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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
March 12, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00010

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
March 12, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00010

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text





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Tune In To IMPACT
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Issues
Produced By
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Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


Two Jacksonville Youth Die in Car Accident;



Country Debates Raising Driving Age


The headline attached to this wrecked car might have
read "Teen driver killed in wreck," or."High school stu-
dent dies in car crash." Those who have to brave the
realities of facing another dead teenager's family want
action. Raising the legal driving age is the answer, many
say, an answer long overdue.


JACKSONVILLE Fla.-
- Kadeem Howell, 11, and
Cedric Djuan Reed, 15, died
in a car accident Sunday and
two other teens, both 14
were critically injured.
None of the youth, in the
vehicle, which was alleged-
ly stolen from a Wal-Mart
parking lot, were wearing
seatbelts.
The 1990 Buick Century
that Reed was driving
reportedly ran a red light at
Lennox Avenue and
Normandy Boulevard when


it was struck on the passen-
ger side by an eastbound
Buick LeSabre, which
erupted into flames, after
the passengers were pulled
from the vehicle.
The women, Terriney
Sharika Clark, 19, and
Linda Juanita Ervin, 31,
were wearing seatbelts and
were taken to the hospital
with non-life-threatening
injuries.
Last week, new findings
were released from brain
researchers at the National


Institute of Health that
explained that the legal driv-
ing age should be raised
from 16 to 17-years-of-age.
The research explained that
16-year-old drivers crash at
a much higher rate than
older teens because the
'weak link' of the brain is
not as developed.
A younger teen might be
taller but they have received
evidence that a 16-year-old's
brains are generally far less
developed than those of
teens just a little bit older.
The scientist say the
weak link is called "the
executive branch" which is
the part of the brain that
weighs risks, makes judg-
ments and controls impul-
sive behavior.
Dr. Jay Giedd, 'chief of
brain imaging in the child
psychiatric unit at National
Institute of Mental Health, is
leading the study.
He said, according to
USA Today that "It all
comes down to impulse con-
trol.
The brain is changing a
lot longer than we used to


Parents Charged With Neglect


Wilson Sullivan


JACKSONVILLE-
Brenda Sullivan, 48, and her
husband Wilson Sullivan,
55, moved from Akron,
Ohio to Jacksonville in
October 2004 and on
January 10, 2005 the
Department of Children and
Families went to their home
because of a call made
through the hotline about a
child born in 1987 who was
observed to be very short
and underweight for his age.
When DCF saw the 17-year-
old, he was wearing a diaper
and appeared to be very
developmentally delayed.
The teen-ager was taken


to the Children's Crisis
Center for a medical evalua-
tion., His weigh was 48.7
pounds and he was 53 /2
inches tall. The examining
doctor reported that this
would be an average height
of a 9-/2 year old and the
average weight of a 6-1/2
year old.
Investigation further
revealed that the teen had to
sleep in a large crib with a
wood frame top that was
locked down with a chain
and pad lock. Dr. McIntosh
reported that the child suf-
fered from the result of psy-
chosocial dwarfism and
starvation.


This condition is often
called "garbage can syn-
drome" in that a child in this
condition can take in a lot of
food and then bring it back
up. He also reported that the
child had sustained perma-
nent injury as a result of his
environmental condition.
When DCF removed the
17-year-old and the two 10-
year-old siblings from the
home they did not arrest the
couple at that time. All
three children were adopted
and had physical or mental
disabilities. Since the chil-
dren left the Sullivan's, the
17-year-old gained about 27
pounds and has grown half
an inch.
The Sullivan's were
arrested Tuesday, March 8
about 3:09 p.m. Their bond
has been set at $200,003
each. Their sister and their
attorney said there is more
to the story and the
Sullivan's are not guilty of a
crime.


Voter Approved Florida Minimum Wage Begins


The Agency for
Workforce Innovation
announced that the Florida
minimum m wroa nror n n


would begin on May 2,
2005. Voters approved on
November 2, 2004 that all
emnlnvees in th1p tatp cov-


ered by the federal mini-
mum wage law would start
at a minimum of $6.15 per
hoir


think. And that part of the
brain involved in decision-
making and controlling
impulses is among the latest
to come on board."
Even though the majority
of those polled regarding
increasing the driving age
agreed that it should be
done, many parents were
concerned that they would
be required to take their
teens to the different func-
tions where they now drive
themselves.
The boys in this accident


First Black TV

Newsman Dies

JACKSONVILLE--
Mack Freeman,
Jacksonville's first back tel-
evision newsman, died
Tuesday, March 8, 2005. He
was 67-years-old.
Freeman became a news
reporter in 1968 at WTLV-
TV, Channel 12. He worked
in that
posi-
tion for
eight
years
b u t
went
back to
teach-
ing in
Mack Freeman 1 9 8 0.
An alumnus of Edward
Waters College, Mr.
Freeman served as a dele-
gate to the-White House
Conference on the
Handicapped, became politi-
cal and sought a seat on the
City Council and the Florida
House of Representatives.
Freeman was born in
Mariarina but grew up in
West Palm Beach. He
joined the Marine Corps and
served in Korea as well as a
rifle instructor for midship-
men at the U.S. Naval
Academy.
Mr. Freeman was a great
civil rights worker and was
able to work with Andrew
Young, Isaac Hayes, Jesse
Jackson and Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. He partici-
pated in the 1963 March on
Washington. Freeman was
still active in the community
and was working to make
the corrections for the prob-
lems now facing his Alma
Mater.
Funeral arrangements are
being handled by Lewis-
Smith Mortuaries.


did not have permission to present legal driving age.
drive and were below the

'News in brief

Tr. Out For John Travolta Film

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. You may not get to be a
movie star but you may get to play in a
movie with John Travolta and The
Sopranos' James Gandolfini if you go to the
third floor of the Adam's Mark Hotel
Saturday between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
S Atmosphere Film and Television Extras
: are casting extras for "Lonely Hearts" star-
John ring Travolta and Gandolfini and need male
Travolta extras between 30 and 50 years of age to
play 1940 policemen. They are also looking for addition-
al extras of all ages, ethnicities and genders. Extras need
-to bring all contact information along with their social
Security number and all clothing sizes to be put in the
Extras database. NO experience, headshot, or resume is
C required. (904) 633-9095. Parking will be at the Court
House across the street or the west lot. Both lots are on a
First come first served basis.
This is Travolta's second motion picture filmed in
Jacksonville.

Superintendent Fryer Resigns

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-- Just a few weeks after
many protests and a request by some African American
Leaders for Superintendent Fryer to resign following the
announcement of Tasers being planned to be placed in the
middle and high schools of Duval County, John C. Fryer
tendered his resignation.
Mr. Fryer said he is not stepping
down under any pressure but is
leaving because this. is what .he .
wishes to do. His sudden resigna-
tion, he said has no relationship to
the illness he suffered in 2003 or the
many who were upset about his
school bus changes or any other
issue. John Fryer
Chairperson, Nancy Broner said
his seven years in Duval County is longer than most super-
intendents. He said his resignation would be effective at
the end of this school year. Plans will begin by the Board
on the process of finding a replacement. Duval County is
the sixth largest school district in Florida with more than
160 schools, 127,000 students, and 15,000 employees.

Gasoline Prices Climbing

It is reported that gasoline prices will probably jump
an additional 15 cents and remain that way through the
heavy driving season. Some analyses have suggested
crude may reach $60 per barrel and more. Regular gaso-
line averaged $2 a gallon last week, 26 cents higher than a
year ago. The high cost of fuel has forced the average
heating bill up 10 percent for natural gas and 29 percent
for heating oil.

Truckers May Have 16 Hour Workdays

Wal-Mart and other retailers are lobbying Congress to
extend the workday for truckers to 16 hours. Labor unions
and safety advocates say that would make the roadways
more dangerous for all drivers. Presently, truck drivers are
limited to 14 hours. Such gives the truckers three hours
to eat, rest or load and unload their trucks. Nearly 5,000
people were killed in large truck crashes in 2003.


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205 SM A UN V OF FLIOR IDA
PO BOX 117007 (01. 10.06)


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FR niRDA STA R


MARCH 12. 2004


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DeSHAYLA BRYANT, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
KELVIN PRYER, DELORES MINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
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The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
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National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
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On the Web:
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SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame

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To Be Equal
By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League
nA .-Ini-21st Century Thing To Say


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


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"Seemed like such, like,
an anti-21st century thing to
say."
So 'said a female under-
graduate at the opening of the
recent ABC News'
"Nightline" edition devoted
to the controversy over
Harvard University President
Larry Summers' speculation
why so few women are rising
to the top levels of the sci-
ences and mathematics in
higher education.
In January Summers, who
possesses a glittering resume
of top-level service in acad-
eme and government (he was
Treasury Secretary during the
Clinton Administration),
speculated while addressing a
small academic conference
that the paucity of women in
these fields has three major
causes, and he briefly listed'
them in what he said was
their probable order of impor-
tance.
The first, he said, was the
possibility that women were
choosing family commit-
ments rather than try to meet
the eighty-hour workweeks
high-level achievement in
these fields demand.
The second was-that fewer
women than men have the
genetic ability-he spoke of it
at one point as "a different
availability of aptitude"-to do
the kind of distinguished
work that would win them
top-level places in math and
science.


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


some' Americans-did have a
prominent place in the
United States of the past.
In that past, from'the sev-
enteenth to the mid-twentieth
centuries, bogus scientific
notions about "innate ability"
and which groups of human
beings have it in abundance
and which don't, helped
stretch a tarpaulin of
respectability over the cal-
lous consigning of millions
of women-and white-ethnic
immigrants and Americans
of color, too-to the ghettos of
the American social and
occupational hierarchies.
It's only been in the last
four decades that American
society has begun to over-
come the loss of "human cap-
ital" discrimination disguised
as a matter of "innate inabili-
ty" caused-and all of us are
right to be suspicious when it
is used to explain or even
hypothesize' about,the pres-
ent status of any group.
As Johnnetta Cole, presi-
dent of Bennett College for
Women, an historically black
college, said on the
"Nightline" edition, "I have
been through this. Women,
Jews, African Americans, all
kinds of underrepresented
groups. When our behavior is
[said to be] explained by
some innate inability, we
need to be careful with this.
... It's associated with the
assumption that there is an
Aryan superiority on this
earth. We have no such evi-
dence."
In fact, Cole later pointed
out that the so-called innate
differences explanation has
been discredited as a justifi-
cation of differences in group
status. She referred to the


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substantial advances women
have made since the 1960s in
all sorts of areas, from col-
lege and professional-school
attendance to occupations of
every sort. "Did we all of a
sudden become innately
more capable?" she asked
rhetorically. "Or does this
have to do with the circum-
stances? Does this have to do
with plain, old discrimina-
tion? How do you avoid that
kind of evidence and bring
forward the suggestion of
innate inability?"
In fact, the evidence is
widespread and compelling
that women's "place" in soci-
ety-and girls' tests scores on
standardized tests, for exam-
ple-have improved as shibbo-
leths about their lack of abili-
ty and the structural barriers
they supported have been
shattered.
Those who've criticized
Larry Summers for being
wrong on his scholarship and
wrong in this instance on his
responsibility as the president
of, not only Harvard the pre-
eminent institution of higher
learning, but Harvard the
richly diverse community of
people, are right-as he him-.
self has stated in the numer-
ous apologies he's issued
since the controversy broke,
Let no one pretend, that
criticism of those remarks is
an attempt to limit academic
freedom or the pursuit of
intellectual inquiry.
Instead, it acknowledges a
responsibility' we all bear:
building a 21st-century com-
munity in which all
Americans are free to achieve
to the best of their ability.


Summers' third hypothe-
sis involved the possibility of
sexist discrimination-but he
immediately largely dis-
counted the role it might play.
Since then, the controver-
sy those words provoked has
sparked a faculty uprising at
Harvard itself, and occupied
a, good bit of space on the
media's airwaves and editori-
al and op-ed pages.
Some beyond the ivied
walls of Harvard, or academe
in general, might be tempted
to shrug this debate off as a
matter of academic politics.
That would be a mistake;
for the broader issues
involved here go to the heart
of the values this nation has
been debating for all its exis-
tence: fairness, opportunity,
inclusiveness, tolerance, and
just plain human decency.
It's all to the good that the
reverberations from
President Summers' "specu-
lations" show no signs of
abating for, if one had to
choose just a few words to
characterize and place them
in context, those spoken by
the female undergraduate on
"Nightline" will do just fine.
Yes, this is the 21st centu-
ry, and the attitudes his words
conveyed should have no
place in it. They are an anti-
21st century thing to believe
and to say. It was this coun-
try's great loss that those atti-
tudes-imposing second- and
thirdclass citizenship on


