than standing against him and the respec-
tive evils. According to the Bible, the Church should actually excommunicate
such child molesters and all those who are in complicity with such sins -- in
accordance with I Corinthians 5:1-13 and others.
We are not trying to be judgmental or holier than thou; we're just trying,
through Christ's empowerment, to stand on biblical principles He has set forth for
His disciples. For example, II Peter 2:1-3 says, "There were false prophets too
among the people, just as there will be false teachers among you, who will intro-
duce destructive sects and deny the Master who has bought them...Many people
will follow their immoral ways, and they will cause the true way to be maligned.
In their greed they will exploit you with pretended arguments."
Of course, one "pretended argument" in this case was the issue of consent, an
-issue that could in no way negate or minimize the crime of child molestation.
Another' pretended argument was the allegation that Minister Kelley reduced
crime in the eastside neighborhood -- I would like to encourage the Judge,
Prosecutor, and Parishioners to investigate and conduct a study to confirm and
verify what may be a frivolous allegation. Another pretended argument regarded
the timeframe of the ev il incident, wherein it was alleged that the occurrence was
"five years ago" rather than .in 2003 as reported by some media. Nevertheless,
such arguments should not and cannot be used in trying to justify a lighter sen-
tence, to negate the gravity or consequences of the heinous crime, or in an attempt
to discredit the media.
Judge Fryfield, whom we love, indicated that he would hold the church
responsible for ensuring that Minister Kelley has no contact with children. How
is that possible since the roles and responsibilities of a pastor necessitate that he


work with the entire church family that includes children? One way to ensure that
Minister Kelley has no contact with children is to bar him from the pastorate, sim-
ilarly to what would be done to a convicted lawyer's practice of law, just as
Catholic priests who were found guilty of molesting children can no longer lead
Catholic parishes. Such stringent approach is necessary for the purity of the
church and to accommodate law and order in our community (I Peter 4:16 17).
Pastor George Harvey, Jr.
Mt. Charity Missionary, Baptist Church
1417 North Laura Street
.Jacksonville, 'Florida 32206


The Continuing Pathetic State of Black America
The National Urban League released its annual report on the State of Black America last
week and while Blacks have made significant gains in many areas the overall well being of
African Americans compared to that of Whites is not improving and in some areas is worse
than reported last year. The report published annually since 1976 is intended to provide a
snapshot of the Black condition in America. It uses an "Equality Index" to measure the dis-
parity between Blacks and Whites in economics, housing, education, health, social justice
and civic participation. While the overall index is at 73 percent, imbedded factors such as
unemployment, income, wealth and home ownership paint a bleaker picture.
After a decade where Blacks began to see drops in the unemployment rate and gains in
income, the post-9/11 recession has resulted in economic stagnation. Recent unemployment
statistics show an unemployment rate for whites of 4.7 percent while for blacks it was more
than twice that at 10.8 percent.
Blacks seem to be stuck in the pre-civil rights era when home ownership statistics are ana-
lyzed. The Black home ownership wealth deficient rate of 48 percent compared to the white
rate of 74 percent. Sixty years after the civil rights movement got underway and still no signs
of significant progress relative to the white majority.
In the area of health care, blacks are twice as likely to die from disease, accident, behav-
ior and homicide than whites. Physicians are less likely to perform the high tech diagnostics,
transplants or prescribe appropriate medical treatment for Blacks as they do for Whites.
At the current rate of economic progress the Equality Index will never reach parity.
Family Income shows a reverse trend and the poverty rate of progress indicates that it will
take 169 years for the triple level poverty burden that Blacks currently carry to drop to the
poverty level of whites. Can Blacks afford to wait for eight generations?
Blacks hold an insignificant share of the wealth of this country. White family average
financial net worth is about 10 times that of the average black family. At the rate of change
indicated by the trend line over the last 100 years it would take about five centuries for Blacks
to catch up to whites. Perhaps, since Blacks waited 250 years to get to this point on the
Equality Index another 500 years won't matter.
The report paints a similar disparity picture in other areas such as politics and education.
Except for minor variations in the numerical percentages only the date of the report changes.
Blacks as a group continue to ride in the nation's economic caboose, with only a chosen few
getting to ride up front.
But the strange thing about having these reports and the supporting statistics issued for the
past 28 years, detailing the sorry state of Black America, is that Blacks do not appear to have
been galvanized into a high state of action. It seems that Blacks are content to have scholars,
public-policy experts, legislatures and activists periodically issue reports, hold panel discus-
sions, make resolutions, and urge the government to fund more programs.
The National Urban League is even calling on Congress to assemble a bipartisan commis-
sion to. examine economic equality and racial disparity in America. This idea was backed by
Rep. Mel Watt, (D-NC), the chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus.
Another study? Is the National Urban League's president, Marc H. Morial, suggesting that
the many State of Black America reports that are based on research from all the available gov-
ernment data is flawed and cannot be used as the basis to fashion remedies for the Black prob-
lems listed in the reports? What purpose then are the reports published each year?
When are Black leaders going to roll up their collective sleeves, develop a plan of action,
allocate resources from the Black $700 billion dollar economy, and coordinate implementa-
tion of Black initiated solutions to the problems that are burdening the Black community? It
is fitting and proper to assign some responsibility to the government for assisting with solu-
tions. However, it should be crystal clear that the White majority's priorities do not include
developing programs or providing resources that mitigate the factors that make up the Urban
League's Equality Index. Their rhetoric says one thing but the truth is revealed when look-
ing at the fiscal year 2006 federal budget.
Cuts in education, housing, job training, childcare, energy assistance, and health care for
the poor--areas that disproportionately impact Blacks--.say that ultimately Blacks must look
out for themselves.
James W Breedlove, www.truthclinic.com










You are invited to attend a




Town Hall


Meeting


Monday, April 18, 2005

6 p.m.


Beauclerc Elementary School
Multi-Purpose Room
.4555 Craven Road W.


Directions from downtown:
Take 1-95 south to the Baymeadows Road exit, turn right (west)
Travel Baymeadows Road to Craven Road, turn left (south).
Beauclerc Elementary is one block ahead on the right.



For more information call Cami Cooper,
Neighborhood Services Division, 630-7633.

This -Town Hall Meeting is sponsored by the Southeast CPAC
(Citizens Planning Advisory Committee)


John Peyton
Mayor


Charles McBurney
Chair
Southeast CPAC


I HE FRUTH CLINI


. I


P I II-


PAGE A-5


FP.nRIDnA STAR


SAnr T r i innr







IP / UI, YJIA -- R A I 1 -....2.0


David H. Dwight Sr. Memorial Committee



For Scouting Sponsors Annual Banquet


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--The David H. Dwight, Sr.
Memorial Committee for Scouting wilt host it's Memorial
Banquet on Friday, June 3, at 7:30 p.m. at the Primes Osborn
Convention Center in Jacksonville.
David H. Dwight, Sr. (1882-1959) was a pioneer for the
development and organization of Scouting among Blacks in
Jacksonville.. For his work, in 1936, he became the first
Black person to receive Scouting's highest council award,
the Silver Beaver.
Notable community and scout leaders to be honored this
year include Mrs. Beverly Brown, Mr. Freddie Brown, and
Mr. Jospeh Johnson. The honorees are being recognized for
their dedication and commitment to the youth in the
Scouting program.
The annual event continues the work of Mr. Dwight by
providing supplement funding to expand the availability of
the Scouting program.
The Committee feels it can fulfiil the vision of Mr. David
H. Dwight, Sr. by providing Scouts the opportunity, skills
and adventure that will have a positive and lasting effect to
carry them through manhood
The Committe's goal is to afford funds for youth in the
the community to enjoy the many benefits and experiences
of Scouting. All proceeds are used to provide Boy Scout
summer camperships, Cub Scout Day camperships, registra-

UF Study: Incarcerated Male
Adolescents Suffer III
Effects From Abuse
GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Sexually abused teenage boys in
jail are just as likely as their female counterparts to suffer
from depression, a University of Florida study finds.
The findings challenge the perception that depression
among jailed juvenile delinquents is mostly a female prob-
lem and point to the need to address it before inmates are
released and commit other crimes that land them in jail
again, said Angela Gover, a UF criminology professor.
"Depression has been found to be the most common psy-
chological symptom experienced by survivors of childhood
sexual abuse, but as a society we've focused much more on
childhood sexual abuse in females than in males," she said.
Girls receive more attention partly because they are more
likely than boys to be sexual abuse victims, said Gover,
whose study was published in the International Journal of
Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology in
December:
They also react differently to upsetting events, which
makes them more prone to depression, Gover said. "Females
are more likely to internalize traumatic events that happen to
them in contrast to males, who externalize things," she said.
"Depression is one of those internalizing events. When bad
things happen to girls, such as witnessing an act of violence
or even seeing a dead animal lying in the road, it may affect
them more in terms of making them sad right then and
there."
Over's study involved adolescents, ages 11 to 20, who
were serving sentences in six juvenile correctional institu-
tions in five states.
"What makes this research unique is that every adoles-
cent in the sample was a serious delinquent and was incar-
cerated in a juvenile correctional facility," she said.
Although studies have established a relationship between
childhood sexual abuse and mental health problems, few
have examined this association using samples of youths who
are incarcerated, she said.
"We do know from several studies about violence being
passed down through generations that the people who are
victimized during childhood are more likely than those who
have not been victimized to become involved in abusive
relationships, either as an abuser or as a victim," she said.


tion for underprivileged youth
training, Savings Bonds to E;
Baden-Powell District, and fur
program enrichment.
Individual tickets are $35,

Coin Toss

Decides


Miss B-CC

Election

DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla. The fate of who would
be Miss Bethune-Cookman
College for the 2005-2006
academic year came down
to a toss of a coin.
And after she called
"heads", Aisa-Lige Arnold
became the campus queen.
In an unusual series of
events, Arnold and Shamfa
Cudjoe each received the
same amount of votes in the
campus-wide election to
determine the incoming
queen. An exhaustive
recount upheld the results.
Rather than undergo a
length runoff, Student Fl
Government Association
(SGA) officials embarked di
Florida laws stating that a C
coin toss would determine A
the winner. TI
With both candidates and Tr
numerous onlookers observ- C
ing, SGA President Jared
Yancey flipped the coin. Ms.
Arnold came up the winner.
"Even if it was decided
by a coin toss, it is still an
honor to be crowned Miss
Bethune-Cookman
College," Arnold said. "The
coin has decided my fate; I
will continue to build upon
the great legacy that has
been set before me from for-
mer Ms. B-CC's."
Arnold is a junior psy-
chology major from San
Bernardino, California.
Cudjoe, a junior major-
ing in International Studies
from Trinidad and Tobago,
also accepted her fate.
"It was a 50/50 chance
and I received the down side
of the 50," Cudjoe said. "At
the end of the day, God's
will was done, and my spirit
is sound with that."


