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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
April 9, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00014

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
April 9, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00014

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text





JON BSister Act
Of Pro Tennis Returns
Bausch & Lomb

Championships
SeePagA :.See Page B6


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


4FLORIDAE


THE


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


thefloridastar.com


APRL 00 -APRL05 205VL.54N.;8 0CI T


Daper Gents


Gun Fight At Moncrief


Apartment Party


Five Injured, One Dies


Jacksonville Chapter of Jack and Jill of America, Inc.'s 2005 Les Beautillion Militare
at their recent presentation. See story on A-3. Photo by J. Carl Davis, Sr.

About 16 Tons Of Spoiled Food Headed

For Jax Chinese Restuarants Seized


Cornelius J. Wilkins
I'Hctim


JACKSONVILLE.
Fla. -- Fixe people suf-
fered from gunshot
wounds during a party at
the Moncrief Village
Apartments about 9:30
p.m. Wednesday.
They attendants were
partying, hearty when
gunfire erupted.
Cornelius Johnson
Wilkins, 27. \\as found
with his face down and
multiple gunshot wounds.
Four other people were
injured, one critical, but


their names were not
released. Three were
male. and one was
female. The woman
was treated and released
from the hospital.
The other two males
did not have serious
injuries. The shooting is
being investigated and
none of the names are
being released while
details are being sought.
Wilkins' funeral service
will be held on Saturday
at 12:00 noon.


TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services'
Commissioner Charles
Bronson said his depart-
ment seized and destroyed
nearly 32,000 pounds of
rotting and contaminated
pork, beef, chicken, duck,
mussels and other food
items that were destined
for Chinese restaurants in
the Jacksonville area.
The seizure occurred


when the truck stopped
for inspection on
Highway 129 in
Suwannee Springs and a
strong odor of thawing
meat was noted.


The inspectors found,
am6ng other things, a
thawed and gutted duck
carcass and boxes of
frozen mussels.
The items were
declared unsafe and
seized 2,511. containers
containing almost 32,000
pound or 16 tons of food.
They seized and deposited
all of the food items into
the Hamilton County
Landfill.


Pope John Paul II To Be Buried Friday; Who Will Replace Him?


Francis Arinz
POPE JOHN II, who
died Saturday, served for
26 years, the third longest
in history, as a leader to
more than a billion
Catholics; 162,329 in the
Diocese of St. Augustine,
which includes Duval
County and 135.6 million


in Africa, about 17 per-
cent of Catholics world-
wide. With such a large
percentage of Africans
being Catholic, many feel
it is possible for a
Nigerian or a Brazilian to
become the next pope.
Pope John Paul, 84,
was the first non-Italian
pope in 455 years and
brought much to the
Roman Catholic world.
Two Cardinals being
mentioned are Francis


Cardinal Arinz, 72, a
Vatican-based Nigerian
and Brazilian Cardinal
Claudio Hummes, 70.
Hummes is Archbishop of
Sao Paolo, Brazil.
If Arinz is elected, he
would be the fourth Black
pope.
Pope St. Victor was
elected in 189 AD, Pope
St. Militiades, reigned as
Pope from 311 314 and
Pope St. Gelasius reigned
from 492 496.


Plans Halted For Jacksonville Infants

To Participate In Pesticide Study

JACKSONVILLE,. Fla.-- While fifteen churches in the black African American
community were joining together to raise awareness and promote improved infant
health in Jacksonville arid the Children's Home Society of Florida was putting its
plans together to recognize April as National Child Abuse Prevention Month,
Stephen Johnson was being nominated to head the U. S. Environmental Protection
Agency.
Most of the community paid little attention to Johnson's nomination but, the nom-
inee told senators at a hearing Wednesday, that he would not cancel a two-year envi-
ronmental study of infants' exposure to pesticides.
The project known as the (CHEERS) Children's Environmental Exposure
Research Study was asking 60 area families with infants from 9 to 12 months old, or
less than 3 months old, to volunteer for the study. The study was scheduled for
Duval County, Florida and each participate was to receive up to $970 in compensa-
tion that would include a t-shirt, a certificate of appreciation, a study bib, a calendar,
newsletter and a video camcorder, if they completed all of the two-year study.
According to the report, Duval County was chosen for this study because of its
year round indoor pesticide use. Also, previous studies showed higher pesticide con-
centrations in the area, data from a previous study done in 2001 was available, the
Duval County Health Department was a committed partner in continuing children's
pesticide exposure research to develop risk management programs, and DCHD's
strong connections with the community.
After Johnson's statement, Senator Nelson blocked his nomination to head EPA
until he receives assurance that this study to test infants' exposure is halted.
Congresswoman Corrine Brown also challenged the study. On Wednesday evening,
the Florida Department of Health announced the study would be terminated. The
Health Department said CHEERS is being halted because they have learned it was
being funded-by the chemical industry.


Ur U U II -


Ch. 1S w.5 ,601
Odp d rs e 1
ill--1


PRESORTED STANDARD
ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
JACKSONVILLE, FL
PERMIT NO. 3617

LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


News in brief

MAYOR PROPOSES MORE
INCOME FOR JACKSONVILLE RESIDENTS

Mayor John Peyton and the Jacksonville Regional
Chamber of Commerce announced their initiative to
increase the standard of living for Jacksonville citizens
through a program called, Blueprint for Prosperity.
He met with community leaders on Tuesday to form
committees and to solicit volunteers to participate in
this effort. The hope is to implement the program over
the next five years.

MORE THAN EIGHT THOUSAND
MASONS TO GATHER IN JACKSONVILLE


The Most Worshipful Union Grand Lodge, Free
and Accepted Masons, Prince Hall Affiliated, of
Florida and Belize, will gather at the Hyatt Regency
(formerly Adams Mark) April 15-18, 2005.
Organization meetings will be held but open to the
public will be the Banquet on Saturday at 7:00 p.m.
and the Gospel Comedy Show following the banquet
at 8:30, featuring Rod Z and Ced Delaney.
The highly impressive Memorial Service where
more than 800 men in black and about 200 women in
white will march in, also opened to the public, at
Second Missionary Baptist Church, 954 Kings Rd. on
Sunday, April 17 at 7:00 p.m. According to the Grand
Master, Dr. Michael Moore, more than 2,000 delegates
had already registered by last Saturday.


'DOWN TO BUSINESS'
IS NOW 'BACK IN BUSINESS'

Andy Johnson's Down to Business radio talk
show, also known as the "most efficacious" resumed
broadcasting Monday April 4 on AM 1530, WYYM.
The show airs weekdays from 1:00 to 6:00 p.m.
reaching listeners throughout the Jacksonville area,
up to Brunswick and down to Daytona Beach.
The live radio call-in talk show is known to be
heated with concerns of the community, specifically
when it comes to fiscal responsibility. The call in
number is (904) 786-2400.


d iELiEditorial .................... A-2
N Lifestyle .................. A-3
Church .................... A-4
ChurchriState .................... A-6
National, ................ -A-7
Local ....................... B-I
D Prep Rap ................ B-3
Jail Or Bail .............. B-5
I= Sports ..................... B-6
Business NI''twork..B-







JPAL Ci;'[ J .. .. .. ...R A R .--. 2 ...


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


rREEL \NCE REPORTERS PHOTOGRAPHERS-
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, NOREEN ERCOLINO, LAURENCE GREENE,
DeSHALYA BRYANT RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DESIREE SANDLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
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WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County'


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will riot be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
:,thei'l its lt hi, pap.r
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association.
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commnierce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStarcom


5AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


I J'I
rVEIOIATION


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into.
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


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RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


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The slow narrowing of the
legal justification of the death
penalty in America contin-
ues. In early March a bitterly-
divided U.S. Supreme Court
barred the use of capital pun-
ishment against convicted
murderers who were older
than 15 but younger than 18
at the time they committed
their crimes.
The ruling means the
rescinding of the .death, sen-
tence for 72 inmates in twelve
states who were juveniles
when they committed their
crimes: the harshest punish-
ment they can now receive is
"life without the possibility of
parole. And it erases the stig-
ma the United States carried-
as one of only two nations in,
the world (the other being
Somalia) whose laws upheld
capital punishment for juve-
niles.
The Court in 1988 had
barred the execution of con-
victed murderers who killed
when they were younger than
16, but a year later upheld
capital punishment for those
who were 16 and 17 years
olds. The 5-to-4 current deci-
sion in\ol\ed a case from
Missouri, Roper v. Simmons,
that resulted from a horrible
crime. The defendant,
Christopher Simmons, 17
years old at the time, burglar-
ized a home with an accom-
plice, bound and gagged the
wife and mother who was
home alone at the time, drove
her to a nearby state park, and
. .


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


To Be Equal
By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League
End the Death Penalty


tion of mentally retarded
offenders.
Drawing upon psycholog-
ical studies cited three partic-
ular reasons as bulwarks of
their stance: That those under
18 lack maturity and a devel-
oped sense of responsibility,
which "often result in
impetuous and ill-considered
actions and decisions;" that
they are "more vulnerable or
susceptible to negative influ-
ences, including peer pres-
sure, and thus have less con-
trol of their emotions and
actions; and that the "traits of
juveniles are. more transitory,
less fixed" than those of
adults.
Chief Justice William H.
Rehnquist and Justice
Antonin Scafia; Clarence
Thomas, and Sandra Day
O'Connor dissented in bitter
words from the majority rul-
ing. Experts differ as to
whether, the series of recent
rulings by the Court narrow-
ing capital punishment fore-
shadow its eventual abolition
or, instead, represent a "fine-
tuning" of the law in order to
solidify its legality.
In out view, however, the
fine-tuning should inevitably
lead to abolition-for moral
reasons, yes; and also
because the very attempt to
apply capital punishment is
untenable. For example, the
death penalty is overwhelm-
ingly disproportionately
imposed upon the poor-
nearly 90 percent of those.
facing capital charges cannot
afford their own attorney-
and race plays a stunning role
in its imposition.
While 50 percent of all
murder victims are white, 84
percent of the victims in
death-penalt cases are


threw her from a bridge
spanning a river to drown in
the waters below. He was
arrested within days, after
bragging to friends about the
killing.
Few words exist which
can adequately condemn the
terrible act Christopher
Simmons committed or sup-
port the life sentence he
deserves.
But the National Urban
League agrees with the.
Supreme Court's decision in
striking down capital punish-
ment for juveniles. We agree
with it in o erarching terms
because we have always
viewed the penalty as being
morally wrong and in practi-
cal terms in the United States
irredeemably tainted with
racial and class bias.
The Court majority of
Justices Anthony Kennedy,
Stephen G. Bryer, David
Souter, John Paul :Stevens,
and Ruth Bader Ginsburg,
pointedly noted "the over-
whelming weight of interna-
tional opinion against the
juvenile death' penalty" and
the fact that although nine-
teen states in the U.S. have
laws permitting the execution
of juveniles, only three-
Texas, Oklahoma, and
Virginia-had executed juve-
niles in the past decade.
Furthermore, the Court's
majority said its ruling in this
case was a logical step for-
ward from its 6-to-3 rulingof
2002 prohibiting the execu-


white. Since the death penalty
was re-imposed in 1976,
blacks, less than 13 percent of
the population as a whole,
have made up 35 percent of
those executed, and are 43
percent of those now on the
death rows nationwide, and
67 percent of death-row
inmates in federal prisons.
Since 1976, 11 whites have
been executed for killing
blacks; 144 blacks have been
executed for killing whites.
Finally, the fatal
"inevitability of caprice and
mistake" in administering the
death penalty that the late
constitutional scholar,
Charles L. Black, Jr., pointed
to has been underscored in
recent years by the uncover-
ing of egregious mistakes
made in the convictions of
men already on death row by
lawyers and law students
working in organized proj-
ects and, in some instances,
law officials themselves who
became convinced a wrong
had been done.
Thus far, 119 men on
death row have been released
from prison because, for
some, their guilt at trial had,
not been proved, and, for oth-
ers, they were found to have
been completely innocent of
the crime they were sen-
tenced to death for. In all
instances, the developments
which led to their freedom
came years-in some cases,
decades-after they were to
have been executed.
The death penalty is
inherently unjust, inherently
unfairly applied; and the
Supreme Court's decision
barring it-for juveniles is a
step in the right direction.
This issue is a matter of life
and death.


