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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State/Nationa...
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
March 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00009

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
March 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00009

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: State/National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text



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II *5 2 0 5 M R CI1 2 0 5V O 4 O 4 5 C N T


infant Dead, 2 Adults

injured, One Jailed

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.- Daniel Dopson. 34. \\as
observed driving
\ ith problems. \\ west-
bound on hILK Blvd.
N' from nlain. It \aas
not long before the
vehicle accelerated
to a high rate of
speed, and struck a
curb as it traveled
down Moncrief,
almost striking
stopped cars and
finally crashing into
a building on 31st
Daniel Dopson Street.
Dopson exited the
car and fled on foot, running through yards when the
officer, who was later joined by a homicide detective
with a drawn gun, to aid him in his pursuit. Dopson
was taken to Shands Hospital because of his injuries
but is now in the Duval County jail charged with DUI
and reckless driving. Dopson was already wanted for
child support and domestic violence charges.

Toddler Dies; Father, Victim in Hospital


Gerald Joiner, 30, was driving
down Atlantic Blvd. with his 17-
month-old son, Jacob Joiner on
Wednesday and ended on the
wrong side of the street trying to
avoid the police and collided head
on with Linda Glisson, 56. Both
Joiner and Glisson are in critical
condition at Shands Hospital.
The toddler expired Thursday
morning. The required child
restraint safety seat was not in use.


Gerald Joiner


News in brief

Stedman Graham Teams With
National Black MBA Association

The National Black MBA Association and author,
businessman,. and
educator, Stedman.
Graham, said they
would collaborate in
providing new oppor-
i. tunities for profes-
sional and leadership
development for
executives, entrepre-
neurs and community
leaders. The group's
initiatives will begin March 31 and will include several:
cities, including Jacksonville on December 1. 2005.

Fugitive May Be In Jacksonville


Ontrayis Keith, 25, is wanted
in Ohio and is considered Armed
and Extremely Dangerous. He
has a.tattoo of "Tray Dog" on his
left arm. Information has been
given that Keith is in
Jacksonville. Call Crime
Stoppers, 1-866-845-8477.


untraylis Keln n
JAA RECEIVED HIGH MARKS
FOR SUPERBOWL
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EWC Still Alive, Kicking Until Further Ruling


J ACKSONV ILL E.
Fla.- U.S. Distcit Judge
Timothy Corrigan said a
temporary restraining
order granted to Edv.ard
Waters College against
the Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools
(SACS) will remain in
place until he can make a
decision on whether it
should be converted to a
preliminary injunction.
"The temporary


injunction remains in
place until further order of
the court." said Judge
Corrigan during argu-
ments in the first phase of
EWC's lawsuit against
SACS on March 3 at the
U.S. Courthouse in down-
town Jacksonville.
Judge Corrigan told
attorneys representing
both parties, college offi-
cials, trustees, students,
staff members and friends


Where Is Kayla?
On Tuesday, March 1, Kayla Victoria King, 14,
was upset because she had gotten
into an altercation with another stu-
dent at Robert E. Lee. She did not
agree with the punishment given
her because she said the fight was
not her fault. She also said that the
boy. she had argued with told her he
was going to "beat" her up later. Kayla V. King
When she voiced her feelings to
her stepfather, he did not give her the consolation
she desired so as of Thursday, Kayla is still missing.
If you have information or see Kayla, please call the
Sheriffs Office, (904) 630-0500 or 630-2644.



John Clark, executive director of Jacksonville Airport
--- Authority was able to pass out a bonus
check for as much as $700 to employees
of the airport for their performance dur-
ing the Super Bowl. When Clark told
the company rating JAA that he had
promised a bonus to his employees if
J they were able to get a ranking of 4-
John Clark points out of 5-points, he was warned
that was almost impossible. But, the
employees topped 4 points they received a rating of 4.8
,on a 5-point scale. Congratulations JAA.

FORMER CONGRESS AND
CITY COUNCIL WOMAN DIES

City, State and National leaders sent out notes of con-
dolence to the family of the Honorable Tillie K. Fowler,
who died on March 2. Mrs. Fowler served the city in
many capacities, including the City Council, the U. S.
Congress and as a volunteer. Public services will be at 1
p.m. on Friday, March 4 at St. Mark's Episcopal Church.

HIV INFECTION RATE
DOUBLED AMONG U.S. BLACKS

The HIV infection rate doubled among U. S. blacks in
10 years while holding steady in the white population.
The U. S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention com-
ipared data from 1988 to 1994 with figures from 1999 to
O2002 and found infection rates among blacks doubling
from 1.10 to.2.4 percent.


of E\VC that there is too
much information he
needed to consider in
order to make a ruling.
EWC attronev Mike
Freed argued that a tem-
porary injunction granted
Monday, Februar 28
should be converted to a
preliminary injunction.
A preliminary injuc-
tion wouldd allow E\WC to
remain accredited w\ while it
pursues its legal case
against SACS.
Freed argued that
SACS did not follow it's
o%\n rules in it's decision
to strip EWC of it's
accreditation giving the
institution a "death
blow."
"We have complied
with that issue," said


SACS Attorney Patrick
McKee.
Mckee is also request-
ing that the la\\suit be
placed under the jurisdic-
tion of the U.S. District
Court in the Northern
District of Georgia.
Judge Corrigan must also
rule on this motion.
_Until further notice of
the court, federal funds.
including federal finan-
cial aid to students
remains available to the
college whilee the court
further pursues the issue.
The United Negro
College Fund is lending
support to the case saying
SACS efforts against
EWC appear to be
"racist."


Blacks Top The Oscars

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. Texas born Eric Bishop, better
known as aMNO
Jamie Foxx,
received the
top award as
Best Actor for
his portrayal of
Ray Charles in
"Ray," and
Mor gan
Freeman, 67,
received a
long-overdue
award as Best
Supporting
Actor in
"Million Dollar
Baby."
The audi-
ence and view- Jamie Fox & Morgan Freeman
ers could feel
the restraints on first time host, Chris Rock, even though he
did show his true personality when he went to a Magic
Johnson theatre and interviewed movie goers, who made it
crystal clear that black folks really like movies with black
characters because they had seen few of the other movies
nominated for awards at the Academy. Nevertheless, in
spite of the restraints, Rock was able to still "do us proud."
There was- additional pride shown when Beyonce per-
formed three of the five best original songs nominated,
including singing one in French, in. three beautiful outfits
with three different hairstyles. And when you talk about the
"bling bling, Deion Sanders' bling bling could not compare
to the jewelry Beyonce wore with her last outfit.
The 77th Annual Academy Awards, held on Sunday,
February 27, 2005, will be one long remembered, even
though the viewing audience was down in age category it
was up for the younger viewers, which in essence, is good
for the advertisers.
Mr. Freeman was very gracious when he accepted his
award,. and the eyes of southern blacks were filled with tears
when Foxx talked about his grandmother who gave him his
first acting lessons "Boy act like you got some sense."
Foxx, a bachelor who shares his home with his sister and
their father, came to the Academy Award with his daughter,
11-year-old Corinne, from a prev ous relationship. Corinne
lives near them, and she was able to share the winning
moment as her father's escort.
African American actors, actresses, musicians, and busi-
nesspersons, were seen at the Oscars all looking good and
feeling proud very proud!