SUBSCRIBE TO
THE FLORIDA STAR

CALL
(904)766-8834


to enter Scouting, leadership table seating 10 and Corporate sponsorships are $1,000.
agle Scout recipients in the Contributions may be sent and made payable to: David H.
ending for special awards and Dwight, Sr. Memorial Committee for Scouting/North
Florida Council, BSA, 521 South Edgewood Ave.,
group tickets are $350 for a Jacksonville, FL 32205


Art And African-Americans


/Y





















ROM LEFT TO RIGID
arlem; Myra Bau
celebrations cookbo
iva; Rev. Keith Dol
hoir; Dr. Barbara A
mbrose, founder ol
rue Faith Christian
tribute to African
learwater.


HT: Rev. Willie Frink, MC and Pastor of the Church of Scientology,
icom amd her daughter Jolyn-Baucom-Wright, authors of
ook; Kay Tolliver, multi-award winning educator; Chaka Khan, soul
bbins, musical director of renowned Without Walls International
nn Teer, director of the National Black Theater of Harlem; Amanda
f Ebony Awakening, and the Rev. Alfreddie Johnson, pastor of the
I Center, Compton, California and keynote speaker at the 2005
American Artists held at the Ft. Harrison Hotel in Downtown

rU


*



















"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Here Christ Gets Lifted




The Victory is in the Word & Music

Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.
Topic For Saturday, April 16, 2005:
A Career Passport Experience
with McDonalds
A McDonalds Owner/Operator identifies
employability skills, attitudes, and abilities
that employers desire when interviewing
prospective employees.


6050-6 MoncriefRd., Jacksonville, FL 32209

Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW WCGL1360. COM


APRIL 16, 2005,


PAGF A-6


FLORIDA STAR


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Flood Aid Given To Flood Victims In Guyana


All, a 4+


A flooded community along the East Coast of Demerara,
the worst hit areas.
DENVER The heaviest rains to hit Guyana in more than
100 years more than 28 inches fell on Boxing Day
(December 26) 2004. This rain left more than 400,000 peo-
ple half the country's population inundated with dirty
flood waters. In a country that lies six feet below sea level,
the disaster left nine dead and an estimated $2 million in
damage.
The First Data Western Union Foundation and Western
Union Financial Services, Inc. came to the rescue. They,
along with their authorized agent, Grace Kennedy
Remittance Services, are contributed $60,000 to assist aid
flood victims in Guyana.
Relief agencies included the Red Cross and businesses
like Grace Kennedy Remittance Services, They rushed to
provide aid to the residents of Guyana.
However, more assistance is needed to combat food
shortages, to prevent and treat water-borne illnesses, to pro-
vide potable \\ ate, and to build temporary housing for those
left homeless.
To support the relief effort, \Western Union, its corporate


foundation and its agent, Grace Kennedy Remittance
Services, are providing a combined grant of $60,000 to the
International Federation of the Red Cross and'Red Crescent
Societies designated specifically to relief efforts in Guyana.
In addition, Grace Foods has donated $20,000 or 2 million
Guyanese dollars in food to support the effort.
"The First Data Western Union Foundation was estab-
lished to address needs in the areas of education, health, and
basic human services." said Luella Chavez D'Angelo, presi-
dent of the First Data Western Union Foundation.
"Supporting the relief efforts in Guyana by the International
Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies
Sallows us to assist individuals and families recover from the
de station of the floods and help them to rebuild their
lives."
Western Union has over 40 agent locations in Guyana.
Consumers may call 1-800-325-6000 in the U.S or 592-227-
5141 in Gu ana to find the nearest Western Union agent
location.


ht !"^' ... .


From left, Anna Lisa Fraser-Phang, Country Director,
presents cheque to official of Guyana Red Cross
Society. Looking on is Alexis Stephens,
Communications Co-ordinator (second from left) and
Joan Skerrett, Compliance Officer (second from right).

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(News from Press Release and wire services)


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DOWN TO BUSINESS

ANDY JOHNSON



Hot!

Timely!


Efficacious!


North Florida's Best
Daily Talk Show!


AM 1530

WEEKDAYS

2-6 P.Mj-

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CALL IN PHONE: (904) 783-2400


FOR MORE INFORMATION:
(904) 568-0769
OR http://www.downtobusiness.org/


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PAGE A-7


P4 RIL 16 200S


FLORIDA STAR


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Regina Hall Reigns In New Movie, King's Ransom
by Rych McCain
My photographer Andre' and I are at the W Hotel in beautiful
Westwood Village across from the UCLA Campus. We are attend-
ing the press junket for New Line Cinema's new Movie KING'S
RANSOM starring Anthony Anderson. We are particularly pleased
because we have a one to one interview/photo shoot scheduled
with one of the film's stars who happens to be very special to us.
She is the lovely and talented Regina Hall.
Our last one to one; with Hall was a couple of years ago at the
fabulous Ritz Carlton Hotel, in Marina Del Rey for the Warner
Bros. flick Malibu's Most Wanted! We photographed her over
looking the Marina and the Pacific Ocean from the penthouse pres-
idential suite. She was as gracious and superfine then, as she still
is now. Hall is soft spoken with deep beautiful eyes that seem to
look right through you. She has a subtle, sexy sensuousness about
her demeanor that is hard to describe. If you are a man, you can '
feel that special vibe in the way she carries herself through her
body movements, posture, gestures and that radiant smile. This LLP
may be the reason she won the role of "Peaches" in King's 'I-.
Ransom.
In the movie, Peaches is the dizzy, ditzy, nitwit mistress of
multi-millionaire business tycoon Malcolm King, played by Regina Hall (Photo 2005 Andre' B. Murray/A
Bern Agency Photo)
Anderson. She's a super sex kitten who totally captivates the atten-
tion and affections of parking lot attendant Andre, played by Donald Faison. How did she like playing this
little airhead role? "I had fun. You know what, it was a nice departure to play that kind of character." Hall
watched a videotape of Marilyn Monroe's "Some Like It Hot," to get ideas for her character. "I watched that
movie to kind of get a feel of someone who is not aware of their sexuality. It's a little less offensive than
when it's overt. I mean she's a mistress and she is sleeping with the boss, so how do you make her likeable?"
What was Hall's favorite part in making the movie? Her first responsewas, "The shopping in Montreal"
(The movie was shot in Canada). Then getting serious again she said, "I liked working with all the guys. I
had never met Charlie Murphy before or worked with Donald Fasion and never worked with Anthony
Anderson in that capacity. We had a kiss but they edited it out. It must have sizzled too hot, but it was kind
of nice to have a love interest and it not'be serious."
Hall's on screen character may be dizzy but in real life off screen, she, is 180 degrees different.-Hall has
a BA in Media Studies from Fordham University in New York City and a Master's Degree in Journalism
from NYU.
How does she keep that killer body in shape? "I like to run. I do a lot of jogging. I go the gym all the.
time. I go there and do what ever I feel that day. Some days I spin, some days I do treadmills, some days I
do yoga. I try not to do the same thing but make sure I do something that's active." Does she follow a cer-
tain diet? "Not really, but I do watch it. I mean, I just can't go and eat McDonald's everyday, so I try to eat
good for most of the time and when I have some cheat days-I cheat!"
Hall is a big boxing fan and loves to go to the sports bars with friends to watch the fights. She also has
an interest in working with young, unwed single mothers. Her next project is to begin shooting Scary Movie
4 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada this summer. So to my Toronto readers, say hi to my girl and treat her to lunch
while she's up there.
inmingw9 '- rw m war Y TV-vrwrm r "mne 'w'm T ogt


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Listen live at www.rejoice925.com





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Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
Real life husband and wife Courtney B. Vance and
Angela Bassett will star in the leading roles for "HIS
GIRL FRIDAY" The play is a John Guare rewrite of
THE FRONT PAGE and will be presented at the
Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis, Minn. next season.
Oscar Nominee Don Cheadle along with Alfre
Woodard and James Cromwell are set to begin shoot-
ing KING LEOPOLD'S GHOST. The real life, King
Leopold of Belgium was a super enemy of Blacks in
the Congo. Under his harsh colonial rule of the coun-
try, he tortured, cut off hands, arms and feet of blacks,
while he worked them to death laboring with the rub-
ber trees to produce raw rubber and ripping off other
natural resources. Let's hope this Hollywood version
will "almost" be accurate.
On the BET front, a new reality series will pre-
miere Thursday, April 21, at 9:30 PM ET/PT called
Blowin' up!: FATTY KOO. It's about the everyday
trials of five young entertainers shooting for a record-
ing career. There is a new Black hip hop comic strip
character out that was created by Olusola "Shala
Esquire" Akintunde called "Seven Spoon." She's a
teen, hip-hop dressing, ghetto cutie who speaks her
mind on subjects she observers from her environment
and experiences. This comic strip is burning up the net
and will attract movie, TV and publishing offers.
Check out the free subscription at
www.sevenspoon.com.
Ray Benzino has resigned from The Source
Magazine and is selling his stocks in the publication
as well. Look for him to start another publication.
Rych
Maat-Hotep!