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FLORIDA STAR


APRIL 9. 2005


PAGE A_-2


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PAIGlE-l3 CTAL' A PR!! 92
rI~lLAiAA'~ZA.C


Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
"Woodlawn Presbyterian Church Celebrates 135
Years"
Top hats, bonnets and circa 1800 attire was the attire
for the kick-off event that commenced the six weeks of
activities to celebrate thel35th Anniversary of the
Woodlawn Presbyterian Church, USA. This congrega-
tion has touched so niany lives-in this community,
including this writer. It was delightful seeing the fash-
ionable attire for the era when the congregation began.
"Our 500+ member congregation celebrated and hon-
ored God's goodness and blessings throughout years of
rich clurchl history," stated church member and volun-
teer Mrs. Cheryl Riddick.
"Joyously Celebrating Our Past; Prayerfully
Anticipating Our Future" was the. theme for events
commemorating Woodlawn's 135 Anniversary and the
activities that followed the Kick-Off Luncheon at the
church's Family Life Center were: Laying of Wreath at
Founder John E. Onley's gravesite in the Old City
Cemetery; "Color Day" where members wore their
"Presbyterian blue" T-shirts; Youth Day Carnival &
Gospelfest; "Evening of Elegance" Banquet; and the
culminating Anniversary Worship Service & Parade of
Banners.
Since February 27, 1870, when Rev. J.W.C.
Pennington led the first worship service of Third
Presbyterian Church, later to be named Laura Street
Presbyterian Church, and finally, Woodlawn
Presbyterian Church, USA, membership has continues
to grow in number and in support of the community.
Today, under the leadership of Rev. Dr. J.W. Rigsby,
this lone African American church among more than 60
in the Presbytery of St. Augustine offers faith-based,
educational and general programming for youth, fami-
lies, couples, seniors & retirees and the community at-
large. "And they do so, with the faith of their founder",
states Mrs. Riddick.
An added joy for the celebration was that the church
congregation (except for the cemetery activity) held
each activity either in the sanctuary or Family Life
Center. From Laura Street to Woodlawn Road the
church continues to be a spiritual beacon on the First
Coast.
May God's blessings continue!

"The 2005 Les Beautillion Militaire"
Nine charming, polished and sophisticated young
men were presented recently at the ninth biennial
Jacksonville, Florida Chapter of Jack and Jill of
America, Inc.'s 2005 Les Beautillion Militaire held at
the University of North Florida's University Center,
which is always a perfect location for the presentation.
The presentation was a wonderful culminating cele-
bration for the families and friends of the young men
who have spent weeks prior to the presentation partici-
pating in workshops, special activities and services that
further encourage friendships, leadership skills and cul-
tural awareness.
Dressed in full formal attire of tails and white ties
with top hats and canes, all attention was on the 2005
Beaux and when you add the beautiful belles, it was a
sight to behold!
Choreographer for the event was the fabulous Mrs.
Kezia Hendricks Justice and I don't need to tell you
that the young beaux dance routines were excellent!
TV Four News Anchor Rob Sweeting was Master
of Ceremonies. Joining him on the program were:
Claud Myers, Mrs. Kimberly Huyghue, Mrs.
Patricia Gillum Sams, Stuart Williams, Dr. Floyd
Willis, Carlton Jones and local Jack and Jill president
Mrs. Wanda Willis. Wyman Winbush directed the
'Topping Ceremony.'
The members of the 2005 Les Beautillion Militaire
group were: Chae Aikens, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Chester Aikens; Anthony Bivens, II, son of Tony
Bivens and Mrs. Juanita Bivens; Gregory Butler II,
son of Mrs. Cheryl Denese Butler and Gregory E.
Butler I; Frederick Harris, II, son of s. Tammie
Wynter and Frederick Harris; Jarrod Nelson, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Tony Nelson; Anthony Sinette, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Ede Sinette; Brian Tyson, son of Lee
Tyson and Mrs. Patricia Garrett; Henry Williams,
II, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Williams, Jr. and
Darren Zeigler, son of Mrs. Denise Zeigler and
Nathan Zeigler.
** *****


"AKA's and Omega's Abound The First Coast"
Last weekend members of Theta Phi Chapter,
Jacksonville, served as the host chapter for the 68th
Seventh District Meeting of Omega Psi Phi
Fraternity, Inc.
"More than 700 Brothers attended this meeting"
laid Robert $. Porter, District Mahshal (Meeting


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Coordinator.) "Our District Meetings are normally well
attended and with the elections this year, even more
interest has been generated" he said. Edgar L. Mathis
Sr., a Jacksonville native, served as the District
Representative (President) for the meeting. However,
due to term limits he left office at this meeting.
The Grand Basileus George Grace from Miami was
in attendance and participated in the meeting.
This weekend the Cluster III members of the South
Atlantic region of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.
will host over 3,000 members during the 52nd South
Atlantic Regional Conference. The conference chair
Mrs. Bertha M. Padgett is a member of the local
Gamma Rho Omega chapter and the South Atlantic
Regional Director is Mrs. Irene Westbrooks
McCollum of Orangeburg, SC.
More on both of these events later...
********
Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me directly at ima-
jol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904)
285-7008.
See you ii the paper!


/ Recovery groups are part of the problem.
/ Quit on your own, and make it stick!

Rational Recovery@ shows you exactly how.

Visit us at: www.rational.org


IThe Readers of the Black
Press in America are,
more educated,
make more income
and have
substantial buvina
Dower.

Source:
The Media Audit
2004 Black Newspapers Readership Report,
nnpa.org


1- -


APRIL 9. 2005


VI OfHn dA RTAR


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Meek Questions IRS Probes Of Black Churches


WASHINGTON, DC Voicing concerns that outside
groups may be specifically
targeting black and other
ethnic churches .by trigger-
ing federal investigations,
U.S. Rep. Kendrick B. Meek
today asked IRS
Commissioner Mark W.
Everson to make public the
number of predominantly
black, Caucasian, Hispanic,
and other ethnic churches
that are presently the subject
of U.S. Internal Revenue
eService investigations into
their tax exempt status.
"Concerns have been raised that black churches in
Florida have been unfairly and disproportionately singled
out or targeted for government scrutiny because of routine
church activities that have been a part of the African
American community for generations," Meek said. "A
letter from the IRS can have a chilling effecton churches,
and we need to be sure that the power of the government
is being properly directed and not used to harass or intim-
idate. I asked the IRS to release these basic facts about
their inquiries or investigations of churches because there
is no other way to gauge whether these suspicions are jus-
tified."
Under federal law, churches are tax exempt and there-


First AME Church Of Plam Coast
Plans Breakfast, Dinner Theater

The Women's Ministry and The Master's Mighty Men
of First A.M.E. (FAME) Church, 91 Old Kings Rd. North
in Palm Coast, Fla. will host a Prayer Breakfast beginning
at 9:0(0 a.m. on Saturday. April 16. The men's donation is
$6 and the women's is $5.
The FAME Inspirational Choir will present a dinner
theatre of "The Death of a Church" on Saturday, April 23,
5:00 p.m. at the Riverview Club, 790 Cristina Dr., St.
Augustine Shores. The donation is $20 (choice of brisket
of beef or turkey).
For more information contact the church at (386) 446-
5759. Rev. Gillard S. Glo\er, Pastor.


Evan el

Temprile
.1 \ 6' hly r, Ci, d./ I li .

It', Time To Visit With Us.

Sunday, April 10th
8:25 a.m., 1 0:-5 a.m., 6:00 p.m.
These are t he Days of a lMighty
Move of God
Have Faith to be Healed
Have Faith to go to the Ne.'t Level


I ~aors' Ceril and (Garr, Wiggin

l5755 Ramona Blvd.
SJacksonville. FL 32205

904-781-9393
W'aebitei: www.e vagn i ernpleagc.o rg
Mail: evangel, 3i cormca~s t.net


WHAT IS GRIEF?


All human relationsliips end
in separation. It's a fact whichh
cannot be denied. Regardles's
of how much energy or emo-
tional commitment we invest
ina relationship, it cannot last
forever.
When a relationship is
brought to an end by death, the
loss is known as berea\ ement.
It is the emotional reaction to
such a loss that we call grief. It
can have many forms and mani-
festations. It can last for vary-
ing lengths of time and be felt to
different degrees, but there are a
few universal factors about
grief.


We understand that grief is
a normal response. It can be
extremely painful, and poten-
tially harmful if avoided. The
proper goal of grief is the inter-
nal realization and recognition
of death. Recovery, however,
does not mean. all emotional
significance of death has ended.
Rather. it signifies the ability of
the grie\er to fenn new rela-
tionships and make new com-
mitments.

A.B. COLEMAN
MORTUARY, INC.
'OurAlm Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
6660 Moncref Rd,
'Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman.com


fore not permitted to participate in partisan political activ-
ities. It was recently reported that Friendship Baptist
Church in Miami, FL is under investigation by the IRS
because of a visit by Senator John Kerry along with black
leaders,including Meek, last fall. The First Baptist
Church of College Hill in Tampa, FL was also under
investigation for a visit by 2002 Florida gubernatorial can-
didate Janet Reno. Both churches serve primarily African
American congregations. The IRS is also investigating
the National Association for the Advancement of Colored
People because of a July 2004 speech given by the group's
chairman, Julian Bond. ,


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-

GOSPEL CONCERT HONORING MAHALIA JACK-
SON-Babyboyy Productions presents Patrick Robinson in
"Move On Up A Little Higher", a Gospel Concert paying
tribute to Mahalia jackson on Saturday, April 9, 5:00 p.m. at
St. Nicholas Bethel Baptist Church, 2606 San Diego Rd.
(across from Douglas Anderson School of the Arts). There
is no charge but donations are appreciated. For more infor-
mation call (904) 791-9986..
SPRING REVIVAL-Blakely Memorial Church of Christ
Written In Heaven, 1430 Kings Rd., invites the public to
attend a Spring Revival April 12 through April 16, nightly at
7:30 p.m. Evangelist Dorothy Yant from Gretna, Fla, presid-
ing. Bishop Thomhs Brown, Pastor.
WOMEN OF THE BIBLE-The Missionary Board of New
Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church, 1824 Prospect St.
presents "Women of the Bible" on Sunday, April 17 at 5:00
p.m. The pubic is invited to come out and watch the ladies
of New Bethlehem present Martha, Mary, Ruth, Jezebel,
Delilah, Deborah and others in song, dramatic and dance
presentations. Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor.
WOMEN'S.SEMINAR-Union Progressive Baptist Church,
613 Pippin St., invites the public to attend a Women's
Seminar on April 15, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., an on April 16,
9:00 a.m.-12 noon. For more information call (904) 355-
3102. Rev. C.R. Morgan, Pastor.
HOMECOMING CELEBRATIONS-Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist Church, 2803 West Edgewood Ave., will
host Homecoming Celebrations. A free cookout (with rides
and games) will be held on the church grounds on Saturday,
April 9. Rev. John E. Guns (guest speaker), pastor of St.
Paul Missionary Baptist Church, along with his choir and
congregation, will be guests at 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, April
10. Dea. Bruce and Verrese Hickson, Program
Chairpersons. Rev. Clifford Johnson, Jr., Pastor.
ANNUAL DUAL DAY CELEBRATION-Resurrection
Baptist Church, Christian Center, 6046 Moncrief Rd. W.,
will host its second Annual Dual's Day celebration on
Sunday, April 10. "Men And Womnel Working Together
Compelling Others To Come" is the theme. The men will
be in charge of the 10:45 a.m. service. Rev. Freddie Sumner
Sof Mt. Lebanon Missionary Baptist Church is the guest
speaker. The Women will be in charge of the 4:00 p.m. serv-
ice. Sis. Patricia Stokes of God House of Prophecy is the
guest speaker. Elder Robert Jackson and The New Spiritual
Travelers are the special guests. Minister F. Foreman, Jr. and
First Lady Cheryl Foreman, General Chairpersons. Rev.
Glen F. Foreman, Sr., Pastor.


Phone Home
It's Me God!