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business or utilize your services? If you
answered YES, then you need to place an ad
in The Florida Star! CALL 904/766-8834 to
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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
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PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GAINESVILLE FL 32611.7007


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7-A'Gl A-D2flA VTAP MAr cf4


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
RON WILLIAMS, SR. SAMUEL CRISWELL
NEWS EDITOR ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR


CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


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REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
CARL DAVIS, ESTER DAVIS, NOREEN ERCOLINO, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DeSHAYLA M. BRYANT, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts orphotos.
Opinions expressed by columnist, in [his
newspaper do not necessarily represent
thepolicy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
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National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
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-Chamber Of Commerce


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
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On the Web:
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SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


VERIFICATION


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


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To Be Equal
By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League
The Senate Must Reject Judge Terrence Boyle


Does a United States
District Court judge who has
demonstrated extraordinary
hostility to laws protecting the.
rights of Americans deserve
appointment to a U.S. Court of
Appeals?
Does a U.S. District Court
judge of extremely conserva-
tive views deserve advance-
ment to the U.S. Court of
Appeals for his jurisdiction
when more than 150 of his
decisions have been reversed
on appeal by that very Court of
Appeals-a panel which itself is
universally regarded as the
most conservative Appeals
Court in the country? Does a
U.S. District Court judge who
fails to turn over thousands of
his unpublished civil rights
opinions to the Senate
Judiciary Committee, which is
to review his nomination,
deserve a lifetime seat on the
nation's second highest court?
These and other questions
surround the Bush
Administration's nomination
of U.S. District Court Judge
Terrence Boyle for a seat on
the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the Fourth Circuit. Its jurisdic-
tion covers the states of North
Carolina, South Carolina,
Virginia, West Virginia, and
Maryland.
We think the answers to
those questions add up to a
resounding no-and we urge the
Senate Judiciary Committee,
which is about to formally
consider the nomination, to


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reject it.
Judge Boyle, of North
Carolina, has been a Federal
District Court judge since
1984, when he was appointed
by President Reagan. He was
first nominated to the Fourth
Circuit Court of Appeals in
1991 by President George
H.W. Bush, but the Judiciary
Committee let his nomination
lapse.. Now, Judge Boyle, long
supported by former
Republican Senator Jesse
Helms, of North Carolina, on
whose staff he once served,
and the late Republican
Senator Strom Thurmond, of
South Carolina, has been re-
nominated to the Fourth
Circuit by President George
W. Bush.
But the Senate Judiciary
Committee's answer must still
be no. Judge Boyle's decisions
overwhelmingly display an
astonishing disregard for the
rights of individuals and the
proper exercise of judicial
authority. A s his record of
reversals on appeal proves,
even a significantly conserva-
tive review panel has found
his rulings unacceptable far
too often.
In cases involving race that
come before Judge Boyle, the
plaintiffs rarely reach the trial
stage. He's dismissed numer-
ous cases even, before trial-
decisions which have prompt-
ed numerous reversals by the
Fourth Circuit Court: For
example, in one case, Rogers


v. Lee, the Fourth Circuit
reversed Judge' Boyle for not
following the established law
on discriminatory jury selec-
tion practices. In that case,
Judge Boyle allowed the pros-
ecution to strike every black
juror, leaving the African-
American defendant to be
tried and subsequently con-
victed by an all-white jury.
In another case, Franks v.
Ross, the Fourth Circuit
reversed Judge Boyle for sum-
marily rejecting a claim of
environmental racism by
plaintiffs seeking to halt con-
struction of a landfill in a pre-
dominantly-black area. The
Fourth Circuit cited numerous
errors by Judge Boyle, includ-
ing his abuse of his discretion
in denying an amended com-
plaint, incorrectly calculating
when the statute of limitations
had begun to run, and wrongly
concluding that state officials
were immune from being
sued.
Judge Boyle's errors in one
civil rights case led the U.S.
Supreme Court to reverse him
twice in that same case. The
case was Cromartie v. Hunt, in
which a group of white North
Carolina voters challenged the
drawing of boundaries for a
district represented by
Democrat Mel. Watt, an
African-American.
First, the High Court
declared in a unanimous 9 0
decision that Judge Boyle had
erred in ruling without a trial
that the North Carolina legis-
lature drew the boundaries of
the district primarily for racial
reasons. Judge Boyle then
held a trial-and again ruled the,
district's boundaries had been
drawn'for racial purposes.
Again, the Supreme Court


declared that it had not t
proved the state legisla!
had drawn the district's bot
aries primarily for racial
sons, and reversed Jui
Boyle's decision. Ju(
Boyle's record is replete w
examples of his seeking,
protect the State from ci
rights lawsuits that do
involve race, too.
For example, in a si
against the North Carolii
department of motor vehicle
Judge Boyle was one of tl
first judges in the country \
assert that a state's sovereign
immunity protected it froi
suits filed by employees unds
the Americans wit.
Disabilities Act. Later, .h
ruled that Congress did no
have the authority to apply thi
ADA to state prisons. The
Supreme Court, taking up a
similar case involving
Pennsylvania, subsequently
declared that states could be
sued under ADA provisions.
Judge Boyle's record on
the bench marks him as being
significantly out of step with
mainstream American
jurisprudence, be it conserva-
tive or liberal, and with the
need of all the residents of a
SCircuit Court jurisdiction that
has more African-Americans
residing within its boundaries
thanany of the nation's twelve
other Circuit Courts.
Certainly, the Bush
Administration, which has
seen more than 200 of its judi-
cial nominees approved by the
Senate, can do better than
Judge Terrence Boyle. The
Senate Judiciary Committee
must do its duty in reminding
then of that.


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FL OR- ID.......TAR...MARCH.. 5. 2005


Socially Speaking

By
Betty Asque
Davis
There Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"

"The Royal Vagabond Dance"
.-The members of the Royal Vagabond Club, Inc. chose
\nto% n's Adam's Mark Hotel for their 77th Annual
eetheart and Benefit Ball. Under the leadership of presi-
it William Sweet, Jr., the Royal Vagabond Club, Inc.
innues the bravura legacy of the sweetheart dance.
/We are always delighted to be the guests of Royal
gabond member Dr. Wendell P. Holmes and Mrs.
cquel ne Holmes as they are the perfect hosts. However
is \ car it was necessary for us to attend sans our hosts as
e, t\ ere both at home suffering from one of those 'nasty'
ruses We are all grateful that they are better now. And
.anks to the warm hospitality of Royal Vagabond Club
iemlber Lou Myers and Mrs. Hilda Myers and their
guests The Mikels and Lt. Col. Robert Porter (Ret.) and
is lonely fiance Mrs. Josephine Hall Fiveash, we had a
harming time.
It was splendid seeing old friends and acquaintances not
o mention our dancing to the music of The Classic Band
hat is always an additional highlight of an evening with The
Ro\ al Vagabonds Club. It was also marvelous watching The
ilhkels as they wowed everyone with their superb dancing
skills throughout the evening. And as is tradition each
fenmlc guest received a stunning red rose and the Royal
Vagabond wives/sweethearts were beautifully adorned with
, gorgeous white floral wrist corsages.

"Planning For A Fabulous 60th Reunion"
Mrs. Mary Crumley writes, "The members of the Class
of 1945 are working diligently to have a remarkable 60th
reunion. The theme for the reunion is "Reflecting on the Past
and looking to the Future".
We have our class photographer, Harry Robinson who
has photographed several individual and group pictures for
our yearbook entitled 'Reflections of the Past'.
At our last meeting of February 5, 2005, we had several
members present, working to make this weekend of May 26-
29, 2005, a memorable one. We received various pictures
from class members of our glorious past at Stanton High
School, which will be included in the yearbook.
The Class of 1945 has been blessed to teach a milestone
of 60 years.. Expressions of sympathy are extended to the
family of our classmate, the late Arthur Barlow who was
funeralized last week. We continue to finalize plans for our
60th Class Reunion and look forward to seeing you. Our
next class meeting is March 5, 2005, 3:30 PM 5:30 PM in
the Community Room of the Bradham/Brooks Northwest
Library 1755 W. Edgewood Avenue."
This sounds wonderful and we will keep you informed of
future events and will certainly share with you those pre-
cious moments of the reunion scheduled for May 2005.
*******+
"Sharon Cline's CD Released"
Some time ago I shared with you a segment on the fabu-
lous Sharon Cline recording party at Simon's Wine and
Jazz Bar. Well, the CD titled Interplay has been released
and it is wonderful! I know her parents, The Charles Clines
are very proud just as the rest of us are.
Ms. Cline states, "It is a lovely CD and has already got-
ten rave reviews!" I personally enjoyed each of the selec-
tions and I found The Nearness of You mesmerizing! Let's
hope that Ms. Cline returns to the First Coast real soon for
another fabulous performance.
***** ***
"JMOMA's Black Films Feature"
We caught the showing of Foxy Brown starring Pam
Grier during the Jacksonville Museum of Modern
Art (JMOMA) Black Film showings. What a flash-
back! Did we really wear those fashions during the
70's?
The Black Movie Showings at JMOMA were spon-
sored by Lewis Siplin's Church's Chicken and The
Bold City Chapter of Links, Inc.
During the month of March JMOMA's film theme is
'Women Making Movies.' On March 9 at 7 PM Beah:
a Black Woman Speaks will be the featured movie. This
movie is the directorial debut of actress Lisa Gay
Hamilton and celebrates the life of legendary African
American actress, poet and political activist the late
Beah Richards, best known for her Oscar nominated
role in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner. The film was
winner of the American Film Institute's Grand Jury
Prize.