FL~ORIDA STAR


APRIL 16,. 2005


PAG; A-S







PAGE B-1


JMoMA Commissioned ScoreTo Be Performed By Ritz Chamber Players


musical genius displayed in this piece."
The concert will be held Tuesday, April 26, at 7 p.m. at
the Jacksonville Museum of Moder Art, 333 North Laura
Street in downtown Jacksonville. A question-and -answer
session with the composer will follow along with a recep-
tion.
Programmatically speaking, the concert is part of some-
thing JMoMA calls the "Big Ear." Specifically, this concert
series showcases contemporary classical music from 1945
forward. Patterson, who serves as artistic director for this set
of concerts, says the work is part of a series he calls "Those
Great Jacksonvillians." It is intended to celebrate
Jacksonville musicians and patrons who are a positive force
in the arts.
In addition to performing the Sung piece, the Ritz
Chamber Players will also perform a work, entitled "Trio,"
by the late Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson, RCP's first compos-
er-in-residence. The composition was the very last work
Perkinson was fine-tuning before his untimely death last
year, said Patterson.


The Ritz Chamber Players
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-- The Ritz Chamber Players will
perform a commissioned musical
score inspired by the art collection
of the Jacksonville Museum of
Modem Art (JMoMA).
The work, entitled "Night
Bloom ", was commissioned by the
Jacksonville Museum of Modemrn
Art and completed by award-win-
ning composer Stella Sung, distin-
guished professor of music at the
Stella Sung University of Central Florida in
Orlando.
"We're pleased to be able to present the work about
JMoMA at JMoMA for the first time ever," said RCP artistic
director Terrance Patterson. "We salute JMOMA for it's
interdisciplinary approach to the arts and Stella Sung for her

EWC, ESHC Release Report

On Super Bowl Homeless
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-- Edward Waters College
(EWC) in conjunction with the Emergency Services and
Homeless Coalition of Jacksonville, Inc. (ESHC), present
ed "The Super Bowl Homeless Survey" results on April 14
at the College's Milne Auditorium. The first presentation
was given by Wanda Lanier, ESHC's director.
"An average of 292 persons per night and 100 persons
during the day found a safe, warm' refuge from the street and
other unsafe living conditions," stated Lanier. "We were
able to house approximately 800 persons from January 31 to
February 7."
EWC students participated in a''living laboratory' prior to
the week of Super Bowl XXXIX and during the week of the
game.
The students gained research experience by surveying
persons who used the shelter and assisted with the registra-
tion and distribution of meal tickets, supervised evening
meals, organized registration records and guests for shower
services, entered data on guests, and volunteered as needed.
The shelter was located at the Old Stanton High School
building, 521 W. Ashley St.
Dr. Nnamdi Oziri, interim chairperson for Social and
Behavior Science, stated, "We took this challenge seriously
because we knew that it would expose our students to prac-
tical, learning experience." Dr. Oziri, who was appointed by
the college to work with ESHC, introduced Ms. Lanier and
gave awards to the students who'participated in the program.
Lanier added, "Many cities that have hosted the Super
Bowl have reported that prior to and during the event, law
enforcement conducted street sweeps to clear homeless per-
sons from the street by arresting them. The situation in
Jacksonville was quite the opposite there was no increase
of arrests of homeless persons prior to or during the Super
Bowl. In fact, the number of arrests of homeless persons in
Duval County actually decreased by 30% for the period of
time the shelter was in operation. This indicates that if
homeless people have a safe alternative to the street they are
less likely to end up arrested, which is most often for tres-
passing."
Dr. Emmanuel Okafor, interim vice president for
Academic Affairs, who also assisted in coordinating the pro-
gram, also participated in the presentation.


THANKS FOR SUPPORTING
THE FLORIDA STAR!
TO ADVERTISE AND SUBSCRIBE
CONTACT US A
AT 904) 766-8834
-%


Through Our Eyes
Art Exhibition
At Ritz Theatre
& Lavilla Museum


The public is invited to
Jacksonville's premier exhi-
bition of artwork by African
American artists, Through
Our Eyes 2005.
In its 12th year, this
year's theme is "Form
Becomes Function", where
artists were challenged to
take a detour from their
usual work styles and media
to create works that exhibit
utility-real or imaginary,
literal or symbolic.
This group of talented
artists has exceeded expec-
tations with a body of works
that are dynamic, rich and
nothing short of astounding
--and year after year.
For information please
call Ritz Theatre & LaVilla"
Museum at 632-5555.

Reed
Educational
Campus To Open
The Reed Educational
Campus, a part of the
National Council of Negro
Women, Inc.'s Child watch
of Jacksonville focus, will
open at 1934 Lentie Rd. on
Tuesday, April 19, at 10:30
a.m., with a ribbon cutting
ceremony.
This Multi year
Educational Facility will
house a unique home style
Literacy Program, focusing
on third and fourth grade
girls.
Classes include reading,
Health, Nutrition/Physical
Activities, Basic Computer
Training, the Arts and
Environmental Education.
Reed Educational
Campus will open daily
Monday through Thursday
(after school hours) 3:00
p.m.-5;30 p.m., early release
days, 1:30 p.m.-5:30 'p.m.
and during Summer School
vacation Days at 9:00 a.m.-
4:00 p.m. To register con-
tact the NCNW, Inc. at (904)
634-0367.


DEATH

NOTICES
BASKIN-Louis, died
April 8, 2005.
BONDS-Larry B., died
April 9, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary,
Inc.
BRINKLEY-Clara,
died April 6, 2005.
DURGIN-Paul D. Sr.,
died April 10, 2005.
FORD-Ida M, 78, died
April 8, 2005.
GODWIN-Fredrick E.
Sr., died April 11,
2005.
GRIFFIN-Ernest E.,
died April 7, 2005.
HALL-Bessie Lee.,
died April 12, 2005. A.
B. Coleman Mortuary,
Inc.
JACKSON-Simia, 13,
died April 4, 2005.
JORDON-Corrine,
died April 8, 2005.
KENT-Otis, died April
7, 2005.
MARRS-Michael
Anthony, died April, 8,
2005.
McCOY-Cohew B.,
died April 7,2005.
PARKER-Randall,
died
April 12, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary,
Inc.
RANDOLPH-
Floraine, died April 10,
2005.
SILVERS-Ernesr,
died, April 12, 2005. A.
B. Coleman Mortuary,
Inc.
TOMPSON-Hattie
M., died March 31,
2005.
ULMER-Jahnz J., 71,
died April 10, 2005.
WIGGINS-William
C., 68, died April 7,
2005.
WILKINS-Cornellus
J., died. March 30, 2005


The Ritz Chamber Players is the nation's only predomi-
nantly black, full-season, classical chamber ensemble who
last year performed at a sold out Carnegie Hall concert and
were broadcast in concert to over 40 countries via the BBC.
Members of the group who will be performing include first
violinist Kyle Lombard, second violinist Orlando Wells,
violist Dawn Smith and guest cellist, Brazilian-born Sophia
Avery of the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra.
Tickets for the concert are free. For more information,
log on to www.ritzchamberplayers.org.


"COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

BANQUET HONORING YOUTH-Empowerment
Resources Inc. invites the public to attend Journey Into
Womanhood's first Charity Scholarship Banquet-An
Awards Celebration Honoring Our Youth on Saturday,
April 16, 2005 at the Radisson Riverwalk Hotel, 1515
Prudential Dr. A reception begins at 6:30 p.m. fol-
lowed by dinner at 7:30 p.m. The banquet will feature
a generational address on the topic of a personal jour-
ney into womanhood from: Anjna Chauhan, Partner
and Attorney at Law with Johnson and Chauhan
Group; Arvella Townsend, Human Service
Professional and Co-host of "Joy In Our Town"; and
Dr. Lois Gibson, Family Health and Wellness
Consultant & Dean of Health Services at FCCJ,
retired. Tickets are $40. Proceeds will go towards the
Journey Into Womanhood program and the scholarship
campaign. For ticket or sponsorship information
please call (904) 268-8287 or e-mail power2suc-
ceed2003@yahoo.com
BOOK REVIEW-The next book club meeting will be
held on May 6, 2005 at 7:00 pm at the home of Goddy
Efeizeme. The book for discussion will be CHURCH
FOLK by Michele Andrea Bowen. There are several
copies of the book in the library. Church Folk tells the
hilarious story of a young pastor and his wife who try
to hold their congregation together despite its mem-
bers' foibles. Bowen's avowedly Christian debut
shows a young black minister struggling in the early
1960s to balance romance, church politics, and spiritu-
,al uprightness. DIRECTIONS FROM DOWN-
TOWN: Take 1-95 North to 8th Street exit, Turn
right at bottom of exit onto 8th Street, Continue
straight on 8th to Boulevard, Turn left on Boulevard,
Go to 9th Street, Turn right on 9th Street, Go to Perry,
Turn left on Perry, Go to 1943 a 2 story house on right.
COMMANDER'S BALL/LEGION
ANNIVESARY (Submitted By Willie C. Simpkins)-
Jacksonville American Legion Post 197 presents its
Commander's Ball and Legion Anniversary on
Sunday, April 24, at 8:00 p.m. at the Northside
Conference Center, 5045 Soutel Dr., Suite 25. Music
will be furnished by Lorenzo and the All Stars, also
featuring Ricky Calloway. The donation for this event
is $10. Semi formal dress is required (BYOB).
EQUAL PAY DAY LUNCHEON-Four "Spirit of
!Rosie" award winners will be honored at the Fifth
Annual Equal Pay Day Luncheon on April 19 at the
Jacksonville Marriott, The awards are presented to
women who achieved success
in non-traditional careers and
broken through the "glass ceil-
ing." The late Tillie Fowler
will be honored posthumously
with the Lifetime Achievement
Award for her extraordinary
accomplishments and lasting Dr. Jeanette
contributions to all women. Dr Jeanette
C. Holmes
The other Rosie winners are:
Glass Ceiling Award: Nancy Dreicer, formerly an
executive with Lucent Technologies and American
Transtech, now serves as district administrator for the
Department of Children and Families. Non-Traditional
Award: Susan Adams Loyd is one of the few women in
the television industry to reach the level of general
i manager. She has served as vice president and general
manager of WAWS Fox 30 and WTEV CBS 47 since
i 2000. Pioneer Award: Dr. Jeannette C. Holmes is a
former Duval County educator and founder of Hope
Chapel Ministries. She also founded and serves as
superintendent of Espirit de Corps Center for
Learning. For ticket information call Phone: (904)
630-7386


APRIL 16, 2005vl~ut


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PA... B2 F D SA A .. 2 ....


Ask Deanna! Is an advice column known for its fearless
approach to reality-based subjects!
Dear Deanna:
I just finished high school and I don't want to go to col-
lege. I worked as a stripper my entire senior year and now
I want to do it full-time because I can make more money.
My mother's having a fit and my dad is going off on me. -
Why can't they understand I can make more money now
than with a college degree? /
Anonymous Los Angeles, CA
Dear Anonymous :
Sounds like you bumped your head on the stripper pole. Your parents are right in
their feelings because they probably sacrificed and went without things to save for
your education. You are very childish in your thinking. What happens in two years
when you're 20 years old looking.40, run down, and tired? Right now you make a
dollar per song and if you think you'll make less with a degree, I suggest you wake
up and come back to the real world-fast.
Dear Deanna!
My wife cheated and destroyed our family 6 years ago. I paid child support but
she was vindictive and kept my kids from me. Now my daughter is pregnant and ran
to me because her mother kicked her out of the house. I took her in but she disre-
spects me, and throws up the past and I want this to stop.
James Todd Milwaukee, WI
Dear James:
If your daughter lives under your roof, she has to abide by your rules. Put your
foot down and let her know what the deal is and start the process of explaining and
healing from the past. It's not too late to share good values with your daughter that
your silly ex-wife never had to begin with. Stay firm and do what you need in order
to ensure your daughter's a better mother than your ex-wife was.
Dear Deanna!
I'm in prison and I read your column every week. I've looked at people's lives and
situations and realize my life wasn't that bad and I messed it up with stupidity and
crime. I'm also glad to see you don't judge the inmates and criminals that are locked
up and help us as well. When I get out, I'm staying out of trouble.
Chris Raleigh, NC Prison
Dear Chris:
A mind is a terrible thing to waste if idle and it's good to see you're reading while in
prison. Continue to receive wisdom from all venues that will make your life better
when you're released. Stay positive and encouraged and you'll be able to stay on the
right path when you get back into society. besides, criminals and inmates are still peo-
ple and need love and support too.
Write Ask Deanna! Email: askdeannal@yahoo.com or Deanna M, 264 S. La Cienega,
Suite 1283, Beverly Hills, CA 90211. Visit her Web site at www.askdeanna.com.
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APRIL 1 6, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE B-2


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Darnell-Cookman Math Students


Place In International Competition


J.\(CKS()N\ ILLE. Fla. -- Aleebha I ltudenti at
Dainell-.'oolkmaii n Middle School flinlihed ighthlll in llhe
:lliniil initel.nalioialI Rlocketl (.il M latlih LeaLcgu.'
('Colllpe11itioll.
The tl1 e ltideni-. enll StIIII\an. (C)LI aIi l\b itslhaar.
Rick .\aJen. .ordan LaCo'tie and Sarah Skippe. comlpet-
ed Ja'aillst teams fr-i i1 fl ilter 1ch, ool-. in 43 ,sates.
Poland. Puerto RIco Japan and Germni\ Tihe', are stiu-
dents of math teacher lat RJI Badillo.
Ben Sullivan also placed I th in the Indll dual conm-


pe lon1. oLt of more th1 an .7'1.100 s-tudent .
I lie Rocket C(i, Math Leauie IRC(NILi i-a .,ear-
lo competition u itelln and c.'ooidiated b\ ittidenlt
at \Vigil I Gri.ss.ol HigL Schliool in Hunti, ille. Ala
The competition is sponsored and funded b,, NMu
.Alpha -l heta. a mll athnalla honor social\ lr Il ior.
li 1h school Il and collie e tiildelll .
The Darnell-Cookiman Itudents \\ill recei e their
a.dard-, from RCN L in NI.. Fo i more iiInformatllon
on the Rocket Citl Math Leauue. yo to x '..\i \ rocketc-


Teens To Compete In Pageants


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Monye Debreal Dawson


JACKSON\ILLE. Fla. Nlon\e Debreal Daw, son, a
senior at Stanton College Preparator. School and Tiffan\
Ala\ne Ga\ of Keman Middle School, \ ill compete in
di isions of the Nationals 2(105 Pageant on Sunda\.
April 11'. 4:Ut p.m. at the Florida Theatre
NMon.se, daughter of Mark and Denise Da\\son \\ill
compete in the Niss Teen Jacksoni ille di \iion \\tih
'ear. Tiffan. daJughter of Joe\ and Robin Ga\ i com-
peting in thile Miss Junioi Teen division. Both youngg


Tiffany Alayne Gay


ladies \\ill be competing in di\iion w\ith ladies
between the ages of 10 and IL) competing in model-
ing rout inies \ Iwhic1h include casual \ .ar and formIal
e ear
Klon\e and Tiffany %ill compete for their share
of oIer $2.00110 in scholarships. pri7es. and special-
t\ gifts that ill be distributed to contestants.


(See "Pageauni" B-3 -.)


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Page B-3A/April 16, 2005


Pageants

(Continued From Cover)


Watch Out Superman, There's

A New Super Hero In Town


Both young ladies will display their personalities and
interviewing skills while interviewing with this year's
Jacksonville judging panel. Personality is the top aspect
that each contestatnt is judged on during all phases of
competition.
Monye performs, in the marching, Concert and
Symphonic Bands at Stanton. As a member of First
Baptist Church of Oakland, she performs in the Youth
Choir and tutors with Project Reach. She plans to attend
Savannah College of Art & Design following graduation.
"Music is my passion," says Tiffany, 14.
If they win their divisions, Monye and Tiffany would
represent Jacksonville and the surrounding communities
at the Cities of America National Competition that will
take place in Orlando, Fla.
Over $60,000 in prizes and awards will be presented
at the National Competition while each winner enjoys
this expense paid trip of five nights and six days in
Orlando.
Community businesses, organizations, and private
individuals are assiting Monye and Tiffany in participat-
ing in this year's competition by serving as official spon-
sors.

Mr. & Ms. Sojourner Truth Pageant
At Jax Museum Of Modern Art
The Sojourner Truth High School of Humanities and
Technology will hold its first annual Mr. & Ms.
Sojourner Truth High School Pageant on-Thursday, May
5, at 7:00 p.m. at the Jacksonville Museum of Modern
Art located at 333 N. Laura St.
The event is open to the public. For sponsorship and
ticket information call 699-2842.