When Jesus chased the money lenders out of the
temple. He was right to do so. He did it out of respect
for Me. The temple was a house of worship, not a mer-
cantile.
Unfortunately, Jesus did so at His own peril. The
elders of the temple were appalled. The trading and
selling that went on was a good source of income for
them. plus it was somewhat of a tradition.
Once again, though, Jesus didthe right thing, and
once again, it was another mark against Him with those
who wanted Him gone.
Follow Jesus' example. When faced with something
you know is wrong, do what is right, no matter the cost
to you personally.
Ultimately, although you may pay a price on this
earth by being unpopular or angering some, you'll be
rewarded by Ie.
Like Jesus, have no fear. I am always with you.

(c) 2005 DBR Media, Inc.


One Lord And One Faith Assembly
5410 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville; Fla. 32208
Ken Milliton, Pastor Faithful Larry, Associate
PH: 713-9343 or 545-6925
"Where The Holy Ghost Makes The Difference"
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.


Sunday Church Service 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday-Bible study 7:00 p.m.
Sunday-Hour Of Power Ministry 8:00-9:00a.m.
WYMM-AM 1530, with Faithful Larry


Although the IRS is prohibited by law from divulging
information on pending investigations, Meek noted that
he has requested only general information that would not
reveal any details about specific agency actions.



The Church Directory

"Come and Worship With Us"

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH.
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday j................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. ,.I.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. '-.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study ..,
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m. '.,*-
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review 8:00 p.m. .':
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


ORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd &4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundm Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Clhurclh
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Oil Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
S Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
"a (Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays -
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonda3 Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

Mount Sinai Community Development Enterprise
Community Resource Education
And Development Institute
2049 North Pearl Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 798-8733

GED Program, FCAT, Tutoring, Mentoring, After School,
Job Skills Training, National Parenting Program, Ex-Offenders,
Computer Skills Training for Youth and Adults.

For More Information
Call (904) 798-8722 or 798-8733.

HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT!
Call 904/765-9773
Give to: The Samuel W. Smith Fund Raiser


for Kidney Transplant,
Account #234-5528-5
Compass Bank
Jacksonville, FL







LOr IDA iA-iTA -


I BL~~~-AU INTECYI


laying the Race Card in Social Security Fight

It does not come as much of a surprise to many that President Bush and his right-
wing friends, who often give lip service to a race neutral philosophy when opposing
affirmative action, are now wrapping themselves in the race card in an attempt to try
:o build support for their misguided plan to restructure Social Security.
If you listen to Bush, African-Americans are short-changed by the current system
because we have a shorter average life span than white folks. However, a report by
the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the Congressional watchdog that inves-
tigates how the federal government spends taxpayer dollars, states that "because of
higher disability rates and lower lifetime earnings, African- Americans and Hispanics
actually receive greater benefits relative to taxes than whites."
The GAO report said: "Differences by race in the relationship between taxes paid
and benefits received under Social Security are due to differences in lifetime earnings,
the incidence of disability, and mortality between the groups. In the aggregate, blacks
and Hispanics have higher disability rates and lower lifetime earnings, and thus
receive greater benefits relative to taxes than whites."
A closer look at the red herring of life expectancy shows the discrepancy between
the life expectancies of Blacks and Whites is largely due to higher mortality rates for
black infants and youths. The actual difference in life expectancy for blacks and
whites who survive until age 65 is only about two years.
If the president wants to show real concern about the black-white longevity dispar-
ity, he should push for efforts to close the racial gap in life expectancy through strate-
gies that would increase access to an improved health care system.
Social Security continues to be the primary 'source of retirement income for
African-Americans aged 65 and older. At the same time, this population remains dis-
proportionately poor.
Although African-Americans represent just over 12 percent of the U.S. population,
nearly 18 percent of workers who receive disability.benefits, 23 percent of children
and 17 percent of widows receiving survivor benefits are Black. There is a deafening
silence when Bush is asked how he would protect disability and survivor benefits.
"Trust me," he says (haven't we heard this before?).
While private accounts are helpful additions to a solvent Social Security, system,
they are no substitute, and they will not necessarily dissolve any disparities in retire-
ment wealth for blacks and whites. Maya Rockeymoore, vice president of Research
and Programs for the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) Foundation, says that
claims that African-Americans would benefit greatly from private accounts is "mis-
leading and overlooks the fact that existing racial income disparities would remain or
even widen under individual accounts even if blacks and whites were earning the
same rate of return."
William Spriggs, a Senior Fellow at the Economic Policy Institute, said: "Private
accounts exacerbate earnings differences for workers who, for whatever reason, have
spells of unemployment when they are.young." This, unfortunately, is a situation fac-
ing many of our young people, both men and women.
The NAACP agrees that Social Security needs to be improved, but the restructur-
ing should not be primarily based on the use of private accounts. While savings and
pensions are important components of overall retirement security, in the foreseeable
future Social Security must continue to be the dependable safety net for workers'
retirement security, disability protections, and survivor benefits for their families. It is
important that African-Americans take a long hard look at the Social Security restruc-
turing sales pitch and an equally hard look at the salesman.

The writer is Interim President of the N'.-ICP


Children Need Increased Minimum Wage

MIilton Bro\\-n is a custodian in \Washington. D.C., with
a son in high school. He works full-time for the minimum
wage and receives no benefits or health insurance. With
hourly \ages of only $6.60-the minimum \\age in the
District of Colunbia--it's a daily struggle to make ends
meet.
All of Brown's income is spent on rent, food, and pub-
lic transportation, and lie is frustrated that he can't con-
tribute more to his son's care. He doesn't know ho\w he can
help his son fulfill his desire to attend college. "People in
this city are living below the poverty level," said Bro\\n. "I
am living in the nation's capital. the most powerful city in the world, and I can't get
by."
Brown, 48, and millions of workers like him are consigned to poverty by a mini-
mum wage that hasn't kept pace with the times. Today, the national minimum. wage
stands at $5.15 an hour-a paltry sum that has not changed since 1997. It should be
raised to $7.25 immediately, as Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) and others propose.
Congress set the first minimum wage in 1938, and for decades it kept millions of
workers out of poverty. Since the early 1980s, however, full-time minimum wage
\workers and their children have been relegated to life below the poverty line. When
compared to average wages, the spending power of the minimum wage today is lower
than it has been since the 1950s. Now afull-time employee earning $5.15 an hour and
working 40 hours a week for 52 weeks a year earns' 510,,712 in annual salary. For a
family of three, that is $4.500 below\ the 2004 poverty threshold.
The pay of a parent working full-time at the national minimum wage covers only 40
percent of the estimated cost of raising two children. As the purchasing power of the
dollar erodes each ear, lo\w-wage workers find it increasingly difficult to support their
children. In America, the wealthiest nation in history, this erosion of spending power
hasincreased the number of people living in poverty to 35.9 million-including 12.9
million children.
Poor children are at least twice as likely as others to suffer stunted growth or lead
poisoning or to be kept back in school. Poor. children also score significantly lower on
reading. math, and vocabulary tests. Nearly 1 in 10 children in America lives in a,
household that \ would be helped if the minimum wige increased to $7.25 an liour.'
More than half ofpoor Americans experience serious problems because of their lack
of money, including insufficient food, utility shutoffs, and crowded or substandard


housing. And the challenge to low-income households would become more pro-
nounced if President Bush's proposed 2006 budget is adopted. The crucial framework
of laws that protects millions of our most vulnerable children would be undermined by
the president's proposed tax cuts for the rich and budget cuts for the poor.
Most minimum wage workers are adults, and many are family breadwinners.'
Recent research shows that more than 7.3 million workers would benefit directly from
an increase to $7.25 an hour. Of these, 5.3 million are adults (aged 20. or older) and 1.8
million are parents with 3.4 million children under 18. Look beyond the workers and
it's easy to see that the minimum wage is a children's issue.
The federal minimum wage is about fairness, the value of work, and the opportuni-
ties.wvork provides. We must question why an increase has not occurred since 1997 and
why friends of big business fought a proposal last' month by Sen. Kennedy to give min-
imum wage workers a raise to $7.25 an hour.
Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) led an effort against the Kennedy propos-
a4 with a plan raise the minimum nage to only $6.25. The tradeoff for Sen.


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HDOP: help delete online predators


1 in 5 children is sexually solicited online.



SYou don't know what your kids are saying online. Or who they
are saying it to. A lot of times neither do they. So get involved.
To protectyour kid's online life or report an incident,
call 1-800-THE LOST or visit cybertipline.com.


NATK AL
CENTRE FIOR t

C H I L D R E N


HOOP: help'delete online predators


Santorum's modest increase \\as a "poison pill" scheme with the bogus title of"flex-
time." He wanted to abolish the 40-hourweek.by allowing employers to deny workers
overtime pay unless they worked more than 50 hours in a week or more than 80 hours
over a two-week period. This would allow employers to deny workers up to 10 hours
of earned overtime pay every two weeks.
The Congress and President Bush must act to give low-income families the
resources they need and work for to take care of their families. It is inexcusable for
elected officials to claim they support working families while leaving more and more
of them behind in poverty.
If President Bush's 2006 budget proposals are adopted and key programs for chil-
dren are starved of funding, these changes will make it even more difficult for low-
wage families to afford many of their basic needs, including health care, food, educa-
tion, child care, .and housing.
Increasing the minimum wage wouldn't make Milton Brown well-to-do, but it
would improve his life-and the lives of millions of children. "What father," he asked,
"wouldn't like to provide a better life for his son?"

Marian Wright Edelman is founder and president of the Children's Defense Fund and
its Action Council, whose "Leave No Child Behind" mission is to ensure every child
a Healthy Start, a Head Start, a Fair Start, a Safe Start, and a Moral Start in life and
successful passage tj adulthood with the help of carin families and communities.


IPRIL 9, 2005


DENNIS C- RTLAND HAYES


I


PAGE A-5


iT IT r" A TA 1D







I" I"FLO -,IDA TAR-PR 9,0


Ella Harrison Mackey:


A Family Profile


By Mrs. Ida Mackey McNeil

Mrs. Ella Harrison Mackey was the oldest child of
Nicholas, Sr. and Mrs. Lenora Love Harrison who were
slaves on the plantation of wealthy slave owner John
Harrison ofFairfield County, South Carolina. After the Civil
War, Nicholas and Lenora moved to Jacksonville, Fla. with
their family in 1885.
After meeting John Mackey in Jacksonville, Ella and
John married in 1890. John was an independent farmer and
florist. He was employed as a florist by Charles Mills,
owner of Mills Florist. John and Ella Harrison Mackey pur-
chased four acres of property from Charles and Etta Mills.
Two acres were purchased on March 2, 1892, and two addi-
tional acres were purchased on April 6, 1897.
The Mackey's homesteaded here where they reared their
ten children. They lived on this property for 45 years, and
were the only Black family living in the Panama Park area.
The Mackey family was well respected by all area residents.
Ella was employed by Dr. James M. Carswell and con-
stantly in demand by citizens in the Panama Park area who
sought her health care assistance.
Doctors requested her talents and expertise in assisting
with the health care of their patients. There were times when
doctors could not be reached, and Ella was called to attend
those in need of health services.
After her husband John's death in 1918, resulting from
injuries received when an automobile struck his bicycle, Ella
ultimately decided to sell the homestead and move closer in
town near other family members. The property located at
300 Tallulah Avenue was sold by Ella to the City of
Jacksonville on July 11, 1935. This property is presently
known as Tallulah Park.
Ella was very proud of her children, grandchildren and
great-grandchildren along with her nieces and nephews, all
who comprised one great family. These descendants repre-
sent many leadership roles in community involvement
across the country. They are civic board members; church
offices; college graduates with several advanced degrees;
school teachers; school principals; school administrators;
Ianuan .0 -.. __ : 'l....im -M wU* *


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postal workers; postal supervisors; private business owners;
locomotive engineers; clinical psychologists; musicians;
executive secretaries; office managers; photo engravers;
municipal public administrators; military officers; medical
supply representatives; insurance actuaries; registered nurs-
es; nursing administrators; physicians; masonry contractors;
and a United States Magistrate.
One descendant was a posthumous recipient of the third
highest military award given in combat, the "Silver Star" for
gallantry in action, in the Korean Conflict. He is listed on
the Jacksonville Veteran's Memorial Wall as Lt. Curtis W.
Christopher.
Also included among these descendants is a grandson,
Rudolph L Daniels, Jacksonville's first Black Army Reserve
Officer to command the first integrated United States Army
Reserve Unit in the city of Jacksonville, who held the rank
of Captain at that time, but was later promoted to Major and
then to Lt. Colonel.
He was also the first Black appointed department head
for the City of Jacksonville, serving under four consecutive
majors.
Mrs. Ella Harrison Mackey was a viable asset to her fam-
ily, the Panama Park community, the city of Jacksonville,
and her country.
Precious memories linger in our hearts of loved ones who
have passed away long, long.years ago and of others in more
recent years. In addition to my parents and grandparents are
my husband Walter McNeil; my siblings and their spouses
and children-Walter and Ida Watson Mackey, Dillon and
Earlean Mackey, Everett and Hosea Mackey and their chil-
dren-Kenneth, Gladys J-Iobson and Ethel M. Hill; Samuel
and Lillian Mackey Gregory and sons Melvin (Mary Brown)
Gregory, Russell (Helen Saunders) Gregory and son-in-law
Lonnie Higginbotham; Winton, Sr. and Ruby Moran
Mackey, their children Claude, Joan, Winton, Jr. and Delano
and grandson Doyle Mackey; Sylvester and Marguerite
Mackey Daniels and their daughter Audrey Daniels; John
Francis, Sr. and Elouise Curry Mackey, their sons William
and Francis, Jr. and Dorothy Mackey; and George Mackey;
my aunts Amelia Harrison, Sallie Harrison Watson, Tillie
Harrison Oxendine, "Dolly" Harrison Christopher, Lena
Garrett, and Ida Mackey; and my uncles John Harrison,
"Nick" Harrison, "Gene" Harrison "Van" Harrison and
Lawrence Gouwdy.