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Socially Speaking

By
Betty Asque
Davis
S"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
"Off The Wall And Onto The Stage: Dancing The Art Of
-. Jonathan Green"
If you missed seeing the "Off The Wall And Onto The
Stage: Dancing The Art Of Jonathan Green Ballet" event
during its First Coast stop, I ardently and passionately recom-
mend that you travel to either Tampa on March 15, Augusta,
Georgia on March 30 or Greenville, South Carolina on April 14
to see this out of this world ballet! This is a 'must see' perform-
ance of all 'must see events'!
'The Beach Lady' was there, as was Ritz Theatre &
LaVilla Museum Exec Mrs. Carol Alexander accompanied
by her son Akeem Washington and retired Museum Exec Dr.
Rowena Rhodes Stewart. The Florida Theatre was over-
flowing with leaders from the arts community.
A few years ago The Howard Taylors gave us a signed
Jonathan Green poster from the Hewitt Collection when it
was on exhibit at the Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum. We were
so fascinated with the poster that we had it matted and framed
to hang in our home. Naturally, when I read the Jonathan Green
Associated Press story in our local weekly newspaper I felt it
was something I would find immensely enjoyable, not to men-
tion my fascination with the Gullah people. I was curious as to
how they could 'pull it off' and also fascinated with informa-
tion from I'd read from the Gallery Chuma in Charleston,
South Carolina that states: "Painter and Printmaker Jonathan
Green was born and raised in the small Gullah community of
Gardens Corner, located near the Sea Islands of South Carolina.
From the moment of his birth, Jonathan Green was special
child. He was born with a caul-an inner fetal membrane cov-
ering the head at birth-that some believe is a sign "that the child
is touched by uncommonness and magic that will bring inordi-
nate grace to the community".
"I was always interested in things, in how crafts were done,
who everyone's relatives were and the religious functions of the
community," says Jonathan Green. "I had all these stuff in my
head but I didn't have a place for it until I started painting."
I felt that I was reading a Tina McElroy Ansa novel.
And to say that I was beyond excitement when I learned that
the performance would be making a First Coast stop, is an
understatement! My anticipation and excitement of what I
thought the performance would be like was bounteously sur-
passed!
First of all Jonathan Green's paintings are vibrant, beautiful,
understandable and they portray subjects from everyday life.
They portray so beautifully the regional roots of the Gullah her-
itage. Combine Jonathan Green's beautiful paintings with the
choreographic artistry of William Starrett and the musical
direction of Trevor Weston and you have breathtaking, magi-
cal imagery!
At the Pre-Performance Reception Dr. Brenda Simmons,
Executive Dean, North Campus, Florida Community who coor-
dinated the First Coast performance spoke and was joined on
the program by Florida Community College Foundation
Trustee Mrs. Emily Smith (whose grandmother wrote a book
on the Sea Island culture that precedes the 'Uncle Remus' sto-
ries), Florida Community College President Dr. Steven
Wallace, North Campus President Dr. Barbara Darby,
National Steering Committee Chair Marvin Chernoff and the
artist himself, Jonathan Green. This group led by Dr. Simmons
collaborated with youth groups and churches to insure that
young people on the First Coast would see this phenomenal
performance. The diverse audience at both the matinee and
evening performance were excitingly responsive!
Among the featured music was a rendition of the late
Charlie 'Hoss 'Singleton's collaborative songwriting work
"He Treats Your Daughter Mean" recorded by the renowned
singer Ms. Ruth Brown. All of songs used for the ballet were
familiar to the audience and took you 'down,memory lane.'
On display during the pre-performance reception were three
of Mr. Green's works owned by Dr. Kenneth and Mrs. Susan
Canty Jones. When we spoke with Mrs. Jones about their
Jonathan Green collection she shared, "I discovered Jonathan
Green's work during a North Carolina visit and fell in love with
his paintings. By chance, we met Jonathan Green in the airport
after having seen another of his paintings in New Orleans.
When he learned of our interest in the painting at the New
Orleans gallery, he arranged for us to make the purchase. We
always purchase three works of an artists to insure that each of
our children will have a work from each artist that we have in
our collection. Jonathan also apprised us of his being a featured
segment on the CBS Sunday Morning."
I'd say that the Joneses and artist Jonathan Green have
become friends. WOW!
*******
"The King and I"
Earlier in the week of the "Off The Wall And Onto The
Stage: Dancing The Art Of Jonathan Green" was the stage
presentation of Rodgers & Hammerstein's The King and I.
We attended the Family Night performance where in addition to
the stage performance there were activities in the lobby before
and after the play and during intermission. In the Times Union
Performing Arts Center lobby there were tables filled with
Thai culture activities. Even the refreshments were child friend-
ly with ice cream, cotton candy, lemonade, cookies and candy.
It was a beautifully glorious evening! The costumes were
gorgeous and the casts of performers were marvelously gra-
cious both on stage and off. When I spoke with Stephanie
Powers following the performance she acknowledged that
most people are unaware of her skilled singing talent. She was


delightful and gracious as was Ronobir Lahiri who played the
role of The Kifng of Siam and all of the children whose parents
traveled with them during the tour.
+*****+*
Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or you may reach me directly at
imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-
7008.
SSee you in the paper! I


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The Readers of
the Black
Press in
America are
more educated,
make more
income and
have
substantial :

buying power.


Source: The Media
Audit, 2004 Black
Newspapers i
Readership Report,
S nnpa.org |
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MARCH 12, 200


FLORIDA STAR


Family And Friends Day Scheduled At Greater Grant Memorial AME


Greater Grant Memorial AME Church, 5533 Gilchrist
Rd., invites the public to attend Family And Friends Day
on Sunday, March 13, during the 7:45 .am. and 11:00 a.m.

Bishop McKinley Young

To Receive Official Welcome


-l I .g' -
Bishop McKinley Young Bishop Philip R. Cousin
And
Dr. Dorothy J. Young
Bishop McKinley young, Presiding Prelate of the
African Methodist Episcopal Church, Eleventh Episcopal
District (Florida and the Bahamas), will be officially wel-
comed along with Supervisor Dr. Dorothy Jackson Young
during a special service on Thursday, March 17, 7:00 p.m.
at Saint Paul AME Church, 6910 New Kings Rd. Rev.
Marvin Zanders, II is the host pastor.
Bishop Young Was elected the 109th Bishop of the
African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1992.
Bishop Philip Robert Cousin, Senior Bishop of The
AME Church is the speaker for this spirit-filled occasion.

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WHAT IS
All human relationships end
in separation. It's a fact which
cannot be denied. Regardless of
how much energy or emotional.
commitment we invest in a rela-
tionship, it cannot last forever.
When a relationship is
brought to an end by death, the
loss is known as bereavement. It
is the emotional reaction to such
a loss that we call grief. It can
have many forms and manifesta-
tions. It can last for varying
lengths of time and be felt to dif-
ferent degrees, but there are a
few universal factors about
grief.
We undersatnd that grief is a


worship services,.
Sis. Saundra Christie Waldrop ofMt. Nebo Missionary
Baptist Church is the speaker for the 7:45 a.m. service.
She is known for her creativity and forsight. Sis. waldrop
and husband, Rev. Will A. Waldrop, have one daughter
currently employed as a Chaplin at Shands Hospital.
Rev. Leroy Mitchell, III, Pastor of Greater Brookville
Church of Lynchburg, Va., and who attend Greater Grant
as a young man, is the speaker for the 11:00 a.m. worship
service. He is the son of Leroy M. and Delores Mitchell.


er..'


Sis..Sau a Wa


Sis. Saundra C. Waldrop


Re Leroy Mitchell, III
Rev. Leroy Mitchell, III


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-
RITZ VOICES IN CONCERT-The Women's Progressive
Club of Saint Paul AME Church, 6910 New Kings Rd., pres-
ents the renowned Ritz Voices in concert on Sunday, March
16, at 4:00 p.m. Mrs. Barbara Presha is President of the
Women's Progressive Club. The Rev. Marvin C. Zanders, II
is the Pastor of Saint Paul.
MARCH REVIVAL-Emanuel Missionary Baptist Church,
2407 Rev. S.L. Badger, Jr. Circle E. (Division St.), will host
a March Revival March 15-17, nightly at 7:00 p.m. Rev
Timothy L..Cole, an associate minister at West Friendship
Baptist Church, is the Evangelist. The emphasis this year is
on the youth. Youth choirs of West Friendship,
Summerville, St. Andrews and Zion Hope Missionary
Baptist Churches will perform. Rev. Herb Anderson, Pastor.
For more information call the church office at 356-9371.
FAMILY AND FRIENDS DAY-Summerville Baptist
Church invites the public to attend Family and Friends Day.
Rev. Galvester Washington of Emanuel Baptist Church is the
speaker. Rev. James W. Henry, Pastor.
EDUCATION FORUM-MOVING YOUTH TOWARD
SUCCESS-The Education MIinistry of Simpson Memorial
United Methodist Church, 1114 Cleveland St., presents an
Education Forum: Moving Youth Toward Success, designed
to help children plan for success. The forum will be held on
March 19, from 9:00 a.m. until 12 noon in the Fellowship
Hall. Topics include college prep classes, SAT, ACT testing
timelines, scholarship essay tips, financing an education, tips
from current college students and professionals,
vocational/professional training and ways parents can help
children move toward success. Rev. Moses H. Johnson,
Senior Pastor.
MEN'S FELLOWSHIP-A Men's Fellowship will be held
on Saturday, March 26 at New Bethlehem Missionary
Baptist Church, 1824 Prospect St. Breakfast will be served
,immediately followshing the fellowship. ,Bro. William
Kelly, Leader. Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor.
DEDICATION BANQUET- Rev. Dr. Clifton Davis is"
Master of Ceremonies at First A.M I.E. Church of Palm Coast
on Sunday, March 13 at 6:00 p.m. The actor, singer, produc-
er. composer and minister is best known for his five-year
stint as Rev. Reuben Gregory on the popular television
series,, "Amen." First AME's educational building dedica-
tion was also highlighted by the Mass choir and New Destiny
Ensemble Concert at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, March 11. The
actual dedication is Saturday, March 12, at 11:00 a.m., with
Bishop McKinley Young as the speaker. Bishop Richard
Allen Hildebrand is the guest speaker for the 8:00 a.m. and
10:45 a.m. servcies on Sunday, March 13. Rev. Gillard S.
Glover, Pastor


GRIEF?
normal response. It can be,
extremely painful, and poten-
tially harmful' if avoided.
The proper goal of grief is
the internal realization and
recognition of death.
Recovery, however, : does
not mean all emotional signifi-
cance of death has ended.
Rather, it signifies the abhilt1 of
the griever to form new rela-
tionships and make new com-
mitments.

A.B. COLEMAN
MORTUARY, INC.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
6860 Moncrlsf Rd,.
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman.com


Account #234-5528-5
Compass Bank
Jacksonville, FL


He is a husband and father of five children and has
two grandchildren.
A free Continental Breakfast will be served following
the 7:45 a.m. service. Dinner will be served following the
11:00 a.m. service. Rev. Tony D. Hansberry, Pastor



The Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress: 723 W. 45th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School 9:31) a.m. .. -.:
Sunday MNorning \orship 11:00 a.m
Sunday% Afternoon Bible Stud)
(E\cepl First Sunda I 4:01) p.m. -
Tuesda) Prauer Meeting 7:30 p.m. i;
Sunday School Re\ies............8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Re%. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church ; ... .-
(904) 768-0272 Home


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


WORSHIP CENTER
SDr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E.-Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.
Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

Mount Sinai Community Development Enterprise
Community Resource Education
And Development Institute
2049 North Pearl Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 798-8733

GED Program, FCAT, Tutoring, Mentoring, After School,
Job Skills Training, National Parenting Program, Ex-Offenders,
Computer Skills Training for Youth and Adults.
For More Information
Call (904) 798-8722 or 798-8733.

HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT!
Call 904/765-9773
Give to: The Samuel W. Smith Fund Raiser
for Kidney Transplant,








4RCHJ2~~~~IIV 0'FLRD -A ACJA


an Rather was no Liberal


When Dan Rather stepped down this week after 24 .......
ears as anchor of "CBS Evening News," he was frequent- "
Characterized as a liberal. However, a review of Rather's
career shows that, if anything, he was more conservative
ian his counterparts at NBC and ABC.
The idea that Rather was politically liberal can be traced
o a testy 1974 press conference exchange he had with
president Richard M. Nixon. At the National Association of
broadcasters' convention in Houston, Nixon called on
lather to ask a question. When he did, there was a burst of
applause for the hometown boy who had made good.
Sixon, in an awkward attempt to be humorous, asked: "Are
you running for something?" Rather quickly retorted, "No, George Curry
sir, Mr. President. Are you?"
Five months later, Rather was replaced on the White House beat by Bob Schieffer who,
ironically, is sitting in Rather's seat until the network decides on the format and person or
persons to be involved in the post-Rather newscast.
In the meantime, the perception exists in many quarters that Rather was a political lib-
eral. As usual, the excellent researchers at Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR) have
examined Rather's broadcasts and they have arrived at a different conclusion. In a report
Son its Web site, www.fair.org, the organization reveals: "...The notion that Rather has used
Shis CBS platform to disseminate left-wing propaganda over the last two decades does not
hold up to scrutiny."
FAIR scrutinized the broadcasts of ABC, NBC and CBS, which remains stuck in third
place.
"If Rather were indeed liberal or just more liberal than his network competitors one
would think that the CBS Evening News would include more critical perspectives in its
newscast, particularly during a Republican administration," the report says. "But FAIR's
study of guests and sources appearing during coverage of the Iraq war (3/20/03-4/9/03)
actually found that Rather's broadcast had the highest percentage of official U.S. sources
(75 percent) and the lowest number (less than one percent) of U.S. anti-war voices.
"A FAIR study of all the network broadcasts in 2001 found that CBS Evening News
had the most Republicans and the fewest Democrats (76 percent vs. 23 percent). The dif-
ference between CBS and the other networks was slim, but such analysis belies the notion
that Rather's network or any of the others have a liberal bias."
Rather did not show any favoritism toward civil rights leaders, especially Jesse
Jackson.
During the 1993 Democratic National Convention, Rather said: "There have always
been two Jesse Jacksons. There's Jesse the radical, who preaches rage and black sepa-
ratism. That Jesse Jackson has always angered whites. And there's Jesse the self-promot-
er, who preaches desegregation and compromise."
Jesse Jackson, a Black separatist? That wasn't true in 1993 or in 2003 or at any other
time.
By contrast, Rather provided fawning coverage of Ronald Reagan's death. On June 5,
2004, he said on CBS Evening News that Reagan "was the great communicator, yes. But
he was also a master at communicating greatness. He understood that, as he once put it,
'History is a ribbon always unfurling,' and managed to convey his vision in terms of both
simple and poetic. And so he was able to act as a conduit to connect us to who we had been
and who we could be."
Reagan's White House image makers couldn't have been more effusive in their praise.
The retiring CBS anchor created what has become known as Ratherisms, such as: "In
Southern states they beat him like a rented mule." And, "If a frog had side pockets, he'd
carry, a handgun."' Beneath such cornball is a biased journalist, a self-admitted bias tilted
in favor of those in pow er, not progressive ideas or movements.
In an appearance on CBS's "Late Show with David Letterman" [9/17/01], Rather, who
retired a year early because he used fake documents about President Bush's service in the
National Guard, said: "George Bush is president. He makes the decisions, and, you know,
it's just one American, wherever he wants me to line up, just tell me where. And he'll make
the call."
Equally troubling was a speech he gave at Harvard University last July 25. Rather said,
"Look, when a president of the United States, any president, Republican or Democrat, says
these are the facts, there is a heavy prejudice, including my own, to give him the benefit
of any doubt, and for that I do not apologize."
Anyone who called Dan Rather a liberal owes all of us an apology.