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,


Omari Jeremiah

By Rona Edwards

Paperboy is at it again.
Fourteen-year old author,
Omari Jeremriah, has
returned to PS 266 where
his hero, Paperboy, suc-
cessfully defeated the
LOEP (League of Evil
People) in his first book,
Paperboy (Morton Books,,
2004), thereby saving his
fellow classmates from the
bullies at recess. Now
Paperboy returns with
more force and more
action in Paperboy II-
Overwhelming Odds.
Paperboy is about a
young boy named Michael
who invents an alter ego
for himself, that of super-
hero Paperboy.
Michael turns into
Paperboy at recess where
he defends the many types
of children we all were or
grew up with, including
the Game whiz Boys, the
-Gossiping Girls and the
nerds, 'from that other
dreaded group known as
the Bullies.
He destroys characters
named Scizzor Man and
Shorty Scarface using
paper blade bommerrangs
and paper airlines, and
rides to school in his
Papennobile, but knows
that these two will be back
for revenge someday.
In Paperboy II,


Michael AKA Paperboy,
now with hero status, con-
tinues his mission to pro-
tect the students from the
bullies but gets much more
than he bargains for.
Not only are the bullies
back but Scizzor Man is
one of quadruplets so
Paperboy has to fight
quadrupably harder.
To makes matters
worse, a new teacher, Mr.
Raptor, has it in for
Paperboy and, will do
whatever it takes to
destroy him.
With the introduction
of three new students to
the school by the principal,
Mr. Pride, Paperboy meets
Billy, Nina and James.
When Billy is rebuffed
by paperboy for being
obnoxious and annoying,
he vows to get him, turn-
ing himself into The Mad
Hunter, and declaring that
Paperboy will be his prey.
With so many compli-
cations, it is only natural
for paperboy to form some
alliances and he does so
with James, who manipu-
lates mathematical pro-
tractors the same way
Michael manipulates
paper, and Nina, who
manipulates pens.
With Paperboy no
longer alone to fight the
evils of the playground,
the threesome ride a roller-
coaster of action and
adventure as they foil the
LOEP, Mr. Raptor and The
Mad Hunter in a humorous
yarn for the young at heart.
Author Omari
Jeremiah takes an imagi-
native look at what it's like
to be picked on by the bul-
lies at school, something
we can all identify with,
and creates a visual and
enthralling tale that is both
humorous and thoughtful.
Using everyday school


paraphernalia such as pen-
cils, portractors and papers
as weapons to help pap-
berboy win the day, shows
the clever genius and wit
of this young author.
With themes such as
"standing up for yourself,"
"helping others even at
great cost to you," and
"understanding what
friendship is all about,"
Paperboy II is, above all, a
delightful entertainment.
Young Jeremiah's
promising first books only
suggest what is to come in
future installments of the
Paperboy saga as' he
delves deeper into his
characters and throws
more enthralling obstacles -
in their direction.
Bernie Rollins' innova-
tive illustrations once
again bring Paperboy and
cronies to life--especially
amusing is Paperboy's
mask made of folds.
In this day and age,
when the news media
seems to only report the
evils of the world, it is
refreshing to come across
a young man like Omari
Jeremiah .-who restores
hope in our hearts for the
young people of tomor-
row.
He sets a great example
to his peers and an even
great example to us adults.
,Dont we wish we all
ihal a :Paperboy looking
6ut for all of us?- What a
wonderful world that
would be!











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-B-3C/APRIL 16, 2005


SChart Busters by Allan Ornstein
7 TOP SINGLES
1. "Since U Been Gone" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) Last
Week: No. 2
12. "Hold You Down" Jennifer Lopez Featuring Fat Joe
(Epic) No. 5
3. "Lonely No More" Rob Thomas (Atlantic) No. 3
4. "Candy Shop" 50 Cent Featuring Olivia (Shady
Aftermath) No. 1
5. "What Happens Tomorrow" Duran Duran (Epic) No. 7
6. "Obsession (No Es Amor)" Frankie J Featuring Baby
Bash (Columbia) No. 9
7. "Boulevard'of Broken Dreams" Green Day (Reprise)
No. 6
8. "Caught Up" Usher (LaFace) No. 10
19. "Disco Inferno" 50 Cent (Shady Aftermath) Re Entry
10. "Rich Girl" Gwen Stefani Featuring Eve (Interscope)
No. 8
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Baby Girl" Sugarland (Mercury) Last Week: No. 2
2. "That's What I Love about Sunday" Craig Morgan
(Broken Bow) No. 3
3. "Anything but Mine" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 4
4. "It's Getting Better All the Time" Brooks & Dunn
(Arista Nashville) No. 5
5. "Nothin' to Lose" Josh Gracin (Lyric Street) No. 1
6. "Gone" Montgomery Gentry (Columbia) No. 7
7. "My Give a Damn's Busted" Jo Dee Messina (Curb
Single) No. 9
"Let Them Be Little" Billy Dean (Curb) No. 8
9. "Bless the Broken Road" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street)
No. 6
10. "I May Hate Myself in the Morning" Lee Ann
Womack (MCA Nashville) New Entry
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Love Is a Drug (Creamer & K Remixes)" Rosko (NY
Love/Import) No. 5
2. "Avalon" Juliet (Astralwerks) No. 3
3. "How Can I Be Falling (D. Aude/D. Tsettos/M.
Rizzo/Presta/Ranpage)" Jennifer Green (TS) No. 1
4. "Home" Suzanne Palmer (Star 69) No. 4
5. "What Happens Tomorrow (Remixes)" Duran Duran
(Epic) No. 6
6., "Waiting for Alegria" Tony Moran & Ric Sena Present
Zhana Saunders (Tommy Boy Silver Label) No. 9
j7. "Stress" Danny "Buddah" Morales (Tweek'd) New
Entry
8. "Fairytale" The Replacement Featuring Maria
Neskovski (Radikal) No. 15
9: "Breathe" Erasure (Mute) No. 2
9. "Breathe" Erasure (Mute) No. 2
10. "Maybe (Illicit/Bini & Martini/Almighty Mixes)"
Emma (19) No. 10





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/ FL 1X nLI F/uRAA SAR 1- ---P-A-GE -


EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of lauw Jacksonville Sheriff's Qffice reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the conm-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
CRIMINAL MISCHIEF-On Monday, April 11, 2005 at 4:30
a.m. a police officer responded to 5327 Timuquana Rd. in refer-
ence to a criminal mischief to a vehicle. Upon arrival, police.offi-
cer met with the victim, who stated that her vehicle was locked
and alarmed and parked in front of her apartment. At approximate-
ly 4:20 a.m. she heard the car alarm go off. The victim told police
officer she went outside and found the vent window pried open on
the right rear passenger door. The victim also stated that she saw
no one in the area. The police officer observed the window
appeared to have been pried open by unknown means, causing
damage to the window and frame area of the vehicle. The victim
was given a case information card. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts
suspended due to lack of suspect information.
BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On
Monday, April 11, 2005 at 7:50 a.m. a police officer was dis-
patched to 6431 Lucente Dr. in reference to a dispute between ex-
boyfriend and girlfriend. Upon arrival, police officer spoke with
the girlfriend victim who advised that her ex-boyfriend(suspect) is
addicted to crack cocaine and steals from her every time he comes
around. She told the police officer that when he came over they
got into an argument. She called the police. The,suspect was gone
before the police arrived and could not be located. After the police
left the suspect returned. The suspect opened the victim's hood on
her Blazer and cut some wires on the engine so the vehicle could
not start. The suspect was unable to be located by the police once,
again, The police officer issued the victim a state attorney's card
and advised her how to file charges.
GRAND THEFT AUTO-On Saturday, April 9, 2005 at 10:45
p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 5943 Manor Dr. in refer-
ence to a stolen vehicle. Upon arrival, police officer met with the
victim, who stated that he went inside the house arid left his vehi-
cle running in the driveway: The victim told the police officer that
when he came back outside he observed his vehicle being driven
off but could not get any suspect information. The victim also stat-
ed that he attempted to follow the vehicle on foot. He also stated
that he contacted a witness who stated that she observed two
males driving the vehicle eastbound on Timuquana Rd. Canvass
of the area was conducted by police, but was unsuccessful. The
vehicle was listed through N. C. I. C. as stolen. The victim was
given a case information card. No further information at this time.
AUNT BATTERS NIECE WITH DEADLY WEAPON-On
Saturday, April 9, 2005 at 7:46 p.m. a police officer was dis-
patched to the 7500 Broxton Ave. area in reference to a domestic
battery with an assault. Upon arrival, police officer met with the
niece (victim). She stated that her aunt (suspect)hit her over the
head with a drinking glass and then cut her with it. Police officer's
investigation revealed that the victim was living with the suspect
for a short period of time on Ken Knight Drive. The victim told
the police officer that her aunt took some of her belongings to her
mother's house on Broxton Ave but not all of them. The victim
also stated that she went to Elwood Ave and asked her aunt where
was the rest of her belongings. The victim stated that she and the
suspect became involved in a dispute and that the suspect charged
at her. The victim stated that she pushed the suspect off of her. At
that time the suspect hit her in the head with a drinking glass and
began to cut her. The victim was treated by rescue #9 and refused
to be transported to the hospital. The victim advised that she
would have a friend take her to Memorial Hospital. The victim did
give a written statement as to what happened, A witness told the
police officer that she saw the suspect hit the victim in the head
with the drinking glass and'then cut her with the broken glass. The
police officer observed. lacerations on the victim's right arm, and
right side of her chest area and head., An E. T. was called to pho-
tograph the victim's injuries. The police officer was unable to
make contactv'ith the suspect at the time of this report, but will
attempt to secure a warrant for the suspect's arrest.
BURGLARY TO RESIDENCE DWELLING-On Sunday,
April 10, 2005ai 1:38 a.m. a police officer was dispatched to 7312
Old Kings Rd. South, regarding a burglary to a residence in
progress. Upon arrival, police officer met with the victim, who
stated that she was in bed sleeping when she heard something
.coming from the bathroom window. She said it sounded like.
someone was trying to remove the screen and open the window.
She told the police officer that's when she went to the bathroom
and saw a dark shadow. She then went to the living room to get
the phone, and noticed the front door was open. The victim stated
the front door was not locked. She then retreated to her bedroom
with the phone and called the police. The police officer observed
the bathroom window screen frame was bent from the outside as
if someone tried to remove it. There were visible marks on the
wall next to the window consistent with handprints. The police
officer did not notice any damageto the front door. There was also
a 5-gallon bucket near the bathroom window, possibly used to
access the window by the suspect. The police officer requested an
ET to investigate. Due to the late hour, no canvass was conducted.
CARJACKING WITH A DEADLY WEAPON-On Saturday,
April 9, 2005 at 10:09 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 655
W. 8th Street (Shands Hospital) in reference to a possible carjack-
ing. Upon arrival, police officer met with the \ victim. She stated
that she was traveling North on Moncrief Rd. "in her 1999
Chevrolet Venture Truck/van". She had stopped at the red light
at W. 21st Street when a black, late model Che\ rolet Lumnina
approached from behind. The victim told the police officer that
two males,, dressed in all black clothing and wearing ski masks,
'exited the Chevrolet Lumina and approached her car. One of the
male came to her window and tried to open her door. He told her
to "Get out of the Van." She refused to get out. The suspect then
stuck a black, long-barreled revolver against her neck. The victim
opened the door and told him that she would drive him anywhere
he needed to go. The suspect jumped into the driver's seat and
started to pull away, thex ictim continued to hold onto the steering


wheel. She told the police officer, at that point, another car came
up behind them and the suspects ran back to the Chevrolet Lumina
and left in an unknown direction. The % ictim was extremely upset
and felt that she may be injured. She. drove herself to Shands
Hospital. The police officer observed swelling to the victim's left
wrist and ankle. The police officer issued a BOLO over the radio
for the suspects and their vehicle. The police officer was unable to
locate any additional evidence at the scene of the incident. No
canvass was conducted due to the surrounding locations being
closed businesses. The victim was given a case information card.
Case not cleared.