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I saw the film when it premiered on HBO and I high-"
ly recommend it!
***++***
Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or you may reach me direct-
lyIat imajol@aol4om, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax
(904) 285-7008. See you in the paper!


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FLORID)A STAR


MARCH 5. 2005


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Riches In Glory Christian Women's Conference 2005 Set For Ja.x


Bethel Missionary Baptist Church of Tallahassee, Fla,
under the leadership of Rev. Dr. R. B. Holmes, Jr. invites
the community to attend the Fourth Annual "Riches In
Glory" Christian Women's Conference 2005 Thursday-
Saturday, March 10-12 at the Omni Jacksonville Hotel,
245 Water St.
The conference offers women of all ages, an opportu-
nity for a true weekend of fulfilling fellowship with sisters


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4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
Directors
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-^ i A.B. COLEMAN
DIRECTOR
WHAT IS GRIEF?.


All human relationships end
in separation. It's a fact which
cannot be denied. Regardless of
how much energy or emotional
commitment we invest in a rela-
tionship, it cannot last forever.
When a relationship is
brought to an end by death, the
loss is known as bereavement. It
is the emotional reaction to such
a loss that we call grief. It can
have many forms and manifesta-
tions. It can last for varying
lengths of time and be felt to dif-
ferent degrees, but there are a
few universal factors about
grief.
We undersatnd that grief is a


normal response. It can be
extremely painful, and poten-
tially harmful if avoided.
The proper.goal of grief is
the internal realization and
recognition of death.
Recovery, however, does
not mean all emotional signifi-
cance of death has ended.
Rather, it signifies the ability of
the griever to form new rela-
tionships and make new com-
mitments.

A.B. COLEMAN
MORTUARY, INC.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.'
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman.com


in the spirit.
During the conference, emphasis will be placed on
ministering to the whole woman of God to bring balance
and well-being spiritually, physically, emotionally, and
financially.
The conference begins Thursday, March 10, at 7:00
p.m. with Freeda Bower, author of the bestseller Give me
40 Days as the speaker. Others such as Janice Bowling of
West Palm Beach, Fla., Saundra Waldrop and Sylvia


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-
WOMEN IN WORSHIP-The Music Ministry of Shiloh
Metropolitan Baptist Church present "Women in Worship"
on Sunday, March 13, at 5:00 p.m. at the church located at
1118 W. Beaver St. The evening will feature Evangelist
Tarra Conner Jones, Ms. Amy Hall, Mrs. Keecia King, Mrs.
Karen Winston Rozier and Mrs. Henrietta Telfair. The pub-
lic is invited to attend. Roger D. Sears, Director of Music
Arts. Darrell L. Gilyard, Pastor.
REVIVAL-The public is invited to attend a revival March
11-13 at Holy Tabernacle Church, 6416 Miriam St. Services
begin nightly at 7:30 on March 11-12 and at 11:00 a.m. on
Sunday, March 13. Apostle Austin Lancaster (Rahi Minister)
from Deland, Fla. is the guest speaker. Paul R. Cardona,
Pastor. R.L. Jones, Bishop.
A SPRING AFFAIR OF FASHIONS-Mt. Sinai
Missionary Baptist Church, 2036 Silver St., presents "A
Spring Affair Of Fashions" Sunday, March 20, 4:00 p.m.
SThe event, hosted by Sinai Sisters in Christ Ministry (Sis.
Wallette Gundy, President) features the "Mount's" own
models stepping and strutting their styles on the runaway.
Rev. R. L. Guhdy, Pastor.
PRE-EASTER CONCERT- A Pre-Easter Concert entitled
"Psalm 100" will be held 7:00 p.m. on March 26 at Cross
Road Family Worship Center, 524284 U.S. Highway 1 in
Callahan, Fla. The event features Tony and The Magnificent
Voices of Durham, N.C. and The Rising Stars of Eastover,
S.C. The Church of God By Faith Praise Team will open the
service.
SPIRITUAL CONCERT-The Jacksonville Masterworks
Chorale presents a concert of "Spiritual Inspirations" on
Saturday, March 12, 7:00 p.m. at Riverside Baptist Church,
2650 Park St. The concert will be presented again on
Sunday, March 13, 3:00 p.m. at Terry Parker Baptist Church,
7024 Merrill Rd. The chorale will feature songs of the earth
and spirit: a medley from "Porgy & Bess", selected spiritu-
als,, and "Missa Kenya", a major work composed, by
University of Florida Professor Paul Basler, with David
Scheininger, Baritone soloist and Kevin Reid, French Horn
(principle with the JSO). Both concerts are free and open to
the public. An offering will be taken to help continue the
preservation and performance of fine choral music in the
northeast Florida area.


Evan el

Tem-le
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It's Time To Visit \\ith Us!
SExc- ira n .'hildr.-n :, YO L-o, 1. n,:.i r iiC
,' 'r.,riich,,. i I It Ii,'. m i i t FF'.1i1 it t10 lllh (IT(i"- i )-s]n .

Sunday Services

,.?;25 a.mn.. 10._.l a.ni &" .X) p.m.
Iesus SLill HI-;ls the S ick.
.' |i.1"L [..l.[ ,F 1 ,.-,d .
, T.. i .. *:' L.,' .. > 1 11 ,l ., ,1 ( ;, 0i .,. [ t. .,,. .'. Yl'


SHonLectioming Sundy '
,. 'lMarch0 13th


-75.5 Ra 9pial l.
.JUL ks.Jinv;iv. FF. 522(05
904~-781 -9393


Johnson of Jacksonville, and Tina "The Chicken La(,,:I
Dupree.
For additional information, or to pre-register, cont
E.W. Bryant Associates at (850) 224-6809 or via e-mail
ebryant446@aol.com. For hotel reservations call (90I
355-6664 and refer to the Christian Women's Conferenc-



The Church Directory,
"Come and Worship With Us"


Su
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New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
nday School 9:30 a.m. ..
nday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
nday Afternoon Bible Study
kcept First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
esday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review............8:00 p.m. .
astor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
)4) 764-5727 Church ,
14) 768-0272 Home


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If There had been a death
in vour l/aiii- y.leserday.l
what wIould ytou be doing
tQday?


MARCH 5, 2


PAGE A-4


CHRISTIAN FAMILY

~ WORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount.Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gunidy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.
Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service...................6:00-8;00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

Mount Sinai Community Development Enterprise
Community Resource Education
And Development Institute
2049 North Pearl Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 798-8733
'GED Program, FCAT, Tutoring, Mentoring, After School,
Job Skills Training, National Parenting Program, Ex-Offenders,
Computer Skills Training for Youth and Adults.
For More Information
SCall (904) 798-8722 or 798-8733.
MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Eyening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible.Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)
GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Adress! 723 W. 45th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Fla. 32206 -
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org

HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT!
Call 904/765-9773
Give to: The Samuel W. Smith Fund Raiser
for Kidney Transplant,
Account #234-5528-5
Compass Bank
Jacksonville, FL








fARCH 5, 205rlu.IS lf
121I aDY-_ VT AE -


.eflecting on 2004

It's that time of the year again: tax season. Typically April
'5, the deadline for filing taxes, is met with moans and groans
is people grudgingly make their way to the post office. But this
rear, lots of people in Jacksonville may have something to $'
look forward to: the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). A host
of public/private companies, agencies and non profits have ,
launched the Northeast Florida Real Sense Prosperity
ICampaign to make sure that those eligible for the EITC get
every penny they deserve.
The Northeast Florida Real Sense Prosperity Campaign has .
identified nearly $10 million in federal earned income tax .
credits to which many low-to-moderate income Duval County
residents may be entitled. This is federal money that has
already been set aside to help struggling families gain financial
independence, but each year the credit goes unclaimed by Mayor John Peyton
nearly 14,000 Jacksonville families. And we aren't talking about small change, either! A
family with two children earning $35,000 may be eligible for up to $4,300 from the EITC,
even if less than that was withheld from their paycheck. Additionally, people who haven't
filed in the past can. file amended returns for up to three years, enabling them to receive up
to $12,000!
What Real Sense does is help families determine whether or not they are eligible for the
EITC and then prepare their tax returns. This service is performed by IRS-certified volun-
teer preparers and is free of charge. Taxpayers using this service will receive an additional,
and very important, benefit: free financial training. Along with the money they deserve,
families will also get financial education and training needed to leverage their money into
long-term assets. Education is key to helping those struggling with money management
break the poverty cycle.
The money and education gained from Real Sense could be, for many, the first step
toward financial independence. Real Sense works to make each individual nore prosperous.
And having more prosperous individuals means the entire community is more prosperous.
That benefits us all.
For more information on the Northeast Florida Real Sense Prosperity Campaign, please
call (904) 632-0600 or visit www.jaxprosperity.org.
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites for free tax preparation:


Gateway WorkSource
Southside WorkSource
The Potters House Christian
Fellowship
Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist

RFK Center
Clay County WorkSource

St. Catherine's Church
Baker County WorkSource

Nassau County WorkSource

St. Augustine WorkSource


St. Matthews Church


5000-2 Norwood Ave.
11000-1 Beach Blvd.
5732 Normandy Blvd.

