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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
March 19, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00011

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
March 19, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00011

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text









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NoTTticed On TheBig Scree


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i'Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


THE


teFLORIDAr


thefloridastar.com


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


. ==REM-. li S


Joe Keel Lisah Keel


Pot Mailed:


Couple Charged

Drugs The Leading Cause

Of Prison Life For Blacks


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-
- When Joe Keel opened his
door to accept.his regularly
mailed package from the
mail man on Tuesday, he did
not know that this new car-
rier, was a postal inspector
dressed up and playing the
role of a delivery man. The
package contained over
eight pounds of marijuana.
Keel and 'his wife, Lisah
were charged for the
offense, which he admitted
had been going on for many
years.
The couple is in the Clay
County Jail with Joe's bond
at $100,000 and Lisah's at
$50,000.
The package was first
intercepted in Texas where a
drug-sniffing dog "hit" on
the package, bringing the
couple to the attention of the
CCSO Narcotics detectives,
the United States Postal
inspectors and DEA agents.
The. investigation continues
in an effort to identify and
arrest those purchasing the
drugs from the couple.
On Christmas Eve, 2003,
Governor Bush rededicated
the 30-year-old minimum-
security state penitentiary in
Lawtey, Florida, which is


the nation's first entirely
"faith-based" prison, where
every inmate has signed up
for intensive religious
instruction.
Lawtey has the capacity
to house 788 inmates. At
the time of this report, there
were 779 of which 60 were
black inmates from
Jacksonville. Of these 60
Jacksonville inmates, the
oldest one was born on
February 17, 1945 and is
scheduled to be released on
July 20, 2012, and the
youngest was born on
September 23, 1981 and is
due to be released on
August 24, 2007. Of the 60
inmates from Jacksonville,
47 are there on drug
charges. The next highest
offense is theft (37) fol-
lowed by robbery (13) and
weapon offenses (10).
Some have more than one
charge but none are there
for crime against the elder-
ly, fraud/embezzlement,
kidnapping, racketeering
and sex crimes.
Will these men return to
Jacksonville, drug free with
an attitude to help others
avoid making their mis-
takes? That is the goal.


Pallbearers carry the casket of Mack Freeman, Jr. draped with the United States flag following a Homegoing cele-
bration on Tuesday, March 15 at Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist Church. Interment was held at Edgewood Cemetery.

Mack Freeman, Jr.: Father, Friend, Leader


By Ron Williams

JACKSONVILLE--Many local residents remember
Mack Freeman, Jr. as a living legend, one who fought
beyond the barriers of racial injustice and political indiffer-
ence.
On Tuesday, March 15, scores of mourners packed Mt.
Sinai Missionary Baptist Church for a Celebration For The
Life and Legacy of Freeman, the city's first Black television
newsman, who was also an educator and activist. Freeman,
born January 12, 1938 in Mariana, Fla., died on March 8. He
was 67. He was a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity,
NAACP, SCLC, a Florida delegate of the Democratic Party,
Edward Waters College Alumni Association, and the
Coalition for Respect.
"Mack was one of a few persons who didn't try to build
himself up as an individual," said Harold Baker, former
Executive at WFGA/WTLV TV 12 and the man who broke
the color barrier in local television journalism by hiring
Freeman as a reporter in 1968.
In a touching poem printed in the program, Freeman's
life-long companion, Brenda Roundtree, wrote "Your words


fled one may be for the position, the employers may not
wish a person wearing body art to represent the compa-
ny. The career professionals recommend that an appli-
cant should minimize anything that could dampen
his/her chances of getting hired.

Federal,Judge Grants Edward Waters
Ability To Remain Accredited Through Fight

Judge Timothy Corrigan, a federal judge, in
Jacksonville, ruled that Edward Waters College (EWC)
would remain accredited through its pursuit of a law-
suit against the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools. The judge said that after hearing evidence and
arguments from both EWC and SACS, "the college has
shown a substantial likelihood that it will prove at trial,
that the association denied the college due process in
the procedures the association employed to expel the
college from association membership."

IRS Announces the 2005 Dirty Dozen

The Internal Revenue Service unveiled its annual
listing of notorious tax scams, the "Dirty Dozen,"
reminding taxpayers to be wary of schemes that prom-
ises to eliminate taxes or otherwise sound too good to
be true.


of comfort, great sense of humor and awesome smile are
buried deep within my heart.
Freeman's daughter, Monique Freeman Fuentes, remem-
bered her father as a fearless leader, political activist, moti-
vator and advocate for education.
Perhaps the most moving tribute given to Freeman was
from his son Tony Freeman.
"He was more than a Civil Rights activist. He was a sur-
geon...He dissected information. He was a genius. My
father understood that there was a past and a presence. He
understood how power corrupts, and he knew that before
folk became rich and famous, they would lick you and me.
He loved being black," said Tony Freeman.
Left to carry out Freeman's legacy along with Brenda
Roundtree (Jacksonville, FL.), Monique Freeman Fuentes
(David), (Jacksonville, FL.) and Tony Freeman
(Jacksonville, FL) are his children Cassandra Freeman
(New York, N.Y.); Bishop Anthnoy Burgess (New York,
N.Y.); Rev. Leslie Sterling (Boston, MA); Stardom
Grissolm-Harris (Ronnie), (Clarksville, TN); Shannon
Shelton (Boston, MA); Carlos Fields (Stephanie),
(Jacksonville, FL); grandchildren; Aunt Cherry Collier.


The Dirty Dozen

1. Trust Misuse. Transferring Assets into a Trust
2. Frivolous Arguments 16th Amendment never
ratified.
3. Return Preparer Fraud Promises of large
refunds.
4. Credit Counseling Agencies Promise to fix
credit rating but add large fees.
5. "Claim of Right" Doctrine File large deduction
as "a necessary expense."
6. "No Gain" Deduction Attempt to eliminate
adjusted gross income.
7. CorporationSole Phony religious organization,
etc.
8. Identity Theft Perpetrator may say you are
being audited to get information.
9. Abuse of Charitable Organizations and
Deductions Moving assets to a non-profit organiza-
tion.
10. Offshore Transactions Hide income in off-
shore banks or brokerage accounts.
11. Zero Return- File all zeros on returns and write
in "nunc pro tune" Latin for "now for then" on the
return.
12. Employment Tax Evasion Not withholding
federal income or other employment taxes from wages.
Suspect tax fraud? Call 1-800-829-0433.


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News in brief

Visible Tattoos and the Job Hunt -
Robust Job Market Expected for Jacksonville

Manpower Employment Outlook Survey released

Jacksonville area employ-
ers expect tohire at a brisk
pace during the second
Quarter of 2005.
S With the saying, last one
sk hired, first one fired, should
people of color get tattoos
that would show when they job hunt? According to a
Philadelphia Tribune story, employment experts say
that having a visible tattoo could be a hindrance. Of
course, this is contingent upon the type of job you are
seeking or, if you plan a career, body art may not be
acceptable in your chosen career, no matter how quali-


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PAGEA-'Fa UTAP TI2If4t2- 12. 200


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PIJOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DeSHAYLA BRYANT, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
KELVIN PRYER, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA'BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS
PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


5AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


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Each time the health of
Pope John Paul II declines
there is much speculation
over who would be his likely
successor, as head of the
Roman Catholic Church.
Newsweek, in its April 16,
2001 edition, went so far as to
name Cardinal Francis Rinse
of Nigeria as the prelate, who
could potentially step into
this role as leader of more
than 1 billion Christians,
making up 17.4 percent of.the
world's population.
It would be wonderful, if
the Black Cardinal did
become head of the world's
largest body of Christians,
but he would not be the first
Black pope. There have been
three Black popes, including
Victor I, who fixed Sundays
as the date for the celebration
of Easter, according to the
Original Black Heritage
Bible.
What better time than now
during the Lenten Season to
correct some of the major
inaccuracies about Blacks
and their contributions to
Christendom? Historically,
these discrepancies and omis-
sions have produced severe
consequences.
Lies provided ainmuni--
tion for slaveholders to treat
Blacks as .human animals
without souls. Moreover lies
and half-truths have resulted
in too many Blacks thinking
of Christianity as a "White
man's religion," when from
its very conception in the


I


Upper Room in Jerusalem
Africans--as well as women--
participated and continued in
the expansion of the
Christian faith.
Besides Saint Victor I, the
15th Pope, there was
Militiades, the 32nd pope.
During his reign, the Roman
Emperor Constantine was
converted to Christianity in
313 A.D and Militiades
received permission from
Constantine for Christians to
worship free of persecution.
.Saint Gelasius I, the 49th
pope was born in Rome of
African parents and was one'
of the most productive popes
of the fifth century. He settled
the dispute over the use of
wine at Holy Communion,
allowing it as an option. His
writings on papal authority
are still current.
To their credit, Catholics
celebrate many Black saints.
Only the Vatican can declare
someone a saint in the
Catholic Church. Nomination
only begins the process. At
least two certified miracles
must be attributed to the indi-
vidual, except for martyr-
dom. Unfortunately, many
Black denominations are
either unaware of this rich
history or do not deem it wor-
thy of teaching.
As Christians reflect on
the passion and suffering of
Christ this is also a proper
time to horror the many Black
martyrs that died protecting
their Christian beliefs.


Black, Beautiful and Holy

Rev. Barbara Reynolds


It is a sad commentary
that while Blacks are being
taught how fortunate we are
that White missionaries came
to Africa to save us in the
19th century, African
Christians were being torn by
lions and sawed in half for
their devout faith in the first
and second centuries after the
Crucifixion of Christ.
Two African women,
Perpetua and Feliciti, are
among th9se honored as
saints. Despite threats of per-
secution and death, Perpetua
and her maidservant, Feliciti,
refused to worship the
Roman gods. For their
offenses, in 202 A.D. they
were thrown to the lions, but
the lions refused to attack.
Although the crowd chanted
for their release, Roman offi-
cials beheaded them.
Some Africans, such as
Saint Charles Lwanga are
recent martyrs. He was one
of 22 Ugandans burned to
death on June 3, 1886 for his
unwillingness to submit to
sexual acts he deemed
immoral.
As a child I attended an
elementary school in
Columbus, Ohio named after
Saint Cyprian, who was
Bishop of Carthage, a city in
Northern Africa in the early
third century. As primate of
Africa, Cyprian brought his
scholarly talents to his min-
istry, becoming one of the
greatest African 'writers in
church history. His service to
the church brought him in
opposition with the Roman
government, who ordered
him beheaded...
In this Holy season, we
should also celebrate two
Black men, who were, among


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those who played an impor-
tant role in the ministry of
Jesus. Simon, the Canaanite,:
was a Jew by nationality but
Black through genealogy
since he was a direct descen-
dant of Ham, the Black son of
Noah. Simon is also identi-
fled in some biblical versions
by his political group, The
Zealots. Yet other than- in
books, such as The Bladk
Biblical Heritage by John L.
Johnson, Simon's identity as
one of the original 12 disci-
ples and an Apostle is a well-
kept secret.
More well known is
Simon of Cyrene, an African
Jew who helped the Messiah
bear his cross to Mt. Calvary.
SNothing more is said about
him in Scripture except for
the mention of his two sons,
Rufus and Alexander, who
also became leaders in the
Christian church. Even
Hollywood's Passion of
Christ allowed a darker char-
acter to play the role of this
Simdn in a token bow to his-
torical accuracy.
During Christianity's
most holy season what better
time to review the sacred role
blacks have played in the
spread of Christianity. Maybe
this knowledge will help' us
to remember that while it was
once said that Black is beau-
Stiful, long before that it was
holy as well.
Rev. Barbara Reynolds is
the author of four books,
including Out Of Hell &
Living Well: Healing from the
Inside Out: and a graduate of
the Howard University
School of Divinity -and the
United Theological
Seminary, where she earned
a doctorate degree in min-


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O, Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


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"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"


"A Birthday Celebration for Monsieur Blanc/Sefior
Blanco"
It was a lovely Springtime Sunday! A perfect day for
devoted husband, father, foreign languages teacher, school
administrator, community leader and marvelous person
Mr. Walter White's 80th birthday (unbelievably as it may
seem for Mr. White seems ageless).
Friends and family filled to capacity Arlington's Blue
Cypress Club House for a celebratory program with Ms.
Beverly White, niece of the honoree, presiding. Other par-
ticipants on the program were: Ms. Pauline Brooks,
Pastor GR. Gaston, Reverend F.L. Waters, Marvin
White, Martha Brown and Brother Johnny Bartley. The
United Brothers of Christ provided music for the after-
noon. It was very fitting to celebrate Mr. White's birthday
in Arlington, as his family were pioneer landowners in the
Arlington area that provided land for much of Arlington
and Regency development. Mr. White is a trustee of the
family's existing land holdings.
Bor on March 3, 1925 in Jacksonville, Mr. White was
educated in the Duval County Public Schools graduating
from Stanton High School. A FAMU Rattler Mrs. White
received a BA degree there. He received the Master of Arts
degree from New York's Columbia University and studied
further at Hamilton College, Jacksonville University and
the University of North Florida. Mr. White's professional
career as a teacher and principal provided many (including
this writer) their first exposure to the foreign languages. He
is fondly remembered as Monsieur Blanc or Sefior Blanco.
Through the years Mr. White has been honored as a dis-
tinguished alumnus from his alma mater Florida A. & M.
University (FAMU). He is listed on the Hall of Fame and
Wall of Distinction at FAMU and received the FAMU
President's Medallion for Outstanding Service.
Mr. White affiliations include the Boy Scouts, YMCA,
Urban League, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, NAACP life
membership and a lifetime membership with Mt. Zion
United Methodist Church.
At this resplendent birthday celebration, surrounded by
his lovely wife Mrs. Sophie White, son Gualterio White,
daughter-in-law Mrs. Sylvia White, grandchildren Terri
Carter and Thursal White, his sisters, nieces, nephews
and loads of friends, Monsieur Blanc/Sefior Blanco in his
always-humble manner was indeed pleased and above all
grateful for his many blessings.

