<%BANNER%>

Florida star

HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
March 26, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00012

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
March 26, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00012

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 3
        page A 4
Full Text





-lid





o Sme b cr ie ad0t tid ab e raisedagi."


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


THE


SFLORIDAX


thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


MARH I6,205 *-APILI 205 OL 05 N 4 0SET


Who's


Taking Our Children?


JACKSONVILLE,
Fla.-- -- Lindsey
Singleton, 14, left for
school on March 16 at
8:00 a.m. Her mother's
job at New Stay In Touch
With God Deliverance
Ministries requires her to
leave for work before
Lindsey returns from
school but thel9-year-old
Goddaughter, Alexis
Gooden is .there for
Lindsey's return. What is
confusing is shortly
before the mother
returned home, her Alexis Gooden (red shirt)
daughter called her from shares a playful moment
the residence yet, when with Lindsey Singleton.
she arrived, both Lindsey and Alexis were not there.
About 3:00 a.m., a male called the residence and
stated, "You did get home okay." The male told the
mother that at about 12:30 a.m., he saw Gooden and


--


Demichael Fuller


Singleton at Lane Avenue
and Normandy Boulevard.
When the mother called the
school the following day,
no one had seen Lindsey,
Lindsey Singleton including her friends.
.Ms. Toney (mother) is
not sure if the girls are together or what has happened
to them and is pleading and praying for assistance in
getting them located.
Mrs. Sherril Griffin and Mr. Willie Griffin are also
looking and praying for their son, 16-year-old


Demichael Fuller. Mrs. Griffin last saw her son on last
Thursday, leaving the house to walk to the school bus
stop at the intersection of Laurina Street and Crane
Avenue.
Demichael suffers from a schizophrenic disorder
and was on medication until January. Because he
appeared to be doing well, she allowed him to stop tak-
ing the medication since he had not suffered an episode
since November 2004.
When the father arrived home, the deadbolt on the
door was not locked so he assumed his son was at
home. Upon checking, he discovered he was not and
contacted the bus company.
He later learned that his son had not attended class-
es that day. The Griffins need your support and assis-
tance in helping to locate their son.
These are circumstances that make parents nervous
and with the many changes and incidents occurring
worldwide, more prayers are been sent up.
We must again activate the policies of "the village"
said one mother. "Life was not as strained then." If
you see or know where these children are, please call
904-630-0500. Their parents are waiting.


Councilwoman Speaks Out


About Toxic Poison


JACKSONVILLE, FL
-Councilwoman Glorious
Johnson, despite her fam-
ily lost in an accident at
295 and 103rd Sunday,
said that her heart is heav-
ier about the potential
hazards that many of the
children in our communi-
ty are being exposed to.
She said the dates
offered for testing is not
acceptable. She is there-
fore proposing that the
Head Start program locat-


ed on potentially haz-
ardous land be moved
immediately to the "Old
Stanton High School."
She said the program
is already funded by out-
side sources so there
would be no extra expen-
diture for their operation
at that site. Ms. Johnson
called upon JEA to pro-
vide necessary utilities to
the program at no charge
until the city is able to
identify any and all


potential hazards at the
Forrest site and correct
such problems as they are
revealed.
Ms. Johnson added
that the old school facili-
ty was suitable during
Super bowl for the home-
less to avoid them wan-
dering the community so
it stands to reason that
there should be no prob-
lem doing the same thing
to make the children'of
Jacksonville safe.


Business Leaders And Educator

Agrees With Bill Gates


According to billion-
aire Bill
Gates,
our pub-
1 i c
schools
are obso-
lete and
outdated.
Roosevelt T h e
Rody
Rody proof is
in the results," said
Roosevelt Roby, an origi-
nal developer of internet
training during his visit to
Florida where he met key


for the contest is May 1, 2005. There is a $25 fee to
enter the contest.