Husband and Father : A young John Mackey. Photo courtesy
of Mrs. Ida Mackey McNeil.


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Mackey descendants seated: Walter Mackey, Lillian
Mackey Gregory, Dillon Mackey, and Everett Mackey.
Standing: Winton Mackey, Marguerite Mackey Daniels,
George Mackey, Ida Mackey McNeil and John Mackey.
Mrs. Ida Mackey McNeil is the only living member of the
sibling group. Photo Courtesy of Mrs. Ida Mackey McNeil.


.4 "


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"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted
-llllm -


The Victory is in the Word & Music


Nm~h I?-


6050-6 MoncriefRd., Jacksonville, FL 32209

Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW WCGL1360.COM


A young M
Mackey McNeil.


ackey. Photo courtesy of.Mrs. Ida


Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.
Topic For Saturday, April 9, 2005:
Where's John?
Even though there's a $100,000 reward for
information regarding the whereabouts of
John Rowan, after four painful years, the fami-
ly is still no closer to finding him. Andrea
Giggetts talks with his mother who desperately
seeks to find her son, John.


APRIL 9, 2005


I -


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-f6


;*.-'*








IPRIL 9. 2005 FLORIDA STAR PAGE A-7


NUL Releases 'State of Black America' Report


S Washington, DC (April 6,
S2005)- Equality between
blacks and whites in urban
America is not improving,
sa and changes in national poli-
a cies and priorities must be
made to help, according to a
report released today by The
National Urban League, eriti-
tled The State of Black
America 2005: Prescriptions
for Change.
r The annual report's
Marc H. Moral "Equality Index" (a statistical
measurement of disparities or "equality gaps" between
blacks and whites in economics, housing, education, health,
social justice and civic engagement) revealed that despite
societal progress, the overall status of Black Americans is
just .73 or 73 percent, compared to the conditions of their
white counterparts, marginally unchanged from 2004 index
results.
After a decade where Black America began to see drops
in the unemployment rate and gains in income, the post-9/11





--.


(News from Press Release and wire services)
U.S.. Supreme Court Accepts Post-Argument
Supplemental Brief In Kentucky
Ten Commandments Case

WASHING TON, DC The United States Supreme
Court issued an order accepting a supplemental brief filed
by Liberty Counsel regarding the repeal of a 1999
Resolution in the Kentucky Ten Commandments case of
M lcCreary County v. ACLU of Kentucky. McCreary and
Pulaski Counties are represented by Mathew D. Staver,,
President and General Counsel of Liberty Counsel, who pre-
sented oral argument on March 2 before the High Court.
ThSe current display before the Court includes the Ten
Commandments along with other historical documents pre-
sented in their entirety as part of the Foundations of
American Law and Government display. The ACLU filed
suit in 1999 after both counties posted a single copy of the
Ten Conunndments. Following suit, both counties modified
their display s by adding .additional historical documents,
some of which excerpted only the religious portions of these
documents. Both counties also passed resolutions regarding.
the second display. The district court found the second dis-
play unconstitutional. The current Foundations display was
also subsequently found unconstitutional, and that is the dis-
plaT which was argued before the Supreme Court.

SCLC Holds nWreath Laying Service.
To Commemorate 37th Anniversary
Of Dr. King's Assassination

ATiLANTA, GA.-- The SCLC and community members
honored there 37th anniversary of the assassination of the
Noble Peace Prize winner and founding president of the
SCLC. Dr. MIartin Luther King, Jr., with a Wreath Laying
Service at the M martin Luther King Jr. Center for Non violence
Sand Social Change. According to SCLC National President
Charles Steele. "April 4thmarks the day in history when an,
assassin's bullet took the .life of one of the world's s most
prophetic and po\\erful leaders. Dr. King gave.his life in
order that \%e might enjoy many of the benefits and privi-
leges that we ha\e today. Surely we can each take a few
moments out of our daily schedules to pay our respects to his
life and legacy whilee recommitting ourseli es to continuing
to d nork for better conditions for all people world wide.
There is so much \ ork still left to be done, and on the day
that %\e remember Dr. King and his dream,. \\e must remem-
ber the struggles and sacrifices of the past while e acknowl-
edging the \\work and commitment still needed today to
ensure a better tomorrow for all of htumnanity."

Zimbabwean Police Deployed Against'
Opposition Protests In Downtown Harare
HARARE. Zimbab we (AP) Zimbabwean police
deployed on rooftops and in the streets of downtown Harare
at dawin Tuesday to prevent further protests against,the oit-
come of lIarch 31 parliamentary elections. .
Armed details at roadblocks checked traffic in and out of
the city centre a day after riot police dispersed a brief
demonstration there.
President Robert Mugabe's ruling Zanu-PF party claimed
\victory in 78 of the 120 elected constituencies and with 30
more appointed by Mugabe,,is Certain to have the two-thirds
majority needed to amend'the constitution at will.
Police spokesman Wayne Bvudzijena told state radio two
youths had been arrested after street protests at a major high-


Sway intersection Monday. Five shops and a bank had been
stoned during the unrest, he said.


recession is marked by economic stagnation. Although the
overall equality index shows that black status remains at 73
percent, the numbers inside the index tell a troubling story in
terms of unemployment, income and wealth," said Marc H.
Morial, President and CEO, National Urban League. Our
nation must wake up. The growing wealth gap in this coun-
try is not just leaving behind Black America, it's leaving
behind, the middle class, urban America, rural America and
Hispanic America too. When one community in America
suffers, our entire economy suffers. That is why we're rec-
ommending specific changes in our national priorities and
policies. Highlights of the Equality Index findings in the
five main areas include:
1. Economics Still the largest divide, black economic
status measures 57 percent of white counterparts, an equali-
ty gap 20 percent wider than any other category. Black
unemployment remained stagnant at 10.8 percent while
white unemployment dropped to 4.7 percent, making black
unemployment more than twice that of whites.
2. Health Black health status is 76 percent of whites.
Obesity rates for blacks are increasing faster and the life
expectancy rate for blacks is 72 years vs. 78 years for whites.
3. Education Black education status is 77 percent of
whites. Teachers with less than 3 years experience teach in
minority schools at twice the rate that they teach in white


schools.
4. Social Justice When measuring sentencing, enforce-
ment and victimization, black vs. white equality under law is
68 percent of whites (5 percent less than 200--the worst
decline overall.). Blacks are three times (3X) more likely to
become prisoners once arrested and a Black person's aver-
age jail sentence is six months longer than a white's for the
,same crime; 39 months versus 33 months.
5. Civic Engagement Blacks out-measure whites in the
area of civic engagement (voter registration, volunteerism
and government service) at 1.08. However, volunteerism is
declining for both blacks and whites, due to an upsurge with
the 2004 elections.
The Total Equality Index states that Black status is 73%
of their white counterparts. "We need members from both
parties and both houses of Congress to get together and real-
ize that the responsibility of our nation to provide economic
opportunity for all of its citizens is the great ci\ il rights chal-
lenge of our time." said Morial in his letter to the President
and Congressional members.
The State of Black America 2005 continues its rich tra-
dition of essays and commentaries focused on economics,
wealth, education, health and voting rights from some of
America's most prominent thinkers.


African American
women make up 12.2% of
Allstate's 38,000-employee
workforce.
The complete list of the
35 companies being high-
lighted is available in the


Yolanda Jones, a field claims adjuster for Allstate, will
be featured in ESSENCE Magazine.


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seven million African-
Americans each month.


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FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-7


IPRIL 9, 2005







A/tlI A-6. 0A-O .""-..AS- ". R.


Jon B: Focused And Back On Track!
by Rych McCain
Being a music artist these days is a tricky proposition. You ...o .."..
have those true to the art form who are genuinely talented and .
gifted, then you have the video age, packaged and canned pre-
tenders who are products of slick producing, fat track, technical
doctoring and record company imaging promotion. The former *
usually go on to greatness while the latter never stand the test of
time. Jon B is an artist whose talent and music has and will con- "
tinue to carve its place in history. First, he is a real and accom- i
polished musician i.e., playing bass and lead guitar, drums and .
piano. In the latter 90's, Jon B was a club music, chart busting
superstar.
Born in Rhode Island and reared in Pasadena, California, Jon ,
B spent many afternoons soaking up the music he listened to at ."
his grandparent's record store. After he graduated from high ..
school, he set out to pursue a music career. This led to his meet- .
ing Kenny "Babyface," Edmonds and his wife Tracy who signed /
him to their record label that was Edmonds Record Group (for-
merly Yab Yum). His debut album BONAFIDE went platinum in
1995 and spawned a #5 R&B/Hip-Hop single "Someone To on photoo 200 Andre' MurrayA Brn
Love," a duet with Babyface. COOL RELAX, his second LP in Agency Photo)
1998, yielded a platinum single, "They Don't Know," which
established Jon B as a legitimate balladeer. Even the B-side to that single, "Are You Still Down," peaked
at #2.
The chart success continued in 2001 with the release of his third album PLEASURES ULIKE, which
rose to #3 on the charts. STRONGER EVERYDAYwas his latest LP released last fall that will have a new
single out shortly.
Personally, Jon B has been through some trying times. He lost his entire recording studio to a fire that
was pretty devastating followed by a horribly painful divorce. Dose the combination ofthe-personal pain
and his multi-platinum success place a lot of pressure on him in terms of his future projects? Jon B con-
fidently responds, "I consider my life to be like a cup, it's overflowing. I've been blessed so over abun-
dantly in so many different ways that my career is such an extra. I mean music is such a gift in terms of
my daily enjoyment, what it takes for me to get by. I don't know what I would do without music. Really,
to be able to make it in the industry and to even have a following with fans who support me and go out
to buy the record every time I come out. Man, it's a constant angel over my shoulder, encouraging me
to keep doing what I set forth to do in the day, which is to write these songs, make these beats, sing these
records. Also to work with as many artists as possible while I'm kickin' it on this earth."
Jon B has a couple of tasty pots cooking on the stove which is exciting. He says, "2005 is going to
bring some good things. Tour, videos and the emergence of my own label, "Vibezelect," is my main
focal point right now. For me it's not just being limited as an artist, singer or entertainer, I really want
to do the production,and record company thing, have artists that are signed to me that I can develop and
help."





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Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
Whitney Houston's latest trip to rehab was not
her own doing, it was court ordered. Former B2K
front man and ladies' man Omarion, will debut his

new video "Touch," Friday, April 8th on BET's
ACCESS GRANTED. ESSENCE magazine
(which was recently sold to Time, Inc.,), cele-
brates its 35th birthday with a special collector's
edition, the biggest in the magazine's history with
346 pages. Faith Evans' new album "First Lady,"

is set to drop April 5th on Capitol Records.
Rapper Crooked I, whom we recently featured in
this column, is in the studio putting the finishing
touches on his new album B.O.S.S. (Beginning
Of Something Serious), on Treacherous/Universal
Records.