Your Weekly Horoscope

(APRIL 16, 2005-APRIL 22, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) Make
some time this
week to be with
loved ones. You'll
be surprised at what you've
been missing. Later in the
week, higher-ups are in a
disagreeable mood, so steer
clear.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) You need to find
D an activity that
stirs your creative
j ui c e s
Fortunately, a
friend has the answer. You'll
both be off to an exciting
adventure.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20). You --
allow someone at
work to work
your nerves this
week. However, this is just
the reaction this person
wants from you. Do your
best to ignore the shenani-
gans.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) Your mate needs
D some TLC from
you this week. A
word of encour-
Sagement is fine.
However, how about a night
on the town over the week-
end?
LEO (July 23 to
August 22) You need to be
D careful with
money this week.
You could make
an impulse pur-
chase that's out of your
reach. Think before you
spend.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) You're
usually a pretty
practical person.
However, this
week, you're
tempted to listen to rumors
at work. It's best .not to
believe anything for which
there is no proof.
LIBRA. (September


23 to October
22) A personal '
problem weighs
heavily on your
mind this week. Instead of
bottling this up, share your
concerns with a trusted
friend. This person just
could have the answers you
need.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21) An
D exciting social
invitation comes
your way this
week. Make sure
you have the proper attire
for the event. On the job
front, pay more attention to
details.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December 21)
You express your-
self quite well this
week You may
not win any converts to your
side, but at least, people
understand where you're
coming from.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19) It's not a good
idea to keep
secrets from your
mate. It's an even
worse idea to
brood about something.
Open up those lines of com-
munication.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18)
You can't control
people's actions.
Thus, go about your own
business at work and ignore
that naysaying co-worker.
Ultimately, you're the one
who triumphs.
PISCES (February
19 to March 20)
Generally, your
[ judgment is good
this week.
However, some
stress comes into play mid-
week. Try to maintain your


Teen Accused Of Stealing Corpse's Head
MORRISVILLE, Vt. A 17-year-old Morrisville youth
was being held on $100,000 bail after police said he raided a
tomb in a cemetery and removed a head from a' corpse.
"We had a person voice their concerns about information
they had heard on the street," said Chief Richard Keith of the
Morristown Police Department.
Keith said police at first could not believe what they had
heard. But when they went to Morrisville Cemetery and inves-
tigated, they found that someone had broken into a tomb. bro-
ken open the casket and removed a man's head.
"We had the funeral director come to thee scene and \e
pulled the casket out. Yes. indeed. \\e found remains and the\
had been disturbed," Keith said. Nickolas Buckale\\. 17. later
was arrested and charged \\ ith unauthorized remo\ al of a dead
body. He pleaded innocent to the crime. Police belie e they
have a strong case against Buckale\\ because remains and e\ i-
dence were found in a silo near the suspect's home outside the
village and one-fifth of a mile from the cemetery.


MINORITYIAIDS COALITION
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composure.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Eric
McCormack, April 18;
Ashley Judd, April 19;
Carmen Electra, April 20;
Queen Elizabeth II, April
21; Aaron Spelling, April


22; George Lopez, April 23;
Kelly Clarkson, April 24.


(c) 2005 DBR Media,
Inc.


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PAGE B-5


FLORIDA STAR


APRIL 16 200







FLORIDA STA APRIL16,2


Tiger Dedicates Master Win To His Dad


AUGUSTA, Ga. Tiger Woods thrust a fist in the air, let


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out a scream and
headed off to hug
family and friends
huddled around the
18th green at
Augusta National.
Woods is a major
champion again, and
No. 1 in the world,
too, making Masters
magic instead of
swing changes, and
back to chasing Jack
Nicklaus' record.
AS Woods col-
lected another green
jacket, he couldn't
help but think of his
dad. And that's when
Tiger, all grown up
now, did something
unusual Sunday.
He cried. "I
want to dedicate


this to my father," Woods said, his eyes filling with tears. "I
could feel him out there with me on the course."
Earl Woods, who has suffered from cancer and heart
problems, didn't feel well enough to leave his hotel room.
But he surely was watching on television, and surely proud
of what he saw.
After surging to the lead with seven straight birdies in the
weather-delayed third round, and after-finishing up on the
dew-covered grass of morning, Woods pulled off a shot for
the ages in the fading sunlight of afternoon.
Then, he made the most important stroke of all: a 15-foot
birdie on the first playoff hole to beat gritty Chris DiMarco.
Woods was clinging to a one-stroke lead and on the ropes
when his tee shot at the par-3 16th hole sailed long. DiMarco
was safely on the green and facing a 15-footer for birdie.
Woods played his chip up the slope and watched it trick-
le toward the flag.
The ball dipped slightly to the right, wobbled back to the
left and stopped at the edge. Hanging there for two full sec-


onds before finally top-
pling into the cup.
Sarazen's double
eagle, meet Woods'
improbable birdie. "I
would rank that as one
of the best ones I've
ever hit," Woods said.
"It turned things
around. It was pretty
huge."
DiMarco mumbled
"nice shot" toward
Woods, then missed his
own birdie attempt.
The Masters, it
seemed, was over. Not
so fast.
The greatest closer
in golf --Woods has
never blown a final-
round lead in a major
and never squandered


: O Copyrighted Material j


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movie than a one-stroke advantage on the last day of any tour-
nament-- made a mess of the final two holes.
His tee shot at 17 flew into the pines, leading to bogey.
Then he missed the fairway off the tee at 18, pushed his sec-
ond shot into a bunker and failed to get up-and-down.
DiMarco's approach rolled off the front of the 18th green,
but he nearly won.the tournament with an amazing chip of
his own. From 40 feet, he caught the right edge of the cup,
his ball spinning around the flagpole before winding up 6
feet away.
For the playoff, the two returned to the 18th tee to do it
all over again. This time, Woods came up with two of his
best shots of the day under stifling pressure. He split the
fairway with his tee shot and covered the flag with an 8-iron.
The winning putt slid into the corner of the cup, giving
Woods his ninth major championship at age 29.
Woods tied Ben Hogan and Gary Player on the career list,
halfway home to the standard set by Nicklaus. Woods joined
Nicklaus (six) and Arnold Palmer (four). as the only players
with at least four Masters titles.


NFL Adopts Olympic Testosterone Standards


DALLAS The NFL and
its players have agreed to
follow stricter standards for
testosterone levels for the
start of next season.
The upgrade, which
required the approval of the
NFL Players Association,
had been expected to be
adopted, but not until next
month, when the NFL and
the union hold their annual
discussions about revising
the drug program.
However, commissioner
Paul Tagliabue said Tuesday
that the union had approved
the new standards, which
continue its practice of using
the guidelines set by the
Olympics.
"I know we've reached
some preliminary agree-
ments with the players last
week and we'll probably
finalize them next week,"
Tagliabue said during a
speech as part of the SMU
Lecture Series.
Cowboys owner Jerry
Jones and Kansas City
Chiefs owner Lamar Hunt
were among the attendees.
The NFL's program --
which includes random test-
ing and suspensions for
first-time failures-- has been
widely credited as being
among the toughest in pro-
fessional sports.
Last week, the NFL sub-
mitted documents to a
Congressional subcommit-
tee which investigated
steroids in baseball and is
continuing with scrutiny in
other sports. CBS' "Sixty
Minutes" reported two
weeks ago that three
Carolina Panthers players
had steroid prescriptions
filled by a South Carolina
doctor now under investi-
gation by federal authori-
ties.
Under the previous


guideline used by the ratio above 6:1 of testos-
International Olympic terone to epitestosterone,
Committee and the NFL, a another natural hormone,


Tyson To Fight


On June 11

WASHINGTON Mike Tyson simply laughed after he


listened to his next
opponent's manager
promise an upset.
Then, after standing
toe-to-toe with Kevin
McBride to pose for
photos, Tyson
clasped the Irish
fighter's hand, patted
him on the back and
Swinked. Is this a
kinder, gentler Iron
Mike?
"I don't get into
Sthe staredowns and
the talking trash. I'm
older, so I'm not real-
S ly too much into
that," Tyson said
Tuesday.