Beauty Queen Not Guilty


Sharron Nicole
Redmond
months after she was


Sharron Nicole Redmond
Admitted she shot hex
Boyfriend but the jury found
- her not guilty of murder. She
said the bullet that killed her
boyfriend outside of the
home of another female he
was dating, hit him at no
fault of hers. The jury agreed
that the bullet ricocheted
before killing her boyfriend.
Miss Redmond was found
not guilty of all three counts.
The incident occurred four
crowned Miss Savannah.


Roaches Do Hurt

According to researchers at Texas Southwestern
Medical Center in Dallas, cockroaches cause more dis-


educational leaders to dis-
cuss implementing his
web-based course cur-
riculum to help failing
schools.
Rody explained that
the problems could be
solved but, not overnight.


His program emphasizes
economic strategies, com-
munity based develop-
ment and entrepreneur-
ship proving that interna-
tional grade can be taught
in schools.


aIwreYSthnyu d to p lace ,an ad



00.,00 0 0. -


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


News in brief

Report Said Most Black NCAA Basketball
Players Never Graduate From College

According to a report, those fellows on the basket-
ball court that score the big baskets do not score good
grades and few graduate from college. Less than one-
half of the schools in the men's tournament this year
graduated 40 percent or less of their black basketball
student-athletes.
Georgia Tech only graduates nine percent of their
black basketball players, according to the report.

Essay Contest "Do Music Videos
Negatively Portray Black Women?"

A Savannah, Ga company is sponsoring an essay
contest "Do Videos Portray Black Women
Negatively?" The owner and founder, Nadra Enzi said,
"I selected this topic because misleading images of
Black people have long been used to program society
with the wrong ideas." He said, "Black safety depends
upon Black people analyzing our culture to see whether
part of it helps or hinders us as a whole." The deadline


tress to asthma than dust mites or pets. The report said
that allergic reactions to cockroaches is more severe
because the allergens come from roach saliva, fecal
material, secretions, cast skins, and dead bodies .are
more harmful than from flowers and dust. They sug-
gest regular cleaning and daily trash/waste disposal.

AIDS May Kill 89 Million Africans by 2025

The United Nations reported that more than 80 mil-
lion Africans might die from AIDS by 2025 if more is
not done soon to fight the disease.
UNAIDS estimate that nearly $200 billion is need-
ed to save 16 million people from death and 43 million
from becoming infected. However, donors are far from
making such an amount in pledges.












Former South African President Nelson Mandela,
center, Will Smith, right, and an HIV sites positive
woman Gertrude Maqanda, left, wave to the crowd
during the Nelson Mandela Foundation's '46664'
HIV/AIDS beneficiary concert in George, South
Africa, Saturday, March 19, 2005. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)


I
N


'"
'~~*








PA jiG A-2 II U ".J


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, NOREEN ERCOLINO, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DESIREE SANDLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON,
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com



SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame

~ p


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHI/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


Two separate news items
reported over the last few
months illustrate as much as
anything can the present sta-
tus of America's and the
world's fight against the
scourge of HIV/AIDS.
On the one hand, there
was the good news. In late
January public health offi-
cials said that AIDS among
infants in the U.S., once the
saddest tragedy of a disease
that- brings enormous suffer-
ing, is close to being elimi-
nated.
In 1990, during the peak
period of HIV infections in
America, nearly 2,000 new-
borns were infected with
HIV, the virus that causes
AIDS. Now, that number has
fallen to about 200, thanks to
the mid-decade development
of a drug called AZT and an
aggressive education cam-
paign aimed at pregnant
women in low-income, high-
risk communities.
On the other hand, how-
ever, it was reported that New
York City's health department
changed the name of one of
its, bureaus. What had been
the department's Bureau of
HIV/AIDS Services is now
called the Bureau of
HIV/AIDS Prevention and
Control.
In that seemingly minor
bureaucratic change was,
health officials said, the
sounding of an alarm, reflect-
ing a sudden spike of concern


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


To Be Equal
By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League
Our False Sense of Complacency about AIDS


- `m


LM



(1)


~0

oh L.L

I a






4Ia)


IO~



0 '-



.m-rcm


E
1:0

I10


bhm

phOdb


4



S

-
~ -
S -


--


- .