George E.. Curry is editor-in-chief of the NNPA News Service and BlackPressUSA.com.
His most recent book is the anthology, The Best of Emerge Magazine. He can be reached
via his Web site, georgecurry.com.
Globalization and the American Worker

Globalization. The word sounds removed from our everyday world of providing public serv-
ices. But globalization is not just about goods manufactured overseas, like American cars made
in Mexico or American toys outsourced to China.
Countries in the European Union, for example, want a piece of our health care, education
and water delivery systems. And with the, current wave .of international trade agreements, they
might just get the whole pie. President' George Bush is pushing a new -pact, the Central
American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), which p6ses a severe threat to public services here
and abroad. In addition, the Free Trade Area of the Americas would include almost every coun-
tr' in the Americas, and make,it easier for governments to ship jobs our state and local gov-
ernment jobs overseas to countries that do not safeguard workers' rights. Laws that help to
keep our jobs within the public sector could be challenged.
When Enron took over the public water system in Buenos Aires, Argentina, it delivered toxic
water. So the Argentine government reclaimed the system. Now, in a secretive World Bank tri-
bunal, Enron is suing Argentina for $550 million in compensation for breach of contract rather
than the Argentine government suing the company for compensation:
Under the North American Free Trade Agreement, United Parcel Service is challenging the
Canadian government, calling its publicly financed postal system "unfair competition." If UPS
wins, any government participation in a service competing with the private sector could be chal-
lenged.
In an example closer to home, the United States has indicated a willingness to consider full
market access to higher education for other countries. If this comes to pass, World Trade
Organization (WTO) members could file a complaint against us for using only domestic (pub-
lic) suppliers and not foreign (private) ones in higher-education support programs like student
loans and public subsidies to state universities. If the U.S. lost a secret WTO adjudication, with-
out worker or public input, we could have duties imposed on our goods shipped overseas.
Because the U.S. government signed onto the General Agreement on Trade in Services,


allowing access to our markets, current negotiations may expand the agreement's coverage over
areas affecting public service workers, such as the regulation of construction and sanitation. The
long arm of GATS could even undermine the protection of public health and safety, the control
of monopolies and the'safeguarding of workers' rights, the environment, and professional
licensing and certification standards. For example, what if the Philippines wanted to send a
group of nurses to work in the United States but they weren't licensed under the same provi-
sions used for our nurses? Our health facilities might not let them work there. If the GATS is
expanded, as some are proposing, the Philippine government could then sue the U.S. govern-
ment for discrimination.
The Bush administration has been pushing really hard for anti-worker international agree-
n-"nts, and labor l~s been pushing right backl nions, churches anyone and everyone who


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SSpring Concert

March 19, 2005

Stravinsky

SL'histoire du soldat

(The Soldier's Tale)

Ravel Piano Trio in

A minor



What a treat, for your senses! The Ritz Chamber Players'
musical mastery entwined with dancer and nationally-recog-:
nized local choreographer sensation Stephanie Powell. These
Sawe-inspiring, original works for chamber ensemble and
dancer will take your breath away! We keep you steeped'in the
dance tradition with music from Ravel, French to his finger-
tips, as his Piano Trio in A minor proves. Finally, we launch
you into the trio version of Stravinsky 's ballet L'histoire du
soldat (The Soldier's Tale), that reveals this great Russian
composer ideas on American Jazz!


:Tickets: $35.00
Call: Jacksonville Symphony Box Office (904) 354-5547; toll free
:(877) 662-6731, Monday Friday

iVisit: Symphony Box Office, 300 West Water Street,
:Jacksonville, FL 32202




a re : r
cares about preserving our democracy and states' rights are working together to fight unfair,
anti-worker deals. We are battling this with membership education, international solidarity, cor-
porate campaigns and political action. And we will continue to fight as.long as the needs of the
few are put ahead of the needs of the many.
What can you do? Union members need to be educated one at a time, so spread the word.
Hook up with fair-trade groups like Jobs with Justice, United Students Against Sweatshops,
the Sierra Club in your communities. Never has the statement "Think globally, act locally"
been more true.
Right now, unions in Central America are staging protests and sit-ins in their parliaments to
block CAFTA. By joining them in this effort, we will send a strong message to the Bush admin-
istration a message that says, trade rules threatening our public services are simply unaccept-
able.
William Lucy is Secretary-Treasurer of the American Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO. He is also founder and president of the Coalition of Black
Trade Unionists e "


o, Vr. .


/2005


ARCH 12


FLORIDA STAR


PAGdE A-


C


-








PAGE A-6 FLORIDA STAR MARCH12, 204.


River Region Hosts Visitors From Africa


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--
On Monday, March 7, River
Region played host to sever-
al visitors from Africa.
Ms. Routh Esther Elise
(Women's Center of the
Association to Fight
Violence Against Women,
Cameroon), Mrs. Khady
Mbengue (General
Secretary West.African
Women Association,
Senegal), Mrs. Zohra Bent
Mohamed (Psychiatrist
Consultant for Tunisian
Union for Mentally


Handicapped People) came
to Jacksonville to learn
about women's leadership
and development in relation-
ship to healthcare, business,
and social issues.
The visit was sponsored
by the U.S. State
Department. The visitors
toured several facilities of
River Region Human
Services to learn about the
numerous programs and
services the non-profit
agency provides to
HIV/AIDS patients through-


out Jacksonville. The toqiW
was coordinated by thI
Duval County Healti|;
Department. Dery
Williams, River Region'!
CEO says, "It was a pleasure
to meet our friends from
Africa, and to shove\ them
what we at River Region are
accomplishing in the fight
against HIV/AIDS. I hope
that the things the)',e .
learned from us will helpi
them in their fight against
HIV/AIDS in Cameroon,,
Senegal, and Tunisia."


Back row from left to right: Ella Simmons (Team Coordinator for USA/SA HIVIAIDS
L~I- S IM -A-l---1 /-I--1 (:.-.--*-.-l H:^M C .. & A/I P I:n:i- I r\narnf:inn fn-


B-CC Announces Four Staff Changes


international Network), Cnarles Simmons, Mlinervad Iryiant (v..r. .inicalii upeiauuio Tui DAYTONA BEACH,
River Region), Derya Williams (Executive Director and CEO for River Region). Front
row: Ms. Routh Esther Elise (Women's Center of the Association to Fight Violence Fla. -- Bethune-ookman
Against Women, Cameroon), Mrs. Khady Mbengue (General Secretary West African College President Dr. Trudie
Women Association, Senegal), Jackie Nash (Regional AIDS Program Officer Duval Kibbe Reed has announced
County Health Dept.), Mrs. Zohra Bent Mohamed (Psychiatrist Consultant for Tunisian four staff changes.
Union for Mentally Handicapped People). Ms. Cynthia Graham

New Study gets At Heart Of Stroke
GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Cardiology. with reduced risk in all of many with permanent
Tossing out tobacco, nosh- "We determined that the these subgroups. stroke-related disabilities. In
ing nutritious foods and type of drugs involved did More than 50 million fact, stroke is one of the
exercising are heart healthy not affect who would go on Americans have high blood leading causes of admission
habits key to slashing stroke to have a stroke," said pressure, according to the to long-term nursing home
and heart attack risk. But Rhonda Cooper-DeHoff, a American Heart care and other disability-


some patients also must take
medicines when these
efforts aren't enough to rein
in high blood pressure, long
linked to the debilitating,
often deadly condition.
Now it appears a blood
pressure-lowering regimen
that includes drugs known
as calcium antagonists is
comparable to traditional
therapy with beta-blockers
and diuretics when it comes
to warding off stroke in
patients with heart disease,
University of Florida
researchers reported today
(March 8) at the annual sci-
entific sessions of the
American College of


research assistant professor
at UF's College of
Medicine. "The bottom line
is it's not as important what
you use to treat the high
blood pressure as it is to get
the blood pressure down."
The study showed that
smoking, diabetes, heart
rhythm abnormalities, resid-
ing in the Southeast and a
history of prior stroke or
heart attack were among the
factors linked to increased
stroke risk.
But lowering systolic
blood pressure -- the higher
of the two numbers in a
blood pressure reading --to
less than 140 was associated


Association. Elevated blood
pressure is associated with.
up to half of all cases of
coronary artery disease, a
leading killer of men and
women in the United States.
Yet surveys have shown
that 30 percent or less of
patients who are known to
be hypertensive comply
with treatment, and even a
smaller percentage achieve
the targeted blood pressure
goal.
Meanwhile, about
700,000 Americans a year
suffer a new or recurrent
stroke, according to the
AHA. Nearly 163,000 die.
Millions of others survive,


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related expenses, said Dr.
Thomas A. Pearson, profes-
sor and chairman of the
department of community
and preventive medicine at
the University of Rochester
Medical Center.
"Stroke turns out be very
costly, both in human and
quality of life terms as well
as monetary terms," Pearson
said.


will assume the position of
Student Ombudsperson and
Dean of Women, Ms. Salina
Hamilton will become an
Analyst/Trainer in the
Center of Information
Technology, and Ms. Cathy
Washington will take over
Graham's position of
Director of Human
Resources. Lillie Wiggins
has assumed the position of
Accounts Payable
Supervisor.
The Office of Student
Ombudsperson was created
by Dr. Reed to improve cus-
tomer service to students
and listen to students and
equip students with the tools
to make effective decisions.
Ms. Graham came to
Bethune-Cookman College
in 2001 and has also served
as Director of Student
Activities. A certified Senior
Professional in Human


Resources, Ms. Graham
earned her bachelor's degree
from Cleveland State
University and her master's
from Malone College in
Canton, Ohio.
A 1989 Bethune-
Cookman College graduate,
Ms. Hamilton is in her 16th
year of employment at her
alma mater, with 13 years of
experience in the Center for
Information Technology.
Ms. Washington, a 1971
graduate, has been working
in the College's accounting
department since 1977. She
also serves as the President
of the Volusia County
Alumni chapter and is an ex
officio member of the
College's Board of Trustees.
Ms. Wiggins has been
with Bethune-Cookman
College since 1993 and has
served as a utility clerk and
book keeper.


pJ
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"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted




The Victory is in the Word & Music

Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.


Topic For Saturday, March 12, 2005:
The "Dynamic Duo" News Anchors Dawn
Lopez (Fox News) and Angela Spears (NBC
News) talk candidly with Andrea Giggetts about
life as Jacksonville's "first ladies"
of network television.


6050-6 MoncriefRd., Jacksonville, FL 32209

Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955

Web address: WWW. WCGL1360. COM

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SELMA, Ala.--Rep.
John Lewis from Georgia
spoke at the Brown AME
Chapel on the anniversary of
"Bloody Sunday" in obser-
vance of observed the 40th
anniversary of the historic
Selma voting rights march.
In March 1965, only 19.3
percent of eligible blacks
were registered in Alabama,
compared with 69.2 percent
of whites.
Among those on hand to
commemorate the march
across the Edmund Pettus
Bridge were singer Harry
Belafonte, who took part in
the demonstration 40 years
ago; the Rev. Jesse Jackson;


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Senate Majority Leader Bill
Frist, and Lynda Johnson
Robb, whose '' father,
President Lyndon Johnson,
signed the Voting Rights Act
into law in 1965.
"President Johnson
signed that act, but it was
written by the people of
Selma," said Congressman
John Lewis, a Georgia
Democrat who was clubbed
on the head during the
"Bloody Sunday" attack on
marchers by state troopers
and sheriffs deputies on
March 7, 1965. He was
among 17 blacks hospital-
ized as that march was
turned back.
i


A second march two
weeks later, under the pro-
tection of a, federal court
order and led by the Rev.
Martin Luther King Jr., went
80 kilometers (50 miles)
from the bridge over the
Alabama River to the steps
of the state Capitol in
Montgomery.
The attack and the march
inspired passage of the
Voting Rights Act, which
barred obstacles such as lit-
eracy tests that were set up
by segregationists to keep
blacks from .registering to
vote.


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Effective March 14, 2005,


the City Of Jacksonville





Department of



Neighborhoods



Property Safety




Division



will relocate to


1801 Art Museum Drive,


Building 3500


Suite 200 (2nd floor).











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PAGE A-7


FLORIDA STAR


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PAWG A-8 I


ENTERTAIN


The 2005 Soul Train Awards

Sby Rych McCcin

This year's Soul Train Awards took place
on the Paramount Studios Lot. Having an
awards show on a movie lot didn't carry the
zeal and enthusiasm that would have taken
place at an auditorium or similar party
venue. The fans who usually stand outside
to scream, hoot, whistle and call names
while viewing the stars arrivals on the red
carpet were absent. The only people to greet
the red carpet star bunch were press, event
staff, security and a few inside lookie-loos.
.Usher and Alicia Keys led the pack in the
winners circle. Both won two individual
awards and shared the prize for best R&B
Soul Single by a group or duo for their hit
"My Boo." Usher snagged the trophy for
Best Male R&B-Soul Single for
"Confessions Part II," and the award for
Best R&B-Soul Album by a Male Artist for
"Confessions." He also took home an award
for Best R&B-Soul or Rap Music Video for
his work with rappers Ludacris & Lil Jon
for the song "Yeah," and was the co-recipi-
ent of The Sammy Davis, Jr. Entertainer of
the Year Award (male), along with "The
Princess of Crunk," Ciara (female).
Keys won Best Female R&B-Soul Single
for her smash "If I Ain't.Got You," and was
honored for Best Female R&B-Soul Album
for "The Diary of Alicia Keys." Ice Cube
was honored with The Quincy Jones Award
for Outstanding Career Achievements.
Other winners included Destiny's Child, for
"Destiny Fulfilled," Ciara for Best R&B-
Soul or rap new artist for her album
"Goodies," and gospel group Israel & New
Breed for their album "Live From Another
Level."
Brian McKnight, Fantasia, Nick Cannon
and Nicole Richie shared the hosting duties
for the evening. The Soul Train Awards was
produced by Don Cornelius Productions,


Usher at the Soul Train Awards (Photo
@2005 Andre' B. Murray/A Bern Agency
Photo)


Nick Cannon and Christina Milian at the
Soul Train Awards (Photo @2005 Andre'
B. Murray/A Bern Agency Photo)

Inc., in association with Tribune .


Entertainment Company and will air on March 12th. Check your local listings.


TheFloridaStar.com
''' k


105.1 FM
we&&mlW ,


TAMA Broadcasting, Inc.


The largest privately Black owned media company in the State of Florida.
Three (3) Stations here in Jacksonville.

Our listeners spend nearly 1.4 Billion Dollars each year in retail sales
Invite them to shop at your business....they will come!
Call for your free, no obligation marketing analysis.