1319 N. Myrtle Ave.

113 Ionia Street
2141 Loch Rane Blvd.

1649 Kinasley Ave,
1184 S 8th Street Macclepny

1367 South 18th Street Fernandina

525 State Rd 16 St. Augustine


3720 N. Myrtle Ave.


Open 6 days per week
Open 6 days per week
Open 6 days per week

Open 6 days per week

Open 6 days per week
Weekdays by
appointment only
TBD
Tues & Thurs by
appointment only
Tues & Thurs by
appointment only
TBD

Weekdays by
appointment, Saturday
walk-ins


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Revolutionary Voices from the Past
There comes a time in the course of human events for persons who have been mistreated to
Dissolve the political bands which have connected them with those who mistreat them. In the
interest of self-respect and to claim the respect of others, after a long train of abuses, such per-
sons have the right and the duty to throw off those who mistreat them and provide new guards
for their future security.
In case you have not read it in a while, the Declaration of Independence contains the itali-
cized phrases in the above paragraph. This country was established on the simple fact that peo-
ple were being mistreated, they were tired of it, and they were not going to take it anymore. One
cannot help but admire people who come to the end of their rope and defiantly proclaim the
truth about their condition, and then do something about it.
I long for the day when Black people finally get so tired of the abuse we suffer all over this
country that we will decide to spend much more of our time, not trying to hurt someone else,
but to use our resources to help ourselves; The plight ofAfrican-Americans in.2005 is similar
to that of the founders of this country. The biggest difference is that they were fed up and deter-
mined to make a change; we are just fed up. They had to go to war, as we must go to war if we
want change. Our war must be revolutionary as well, but it must be fought with dollars rather
than musket balls.
Our resolve must be the same as the patriots, however. We must "admit" our problem and
.then "commit" to doing'what we have to do to get what we want. Why would we continue to
hope and wish for change from people who have demonstrated no indication of their willing-
ness to do so? Check out how Patrick Henry put it: "I have but one lamp by which my feet are
guided, and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging the future but by the
past. And judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of the British
ministry for the last ten.years to justify those hopes with which gentlemen have been pleased to
solace themselves..."
Henry knew he had to fight rather than hope and wish for change. He asked his compatriots
what would make them believe their captors would change. "Is it that insidious smile with
which our petition has been lately received? Trust it not, sir; it will prove a snare to your feet."
Patrick Henry continued, "They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so formi-
dable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year?
Will it be when we are totally disarmed... Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction?
Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying, supinely on our backs and hugging
the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand arid foot?"
Black people must ask ourselves those same questions. Henry reminded the people of their
futile petitions, their arguments against oppression, their entreaties and supplications to the
King. He reminded them of their demonstrations, their protestations, and their humility, all
rejected by the power, structure. He told them it was time to take things into their own hands
and stop begging their oppressors to come to their rescue. He said, "There is no longer any room
for hope. If we wish to be free... we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight!"
Until Black people, who occupy the bottom of every economic category and the top of every
incarceration category, who suffer from the lowest education levels among males and have the
highest percentage of female-headed households, until we decide to fight not only against White
folks who mistreat us but against our own internal demons as well, the words of Henry, David
Walker, and Maria Stewart will continue their hollow ring.
If we cannot see the historical irony between what David Walker said and what Patrick
Henry said, and act upon those words, we are doomed to permanent underclass status. We must
use our intellectual capacity to improve our situation in this country. We must use our tremen-
dous economic capacity as a hammer against banks that discriminate against us and corpora-
tions that treat us like afterthoughts. And, we must combine our intellectual and financial
resources to build our own political, economic, educational, and social independence. The King
is not going to do it, brothers and sisters.
Since I hare been writing this weekly column for more than a decade, figured I'd let a
* White man, dd the talking this time; mayle more of our people will listen and act, because if a


Mayor's Neighborhood


Matching Grants Program

To continue the City of Jacksonville's efforts to improve neighborhoods,
the Neighborhoods Department announces the opening of the
2005-20061 Mayor's Neighborhood Matching Grants Program.
Funding is expected to be $308,800 for next year. However, the amount is subject to
change if the mayor or City Council authorizes a different amount.
Any neighborhood association, civic organization or other community group that has
been in existence for at least six (6) months prior to the application date and is located
in Duval County is eligible. The maximum amount is $5,000.
Application forms are available at the Neighborhood Services Division,
S 117W. Duval St., Suite 310-A, City Hall at St.James. Proposals will be accepted
until May 31,2005, no later than 5 p.m. or postmarked by 5 p.m.

WORKSHOPS.ARE MANDATORY!
Matching Grants Pre-application Workshops are scheduled for
the following Thursdays
March 17,6:30-7:30 p.m.
March 24,10:30-11:30 a.m.
April 21,6:30-7:30 p.m.
April 28,10:30-11:30 a.m.

All training workshops will be held.at:
City Hall at St. James, 117 W. Duval St., Renaissance Room (Lobby)

Workshops will include an overview of the application process,
project eligibility and assistance with application preparation.
Please remember: No applications for fiscal year 2005-2006 will be
accepted without a representative of the organization attending
one of the technical assistance workshops.
Call the Neighborhood Services Division at (904) 630-7398 to reserve
a seat at the workshop of your choice.


John Peyton, Mayor


Roslyn Mixon-Phillips, Director
Neighborhoods Department


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PAGE A-5


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tr AtFORIDA STAR MAR -52


P U B L I X


CELEBRA T E S


H I S T O R Y


my recipe for living, my history.


C)


Leah Chase
Chef, Restaurateur, Author, Icon
Dooky Chase Restaurant I ew Orleans, La.
Main Ingredient: Dedication

Leah Chase's rise to Queen of Creole
Cuisine didn't start with a hunger for fame and
fortune, but instead from a desire to provide hot
lunches to Black men beginning to work in nearby
offices Believing that "you have to put all your love
in that pot," Chef Chase's passion isn't just
about good food, but also a testament to her
-* legacy of determination, cultural pride
/. and community involverrent.


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'News from Press Release and wire services)
Skin Heads Attack Black Diplomat
KIEV, Ukraine An American diplomat said Tuesday he
is attacked and severely beaten by a group of skinheads in
5 Ukrainian capital because he was black.
Robert Simmons, serving at the U.S. Agency for
international Development in Uzbekistan, was attacked
iturday night by what he described as a well-organized
,oup of more than a dozen skinheads wearing combat
,ots.
"I was attacked because I am African-American. They
lid not touch my friends who were there with me but were
ot black," Simmons told The Associated Press in the Uzbek
capital, Tashkent. "They beat me in turns, it looked like
raining for them," Simmons said.