This from the man who brawled with Lennox Lewis three
years ago at a news conference announcing a bout, who
vowed to eat Lewis' children, who bit off a piece of Evander
Holyfield's ear, who was convicted of rape in 1992.
On Tuesday, in town to announce his fight at the MCI
Center on June 11 against McBride, Tyson seemed to alter-
nate personas.
At times, he was introspective or doted on his three chil-
dren who joined him on stage. At others, he came close to
being the Tyson everyone has come to expect: the curiosity
promoters hope can still sell tickets and pay-per-view buys
even though he's 38 and lost two of his past three fights.
He talked about sinking into depression, called McBride
"real cute," labeled himself "probably the worst husband in
the world," and told a PR person running the show to "chill
out" when she pointed out it was time for more posed pho-
tos. "I just hope these people of Washington, D.C., are pre-
pared to handle this," Tyson said. "It's going to be a train
wreck."
It will be the former champion's first fight in nearly a
year, and just his second in 28 months. In his most recent
outing, at Louisville on July 30, he was stopped in the fourth
round by Danny Williams after tearing cartilage in his left
knee. Tyson had surgery -- the knee is fine, he said Tuesday-
- and he's been training in Phoenix for three weeks.
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r --------------. -^-^-------- --------
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FL;ORIDA STAR


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EMPLOYMENT


FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at
FCCJ. E.O.E.

Drivers Dedicated Shorthaul
HOME EVERY NIGHT AND
WEEKEND GUARANTEED
*No Touch Freight
*85% Preloaded/Pretarped
*Avg. $777- $1017/week
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
Sunday Callers Welcome!
CDL -A req'd. 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com



Refrigerators GE
Washers Hotpoint
Dryers Sears
Ranges Whirlpool
Dish Washers Maytag

"WE WORK ON ALL
MAJOR BRANDS"
Tony Cochran, Owner
(904) 721-0101
FREE SERVICE CALL WITH
REPAIRS

To place an ad:
SCAII: (904) 766-8834
SFAX: (904) 765-1673

LEGAL NOTICE
In RE: Joyce Virginis, deceased
CASE NO: 16-2005-CP-000377
A hearing will be held on April 22,
2005, 11:00 am in Room 101,
Duval County Courthouse, 330 E.
Bay St.
Any interested party must file a
petition within 3 months after Date
of Service or a copy of the notice
on the objecting person or those
objections are forever barred.


I I


SERVICES


Alu inmAwig


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS .
CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764



GEERLMEAL&PLSTC Ic


FLORJIDA 'TAR


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
I (Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
I MAI rIAIKI A rtAVlRl


LOW DVV WNVVI T IVMEN I
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L ----- ---------------------
Drivers...
Mail/Dedicated Freight Runs
e a iy P :& Call
Fin -eits 1-800-251-4301
A h li between 8am 4pm
ro e cs la e Monday Friday
r-nefr ; *. Any employment that would be
offered may be in place of employ-
*A A~0LI ees engaged in a labor dispute
I- T p- l! u re or apply online at:
experi enereq1e www.mailcontractors.com
EOE M/F
[]


I


THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

Want to purchase minerals and
other oillgas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201

IMPACT

WCGL AM

1360


THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAY @ 6:30 P.M.

Issues That Address
Concerns Of The
African American Community
In Jacksonville AndThe World


MOUNT CARMEL GARDENS, INC.
5846 Mt. Carmel Terrace, Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 733-6696 FAX: 739-3512
"HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS"
*Housing for Seniors and those with verifiable disabilities.
*Efficiencies, alcoves, small and large one bedroom apartments.
*Rental includes utilities (lights, heat and air conditioning)
*Range, refrigerator, mini-blinds and fully carpeted.
*Laundry facilities available
*24 hour security
*Complete activities program ....
"Jacksonville Housing Authority Vouchers Accepted"


Announcements


Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by
Ron L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99
to Dianetics, 3102 N. Habana Ave., Tampa FL
33607.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories.
Quick turn around! Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/
day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995.
(800)814-6323 B02000033. CALL US: We will not
be undersold!

#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine Hd. You
approve Loc's-$10.670 (800)836-3464 #B02428.


Financial


$50,000 FREE CASH GRANTS**"**- 2005! Never
Repay! For personal bills, school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from 2004. Live
Operators! (800)606-6081 Ext #75.

Mortgages, Refinance or Purchase. No money
down. No Income, low rates. All credit considered.
(higher rates may apply) No mobile homes.
(888)874-4829 or www.AccentCapital.com
Licensed Correspondent Lender.

Loans by phone. Up to $1000 in 24hrs. No Credit
Check! Bank Account Req. (888)350-3722
www.pavchecktodav.com.

For Sale

WOLFF TANNING BEDS Buy Direct and Save!
Full Body units from $22' a month! FREE Color
Catalog CALL TODAY! (800)842-1305
www.np.etstan.com.

STEEL BUILDINGS EZ BUILD AISC Certifica-
tidn Office/Warehouse, Shop/Garage, Arena/Barn,
.Hangers. A plant near you! Will beat any price or
$205. (800)993-4660, www.universalsteel.com.

SPA. Must Sell. 7 Person Deluxe. Never Used.
Includes Cover. Will Deliver. Full Warranty. Can
Finance W.A.C. Payments Under $100 per Month.
In a Hurry. Call (800)980-7727.

Health Care

New Motorized Wheelchairs-Scooter Type, and
Diabetic Supplies at NO COST if eligible. Free
Delivery! Medicare or Private Insurance accepted.
.We Come To You! TLC Medical Supplies
(888)601-0641.


Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay
& Benefits for Experienced Drivers, O/O, Solos,
Teams & Graduate Students. Bonuses Paid Weekly.
Equal Opportunity Employer. (888jMORE PAY
.(888-667-3729).

A COOL TRAVEL Job. Now hiring (18-24 posi-
tions). Guys/Gals to work and travel entire USA. Paid
training, transportation, lodging furnished. Call
today, Start today. (877)646-5050.

-NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS PT/FT No
Exp Necessary $50 Cash Hiring Bonus
(888)287-6011 ext 107 www.USMailineGroup.com.

S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Drivers. HOME WEEK-
ENDS. Mileage Pay, Benefits, 401K. Trainees
Welcome/ Miami area- exp. req. 23 min age/Class-A
CDL Cypress Truck Lines (800)545-1351.

0/0 Driver FFE, The F/S is higher here! ,$1.02 Avg.
$2:000.,sign-on $2,600 referral bonus. Base plate
provided. No truck no problem, low cost lease
purchase. (800)569-9298.

Legal Services

DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS children, etc. Only
one signature required! '"Excludes govt. fees! Call
weekdays (800)462-2000, ext.600. (8iim-7pm)
Divorce Tcch. Established 1977.

Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Business,
*Paralegal, *Computers. Job Placement Assistance.
Computer & Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
www tidewatertechonline.com.

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM includes
standard installation. 3 MONTHS FREE 50+
Premium Channels. Access to over 225 channels!
Limited time offer. S&H. Restrictions Apply.
(866)500-4056.

BRAND NEW COMPUTER Bad Credit? No
Problem! You're. approved. Guaranteed. No Credit
Check Checking account required. (800)507-4855
Blue I-lrp'.. Funding Call now for free bonus.

Real Estate

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. MUST SEE
THE BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS. Homes, Cabins.
Acreage & Investments. Cherokee Mountain
Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
wvww.cherokeemountainrealty.colm Call for Free
Brochure (800)841-5868.

FORECLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low down!
Tax repos and bankruptcies! No Credit O.K. $0 to low
down. For listings (800)501-1777 ext. 1299.


ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS NO. SJ301FO
ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF DISTRICT'S LANDS
The St. Johns River Water Management District (District) is requesting letters of
interest from professional firms licensed in the state of Florida to provide compre-
hensive environmental engineering services including, but not limited to: Phase I, II,
III and IV Environmental Site Assessments (ESA), and other reports as required by
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Florida Department of
Environmental Protection (FDEP), and local agencies for contaminated sites. The
work area under this Statement of Work shall include the 18-county area of the
District boundary. It is the District's intent to enter into agreements with up to three
(3) of the top ranked firms for this project. Although the District intends to divide
the work equitably between the selected firms, it shall be at the District's sole dis-
cretion as to the award of individual work orders to selected firms as part of this
solicitation. The Each firm selected shall be required to execute a contract for a
period of/through 12 months. Theseis contracts may be renewed for two additional
one-year periods. Award oftheseis contracts does not preclude the firms from sub-
mitting a letter of interest for any other projects advertised by the District.
Professional Engineer (PE) certification in the State of Florida is required. Other
requirements are listed in the RFQ.
RESPONSES DUE: 5:00 p.m.
June 30May 270, 2005
In accordance with the Public Records Law, Chapter 119.07(6)(m), Fla. Stat. (as
amended), the District's project budgets are a matter of public record. As a courtesy
to the interested respondents on this project, this information is being provided with
the Request for Qualifications package. The estimated budget for the period begin-
ning October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 is $600,000, combined total for
all contracts awarded under this solicitation. The estimated budget for each subse-
quent term is $600,000, combined total for all three (3) contracts. Respondents are
cautioned that this amount is an estimate only and poses no limitation on the
District.
Interested firms may obtain a project information package by contacting
DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com or by calling (800) 711-1712.
Packages may also be obtained from the District by calling Carol Miller, CPPB,
Contracts Administrator, (386) 329-4170. Firms requesting packages through the
District will be charged copying and shipping/handling costs as stated at
DemandStar by Onvia or as provided for in Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., whichever is
less. If hearing impaired please call (386) 329-4450 (TDD).
Evaluation of submitted letters of interest and subsequent negotiations will be pur-
suant to Section 287.055, Fla. Stat. Letters of Interest will be evaluated by a District
staff evaluation committee. The eEvaluation Ccommittee will.meet at District
Headquarters at 10:00 a.m., June 210, 2005 to discuss the evaluations and finalize
its short list. The Evaluation Committee may determine that it will assist their eval-
uation for some or all respondents to make an oral presentation of their qualifica-
tions and credentials. In such event the District will schedule such presentations at
the District's Headquarters on July 6 and 7, 2005. Respondents who have been
selected for such presentations shall be notified in advance of said date. After eval-
uations have been completed all respondents will be notified in writing of the staff's
intended recommendation to the Governing Board at the August 9, 2005 meeting.
Following approval of the top-selected Respondents, contractual negotiations will
commence with the top-ranked firms.
If, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate, contact
Carol Miller, CPPB, Contracts Administrator, at the above address or either of the
above' telephone numbers at least five (5) business days before the date and time
specified.