9550 Regency Square Blvd.
Suite #200
Jacksonville, Fl 32225
Office (904) 680-1050
Fax (904) 680-1051
www.tamabroadcastine.com


Rolonda Watts: New TV Show Lie Detector
by Rych McCain

Journalist/Actress/Talk Show Hostess Rolonda Watts has
a new PAX TV Network Show "LIE DETECTOR." It airs
on Tuesday nights at 9:PM ET/PT. The concept of the show
is to give people a chance to explain their side of a situation
who have been accused of something or are accusing some-
one of something. Every hour long episode will present
three intriguing cases whose conclusions are unresolved for
those who tell them. After the viewers see news footage and
taped interviews, Watts conducts a candid conversation,
allowing them to voice their side of the story. The moment
of truth arrives when the guest submits to a lie detector test
administered by renowned polygraph expert Dr. Ed Gelb.
At the end of each segment, Watts reveals if the lie detector
vindicates the guest or brands them as a liar. Their reactions
are live and real. Rolonda Watts (Photo @2005 Andre' B. Murray/A
Watts formerly hosted her own daytime talk show "The Bern Agency Photo)
Rolonda Show," that ran for four years. Unfortunately, Jerry Springer upset the apple cart with his trail-
er park, White trash/Black ghetto guests, with no class who would erupt on the set with fist fights and
explicit language gestures and arguments. With Oprah dominating the market, Springer hogged what lit-
tle viewing audience was left basically between Montel Williams, Geraldo Rivera and herself. Watts
refused to stoop down to gutter journalism to compete with Springer's ratings.
As she so eloquently states, "We were faced with a decision, do you do the Springer thing and com-
pete, or do you just say, let me stop while I'm on stop and move on?"
"I can't give up my integrity. My ancestors worked too hard for me to do that on television. I can't do
that and I can't live with myself doing that. So I had to bow out."
Watts is a very versatile and muli-talented. What or who inspired and nurtured that versatility? Watts
enthusiastically responded, "I believe my parents, Spelman College, Columbia University and the edu-
cated people in my neighborhood. I was always a little kid who had way too much energy. I could have
run a gang as well as I run my own company. I just had good people around me who helped put that
energy in the right place. My mother swears I'd be on Ritalin if she hadn't given me other things to do
because I'm hyperactive. I have to constantly be busy. Of course I had people in my life i.e., parents,
educators and community leaders who told me there wasn't nothing I couldn't do."
Watts offers some solid advice to young people and says, "The world is changing all the time. What
is hot today, won't be hot tomorrow. What is selling today will stink tomorrow. So you always have to
.have more than one craft going, more than one career with multiple streams of income going on. When
my talk show was over, what else was I going to do if I didn't have acting, writing and journalism to fall
back on?"
Good advice from a very attractive, well educated soul sistah whose wisdom, experience and enthu-
siasm with life is very uplifting and inspiring.


Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
BE COOL was released by MGM this weekend. It is
the sequel to the comedy smash GET SHORTY. John
Travolta returns as Chili Palmer, the movie shylock who
dumps the film world for the record business. After a friend
who owns an independent record label is shot to death.
while at lunch at an outdoor caf6, Palmer (Travolta) joins
the deceased's widow Edie (Urna Thurman) as her ne\\
partner with the label. Palmer takes an up-and-coming
singing starlet Linda Moon (Christina Milian), from her
personal manager Raji (Vince Vaughn). He also has to deal
with Russian mobsters, eloquent gangsta record producer
Sin LaSalle (Cedric The Entertainer) and wannabe-actor
bodyguard Elliot Wilhelm (The Rock).
The movie has the typical ethnic stereotypes that con-
scious people hate to stomach and Hollyweird loves to
exploit. Travolta's character gets into predicaments that in
real life he would have been smoked but this is
Hollyweird! If entertainment with no realistic after thought
is your cup of tea and you're into the flash and glitter of the
record business, you might get off on this flick.
Tyra Banks' UPN show TOP MODEL, opened its
fourth season to its largest premiere viewing audience ever.
Any wannabe model who is serious, should watch this pro-
gram religiously. The twenty-four year old, Chicago writer,
Jessica Betts won UPN's' THE ROAD TO STARDOM
WITH MISSY ELLIOTT. Her prizes included a record
contract with Elliott's label, single to be released and a 100
thousand dollar check.
Wrong target? Why are ministers from 20 churches in
Jonesboro, Arkansas planning a protest against rapper
NELLY for his scheduled March 12th concert there. Why
don't these "Faith Based," government paid off, soft shoe,
"So-called," men-of-God, attack the real culprits-the
record companies who finance, produce, release, market
and promote this self hate, misogynistic garbage?
Singer Gerald Levert was arrested for DUI after a traf-
fic stop. He was pepper sprayed and physically subdued
after allegedly resisting arrest, which led to an additional
charge of assaulting a police officer
Rapper 50 Cent fired rapper GAME from the G Unit
over the air on New York's Hot 97. Shortly after, one of
50's entourage members was shot in the leg during a con-
frontation in the radio station's lobby. 50 made it to safety.
Hip Hop veteran Davey D, assembled a protest against
Hot 97 called "STOP RACIST HOT 97 RALLY 4 HIP
HOP!" He raises questions about Hot 97's involvement
and encouragement of rap beefs that keep our community
divided. For more information, check out Davey D's
newsletter, FNV-Newsletter-on@mail-list.com.
Maat-Hotep!


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MARCH 12. 200,'


FR nvjlIA STAR


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1.-IIRCH 12, 2005l _____


Hip! Hop! Hooray! Black Women Starting Over


The Delta Delta Chapter of The National Sorority of Phi
Delta Kappa, Inc. has organized a group of seven men to
be part of the Chapter's Anthropos, men who support
the local Chapter's activities. The Anthropos are plan-
ning several upcoming events in support of the sorority.
From left are, Samuel Holman (President), Michael
McKinney, David Perry (Chaplain), Curtis Kimbrough
(Secretary), Donald Parker (Treasurer), and Anthony
Kennedy. Not shown is Arnold Merriweather. Delta
Delta's Chairpersons are Jakki Stubbs and Rebecca
Highsmith. Flora Parker, Basileus.



COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

WHO'S TAKING CARE OF ME?-A free seminar will
be held on Saturday, March 19 at The Charles M.
Neviaser Educational Institute at Community Hospice,
4266-100 Sunbeam Rd. The conference will provide
Women "iith a support group atmosphere \\ here caregiv-
ing experiences can be shared. Topics include Why Stress
Can Hurt You and How To Reduce Stress, Tips on
Dealtng With Grief and Loss, How To Choose Your
Battles, Health Information, and Ways To Keep Your
Own Needs Met. The program is presented by the
Community Hospice African-American Task Force, rec-
ogn izing the iole women play in caregiving. Registration
is free and includes a continental breakfast (8:30-9:00
a.m.) Seating is limited. Register early. For more infor-
mation call (904) 268-2280, ext. 6806.
SHERIFF'S TOWN HALL MEETINGS-The
Jacksonville Sheriff's Office will host a series of meet-
ings soliciting citizen input on the subject of Tasers in the
schools. Meeting dates and locations include: Monday,
March 14, 7:00 p.m., FCCJ Kent Campus, 3939
Rooselvelt Blvd-Student .Union Room (Southwest
Jacksonville CPAC); and Thursday, March 17, 7:00 p.m.,
Gateway Mall JSO Substation (ShAdCo Sector C). All
meetings are open to the public and free of charge If your
civic, fraternal or religious group is interested in dis-
cussing the subject of tasers in the schools, or interested
in having a representative from the JSO speak with your
members, please call (904) 630-2538.
,STATIONS OF THE CROSS IN THE NEIGHBOR-
HOOD-St. Pius Catholic Church,. 2110 Blue Ave., will
hold the annual "Stations of the Cross in the
Nieghborhood" on Good Friday. March 25, at 1:00 p.m.
For more information, contact Lucile Trotter at 1904)
354-1501. Come walk in prayerful remembrance of
Jesus' sufferings while also pra\ ing for the neighbors sur-
rounding the church.
TRAINING/EMPLOYEMNENT FOR SENIORS-
Experience Works is offering training and employment
opportunities for seniors 55 and older. Experience Works
is a national nonprofit and Equal Opportunity Service
Provider. For more information call 924-1710, ext. 2402,
2419, or 997-3100 ext. 2317.
CHARITY AUCTION-The Third Annual
Bachelor/Bachelorette Charit\ Auction will be held
Saturday, May 5 from 7:00-10:00 p.m. at the Terrace
Suite located in the south end of Alltel Stadium. The
charity event benefits students with developmental dis-
abilities such as Down Syndrome and Cerebal Palsy at
North Florida School. For more information call 724-
8326, 388-2118, or 398-0726.
LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO TO PERFORM
AT UNF-Ladysmith Black Mambazo, 2005 Grammy
winners, will perform their South African vocal sounds in
the Lazzara Performance Hall on Saturday, April 2, at
7:30 p.m. on the campus of the University of North
Florida located at 4567 St. Johns Bluff Rd. South. For
more information and tickets call (904) 620-2878 or visit
iwww.unf.edu. 4
.i31(IPa


Shown from Left: Mattie Campbell (surviving founder), Eartha Sanders (guest), Novella Williams, Naomi Briggs,
President, Peggy Johnson, Mary Streater, Willie Bell Garvin, Esther Plummer, Martha Jackson, hostess, Louella
McBride, and Thelma Walker, guest. Seated: Vermel Glover, Lenora Lee and Delores Ashley.


DEATH

NOTICES


BANKS-Rosa, died
March 4, 2005.
BIVENS-Luella, 83, died
March 5, 2005.
BOLDEN-Edward, Sr.,
96, died March 3, 2005.
BOYD-Lewis, 70, died
March 4, 2005.
BROWN-Charles, 55,
died Maich 4, 2005.
BRIMMER-Robert E.,
died March 7, 2005.
BRYANT-Charles, died
March 6, 2005.
CARROLL-William T.,
died March 1, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
CHATMAN-David, died
March 4, 2005.
EDWARDS-
BishopLucius C., Sr., 86,
died March 6, 2005.
Alphonso West Mortuary,
Inc.
FREEMAN-Mack, 67,
died March 8, 2005.
Lewis-Smith Mortuary,
Inc.
HARP-Arthur, died
March 7, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
HOLMES-Martha, died
March 7, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
JOHNSON-Jack B., 41,
died March 5, 2005.
LEVY-Charles E., died
February 28, 2005.
MARSHALL-Charlotte,
died March 5, 2005.
MATHIS-Mason, 72,
died March 7, 2005.
McDONALD-Oscar,
died March 5, 2005.
PARKER-Annguenetta,
42, died March 6, 2005.
PATE-Deborah, 53, died
March 2, 2005.
REED-Hattie W., 80,
died March 3, 2005.
STROZIER-Edward
Lee, died February 28,
2005.
WASHINGTON-Willie,
died March 1, 2005.
WILLIAMS-Patricia,
died March 5, 2005.
4


The Vie Leido Ladies
Educational Club, a group of
retired educators, discussed
"Black Women Starting
Over" at their meeting held
at the home of member,
Martha Jackson. A discus-
sion was held after Clara
McLaughlin Criswell,
author and publisher of The
Florida Star spoke with the


ladies on the subject.
The Vie Leido Ladies
Educational Club was
founded by four great edu-
cators: Mattie Campbell,
Mary Robinson (deceased),
Josie Ashley (deceased), and
Neida Bell Butler
(deceased), in 1960 for the
purpose of "Women of
Color Bonding Socially


Together." The organization
meets monthly to discuss
various educational issues
and other concerns.
The meeting, hosted by
Mrs. Jackson, included an
old fashion "sit-down" din-
ner, with the help of Mrs.
Jackson's daughters,
Jennifer and Sharon.


i~ui!


PAGE B-1


FLORIDA STAR


4 FtYT I'l 1)11/)C








PAGE B-2 FLORIDA STAR MARCH 12. 2005


Ask Deanna! Is an advice column known for its fearless
approach to reality-based subjects!

Dear Deanna:
don't take my 3-year old sons to church with me.
However, I end up losing my religion and arguing with my
family after church. My family feels they should at least be
there in the nursery. I think they're a distraction if in the con-
gregation and the church nursery is a waste of time. Who's
right on this issue? ..
Lois (Tampa, FL)

Dear Lois:
Take those kids to church and let them make noise now because if not, you'll find
yourself crying at their jail cell later. If you attend church, pay tithes and offerings then
you should'go ahead and utilize the nursery for your children. Don't be foolish. The
nursery has structure that will begin the process of giving your toddlers a foundation of
Christ. Again, let those boys make their joyful noise unto the Lord.

Dear Deanna!
There's a guy I like and we really care for each other. The only problem is that I'm in
my late 20's and he's in his teens. He's very mature for his age. I really like him and don't
know what to do. He can barely go out because his mom is strict and he's always at
school. I've never felt this way for someone as young. Can you please help me because
I don't know what to do?
Ms. Shy (Online E-Mail)

Dear Ms. Shy:
Save yourself some jail time with two words. Statutory Rape. It's against public law
arid his mother's law for you to date her son who's a minor. He can't drive, make money,
or provide emotional support which leaves you with a young stud with milk breath.
Wake up and date men in your league. As a last resort see what happens when he
becomes legal. However, don't be surprised if he, selects girls his age instead of you.

Dear Deanna!
I have two cousins messing with the same guy. One has been with him 5 years and
they have kids but I accidentally found out he beats her and threatens her. I didn't know
about the other cousin until I was telling her about the beatings and I realized she's mess-
ing with him too. I told both of them what's going on and instead of the issue, they talked
about me. I lie when I get nervous so when the other cousin asked if I had told on her, I
lied and now she's ignoring me. Can I fix this or do I leave it alone?
No More Drama (Toledo, OH)

Dear Drama:
This must be a family tree with a rotten apple or a classic episode of Jerry Springer.
You've done enough to both cousins by having two faces and gossiping. You should be
concerned about the violence and the safety issue instead of who's zooming who. You
need to fixing it by telling the truth to whoever you lied to and seek help for that little
nerve problem if you're going to be in people's business.