"Kappa Alpha Psi's 11th Annual Golf Tournament"
It was Founder's Weekend for the members of the local
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. Along with the usual
founder's activities there was the 11th Annual Golf
Tournament chaired by Dr. William Cody. Assisting Dr.
Cody with registration for the event were his lovely
'Silhouette' Mrs. Betty Cody and Silhouette Mrs. Tina
Daniels the charming wife of Kappa Alpha Psi member
Henry Daniels. The Grand Polemarch Of Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity, Samuel Hamilton from Manchester,
Connecticut was on hand for the weekend events with his
most gracious 'Silhouette' Mrs. Sandy Hamilton.
The golf activity at the Mill Cove Golf Club raised
funds that provide funding for the fraternities Scholarship
and Guide-Right Program, a mentoring program for
teenage boys. Participants in the tournament included
Kappa Alpha Psi members, local and out-of-town guests.
Mrs. Esther Wilson of Orlando, FL travels to the First
Coast each year for the Kappa Alpha Psi tournament.
When we spoke with Mrs. Wilson we learned that she is no
novice to the game as she has been golfing for the past thir-
ty-one years.
Among the winners at the tournament were: First Place
Net-Glen Warren, Dr. Herman Miller, Hal Callin and
Dennis Guidi; Second Place Net-Ted Thomas, 'Andy'
Anderson, Tommie Chandler, and Freddie Mitchell;
Third Place Net- Carl Whitney, Curtis Parker and
Morris Rogers; First Place Gross Overall ('Tommie
Chandler's Team'-Charlie Revels, Davis Barclay, Perry
Havener and Bud McCleskey; 2nd Place Gross
Winners- Amr Asker, Mark Hurt, Kamaal Arshad and
Roy Poellnitz; Third Place Gross-Brian McWilliams,
Mike Soha, Sr., Mike Soha, Jr. and Lee Rosenberg.
The fun-filled Saturday afternoon and evening affair
culminated with an auction, raffle and scrumptious dinner.

Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or reach me directly at ima-
jol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-
7008.
See you in tke paper!


e 1


The Readers of
the Black
Press in
America are
more educated,
make more
income and
have
substantial
buying power.


Source:
The Media Audit
2004 Black
Newspapers
Readership Report,
nnpa.org


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MARCH 19, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


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MARCH 19, 200.


FLORIDA STAR


Prison Fellowship Ministries To worship With Evangelist Betty Tutt


The Prison Fellwoship Ministries of Duval and sur-
rounding counties will join Evangelist Betty Tutt for serv-
ices at 2519 Soutel Dr. on Sunday, March 20 for the 11:00
a.m. service, the Fellowship Hour 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.,
followed by a Business meeting at 2:00 p.m.
Rev. Louis and Evangelist Betty Tutt have been work-'
ing with Prison Fellowship Ministries for several years.


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ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
Directors


Alphonso West


Jacqueline Y. Bartley


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They have held monthly meetings at Shiloh Baptist
Church, and sponsored workshops, seminars and confer-
ences at various prisons. They have opened half way
houses for release prisoners and started the Watch The
Lamb Ministry (904/764-1104).
Rev. Tutt is ill and is confined to St. Catherine.
Evangelist Tutt is carrying on the work of the ministry at
the Soutel Drive location and remains faithful to the


SA .f
os l
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Rev. Louis and Evangelist Betty Tutt


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-
ANOINTING AND HEALING SACRAMENT/HEAL-
ING SERVICE-The Mass Choir of Greater Macedonia
Baptist Church, 1880 W. Edgewood Ave., presents their
Easter Cantata "I Serve A Risen Saviour" on Easter Sunday,
March 27, 6:00 p.m. An Anointing and Healing Sacrament
service will be held on Good Friday, March 25, at 7:00 p.m.
The public is invited to these events. Dr. Landon L.
Williams, Sr.
FREE CONCERTS-The Tuskegee University Choir will
appear in concert on March 19, 5:00 p.m. at King Solomon
United Baptist Church, 2240 Forest St. The choir will per-
form March 20 at 7:30 a.m.,and 10:45 a.m. at St. Paul AME
Church, 6910 New Kings Rd. The concerts are sposnored by
the Jacksonville Tuskegee Alumni Club.
SPECIAL SERVICE/BREAKFAST-Attorey Bronstein
and Temple who fought Civil Rights battles during the six-
ties in St. Augustine, Fla, will be in attendance at Epiphany
Baptist Church, 663 South McDuff Ave. on Sunday, March
20. The men of the church will host a breakfast at 8:15 a.m.
prior to the presentations.
GOSPEL GROUP CELEBRATES-Elder Robert Jackson
anid The New Spirit Tra\elers. a three generations family
gospel group, will celebrate their 17th Anniversary on
Sunday, March 20, 5:00 p.m. at Angel Square, 5133 Soutel
Dr. Special guests include Voices of Harmony (Sanford,
Fla.), The Mighty Golden Voices, The Florida Gospel
Travelers, Nu Testament, and others.
FAMILY AND FRIENDS DAY7Summerville Baptist
Church invites the public to attend Family and Friendg Day
on Sunday, March 20 at 11:00 a.m.. Rev. Galvester
Washington, of Emanuel Baptist Church is the speaker. Rev.
James W. Henry, Pastor.
MEN'S FELLOWSHIP-A Men's Fellowship will be held
on Saturday, March 26 at New Bethlehem, Missionary
Baptist Church, 1824 Prospect St. Breakfast will be served
immediately following the fellowship. Bro. William Kelly,
Leader. Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor.

One Lord And One Faith Assembly
5410 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, Fla. 32208
Phone: 713-9343 .Cell: 545-6925
"Faithful Larry" Is Back!!
WYMM-AM 1530
HOUR OF POWER MINISTRY
Tune In And Be Blessed
Each Sunday 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.


COMFORTING HAND


A study whose results were
reported in the new England
Journal of Medicine indicates
that funeral directors have been
very helpful in dealing with
families suffering the grievous
loss of a child due to disease.
Most of the families expressed
very positive feelings toward
the funeral director for the serv-
ices rendered during their
bereavement. The authors con-
clude that the funeral directors'
experience with grief reactions
make then skilled in offering
solace to grieving families.
-This role as counselor/com-
fotter may be more 'important


than ever before.
The increasing isolation of
people in our society, and the
fractionalization of the faminll
often make the needs of the
bereaved very acute. The mod-
em funeral director is aware of
and sensitive to these needs.
Often, because of frequent
experience, working with griev-
ing families, the director can
make an invaluable contribution
to meeting these needs

A.B. COLEMAN
I MORTUARY, INC.
"OurAim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrlef Rd,*
Tel: 768-0507


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Prison Fellowship Ministry. She travels to Lawtey
Correctional Institution on Wednesdays, the Women
Release Center on Thursdays, and the Dinsmore
Correctional Institution on Fridays. Evangelist Tutt visits
the Montgomery Correctional Center (Pea Farm) as an
instructor on each fifth Sunday.

The Church Directory

"Come and Worship With Us"

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sips.:.was buried and Rose again" (see I Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship '6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 45th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Jdy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review............8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


T' -


CHRISTIAN FAMILY

WORSHIP CENTER
SDr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor
,


220 NE. 1st Ave.
P.O. Box 2187
High Springs, FL 32655


CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
HOME-(386) 454-8251
CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
S Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
SBaptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
SYouth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.
Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer .....12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

Mount Sinai Community Development Enterprise
Community Resource Education
And Development Institute
2049 North Pearl Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 798-8733

GED Program, FCAT, Tutoring, Mentoring, After School,
Job Skills Training, National Parenting Program, Ex-Offenders,
Computer Skills Training for Youth and Adults.
For More Information
Call (904) 798-8722 or 798-8733.

HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT!
Call 904/765-9773
Give to: The Samuel W. Smith Fund Raiser
for Kidney Transplant,
Account #234-5528-5
Compass Bank
Jacksonville, FL


If There had been a death
in rour lantuilr resterday.
ihati wuhl .roui he doing
lodal.''


Deborah West


PA GEA-4








/2005n PVE A-


0 CIT
%mo cmd &q qb4b b -4


Let me sign on now to the campaign of Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr. to obtain 1 million signa-
tures to give to Congress and the president to renew the Voting Rights Act by August 6, the
40th anniversary of its signing into law by President Lyndon Johnson.
This campaign was rolled recently out at the 40th Anniversary of "Bloody Sunday" in
Selma, Ala. As most of us now know, it was that scene of unspeakable brutality against civil
rights workers, flooding into the living rooms of millions of Americans through the device
of television. That created the sentiment for the passage of a new civil rights act.
Bloody Sunday, was an act of personal and collective responsibility, unrecognized by
many who call for that today. In fact, the Black liberation movement that comprised move-
ments for civil rights, and others proposing more systemic change, were filled with such acts
of personal and collective responsibility that went unnoticed. But Bloody Sunday was
noticed and it has lived as a symbol of a peoples movement that sought to acquire the unfet-
tered right to vote as an equal human and civil right.
As usual, the launching of 1 million signature campaign for the renewal of the VRA is a
brilliant idea by Jackson, begun early enough to begin the campaign for the renewal of the
Act, since important provisions of it 'expire in 2007. Let's be clear: this year is the 40th
anniversary of the Act, but important provisions of it expire in 2007. This is so because the
Voting Rights act, though passed in 1965, was amended in 1970 and 1982 and some of the
provisions added in 1982 were to remain in force for 25 years -2007.
I will keep writing about this because there is a lot of confusion about this in the Black
community. On many talk shows, I encounter people who think that the voting rights of
Black people will end in 2007. That is not so, because the right of Blacks to vote was enact-
ed by the 15th Amendment to the Constitution, passed in 1870. It said that: "The right of cit-
izens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by
any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude." This amendment
remained in force until the Civil Rights movement and many Blacks voted in Northern elec-
tions (some in Southern elections) during that time. But most Blacks, especially in the South,
were excluded from the polls. The Voting Rights Act was passed as a modern enforcement
measure to open up voting to all Blacks.
So, I am suggesting that people can go to the Web site (civilrights.org) to get accurate
information on what the provisions of the VRA will be coming to an end ion 2007 unless
they are renewed. One of these provisions is Section 5, that called on the states covered by
the Act in 1965, to submit all changes to their electoral systems to the Justice Department;
another of the 1982 amendments provided for bilingual translation of voting materials and
assistance at the polls; and another provided the Justice Department with the authority to
send federal voting examiners into states to monitor elections.
In light of what happened in 2000 and 2004 in Florida, Ohio and in other states, it is clear
that not only are these provisions needed, there needs to be some action eliminating the
exclusion of convicted felons from voting. There are cases now in the court that ask the ques-
tion whether excluding felons from voting does not constitute a "voting requirement" or test
that was outlawed in Section 4 of the VRA. And although the Supreme Court recently
refused to hear such a case, it will come again. It should also be considered as an added
measure in the renewal of the VRA.
Let us join Rev. Jackson's campaign. Get the petitions from his \\ebsite
(rainbowpush.lorg) or call his office in Chicago or Washington. DC and let's get going.
Ron Walters is the Distinguished Leadership Scholar, director o/ the .African .-merican
Leadersh-ip Institute in the. cadenil ofLeadership and professor oi government ahn politics
at the U1niversitY of Maryland-College Park. His latest book is "11hire Nationalisi Black
bnJcrests (Wayne State University.Press).
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THE FLORIDA STAR!
I


I, 1(1 0Rc.isons to GetOut and VlIe
I. To s[' k oulr nilud: 'i'our -I 'I' 't'ut "ilL h .1, clricdl cfliTHs.'*; l kJ 'I h ol eInillt ~I in,
rnn1 TY, ii 19.0.iI 1.111 nd tihcr mIO..lni IrSUL
7.1 To RIhiLi fern liLmen \:'u l IL 'our kit' 1 poiur vi-t l .. urn )mr tii''cie. uiarr bc i


3. Fr ror cihidrrn: 'r iur ldr-r urn I % [AC L- W. ii h~ie to do it ifr Item. Tlirr'l how % n,c iLmk eour
IL"I i tr:1W jhAxim hvo. :,l.'ikthii h'.- aLmed do.r inisuc.) shot will] viout hilditnr's 'uture
4 ['ar tuur Eirurunitv: Dc, u u' v Li iv-dir lly flL iI'ihtboihoLod gl'. pxd Sid ULCer uI rIL he i ; II
.ed v'. hilt ouhr Iifie hbrhnfAs s'ern to 10g it li" One hib tu3:on i, '1rion Whcnwevote, we get
rct.ulu .%c cai .c nhi. i u c cIII e
5. Fnrpoursttf: Lr's ltxe IL -i II', r. run 10 nl or [Ic :dcliric and complain To nn liii gnmr. iou h.Km Io
tein 01i \'t.oln ping ULtu in [IF 1-,jirit ItI Cod most ul nll 'Jcrn''ci.icy
6. To hunur our history. ; l Jor .uL;rhii co lrr hu, eusit:d, hr- re havc hcun people who didn't want
OLiL s o ote .ico parefii ndrd 'nodpairitn and ounis :Uid ln. iro here bnen, umiliared. and lied fur
trding Li up ior the n gl to 'h:% Well. uguv-ih,; 4 Tuday trire aij pcoplk who dnr't warir n mto
vote, 1d itt our 'un, to trid up and bair. Io Ipre'rve end harorar l o who vTnt ikflre uS.
I, To cvniril our fulurt: Ecimd rllifif ma] 6c d'.cision-'ia MIOL eafour du 'il v ci.From ol'iirmiu''e
ori, mi ral prc[ilinm I" ir .iandi .aJ il cicnly,,he individual we reoi on minl mJ.c duno;ioni ib~ut
orI quaiirv offlel reTderal jdgL: :t app-uu'l b- ,th Prcidcrii and iciirmid byrh th Stnctm and have
life r nur Ie 1 .0nn `Cir Therolore hi" n O sure.X a0 ie also% oiung for rhet kinds of ludgi and jusbcv
till to apramiedivc t LLhc cau
B. ThI) tp somllthing: \'Votinttgl 'ou stop Complaining about dings Ini ur coahioiu Itputsyou
ie dhejiveri':Ljt iuuisw I -i J il'o b.Jl. of the hus.
9. Tu Nitrt uocthmi. Voiirm gci. to I hvhii fl rimug, and itn auntr an, iton Cn1Cr you gel out
urd vLok, II l feel o. vo diAl t'ull *'jl i1 Jr It again and a~Jn. Prttv soon your 1lids and
niluI I'o I Wont ;[mC oh I 'A us gIi rl i nd frc'i r thtr in. thtint Lwill kli hi-utr)
Il. Tu iSu: In '.i'rk cliiron Nsea. Jt. rjcis tJLL denid b-,i iA 'i hndnlul of Vou, Thvoc v1ii1 1 o. e
dcruLnd' rL p P.0h. u1 'C ."Il-i., %A eWil


JACKSONVILLE
PUBLIC LIBRARY


WHAT TOOK YOU A LIFETIME
TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.





WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.
Learn the warning signs at
StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE.
American Stroke
Association.
S, ,:,, H "' :"' A vl0lon0olAerlcl ,


WHO: ALL REGISTERED VOTERS
WHAT: Voting prior to the March 29, 2005 Special Election
WHY: Avoid the Election Day rush; vote at your convenience

WHERE AND WHEN: Early voting hours at the Supervisor of Elections Office,105 East Monroe Street,
Downtown Jacksonville are as follows:
Monday, March 21 through Friday, March 25- 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 26- 9:00 a.m.to 5:00 p.m.
SMonday, March 28- 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.


Early voting at Library locations are as follows:
Bradham-Brooks NW Branch, 1755 Edgewood Avenue West
Beaches Branch 600 3rd Street
Mandarin Branch, 3330 Kori Road
Oceanway Community Center (Temporary Library Early Voting Site), 12215 Sago Avenue West
Pablo Creek Regional Branch, 13295 Beach Boulevard
Regency Square Branch, 9900 Regency Square Boulevard
Southeast Branch, 10599 Deerwood Park Boulevard
Webb'Wesconnett Branch, 6887 103rd Street
Willowbranch Library, 2875 Park Street

Early voting hours for all Library locations:
Monday, March 21 through Friday, March 25 -10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 26 -1:00p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

There will be no Early Voting Sunday, March 27 in observance of Easter Sunday.
Early Voting Monday, March 28 will be available only at the Supervisor of Elections Office.


MARCH 19,


Renewing the Voting Rights Act


Z, uU.1


PAGE A-5


FLORIDA STAR


, /\i e


For information, ca I I 630-1410,,pr visit our website: httpd/duvalelectio oj.net


C


__









C








PAGE A-6 FLORIDA STAR MARCH, 19, 2005


Floridians Spend Evening With Grammy Winner Ken Williams


Bea Walker, President of the Nassau County Friends of
The Library


Mary Seymour and Johnnie Williams with his sister, no
Gay-Davis.


By Marsha Dean Phelts over 250 registered songs
for Broadcast Music
Ken Williams award Incorporated was in town
winning professional this week to celebrate his
licensed songwriter with most recent music accom-


- "


From left, State Senator Mandy Dawson (Ft. Lauderda!e)


An honored cortege of
family and friends accompa-
ted educator-activist, Olivia nied Ken and his wife Mary
to the Grammys including
plishment with family, his two sisters Olivia Gay-
friends and schoolmates. Davis and Dorothy W. Jones
Ken was nominated for a of Jacksonville.
Grammy in 1972 when he They had a grand time,
wrote the hit song, Ken reports that he enjoyed
"Everybody Plays a Fool." the Grammy Awards as
This year, "You Don't Know much as when he walked on
My Name," written by the Red Carpet in Miami a
Williams in 1973 as "Betcha few months earlier for the
Don't Know" and sung to the BMI Music Award
top of the Billboard music Williams, singer, song-
charts by Alicia Keys, won writer and music producer is
them the coveted Grammy the son of the late Johnny
Award and a trip to Los and Beatrice Williams of
Angeles to receive it on Fernandina/Jacksonville.
February 13, 2005.

Woman Charged With Mu
MIAMI--Geralyn and aggravated child abuse
Graham was charged with Wednesday, March 16. No
murdering body has been found, prose-
4-year-old cutors said. The girl was
Ri 1 y a reportedly taken in January
Wilson, 2001 from her grandmoth-
three years er's' home by a woman pur-


after the
foster
Geralyn .child's dis-
Graham appearance
scandalized Florida's child-
protection agency.
Graham was also
charged with kidnapping


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U


His mother is remem-
bered as the organist for
Zion Hope Baptist Church
in Jacksonville where she
played for 44 years.
Ken Williams' wife
Mary Seymour, a booking
agent, is not a novice to the
entertainment industry. She
has played lead roles on and
off-Broadway and travels
globally as a Jazz/Rock
&Roll/Dance Music per-
former with a voice in a 3
Octave Range.
She was in the original
cast of Green Pastures and
played the first Black nurse
in the daytime soap opera


"All My Children."
Two weeks after receiv-
ing the Grammy, Ken
Williams performed a free
concert in the Willie Mae
Ashley Auditorium of the
Peck Community Center.
Williams a graduate of Peck
High School was joined in
concert with his school-
mates "Stars of Peck": Rev.
William (Billy) Holmes,
James (Mickey) Mullins
and the Harris Twins, Doris
and Delores. They sang a
range of songs from gospel
to rhythm and blues and
turned the full house out
with a hootenanny country
and western.
An Evening with Ken
Williams and Friends was
sponsored by the Fernandina
Beach Friends of the
Library, Bea Walker
President and The Nassau
County African American
Historical Organization,
Neil Frink, President. Ken
Williams and both sponsor-
ing groups presented
Johnnie Robinson, Band
Director of the superior
rated Fernandina Beach
High School Band with a
generous contribution.


ordering Missing Little Girl
ported to be the woman who was sup-
from the posed to be taking care of
Florida '. .. Rilya.
Department She is in jail on unrelat-
of Children .... ed fraud charges and is set
& Families. for a court appearance on the
Graham was Rilya Wilson new charges
UM~m


"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted
-m -

&

The Victory is in the Word & Music

Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.


Topic For Saturday, March 19, 2005:
Sharon Moody, Suited For Success, and
Harriet Courtney, The Challenge Program, dis-
cuss how their community service programs
assist people in transition with obtaining and
retaining employment, clothing,
and career development skills.


6050-6 MoncriefRd., Jacksonville, FL 32209

Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW. WCGL1360. COM


MARCHI, 19, 2005


PAGE A-6


FLORIDA STAR









I719, 2005 P LULA31.K


Black Leaders Debunk Bush's Claims



That Privitization Helps African Americans


WASHINGTON, DC -
Congresswoman Stephanie
S Tubbs Jones(D-OH), Beverly
Watts, Former Kentucky
^ ..Commission on Human Rights
and Americans United to Protect
Social Secu r t, the national cam-
paign dedicated to defeating
SPresident Bush's scheme to pri-
S. ." vatize Social Security, held a
joint' press conference call
address the President's misinfor-
Stephanie Tubbs nation on the benefit that the pri-
Jones vatization would have on African

Americans.
Jones and watts say that as President Bush, Ken
Mehlman and the Republican National Committee spread
misinformation to the 'black community, Americans United
and pro-Social Security Groups are joining together as part


(News from Press Release and wire services)

Colortectal Cancer Rates Among
African Americans Continue To Rise
PHILADELPHIA -- Despite advances in research and
treatment that continue to help many people live beyond a
colorectal cancer diagnosis, African Americans are more
likely to die from the disease than any other racial or ethnic
group. Knowing this, Edith P. Mitchell, M.D., an oncologist
at Thomas Jefferson University, became the force behind an
educational film, The Colon Cancer Puzzle: Putting all the
Right Pieces Together to Beat It, now available to physicians
and healthcare professionals to educate their African-
American patients and the community at-large about col-
orectal cancer and the importance of early detection.
Despite advances in treatments, incidence rates, for
African Americans.are increasing. In recent years, colorec-
tal cancer incidence has increased 46 percent among
African-American men and 10 percent among African-
American women.
African-Americans are more likely to' be diagnosed with
colorectal cancer in its more advanced stages when there are
fewer treatment options available, and they are less likely to
live five or more years after being diagnosed than other pop-
ulations, according to the Cancer Research and Prevention
Foundation. Research indicates several reasons for this:
Environmental factors, access to diagnostic testing and
healthcare, cultural factors that may delay diagnosis or affect'
treatment choices, biological features of: the disease, and
lack of physician communication.
********* **
First Data Western Union Foundation,
Western Union Provide Aid
To Flood Victims In Guyana
DENVER -- The First Data Western Union Foundation
and Western Union Financial Ser\ ices. Inc. announced today
that tle\, along \\ith their authorized agent, Grace Kennedy
Remittance Services, are contributing $60,000. to aid flood
victims in Guyana.
The heaviest rains to hit Guyana in more than 100 years
more than 28 inches fell on Boxing Day (December 26)
2004. This rain left more than 400,000 people half the
country's population inundated with dirty flood waters. In
a country that lies six feet below sea level, the disaster left
nine dead and an estimated $2 million in damage.
Relief agencies including the Red Cross and businesses'
like Grace Kennedy Remittance Ser\ ices rushed to provide
aid to the residents of Guyana. Ho\\ e\ er. more assistance is
needed to combat food shortages. to prevent and treat water-
borne illnesses, to provide potable water, and to build tem-
porary housing for those left homeless. To support The relief
effort, Western Union, its corporate foundation and its
agent, Grace Kennedy Remittance Services, are providing a
combined grant of $60,000 to the Internationfal Federation
of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies designated
specifically to relief efforts in Guyana. In addition, Grace
Foods has donated $20,000 or 2 million Guyanese dollars in
food to support the effort. .
"The First Data Western Union Foundation was estab-
lished to address needs in the areas of education, health, and
basic human services." said Luella Chavez.D'Angelo, presi-
dent of the First Data Western' Union .Foundation.
"Supporting the relief efforts in Guyana by the International
Federation .of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies
allows us to assist individuals and families recover from the
devastation of the floods and help them to rebuild their
'lives."
Western Union has over 40 agent locations in Guyana.
Consumers may call 1-800-3 25-6000 )in the U.S or 592-227-
5141. in Guyana to find the nearest Western Union agent
fbcation. '
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Beverly Watts


of an ongoing campaign to make
it known that the Bush
Privatization scheme would harm
the real value of social insurance
benefits to African Americans.
"Social Security gives people
with lower earnings a greater
return on whatthey paid in, and
African Americans on average
have lower incomes.' In fact,
thanks to Social Security, African
American seniors are better off,


relative to whites, than younger or
middle-aged African Americans. But private accounts
would not continue these progressive benefits. In addition,
private accounts would not make up for the drastic Social
Security benefit cuts proposed by Republicans, according to
the Congressional Budget Office, once the risk is taken into
account. Finally, private accounts do not include the annual
cost-of-living guarantee in Social Security, which would
jeopardize retirement security for African Americans," said
Congresswoman Tubbs Jones (D-OH).
"Americans United and those who care about protecting
Social Security are not going to allow the administration or
others seeking to privatize Social Security to target African
Americans with dishonest misleading information about
Social Security. The Presidents repetitive myths and misin-
formation, the RNC's flagrantly dishonest flyers and the
administrations propaganda being spread by the likes of

Smithsonian Names Bunch Head

Of National Museum Of African

American History And Culture


,for curatorial affairs (1992-
1994) at the American
History museum, Bunch
supervised the planning and
implementation of the muse-
um's research and collection
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Sean Hannity will not succeed in brainwashing African
Americans into thinking that privatization will do anything
but weaken Social Security," said Americans United spokes-
woman Cara Morris.
"The President's use of race baiting on Social Security is
offensive and irresponsible. The Administration's argument
that privatization will benefit African Americans because we
tend to have lower life expectancies is troubling: They have
taken a serious issue and instead of trying to improve the
conditions that have lead to this problem, they expect us to
accept it .as a fact of life," said Beverly Watts, Former
Executive Director of the Kentucky Commission on Human
Rights.