Blacks Face High-Interest Loans
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Auto financing companies have
long used marked-up car loans to charge higher interest
rates, but plaintiffs' lawyers in a federal discrimination trial
say black customers have. suffered from the practice even
more than whites.
In opening statements Tuesday; plaintiffs' lawyer Clint
Watkins said economists from Yale and Vanderbilt universi-
ties "will explain how African-Americans and Hispanics are
seen in the industry as a prime profit opportunity."
He said the black customers of Primus Automotive
Financial Services, an affiliate of Ford Motor Credit Corp.,
were more than twice as likely as whites to be charged high-
er rates on car loans.
But a lawyer for Primus said the evidence will show that
blacks and whites were equally as likely to receive markups.
Marking up a loan is a practice in which dealers add, per-
centage points of interest to a loan and, in agreement with
the finance company, get to keep most of the extra interest
money. .
"This is one of the most commonplace transactions in
American commerce," said Primus attorney Tom Byrne.
"There is no specific (discriminatory) practice going on
here."
Since 1998, there have been several lawsuits filed against
auto financing companies, alleging discrimination against
blacks. Those suits have resulted in five out-of-court settle-
ments. The class-action suit against Primus is the first to go
to trial. Stephen Brobeck, executive director of the
Consumer Federation of America, said the settlements have
reduced the amount of interest all consumers in the United
States \\ill pay for vehicle purchases.


Cairns Foundation Contribute Funding,

Expertise To Bethune-Cookman College


Cairns Foundation Director Sonja Wadsworth, Dr.
James Cairns and his wife, Anna Maria, make a check
presentation to Bethune-Cookman College Vice
President of College Advancement Sumner Hutcheson


DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla. The Bethune-
Cookman College School of
Science, Engineering and
Mathematics received an
eight thousand dollar grant
from the Caims Foundation
to benefit students majoring
in Physics and Computer
Engineering,
Cairns Foundation
Director Sonja Wadsworth,
Dr. James Cairns and his,
wife, Anna Maria, made a
check presentation to
Bethune-Cookman College
Vice President of College
Advancement Sumner
Hutcheson III
Prior to delivering a
workshop. in the Science
Lecture lab on Friday,
February 11, Dr. James
Cairns presented the gift,
which will be distributed
equally between two stu-
dents in those respective
majors.
"Our intentions are to
support and mentor promis-
ing young students," Dr.


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Cairns said. "As I'm getting
closer to the end of my
career, I want to share some
of my, experience and
resources."-
Dr. Cairns, a noted
physicist and oceanograph-
er, pioneered the use of elec-
trical wet-mateable connec-
tors in subsea markets.
His company, Ocean
Designs Inc., has one of its
four worldwide offices
located in nearby Ormond
Beach and currently has a
Bethune-Cookman College
student serving an internship
there.
Following his check
presentation, Dr. Cairns
hosted a workshop, "How
To Create and Develop
Inventions" sponsored by


the National Science
Foundation's STEM
(Science, Technology,
Engineering and
Mathematics) program.I
Dr. Cairns meticulously
went through the process of
inventing, starting with the
"simple beauty" of an origi-
nal idea, followed by fund-
ing the development, receiv-
ing a patent, and above all,
maintaining persistence. In
the past 20 years, Dr. Cairns'
inventions have generated


over $200 million in sales.
"Inventing is an avenue
for people to have a big suc-
cess," Dr. Cairns said. "I
think there's a higher proba-
bility of success than trying
to be a baseball star or a rock
star." The Computer
Engineering program began
at Bethune-Cookman
College last year through a
$3.2 million grant from the
National Science
Foundation. The first gradu-
ates are expected in 2006.


MINORITYAIDS COALITION
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Where Christ Gets Lifted




The Victory is in the Word & Music

Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.


Topic For Saturday, March 5, 2005:
Andrea Giggetts discusses the African
Americans who built the "old west" and the six
African American United States Presidents.




6050-6 MoncriefRd., Jacksonville, FL 32209

Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955

Web address: WWW WCGL1360. COM


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The 2005 H.E.R.B.I.E. Awards
by Rych McCain
The 2005 H.E.R.B.I.E. Awards ',- 0 M
were held on Valentines Day,
February 14, 2005 at the Century An E P 4R e
Club in the fabulous "Century City" ,L -:OR TH 1 YRETHM A~ BLUES JNDATIOr
section of Los Angeles. The night .
was damp and chilly from all of the
rain you have been hearing about on ORTH E R
the news, but the action on the red
carpet and the happenings inside the
club were red hot!
H.E.R.B.I.E is an acronym for
Honoring the Evolution of Rhythm
& Blues In Entertainment. The
affair is a fundraiser for The
Rhythm & Blues Foundation. The
event was created and produced by Claudette Robinson & Cuba Gooding, The Suprmes; L to R; Sherrie Payne,
Denise Pendleton for De Nice Sr. (Photo @2005 Andre' B. Murray/A Cindy Birdsong & Jean Terrell. (Photo
Bern Agency Photo) @2005 Andre' B. Murray/A Bern Agency
Productions, Inc. The guests for the Photo)
evening read like a Who's Who of
past R&B superstars from the 60's and 70's. These were the.
trailblazer's who opened the door for today's hip-hop artists.
Some of the R&B royalty that strolled down the carpet were
Cindy Birdsong, Jean Terrell and Sherrie Payne (The
Supremes), Wanda Vaughn (The Emotions), Claudette
Robinson (The Miracles), Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes
featuring Sharon Paige, The Intruders, Cuba Gooding, Sr. (The
Main Ingredients), Angie Stone and Paul Jackson, Jr. to name a
few.
The Recognition Awards went to The GAP Inc.; Chevrolet
Motor Co.; 20th Century Fox Pictures; Musician/Producer Paul
Jackson, Jr. and Dr.. Benjamin Wright. The H.E.R.B.I.E.
Honorees were Chicago Radio legend Herb "The Cool Gent" The Blue Notes with Sharon Paige. (Photo @2005
Kent; Matt Robinson; Advertising guru, Tom Burrell of Burrell Andre' B. Murray/A Bern Agency Photo)
Advertising; Rapper Coolio; The Coca-Cola Company; Universal Pictures and The Chi-Lites, a siuper soul
vocal group. Jered and Claude Millhouse and Jeffery Daniels of Hierographix, designed the official
H.E.R.B.I.E Awards web page www.herbieawards.com. Ms. Valdemenia Williams, one of the rare, top, black
Hollywood professional Make-Up Artists was in the house and is a special friend to this article's author. The
sponsors were the world famous Roscoe's Chicken & Waffles, Pit Bull Energy Drink, The Gap Inc., The
Westin Century Plaza, Chevy, FedEx Kinko's and Hierographix. Jerry Peters served as Musical Director.
At the conclusion of this historic evening, Pendleton said, "We got a lot of positive feedback. Everybody
wants us to bring the show back bigger next year. It's a very positive thing for Black Music and Black History.
We want to do that, but we need sponsorship support. Those who want to sponsor next year's event should go
to our website (mentioned above), or call 818-779-0077." The H.E.R.B.I.E. Awards is the crucial link between
our musical past and present and should receive the grass roots support of the music industry and the commu-
nity at large. This show will be a major factor in the years ahead.


I


Diary Of A Mad Black Woman Hollywood World Premiere

by Rych McCain

You all should be tired of me mentioning no l et
rain in my last several features, but Los o ly 2
Angeles and Southern California have been
drenched for the last month and a half solid
with only two or three days of let up in
between from the rain. Last Monday was no
exception. It rained like cats and dogs dur-
ing the Hollywood premiere of Lions Gate
Films, Diary OfA Mad Black Woman.
The flimsy canopy tent roofing and
walling that was built, proved to be either no
match for the storm or the crew who con-
structed it was professionally inept. The red
carpet walkway had a several major leaks.
At first it appeared as if no one would show.
The press was in line almost two hours.
Then one or two folks popped in and before
you know it, the carpet was jammed with Cicely Tyson and Kimberly Elise atthe
major stars. premiere. (Photo @2005 Andre' B.
The movie drew mixed emotions from Murray/A Bern Agency Photo)
me. It was a well-written script with some powerful, emotional scenes that were
good. But the film lost me with some of the typical Black folk stereotypes. Why
does every Black film have to have a shouting church scene, a chicken & ham din-
ner scene, farting, weed smoking and heavy alcohol consumption and someone
getting drunk and acting a fool? You can easily predict where those scenes are
going even before they start. I also had difficulty with the stereotypical Black man
in drag as something to laugh at without regard to the deeper meaning i.e., the
degrading of our Black female elders and the feminization of our black males.
We will bring you the actor's viewpoints with individual interviews. The film
should do well at the box office. Tyler Perry has a built in audience nationwide
from his successful gospel stage plays. Kimberly Elise, Steve Harris and Shemar
Moore all delivered top, professional form portrayals that not only brought their
characters to life, but allowed you to feel them as well.