- *
*


oNN'

14


0*4E


Qa)
*


W-d


S
S
S


U C
6?9'm


Dr. Thomas R. Frieden,
New York City's health com-
missioner, worries this com-
bination may have led many,
including some who are most
at risk for being infected with
HIV, to think of the disease
as merely another chronic
health condition, which can
be held at bay with medical
treatment.
His concern was second-
ed in more graphic terms by
an HIV-positive woman a
New York Times reporter
interviewed last month at a
city community-based treat-
ment center.
"The medications gave
people a false sense of secu-
rity," she said. "It gave them
a sense that they could-do
things that before were a
death sentence." HIV/AIDS
is not "just" another chronic
health problem. It is a killer
plague. In the rich nations of
Europe and America, the
medical community's mobi-
Slization and our ability to
afford the drugs has shielded
our societies from the killer's
full power. In other parts of
the world, where that is not
so, we can see AIDS' grim
reaping.
In Black Africa more than
2 million people die from
AIDS each year, devastating
families, entire villages, and
threatening to strangle the
economies of numerous
countries as it robs them of
population. At least five mil-
lion of South Africa's 44 mil-
lion citizens have HIV; in
2002 at least 499,000 people
there died from AIDS.
Worldwide, 39 million peo-
ple now have HIV/AIDS,
and, with the disease reach-
ing the epidemic stage in


among many American AIDS
researchers and activists that
the very success of treating
the disease in this country-
stabilizing those who have
HIV/AIDS with carefully-
calibrated regimens of med-
ical drugs and diets-has pro-
duced growing complacency
among some in the larger
population about the dangers
of unprotected sex or the
sharing of drug needles.
What brought that alarm to
the surface was New York
City health officials' early
February announcement of
the discovery of a possibly
new and virulent strain of
HIV in a single patient.
It's still unclear if this one
case does indeed represent a
more ferocious variant of the
virus. Some researchers and
activists have expressed great
skepticism that it does.
Nonetheless, the announce-
ment did get the AIDS com-
munity's attention for two
reasons.
One is that experts have
long believed that it's only a
matter of time before a so-
called HIV super virus-one
impervious to all current
treatments-emerges. The sec-
ond stems from the fact that
the number of Americans
infected with HIV-estimated
at 950,000-is relatively small
compared to the total U.S.
population, and that medical
treatment for the disease here
is the best in the world.


Russia, China and India, the
worldwide annual death total
is expected to reach at least
five million by 2007.
In the United States
HIV/AIDS continues to
become concentrated among
African Americans. Federal
statistics indicate that black
males make up nearly 36 per-
cent of males with
HIV/AIDS, and black
females, reflecting a world-
wide trend of the growing
"feminization" of HIV infec-
tion, comprise 61 percent of
females with it.
What this grim welter of
statistics should underscore
for us all is the world itself
remains at risk of this devas-
tating scourge-for which as
yet there is no cure in sight.
Abroad, the developed
nations need to provide more
funds for research and for
HIV prevention and treat-
ment programs, which have
made a significant difference
in many countries. Here at
home, we need to re-start a
vigorous public HIV/AIDS
education and prevention
program, especially in low-
income African-American
communities.
SWe must make the dan-
gers of HIV/AIDS visible-
and frightening-again,
because the consequences are
frightening. This is no time to
be complacent. Our very
lives are at stake.