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aaendas.
r -- -
;Ao",


Lonnie G. Bunch


WASHINGTON (U.S.
Newswire)--The
Smithsonian Institution has
named Lonnie G. Bunch as
the first director of the
National Museum of African
American History and
Culture, effective July 2005.
As the museum's found-
ing director, Bunch will
work .to identify the muse-
um's mission; develop exhi-
bitions and public programs
about the history, culture
and contributions of African
Americans; and coordinate
the museum's fundraising
efforts and budget develop-
ment.
Prior to his appointment
.as director, of the National.
Museum of African
American History and
Culture, Bunch, 52, served
as, the president of the
Chicago Historical Society
(January 2001-June 2005).
There,li he led a success-
ful capital campaign to
transform the institution in
celebration of its 150th
anniversary; 'managed' an
institutional reorganization;
initiated an ,unprecedented
outreach initiative to diverse
communities; and launched
a much- applauded exhibi-
tion and program on teenage,
life titled "Teen Chicago."
Bunch has held several
positions at the Smithsonian.
'As the National Museum of
American History's associ-
ate' director for curatorial
affairs (1994-2000), Bunch
oversaw the curatorial and
collections management
staff. He also led the curato-
rial team that developed the
major permanent exhibition
"American Presidency: A
Glorious Btd en." While
serving as assistant director


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Pf (A AA-8 lA RCI-! 19. 200


ENTERTA- INE


Meagan Good: Stunning Star Of D.E.B.S!
by Rych McCain


She has a presence that you "have," to notice. This young lady 7%.
has been blessed with natural beauty that is so breath taking, most
men can only look and shake their heads in amazement! Were talk-
ing about Meagan Good, of course. She is a personal favorite of my
photographer Andre' and myself because her friendly, sweet nature
is as pure as her stunning fine looks.
A native San Fernando Valley girl, Good started acting at age 4
in commercials and to date has done over sixty of them. Her first
TV role was as a series regular on the hit sitcom "Cousin Skeeter."
She was a prime time regular playing Sarah's best friend "Katie," on
the WB show "Rasing Dad." Good has guest starred on many TV
shows such as "Moesha," "Touched By An Angel," "The Steve
Harvey Show," "The Division" and "The Parenthood" to name a
few. On the big silver screen, you have seen her starring in FRI- "'
DAY, HOUSE PARTY, THE SECRET LIFE OF GIRLS, EVE'S
BAYOU, for which she received an NAACP Image Award and a
Hollywood Reporter nomination. She has also starred in DELIVER Meagan Good (Photo 2005 Andre' B.
US FROM EVA, BIKER BOYZ, YOU GOT SERVED and THE Murray/A Bern Agency Photo)
COOKOUT.
Good's latest movie D.E.B.S. is about four young ladies who were recruited by the U.S. Government to
join an underground academy that trains girls to become secret agents. Good plays Max, the squad leader.
She also has the biggest gun and when asked if she requested the biggest weapon Good explains, "No, that's
the way the script was written. Max was a borderline psychotic and always the first one to pull her gun. The
leader of the D.E.B.E.S., She's just like that, you know? Actually, when I first saw the guns, I knew they were
going to be heavy but I was determined to hold them anyway no matter how many hours. I was determined
to learn how to shoot them and everything. When the guy saw how small I was and offered smaller guns I
said no." After Good became familiar with her weapon, she was using it as a lifting weight between shoot-
ing takes. While they were training with the guns, Good's instructor was impressed that she was a dead on
bull's eye, expert shot. It must run in the blood because her real life policeman father was a sniper in Viet
Nam.
Good is still young and young looking enough to play teenage characters as she has in most of her films
and TV roles. Does this pressure her to pursue older roles? She responds, "Right now I feel like I'm not in a
rush. I have the rest of my life to be an adult. I'm 23 where I can still play high school, teenage stuff. I'll still
do it. I'd like to do both, butjinevitably I will be playing an adult.
Off the set Good loves to go to the movies, church, horseback riding, kick boxing and going out with
friends. Fellas, if you want to take Ms. Good out, you'd better have an informative conversation. What's her
biggest turn off? She says, "Someone telling me about what they are doing, what their job is, how much they
have, what kind of car they drive, what they are going to doing next and all that stuff. And a person who
offers to buy you this or buy you that. I like someone who is genuine and honest about who they are, what
they have or don't have. Someone who would be casual enough to say let's just go hang out and talk. We don't
even have to do dinner and a movie."
Good has at least three more movies coming down the pipe including the highly anticipated roller skate
comedy ROLL BOUNCE with Lil' Bow Bow. Good's legion of dedicated fans and growing box office appeal
has Hollywood on notice for bigger things to come.


CJ Sanders: Budding Young Actor/Athlete Destined For
Great Things!
by Rych McCain

Millions of movies goers were enthralled and
mesmerized with the amazing performance of
Jamie Foxx as the late great music icon and genius ".-'
Ray Charles, but they were equally as impressed
with the young actor who brilliantly portrayed the
boy child Ray in the film. He is eight year old.CJ
Sanders whom many film critics and industry
insiders hail as the next coming of Denzel
Washington, Morgan Freeman and yes, even the
dean himself, Sidney Poitier.
Young Sanders is the son of CJ Sanders, Sr.,
formerly of the Tennessee Titans Football Team
and mom Stacie who is an actress and former col-
lege basketball player. Due to his parent's athletic
gene pool, young Sanders is as equally talented in
athletics as he is in acting. As a quarterback on his
football team, he holds several records and is
already facing the inevitable dilemma of making
the choice between pursuing athletics or acting.
For now he's more than confident that he can do
both.
bot. CJ Sanders Jr., Mom Stacie, sister Cierra
Sanders began his career in Nashville, on the red carpet at the Inner City
Tennessee doing print commercials at one year old. Destiny Awards (Photo 2005 Andre' B.
His mom got him into it because she was doing Murray/A Bern Agency Photo)
commercials herself. 'The casting directors for the
movie Ray were conducting a search for a child to play the young Ray all over the South
because they wanted a southern youngster. They came across one of Sander's modeling pho-
tos and got in touch with his mom. An audition tape was made with the aid of an acting coach
and after a call back, he secured the role. Then it was off to Louisiana to shoot the film.
What was it like to meet Jamie Foxx, Regina King, Kerry Washington, Sharon Warren,
Larenz Tate, Clifton Powell, Harry Lennix and the rest of the cast? An enthusiastic Sanders
responds, "It was a lot of fun to see the real, real actors. When I saw them, I was like (whoa),
I'm meeting these people that I saw on TV. I mean, it's an honor to see these people." They
reacted to him with equal admiration. He got to go to his first basketball game and sit in the
first row at a New Orleans game. Sanders chimed in, "That's when we first met Jamie before
the movie."
And what about those contact lenses to give him the blind look, how did he bare that?
"They had to put the contacts in and then the gook, it was real hard. I was like, when can I go
home please." His mom added that she alone, was the only one who put the contacts in and
took them out. She also added that the film's director Taylor Hackford and Jamie Foxx both
expressed to Sanders that he was part of the team and that his role as the young Ray was just
as important as Jamie's role as the older Ray. Being an athlete, Sanders completely understands
the team concept.
The chemistry on set between himself and Sharon Warren as his mother was incredibly
believable. He's beaming with pride again as he responds, "On the set, she was my mother, I
was her son, that's how we were doing it." Sander's mom added, "Her scenes with my son were
so believable because she came to me as a mother and said, "I don't have kids, I need to know
how you look at him, how you touch him and how.you guys bond." Warren did spend time
with her two screen sons going to places like the aquarium and eateries. She would call to
check in on them etc., in short, she was their mom for four weeks and the bond was established.
Sanders is up for an NAACP Image Awards for Best Supporting Actor. At home, away from
the lights and glitter, Sanders is a video game person and likes shrimp from his favorite eatery
P.F. Chang's C ina Bistro. This youngster's talent in sports and acting is only 41 the first stages
of development, so the future is wide open and we will be hearing big time from this child.


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Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
BE COOL was released by MGM this weekend. It is
the sequel to the comedy smash GET SHORTY. John
Travolta returns as Chili Palmer, the movie shylock who
dumps the film world for the record business. After a friend
who owns an independent record label is shot to death,
while at lunch at an outdoor caf6, Palmer (Travolta) joins
the deceased's widow Edie (Uma Thurman) as her new
partner with the label. Palmer takes an up-and-coming
singing starlet Linda Moon (Christina Milian), from her
personal manager Raji (Vince Vaughn). He also has to deal
with Russian mobsters, eloquent gangsta record producer
Sin LaSalle (Cedric The Entertainer) and wannabe-actor
bodyguard Elliot Wilhelm (The Rock).
The movie has.the typical ethnic stereotypes that con-
scious people hate to stomach and Hollyweird loves to
exploit. Travolta's character gets into predicaments that in
real life he would have been smoked but this is
Hollyweird! If entertainment with no realistic after thought
is your cup of tea and you're into the flash and glitter of the
record business, you might get off on this flick.
Tyra Banks' UPN show TOP MODEL, opened its
fourth season to its largest premiere viewing audience ever.
Any wannabe model who is serious, should watch.this pro-
gram religiously. The twenty-four year old, Chicago writer,
Jessica Betts won UPN's THE ROAD TO STARDOM
WITH MISSY ELLIOTT Her prizes included a record
contract with Elliott's label, single to be released and a 100
thousand dollar check.
Wrong target? Why are ministers from 20 churches in
Jonesboro, Arkansas planning a protest against rapper
NELLY for his scheduled March 12th concert there. Why
don't these "Faith Based," government paid off, soft shoe,
"So-called," men-of-God, attack the real culprits-the
record companies who finance, produce, release, market
and promote this self hate, misogynistic garbage?
Singer Gerald Levert was arrested for DUI after a traf-
fic stop. He was pepper sprayed and physically subdued
after allegedly resisting arrest, which led to an additional
charge of assaulting a police officer
Rapper 50 Cent fired rapper GAME from the G Unit
over the air on New York's Hot 97. Shortly after, one of
50's entourage members was shot in the leg during a con-
frontation in the radio station's lobby. 50 made it to safety.
Hip Hop veteran Davey D, assembled a protest against
Hot 97 called "STOP RACIST HOT 97 RALLY 4 HIP
HOP!" He raises questions about Hot 97's involvement
and encouragement of rap beefs that keep our community
divided. For more information, check out Davey D's
newsletter, FNV-Newsletter-on@mail-list.com.
Maat-Hotep!


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MARC~H 19, 2005'',,vl


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IADf YI 1 i nIflA, VT4R PAGE B-i


Clara White Mission Gets Funds For Homeless Health Care


education services to the
homeless.
"Aetna's partnership will
allow our agency an oppor-
tunity to promote medical,
physical and nutritional edu-
cation to a population in our
community who are under-
served," said Ju'Coby
Pittman-Peele, CEO Clara
White Mission.
Aetna recently awarded a
total of $100,000 to nine
nonprofit organizations,
located across the 'country.
The Clara White Mission is
honored to have been nomi-
nated by Tison and
Associates, and to have been


From left, are Meg Fisher, V. P., Clara White Mission; Sherry Baker, Vice President,
Small Group, Aetna; Lisa Jannott, Account Manager, Aetna; Satonia Hart, Outreach
Case Manager, CWM; Bobby Leverett, Director of Veterans and Residential Services,
CWM; Carolyn Coppenhaver, Sales Service Manager, Aetna; Jamie Durrance, Sales
Manager, Aetna; Carolyn Kraus, LUTCF, Robert Tison & Associates; Veronica
Chambers, Director of Finance and Human Resources, CWM; Ju'Coby Pittman-Peele,
CEO/President, Clara White Mission.


JACKSONVILLE- The
Clara White Mission proud-


Mike Freeman


JACKSONVILLE --
Much Ado About Books,
Jacksonville's literary festi-
val taking place April 2,
2005 at the Prime Osborn
Convention Center, is high-
lighting four dynamic
African-American writers
that appeal to men, women
and young adults.
These writers will take
part in panel discussions on
the art and craft of writing,
and will sign books and visit
with the public during the
festival. Doors open at 9
a.m. and panels begin at
9:15 a.m.
A luncheon featuring
writer Pat Conroy begins at
12:30 p.m. and tickets can
be purchased from the
Jacksonville Library
Foundation office, 904-630-
1704
Jennifer Burton has
back-to-back offerings for
young adult readers at Much
Ado this year with a series
named Topeka Heights, tak-
ing place in an inner city
neighborhood.
The first in the series is
r incest' Journey the touch-
ing story of a young woman


ly announces the receipt of a which will allow the
$10,000 grant from Aetna Mission to provide health


named Princess who leaves
Topeka Heights to attend
boarding school. At first she
feels out of place but, in
time, she learns how to
make friends and grow in
new ways.
Burton. is a native New
Yorker and a high school
teacher by profession. She
lives in New Jersey. More
about her and the series can
be found at www.topeka-
heights.com.
Just the title alone should
get you to sit down with
Mike Freeman's latest
book: Bloody Sundays:
Inside the Dazzling, Rough-
and-Tumble World of the
NFL.
Mike has written for The
Dallas Morning News, The
Boston Globe, The
Washington Post and The
New York Times. He has
covered the NFL, NBA,
major league baseball, the
NHL and college football.
His first book was ESPN:
The Uncensored History.
Freeman is working on
his third book, a biography
of the legendary running
back Jim Brown. Mike is the
lead sports columnist for
The Florida Times-Union in
Jacksonville. God Provides
the Sacrifice: Women
Discuss Making Their
Hardest Decisions is the
story of a group of African-
American women who
belonged to a Philadelphia
area collective, written by
Yvonne LaMar, Ph.D.