Thank you for reading

THE FLORIDA STAR!




TheFloridaStar.com


^AMA I3KAJDCATN INC.











K t













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TAMA Broadcasting, Inc.


The largest privately Black owned media company in the State of Florida.
Three (3) Stations here in Jacksonville.

Our listeners spend nearly 1.4 Billion Dollars each year in retail sales
Invite them to shop at your business....they will come!
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Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
Singer Whitey Houston made headlines all over thi
place when she became ill during a transatlantic flight ti
Paris. Upon landing in France, she was rushed to the hos--
pital. Food poisoning was the culprit. By the time ) on
read this, it will have been history, but Prince, Sean "P,
Diddy" Combs and Samuel L. Jackson as presenters and
Chris Rock hosting? The Academy Awards can window!
dress all they want, but the black won't be impressed until
we see major black actors with "Their Names only," in
lights on the marquee headlining major One-Hundred
Million dollar flicks! We all know the above-mentioned
"brothas," were there to boost sagging ratings to an other-
wise boring, White-Folks-Night-Out; Show-The-World-
How-Grand-We-Are," affair!
There is a buzz amongst some of us in the Black press
that Kanye West's ego arrives in the room before he does.
I personally have no opinion (as I usually do), until I per-
sonally get the opportunity to find out where he's coming
from, which will happen in a minute. Case in point; West
told a major daily newspaper that the magazines would
now have to "PAY" him to do covers because his mug
shot sells these publications. A word of advice to my
young brotha. First, you are a Black artist. Our kind
"rarely" if "ever" make it on the covers of "mainstream
American" magazines. Mr. West, instead of them "Paying
You," you probably "Can't pay them." to put you on their
covers!
Much of West's success is due in part to the massive
amount of press he has received. Should the press put him
on ice to chill for a minute, he and his career would dis-
appear like a rabbit being stuffed in a magician's hat! It
was reported that Playgirl Magazine has offered to pay
him for a cover if he poses nude. Stay tuned.
Rapper/Actor James Todd Smith P.K.A. LL Cool J,
has sued the owners of the FUBU Clothing for failing to
properly compensate him financially after his image and
endorsement of the clothing line help sell several hundred
million dollars worth of product. Nelly, Fat Joe and
Fabolous are planning a spring tour.
Author Trenay Perry Bynum has written a new book
titled TRIUMPH! (The Beautiful Face Of Courage). It is
a collection of essays from twelve women who survived
abuse, cancer, depression, homelessness, poverty and
other serious life changing experiences. Their stories take
readers on a daring journey as these women share stories
of recovery, healing and hope. The book is available
exclusively on Bynum's website
www.mytriumph.homestead.com or call 615-566-5161.
Maat-Hotep!


PAF A_


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FLORIDA STAR







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,he Present Meets The Past And Sparks The Future In 'The Journey'


NEW BETHEL AME CHURCH
Black History Program 2005


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It has been said that those who don't know their history
are destined to repeat it and to know where we're going, we
need first of all to know from whence we've come.
That's the message conveyed in "The Journey" a Black
History play to be presented on Friday, March 11, 7:00 p.m.


at New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 1231 Tyler St. Rev. William
H. Lamar, IV, Pastor.
"The Journey", a play written by Irma Lindsey Parker
and Ron Williams, and directed by Eugene Lindsey, relives
and celebrates Black History through the eyes of six African
American students who skip school and are sent on a jour-
ney to trace the steps of the civil rights movement from slav-


ery to freedom to modern times.
Along the way, they must take part in historic moments
of the movement in order to understand the present and
position themselves for a future of productivity and prosper-
ity. The play is the highlight of New Bethel AME Church's
Black History Celebration 2005. The public is invited to
attend the free celebration.


Concours d'Elegance At The Ritz-Carlton


By Mhrsha Dean Phelts

If you enjoy fine cus-
tomized luxurious cars then
hang out at The Ritz-Carlton
on Amelia Island March 11-
13. The 10th Annual
Concours d'Elegance returns
to the island where nearly
300 of the rarest vintage cars
parade over the slopping
seaside golf greens.
"George Barris, the flam-
boyant specialty car design-
er known in Hollywood as
the King of the Kustomizers,
will debut a one-of-a-kind
Pontiac GTO."
Barris, designer of the
Batmobile stole the show
last year when he dashed
from the Judges Stand onto
the greens and slithered up
to the model known as
Python Susan. She was after


all riding in Marris' 1951
custom designed Mercury.
Several sleek Alfa Romeo's
from the 19306C-1500 to
the-2004 Alfa Romeo
Sportiva Evoluta will be a
part of this year's show.
Get your tickets right
away for any of the three-
day events by going online
to www.ameliaconcours.org.
Several events have already
sold out. A number of semi-
nars will be offered includ-
ing Corvette, Young
Designers, Stock Car
Legends, General Motors
Presents the Small-Block
Chevy V-8 Engine and oth-


DEATH

NOTICES
AUSTIN-Eugene C. Jr.,
died February 22, 2005.
BAKER-Lois, died
February 27, 2005.
BELL-Theodore, died
February 27, 2005.
COLEMAN-John J. 79,
died February 27, 2005.
DAVIS-Katie E., died
February 24, 2005.
DOLLISON-Gwendolyn,
died February 25, 2005, A.
B. Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
HALL-Emestine, 76, died
February 21, 2005.
HILL-Annie, died
February 27, 2005.
JONES-Mary A., died
February 25, 2005.
KELLY-Alphonso, died
February 28, 2005.
KILPATRICK-Veronica,
T., died February 24, 2005.
KOHN-Sonny, died
February 23, 2005.
LEE-Zsa, died February
28, 2005 A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
MELTON-Judy, died
February 22, 2005.
PETTY-Beatrice,died
February 23, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
ROLLINS-Matthew,died
February 24, 2005.
ROSS-Hazel, died
February 26, 2005.
SMITH-George, 82, died
February 24, 2005.
SYLICI-Mae Green, 97,
died February 24, 2005.
TURNER-George, 65,
died February 27, 2005.
WALKER-Joe, died
February 24, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.

Correction: Leonard
Surrency, 54, funeral was
on Saturday, February 26,
2005 by Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc. It was incor-
rectly listed as, arrange-
ment under the directions
ofA. B. Coleman Mortuary,
Inc
9


ers. The BASF Automotive
Restoration Seminar is a
new addition. The BASF
Seminar is offered at no cost
on Friday, March 11 from
9 a.m.- 11 a.m. at the Golf
Club of Amelia Island,
located on the grounds of
The Ritz-Carlton. Some of
the cars in this year's show
are the rare Hemis, the
Small Block Chevrolet V-8
and Bobby Allison's race
cars. Allison, who has won
84 NASCAR races is hon-


orary chairman of this event.
Bill Warner of Jacksonville
founded Concours
d'Elegance.
To date this event has
raised more than $1.3 mil-
lion for the benefit of
Community Hospice of
Northeast Florida. Award
winning actor Edward
Herrmann, star of Gilmore
Girls wil be a judge for this
star-studded event of people
and their automobiles.


"COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.


LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO TO PERFORM
AT UNF-Ladysmith Black Mambazo, 2005 Grammy
winners, will perform their South African vocal sounds in
the Lazzara Performance Hall on Saturday, April 2, &30
p.m. on the campus of the University of North Florida
located at-4567 St. Johns Bluff Rd. South. For more
information and tickets call (904) 620-2878 or visit
www.unf.edu.
TRAINING/EMPLOYEMENT FOR SENIORS-
Experience Works is offering training and employment
opportunities for seniors 55 and older. Experience Works
is a national nonprofit and Equal Opportunity Service
Provider. For more information call 924-1710, ext. 2402,
2419, or 997-3100 ext. 2317.
PERSONAL FINANCE PLANNING- First Coast
Black Business Investment Corporation presents Personal
Financial Planning from 6:00-8:00 p.m. on Tuesday,
March 8 in Suite 100-Conference Room at the Ben
Durham Business Center located at 2933 North Myrtle
Ave. To register call (904) 634-0543.
CHARITY AUCTION-The Third Annual
Bachelor/Bachelorette Charity Auction will be held
Saturday, May 5 from 7:00-10:00 p.m. at the Terrace
Suite located in the south end of Alltel Stadium. The
charity event benefits students with developmental dis-
abilities such as Down Syndrome and Cerebal Palsy at
North Florida School. .For more information call 724-
8326, 388-2118, or 398-0726.
INNER-CITY CHEERLEADING COMPETITION-
Family, friends and fans can support their favorite Team
Up cheerleaders squad during the Sixth Annual Team Up
Cheerleading Competition on Saturday, March 5 from
9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Paxon Middle School.
Admission is free.
CHOLESTEROL SCREENING-Cholesterol Screening
will be held March 10 through March 12 at 10:00 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:00 p.m. at KMART located at 1501
Normandy Village Parkway. Low cost health screening
will include tests for Cholesterol, Diabetes, Liver
Function H. Pylori, Thyroid, PSA, and Hemoglobin Alc


I~... .1...... .__ .M EW..