Imagine living in a world where the worst poverty and hunger had ended. Imagine that
every child around the world, even in the poorest country or family, was able to go to school
and receive an education-and girls were just as well-educated as boys. Imagine we could
promise mothers everywhere that from now on they would be less likely to die during child-
birth and their babies would be more likely to be born healthy and survive early childhood.
Imagine health officials around the world making a joint commitment to stop the spread of
HIV/AIDS and other major diseases. Imagine a world where every country promised to find
ways to protect the environment's resources and make sure more people had access to clean,
safe drinking water and living accommodations. And imagine a world where larger, wealthi-
er countries committed to working together with smaller, poorer ones to create stronger
economies around the globe.
Does this sound like a utopia? Actually, this vision of the world isn't a fantasy at all. This
is the vision that all 191 United Nations member states have promised to create by the year
2015, by pledging to meet the U.N.'s Millennium Development Goals. The Millennium Goals
aren't just a set of nice ideals. As the U.N. explains it, "They are also basic human rights-
the rights of each person on the planet to health, education, shelter, and security as pledged
in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the U.N. Millennium Declaration." And
leaders around the world have committed to reaching these goals because they know they are
achievable.
The first goal is to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger by cutting in half the proportion
of people living on less than one dollar a day and the proportion of people who suffer from
hunger. By achieving this goal, more than 500 million people would be lifted out of extreme
poverty and more than 300 million would no longer go hungry. The second goal is ensuring
universal primary education, making sure every boy and girl completes a full course of pri-
mary schooling. The third goal pledges to promote gender equality and empower women by
eliminating gender disparity in primary and secondary education, preferably by the end of this
year, and at all levels by 2015. When these two education goals are achieved, hundreds of mil-
lions more girls and women around the world will be able to go to school, giving them access
to many new opportunities.
The next two goals are to reduce by two-thirds the mortality rate of children under 5 years
old, and to reduce by three-fourths the maternal mortality rate. Together, those goals would
save the lives of 30 million children and more than 2 million mothers. The sixth goal is to stop
and begin to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS and the occurrence of malaria and other major
diseases, a dramatic commitment to improving health and increasing life expectancy around
the world, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The seventh goal would focus on making sustain-
able development a priority in country policies and programs, which would include reversing
the loss of environmental resources, reducing by half the proportion of people without sustain-
able access to safe drinking water-meaning bringing safe water to 350 million people-and
achieving significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers by 2020.
And the final Millennium Goal is to develop a global partnership for development, which
would include strengthening fair trading and financial systems, debt relief, and giving more
countries and people access to affordable essential drugs and important new technologies,
especially information and communications technologies.
These eight goals are all very big ideas. But it's thrilling to know the resources and tech-
nology exist to make all of these big ideas reality and that nations all.over the world have
already pledged to make this happen. The U.N. recently released a major new report on the
specific steps countries need to be taking right now in order to reach the Millennium Goals.
The promises are there. The practical roadmaps to realize them are there. 'Now every nation
just needs to focus on living up to its promise. I hope the United States will lead the world in
giving people the tools of life.
Marian Wright Edelman is founder and president of the Children's Defense Find.


Write Ask Deanna! Email: askdeannal@yahoo.com or Deanna M, 264 S. La Ciene,
Suite 1283, Beverly Hills, CA 90211. Visit her Web site at www.askdeanna.com.


ga,


The Miami International Film Festival
by Dwight Brown, NNPA Special Contributor
MIAMI (NNPA) The Miami International Film Festival offers a unique expe-
rience. Come for the stellar, high-quality, multicultural films and great hospitality.
Stay for the sun, sand, city and nightlife. MIFF is big enough to attract celebrities,
and small enough to navigate (last-minute tickets are a breeze). I found it a critic's
delight and a movie lover's paradise.
Set in various Miami locations -- sexy South Beach to the University of Miami
campus -- the extremely well run MIFF offers a cinematic smorgasbord, with a pinch
of Latin flavor, all under the judicious guidance of its astute festival director, Nicole
Guillemet. She put the Sundance Film Festival on the map, and now helps MIFF
flourish.
In February 2005, a diverse blend of African Diaspora films were an integral part
of the festival's mix and many will premiere at your neighborhood cinema or screen
on TV, soon. Keep an eye out for...
Sweet Honey In the Rock: Raise Your Voice. The legendary, all-Black, all-female
accapella singing group has been a class act on the concert hall'college campus cir-
cuit for 30 years. Documentary director Stan Nelson goes on the road with the group
as it celebrates its milestone and handles the retirement of the group's founder
Bernice Johnson Reagon. Their vibe has gospel, folk, rap, jazz, R&B and African
influences. Their shows are philosophical, spiritual,,political. Most festivals would
just screen the movie, but MIFF featured the group in a live performance at Miami's
Gusman Theater where they raised the roof. It's headed to Public Television.this
summer.
Red Dusk. In 2000, a White South African police officer applies, for amnesty
under the Truth & Reconciliation Commission. One of his former victims (Chiwetel
Ejiofor, Dirty Pretty Things) opposes the amnesty as the official killed his friend.
Hilary Swank plays the plaintiff's lawyer. Turns out the victim knows more than he's
saying. A very well produced, beautifully shot, well written and gracefully directed
drama. It's a timely historical narrative with an important socio-political theme about
truth and forgiveness. Swank brings the star power. Chiwetel Ejiofor supplies the
charisma. Co-winner of the Audience Award -- Dramatic Features. Destined for an
art film theater.
A Way Of Life. Traditionally filmmakers tackle racism by honing in on victims,
Showing abuse and sometimes in their zeal victimizing the oppressed all over again.
Rarely is the perpetrator's motivation explored. That is until Amma Assante, an
astute Black British female actress, turned TV writer, turned new filmmaker, created
This brilliant, probing story about a desperate young single White South Wales moth-
er who vents her frustration on a Pakistani-looking neighbor. Assante's poignant
script thoroughly,develops the characters and the racial axes they grind with a
vengeance. Her gripping'film MIFF's Grand Jury Prize for Best Dramatic Feature,
World Cinema Competition and the prestigious International Federation of Film
Critics Award (FIPRESCI). It's prime candidate for indie film theater.
The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till. Arguably the modem civil rights move-
ment began after the gruesome, 1955 Mississippi murder of Emmett Louis Till. The
14-year-old Black boy was accused of whistling at a White woman and was subse-
quently maimed and slayed by her husband. Unarguably, courageous young direc-
tor/writer Keith A. Beauchamp has assembled the most revealing, emotionally-
Scharged footage of Till's mothl Mamie recollecting her son's drnise and her fight
to bring his perpetrators to justice. The cousins, now grown men, who were in the


Advice from Lady
Memeh

ACTS OF FAITH
If your brain can move,
Your body with a split
second: command
thought, imagine what it
can do with concentrat-
ed and directed thought.
Dr. Therman Evans

Everyone wants to now
the secret of a long,
happy prosperous: and
successful life. It's, no
secret. It's an attitude.
:An energy. A formula.
Want to know it?
Here it is:
(1) Do all things in
peace; '
(2) Achieve personal


unity of heart and mind; riage;
Iige


(3) Learn truth;
(4) Maintain your body;
(5) Correct character
imperfections;
(6) Be free from fear;,
(7) Live in harmony with
all people;
(8) Eliminate worry;
(9) Be poised;
(10) Give love;
(11) Admire, respect
and trust yourself;
(12) Know God;.
(13) Express God;-
(14) Know what works
for you;
(15) Help others;
(16) Make, have and
keep good friends;
(17) Solve your own :
problems;
(18) Find your proper
place;
(19) Have a true mar-


(20) Discover and use
your personal talents;
(21) Acquire knowledge;
(22) Share what you
learn with others;
(23) Relax;
(24) Sleep well;
(25) Awake with enthu-
siasm;
(26) Stop unwanted
habits;
(27) Think positively;
(28) Always give thanks
for everything you have!

Remember: You will
prosper because You
give thanks.

I remain,
Ladymemeh
www.ladvmemeh.com


Sweet Honey in the Rock


house the night Till was kidnapped and killed, recount their vivid, haunting memo-
ries. Winner of a Special Jury Prize: Raising Social Awareness and the Audience
Award Documentary Feature.
The MIFF roster for 2005 included other African heritage films, European, Asian,
Australian and Latino movies. From Korea to Columbia, Germany to Haiti. Features,
documentaries and shorts. There were even community outreach screenings for pub-
lic school kids. All films received multiple showingsand the earliest start times were
1 P.M. As a critic or a movie fan, that means you can lounge on warm South Beach
under February skies, play tennis in the public parks, shop, sightsee, 'eat out, go
nightclubbing and view a dazzling array of international films without skipping a
beat.
For more info on America's most impressive, well programmed film festival and
to view a complete list of the award winners, log on to www.miamifilmfestival.com.
Stay tuned to the aforementioned movies and start planning a trip to the Miami
Internationalfilm Festival for 2006. Fine fi'ns. A timely, multicultural viewpoint.X
Leisure time galore. You can't beat it!


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE B-2


MARCH*12. 2005










Boys & Girls Clubs Of Northeast



Florida Announces Youth Of Year


The 2005 Boys & Girls Clubs of NortheastFlorida Youth of the Year, Britnie Barber (right), Victory Pointe
Club on the Westside, and her mom. Sonya Jefferson (left).


-- -,


I I i. I! I.
Britnie receiving her award plaque from master of
ceremonies, Alan Gionet, Channel 12.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.- Bos- & Girls Clubs of
Northeast Florida announced Britnie Barber as
Youth of the Year at its annual dinner on March 8 in
Jackson\ ille.
Barber is a member of the Victors Pointe Bo\s &
Girls Club on Jackson ille's \Westside. She % ill no\\
go on to compete at the state le\ el, and could ad\ ance
to the regional competition.
Five regional winners s selected from among the
state winners \\ill compete for the national honor in
Washington, D.C., \\here the president \\ill officially
announce the National Youth of the Year at a white e
House ceremony in September.
In addition, the national \\inner receives a
$10.000 scholarship from Reader's Digest
Foundation, sponsor of the program since its incep-
ton in 1)4 .


(See "Enith, Of The Ieur". B3 -4


VOL.11 N0, 3
Published Weekly,-
By:he Florida Stair


:March 12, 2005


INSIDE:


T P F THE CHARTS........................................................... ...................................B-5C
CO....................................................................................................................B-5C
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Youth Of The year

(Continued From Cover)


All six nominees join Alan Gionet. From left to right: Britnie Barber (Youth of the Year), Deja' Ramsey,
Matthew Hernandez, Latoya Huey, Rahkiah Whitmore, Octavia Myers and Alan Gionet.


More than 200 people
attended the event, where
they learned that master of
ceremonies, Alan Gionet,
and guest speaker, David
Condon, were Boys Club
(as it was called then)
members as youth. The
Youth of the Year is a
national program adminis-
tered by Boys & Girls
Clubs of America that rec-
ognizes individual Club
members' exemplary char-
acter, superior leadership,
academic achievement and
outstanding service to
their Clubs and communi-
ties.
Barber, a high school
junior, didn't expect the
award because she thought
"one of the other nominees
would win," and she was
"very happy" to be chosen.
She plans to attend UCLA


and then medical school.
Barber was recognized in
part for her leadership role
in the Club as president,
vice-president, and secre-
tary of the Keystone Club.
She also planned and
implemented anti-drugs
activities for youth in the
Victory Pointe community
for Red Ribbon Week
which included a drug-free
march, essay contest, and
a drug-free poster contest.
Other nominees were
Matthew Hernandez,,
Beaches Boys &* Girls
Club; Rahkiah Whitmore,
Kooker Park Boys & Girls
Club; Octavia Myers,
Laurence F. Lee Memorial
Boys & Girls Club; Deja'
Ramsey, Nassau County
Boys & Girls Club; and
Latoya Huey, Woodland
Acres Boys & Girls Club.


BGCNF is a member
of Boys & Girls Clubs of
America, and has played
an integral role in
Jacksonville for more than
41 years. BGCNF pro-


vides daily programs and
services to nearly 8,000
young people annually at
10 facilities in Duval,
Nassau, and St. Johns
counties.


Obesity
Prevention
Program Names
Contest Winners
Two Duval county ele-
mentary school students
have been named winners
of the Obesity Prevention
Program's "Get Health
Kids Club" Essay Contest.
The winners are
Martez Mitchell (First
Place), Fourth Grade, St.
Clair Evans Academy
Elementary School) who
received a $150 Sports
Authority gift card, and
James hall (Second Place,
Third Grade, Reynolds
Lane Elementary School.
He received a $100 Sports
Authority Gift Card.
The Obesity
Prevention Program,
Division of Community
Nutrition Services of the
Duval County Health
-Department joined forces
with the Jacksonville
Children's Commission to
offer the Get Healthy Kids
Club program at Team Up
after-school sites at St.
Clair Evans Academy
Elementary School, Butler
Middle School, and
Reynolds Lane
Elementary School.
During the program,
students learned about the
Food Guide Pyramid and
the importance of eating
dairy foods every day.


FIND OUT


HOW YOU


CAN APPEAR


IN PREP RAP!