Sallie Ann Robinson


Dr.LaMar has been a
counselor, trainer and
administrator for women's
programs. She received her
bachelor's degree from
Temple University, her mas-
ter's from University of
Pennsylvania and PhD in
educational psychology and
measurement from Cornell
University. She now teaches
at a college in west Texas,
where she works on educa-
tional programming for
faith-based organizations,
grant writing and research-
ing faith development and
moral reasoning of children
and young adults.
She was selected to be
part of the Oxford Round
Table in Oxford, England in
the Summer of 2005.
Sallie Ann Robinson
makes you hungry, makes
you want to sit down, clean
your plate and ask for sec-
onds. Her new book,
Gullah Home Cooking the
Daufuskie Way is popping
with down home recipes
such as "Down Yondah
Chicken Stew" or
"Momma's Homegrown
Collards" or "Tummy-Yum
Bread Pudding." Pat Conroy
knows Sallie Ann.
She was one of his stu-
dents many years ago when
the young Pat came to
Daufuskie Island, S.C just
off Savannah to teach
African American children.
Sallie Ann noji lives (and
cooks) in Savannah.


selected as one of these
recipients.
The 2004 Aetna Grants
Program's goal is building
healthy communities by
improving access to health
care services.
"Aetna is dedicated to
working with local organiza-
tions to build a healthy com-
munity," said Steve
Wohlwend, General
Manger, Southeast Region.
"But too many people have
difficulty accessing the
health care and educational
services they need. We look
forward to working with the
Clara White Mission to help


"COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

HE'S COMING BACK AGAIN-Padrica Mendez and
Minstering Artists International, Inc. present their seventh
performance of "He's Coming*Back Again," an outdoor
procession and pageant depicting the passion, death and
resurrection of Jesus Christ The procession and pageant
will be held on Easter Sunday, March 27, at 5:00 p.m. in
the 700 block of West Monroe St. (next door to the old
Mendez landmark in historic LaVilla in downtown
Jacksonville). It is free to the public. Seating will be pro-
vided and free secured parking will be available. For
more information call (904) 354-2604.
AUDITIONS FOR MAHALIA--Jacksonville's Stage
Aurora Theatrical Company will present Mahalia, the
weekends of April 29, 30, and May 1,6, 7, and 8. Stage
Aurora is looking for three females and one male who can
sing and act. At least one performer must be able to play
the piano/organ. Auditions will be held Tuesday and
Wednesday March 22 and 23 and Monday, March 28 at
the Saint Stephen Child Care and Learning Center from
6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. each evening. For more informa-
tion contact Gloria Stephens at 358-2799 between 10:00
a.m.-7:00 p.m.
STATIONS OF THE CROSS IN THE NEIGHBOR-
HOOD-St. Pius V Catholic Church, 2110 Blue Ave., will
hold the annual "Stations of the Cross in the
Neighborhood" on Good Friday, March 25, at 1:00 p.m.
For more information, contact Lucille Trotter at (904)
354-1501. Come walk in prayerful rememberance of
Jesus' sufferings while also praying for the neighbors sur-
rounding the church.
TRAINING/EMPLOYEMENT FOR SENIORS-
Experience Works is offering training and employment
opportunities for seniors 55 and older. Experience Works
is a national nonprofit and Equal'Opportunity Service
Provider. For more information call 924-1710, ext. 2402,
2419, or 997-3100 ext. 2317.
CHARITY AUCTION-The Third Annual
Bachelor/Bachelorette Charity Auction will be held
Saturday. Mfay 5 from 7:00-10:00 p.m. at the Terrace
Sulte located in the south end of Alltel Stadium. The
clart) event benefits students with developmental dis-
abilities such as Down Syndrome and Cerebal Palsy at
North Florida School. For more information call 724-
8326, 388-2118, or 398-0726.
LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO TO PERFORM
AT UNF-Ladysmith Black Mambazo, 2005 Grammy
winners, will perform their South African vocal sounds in
the Lazzara Performance Hall on Saturday, April 2, at
7:30 p.m. on the campus of the University of North
Florida located at 4567 St. Johns Bluff Rd. South. For
more information and tickets call (904) 620-2878 or visit
www.unf.edu.
ANNUAL RUN WITH VISION 5K-The Clara White
Mission and Vision Baptist Church of Jacksonville pres-
ent the first Run With Vision 5K Race on Saturday, April
16, 9:00 a.m. The race begins at 8973 Lem Turner Rd.
(the corer of Lem Turner and Grand Street). The race
will proceed 1.55 miles north on Lem Turner Road, to a
designated point near Capper Road, where the field will
turn south on Lem Turner Road, to finish at the starting
point, for a total of 3.1 miles. Registration begins at 8:00
- a.m.. Participants will include those 18 years and older.
proceeds will benefit the Clara White Mission and the
ministries of Vision Baptist Church. For more informa-
tion call (904) 705- 965, 762-0899, or 234-6927.
L '


address this critical need."
Through its four home-
less assistance programs,
Clara White currently pro-
vides services to approxi-
mately 500 individuals on a
daily basis, acting as an out-
reach site for the city's most
needful citizens.
In 2003, 46% of those
served indicate that they
have physical health prob-
lems; 82% reported having
no medical insurance or
access to medical services.
The Clara White
Mission's program
"Healthcare for the
Homeless" will educate pri-
marily single African
American. men in
Jacksonville, on topics such
as hypertension, HIV/AIDS,
and others.

DEATH

NOTICES


BREWINGTON-
Christopher Jr., 73, died
March 8, 2005.
Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
COLVIN-Mae H., 82,
died March 10,2005.
DANIELS-Jordan,
died March 11,
2005.A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
EVERSON-Zada, died
March 12, 2005.
FELDER-Queen Ester,
March 8, 2005
FREEMAN-Mack, 67,
died March 7, 2005
GOODEEN-Solena,
died March 9, 2005. A.
B. Coleman Mortuary,
Inc.
HALL-Ceola, died
March 13, 2005.
HOWELL-Kadeem,
11, died March 6, 2005
JACKSON-Maggie L.,
died March 8, 2005
JEFFERSON-Curtis,
died March 10, 2005.
JONES-Deanea M.,
died March 3, 2005.
JONES-Lila P., 92,
died March 9, 2005.
LAMBERT-Charles H.
Jr., died February 20,
2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
MAYERS-Lydia A.,
died March 11, 2005.
Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
POOLE-Johnny, 58,
died March 11, 2005.
SHEPPARD-Freddy,
47, died March 10,
2005.
WALKER-William,
61, died March 10,
2005.
WOOTEN-Osie, died
March 9, 2005.


Much Ado About Books Features


African American Authors


Jennifer Burton


PAGE B-1


FI nrnA cTAR


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FLORIDA STAR


MARCH 19. 200'


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with custhmwrs!

Carolyn Shelton, chef. :lookhrcok- au uIir.r rand Ftiqlue-tt. Con-.ult,.nt not only toves
to cook, she loves to teach" enlig hten and share her kInoledc e of food history
and important contributions mnide h Arri-an-A..nim'rii-nt tI tli- cuIlrn.- wor\vld.

You can watch Carolyn in action on her most recent .vuin: ir'eo, r;,g.l/iri',
"Zydeco" (Vol. 4) which features:

Slammin'Smothered Park Chop.
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Shrimp Etouflee
Gumbo
About tihe Product

The 30 minute video features how-tO isjlstru titrns for thr.:.:-. Cjljn-Creole
classics. Chef Carolyn shares (-chniqties. learned norn herCre'role mrnthler.
Angelina. and grandmothers. Shelftn crteavlt' th \ ideo Lnov.i nl, U Jial '.eupl' el
excited about cooking a dish when thev seeA it Ix-rg doie. Vhen '. atch~i Img 't.\ .
shows, they often forget the details. Anvone can Pau-. Rewiv-nd and play
Angeiuai "Zydeco' videus over aid over .agt.uI.

A bolt a rovlyi Shelloi

Having worked ith celebnirles like Cladvys K niglih. rBF Kin ,ud iii h;;'
Jordan. Shelton has led a life in the public eye. oidav. o'.o n iatLh her on er
own radio show (The Zyider' Cafr'). nn wreklv T'- a(ross Tes Tesand T.nuisianTa or
on any number of national anrd cable TV shows.
Shelton is very busy these davs. teaching a Youngi. Gifted andClassi Kid in
the Kitchen program where shl' teaches cooking teduuque-t, nd itqueue ut
inner-city children. Check out her book, ''irrnig. Giif Hood.) .
Before launching the Angeliha' s "Ziydc-co" vicde stencs. Shel(on iruthoired -'.'-
books, hosted li Chicago '1' series, Coo king C,,jun t, it!t Carofi '.'o. noei the
renowned Cafe Caroline restaurant in Atlanta, Georgia and wnork:-d as food
editOr for an array of newspapers. iBetween her regular sh:iow. ~h$, th ra. l tioL
country, preparing her famous recipes on national and cable TV show_., Ms.
Shelton has appeared on Donahue, 60 Minutes, Cooking LSA. three :oF .
Network: (NY), Good Morning Houston and Home Today w.. ith Edy HFts. She
served as spokesperson for I house of Segrams and the USA Tea Council. A\
devoted supporter of m.."ler-cily youth programs, Is. Shelton rvolunieers ,' a
motivational workshop leader and etiquette consultant.


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Metro Jax Youth Play Key Role Raising

Millions During Souper Bowl Of Caring


J \CKSO)N\ IL LE--
Soup ki Itchens, food banks.
Iomelel.ss shItelters and
related mlnistrice helping
the tillunr\ and homneless
in Northeast Florida \\ere
biwg \winners in ill Souper
Boxt I of CalrinU Youth
Ser\ ice Blitz held on
February. 5.
Yottlh from o er 1" i
area chtirches,. scIools and
other organlZatiolls joined
in the elfirt-s to raise more
than 53.S million nation-
\ ide as part of tile blit7
More than $12i0,000
\\ias donated to mole than
50( local charities in the
fi\ e-count.\ area surround-
ing Jackson\ ille.
Compared to 2004. the
2005 project had almost a
700(-percent increase in the
amount of dollars raised
and a 300-percent increase
in the number of organiza-
tions participating in tlls
\eai's effort.
Schools \\ere one ot
the largest grow\ th areas of
population IIn the 21105
campaign
Each school in The
Catholic Diocese of St.
Augustine carried out a
food drive as part of the
campaign and Catholic
Schools w eek. whilee
Nassau Counlt\ School
students collected food at
their schools and played
teachers in a basketball
game to benefit the cam-
pa in.
In Mlandarin. more
than s. (11 non-perishable
food items were collected
in a weeklyl b,, some l ."f0
students at Manlidalrill


Nliddlc School
Youth across the counL-
tr\ collected one-dollar
doLnation, in large soup
pot. oiln or near Februar\ b.

Eat


2 1i(15 through thie Souper
Bo I >>of Car inlL.
Each Lroul Jonotied
their mIone\. directly\ to the


chatt', of their choice-
-nO mone' \ ,as senl to
the Souper Bol I of
Caring headquarters.


Your Wheaties


Miami Heat's Shaquille O'Neal (news) stands by a giant box ot Wneaties bear-
ing his photo Wednesday. March 16, 2005, in Miami. The cereal company
announced he would be the latest person added to the sports lineup on the
box. Members of the Mami Heat junior cheering squad hold boxes. (AP PhotoiJ
Pat Carter)

Youth Fitness Program Gets Kids Moving


(NAPSI i-You ma\
ha\e noticed that child-
hood lsni't quite whIat it
used to be-plantitme fun
has become lmore virtuall
than ph1Isicall actlie.
Ho\ important is it
that children de\ elop


responsible exercise habits
that include w eekly, if not
daily ph sical futn acti i-

E\ers da\ the media
report,, oil the issue of obe-
sitv regarding children and
teens as well as adults
Kids need to get mo\ -
ing antd ultimately\ feel
emnpo\\ered to take charge
of their o \n fitness. To
help, ESPN has- launched a
southh fitness inl tlallie
The iniltia\t e elcouraugess


kids. ages 4 to 14, to
tap into the power of
pla\ and to take charge
of their ow\ n health and
fitness
.A\ailable nation-
, ide. the program i-
called ESPN Pla\ Y'our
\\a\ It's designed for
bothll kid and adults to
usle.
You can al.o pick
uip some \ wonderful

(Sec' "'-Fitnes'." B3 I)


W


7


W






Fitness
(Continued From Cover)
ideas to get kids active by visiting www.espnplayyour-
way.com. At the site:
Kids and parents can download easy instructions on
how to create a Physically Active Game (PAG).
Parents and coordinators can download facilitator
guides.
You can join an ESPN on-line PAG Club and be
part of a national community.
Check-out new games created by other kids and
play them.
Get ideas about traditional and nontraditional gear
and how to use it to create new games.
Find "places to play" suggestions for the ESPN Play
Your Way PAGs.
Parents and coordinators of after-school clubs can
form PAG clubs or conduct weekly PAG sessions in local
after-school programs as a fun and creative resource to
help kids get active.
Games are great to watch, but they're even better
when played, especially when kids are encouraged to use
their imagination. That's why ESPN's Play Your Way can
be relevant. Participation is easy and free.
By visiting www.espnplayyourway.com, parents can
show their kids just how much fun getting active can be.
A youth initiative encourages kids, ages 9 to 14, to tap
into the power of play.