-Rm -
- -0om


a. -


0


&A&


4b







40M


*
S


I


*06


* *

*
* *
* *


* 0
* C


4D




ml
am
SNO 4


* *
*
*
*
* *
*
*e*


i -L


- -


MARCH26.2005 nn~


'T f/ n mA STAI


n~hl"U .4 1













EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless'proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
DISORDERLY CONDUCT AND TRESPASSING-
On Monday. March 21, 2005 at 1:35 a.m. an off duty
police officer was working the Bar/Night Club at 1770
St. Johns Bluff Rd. South when he was informed of a
disturbance that the suspect was involved in. The sus-
pect'ordered an alcoholic beverage, and attempted to
walk away without t paying. The suspect was issued a
verbal warning and asked to vacate the business for the
rest of the evening, at the owner's request. The suspect
refused to do so. The police officer also asked the sus-
pect to leave, but he refused. The suspect then stated
"F*** you Niggers. You can't take me to jail." The sus-
pect continued to curse at the police officer, and
attempted to entice others to riot. This gave the police
office no other choice but to arrest the suspect. It should
be noted during contact with the suspect, the police
officer detected a strong odor of alcoholic beverage. In
light of the above he was transported to and placed into
jail for booking. Case cleared by an arrest.
AN ACQUAINTANCE BATTERY TO A FRIEND- On
Monday, March 21, 2005 at 4:52 a.m. A police officer
was dispatched to a battery call at 3326 Plateau Street.
Upon arrival police officer met with the female (victim),
who stated that at 4:00 a.m. she went \\ith the male (sus-
pect), to his house at 1036 East 24th Street. She stated
that after they had sex the suspect began to yell at her.
She stated that he hit her on the mouth and grabbed her
around the neck. The victim told the police officer she
then left his house after the incident and \\ ent home and
called the police. The police officer interviewed the sus-
pect at his home. He stated that they did make love but
he did not touch the victim afterwards. He statedthat the
victim came to his house to smoke crack and she
became angry \ hen he could not find her a lighter and
\went home. There were no \witnesses. The victim wvas
given a state attorney's card. Case not cleared, pending,
state attorney's disposition.
GRAND THEFT AUTO On Monday. Nlarch 21,
2005 at 9:50 a.m., a police officer \\as dispatched to
7146 Luke Street in reference to an auto theft. Upon
arrival, police officer net with the victim. who stated
that he parked his vehicle in front of 7146 Luke Street
around 1:00 a.m. \hen he left the home around 6:00
a.m. he found the listed vehicle gone. The \ ictim further
stated that he left the doors to the vehiclee unlocked. The
\ictim told the police officer that he does not know\ w\ho
might have taken the vehicle. Due to the lack of suspect
information patrol efforts were suspended. Case not
cleared. The \ ictim \\as given an auto theft information
form.
BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND DOMESTIC VIO-
LENCE-On Sunday. NIarch 20, 2005 at 9:30 p.m. the
suspect and the victim at the intersection of Golfair
Bl d. and Walgreen Rd.. flagged down a police officer.
The police officer placed the suspect in the backseat of
the patrol car, and interviewed the victim. The victimm
stated that she \\as in room #134 at the Ci\ ista TIn at
1055 Golfair Bl\d. with the suspect. The suspect and
victim are boyfriend. girlfriend and have lied together
off and on for four years. The victim and suspect were
arguing and the suspect would not let her leave the
room. The suspect hit the victimm on the left side of her
face \ith his hand. The suspect told the police officer
that the victim cut him with an ulnkno'vn object. The
police officer's investigation detennined that the sus-
pect was the primary aggressor and therefore he was
arrested. Patrol efforts suspended. Case cleared by an
arrest.
THREATENING PHONE CALLS-On Sunday.
March 20. 2005 at 7:00 p.m. a police officer \'as dis-
patched because of a threatening phone call at 2445
Dunn Ave. Upon arrival, police officer met with the \ic-
tim wvho stated that she had been receiving threatening
phone calls. The victim stated that the calls started that
morning at 5:30 a.m. The victim told the police officer,
the suspect said she w\as going to "Come up there and
kick mi a**." The \ ictim said that she does not know
the person calling other then she is a person she has had
problems with in the past. The police officer conducted
a JEA check to obtain information about the suspect.
There \\as no listing for the suspect's telephone number.
The victim \\as unable to provide any other infonnation
about the suspect. The victim w\as given a case infonna-
tion card. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts suspended.
CRIMINAL MISCHIEF- On Mlonda,. March 21.
2005 at 7:00 a.m. a police officer w\as dispatched to
7147 Old Kings Rd. (Williamsburg Apartments) in ref-
erence to a criminal mischief case. Upon arrival, police
officer met w ith the victim. who stated that an unknown