ASCAP will hold its 20th Annual Film and
Television Music Awards Gala on Wednesday,

April 27th at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly
Hills, Calif. KING magazine .will host a
Hollywood birthday bash for its West Coast
Editor Adell Henderson as well as salute
actress/singer Christina Milian on the success of
her Novebmer/December King cover, which was
the best selling issue ever! Not to be out done,

SMOOTH magazine will host their 3rd Annual
Hollywood Red Carpet Extravaganza on April

20th in celebration of their cover girls Stacey
Dash, Kenya Moore, Nicole Narain, Elise Neal,
Regan Gomez-Preston and Farrah Franklin.
Fellas, if you have ever attended this event, the
eye candy is blinding!
Maat-Hotep!


APRIL 9. 2005


FLORIDA STAR


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Soldier From First Coast Pens Poetry While Serving In Iraq


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--SSG Raymond Lee Broughton
II (E6) of Jacksonville is on his second tour in Iraq/Kuwait
with the 4/3ACR Unit. When he has spare time while serv-
ing his country he communicates with family back home and
writes poetry.
The Only son of Jacqueline Barrett and Raymond Lee
Broughton, Raymond II was born, July 9, 1975 at Univirsity
Medical Center now known as Shands Jacksonville.
A month after graduating for Andrews Jackson High


"COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
Events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

B .- _- -.. -.. .-- --.-...- ---V
MAJIGEEN- Nlajigeen (MAJIG IN) a musical drama
by Jennifer Chase premieres at Boomtown Theatre in
historic Springfield April 7-10 and April 14-17. All
shows begin at 7:30 p.m. except Sundays with matinees
beginning at 2:00 p.m. The play is produced by Anne
Kraft and Carol Gladstone. Noble Lee Lester, Director;
Keezia Justice and Christa Paulk, Choreographers;
Percival Cacanindin, Music Director; and Kathleen
King, Artistic Consultant. The original recording
soundtrack was recorded by Les Brules, Souvigny
France. Studio 2000 in Dakar, Senegal and Eclipse
Studio in St. Augustine, Florida. For reservations and
ticket information log in to www. majigeen.com
SPRINGAPALOOZA COMING TO 'UNF-UNF's
Residence Life will host the seventh annual
Springapalooza from noon to 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday,
April 12 on the campus of the University of North
Florida. This event helps mark the end of the academic
year for LUNF students, faculty. staff and families. The
event is free and is expected to draw more than 150 peo-
ple. An area near the residence halls \\ill feature inflat-
able games, free food, prizes for various competitions
and games. tie-dI ing and more.
TALENT GRANTS AUDITIONS-Florida
Community College has scheduled dance auditions for
talent grants on April 13. 6:00 p.m. at Florida
Community College South Campus. 11901 Beach
BlId.. Dance Studio (Bldg I. Room 21101. Talent
grant scholarships are awarded to students who show
ability and meet the requirements. Intermediate dance
level is required. For more information call
904.646.2361 or e-mail rtletchei'dcci.edu.
STAGE AURORA PRESENTS NIAHALIA-
LAHALIA: A GOSPEL MUSICAL %\ill be presented
April 29. 30. May 1. 6. ". 8, 2005 at the Ezekiel Bryant
Auditorium located at 4501 Capper Road (FCCJ North
Campus). MNAHALIA (brought to Jacksonxille by
Darr'l Reuben Hall) \ill be directed by Gloria
Stephens and is sponsored in part by the City of
Jacksonville. the Cultural Council of Greater
Jacksonville. Di\ ision of Cultural Affairs. Department
of State. Florida Arts Council. and the National
Endowment for the Arts. Additional funding is receix ed
from The Educational Community Credit Union. Sanms
Club, and WVal-Nart. Tickets may be purchased at
Gospel World (3000 Dunn A\enue-764 "679 or 1066
Arlington Rd-724-0825). Life Way Christian Bookstore
St. (John Town Center 10261 River March Dr.-645
7096,. Music of Note (756 Park A enue-215 70001. or
bs calling Stage Aurora Executi\e Director Darryl
Reuben Hall at (904) 765-7373-Visa or Master Card.
BANQUET HONORING YOUTH-Empowerment
Resources Inc. in\ ites the public to attend Journey Into
Womanhood's first Charirt Scholarship Banquet-An
Awards Celebration Honoring Our Youth on Saturday,
April 16. 2005 at theRadisson Riverwalk Hotel. 1515
Prudential Dr. A reception begins at 6:30 p.m. fol-
lo\wed by dinner at 7:30 p.m. The banquet \will feature
a generational address on the topic of a personal jour-
ney into womanhood from: Anjna Chauhan, Partner and
Attorney at La\\ with Johnson and Chauhan Group:
Arvella Townsend. Human Ser ice Professional and
Co-host of "Joy In Our To\wn": and Dr. Lois Gibson.
Famil\ Health and Wellness Consultant & Dean of
Health Services at FCCJ. retired. Tickets are S40.
Proceeds \\ill go towards the Journey Into Womanhood
program and the scholarship campaign. For ticket or
sponsorship information please call (904) 268-8287 or
e-mail pow\ er2succeed2003i@.'vahoo.com


School
h e
passed
t h e
Navy
a n d
S' Army
-0 .,"' tests
"ad t ae, with
Very
whitgh

scores.
..... ."..."H e

n o t
enlist
without my signature. That was not going to happen, so he
had to wait until he was 18, before they could take him,"
explained Jacqueline Barrett.


DEATH


NOTICES
ALLEN-Everett, died April 3,
2005.
ANGELL-Robert, 71, died
March 12, 2005.
BASS-James, died March 30,
2005.
BIVENS-Woodrow B., 90, died
April 3, 2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary
BROWN-Frances, 89, died
March 31, 2005.
BRYANT-Fannie, died April 4,
2005.
BOWES-Venis L., died March
28, 2005.
CAMPBELL-Mary Ruth, died
April I, 2011 '
CARBERT-Bennie Lee, 65, died
March 29, 2005.
CLARK-John, Jr. died April 3,
20.15 A. B. Coleman Mortuary
COLEMAN-Pearlena, 50, died
March 28, 2005.
FEN NELL-Ople Lee,89, died
April 2, 2005.
GILLARD-Gladys, died March
29. 0105.
GRIFFIN-Sara, 79, died March
3 1. 2005.
GREEN-Sylvia, died March 24,

HENDERSON-Deborah Diane,
died March 30, 2005. Alphonso
\\est Mortuary
JENNINGS-Shellie, died March
31.. 2005.
JOHNSON-Carolyn, died April
5. 2005.
JOHNSON-Katie, died March
2's. 2005.
1.O\ETT-Mamie, 86, died
March 28, 2005.
MARTIN-Charles R., 82, died
.pril 3, 2005. Alphonso West
Mortilary
lcCORD-Gail, 51, died March
31. 2005.
MILLS-Mattie W., died March
30, 2)05.
NIMlS-Mlar L., 69, died April 4,
11W') i
2005
PATTERSON-Hayward, died
April 3, 2005.
PONDER-Linda, died March 28,

PO\\ELL-Michael, died April 4,
211"'i 5
REDFIELD-Clarence,died April
3. 2005.
RIVERS-Richard, died April 4,

SAN DERS-Fleta E., died April 2,

SCHMIDT-Shane, 32, died April
1. 2005.
SH ULER-Tanieta H., died
March 29, 2005.
STOGDEN-Wayne, 4.7, died
April 2, 2005.
SULLIVAN-June, died April 1,

TERRELL-Jirfmie, 83, died
April 1, 2005.
THOMAS-Mary L., died March
31. 2005.
\AN BLAKE-.Barbara, died
April 1, 2005.
\\ILKINS-Corellus, 27, died
March 30, 2005.
'WILLIAMS-Johnny, died April
1. 200:5.
\VRIGHT-Sidney, 74, died
March 25, 2005?


BHTF Committee
Names Peyton
'Man Of Year'


Jonn reyton
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--
The Bob Hayes Track &
Field Committee (BHTFC)
named Jacksonville Mayor
John Peyton "Man of the
Year" for 2005.
Councilweman Pat
Lockett Felder and Mia
Jones and the BHTFC pre-
sented the award to Mayor
Peyton during, the 41st
Annual Bob Hayes
Invitational on Saturday,
March 19 at Raines High
School.
The mayor welcomed
participants and served as
starter for the event.
'The award was given in
recognition of the mayor's
service to the city, his guid-
ance of the city's Super
Bowl preparations and his
effort to help Edward Waters
College retain its accredita-
tion.
The mayor is the first
Jacksonville mayor to have
attended the Babo Hayes
Invitational while in office.
The BHTFC was funded
by James Day and Nathaniel
Washington, and includes
Earl S. Kitchings, Jimmy
Johnson, Edwin Lawson and
Charles Grover.
The committee sponsors
the Bob Hayes Invitational,
a track field event that rec-
ognizes young athletes and
honors the legacy of sports
hero Bob Hayes.
Hayes, known as "Bullet
Bob" and the "World's
Fastest Human", was a grad-
uate of Matthew W. Gilbert
High School and Florida
A&M University. He won
gold medals in the 100-yard
dash and 400 relay at the
1964 Olympic games. He
played wide receiver with
the Dallas Co\\ bo\ s


SSG Broughton experienced Boot Camp at Fort
Jackson, SC. From there he went to Ft. Carson, Colorado.
Tw o -
years
later he
married
h i s
Afreda.
The
couple
h-ave
t w o

and a
boy.
He has been stationed in Germary, Ft. Stewart Ga. and back
to Colorado for 11 years.
SSG Broughton, who has a Bachelor degree in Physical
Education, is a member of the Audie Murphy Club and
coaches a youth basketball team in Fort Carson for Teenage
Boys..
His goal is to retire from the Army and open four to five
Barber Shops in Jacksonville and other locations in Florida.
He provides servcies as a Barber when he is not working or
coaching.
"My son loves Jacksonville and the Jacksonville
Jaguars. All he want is for the Jaguars to send him some-
thing over there. He really don't care what it is. His room
is always full of Jaguars stuff," said Ms. Barrett.
Here are two of his poems submitted by his mother:

"If I Was Gone"
By Raymond Lee Broughton II

If I was gone will I be forgotten, Will my memories be washed away as if
I were rotten?

Will my kids look up to someone else as dad? or will I just make my
babies mad?

When I am gone will they remember the laughs and hugs? or.will it be like
many of my people, money, women and drugs?

When I am gone momma don't cry too many tears cause your baby boy
had some great years.

When it is said and done no big funeral or big front. Just cremate me and
roll me in a big fat blunt.

When I take my last breath will my legacy carry on in the back of people's
minds? Or will it be erased like a VCR tape after pressing rewind?

Will I be remembered as a soldier who kept it simple or as a tall black
brother who had one cute dimple?

I talk about being gone not crazy just curious cause if anyone forgets me
I will be furious.

When I am gone just remember me for me no matter what that is Ray, Sgt.
Broughton or just plain ole B.

I talk about being dead as if I had be drinking, nope just in Iraq doing a
whole lot of thinking.

I've got plenty to live for and a lot of goals to reach
I've even got three beautiful kids I've got to teach.

But for now I'm here just being who I be.
No matter what you get told just remember freedom ain't free.

FREEDOM
By Raymond Lee Broughton II

Two years later and the Operation Iraqi Freedom goes on
America's sons and daughters continue
to fight so that the Iraqi people can stand alone.

Doesn't matter how old you are or your race
We all see red, white and blue in this God forsaken place

The reason for this war hasn't been made clear
Losing America's kids is what all Americans fear
No matter what the reason; on we must fight
Because it is the right thing to do or is it just politically right
Here it is SOLDIERS, SAILORS,
MARINES AND AIRMEN stand so faithful
But yet and still some Americans seem so ungrateful
As Americans we may .take a lot of small things for granted
Thank you for our FREEDOM as some Iraqis chanted

The question everyone is asking, was this war fought in vain
That is the least of my worries. I'm focused
on my commarades and I from being mamed or slain
While OLE GLORY still flies high from sea to shining sea
Thank you for all of your support cause
"FREEDOM STILL AIN'T FREE"

THANKS FOR SUPPORTING
THE FLORIDA STAR!