tr. I SewkE a A k


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S-3C/MARCH 19, 2005


Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "Candy Shop" 50 Cent Featuring Olivia (Shady
Aftermath) Last Week: No. 1
2. "Since U Been Gone" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 2
3. "Lonely No More" Rob Thomas (Atlantic) New Entry
4. "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" Green Day (Reprise)
No. 4
5. "Rich Girl" Gwen Stefani Featuring Eve (Interscope)
No. 6
6. "Caught Up" Usher (LaFace) No. 7
7. "Get Right" Jennifer Lopez (Epic) No. 3
8. "How We Do the Game" Featuring 50 Cent (Aftermath
G Unit) No. 11
9. "You and Me" Lifehouse (Geffen) No. 5
10. "Let Me Love You" Mario (3rd Street J) No. 8
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "You're My Better Half' Keith Urban (Capitol) Last
Week: No. 1
2. "Nothin' to Lose" Josh Gracin (Lyric Street) No. 3
3. "Bless the Broken Road" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street) No.
2
4. "Baby Girl" Sugarland (Mercury) No. 4
5. "That's What I Love about Sunday" Craig Morgan
(Broken Bow) No. 5
6. "Anything but Mine" Kenny Chesney (BNA) New Entry
7. "Let Them Be Little" Billy Dean (Curb) No. 9
8. "He Gets that from Me" Reba McEntire (MCA Nashville)
'No. 8
9. "Mud on the Tires" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) No.
10
10. "Nothin 'Bout Love Makes Sense" LeAnn Rimes
(Asylum Curb) No. 7
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Show It" Fribur & Urik (Tormy Boy Silver Label)
Last Week: No. 3
2. "Soldier (Remixes)" Destiny's Child Featuring T.I. &
Lil Wayne (Columbia) No. 2
3. "Breathe" Erasure (Mute) No. 6
4. "Pop!Ular (Guido/Wayne G/P. Presta/J. Budz Mixes)"
Darren Hayes (Columbia) No. 4
S5. "I Believe in You" Kylie Minogue (Capitol) No. 5
6 "U Ain't That Good" Sheila Brody (Star 69) No. 1
". Home" Suzanne Palmer (Star 69) New Entry
S. "La La (Sharp Boys/F. Garibay Mixes)" Ashlee
Simpson (Geffen) No. 9
9. "Avalon" Juliet (Astralwerks) No. 13
10. "I Am (The Rising) (J. Rocks/Friscia &
SLamboy/Guiseppe D/J. Barringer Mixes)" Taborah (Catz)
No. 16



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PAGE B-5


1Ir nlrA .STAR


1V'tI L' 1H L ZUUVJ 3 =


TAIL OR BAIL,

EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in,a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
h
ARMED ROBBERY WITH A DEADLY WEAPON-On Friday, March
11, 2005 at 2:30 a.m. a police officer was dispatched to 4800 Atlantic Blvd.
(Whispering Oaks Apartments), in reference to a robbery incident. Upon C
arrival the officer met with the victim, who advised that at approximately e
2:50 a.m. he was robbed by two black males (suspects) in the parking lot of P
his apartment complex. The officer's investigation revealed that at the time
the victim exited his vehicle in front off his apartment, two unknown black
males exited their vehicle, which was parked just south of the victim's vehi- Y
cle, and immediately approached him. Suspect #1 was holding a large blue t
steel revolver in his right hand which he fired twice over the victim's head h
while demanding the victim to "give up your money and car keys." Suspect
#2 circled around to the rear of the victim, blocking his escape to his apart-
ment as suspect #3, the driver of the suspect's vehicle, remained in the car.
The victim told police he handed suspect #1, his wallet and car keys as
ordered. At that point, suspects #1 & #2 entered the.suspect's vehicle driv-
en by suspect #3, and fled from the scene heading eastbound on Atlantic
Blvd. The victim told police he worked at the Exxon Gas Station in the
5500 block of North Main Street and believes the suspect may have fol- C
lowed him home from his place of employment. He advised that he did not i:
get a good look at the suspects to determine if they were previous cus
tomers. The officer advised the victim to disable his vehicle by changing
*the ignition switch on his vehicle where only he could start the vehicle. The
suspects' descriptions and last known direction of travel were issued by the
police officer's and the victim was given a case information card. Case not J
cleared. Patrol efforts suspended. S
SPOUSE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On Saturday, March 12, 2005 at 9:11.
p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 6710.Collins Rd. in reference to a
domestic battery. Upon arrival, the officer spoke with .a woman (victim) t
who stated.that her husband (suspect), threw her down and hit her. She n
stated that the suspect wanted to go out for the evening, woke her to get the S
gate code 'to let his friend enter the complex, took'her car keys and' tried to
leave. She told the officer that she asked her husband to return her Keys and
he then threw her down' on the couch and held her down. The victim told i
the officer that her husband punched her on the left side of her face, got b
,up, took her cell phone and her car keys and left. The police officer stopped
the suspect as he was driving away from the complex, and brought hiim back -
to the scene. The suspect told the officer that he had awakened his i-fe to
get the gate code for his friend. He stated that the victim said she was
going out but not him. The suspect said he told his wife that his friend was
already there and that she could not go. He said he took her car keys to
prevent her from leaving. He stated that their children were asleep in their
bedroomand noted that that his wife grabbed him, pulled him down to the
couch, and wrapped her les_' aron 31 d him to present hini from leah in, The C
suspect told thei officer that he got loose fromr, her and took her car ke s and 1
cell phone with him. The officer observed that the victim had a scratch'on
her face and slight swelling to the left side of her face. The victim was
adi ised of slielter and victim services, refused both and declined to rtre a
statement. The suspect was read his-rights, arrested and taken to 3ail Case
cleared by an arrest. .
PERSON IN ACTUAL POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SiB- x
STANCE-Oin Saturda3 March 12, 2005 at 10:04 p.m. a police officer saw
a man operating a 2001 Suzuki Motorcycle traveling Westbound on
inr. ersir, Boulevard at a high rate of speed in a very reckless manner. i
The officer said the driver appeared to have no regards for the safety of r
others o:r himself The driver'was allegedly Iraeling appro imnatel 80 to
90 mile per hour in a posted 45 niles per hour zone while passing a vehi-
cle on the right shoulder as he approached the intersection of Phillips
Highwa.v The officer theii toppedd the suspect in the parking lot of Big a
Chief Tire, ad'. ised hint to get off the bike, turn around, spread his teeth. put i
his hands on the top of his head and interlock his fingers. The officer then
began to pat the suspect for w weapons but the t suspect then pulled a\\a. from
the ,officer and anempted to flee .oi.i too The officer then look the suspect
Sto the ground and handcuffed him. A search of the suspect revealed E
approximately 5 grams"of marijuana and a pack of rolling papers located in t
'his front right pocket Forrt) i\ crack cocaine rocks %were found in a ciga- t
rene bo\ in the,suspect s left pocket The crack cocaine and marijuana t
,ere field-tested and cane back positive The narcotics \were placed in the
properrm room The suspect i as read his rights. arrested and \was taken to
jail booked on "feloni" charges..
ASSAULT W\\ITH A DEADLY \\ EAPON BY AN ACQUAINTANCE-.
On Saturday. March 12. '2005 at 5 35 p.m a police officer \was dispatched
to 4220 Mloncref Rd \\est, regarding a baner, wit'h injuries Lipon arrival,
the officer met u ith ictnim #-2 \\ho stated that she and Victim t attended
a funeral of a child \\ho lied in Washington Heights Apartments. The offi-
cer learned that victimm #1 and Vicmn tm returned to Washington Heights
Apartments after the funeral. The officer learned that that v\hile the \ic-
tims \were in front of Building A theN \%ere approached b\ a suspect \hho
pulled out an unknown type handgun The t victims said the suspect cocked
the gun. pointed it at the head of \ ctim f1. but Victim #2 panicked and
tried to run from the vehicle Victim #f put the vehiclee in reverse to get
Sway from the suspect. \ victim u2 said her dress got caught in the door of
Sthe vehicle and she .as unintentionall[ dragged against the roadway by.
Victim fl's vehiclee As a result, Victim 42 suffered injuries to both knees
Sand right elbow. The suspect fired no shots arid the suspect and Victim #1
fled the scene in difference directions victimm #1 has not contacted the
police regarding the incident People at the scene refused to.assist-the offi-
cer nith tie.description or the whereabouts of the suspect. Victim #2 was
transported to Shands Hospital by Rescue 7 for treatment The officer said
it is possible te e suspect frequents the Washington Heights area and resides
ith a female in partment !4-l8 This information "as obtained from a
source'wanting to remain anonymous. The police officer will attempt to
foillo'i up this case. Case not cleared.
GRAND THEFT AULTO-On Sunda\. March 13. 2005 at ?:08 a ni a police
office "a: dispatched to \est I't Street in reference to a person removing
tires from an abandoned vehicle Upon arrival, the officer located the 'chi-
cle behind some 'acant apartments in the 2100 block of West Ist Street.
. The chicle w'as on stands and three tires had been removed The ke\s to
the vehicle \v.ere in the ignition and the front lights "ere on. There \\as
nobody, around the vehiclee A check of the tag revealed the vehicle was
stolen and the alerting agency "\as the Atlantic Beach Police Depnnent.
NCiIC "\as contacted and confirmed through Atlantic Beach police that the
\chicle \.as stolen. The officer made contact \ith the victim and \irness.
The \ictim and .i mess stated the\ observed a black male (suspect) remov-
ing the tires,from the e!hicle and placing the tIres in a burgundy S Li.V. The
"imness told the officer the suspect returned on two occasions to remove
the tires after she called police, but she could not describe "\hat the sus-
pect looked like. Southern \Wrecker responded and towed the \elhcle Case
not cleared Patrol efforts suspended
BOYFRIEND/GRILFRIEND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On Saturday,
Marchl2. 2005 at 5 30 p in. a police officer \as dispatched to 44132 Friden
Dr in reference to a domestic banen Upon arrival, the officer made con-
tact witth girlfriend i victim i. 'vho stated, she and her Il~e-in bo friend I(sus-
pect. got into an altercation in their home The v ictim told the police officer
that the suspect got upset because -he "anted to go -.ee her family She fur-
ther stated, the altercation turned ph. sical and the suspect hit her in the right
side of her face. The \ victim ad\ ised. the hit made her fall back into a corner


of her Ii\ing room. knocking things off the shelf The \ ictin then .aid she
grabbed her cell phone and \ent outside to call the police. As she e\iied the
house, the suspect came from behind her and grabbed her in an attempt toI
get the phone out of her hand He took the phone and broke it After break-
ing the phone the suspect left the scene in his vehicle. The victim adt ised
she \ent to the neighbor's house to use their phone to call the police Tlhe
police officer observed the corner where the viciim \as knocked into and
there \\ere miscellaneous things on the floor. In the couple's bedroom, a
desk was open and things in disarray% on the floor in front of the desk The
right eye of victim \wa red and the \ ctin had a scratch on her right land.
The iciinim as ad\ ised of shelter and chose an alternate sate place. She was
also ad\ ised of the process for filing an injunction for protection and given
all domestic \ violence papenrork. The police cfficel i llollow -up the case.
\ith the state anorne. 's office and seek an arrest i arrant for the suspect.
Case not cleared. Patrol efforts i follow-upl


Your Weekly Horoscope

(MARCH 19, 2005-MARCH 25, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) It's
lard for you to
believe, but you
can't control
everything This feeling of,
powerlessness has you
wanting to run and hide. If
you do, you could alienate
he very people who can
lelp you.
TAURUS (April 20 to
SMay 20) You're
somewhat dis-
tracted this week.
As a result, you
could misplace something
important. Later in the
veek, you're back on your
;ame.
GEMINI (lMa 21 to
lune 20) You're
o preoccupied .
vith your o\\n
thoughts, you're
lot listening to what's being
aid. However, y3ou could
niss out on something
important. lake an effort to,
be more attentive.
CANCER (June 21 to
Fuly 22) Something that's
Happening at
home could trip
N ou up this week.
It just seems to
come out of the blue.
together. as a family unit,
rou can successfully deal
vith it.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22) It's not a good
veek for you
where socializing
s concerned. You
need to focus
rour energies on work mat-
ers. Over the weekend,
Ivoid someone who's behav-
ng erratically.
VIRGO (August 23
o September '22) You
ind you just can't go it alone
his week. Feel free to enlist
he help of co-workers to get
hat project done. In the long


run, you'll all be
La g lad you did.
LIBRA
(September 23
to October 22) It's fine to
be diligent at work.
However, you .also have
responsibilities at
home. Strive for
that famous Libra
balance:
SCORPIO. (October
23 to November 21) You
have some concerns about
money this week. It's a good
idea to sit down with family
members and
Some up with a
S"' I"new plan. Be sure
you're open to
suggestions.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
.December 21)
Communication between
you and your mate is not
good this week.
Both of you are
sending aand
receiving mixed
signals. Stop playing games
and just say what you mean.
CAPR ICORN
(December 22 to
January. 19) Something
that's happening behind the
scenes will affect
you from a dis-
tance. However,
that's not a bad
thing. When you ultimately
discover what it is, you'll be
pleased.
'A Q.U AR I U S
(January 20 to
February 18) A friend
surprises you \% ith
some harsh words
this %eek.
However,. think
about it. Have you done
something to warrant this
attack?
PISCES (February
19 to March 20) You're
stymied on a certain project


.,*.,. .,,1
''I.
'III Fl'i


$40,000

REWARD


Hiep Nguyen was found murdered on
June 23 2004. at 630 a m
at his business. Boba Coffee
7999 Philips Highway.
A $40,000 reward is being offered to
anyone providing information leading
to the arrest and conviction of persons)
responsible for this crime
Call 630-0500
Jacksonville Sheriff's Office


I A


you thought
would be easy.
The good thing is,
your fine mind is
up to the job. Tap into your
innovative side.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Rosie
O'Donnell, March 21;


Andrew Lloyd Webber,
March 22; Amanda
Plummer, March 23; Lara
Flynn Boyle, March 24;
Sarah Jessica Parker, March
25; Leonard Nimoy, March
26; Mariah Carey, March 27.
(c) 2005 DBR Media,
Inc.