CALL 904/766-8834





B-3B/MARCH 12. 2005


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5C/MARCH 12, 2005


Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "Candy Shop" 50 Cent Featuring Olivia (Shady
Aftermath) Last Week: No. 4
S"Since U Been Gone" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 1
3. "Get Right" Jennifer Lopez (Epic) No. 2
4. "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" Green Day (Reprise)
No. 3
5. "You and Me" Lifehouse (Geffen) No. 5
6. "Rich Girl" Gwen Stefani Featuring Eve (Interscope)
No. 7
7. "Caught Up" Usher (LaFace) No. 8
8. "Let Me Love You" Mario (3rd Street J) No. 6
9. "It's Like That" Mariah Carey (Island) No. 9
10. "1, 2 Step" Ciara Featuring Missy Elliott (Sho'nuff
JMusicLine La Face) No. 10
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "You're My Better Half' Keith Urban (Capitol) Last
Week: No. 4
2. "Bless the Broken Road" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street) No.
1
3. "Nothin' to Lose" Josh Gracin (Lyric Street) No. 3
4. "Baby Girl" Sugarland (Mercury) No. 7
"That's What I Love about Sunday" Craig Morgan
broken Bow) No. 8
S"Monday Morning Church" Alan Jackson (Arista
ashville) No. 5
S"Nothin 'Bout-Love Makes Sense" LeAnn Rimes
Asylum Curb) No. 2
&-"He Gets that from Me" Reba McEntire (MCA Nashville)
No. 6
9. "Let Them Be Little" Billy Dean (Curb) No. 10
10. "Mud on the Tires" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) No.
9.
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "U Ain't That Good" Sheila Brody (Star 69) Last
;Week: No. 1
2. "Soldier (Remixes)" Destiny's Child Featuring T.I. &
Lil Wayne (Columbia) No. 4
3. "Show It" Friburn & Urik (Tommy Boy Silver Label)
No. 9
4. "Pop!Ular (Guido/Wayne G/P. Presta/J. Budz Mixes)"
Darren Hayes (Columbia) No. 5
5. "I Believe in You" Kylie Minogue (Capitol) No. 8
6. "Breathe" Erasure (Mute) New Entry
" "House of Jupiter (Junior/P. Bailey/Boris Mixes)"
Casey Stratton (Odyssey Sony Classical) No. 2
8. "Back to Love" Rachel Panay (Act 2) No. 3
9. "La La (Sharp Boys/F. Garibay Mixes)" Ashlee
Simpson (Geffen) No. 14
10. "Killer 2005 (P. Rauhofer/Morel/DJ Monk/J.Albert
Mixes)" Seal (Warner Bros.) No. 7


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"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


WOULD YOU LIKE
TO APPEAR IN PREP RAP?
* FOR INFORMATION
CALL (904) 766-8834


& O
^'TT


-


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A HL IZ 1&, ZrvUJ -


JAIL OR BAIL


)ITOR 'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
ilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
unity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
URGLARY TO AN AUTO-On Saturday, March 5, 2005 at 2:15
m. a police officer responded to 5471 Marsala Ln. in reference
a burglary to an auto. Upon arrival police officer met with the
victim who stated that he had his vehicle parked on the street in
ont of the reported address with the door locked. The victim told
ae police officer that at approximately 2:00 a.m. he walked out
4e front door and observed a male (suspect) in his vehicle. The
victim also stated that the suspect fled on foot towards Ortega
luff Rd. The victim could not give any further description. The
policee officer observed the left rear door window was smashed
md the steering wheel would not lock into position as it could
rior to this incident. The items missing were: a cell phone, cred-
it/debit cards, hand tools, and other miscellaneous items. The vic-
tim did not wish to have his vehicle processed. Patrol efforts sus-
pended due to lack of suspect information.
BOYFRIENiD/GIRLFRIEND DOMESTIC BATTERY- On
Sunday, March 6, 2005 at 4:56 a.m. a police officer was dis-
patched to 1545 West 24th Street regarding a home invasion.
Upon Arrival, police officer met with the girlfriend (victim) who
stated that her boyfriend (suspect) came to the above address and
knocked on the front door and bedroom windows trying to get
into the residence. The victim told the suspect that she was not
going to open the door. The victim told the police officer that the
suspect then went to the bedroom window and broke it with an
unknown tool. He then climbed through the bedroom window
cutting his hand and leg in the process. The witness then stood
between the victim and suspect in an attempt to separate the two
and was hit in the face by the suspect's fist. The victim ran outside
to the residence next door, in an attempt to call the police. The
suspect then pulled the victim back into the house and put a piece
of glass to her throat and cut her on the left finger and left side of
her waist. The victim then picked up a brick and threw it at the
suspect, hitting him on the left side of his head. The suspect fled
the area on foot Northbound on Wilson Street. The suspect was
located in the 1500 block of West 25th Street hiding in a "Port-o-
let." The suspect was read his rights and taken to jail. The sus-
pect was transported to Shands Hospital were he was released to
Wackenhut Security Officer and booked absentee. The victim was
given a case information card. Case cleared by an arrest
PETIT THEFT AT EDWARD H. WHITE HIGH SCHOOL-
On Friday, March 4, 2005 at 8:20 p.m. an off duty police officer
working at Edward H. White School, located at 1700 Old
Middleburg Rd. North met with the student (victim) who advised
that while she was participating in the track meet at the listed
school, her items were stolen. The victim told the police officer
that at approximately 4 30 p.m. she left her clear backpack, which
contained her purse which contained a Game Boy, small radio,
handbag, ID card, cell phone, and other miscellaneous items on
the east concrete bleachers of the track football field When she
returned at approximately 8:30 p.m. to the bleachers she discov-
ered that that an unknown (suspect) had stolen her backpack
which contained the listed items. The off duty officer questioned
the school staff to see if someone had turned in the victim's prop-
erty. They said no. The off duty police officer also walked the
area with the victim in search of her listed property but to no avail.
The victim's, fatherwas contacted by phone and advised of the
theft of his daughter's property. The victim was given a case infor-
mation card. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts suspended.
MOTHER'S SON MAKING THREATS TO SHIOOT UPTHE
HOUSE-On Fnday. March 4, 2005 at 9:45 p.m. a police officer
\%as dispatched to a domestic violence call at 126 East 45th Street.
Upon arri% al. the police officer met with the mother (victim), who
.stated that her son (suspect) left the house on 3/4/05 and returned
that same night through the back door. The door was locked so the
suspect broke the doorknob to get into the house. The victim told
the police=officer that during the e% ening on 3/4/05, as her son was
leading the house she heard him say he was going to "spray the
hduse." She told the police officer that %\hen he said, "Spray the
house," he meant,"shoot up the house." The suspect had fled the
scene prior to the police officer's arrival. The victim was given a
Juvenile" state attorney's card.and case information card. Case
not cleared, pending state attorney's office disposition.
POSSESSION OF CONTROLED SUBSTANCE WITH
INTENT TO USE On Sunday, March 6, 2005 at 5:00 a.m. a
police officer, while on patrol was leaving 12450 Biscayne"
Blvd.ItMission Point Apartments) on an unrelated call. While
waiting to turn south on Biscayne Blvd. the police officer
Observed a vehicle sitting at the stop sign on Biscayne Estate at
Biscavne Lake. The vehicle sat there for approximately twenty
seconds despite not having confliction of traffic. The right turn
signal was then activated and the vehicle turned south on
Biscayne Lake. The police officer then began to follow the vehi-
cle because of the suspicious movement. The vehicle then came to
a eqmplete stop site that is only occupied by one resident and acti-
vated the right turn signal again. At that point the police officer
made contact with the dri\ er (suspect), who said he was there to
visit his aunt who was visiting from out of town. The suspect then
pointed to a tow house next door. The police officer then asked
the suspect for his identification which he said he did not have.
The police officer then spoke with the passenger of the vehicle.
She gave her name and date of birth. The suspect then gave ver-
bal consent to search the vehicle. During the search the police offi-
cer found a pill bottle containing "Hydro morphine HCL 7mg"
tablets (Schedule II Narcotic) in the glove box and various crack
pipe paraphernalia behind the back seat. The police officer read
both suspects their rights. Both denied owning the drug parapher-
nalia. Both suspects \ as arrested and taken to jail and booked on
"FELONY" charges.
SPOUSE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On Sunday, March 6, 2005
at 2:53 p.m. A police officer was dispatched to 1665 Winthrop
Street in reference to a dispute. Upon arrival police officer met
with the wife (victim), who stated that she and her husband (sus-
.pect). are still married, but currently live separate. The victim


told the police officer that she and her husband were in a counsel-
ing session with their pastor at "Trinity Church Ministries." The
!suspect became angry with the victim threatening to hit her. The
suspect stated "I will go to jail today." The Pastor stepped
'between the suspect and victim begging the suspect not to hit the
.victim. When the suspect left the church he took the victim's cell
.phone, charger. and CD'S out of her car. The victim stated that
approximately 4 years ago she was granted a permanent injunc-
tion, although it was amended 2 years ago so that they could con-
tact each other. The victim was given a state attorney's card and
advised on filing procedures. Case not cleared.


Your Weekly Horoscope
(MARCH 12, 2005-MARCH 18, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) You
could be asked to
go that extra mile
this week at work.
Be sure you're able to handle.
the job. This is a big test for
you in the long run.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) You're on quite
the roll this week
at work.
Everything you
touch works out
magically. At
home, though, it's a different
story, so be patient.
GEMINI (Ma) 21 to
June 20) Don't
give in to tempta-
tion this week
where credit mat-
ters are concerned. You
could easily get in over your
head. In relationships,
remember that compromise
is always best.
CANCER (June 21 to
I July 22) You're
going to have to
.- e resist the urge to
.give advice this
week. Yes, it would be on
the mark. However, not
everyone will appreciate
your words of wisdom.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22)
Exercise restraint
this week when
dealing with those
in authority at
work. You could say some-
thing flippantly that would
be misinterpreted. Later in'
the week, romance is
favored.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) A friend
who normally agrees with
S you won't this
y week. Don't let
In I that throw you.
By week's end,


you're happily on the same
page again.
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) It's a
good week to tie
up some loose
ends at work.
You've been pro-
crastinating over certain
things for too long. Bigwigs
are watching.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21) Ease
up a bit this week
on colleagues.
You get more
done if you stop
pushing your weight around.
Others will be more inclined
to cooperate.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22
to December
21) Guard against
impatience this
week. You'll also
have an unfortunate tenden-
cy to fly off the handle. Get
to the heart of what's bug-
ging you to get back on a
more even keel.
CA PRI CO R N
(December 22 to
January 19) You'll feel
S very harried and
I -, rushed this week.
I !' Calm down and
prioritize. Even if
you don't accomplish every-
thing, you'll find you've
done enough by the end of
the week to keep you sane.
AQUARIUS (January
20 to February 18) You
make a poor
impression on
friends and family
this week. For
some reason,, they find you
overbearing right now. Back
down a bit and soften your
approach.
PISCES (February 19
to March 20) You dig in


Teen Sends Semen

Frosted Brownies

COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho A teenager has agreed to
admit to three counts of disturbing the peace after
anonymously sending semen-frosted brownies to a fel-
low student. The recipient shared the treat with two other
teens; police said.
They said the 17-year-old Coeur d'Alene High
School student was upset after a prank in which the other
student put peanut butter in his cheese sandwich days
before. He told a school resource officer that "he hated
peanut butter and it made him more mad than he could
explain," according to the police report.
The teen later told School Resource Officer Jeff
Walther that he got the idea of putting his semen on the
brownies from the movie "National Lampoon's Van
Wilder." The youth is to be sentenced on April 4 on the
three misdemeanor counts, which are each punishable
by up to 90 days in detention, prosecutors said. The vic-
tims' parents were notified and the children were tested
for anything that could have been transmitted through
the body fluid, although Panhandle Health spokes-
woman Susan Cuff said the chance of the students'
health being affected would be "extremely remote."

Florida Officer Used

Taser Over Urine Sample
ORLANDO, Fla. A police officer kneeled on a drug
suspect's chest to restrain him and twice used a Taser
stun gun after he refused to provide a urine sample at a
hospital, authorities said. Antonio Wheeler, 18, was
arrested Friday on a drug charge and taken to an emer-
gency room after telling officers he had consumed
cocaine, police said..
At Florida Hospital, Wheeler refused to provide a
urine sample and was handcuffed and secured with
.leather straps to a bed, where hospital workers tried to
catheterize him, a police affidavit said. Officer Peter
Linnenkamp reported he jumped onto the bed with his
knees on Wheeler's chest to restrain him. When Wheeler
still refused to be catheterized, Linnenkamp said he
twice used his Taser, which sends 50,000 volts into a tar-
get.


your heels this
week and insist
things go your
way. Frankly,
that's not very attractive.
Tact and diplomacy will
serve you better.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Quincy


Tara's


Jones, March 14; Judd
Hirsch, March 15; Jerry
Lewis, March 16; Rob
Lowe, March 17; Queen
Latifah, March 18; Glenn
Close, March 19; Spike Lee,
March 20.

(c) 2005 DBR Media,


Bail


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Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville, Florida 32206


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PAGE B-5


356-TARA
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'A VrM I 7fil I


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rPAGE B-6O iL uAu I M.ACalA2


Most Powerful Blacks In Sports Featured In BE


(L-R): Isiah Thomas, Donna Bryan, Jimmie Lee
Solomon, Adrian E. Bracy, Eugene E. Parker, William L.
Strickland and Reggie Williams.
NEW YORK, N.Y.-- Fifty of the most influential Blacks
in sports are featured in the March issue of BLACK ENTER-
PRISE (BE).
The list of the 50 Most Powerful Blacks in Sports is fea-
tured in the March 2005 cover story. "Although many super-
star black athletes dominate their chosen playing fields, the
true power in sports lies with the executives who work
behind the scenes," says Features Editor Alan Hughes. "We
approached this list from a business perspective, citing those
who control revenues, sign athletes, and have the authority
to hire or fire coaches."
While there remains a gross disparity between blacks
and non-blacks at the pinnacle of the sports industry, the edi-
tors at BE selected and recognized those who have broken
through to the highest ranks to achieve true clout within the
sports industry.
The list of the 50 Most Powerful Blacks in Sports is
divided into eight categories: agents/promoters (6); athletes
(3); collegiate decision makers (8); corporate executives (6);
front-office leagues executives (8); front-office team execu-
tives (14); industry association heads (4); and owners (1).
Agents/Promoters:
Bill A. Duffy -- President, BDA Sports Management
Aaron Goodwin -- CEO, Goodwin Sports Management
Don King -- Boxing Promoter, Don King Productions Inc.
Eugene E. Parker -- President, Maximum Sports Management
C. Lamont Smith -- President & CEO,
All Pro Sports and Entertainment Inc.
William L. Strickland -- President & CEO,
Strickland Management Group L.L.C.
Athletes:
Michael Jordan -- NBA Legend
Serena Williams -- Professional Tennis Player
Tiger Woods -- Professional Golfer
Collegiate Decision Makers:
Bob Chichester -- Director of Athletics,
University of California,Irvine
Damon Evans -- Director of Athletics,
University of Georgia
Herman Frazier -- Director of Athletics,
University of Hawaii