TO ADVERTISE AND SUBSCRIBE
CONTACT US A
AT 9 4) 766-8834


PAGE B-1


FLORIDA STAR


APRIL 9 2005







PACJ' R-9 F1,-fR--A STA APR11 9 2005


Ask Deanna! Is an advice column known for its fearless
approach to reality-based subjects!

Dear Deanna:
I almost went off on a stranger in the grocery store. I
was shopping and looked up and saw my boyfriend's jack- p
et floating down the canned food aisle. He swore up and
down somebody stole his coat. To get a closer look, I- 1
walked up and spoke to the lady. She had on his jacket
with his name monogrammed exactly the way I bought it A,' -i ;
along with his picture on a key chain. What do I do about
this?


Tressie


Milwaukee, WI


Dear Tressie :
Your boyfriend has another woman and you either confront him head on or keep
rolling dumb in the dark. If she proudly flaunts his photo, the encounter wasn't a one-
night stand and it's serious if she's wearing his clothes. Tell your boyfriend what you
saw, you want the jacket back immediately, and the other woman has to go. If he says
no, goes into denial or lies about anything, give him the boot and keep it moving.

Dear Deanna!
I want to know why you never mention the good men in your articles? Yes a
majority of men are dogs but not all of them. sometimes a man can be telling the truth
but the woman seems to think he's lying. It boils down to how well you trust your
man. I believe if a man cheated once doesn't necessarily mean he'll cheat again.
There are some. men that cheat and keep on cheating but some men do tend to stop.
Ms. Confident On-Line Reader

Dear Ms. Confident:.
You're absolutely right. There are many good men whose existence and credibil-
ity is being destroyed by the dogs. A woman must have her own confidence, self-
love, and esteem in order to reflect and build trust in a man. There are men out there
treating their women well and just as many good men waiting for a good woman. I
definitely give props to the faithful, Godly, honorable and caring men that are hold-
ing it down ano doing the right thing.

Dear Deanna!
Recently I pledged a sorority and I feel it's the biggest mistake of my life. These
girls perpetrate as if they promote unity and bonding to get you in the group then the
story changes. Now that I'm in the sorority, I see a lot of loose sex, back stabbing,
drinking and phony people. I'm ashamed and want out of the sisterhood but don't
know how to get out.
Pam Spartanburg, SC

Dear Pam:
You would be surprised at the number of girls who pledge sororities just for popular-
ity. Then over half of them don't finish college and if they do, they don't do anything
in the community or maintain their membership or represent the sorority. Revoke
your membership by writing a letter to the sorority's headquarters, cancel your dues
and burn your Greek stuff. Next time, stay in the right group-Me Phi Me.
Write Ask Deanna! Email: askdeannal@yahoo.com or Deanna M, 264 S. La Cienega,
Suite 1283, Beverly Hills, CA 90211. Visit her Web site at www.askdeanna.com.

Ese avi


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Cats may not have nine lives, but they can sure produce nine lives of their own -
plus thousands more.
Consider this: One pair of unsterilized cats, together with their offspring, can
result in 420,000 kittens in seven years. One pair of unsterilized dogs, with their off-
spring, can result in 4,372 puppies, also in seven years.
Statistics also show that only 1 out of 9 of these animals ever find a good home,
leaving the rest to suffer abandonment and/or euthanasia.
Some pet owners may wince at the thought of having 01' Blue "fixed," but there
are many more pros than cons when it comes to spaying or neutering your pet.
Whether your pets are kept indoors or out, there are many health and behavioral
benefits associated with spaying and neutering, says Dr. Lynn Ruoff, a veterinarian
in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M
University.
"Spaying and neutering pets results in fewer reproductive health problems and
makes the treatment of epilepsy, diabetes and other diseases much easier," notes
Ruoff.
"Spayed pets will not develop pyometra, or pus in the uterus, and they have a
greatly decreased risk of developing mammary gland tumors. Neutered pets are less
likely to develop testicular tumors or an enlarged prostate."
Another big benefit can be peace of mind a spayed or neutered pet is less likely
to leave the yard in search of other animals.
"In both male and female pets, sterilization makes them far less likely to roam,
which tends to safeguard against injuries due to fights and accidents," adds Ruoff.
"Spayed or neutered dogs are often less aggressive with both people and other dogs."
"Neutered males are less likely to mark their territory by urinating in the house
and will not be inclined to wander off in search of a mate. Spayed females are also
less likely to wander and will not attract males who will fight over a female in heat."
In addition, hunting, guarding and other skills are actually improved in spayed
and neutered dogs because they are not distracted by hormonal urges, Ruoff believes.
Pet owners concerned with the pain and cost of the actual procedure can be put at
ease by talking with their veterinarian.
Ruoff explains that spaying and neutering, while considered major surgery and
performed under general anesthesia, involve little risk in: young, healthy pets. In the
past, it was believed that puppies and kittens should not be spayed or neutered until
they were at least six months of age. However, recent studies conclude that sterili-
zation of pets as young as three months of age does not increase the risks associated
with surgery or the number of long-term complications.
Animals also recover from these procedures much faster than you might expect.
Stitches are usually removed 10 days after the surgery, until which time pet owners
are advised to keep the surgical area clean and to keep the animal calm. Most pets
recover within a week or less, often not requiring additional pain medication.
If cost has been keeping you from.having a pet spayed or neutered, it is wise to
consider the expenses associated with the alternative. Without sterilization, you may
find yourself paying to treat pyometra, mammary gland tumors, prostatic enlarge-
ment or injuries caused by automobiles.
"You can't put a price tag on a family pet that becomes lost or killed," adds Ruoff.
Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University.
Stories can be viewed on the World Wide Web at http://rev.tamu.edu/pettalk/






THIS FUTURE




OVERACHIEVER

BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FLORIDA LOTTERY


....A..


*
a


*


- 0 -


O


. FLORIDA STAR


PAG:F R-2


A


APRIL 9 2005


o


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EWC Student Makes



National Dean's List


John C. Jones
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Edward Waters College
student John Cornelius Jones will receive an honorary


12 Students To Be Honored


As 12 Kids Who Care


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-Twelve distinguished high
school students will be honored as outstanding student
volunteers in First Coast News' annual 12 KIDS WHO
CARE program.
The 12 KIDS WHO CARE program, now in its 13th
year, recognizes and salutes young people who at an
early age have learned the value of giving back to their
communities.
First Coast News, together with sponsor partner
Publix Super Markets, will be honoring these extraordi-
nary teens who were nominated from communities in


and around the First Coast.


2005 12 KIDS WHO CARE WINNERS


Katelyn M. Baird
Stephanie Donelan
Joseph Gaskin
Jennifer Goetz


Palatka High School
Stanton College Preparatory
Robert E. Lee High School
Mandarin Senior High
School


(See "12 Kids", B-5A)


P


so


award recognizing him as a member of The National
Dean's List, one of the highest academic honors that
can be bestowed on college students.
Jones, a sophomore majoring in Mathematics, was
nominated by Angela Freeman, EWC's registrar. The
criteria for nomination include students who have
achieved "Dean's List" honors (at least a 3.5 GPA), or
comparable academic achievement, have a "B+"
average or are in the upper 10% of their classes.
Jones is also a runner-up in the on-campus Claude
Pepper Oratorical Competition where he presented an
eight to ten-minute persuasion speech on the topic of
"Social Security: How do we make it secure now and
for generations to come?" He was judged on struc-
ture and organization, logic and reasoning, research
and documentation, solutions to the social security
problem, and their oratorical skills.
The Gainesville native is also an Amtrak Travel
Scholar, an award that he received as a result of his
academic achievements.
Jones will have his biography published in the
28th Annual Edition of The National Dean's List,
2004/2005, and will be eligible to compete for vari-
ous scholarships. The National Dean's List is the
largest, most prestigious publication in the country
recognizing gifted students selected by their deans,
comparable faculty members or other educational
organizations.




Page B-SA/April 9, 2005


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www.act.org. Have a question you want answered in a
future column? Send a letter to this newspaper or e-mail
Rose at AskRose@act.org.

Because Of Winn-Dixie!


Elementary schools students in the Duval Public Schools will be getting a little
help in reaching their goal of reading 50 books this year, thanks to Winn-Dixie
Stores. The Jacksonville-based grocery chain donated 50 copies of the award-
winning children's book "Because of Winn-Dixie" by Kate DeCamillo to the
school system. Accepting the books from Robin Miller of Winn-Dixie is Burt
Jordan, an instructional specialist with the school system. Besides the books,
Winn-Dixie donated "Because of Winn-Dixie" bookmarks and movie posters from
the film version of the book, which was released in February by Fox
Entertainment.

12 Kids
(Continued From Cover)


Davis Greene
Matthew R. Hernandez
Frankie Nicole Porter
Cole Slate
Erin Thompson
Brandi Nichole Traxler
Jennifer Whitelock
Loren Zachary


Stanton College Preparatory
D. U. Fletcher Senior High School
Camden County High School
Bartram Trail High School
Ridgeview High School
Interlachen High School
Episcopal High School
Bishop Kenny High School


S The 12 KIDS WHO CARE program looks beyond grades, seeking young people
who willingly spend their free time volunteering.
These are kids who truly go above and beyond, well exceeding the minimum num-
ber of volunteer hours set by some schools. 12 KIDS WHO CARE award recipients
have made the joy of helping others a way of life.
Winners and their families will be honored at a special reception on Tuesday, April
S 26th, at the First Coast News studios.
The station invites viewers to tune in for a special look at these extraordinary high
school students when the 12 KIDS WHO CARE television special airs on WTLV on
- Saturday, June 11 at 7:30 pm, and on WJXX on Saturday, June 18 at 7:30 pm.


*




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B-3C/APRIL 9, 2005
Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein b oft
TOP SINGLES
1. "Candy Shop" 50 Cent Featuring Olivia (Shady .
Aftermath) Last Week: No. 1
Since U Been Gone" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 2
3. "Lonely No More" Rob Thomas (Atlantic) No. 3
4. "Somebody" Bonnie McKee (Warner Bros.) No. 4
5. "Hold You Down" Jennifer Lopez Featuring Fat Joe
(Epic) New Entry
6. "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" Green Day (Reprise)
No. 6
7. "What Happens Tomorrow" Duran Duran (Epic) New
Entry
8. "Rich Girl" Gwen Stefani Featuring Eve (Interscope)
No. 5
9fObsession (No Es Amor)" Frankie J Featuring Baby
Bash (Columbia) No. 9
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Nothin' to Lose" Josh Gracin (Lyric Street) Last Week:
No. 1
2. "Baby Girl" Sugarland (Mercury) No. 2
3. "That's What I Love about Sunday" Craig Morgan-
(Broken Bow) No. 3
4. "Anything but Mine" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 5
5. "It's Getting Better All the Time" Brooks & Dunn (Arista
Nashville) No. 9
6. "Bless the Broken Road" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street) No.
4
7. "Gone" Montgomery Gentry (Columbia) No. 8
8.,'Let Them Be Little" Billy Dean (Curb) No. 7
9. "N 1I Give a Damn's Busted" Jo Dee Messina (Curb
Single) New Entry
10. "You're My Better Half" Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 6
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "How Can I Be Falling (D. Aude/D. Tsettos/M.