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Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville, Florida 32206
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APCAGE R -u RASTMR I CH19 20


Gator Teen Breaks 400 Record


FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. -
Kerron Clement has struck
down a world record held
for a decade by one of the
greats of track and field, and
he's only 19. The University
of Florida sophomore
seemed as surprised as
everyone else when he ran
44.57 seconds at the NCAA
Indoor Track and Field
Championships Saturday
night, breaking the mark of
44.63 set by Michael
Johnson in 1995.
It was the second phe-
nomenal clocking by a U.S.
teenager in the event this
season, and both came at the
Randal Tyson Track Center.
A month ago, 18-year-old
LaShawn Merritt of East
Carolina ran a 44.93 -- then
the third-fastest time in the
event's history -- at the
Tyson Invitational.
But two weeks ago,
Merritt signed a shoe con-
tract with Nike and turned
professional without ever
running in an NCAA meet.
That deprived the indoor
championships of a big-time
showdown, but Clement did
just fine on his own.
"He's been blessed by a
wonderful ability by God--
he chose the right parents,"
Florida coach Mike
Holloway said. "He's an
incredibly hard worker. If I
get on him about something,
he listens and goes out and
tries to correct it."
Clement was born in
Trinidad and moved to the
United States as an eighth-
grader.
He was a highly coveted
track recruit at La Porte
(Texas) High School,
recruited by the big powers
of the sport, including LSU,
Texas and Tennessee.
Clement said no to
Baylor coach Clyde Hart,
who developed Johnson and
2004 Olympic gold medalist
Jeremy Wariner.
After choosing Florida,
the easygoing youngster
wasted no time in making
his mark.
He won the NCAA
championship outdoors in
the 400 hurdles, then won
the world junior champi-
onship in the same event, in
meet record time.
At the junior champi-
onships, Clement competed
for the United States after
earning his U.S. citizenship
last summer.
He probably could have
gone to the Olympics for
Trinidad and Tobago last
year, but preferred to
become an American.


Florida's Kerron Clement, right, and UCLA's Craig Everhart begin the final lap of a pre-
liminary heat of the 400 meter run at the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships
in Fayetteville, Ark., Friday, March 11, 2005. Clement won the heat with a time of 46.05
seconds. (AP PhotolApril L. Brown)


Alabama A&M Out Of March Madness


!









Alabama A&M forward Chris Collins (55) blocks a shot
by Oakland guard DeMarcus Ishmeal (10) in the first half
of the NCAA (news web sites) opening round game,
Tuesday, March 15, 2005, in Dayton, Ohio. (AP Photo/Al
Behrman)


The Oakland Golden
Grizzlies beat historically
black Alabama A&M
University 79-69 in the


NCAA opening-round
game behind Rawle
Marshall's 29 points and
Cortney Scott's 21. The


game was played March 15
at the University of
Dayton.
The Golden Grizzlies
became only the fifth team
with a losing record to win
an NCAA tournament game,
joining Florida A&M
(2004), UNC-Asheville
(2003) and Siena (2002) --
all at Dayton-- and Bradley
(1955).
Obie Trotter scored 24
points and Joseph Martin
added 22 for Alabama A&M
(18-14), the Southwestern
Athletic Conference regular-
season and tournament
champs.
A&M coach L. Vann
Pettaway said his team was
worn out from playing four
games in six days, winning
the conference tournament
Sunday before hitting the
road less than 24 hours later
to make it to Dayton.
"We want to get back to
the big dance, but we want
to dance when we're rested,"
he said.
Both teams were making
their first appearance in the
NCAA tournament. Oakland
made the jump from
Division II to Division I in
the 1997-98 season.


Chris Fuamatu-Maafala Troy Edwards
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--Running back Chris Fuamatu-
Maafala and wide receiver Troy Edwards will once again
wear the teal and black as members of the Jacksonville
~Jaguars. The Jaguars re-signed ihe.pair on Tuesday, March


15.
Both Fuamatu-Maafala and Edwards had been unrestrict-
ed free agents. Edwards, a first-round draft pick by
Pittsburgh in 1999, spent the last three years in Jacksonville.
He was second on the team last seasoniwith 50 catches for
533 yards and one touchdown.
Fuamatu-Maafala also spent time with the Steelers. He
was used mostly in short-yardage situations last season and
carried 20 times for 69 yards and a touchdown. Terms of the
deal were not disclosed.




T *


Bethune Cookman Players

Earned MEAC Baseball

Player Of The Week Honors

GREENSBORO, N.C. Rob Caruso of Bethune-
Cookman was named baseball's Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference Player of the Week.
Teammate Richard Rodriguez and
softball's Katie Finn iere honored as
S MEAC pitchers of the week.
Caruso (1B, 5-11, Jr. Pembroke
1Pines, Fla.) went 8-14 for a batting
average of .571 for the week.
He hit one homerun in the bottom
Rob Caruso of the ninth to give B-CC a 5-4 win
over Florida A&M. He drove in five
runs and struck out only'once in 14 at-
bats, as the Wildcats went 3-1.
SRodriguez (P, 5-11, Sr. Hialeah,
Fla.) pitched a complete game against
Florida A&M giving ,up two runs and
striking out 11 batters to earn the vic-
tory. He faced 28 batters walking only
Richard
Ri two and gave up eight hits.
Rodriquez
Finn (P, 5-7, Sr. Philomath,
Oregon) went 3-1 with a 1.28 ERA in
four starts last week, which included a
no-hitter against instate rival Stetson.
She recorded two strikeouts and was
three walks shy of a perfect game
against Stetson.
For the week Finn faced 68 batters
Katie Finn recording six strikeouts, gave up nine
hits and walked 10.



FAMU's Kevin Hicks Wins

NCAA 800 Meter Title

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. -
Florida A&M's Kevin Hicks won
the NCAA Division One Indoor
National title in the men's 800
meter run Saturday evening March
12, running a personal best time in
the process at the Randall Tyson
Track Center on the University of
Arkansas campus.
The sophomore from' Miami,
ran a 1:46.97 on March 12 to all
but blow away an impressive field
in the 800, field which featured Kevin Hicks
runners from the Big 10, Big 12,
Mid-American and Southeastern Conferences.
James Hatch, of host Arkansas, ran 1:47.40 to finish sec-
ond, while Auburn's Sherridan Kirk (1:47.64), finished third.
Hicks won the USTA National Indoor 800 Meter title two
weeks ago in Boston, just a week after winning the 800 and
mile run at the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Indoor
Championships, helping the Rattlers to a repeat as league
champions.
Friday, Hicks ran the second-fastest time in the prelimi-
nary heats, turning in a 1:48.54 to finish behind Texas Tech's
Jonathon Johnson, who finislied sixth (1:47.92). *

Ali To Receive German Prize


BERLIN Muhammad


Ali will receive a prestigious
German prize in
December in recogni-
tion of his commitment
to the U.S. civil rights
movement and his work
as a U.N. peace ambas-
sador, organizers said.
The former heavy-
weight boxing champi-
on will receive the Otto
Hahn Freedom Medal
Dec. 17, the German


" Society for the United
Nations said in a
Muhammad Ali recent statement. It
noted that Parkinson's disease "has been unable to halt him
in his commitment to society."
Previous winners of the medal, named for the Nobel
Prize-winning chemist, include Mikhail Gorbachev, Simon
Wiesenthal and Yehudi Menuhin.

House GOP Wary Of Regulating Boxing
WASHINGTON Boxing needs the government to step
in and protect the sport, reformers told Congress on
Thursday. A key Republican said he was wary of making
bureaucrats act as referees.
A stalled bill to create a U.S. Boxing Commission
brought a hearing in a House Energy and Commerce sub-
committee, where lawmakers are trying to forge a compro-
mise with a Senate effort championed by Sen. John McCain,
R-Ariz.
"The problem that we have is we don't have any enforce-
ment mechanism," said Ron Scott Stevens, chairman of the
New York State Athletic Commission.


Fuamatu-Maafala And Edwards



Resigned To Play Jaguars


MARCH 19, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE B-6









PAtiUL D-/ A .tntl A SA


EMPLOYMENT

FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at
FCCJ. E.OQE.

Safety Specialists
BMT Designers & Planners (D&P)
is seeking Safety Specialists at its
Norfolk, VA and San Diego, CA
offices to provide motor vehicle
and recreational safety to Navy
personnel. Candidates should
possess experience as an instruc-
tor in one or more of the following
areas: AAA Driver Improvement
Program, Motorcycle Safety, ATV
Safety, Snowmobile Safety and
Recreational Safety. A Bachelors
degree in an occupational safety
and health (OSH) related disci-
pline with minimum 5 years expe-
rience is preferred but not
required. Organizational skills,
training experience, communica-
tion skills, ability to travel required.
Email or fax resumes with subject
line "ESH010" to
MPirrera@dandp.com or faxc 703-
920-7177. No phone calls please.

JOB OPENING
Maintenance person want-
ed for renovation work at
Apt. complex. Experience
a must. 633-6265




Refrigerators GE
Washers Hotpoint
Dryers Sears
Ranges Whirlpool
Dish Washers Maytag


"WE WORK ON ALL
MAJOR BRANDS"
Tony Cochran, Owner
(904) 721-0101

FREE SERVICE CALL VVITH
REPAIRS



To place an ad:
CAII: (904) 766-8834:
:FAX: (904) 765-1673


Want to purchase minerals and
other oil/gas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver. CO 80201


SERVICES

Al mA












CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
* TRAILER AWNINGS
*CARPORTS
* MARQUEES & CANOPIES
aSCC 055764


THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS
Low Rates
764-9852


I


Announcements


r, Hu-. i.nrneSlr IIa,' Re.j iOtI'AN F-Pi t.' F.


Auctions


I \1D fn ,\(' \I'(_TIO : L,: AI...,:.J rL IAM, Sat
,I..- -, 1-A' '+ 1.i, \.| 5 ~r~r' h .'n'ri'. .n 16 Parcels.
Preview: 1-SPM, Sat. March 19 Call for details:
(800)257-4161 H iggeniboiham Auctioneers
Sr,... en ;a... ....... ME liggenbothan, CA. FL Lic
".\5 .. Sil .


Building Materials


\IEl \i. NRl|.l i %\\ E $'ti., Di:., :r,
Manufaciurer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Tii .l Fr5 i,-,'I?" U". '5


Business Opportunities


I\ CR I\ D I II I ()I'oI' ()R NII :! o,-,kiIl i,. I h1:M
cLll. .IuuV)y4 ')93u.

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All for :1',' ;':'. Pl4, .3 3
'r,.,i'-jii CALL. US: We will ).mIi r, ,rdI.:rs'ld! .

tSf.S'k. Si. kl Is 'L ellt i, rP i .i ..'J .n rir,-- f
products to Siart No Invenior. I':,i:.Jc' N.' Experience
Required. Call I'".,L, ',i .."r'. i ".- ii II, 4,-'J Ext. 531,4.

k1 I I L(>i .r..,r. l. h riJ 'l. ,u pp
I. 4i. 11;'I, :- '; AL .: 4lill 'J.. f; .i6':42 S

Financtiul

S (%. I lt 1 %1 ) % ( ., ,1 rl. I ,I 1,.1 1



1" ..ni i 1..1,. p h .nn I I ln : 11, J nl-.I.