Mike Garrett -- Director of Athletics,
University of Southern California
Craig Littlepage -- Director of Athletics,
University of Virginia
Lee Reed -- Director of Athletics,
Cleveland State University
Gene Smith -- Director of Athletics,
Arizona, State University
Keith Tribble -- Chief Executive Officer,
Orange Bowl Cdmmittee
Corporate Executives:
Adrian E. Bracy -- VP of Finance, St. Louis Rams
Donna Bryan -- VP of Business Affairs, NBC Sports
Kery D. Davis -- Senior VP, Sports Programming, HBO
Trevor Edwards -- Corporate VP
of Global Brand Management, Nike
Larry Miller -- President, Nike Jordan Brand
David B. Rone -- Executive VP,
Network Development & Rights
Acquisitions, FOX Sports
Front-Office League Executives:
Shawn Lawson Cummings -- VP International
Corporate Sponsorship & Licensing, MLB Properties
Harold R. Henderson --Executive VP
for Labor Relations/Chairman of Management
Council Executive Committee, NFL
Stu Jackson -- Senior VP Basketball Operations, NBA
Jonathan Mariner -- Executive VP and
Chief Financial Officer, MLB
Art Shell -- Senior VP of Football
Operations and Development, NFL
Jimmie Lee Solomon Jr. --Senior VP
of Baseball Operations, MLB
Gene Washington -- Director of Football
Operations, NFL
Bob Watson -- VP of On-Field Operations, MLB
Front-Office Team Executives:
Elgin Baylor -- VP of Basketball Operations, Los Angeles Clippers
Wayne Cooper -- VP of Basketball Operations, Sacramento Kings
Joe Dumars -- President of Basketball Operations, Detroit Pistons
Rod Graves -- VP of Football Operations, Arizona Cardinals
James Harris -- VP of Player Personnel, Jacksonville Jaguars
Billy King -- President/General Manager, Philadelphia 76ers
Martin Mayhew -- Senior VP/Assistant
General Manager, Detroit Lions
Steve Mills -- President and Chief Operating Officer, MSG Sports
Ozzie Newsome -- General Manager/Executive VP,
Baltimore Ravens
Ed Tapscott -- President/Chief Operating Officer, Charlotte
Bobcats/Charlotte Sting
Isiah Thomas -- President of Basketball Operations,
New York Knicks
Terdema Ussery -- President/CEO, Dallas Mavericks
Ken Williams -- Senior VP/General Manager, Chicago White Sox
Reggie Williams -- VP, Disney Sports Attractions Inc.
Industry Associations:
Billy Hunter -- Executive Director,
National Basketball PlayersAssociation
Floyd Keith -- Executive Director,
Black Coaches Association
Gene Upshaw -- Executive Director,
National Football League Players Association
Pamela M. Wheeler -- Director of Operations, Women's National
Basketball Players Association
Owners:
Robert L. Johnson -- CEO RLJ Development L.L.C.
/Owner, Charlotte Bobcats/Charlotte Sting


EWC Lady Tigers Basketball Team


Crowned 2005 EIAC Champions


Sitting from left, Ruth Waters, Aisha Thornton, Ericka Golding, Katrina Morame,
Crystal Reese and Tahnita Fleming. Standing from left, Amber Carter, Amber Lee,
Latrika Allen, Tayaqua Gunn, Sheena Williams, Kimberly Ryan, and Antoinette
Upshaw.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
-- The Edward Waters
College Lady Tigers pulled
a big upset in basketball by
taking the sting out of the
Allen University Yellow
Jackets to claim its second


Eastern Intercollegiate
Athletic Conference
(EIAC) Championship.
It was the the first cham-
pionship under coach
Regina Mosley who also
played collegiately at EWC.


Ruth Waters led the Lady
Tigers with 40 points and 15
rebounds in their 70-48 vic-
tory over the Yellow Jackets
this past Saturday, March 5
at Benedict College's
Benjamin E. Mays Human


Development Center in
Columbia, SC.
The Lady Tigers will
participate in the National
Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics
(NAIA) National Women's
Basketball Tournament
scheduled for March 16,
2005 in Jackson, Tenn. at the
Oman Arena.
Receiving All
Tournament Awards were
Latrika Allen, Amber Lee,
Aisha Thornton and Ruth
Waters. Coach Mosley
received the Tournament
Coach Award. In the single
elimination contest, the
Lady Tigers defeated Morris
College Hornets on Friday,
March 4, 56-48.
The Tigers did not fare
as well. They were elimi-
nated in the first round by
Voorhees College, 56-70.
Tigers Ben Cornish made
the All Tomrnament Team.


g'Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
~Y~lk0


Bill A. Duffy


LI l


Don King Michael Jordan


Serena
Williams


.vaCII
I-


Craig
Mike Garrett Littlepage Lee Reed







Trevor


Kery Davis


Edwards


Gene smitn


Jonathan
Mariner


n Baylor Joe Dumars
- -


Martin
Mayhew


Tapscott


Terdema
Ussery


,ene
Upshaw


Rod Graves James Harris







Ozzie
Steve Mills Newsome








Ken Williams Billy Hunter

^.


ramela
Wheeler


Bob Johnson


Team With Losing Record

Makes March Madness

STULSA, Okla. All those impossible road trips and mur-
derous nonconference games may have finally paid off for
Oakland. After starting the season with seven losses and get-
ting roughed up at Illinois, Missouri, Xavier, Texas A&M
and Michigan State, the Golden Grizzlies are going to the
NCAA tournament with a 12-18 record.
Pierre Dukes hit a 3-pointer with 1.3 seconds left and
Oakland (Mich.) upset top-seeded Oral Roberts. 61-60
Tuesday night to win the Mid-Continent Conference tourna-
ment and an automatic bid to the NCAAs.
"Even though our record might not show it, we are a
good team," forward Rawle Marshall said. "We know how to
play." Oakland finished 7-9 in the conference and was the
seventh seed in the tournament.
The Grizzlies never won more than two games in a row
in the regular season, but have a five-game winning streak
after three straight tournament victories. P r


wgm


rmm


MVIARCH 12, 20,.~


FLORIDA STAR


n AA 7 D l


*J~r~F .F (1~111111~1~l..qp J .. l


,*41 "I .q l qm &4w- 144rA









r'I D I7


-- B-f


EMPLOYMENT

S RIDA COMMUNITY
!LEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
Searn about a wide variety of
loyment opportunities at
J. E.O.E.

Safety Specialists
IT Designers & Planners (D&P)
seekingg Safety Specialists at its
irfolk,.VA and San Diego, CA
ices to provide motor vehicle
:d recreational safety to Navy
rsonnel. Candidates should
',ssess experience as an instruc-
r in one or more of the following
eas: AAA Driver Improvement
program Motorcycle Safety, ATV
*afety, Snowmobile Safety and
recreationall Safety. A Bachelors
degree in an occupational safety
ind health (OSH) related disci-
Pline with minimum 5 years expe-
ience is preferred but not
required Organizational skills,
.raining experience, communica-
ion skills, ability to travel required.
.Email or fax resumes with subject
line "ESH010" to
MPirrera@dandp.com or fax 703-
j920-7177. No phone calls please.


Cargo Specialist
Add the Army Reserve to your life,
,and receive extra pay and excellent
benefits, Age 18-34. Train near
home in Over 120 specialties to
choose from. And' earn up, to
$22,000 for college. For an experi-
ence of a lifetime, call Sgt. 1st
Class Sebastian (904) 771-8670
U.S. Army Reserve.
Experienced Cook
Seafood & Soul Food Restaurant
Mon. Sat. 11am 7pm
Call 924-2049 for interview

ROOMS TO RENT
Best deal in Jacksonville.
Large furnished rooms.
Heat/air. Share kitchen/bath.
On .bus/trolley routes.
$75/week. 877-333-8486.

HOUSE TO RENT
Unfurnished. E 16th St.
Roomy 4/ 1 1/2 recent rehab,
heat/air, no app. fee. Special
March move-in. $500. Then
$650/mo. incl. deposit. 877-
333-8486

Want to purchase minerals and
other oil/gas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201


I SERVICES

A nmAwn


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
*CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764


GEERL ETL PASIC Ic
2727 WKALLER STREETH
^^^^PH. 354-8224


HELP WANTED
Housekeeper need, 5 days
per week. Must be depend-
able, reliable and have trans-
portation.
CALL: 398-9014


FLORIDA STAR


t A UT INSURANCIE


BUSINESS NETWORK


I


JOB OPENING
Maintenance person wanted
for renovation work at Apt.
complex. Experience a must.
633-6265

THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

******** ******************nr*******
APPRENTICESHIP

*CARPENTRY
*ELECTRICAL
*PLUMBING
*HEATING, A/C & REF.
Must be at least 18 by 7/1/05, be
HS grad or GED by 7/1/05, have
driver's lic. & transportation. Apply
in person on MONDAYS, MARCH
7, 14, 21 & 28 AT 7:00 P.M.
promptly.
Northeast Florida
Builders Assn.
103 Century 21 Drive,
Suite #100
EOE
**********************************


* *


0
S-


Licensed & Insured CGC# 1507816
Florida Contractor
"Roof To Foundation, We Fix It Aft"


Ru or AdSatwd


2x2 Rates

o place an ad: Statewide $1200
-.A: 4 Regional or national
CAII: (904) 766-8834 Placement also available
FAX: (904) 765-1673 Regions: North, South, Central
STotal Circulation: 1.9 Million


*
*


2x4 Rates
Statewide $2400
Regional placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
sr.._r.. -uA--a--. 1 fi t 10 ll;0--


I -


Announcements

1. .tr-,i Ruming V'.,mr I.&k' P: DI ,NETi'. s h R.n
L. Hubbard Call -- ,. .-.. send $7.99 to Dianetics,
3102 N. Habana \. ri.r i,... F. 33607.

Auctions

GOVERNMENT AUCTION- 520 acres in C6lumbia, SC
area- Horse training facility and other acreage. Date: March
24, 2(005. Visit: www.uslreas gtv/4uctions/irs for further
details. .

LAND & GROVE AUCTION! Lake Placid, FL IIAM, Sat
Mar 26 443.9+/- Total Acres 3 Tracts Offered in 16 Parcels.
Preview: 1-5PM, Sat. March 19 Call for details:
(800)257-4161 i-i;,.. ...II,,n Auctioneers
www hiRgenbotham cor ME Higgenbotham,
CA] FL Lie #AU305/AB158.

Building materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From Manu-
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Business )Opportunities

k 1tkl II. ,'51, .,, ]_C PJ-..J Ll 52.ti ,r, FiUFF
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#1 C .'O H CO4 '! ,', .,Jr.,i M .is.n.: H-Id 'i... ilh.| .
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ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE 'Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All fdr $9,995. (800)814-6323
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,Financial


Mortgages, Refinance or Purchase No money down. No
income, low rates. All credit ...,r..,,.l cJ (higher rates may
apply) No mobile homes. (888)874-4829 or
www AccentCapilal com Licensed Correspondent Lender.

HelpWanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced Drivers, 0/0, Solos; Teams &
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$ GET PAID TO SHOP! $ Mystery Shoppers needed
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necessary $50 Cash hiring bonus Guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638 ext 107 www USMaillitgroupcom.

Now Hiring 2005 Postal Postilons Federal, State & Local.
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Cool Travel Jobl!! One Month Paid Traiining! $500 Sign on
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UP TO $4,000 WEEKI.Y!I Exciting Weekly Paycheckl
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Drivers- Owner Ops & Co. Drivers Needed Now! Run SE
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Dispatch, Ct,.J F, plus Fuel (866)250-4292.

Hunting

ARGENTINA, Goose, Duck, Dove, Perdiz, Pigeon, Big
Game, Trout Fishing, 'Bolivia, Uruguay, Dove, Pigeon,
Fishing. Best bang for the $ in the world. Season April-
\ugul :i'rlM WelkJ.,d (314)209-9800
I_.c,,,,_ .'I 4i21i ."r'I

Legal Sen ices

DIVORCE$175.$275*COVERS children, etc. Only one
signature required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce Tech.
Established 1977,

NEED \N I 0RNL1 ARRESTED? Criminal Defense
*State 'r.-,ri *t I.ltie *Misdemeanors *DUI *License
Suspension *Parole *Probation *Domestic Violence *Drugs
"Protect Your Rights" A-A-A Attorney Referral Service
(800)733-5342 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK.

Miscellaneous

I RI. .RiROO(IM DIRIC.\ I% i11 I.M ,rii.j IIIJ.- d
installation, 2 MONTHS FREE 50+ Premium Channels.
Access to over 225 channels! Limited time offer. S&lH.
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www TheSanctified org FREE INTERNET MINISTRY.

Larn DIerti Online from home, *Business, *Paralegal,
C .'m.p.JT .r ,.r tI'liCL,.n.:nl iln. C..r, ..ii r &
Financial 2ld ,1 i1ju i ritii? 1,-. i 21
www tidewaterlechonling com,

RealEstate

tI I)O RENT\ .S Sulhtcrn, ,r,. irlr. r.,l r .:l;.
Mount Snow, West Dover, Vermont. By week/weekend/
month or season! Includes recreational/cultural activities. We
offer hillside condos, town houses, chalets, (large/small
homes.) Mountain Resort Rentals. P.O. BOX 1804, West
Dover, Vermont 05356. www mountainresortrentals.com
e-mail: rentverm@sover.net. (888)336-1445, (802-464-1445).

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. WINTER SEASON
IS HERE MUST SEE THE .BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL
MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS. Homes,
Cabins, Acreage & investments. Cherokee Mountain Really
GMAC Rea'l Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainrealtv.com Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.

WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS North Carolina Where there
is: Cool Mountain Air,'Views & Stream, Homes, Cabins &
Acreage. CALL FOR FREE BROCHURE OF MOUNTAIN
PROPERTY SALES. (800)642-5333, Realty Of Murphy
317 Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www realtyofmurphy orm

FREE LANI LIST- NC MOUNTAINS- Custom built log
homes, river frontage and beautiful secluded land off Blue
Ridge Parkway. Call now. (800)455-1981, ext. 133.

NEW MEXICO-20 Acres $24,900, Scenic region, views;'
canyons, trees, rolling hills, wildlife. Enjoy hunting, hiking,
horses, great climate. Power, great access. 100% Financing.
Call (877)822-LANDI

LAND WANTED Land Investment company seeks.large
acreage in Florida and Georgia. Interested in waterfront,
timber, and agricultural lands. Must have road frontage or
good access. Cashl buyer wilh quick closings. Call
(877)426-2636 or e-mail: landyltiveg@aQl.com.


NORTH CAROLINA LAKEFRONT ONLY $39,900.
Great All Sports lake to fish, boat, swim or just relax..Call
for details, MLC (866)920-5263.