PAGE B-1


FLORIDA STAR


?r-Hi 0 9/I1


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DrA I2 FOD Al


Ask Deanna! Is an advice column known for its fearless
approach to reality-based subjects!

Dear Deanna:
I'm a female that has a problem with the girly stuff. I'm
not gay or anything like that, I just prefer to wear men's
clothing and sports gear. People judge me, call me a lesbian
and hurt my feelings because I want to be comfortable and
just be myself. I can't take it anymore and want it to stop.
Andrea W. Leesville, LA

Dear Andrea:
Just like wearing hoochie clothes, you set yourself up for unwanted attention through
your wardrobe. If your feelings are hurt, obviously this mistreatment bothers you. You're
not as comfortable being in boys underwear as you pretend to be. Stop trying to be a Jack
and go back to being Jill. If you want the harassment to stop, toss out the boxers, buy a
thong and be the female you were born to be.

Dear Deanna!
My friend and I go to the club every weekend. Because I ride with her, she expects
me to buy gas and when we get to the club, she wants me to pay her entry fee and buy
drinks. I barely have enough left to pay my cover charge so, I sit at a table all night and
can't have a good time because I don't have any money left.
Drained Dry Charlotte, NC

Dear Drained Dry:
If you can buy alcohol, you can fill up your gas tank and take yourself to the club.
Ask your friend to ride with you and make her spend some money for a change. If she
gets angry or develops an attitude, she's not a true friend. You are being used as a one-
way ticket to a good time. Leave her dry on the curb and turn up the volume as you head
to the dance floor.

Dear Deanna!
Help me with this dilemma. 'm starting a new friendship and want to know if you
kiss on the first date, does that make you seem easy? I'm going out for the first time with
a guy I really like and I don't want the smooch rules to mess things up.
Janice Phoenix, AZ

Dear Janice:
Forget easy, if you've never dated him before, you shouldn't be thinking about putting
your lips on his body. You don't know if he's infected, has tart breath, diseases or what.
The time when kissing should occur is when it feels right for both people and after
you've gotten to know each other. Don't get yourself embarrassed by trying to plan the
kiss, if it's meant to be it'll happen.

Write Ask Deanna! Email: askdeannal@yahoo.com or Deanna M, 264 S. La Cienega,
Suite 1283, Beverly Hills, CA 90211. Visit her Web site at www.askdeanna.com.


Dear Editor:
Thanks so much for the profound Black History segments in this week's edition
of the Florida Star. We're elated at the fine Black History columns and look forward
to more of the same in the future. Also, we're thankful for President George W.
Bush's comments; on Black History. As he welcomed Black leaders to the East Room
of the White House to celebrate Black History on February 11, Mr. Bush said,
"Success of Freedom on the home front is critical to its success in foreign lands....
As I said in my inaugural address, we cannot carry the message of freedom and the.
baggage of bigotry at the same time". This is right on target, regardless of how one
voted last November.
As you probably are aware, in the same meeting, according to the AP, President
Bush noted legislation he signed in 2003 to create the National Museum of African
American History and Culture within the Smithsonian Institution, and that he and
Mrs. Bush made a contribution of an undisclosed amount to help build the museum.
Further, Mr Bush shared other important points that are good medicine for all
Americans -for example, he also said: 1) "It's important that our children know that
there was a time in their nation's history when one in every seven human beings was
the property of another"; 2) "Americans were still barred by law from hotels and
restaurants, made to drink from separate water fountains, forced to sit in the back of
the bus -- all'because of the color of their skin"; 3) "We need to teach them about the
heroes of the civil rights movement, who by their courage and dignity forced
America to confront the central defect of our founding".
By the way, your article regarding closure of the 30-year-old Cold Case was also
an important piece of Black History in terms of the killer being under convictionri and
turning himself in thus allowing JSO to close an important case, the. oldest ever
closed according to reports. Since there are over 800 Cold Cases outstanding, some
of which date'back to the 1960's, we continue to hope and pray that others responsi-
ble will also turn themselves in for conscience sake and to- facilitate needful closure
for the victim's families. Thanks for all you are doing to make a difference.
Pastor George Harvey, Jr.
Mt. Charity Missionary Baptist Church
1417 North Laura Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
904-356-0664:

Dear Editor: "
Thank you for the write up in The Florida Star on the Virginia law banning low
riding pants. The time has been long overdue for this law to be passed.
There is no excuse for our lawmakers to not have passed a law for such an act as
these, "Body parts Exposed" for the elder, young and for those who don't have the
desire to look at undershorts or bare skin.


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THE FLORIDA STAR!
ThForidaStar.com
The F IoridaSta r.com


Just two days ago in Super Wal-Mart this.young man came walking up the aisle.
I was sitting in an electric chair picking through items when he came passed me with
his rare flesh sticking out of his shorts. The pants were pulled down his legs, so I
told him, ''Your pants are falling down.". Yes, I did say it with a little anger in my
voice, and he acted as though he did not know it. Soon after he passed me, I saw him
pull them back down. The law should not only fine them, but it should make.the par-
ents pay also, as they live with them. Because they allow it at home, they feel it is all
right to take it to the streets.
Thanks to the Virginia lawmaker from Norfolk. Keep imposing until this is
stopped.
Thank you "Watching!!!"
Concerned Citizen a
Jacksonville, Florida


FLORIDA STAR


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Students view the exhibits .


The Bold City
Chapter of the Links,
Incorporated took
more than twenty-five
band students from
Darnell-Cookman
Middle School, Mrs.
Karen Jenkins,
Director to the
Jacksonville Museum
of Modern Art
(JMOMA) in order to
provide field and cine-
matography .experi-
ence for youth.
The activity
focused on photo-
graphic and cinematic
visual arts.
The participants
were provided a spe-
cial guided tour of the
Game Face exhibit
which focused on
women and girls in


sport.
(See "JMOMA",
B3A)
Youth Ready
For Drive, Chip,
Putt Program
Hundreds of
youngsters will hit the
links of The Golfplex
at the University of
North Florida on
Tuesday, March 29,
when Mutual of
Omaha and The Golf
Channel showcase
their Drive, Chip &
Putt prorajmh in the
jied.
(See ")(With", B3.1


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JMOMA Youth
(Continued From Cover) (Continued From Cover)
Now in its seventh year, Jacksonville is one of the
105 stops throughout the United States and Canada for
the world's largest junior golf program of its kind.
SWith the help of Comcast, Nike Golf, Delta Apparel
and Featherlite, The Golf Channel hopes in 2005 to
introduce the game of golf in a free, fun and friendly
A W, environment to more than 35,000 kids regardless of their
skill level.
.- "We're thrilled to bring Mutual of Omaha's Drive,
Chip and Putt Junior Challenge to Jacksonville," said
S' Mutual of Omaha regional sales officer A.J. Skar.
S"Everyone is a winner in this fun and rewarding program
for kids between the ages of 7 and 14."
S...-, -- The first 250 registrants in each city will be selected
f ,.' to compete.
r. o' 'a Winners from each local event will have the opportu-
nity to compete in regional championships and, possibly,
f represent their hometowns at the Mutual of Omaha
SDrive, Chip & Putt National Championship in October.
S' s For more information and a complete event schedule,
Link Aleizha Batson leads discussion with the students. log on to .www.TheGolfChannelcom golfchannel.com/> .