LAKE VIEW BARGAIN $29,900. Free boat slip!
High elevation, beautifully wooded parcel. Across
from national forest on 35,000 acre recreationall lake
in TN. Paved roads, u/g utils, central water, sewer,
more. Excellent financing. Call now (800)704-3154,
ext. 608. Sunset Bay, LL.C.

LAND WANTED Land Investment company seeks
large acreage in Florida and Georgia. Interested in
waterfront, timber, and agricultural lands. Must have
road frontage or good access. Cash buyer with quick
closings. Call (877)426-2326 or email:
landyetiveg@aol.com.

COASTAL GEORGIA- Water access, marshfiont
homesites. Gated community, tennis, golf, kayaking
& canoeing. Preconstruction discounts, limited time.
From the mid-70's. (877)266-7376.
www.cooperspoint.conm.

SERENE MOUNTAIN GOLF HOMESITE $230/
MO. Upscale Golf Community set amid Dye de-
signed 18 hole course in Carolina Mountains. Breath-
taking views. Near Asheville NC. A sanctioned Golf
Digest Teaching Facility! Call toll-free
(866)334-3253 ext 832 www,cherokeevallevsc,com
Price: $59,900, 10%1 down. balance financed 12
months at 4.49% fixed, one year balloon. OAC.

Steel Buildings

STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory Deals Save $$$. 40
x 60' to 100 x 200'. Example: 50 x 100 x 12'= $3,60/
sq ft. (800)658-2885 www.rigidbuilding.com.

BUILDING SALE! "Built To Last/Priced To Sell!"
Economical all steel arch style. Best for wind/snow.
Many sizes/shapes. Pioneer (800)668-5422. Since
1980. www.poinecrsteel,com.


Your Ad Could Be Here


ONE CALL STANDS BETWEEN YOUR BUSI-
NESS and millions of potential customers. Place your
advertisement in the FL Classified Advertising
Network. For $450 your ad will be placed in over 150
papers. Check out our 2x2 and 2x4 display network
too! Call this paper, or Heather Mola, FL Statewide
Network Director at (866)742-1373, or e-mail
hmola@flpress.com for more information. (Out of
State placement is also available.) Visit us online at
www.florida-classifieds.com.


ANF


Advertising Networks of Florida


Week of April 11, 2005
j '


T'.


APRT 16 2005


------ -----------


100 Homesites in
Highlands County, FL
T i ..4. i Y r.T b;.,,,'. .,.u r, i -''t' i in

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AUTON 1A OatArl9A
Plusl 2 Large Tracts in Levy
County to be sold in parcels!

Call ForrFrther
isf11oul W i l:
800-257-41A61 i 't bih'" I5~ arr co


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FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, On
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS


(800) 794-7310

JG. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!

2- ? 1-


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* Read Together, florida o

March April 2005


Essay Contest for Middle School

www.VolunteerFloridaFoundation.org

H O O T b,.:,ni;red b, l Washington Mutual



R Y Ad.


2x2 Rates
Statewide $1200
Regional or national;
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 1.9 Million


2x4 Rates
Statewide $2400
Regional placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Circulation: 1.9 Million


** 4S


3 Days!
imted 2 Nights!
V i Time
Offe! Plus (2) Adult Tickets
Per Pac'age rfot Per to your choice of any
Person, Not Per Night magical Disney
MTAR ** Theme Park!


Resort Amenities


Orlando





*Additional Nights
Available at
Discounted Rates


-FLORIDA GETAWAY VACATIONS-
954.252.8968 or 1.800.254.4006
Visit us online: wwwireegetawayvacations.com
Offers on this advertising maternal are being used forthe purpose of soliciting the sales of Vacation Ownership plans


Help Wanted


IMPACT

WCGL

AM 1360











THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 6:30 P.M.
UNNW


BUSINESS NETWORK


= -- COUPON --- 1
CARPET CLEANING $995 I

"We Move Furniture 4 U" each room, 2 rooms or more
please

WHOLE HOUSE SPECIAL $79.95
Any 5 rooms & hall including
Scotchgard & Deodorant


SOFA & CHAIR SPECIAL $79.95


PRESSURE WASHING $79.95
Homes, Mobile Homes, Driveways, Pool Decks, I
Store Fronts, Warehouses, Roofs

Customer Satisfaction 100% Guaranteed
Phone: 904.962.2300




i I
email: frdbullard@aol.com
Licensed, Insured, Bonded 31 Yrs Exp A Fred Bullard Company

l.----r --A CTI IN !


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PREMIER FOODS
OF JACKSONVILLE


a
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-3118
Edgewood A\venue
PH: (904) 764-2476
FAX: (904) 764-0298
STORE HOURS:
MON-THURS 7AM-8PM
FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM
SUN. 7AM-7:30PMI


*1824
,'VWst Beavcr Street
PH: (904) 354-0665
FAX: (904) 354-4543
STORE HOURS:
MON-THURS 7AM-8PM
FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM


we Cash
Government Clecks'
WE ACCEPT
DEBIT CARDS &
MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
FOOD STAMPS & EBT CARDS
BEAVERR STREET STORE
CA-SHES ONLY
PAYROLL CHECKS


FAMILY p C1ip LB.

A7 ;---- ;d



IOL BAC- FRESH


L EACH


UJSDpr
GRAII1FED BEEF
ti 3 (--) 1-) 4. 1 e -, s
BeefC4' (t-ick ovr

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FAMILY PACK
IBeef ChLuc (),I
Sliilu Ider SIc cak.-.


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FAMIILY PACK MARKET FRESH
8 1 !,-b1 e99
qhukoun.
chuI~ck L. 9


FRESH
Pole Beans
.o0 CGGreen Bean'.

FRESH .
:"Green Bell: ... ....
Peppers or .
Crisp Cucumbers :

\ 44 .. ^ *. .


dl 17" M- I


-. L .--- ;
TWIN PACK
2 1/2 OOOWN SIZE .
:"cDanl ish Pork-- ..
---- S Spare Ribs .-
. '-3. BOX .
I.. s.. ,...
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WASHINGTON WASHINGTON
SRed or D'AnjouL
Golden or iosc
Apples d Pea rs

LmoB. L


WHOLE ia d


Smoked SLICED
Picnic Hams.
HEAVY CUT
Boneless Shoulder
Roast .. ..


FOI


R SB1 :L

L1..


FRESH
Green Cabbage

LB.


ASSORTED
Velda Farms
Fruit Drinks -
Sauer's
Salad Dressings
(LIMIT 2. PLEASE


GALLON 894

32-OZ. 8901


S 12 PACK 12-OZ. CANS
-- ,.,---,'- ASSORTED VARIETIES
f,; -..- Pe si Cola


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'.. ::r.: "s2/'=Jr O y
: 4, .


NRE
Heineken
Beer. .12 PACK BTLS. A


ASSORTED VARIETIES
Kool-Aid
Jammers ....
Golden Flake
Potato Chips.


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249


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-



135th Annual Grand Communication


Of The MWUGL, F.& A.M., PHA

Florida and Belize, Central America Jurisdiction, Inc.


/14

44'..;


April 15-April 18, 2005

In Jacksonville, Florida


All Business Sessions (closed to the public) At Hyatt Regency Hotel


State Banquet-Saturday, April 16, 7:00 8:15 p.nm.
Hyatt Regency Hotel (formerly Adam's Mark Hotel)
Admission $35
(Proceeds To Benefit $10,000 Scholarship Fund)

Comedy Show-8:30 p.m. at Hyatt Regency Hotel
Admission $20 (*Discount for groups of 10 or more)
Tickets On Sale At
Big Al's Records & Tapes, 5258 Norwood Avenue
Suite 14 (Gateway Mall)
Urban Flava, 9440 Arlington Expressway
(Adjacent to Regency Mall)
TicketAnnex.com
Featuring Gospel Comedians:


Ced Delaney
(*Worked with Ricky Smiley)


Dr. Michael R. Moore 33,
Grand Mlaser


Grand East
(Historic Masonic Temple) 410 Broad St.
(Being Renovated)

Annual Memorial Service
Sunday, April 17, 2005-7:00 p.m.
Second Missionary Baptist Church
954 Kings Rd.\Rev. Dr. Odell Smith, Jr., Pastor
Open to the public
(*Processional & Seating at 6:30 p.m.)


fabulous
FLORIDA. ;,
a'" of
Southern charm.






'4 L L
,:.' -- ; ,- ,. :..-.


TIIE

IFLORDAv) TA=,


*Real Topics *Real issues
Saturday 6:30-7:00 p.m.
WCGL 1360-AM


I


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APRIL 16, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


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