COASTAL NORTH CAROLINA. Phase I sold out. Now
offering new homesites in Phase II at Shine Ianding, a gated
waterfront community. Be a proud owner in this upscale
community with boating access to the Neuse River, Pamnlico
Sound and Atlantic Ocean, plus clubhouse, fitness center,
tennis, swimming pool and private marina. Homesites as low
as $29,900. Financing available. Coastal Marketing &
Development Company, New Bern, NC (800)566-5263,
www shinelanding com.

ATTENTION INVESTORS: Waterfront lots in the Foot-
hills of NC. Deep water lake with 90 miles of shoreline. 20%
redevelopment discounts and 90% financing.'NO PAY-
MENTS for I year, Call now for best selection.
www.nclakefrofitproperties.com (800)709-LAKE.

Savor Breathtaking Mountain Views & Golf Living at
Cherokee Valley. a premier mountain golf community set
amid PB Dye designed 18 hole course in Carolina Mins. A
sanctioned Golf Digest Teaching Facility toot Impeccable
mtn view homesites from $59,900. Financing, Call
(866)334-3253 x822 www.cherokeevallcysc.com

LAKE VIEW BARGAIN $29,900. Free boat slipl High
elevation beautifully wooded parcel. Across from national
forest on 35,001) acre recreational lake in TN. Paved roads,.
u/g utils, central water, sewer, more. Excellent financing, Call
now (800)704-3154, ext. 609. Sunset Bay, LLC.

Grand Opening Land Sale! FLORIDA 10+ ACRES Only
$294,900. Huge savings on big ranch acreage in South
Floridal Gorgeous mix of mature oaks, palms, & pasture.
Miles of bridle paths. Near Lake Okeechobee. Quiet, se-
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i..I ,,i.r,. iri. .t ml dowh. Call now. (866)3.52-2249 x379.

FORECLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low down! Tax
repos and bankruptcies! No Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For
listings (800)501-1777 ext. 1299.

RVs/Campers

NATION'S #1 SELLING RV BRANDS-Florida's
MolorHome & Towable Headquarters. Great Service-Fair
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SteelBuildings

STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory Deals Save $$$. 40 x 60
to 10q x 200. Example: 50 x 100 x 12 = $3.60 sq ft.
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classifieds.com.




FCAN


Week of March 7, 2005


'I I


MARCH 12. 2005


I


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
I((Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L ------ ------------------------1
888-629-5000,'+ DIGITAL SATELLITE SYSTEMS 888-629-5000
^MASK US HOW ^- z
STO GETL UP TO -
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ROOMS i



L8 II29 50DO r Ia t l. v C rll s ..,
888-6290:5D .i DIGITAL .ATELLITE SItMS g: *..88&8629-5000


LEGAL NOTICE
The law firm of Alford & Kalil, P.A., is requesting that the following clients
contact the law firm regarding your pending lawsuit. Your failure to con-
tact the law firm by March 30, 2005,could affect your legal rights. The fol-
lowing individuals are asked to please call Mary Green at 904-757-3867:

Raymond Allen; Joe Anderson; Bernadette G Arline; Alice Armstrong;
Wilhelmina Atkins; April Autry; Edward Bailey; Karen R Bailey; Alterial C
Baker; Rose L Baker; Claretha W Battle; McHellen Belinda; Cynthia Bell;
Sherry Bennett; Tiauna Benton; Brenda Bevel; Carol Blair; Sha'tique Blue;
Shirley P Bolton; Marie B Boston; Charlene Boyd; Shantelle Boyd; Felecia
Bradham; Anthony L Brady; Frances Bright; Glenda Bronner; Gracie B
Bronner; A.W. Brookins; Virginia Brookins; Julsh Brooks; Paris Brooks;
Brent B Brown; Loranda Brown; Markesia M Brown; Melvina Brown;
Natalie Brown; Vontresa Brown; Melvin B Bryant; Barbara Bryant-Preister;
Eugene B Butler; Lucious C Campbell; Michael D Carswell; Howard L
Carter; Latonya Carter; Tiffany Cason; April B Chambers; Bolsey G
Christie; Angela Claiborne; Betty Clark; Gary A Clark; Brenda M Coats;
Edward Coats; Warren L Coats; Marietta Coleman; Maria Collins; Louis
Coney; Frederick Conyers; Arlethea Cook; Fannie M Cooper; Albert N
Crane; Virginia L Crane; Roy Cransford; Terrell Cromer; Chontell Cue;
Dawn E Cunningham; Charel Cy; Pearly Cyler; Robert Dabney; Tara M
Daniels; Avis Davis; Oralee Davis; Vonnie Davis; Yolanda Dawson; Katrina
Denson; Carlos Dillard; Warren Douglas; Catherine Easter; Herbert L
Edmonds; Priscilla Edmondson; Janese Edwards; Sheila Edwards; Shirley
A Edwards; Shirley Ellis; Natasha Epps; Marva L Eunice; Jessie M Eutsay;
Ida Felder; Hattie B Fields; Maurice Fields; Antonio Fitzgerald; Melissa
Flood; Oliver Floyd; Juanita Ford; Forte Forest; Raphael Foster; Robert
Foster; Gregory J Francis; Gail Franklin; Valerie Franklin; Raytonya
Freeman; Mary Gant; Sheila Gates; Betty Gay; Lucille General; Phyllis
General; Mary Gettis; Carmen Gibbons; Lisa D Gibbons; Anthony A
Gibson; Martinique Gibson; Brenda Gillis; Demitry A Glover; Phyllis Glover;
Voncea Glover; Arthur L Godfrey; Mary Goodman; Troy Gordon; Deloris
Grant; Sean Gray; Ernest Green; Kay Green; Tantalaine Green; Yolanda D
Green; Felecia E.Green-Hicks; Charlie M Grier; Aqueelah Griffin; Joyce
Griffin; Kareem Griffin; Lonnie B Griffin; Tommy Hall; Charde L Hampton;
Alonzo Harden; Jerod Hardwick; Alonzo Harper; Timothy E Harris; Yolanda
Hart; George Harvey; Warrick Harvey; Cornelius Haugabook; Yvette Y
Haymes; Brenda Hayward; John Heath; Josephine Heath; Bruce J Henry;
Daniel Henry; Prudence Henry; Valencia Herring; Dennis Hill; Russell Hill;
Ernestine H Hills; Ingrid Hills; Altamese Hines; Virginia Hodges;'Ollie L
Holmes Sr.; Jack B Hoover; Lapanza Houston; Alene Howard; Arthur
Howard; Dettra Howard; James Howard; Tracy Howard; Derrick Hunt;
Ingram A Ingram; Gregory Irby; Juanita Ivory; Carolyn Jackson; Chauncey
Jackson; Linda Jackson; Martha Jackson; Marvin Jackson; Robert
Jackson; Temesha Jackson; Teresa Jackson; Kersha James; Andre
Jenkins; Leggett Jenkins; Adda Johnson; Brenda Johnson; Carolyn R
Johnson; Derek Johnson; Gregory Johnson; Gregory V Johnson; Janice D
Johnson; Sylvia Johnson; Timothy H Johnson; Timothy V Johnson Sr.;
Claude Jones; Evelyn D Jones; James Jones; Tamisha Jones; Eddie D
Jones Jr.; Lisa Jossey; Rayshad Jossey; Jacqueline Joyner; Chrisshone D
Kamma; Emily Kennedy; James Key Jr.; Malikah Kilpatrick; Marcus King;
Wilhelmina S King; Odessa R Kirkland; Emory K Kohn; Lorenzo A Kohn;
Josietta Ladson; Korffie Lake; Matthew Lewis; Michael Lewis; Roderick
Lewis; Cora Lindsey; Sandra J Linton; Keisha O Long; Eddie D Long Jr.;
John, Loveday; Laquillia Lovett; Willie M Lyons; Kevin D Mack; Brannen C
Madison; Inez Madison; Belinda Mangrum; Cheryl Mason; Dessie P
Mathews; Edwin Matthews; Sarah S May; Jibri D McClendon; Erica
McCoy; Morris L McCoy; Willie McDaniel; Willie D McDaniels Sr.; Onesha
R Mclntosh; Carolyn B McKiever; Johnnie L McKnight; Joyce L McNeal-
Yates; Saundra McNeil; Mary E McRoy; Andrea Meeks; Jessie B Mercer;
Josephine Mercer; Quain Mercer; Vernon L Meuse; Vernon L Meuse Sr.;
Shadeed R.Middleton; Michael Miles; Robbie D Miles; Timothy Miles; Ella
Miller; John Mills; Lafonda Mills; Mary Mills; Arthur Mitchell; Brenda
Mitchell; Galan Mitchell; Rishard Mitchell; Carol D Mitchner; Ann Moore;
David Moore; Shamika Moore; Tina D Moore; Bernice Moran; Barbara
Moultrie; Marie Murkey; Barbara Murphy; Edith Murphy; Kierra M Murphy;
Maurice Murphy; Margie Neal; Lydia Nealy; Dianne Norris; Robert Oakley;
Eric Orr; Jermaine Orr; Barbara Parker; Edna E Parker; Franke Patterson;
Rochester Patterson; Tiffany Patterson; Nathaniel Pearson; Elizabeth
Pelham; Micahel Perkins; John L Perry; Yvonne Perry; Janet Phillips; Eddy
J Pierre; Ernestine C Pinkney; Gloria J Pitts; Minerva J Platt; Dyneshia
Platts; Alzie L Plummer; Darlene Poole; Deborah Poole; Leonard Poole;
Clyde Porter; Henry Porter; Annie P Powell; Jamar R Powell; Mialahn V
Powell; Vincent T Powell II; Kathy Prier; Mary L Priester; Ollie L Priester Jr.;
Terri Pugh; Justin Pullins; Laclassie Rainge; Gene Ramsey; Regina
Raynor; Regina L Reddick; Aiator Reynolds; Jackie Reynolds; Stacy
Reynolds; Lueann Richards; Zachary L Richardson; Alicia Richmond;
Jaquambia Roberts; Anita Robinson; Carolyn Robinson; Chane Robinson;
Gregory K Robinson; Lauren Robinson; Willie A Robinson; Lathen Rogers;
Amanda Roundtree; Willie C Salley; Gary V Savage; Tony Scholtz; Lillian
Scott; Tammy Seymour; Tony Sholtz; Sheila C Shumake; Napolian
Shuman; Juanita L Simmons; Willie C Sims; Lewis B Singletary; Antionette
Smith; Billy Smith; Ernie Smith; Florine Smith; John Smith; Lakshia Smith;
Maggie Smith; Pamela Smith; Raphnell Smith; Sara Smith; Stacy Smith;
Taki Starkes; Robert L Stevens; Shirley A Stevens; Betty R Stewart;
Clenetta V Stokes; Muriel C Stokes; Cerissa Sumter; Erick Sumter; Donald
L Sykes; Barbara J Thomas; Brenda Thomas; Dale Thomas; Dorothy
Thomas; Joyce Thomas; Latoya Thomas; Phyllis Thomas; Roy Thomas;
Sabrina Thomas; Shuprina Thompson; Gloria E Timley; Lequenten L
Timley; Janet Tolbert; Vivian Tolbert; Keysha A Travis; Dana Tubbs-Sumter;
Latrese Tunsill; Anita Turner; Annita Turner; Betty Tyson; Pauline Waker;
Saundra C Waldrup; Falencia Walker; Sheila Walker; Vivian Walker; Tonja
Wallace; James Walton; John Walton; Mark Walton; Carl I Ward; Regina
Washington; Carolyn Waters; Penelope L Watson; Walter Watson; John
Watts; Matthew Watts; Voncille Weatherington; William West; Brenda
White; Debora D White; Michael White; Courtney Willams; Al Williams;
Betty Williams; Carolyn Williams; Delores H Williams; Delores Williams;
Ernest Jr. Williams; Eugene R Williams; Evelyn L Williams; Francisco
Williams; Irene Williams; Janice J Williams; Kalif Williams; Kenneth
Williams; Latasha Williams; Olympia Williams; Ray W Williams; Riley
Williams; Sabrina Williams; Tia J Williams; Valarie P Williams; Varletta
Williams; Weedie Williams; Yolanda Williams; Jim E Williams Sr.; Freddie
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INVITATION FOR BIDS
C-1081A Remote Operated
Radiation Portal Monitor at
Talleyrand Marine Terminal
Sealed bids will be received by the
Jacksonville Port Authority until
3:00 PM, local time, April 5, 2005,
at which time they shall be opened
in the Public Meeting Room of the
Port Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville,
Florida, for C-1081A Remote
Operated Radiation Portal
Monitor Installation At Trail.
All bids must be submitted in
accordance with specifications
and drawings for Project No. C-
1081A Remote Operated
Radiation Portal' Monitor
Installation at Rail, which may be
examined in, or obtained from the
Engineering & Construction
Department of the Jacksonville
Port Authority, located on the sec-
ond floor of the Port Central Office
Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue,
Jacksonville, Florida 32206.
(Please telephone 904/630-3062
for information.)
PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL
BE HELD ON March 10, 2005, AT
10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC
MEETING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR
OF THE PORT CENTRAL
OFFICE BUILDING LOCATED AT
ADDRESS STATED ABOVE.
ATTENDANCE BY A REPRE-
SENTATIVE OF EACH
PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS
REQUIRED. A BID WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER
WHO IS NOT REPRESENTED AT
SUCH CONFERENCE.
Bid and contract bonding are
required.
Federal funds are being utilized
in conjunction with this project.
Therefore, in addition to MBE or
WBE firms, Federal DBE firms
may be sued. Any combination
of MBE/WBE/DBE participation
will satisfy this requirement.
There are 5% mandatory
MBE/WBE Participation Goals
established for this project
Randy B. Murray, P.E.
Director, Engineering & Construction
Jacksonville Port Authority


i -


ach ox er 4 X-li I I ion Readers tl\ ca I I im-, H oridn s S ic
(8,66)742-1373
F". I L, I., I


Circulation: 1. n


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I







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rn---- Ut--------- fl-U--- -- --;- -- ~- ~ ~ Ir"' -~~"x""~~~~~


MAIMI


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Colonial Mall

Glynn Place


Wed., March 23

&
Thur., March 24


4:30 & 7:30 PM

Daily


MEET '
SPEIlAL


STAR
(LSr= 3T
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t'M h,( ?Wfl MutltI)SlflllI tNC




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STORE HOURS:
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MARCH 12. 206


FLORIDA STAR


T] PAV RD 0


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