Rizzo/Presta/Ranpage)" Jennifer Green (TS) Last Week:
2 "Breathe" Erasure (Mute) No. 1
3. "Avalon" Juliet (Astralwerks) No. 3
4. '"Home" Suzanne Palmer (Star 69) No. 4
5. "Love Is a Drug (Creamer & K Remixes)" Rosko (NY
Love/Import) No. 5
6. "What Happens Tomorrow (Remixes)" Duran Duran
(Epic) New Entry
7. "I Am (the Rising) (J. Rocks/Friscia & **s ** r II 6WaodS
L-amboy/Guiseppe D/J. Barringer Mixes)" Taborah (Catz) w .a m o od o I e W* SA s0
No. 7 _
8. "Show It" Friburn & Urik (Tommy Boy Silver Label)
No. 6 "m-
9. "Waiting for Algeria" Tony Moran & Ric Sena Present
Zhana Saunders (Tommy Boy Silver Label) No. 20 0
10. "Maybe (Illicit/Bini & Martini/Almighty Mixes)"
Emma (19) Nb. 14



"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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'APIL Y 7 .IUUJ


JAIL OR BAIL


EDITOR 'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
BURGLARY TO A DWELLING-On Monday, April 4, 2005
at 12:08 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 301 Caravan
Circle Apartments, in reference to a burglary to a residence.
Upon arrival, police officer met with the victim who advised
that at approximately 2:45 a.m. he heard someone attempt to
open the front door of his apartment. The victim also told the
police officer that the suspect then forced his apartment door
open, but as soon as the suspect saw the victim, the suspect
fled the scene. The victim further advised the suspect did not
take any items from his apartment.
Police officer investigation revealed the victim only had the
chain lock on the front door of his apartment. It appeared
someone had forced the front door open, damaging the door-
jamb, and the chain lock. The victim told the police officer that
he did not know the suspect. However the victim advised he
did observe the suspect wore dark clothing, and was bald
except for a small braid on the top of his head. The victim was
given a victim services card. Case suspended.
BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-
On Monday, April 4, 2005 at 2:14 p.m. a police officer was
dispatched to 1111 Woodruff Ave., to investigate a battery to
a girlfriend by her boyfriend. Upon arrival, police officer met
with the victim, and the witness (8-year-old granddaughter of
the victim). The suspect had left the scene prior to police offi-
cer's arrival. The suspect and victim have been involved as
boyfriend andgirlfriend for the past eight months. They do not
live together-nor have children together. The suspect is report-
edly a married man. According to the victim, the suspect last
battered her a month ago. A report was made, but the victim
did not prosecute. The police officer gave the victim a state
attorney's card with prosecution instructions; The MCI office
will follow up. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts suspended.
THEFT AND UNAUTHORIZED USE OF A VEHICLE-
On Monday, April 4, 2005 at 12:08 p.m. a police officer
responded to the Days Inn at 5649 Cagle Rd. in reference to a
disturbance. Upon arrival, police officer talked to the victim,
who stated an unknown black female had driven off with his
car. Police officer investigation revealed that the victim met
the unknown female at another location, and then they decid-
ed to get a motel room. When the victim woke up the next
morning, his keys and car were gone. The victim told the
police officer that he'had $5,000.00 in his car when the
unknown female suspect drove of with his car, and that he did
not know her name or her address. The police officer asked the
victim why he had $5,000.00 in his car. He explained to the
police officer that because he was having problems witlh his
wife, he left with the money. The victim was given a case
information card. The suspect has not been identified in this
investigation. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts suspended.
CRIMINAL MISCHIEF-On Monday, April 4, 2005 at 11:18
a.m. a police officer was dispatched to 1447 Ionia Street in ref-
erence to a criminal mischief to a vehicle. Upon arrival, police
officer met with the victim who stated that on 4/4/05 around
11:13, a.m. the suspect, who is the mother of his daughter,
arrived at his house and knocked on the door. The victim
advised that he unlocked the door and as he was opening it,
the suspect pushed the door open striking him, on the face. The
victim told the police officer he immediately closed the door
and locked it. At this time, the suspect told him to open the
door or she Was going to "f*** up his car." The victim told his
daughter's mother that he was going to call the police. The
suspect scratched up the victim car, and then got into a white
vehicle and fled the scene. The victim told the police officer
that the suspect was-angry with him because he did not take
she and their daughter to a doctor's appointment that morning.
The police officer did not observed any physical signs of
injuries to the victim's face. However there was scratch marks
going down the side of the victim's SUV. The victim was given
a case information card and a state attorney's card, and
explained how to file charges. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts
suspended.
GRAND THEFT AUTO-On Monday, April 4, 2005 at 8:00
a.m. a police officer was dispatched to .11710 Central Parkway
(Johnstone Supply) in reference to an auto theft. Upon arrival,
police officer met with the victim who advised his 1973 Chevy
C-10 has been at the business parking lot for the last 2 years.
The victim told the police officer the vehicle was last seen on
4/2/05 at 4:00 p.m. On 4/4/05 at 8:00 a.m. the victim's vehi-
cle was discovered missing. The victim advised the vehicle
did not have a battery or carburetor. The victim found broken
glass on the ground where his vehicle had been parked. The
victim advised no one had permission to take the vehicle. A
towing and storage check produced negative results. There
were no witnesses to the incident. The victim was given an
auto theft affidavit and a case information card. Case not
cleared. Patrol efforts suspended.
THREATENING PHONE CALLS-On Monday, April 4,
2005 at 7:29 a.m. a police officer was dispatched to 10173
Glennfield Ct. to a threatening phone call report. Upon arrival,
police officer met with the victim, who stated that the suspect
called him four times threatening to "kill him." The suspect
was contacted by the police officer who stated that he never
called and threaten him. He stated that he did call him but it
was only a return call that the victim had made to him. The
suspect told the police officer that the victim has come to his
residence in the past and broke out the windows of his wife's
vehicle, while the vehicle was parked in his driveway, and has
made threats that he was going to burn down the suspect's


house and "kill everyone in it." The victim's wife is now liv-
ing with the suspect. The suspect declined to provide any fur-
ther information about himself. He did advise that the phone
number that the police officer called him on was his'. He went
on to advise that he did live in Jacksonville but would not
pro\ ide an address because he was afraid that the victim
would obtain it and bur his house down because he is upset
that his wife left him (victim) to live with him (suspect). Case
suspended since unable to identify suspect.
*f"I .! :i


Your Weekly Horoscope

(APRIL 8, 2005-APRIL 15, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) Try
not to take your
work problems
home with you.
Family members won't
appreciate this. Later in the
week, social life is favored.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) You feel a need
for some private
time this week.
: E However, this
won't be easy to
attain. Be patient, and you'll
find all the time you need by
week's end.
GEMINI (May 21, to
June 20) Tune in
to your own
instincts .
Sometimes, it's
best to trust intuition. Over
the weekend, a friend con-
tacts you out of the blue.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) A new money-
making venture
captures your
attention .
Investigate this
thoroughly. It could work
out quite well for you in the
long run.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22)
Curb a tendency
to be impatient
this week. While
you want to get things done,
it's not wise to do so too
quickly. If you do, you could
end up making sloppy mis-
takes.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) --
If you're not r
pleased with the -
way your home
looks, make plans to do
some decorating. Be sure,
though, to get the input of
family members. Together,
you come up with a mutual-
ly acceptable new look.
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) You're
quite spontaneous this week.


This is especially
true on the social
scene. However,
it's not a good

idea to use the same
approach at work.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21)
You're full of new ideas and
Plans. However,
S don't let your
S enthusiasm cause
you to proceed
too quickly. Work out the
details first.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December 21)
You're captivated
at the novel idea
proposed by a
friend. It's important,
though, that everyone under-
stands what's required. If
not, a minor disagreement
could occur.
CAPRICORN
(December 22
S to January 19)
It's best to keep
everything in
moderation this week.
Whether this involves your
diet or your finances, it's a
successful strategy. This
weekend, take advantage of
your creativity.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18)
You receive inspi-
ration from some
surprising sources
this week. Someone you'd
underestimated particularly
impresses you. Later,
behind-the-scenes maneu-
vering at work is in yoir
favor.
P I S C E S
(February 19 to March
20) You don't make as much
progress as you'd
like on the work
S front. You're,
blessed, though,
with a spate of new ideas.
Once you begin to imple-


Graduate Student Accused

Of Lewd Behavior

PRINCETON, N.J. A Princeton University graduate
student has been barred from campus after he was accused of
surreptitiously cutting locks of hair from women on campus
and pouring bodily fluids into women's drinks.
Officials say the student, Michael J. Lohman, 28, target-
ed Asian women in a spree that may have lasted from 2002
until Lohman was arrested March 30.
A woman reported last month that a man cut off a lock of
her hair on a campus shuttle bus, triggering an investigation.
University spokeswoman Lauren Robinson-Brown said
Wednesday that Lohman admitted to campus security he cut
women's hair and poured semen and urine into women's
drinks when they were not looking.
Lohman, who was working toward a doctorate in math,.
was charged by local police with two counts each of reck-'
lessly endangering another person and tampering with a food
product, one count of theft and one of harassment.
Attempts to reach Lohman on Wednesday were unsuc-
cessful. Since his arrest, he has been in a mental health ward
of a hospital in Trenton, The Times of Trenton reported in
Wednesday's editions.
University President Shirley M. Tilghman announced
Tuesday that Lohman was barred from campus.

Suspect's Phone Tips Police To Burglary

ROGERSVILLE, Tenn. Hawkins County authorities
were waiting for two would-be burglars, after a cell phone in
a suspect's pocket accidentally dialed 911 and dispatchers
overheard them plotting the crime.
Authorities arrested Jason Anthony Arnold, 29, and
James Keith Benton, 38, both of Church Hill, and charged
them with burglary and theft over $500., Officers said they
tried to steal a refrigerator from a mobile home dealership.
The Hawkins County Sheriffs Department was tipped off
early Friday morning when dispatchers overheard a 40-
minute conversation from a cell phone about plans to rob the
dealership. Deputies thought the 911 call could have been
a prank because it was April Fool's Day, but the scene
unfolded exactly the way the conversation had described.
The suspects went into one of the mobile homes, carried out
a refrigerator and were surprised when police came out from
hiding and confronted them.


ment them, you're unstop-
pable.

CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Richie
Sambora, April 11; David
Letterman, April 12; Paul
Sorvino, April 13; Sarah
Michelle Gellar, April 14;
Emma Thompson, April 15;


Lukas Haas, April 16;
Boomer Esiason, April 17..





(c) 2005 DBR Media.
Inc.


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FLORIDA LOTTO. WINNING NUMBERS
S12, 13-16-28-30-44 $aturday, April 2 ONE WINNERi!


PAGE B-5


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PAGE- B- FLRD STA API O


Top 10 World Tennis Champions



Venus And Serena Williams Return


LEFT FRAME: Venus Williams poses with Florida Star Socially Speaking Columnis Betty Asque Davis at the
Bausch & Lomb Championships at the Amelia Island Plantation in Amelia Ilsand, Fla. RIGHT FRAME: Venus signs


autographs during a break.
By Marsha Dean Phelts


The fashionable racket swinging Williams sisters, Venus
and Serena have returned to the First Coast to play ini the
Women's Tournament Association's world premier event.
Outside of California the Williams sisters find their largest
showing of Black fans at the Bausch & Lomb
Championships on Amelia Island. Venus so enamoured with
the First Coast stated ina press conference that she and her
sister need to look for real estate in this area.
Much to my delight and quite by chance I was invited to
sit with the Williams family and share lunch with their five-
member entourage which included their father Richard,
Serena and her Yorkshire Terrier, Jackie. So close between
Mr. Williams and Serena I sat that I didn't have the space to
take pictures of them.
From their front row stadium box seats Richard and
Serena cheered and echoed encouraging pointers to Venus as
she sent balls across the net at speeds over 100 mph on the
Stadium Court.
On Tuesday, Venus who hasn't played here since she won


the 2002 Bausch & Lomb Championship, handily defeating
her Slovakian opponent, Martina Sucha, in a 6-1 match.
This marks the first time that both sisters have played the
Bausch & Lomb in the same tournament. The Williams sis-
ters are on a record making WTA winning spree and they like
the clay courts at Amelia.
Venus is the reigning champion of the 2005 Nasdaq-10.0
Open. Serena won the title last year. Tickets for the remain-
ing matches have reached a sellout. Ticket holders are cau-
tioned to arrive early and dress appropriately for the weath-
er.
Don't leave home without sunglasses or hats. Come cam-
era ready to snap pictures of the champions on the courts and
of world known luminaries in the stands. Bring plenty of
film because photo opportunities are bountiful. Autograph
seekers can meet their favorite players in the Racquet Park at
the announced times.
Venus Williams remarked, "This is the nicest time ever,
we (Serena) should invest in a place here."
Thought for the Day. "If you are lucky enough to live on
the First Coast, you are lucky."