'For Sale


',,I I 1 1. rHCII. .' i t' Z \A .' L. 1) ,r.'rA. .i3' n II,,,

~~~',I SilO)~1r~_r


Help \Wanled

Uriir- .(Il\l%\N1 IRKNsP(ORI F "..,1,- i.. i.
rc .AC .I I, 1 r .'.c .:d O .:u ) I,. I ,. .
(,-. .Ip .ilir" -luide [c r '",U' ( I ,, '.,l \ I, "'lu
'l~l~nh l r., nl) i-rrn r, h,, li.kin P 1N I I nl,-.' l r

Drivers. Owner Ops & (C' Ln It,j:.J:J N .- Rin SE
Only or SE, Mid-Atl, M'"' i<,;.-0. il i'O .,. Forced
Dispatch, Good Pay plus i .:i ~ci.( 2 1-42"

NO%% 1 1 ( i ilN(, I'PI I(,\1 10 s '1.F% 1 .. 1 ,'p
rc...* .'.hl CAsh hiring bonus Guaranteed in writing
.H 'il'l' i .. .1 107 www USMailingOroupcom

POSTAL POSITIONS AVAILABLE! Federal. State,
Local: $14,00-$48.0)0+ir. No Lip.rr.~: ,..:. ,r Paid
Tr ri,;n. ,.rd Full Benelitsl. Enm L.:. CII i ,h.;, for
,i. ..-,ni.., (888)$26-2513 ext. ,111.


APPRENTICESHIP

*CARPENTRY
*ELECTRICAL
*PLUMBING
*HEATING, A/C & REF.
Must be at least 18 by 7/1/05 be
HS. grad or GED by 7/1/05, have
driver's lic. & transportation. Apply
in person on MONDAYS, MARCH
7, 14, 21 & 28 AT 7:00 P.M
promptly.
Northeast Florida

Builders Assn.
103 Century 21 Drive,
Suite #100
.' EOE
**************** ******************

FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE
CONSERVATION COMMISSION
BID#: FWC 04105-92
BID TITLE- BLUE CRAB, STONE
CRAB AND SPINY LOBSTER
TRAP RETRIEVAL PROGRAM
BID OPENING:
APRIL 6. 2005 @ 2.00PM
CONTACT PERSON JULI DOD-
SON 850-922-4340 EXT 250
The purpose of this RFP is to seek
sealed proposals from vendors for
the provision of closed season trap
retrieval trap data collection and
disposal of traps remaining in state
and adjacent federal waters, and
river and bay areas as specified
within the RFP.
For a complete copy of the RFP, go to
http:llfcn.state.fl.uslowa_vbslow
a/vbs_www.main_menu


I BSINES NETORK


Licensed & Insured CGC# 1507816
Florida Contractor
"Roof To Foundation, We Fix It All"
Call toll free

(800)852-9092
offices throughout Florida.


CASH NOW
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS,
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW'',
for Structured Settlements!


V;-

Read Together, florida0
I 4
4" V- Moarch April 2005
3.' W.,,. .'

St^^. .-':" Essay Contest for Middle School

S. www.VolunteerFloridaFoundation.org .

M'H -. s.0 ipcnsored b., tN Washington Mutual

R'u Y :A


2x.2 Rates
State\ ide 1200
Regional or national
Placement also available
Regiuns: North, South. Central
Total Circulation. I 9 Miilion


UP TO $4,000 \luEEIL" E-.,i.r,; .cS.l P.I.-Ai,.!
Written Guarantee! 11 Year \ ,.-.is .Jc i -..nr.p -," '-. q*
lfring! Easy Work, Sending Out Our Simple One Page
Broclhi.r' F,..,: P,i..i1,1,'. ,ppl', I vesome Bonuses!!
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(800)24: ',;(. E.l 'hll

Legal Service

DI\ ()R(.T$i75-.27.' 'CfO'. Ek childrenn etc. .QOly one
*.. rn' f r.. ,ullid, l r_,ult : >;'.t.% ; 'ea! C.'I '.' i 'CJ,
TijuiiiA h' L4 '1 iAl~-'pT\l-'. Divorce Ti.h
'Established, 1.977.

Miscellaneous

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECTV SYqTEM includes standard
ir..iialnlor,. 2 MOivrHS FRPEte ~i+ Premium Channels.
Access t over 225 channels! Limited time offer. S&H.
Restrictions Apply., ,,'.r, i '. i'.4,',

I \HIN I I;RI I nnlln Imrom hnme '"rIu 5 'P.. .ci
F ir.cwi u i c i l C.0.r l-1- 1 i e Ill. 8- 1
,"vA ird, a nir, ,Iint ci.I

SPAt Ovel'stocked! N.,: 7 p:ri.'r. spa-Loaded! Includes
'UiA J.i d;'.. & waminty. $2999, was $5999.
n kl iW -.-'- i :. .


Real Estate


liHE. F irIli NORI1H .I IROIIN.A V. INIER.,. %'C S N
IS HEI- RE' I lll l I S Il h is t L ll. I -'L \t iFLP.'L
MOI.NTAINS Or 'A.'ET-kRN S;_ MVlr:iLiNT-i". iS flc.r
Cabins, Acreage & Investment: ClAlj M.,,rn, ir.r
hkell C .1M \I k t.,.I si 'I.,ipht.
,iri5 r-", .,, in t [ ih( it. r. r

LANDn INi L ED Larid li,.',-i.', l .*in'rir\ S l, ILA l n
. .j-\ r, p-h. -,j, rU I ,',lt.:'. ,ln. .I '.,J II .l el r ,ii .
Qr itrJ n'cuii.*r ra.l r .u .jIr h ... ..,- n .. Tir ,
,-mII I rd ho"A'AA" I Fr .n I -lA.I II '''A ,,,I .rIT

11115 M ION INS1iNFORa ..'J|,T.....r l.. ..' in. i i
-,i .I,- N C rL '. .. rc, i jl.,J l. I,. ,A A i: 'l i. l I .

rI l. l, I ir lr. I L u I ..AI I I L -IIL r I. S I ki

11 % >irn k I.u i AL.. i. .r I .. .iu. I'' p.ns SiAC.;
llJ .J| Pfl L- L K CHI "I" ',. '

':FRElE LAND) LIST'- NC t'I,'iiN\T dINS i,, ,n hu;l l"'
I.Jln Irul l. r, -,: I -d1, .. lI IImo li l h / I IJr l

10111(.C.OSI.I GO\ I HOMI'S .r _,. ,. .,.., To.
listings (800)50.r-1777 J l I :t 129.
listings (800)50]-1777 ext. 1299.


round d )O ning L lnd ,ale': 1. IL I.ID% i I" ',CRLS
' I, C- ,d,, lrdF, ,1 %, '1 .'A'.A .l 015 A', .' i I i-,t A'
Miles of bridle paths. N. I. I.k, CI.L-.i i1.1.Q;: Quiet,
secluded, yet close to 1-95 & coast. Also, 5 acres $174,900.
Great financing, little down: Call now. (866)352-2249 x379.

LAKE VIEW BARGAIN $29.900. Free bout slip! High
I1.: .i.n'i hCuua i.'l.ll i 'I'JL "ill.. \ ., f i rom national
lI." ,r. 1 4, -SIa.i n r L i'-' I.Il, i i.' .n IN. Paved roads,
i/g uils, central water, sewer, more. Excellent financing.
Call now (800)704-3154, ext. 609. Sunset Bay. LLC.


2\4 Rates
States ide S2400
Regional placement
also n\ ailable
Ke iolis' Nonh. l Soutllh. Cenlial
C ircLn111011 I I : nilion


CO\ST.L NORTH C\RROLI\ i Ir .. o ,, '
'..(ilc .n r>." I,.,",r M T ll ,n [',.. ti .. l I l;i ., ,I

1 ] icr u l'.n l ,t lrlnll r ,J .. ,-,L ,,, 1 ,-l'1 i .r1
Dr.l' .p sr.. i r pIF nr, Pt I I'. r.n l ... n l

h i '* I -,o0 i -*i 1

\ORIII 'AROLINA L \KI FRONT ,l\I tfS ,,
ir l L l.1. N l ( (i ";" .

(O ~SI \L (.LI)R(;Is- GATED COMMUNITY Large
wooded water access and marsihfont h6mcsites. Ancient Live
oaks. pool, tennis, golf. Water access, From $64,900.
r i"'i Iiu n discounts. ._ **C.LP I
1`2'.r..- 7(. '

%I RI-'I IOtll'NI IN I I I110.MI .111 i i 0- '
MO. Upscale Golf Communitly set amid Dye designed
.18 hole course in Carolina M. uni.n,r, c. i ..:..I.i
Near Asheville NC. A sanct'n "':J -,. ,.I : ii..11n..
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S h l 0. ..l .. -ri, I'r-, *'*'' ',i, 10% down,
[i'.Ai.h'I I lr..,r, 1 .1 r,,,nlt, ,11 4 2.' ,', ,.d .. L, '..11...,'.
OAC.

I.ukL \li I |lim nin! 2 1,.1. 'l' 'lll I N 11 .. .i

' L.Aur.i,\ u,ad 'A A utilities. Lo.wt I n. I
* .h.II.lC-.lC i ?l n'lh.JA ,-5092 x96.

R\ s/Cuaiiinper,

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"McTli',inrn .. 'i.,' 7i.l I'11 I. *Orlando- (800()654-8475:
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hnola@tlpress.cotn for more information. (Out of State
placement is also available.) Visit us online at




FCAN


Week of March 14, 2005


I I

ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
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LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
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- - -


INVITATION FOR BIDS
Competitive sealed Bids will be received by the St. Johns River Water Management
District (hereafter "the District") at 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 32177, until
2:00 p.m., Tuesday, April 12, 2005, and publicly opened at that time for:
BID NUMBER SI642XA
LEVEE 54 SPOIL BERM MATERIAL REMOVAL
A MANDATORY Pre-Bid Conference is scheduled for
10:00 a.m., Tuei.ja, Mafich 22,2005 ,
Canal 54 on Babcock Road in Brevard County, Florida

The pre-bid conference is intended to provide bidders the opportunity to receive clar-
ification of any requirement of this Invitation For Bid. The District will only accept bids
from those attending the pre-bid conference.

Bid packages may be obtained on or after March 15, 2005, by contacting
DernandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com or by calling (800) 71' -.1 Bid
packages may also be obtained from the District by calling Sharon Whitener, CPPB,
Contracts Administrator at (386) 329-4281. Bidders (hereafter "Respondent(s)")
requesting packages through the District will be charged copying and shipping/han-
dling costs as stated at DemandStar by Onvia or as provided for in Chapter 119, Fla.
Stat., whichever is less.

Bid packages will also be available at the mandatory pre-bid conference. Attendees
may purchase these packages at that time for the cost as stated at DemandStar by
Ona, The O sirci rcesques.e thrat trho.ie ,nlersild in purchasing a package st Ire pre-
*id meeTiing ha'.: 3 cc rr pn, .jr c.anhir ':hck: made payable to the St. Johns River
VVialr .l0anagemrer Dis trc or if parng eriir. cash, have the e.a.:l anc.urt

II due It disability, you require a special accommodation to participate in any activi-
ty relating to this Bid, please contact the Division of Procurement Sireice ail the
atb:,oe addres or ieleiphonre number o iif ,iiarnr impaired, by calling (386) 329-
44ff iTDDD at e1asl fi,, i ibuSires ;j.., beforee the dates and times specified
herein.
After evaluations have been completed all respondents will be notified in writing of
Ihe lsn'i r.enrdedr re.:.jnrrin da. rn to tre .:..er-rng B.ar. 3at ie Ma.a, 10r 2,005'
meeting The DLi.ri.:l rese-r.'eS Ih.e rigrt 1to rIe.e l rn, and all Bd Tre D'silr,: als~,
re, ere thre rnghQi I,: As s. anr, minor de al nors in an oirh r ,e l jaid i, and Ii:'
ac.epl rne Bid iral i.ill be, irn Ih bE t .niere-t' of ithe Ditri,.:l

L' IH I 1 ..h(r i" i F ,R'( riL Thl rnrF fi llr I.'Ti .il. l-7 li










nn d.I n. .s l, : 'n o ii.'l'i..L r iO D I. I ii P o rI i ., v L










COPYOFTCE TO NOTICEON TE
TNe dmfTISistsaton of Ithe n 0Tte of ARiTHR TWAD LRNXLAVENS, dAN ase. Fi LED'tomb
adrsis of wI r.i l 330 i Biay qSteet 4 103, esLD qisvll I, E I32202. fThs ttRs ned addrass. of t;


Ij t,'sr OR IOU.:d :ct, sp- ..' hc' IV..fll' a' ,''.r. OF K. li% tH I es I B I[ .ij ...
It A ",l, .[ ..aI d iq,,,!,j,.iJ ..n, l,; ,, '..A'IjI-ij nu. I. ..' .1"-- 'i!tlL 5',Ia".A A, id,..
,:.,. 'TI-tU- *[.L LAiFR 01 laRti. M(i;Tin.- Wfm.f Ih Ii \T l 'U f To S m--ST
PUliiCA'iHOPTWI l'O'ilc OR riLIR1 .\' ,\Fii. !liii. Ofhirc g t'EOpA
(XYOt' TlIS NOTICE ONTL4EM.



AF)ER ThE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OP THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS. EMfA NIS ANDOBJECTIONSNOTSO FLEDDLL BE OtsVERBApffiD.
NOTWXirSTAN[O T[ETJIBIOSSETBO&TEP A.OVEANyCL 4OiTW0
'W.1.RS, OR M JOR Ti! fill DOEC.itiV':, lAOFl o Ir Is -iLRREfi.

It ., ,l ,,i l ..,,i, n rt,::. A,,.. ; .ii, .:.....,A j Sc .' .. 9 .


Aftsey'forsPeeaonal Repmsentssive:


Attrssys at Law
1200 N.Mflitaty'Tsivt, Suite,2oo
Rooa telosA FL 33431


im
f .Ia1 Ndr
i~ IAIts, Nsnfi~rvAr


3aelslewizle utw322w8


M1 .1L /)


IMPA CT

WCGL

AM 1360


THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 6:30 P.M.


11


------------- -------


]


-0


Y : ,I


0


r nnrnA STAR


MARCH 19. 2005


]r ACf


I


cah ei- M II in eacets 7, a in IloidaPrss"eric


-


IMPACT


WCGL AM 1360

THE FLORIDA

STAR

REAL TALK

REAL TOPICS

SATURDAYS @ 6:30

P.M.



Issues That Address

Concerns Of The

African American

Community In Jacksonville

AndThe World






Lowest Prices in Town
Guaranteed
JULIUS BACON
(904) 766-0240
Fast Checks Fast Funds
Electronic Bookkeeping*
Notary
4932-2 Moncrief Road
West (At Richardson Road)


INVITATION TO BID

The Haskell Company, as Design
Builder for the Arena and Sports
Complex Parking Garages, is solic-
iting bids from certified Minority
Business Enterprise (MBE) sub-
contractors and suppliers, who are
interested in providing goods or
services. You must be currently
certified under the JSEB Program
of the City of Jacksonville. All sub-
contractors must Pre-Qualify by
completing and submitting a
Vendor Qualification Form and
Letter of Interest prior to submitting
a bid. Plans and specifications can
be viewed at The Haskell Building
(111 Riverside Ave.). Bids are due
March 31, 2005 at 2:00 p.m. at The
Haskell Company's corporate
headquarters, 111 Riverside
Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida.
Please direct all inquires to:
William H Glenn II, Project
Manager, (904) 357- 4258. The
Haskell Company is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.

The following Divisions of work will
be available for bids:

Division 2 Site Construction
Division 3 Concrete
Division 4 Masonry
Division 5 Metals
Division 6 Wood & Plastics.
Division 7 Thermal & Moisture
Protection
Division 8 Doors & Windows
Division 9 Finishes
Division 10 Specialties
Division 14 Conveying Systems
Division 15 Mechanical (HVAC,
Plumbing, Fire Protection)
Division 16 Electrical







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MARC1H 19. 2005


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Ticket Prices
$'27.50/$21t50
Students $7.50


- Saturday, MIarch 26.
Patron Reception 6:30 pn
Concert 8:00 pm
Florida Theatre


nsrteningd by

Listening. A,


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PI(904) 764-476 PH: (904) 354-0665 T CARDSEPT
Si FAX: (904) 764-0298 FAX: (904) 354-4543 MOST MAJOR CREDT CARD
STORE HOURS: STORE HOURS: FOOD STAMPS & EBT CARDS
S. MON-THURS 7AM-SPM MON-THURS 7AM-8PM -BEAVER STREET STORE
FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM CASHES ONLY
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM SUN. 7AM-7:30PM PAYROLL CHECKS


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