IvMRC1 H0, -vUJ I "fl'A--l' *- -


JAIL OR BAIL


ARIES (March 21 to
April' 19)
(March 21 to
April 19) It's best
to leave certain
home-improvement projects
up to the experts. You'll be
glad you did in the long run.
Later in the week, you find
some time just to relax and
get away from stress.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) A slight
misunderstanding
with your mate
has you a bit out
of sorts as the week begins.
Fortunately, this doesn't last
long. This weekend, travel is
in the offing.
GEMINI (Ma> 21 to
June 20) Right
now, you're not
seeing eye-to-eye
with a business
partner concerning finances.
Perhaps it's time to consult
an expert. A well-meaning
loved one may have some
ideas, but it's best not to
implement them.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 221 Your fine
mind is chal-
lenged this week
by a friend's
philosophical question. This
could have you doing some
research. In the process, you
learn some wonderful new
things.
LEO (July 23 to August
22) You're tempt-
ed to lash out at
someone this
week in a sarcas-
tic manner. Don't give in to
that. Those \ords won't eas-
ily be taken back and forgot-
tell.
VIRGO (August 23 to.
September 22)
You're brimnning
,ith energy and
self-confidence.
this week. As a result, you're


suspect took se eral glass bottles and smashed the win-
dows of the vehicle The unknown suspect then took a
knife and slashed the tires of the vehicle. The unknown
suspect then fled the area in an unknown direction. No
ET was required and a canvass \ as not conducted diue
to the vehicle being in the parking lot away from the
apartment. This case is not cleared. The victim w'as
Given a case infonnation card. Patrol efforts suspended.


Your Weekly Horoscope
(MARCH 26, 2005-APRIL 1, 2005)


at your most productive.
Over the weekend, quiet
times are best.
LIBRA (September 23
to October 22)
You haven't
exactly felt very
social lately. This
week, though, you have an
obligation you can't ignore.
Happily, you'll find you
have a delightful time.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21) Try
to avoid putting
yourself into the
middle of a con-
troversy. Granted,
you've watched this brewing
for a long time. Ultimately,
though, it doesn't concern
you.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December 21)
Nloney is a stick-
ing point this
week. Perhaps
you've been just a tad reck-
less. Address this before it
gets out of hand.
C A PRICE O RN.
(December 22 to
January 19) Not everyone
D understands your
particular brand
of htunor. Thus. a
disagreement is.
possible with a friend. Do
your best to explain what
you really meant.
A Q UA R I U S
(January 20 to
February 18) Domestic
matters are \ our
focus earl. in the
week. Later, it's
back to the grind-
stone. By week's end, you're
satisfied with the outcome.
PISCES (February
19 to March 20) Youhave
some great ideas
at work.
However try not
to push them too


Woman Eating Chili

Bites Into Human Finger

A woman bit into a partial finger served in a bo\l of chili
at a Wends's restaurant, leading authorities to a fingerprint
database Thursday to detennine \\ho lost the digit.
The incident occurred Tuesda. night at a San Jose
Wendy's restaurant and left the customer ill and distraught.
said Jo\ Alexiou, a spokeswoman for the Santa Clara County
Health Department. .
"She \\as so emotionally upset once she found out \hat
it \\as." Alexiou said. "She \\as vomiting." Employees at the
Wendy's store \\ere asked to show\ investigators their fingers
after the Tuesday night incident. All employees' digits \\ere
accounted for, officials said, adding that the \\ ell-cooked fin-
ger may ha e come from a food processing plant that sup-
plies the company.
"All of our emplo ees have ten digits." said Denny
Lynch, a spokesman for Wendy's International Inc.. based in
Dublin. Ohio. He said there have been no reports to the
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (ne\s web
sites) of injuries at any supplier of chili ingredients to
\end\'s. "By law\. ou can't hide that sort of suff,'" Lynch
said. "All of our chili suppliers report no accidents."
Investigators seized the remaining chili and closed the
restaurant for a few\ hours late Tuesda\. Health officials said
the fingertip \\as approximately 1 1/2 inches long. They
believe it belongs to a woman because of the long. mani-
cured nail.