FAMU's Nakia Daniels Finishes Second In 4x400 At USF Meet


Bethune-Cookman's 2005 Football
Schedule Includes Game Against
South Carolina State In Jax

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla- Bethune-Cookman Athletic
Director Lynn Thompson has released
an 11-game football schedule which
includes the earliest Homecoming in
school history, a different date for the
Gateway Classic and four Classic
games.
The Wildcats 2005 Homecoming is
slated for October 1 against Morgan
State University. Last season B-CC
had a crowd 13,481 in attendance for
Lynn Thompson the Centennial Homecoming game.
"With the new MEAC schedule
coming out mandating that we return back to North Carolina
A&T forothe second consecutive year, this necessitated a.
change in our Homecoming day," said B-CC Athletic
Director Lynn Thompson. "The game is traditionally played
the last weekend in October, this season it will be played the
first weekend in October."
B-CC will play in two consecutive Classics, the first
against South Carolina State in the 52nd Gateway Classic at
Alltel Stadium in Jacksonville on September 17, then to
Norfolk, Virginia to take on Norfolk State in the Fish Bowl
Classic.
Other B-CC Classic games include Savannah State
University in the CSRA Classic on October 15th in Augusta,
Ga. and the XXIV Walt Disney World Florida Classic
against Florida A&M on November 19.
"Classis games are important because they provide a very
special atmosphere," Thompson said. "It affords our fans an
opportunity to travel and become a part of our program as we
take our show on the road."
The Wildcats will kick off the season with two non-con-
ference games in Daytona Beach against CIAA opponent
Elizabeth City State University on September 3 and rematch
of last years game with SWAC conference contender
University of Arkansas Pine Bluff on September 10.
Rounding out the conference schedule, B-CC will travel
to North Carolina A&T on October 29 and Howard
University on November 12. The Wildcats will play their last
home game of the season on November 5 against Hampton.
The Wildcats went 6-4 last season under head coach
Alvin Wyatt and defeated Florida A&M for the third straight
season. Season tickets are scheduled to go on sale May 1.


TAMPA, Fla. The
Florida A&M Men's and
Women's Track teams
turned in
solid per-
for-
mances
Friday
a n d
Saturday,
combin-
ing for
37 Top
Nakia Daniels 10 finish.
10 finish-
es in the USF Track and
Field Invitational, hosted by
the University of South

Teacher Is First
Woman To Die
In Sanctioned
Boxing Bout

DENVER A college
teacher who won a regional
boxing title three years ago
died from a head injury she
sustained in a Golden
Gloves competition, appar-
ently becoming the first
woman to die in a sanc-
tioned bout.
Becky Zerlentes, 34, of
Fort Collins, died Sunday,
Howard Daniel of the
Denver County coroner's
office said Monday. The pre-
liminary cause of death was
blunt force trauma to the
head causing internal bleed-
ing, but results from an
autopsy were not immedi-
ately available.
Zerlentes is believed to
be the first female amateur
boxer to die in a sanctioned.
match,.USA Boxing spokes-
woman Julie Goldsticker
said.
Zerlentes was hit by a
punch from Heather
Schmitz, and despite wear-
ing protective headgear fell
unconscious during the third
round of a bout late
Saturday, Goldsticker said.


Florida.
The Lady Rattler crew
compiled 13 Top 10 finishes
in Tampa, headed by Nakia
Daniels in the 400 meters
(2nd 56.45); Nadia
Covington in the long jump
(6th 5.85 meters); Lindsay


Thomas in the 1500 meter.
invitational (6th 4:49.43);
Shantrice Green in the 100
meter invitational (6th -
14.33) and the 400 meter
hurdles (6th -1:04.38), plus
Ashley Gillis in the open
100 meter dash (9th 12.00).


In relay action, the
FAMU 4x100 "A" Team ran
fifth (5th 47.11), while in
the 4x400 finals, the "A"
Team ran third (3rd -
3:48.82) and the "B" Team
finished 10th (10th -
4:01.14).


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'~ ~


APRIL 9, 20051:,:








PAGE B46


FLORIDAA STAR








nA ie D '7


.--------------


EMPLOYMENT
FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at
FCCJ. E.O.E.

Drivers Dedicated Shorthaul
HOME EVERY NIGHT AND
WEEKEND GUARANTEED
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GREATER -M ICAW


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Ranges
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Whirlpool
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Rooms for Rent
Adults preferred
Nice clean quiet area
Call: Mike or Cynt
722-3830
LEGAL NOTICE
In RE: Joyce Virginis, deceased
CASE NO: 16-2005-CP-000377
A hearing will be held on April 22,
2005, 11:00 am in Room 101,
Duval County Courthouse, 330 E.
Bay St.
Any interested party must file a "
petition within 3 months after Date
of Service or a copy of the notice
on the objecting person or those
objections are forever barred.


I SERVICES

Aluminu Awni


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CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED F eBn
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764-9852


Want to purchase minerals and
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Denver, CO 80201





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5846 Mt. Carmel Terrace, Jacksonville, FL 32216
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"HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS"
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*Laundry facilities available
*24 hour security
"Complete actvltles program ru EAL HI
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Announcemenls

I Stre.s Ruinminu ,,ur Life? Read DIANETICS by Ron
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Any employment that would be
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or apply online at:
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EOE M/F


IMPACT


WCGL AM


1360


THE FLORIDA

STAR

REAL TALK

REAL TOPICS

RADIO SHOW

SATURDAYS @ 6:30

P.M.



Issues That Address

Concerns Of The

African American

Community In

Jacksonville AndThe

World


NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS PT/FT No Exp
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Legal Services

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INVITATION FOR BIDS
PAVEMENT REPAIR
Talleyrand Marine Terminal
JAXPORT Project
No. T2005-09
JAXPORT Contract
No. C-1138 .
Sealed bids will be received by the
Jacksonville Port Authority until
2:00 PM, local time, May 17, 2005,
at which time they shall be opened
in the Public Meeting Room of the
Port Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville,
Florida, for Pavement Repair.
All bids must be submitted in
accordance with specifications and
drawings for Project No. C-1138,
which may be examined in, or
obtained from the Engineering &
Construction Department of the
Jacksonville Port Authority, located
on the second floor of the Port
Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville,
Florida 32206. (Please telephone
904/630-3062 for information.)
PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL BE
HELD ON May 2. 2005. AT 10:00
AM,' IN- THE PUBLIC MEETING
ROOM, FIRST FLOOR OF THE
PORT CENTRAL OFFICE BUILD-
ING LOCATED AT ADDRESS
STATED ABOVE. ATTENDANCE
BY A REPRESENTATIVE OF
EACH PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS
REQUIRED. A BID WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER
WHO IS NOT REPRESENTED AT
SUCH CONFERENCE.
Bid and contract bonding are
required.
There are 20% mandatory
MBE/WBE Participation Goals
established for this project
.Randy B. Murray, PE.
Director, Engineering & Construction
Jacksonville Port Authority


SERFNITMOI'NT INGOI FHONIfESITFT i .lN,
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FCAN

Week of April 4, 2005


FTORnIDA STAR


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
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FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!

*


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March April 2005


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spoi oredby wIll Washington Mutual


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Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 1.9 Million


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Regional placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Circulation: 1.9 Million


.IMPACT

WCGL

AM 1360











THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAY @ 6.30 P.M.


MORE THAN 50 WAYS TO PREVENT DIABETES


#15 Eat a small umeal le

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- -- -- -- -


-------------------


I


r


APRIL 9, 2005

r -- COUPON -
1CARPET CLEANING $995 |

I "We Move Furniture 4 U" each room, 2 rooms or more I
please

WHOLE HOUSE SPECIAL $79.95
IAny 5 rooms & hall including I
SScotchgard & Deodorant


| SOFA & CHAIR SPECIAL $79.95






FLORIDA STAR


( PREMIER
1 OF JACKS


P4 GE B-8


WiC. IV r --F c.y
%^ r.>> l i'- .1 ," H


.d ,c -v~.i.io trt~''^


PI
FA
MF
F!


APRIL 9, 2005


FOODS am
ONVILLE
124 wi cash
est [ eaver- Street Governmen: Clhecks'
H: (904) 354-0665 WF ACCEPT
DEBIT CARDS |
iX (904) 354 4543 EIT CARDS A
STORE HOURS- MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS.
N-THURS 7AM-PM FOOD STAMP & EBT CARDS
N-THURS 7AM-PM BEAVER STREET STORE
Ri-SAT 7AM-8:30PM CASHES ONLY
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM PAYROLL CHECKS
JI


ShurFine v .9
Pure .ranulatecit am
Sugar HERE'S OUR PITCH...TO CELEBRATE THE OPENING OF
sol 5-i'' "-i BASEBALL SEASON, WE'VE COME UP WITH SOME GREAT
SShurFiine DEALS ACROSS THE BOARD SO YOU CAN SCORE SOME
I"'' J FABULOUS SAVINGS!
-M I.,iqlrid
"Bleach"--
128-OZ. (RFO. SCENT-

IUSDA CPAINFEDp SCEBEF C Visk
rip Roast Ultra LiAquid
Detergent
0oo-0OZ -ASSORTED VARIlTieS '




S Leg QIBA crsL


r40LBs BOX...1 9-. FAMILY PACK OR SERVICE CASE
S 1SLB. BO SS9.SO OR LB. EBHSOX" 9


GREAT FOR SALADS OR DIPS FV o Iu aS1-
Fresh elo S u h .l -
Crisp Celery
""-H I I ,'. ,-,' ..-, ..: ..: : .. ...ee ,.. ;. ,,:., :... ,
EAyCH" ;. ;.- ""
~I ~LEIBOX..S7 9tFAMLY p~K R &nrvlts a-d


Im~ialm-:AIf 6mi j ili EI III


FAMILY PACK
First Cut 7
FAMILY PACK Pork Chops .. ... ... LB
S LEAN BONE-IN FAMILY PACK
oBeef i Market Fresh 1 57
Short Ris round Beef ... LB.
STI~f LIMITT 2. PLEASE)
S"; Sauer's Mustard


FRESH '-' ASHINGTON GOLDEN OR
Pole Beans or R d Delicious
String Beans NR... Apples

LB. 9 ;A 3LB. BAG


2 LI'ER BTLS.
ASSORTED VAREIETIS
Coca Cola
S5/ O0



MILLER
!B-' ._


High life I fc
Beer.. .... 4PK/16-OZ. CANS
NATURAL OR
Natural Light 8 99
Beer .. .. 2PK .,1 -OZ. CANS
GREAT FOR SNACKS
Lay's 5/ ,OO
Potato Chips ..... BAG


135th Annual Grand Communication


Of The MWUGL, F.& A.M., PHA

Florida and Belize, Central America Jurisdiction, Inc.

:- April 15-April 18, 2005

In Jacksonville, Florida


All Business Sessions (closed to the public) At Hyatt Regency Hotel


State Banquet-Saturday, April 16, 7:00 8:15 p.m.
Hyatt Regency Hotel (formerly Adam's Mark Hotel)
Admission $35
(Proceeds To Benefit $10,000 Scholarship Fundy

Comedy Show-8:30 pm, at Hyatt Regency Hotel
Admission $20 (*Discount for groups of 10 or more)
Tickets On Sale At
Big Al's Records & Tapes, 5258 Norwood Avenue
Suite 14 (Gateway Mall)
Urban Flava, 9440 Arlington Expressway
(Adjacent to Regency Mall)
TicketAnnex.com
Featuring Gospel Comedians:


Dr. Michael R. Moore 33",
Grand Master


Grand East
(Historic Masonic Temple) 410 Broad St.
(Being Renovated)

Annual Memorial Service
Sunday, April 17, 2005-7:00 p.m.
Second Missionary Baptist Church
954 Kings Rd.\Rev. Dr. Odell Smith, Jr., Pastor
Open to the public
(*Processional & Seating at 6:30 p.m.)


fabulous
FLORIDA. ,
a Of
Southern charm.


Ced Delaney-
(*Worked with Ricky Smiley)


Rod'Z -


~ **. *. ''
*i *': .lI;~.i ~~$. .


-'ftORIDA~LS1AR


*Real Topics *Real issues
Saturday 6:30-7:00 p.m.
WCGL.1360-AM


II r


3I 18
I':dt cvod Ave n .l1 c
PH: (904) 764-2476
FAX: (904) 764-0298
STORE HOURS:
MON-THURS 7AM-OPM
FRI-SAT 7AM-8.50PM
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM


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