$40,000
R E W A R D






Hiep Nguyen was round inurderea on
June 23. 2004, at 6 30 a in
at his business. Boba Coffee
7999 Philips Highway
A $40.000 reward is being offered to
anyone providing information leading
to the arrest and conviction of persons)
responsible for this crime
Call 630-0500
Jacksonville Sheriff's Office


hard. Eventually, co-work-
ers will come around to your
way of thinking, so be
patient.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Reba
McEntire, March 28;
Jennifer Capriati, March 29;
John Astin, March 30;


Shirley Jones, March 31;
Annette O'Toole, April 1;
Dana Carvey, April 2; Jennie
Garth, April 3.


(c) 2005 DBR Media.
Inc.


Tara's Bail

24/7 Bonds
Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville, Florida 32206

356-TARA
(8272)


REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.
FAMI LY P R A CTICE
3160 Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32209











WE PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR:
OHypertension
ODiabetes
*Elevated Chlesterol
*Obesity and Weight Management
OWomen's Health
9Childcare and Imr uqfziaio s
I I
*Preventive Care ,
*Imrpotence and erectile Dysfunction

Dr. Reginald SyIs..r'e iC'n les T ;-Tonya Hollinger
to tli tice. ;
NO W' N. E T I N G
NEW PATI IE NTS
fIe invite you to ilc( it u as your provider
of choice fi le I4th'care needs.
TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT CALL
76984822
FAX: 904-182-0373
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR HEALTH PLANS
HMIOs, PPOs, NIEDICARE. And MEDICAID
3160 Edgewtood A.4-veinieJacksonille, FL 32209
OFFICE HOURS:
M-F 8A.M. TO 5 P.M. Wed.. 2 P.M. TO 5 P.M.


WANT

CUSTOMERS?

ADVERTISE

IN THE FLORIDA STAR
TO PLACE

YOUR AD

CALL US

r TODAYr

AT 904/766-8834



r' i '* -. .,'






REWARDS UP TO $1,000 FOR YOUR TIPS

REMAIN ANONYMOUS
CALL TOLL FREE

.. v i, .6 .: .i

PAID FORi BS THE FLORIAOA ATTORNEY GENERtL'S OFFICE CRIME riOPPERS RUil FllHD


FLORIDA LOTTO WINNING NUMBERS
13. 30-37-39-42-45 Saturday, March 19 ONE WINNER!!


f~4~ki~B~S~I~


wmuwmwm


IXl~rrT~~~ ?nnr


PAGE A-3


7L nIl dA STAR






MARCH 26. 2005


PAGEA-4 ..


m kLook for our ad"-^
in the Florida Star "
Newspaper on Friday.
Mc,, ot every week. _e


PREMIER FOODS a

OF JACKSONVILLE g


*3118
Edgewood Avenue
PH: (904) 764-2476
FAX: (904) 764-0298
STORE HOURS:
MON-THURS 7AM-8PM
FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM


*1824
West Beaver Street
PH: (904) 354-0665
FAX: (904) 354-4543
STORE HOURS:
MON-THURS 7AM-8PM
FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM


We Cash
Government Checks'
WE ACCEPT:
DEBIT CARDS &
MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS,
FOOD STAMPS & EBT CARDS
,BEAVER STREET STORE
CASHES ONLY
PAYROLL CHECKS


FLORIDA STAR


-- r,-


'' '!''' "~
1~1 5CI i~:i~~cii
I L~
1-I
,-
~ '~