T-Ball And Baseball

At the Johnson YMCA
SThe James Weldon Johnson Family is continuing T-
.. '; "-, ball and Baseball registration through March 11 from
4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. at the Yates YMCA. The season
S.. begins April 2. Boys and girls ages 4-9 compete in T-
S'*Ball. Boys and girls ages 10-11 compete in baseball. For
S more information, contact Patrick Bryant at 703-4035.
.-.. The first 25 kids to register pay only $25.00. The reg-
Sular registration is $50.00.


a FIND OUT
Students receive briefing.
Additionally, the students viewed excerpts from a documentary on the bblaxploita-
tionb film genre and given an opportunity to analyze the material presented as it relates O W Y O U
to their modernday context.
Their commentary was filmed and were presented in mini-documentary format at CA N A PP EA R
the opening of the Second Annual Black on Black Film Series offered by JMOMA.

SIN PREP RAP!




CALL

9041766-8834




B-3B/MARCH 5. 2005


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Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" Green Day (Reprise)
Last Week: No. 1
2._Get Right" Jennifer Lopez (Epic) No. 3
3. 'Since U Been Gone" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) No. 4
4. "1, 2 Step" Ciara Featuring Missy Elliott (Sho'nuff
Music Line LaFace) No. 2
5. "Soldier" Destiny's Child (Columbia) No. 6
6. "Let Me Love You" Mario (3rd Street J) No. 5
7. "Rich Girl" Gwen Stefani Featuring Eve (Interscope)
No. 7
8. "Caught Up" Usher (LaFace) No. 8
9. "It's Like That" Mariah Carey (Island) New Entry
10. "Lovers and Friends" Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz
Featuring Usher & Ludacris (BME) No. .10
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Bless the Broken Road" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street) Last
Week: No. 1
2. "Nothin 'Bout Love Makes Sense" LeAnn Rimes
(Asylum Curb) No. 4
3. "Mud on the Tires" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) No. 3
4. "You're My Better Half' Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 2
5. "Monday Morning Church" Alan Jackson (Arista
Nashville) No. 9
6. "Nothin' To Lose" Josh Gracin (Lyric Street) No. 7
7. "He Gets that from Me" Reba McEntire (MCA Nashville)
No. 6
8. "Baby Girl" Sugarland (Mercury) No. 10
9. "When I Think about Cheatin"' Gretchen Wilson (Epic)
NcT 8
10. "Awful, Beautiful Life" Darryl Worley (DreamWorks)
No. 5
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
3
2 1. "Back to Love" Rachel Panay (Act 2) Last Week: No.
2. "Killer 2005 (P. Rauhofer/Morel/DJ Monk/J. Albert
Nhixes)" Seal (Warner Bros.) No. 1
3. "House of Jupiter (Junior/P. Bailey/Boris Mixes)"
Casey Stratton (Odyssey Sony Classical) No. 6
4. "U Ain't That Good" Sheila Brody (Star 69) No. 4
5. "Pop!Ular (Guido/Wayne G./P. Presta/J. Budz Mixes)"
Darren Hayes (Columbia) No. 9
6. "Kumbalawe (Roger Sanchez Mixes)" Kumbalawe
(Cirque Du Soleil) New Entry
7. "The Wonder of It All (Remixes)" Kristine W. (Tommy
BoySilver Label) No. 5
8. "Soldier (Remixes)" Destiny's Child Featuring T.I. &
Lil Wayne (Columbia) No. 15
9. "I Believe in You" Kylie Minogue (Capitol) New Entry
10."Da ya Think I'm Sexy? (Remixes)" Rod Stewart
(Warner Bros.) No. 8



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JAIL OR BAIL


ITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
ilty in a court of law Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
'.tter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
unity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
SPOUSE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On Sunday, February 27,
005 at 12:31 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 8334
:.hason Rd. East in reference to assault domestic battery vio-
nnce.Upon arrival, police officer met with the wife (victim)
'ho stated that she and her husband (suspect) had been argu-
ng that morning. The argument became increasingly heated
vhen the suspect threatened her. The victim said that the sus-
Sect told her that he would shoot her in the head and bur the
:iouse down." The suspect had been recently released from
prison and moved back in with her on 1/9/05. The victim told
the police officer that she was only letting him stay there until
he could get back on his feet and that she no longer loved him.
The suspect told the police officer that they had been arguing
but denies threatening her. He did acknowledge that he said
something -about burning the house down, but he was only say-
ing that to scare her and did not mean it. The suspect packed his
belongings and willingly left the premises without incident. The
victim was advised of procedure for filing for an injunction for
protection and given a state attorney's card. Patrol efforts sus-
pended.
GRAND THEFT OF McDONALDS-On Saturday, February
26,. 2005 at 11:45 p.m. a police officer was assigned to conduct
a follow up investigation to a grand theft. Witness who is a
manager at McDonalds stated an employee (suspect) was given
the responsibility of depositing money generated from the day's
sales. After interviewing the other manager on duty working
with suspect the witness explained per McDonald's procedure,
when the witness' shift ended he counted the receipts with the
suspect. Both witness and suspect verified receipt's equaled
$2,511.42. As part of the suspect's shift responsibilities he
would take deposits to the bank. Suspect confirmed he would
take the deposit to the bank. Suspect noted a "deposit" in the
businesses bank deposit ledger. No other employee had
authority or access to the money for the purpose of making a
deposit. Bank confirmed to witness that a deposit had not been
made from the suspect. Suspect had not returned to work since
the money had been discovered missing. Wife of the suspect
stated he had not been home in over a week. Police officer,
made contact With the suspect, read him his constitutional
rights. The suspect was arrested and taken to jail, and booked
on felony charges.
SPOUSE BATTERED BECAUSE OF DAUGHTER-On
Saturday, February 26, 2005 at 10:58 p.m. A police officer was
dispatched to 2535 Jammes Rd. In reference to an assault com-
plaint. Upon arrival, police officer met with the Wife (victim)
who stated that she got into an argument with her husband (sus-
pect), over her daughter. During the course of the argument, the
suspect became violent and threw her on the couch. While on
the couch, the suspect hit her several times in the face. The vic-
tim told the police officer that she was able to push the suspect
off her. The suspect fled the area in an unknown direction. The
police officer observed the victim's lip swollen and her right
eye was beginning to swell. Based on the victim's injuries, an
E. T. was assigned by HQ. The victim was given a domestic
violence booklet and treatment for her injuries, and she was
advised of a safe location. The police officer will attempt to
contact the suspect. If those efforts fail, the police officer will
contact the state attorney's office and seek a warrant for the
suspect's arrest. Patrol efforts are continuing. Case not cleared.
GRAND THEFT AUTO-On Saturday, February 26, 2005 at
7:11 a.m.a police officer was dispatched to 5301 Norwood Ave.
(Flea Market) in reference to a stolen vehicle. Upon arrival,
police officer met with the victim. He stated that someone.had
stolen his vehicle while he was inside the flea market. The
police officer's investigation revealed that an unknown suspect
gained entry into the victim's vehicle by an undetermined
means. Once inside the vehicle, the unknown suspect started
the vehicle and fled the scene. During the officer's interview of
the victim, he walked to the location where the victim had
parked the vehicle. He did not see any glass on the ground. The
vehicle was not equipped with a of burglary alarm system. The
listed Nextel cell phone was inside the vehicle, according to the
victim. Case not cleared.
BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-
On Sunday, February 27, 2005 a police officer was dispatched
to1214 Labelle Street. #181 in reference to a battery domestic
violence case. Upon arrival, police office met with the girl-
friend (victim), who informed him that she assaulted her live in
boyfriend (suspect). The victim and suspect have a set of twins
together which were not home at the time. The police officer's
investigation revealed that the victim and suspect had been
involved in an argument and that the suspect hit her in, the face,
banged her head against the wall and kicked her in the stomach.
The police officer did not see any signs of injuries on the vic-
tim. The police officer spoke with the suspect, who denied all
of the allegations. The victim was given a state attorney's card
and advised to seek prosecution. The police officer faxed a copy
of the report to children and family services. Patrol efforts were
suspended; MIC office follow-up.
POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE WITH
INTENT TO SELL-On Saturday, February 26, 2005 at 10:40
p.m. undercover police officers posed as drug users at the
Gator Lodge (4141 Phillips Hwy.). The undercover officers
were introduced to the drug dealer (suspect) by an unknown
black male about getting $40.00 worth of crack cocaine. The
suspect advised the officers that they needed to go into the bar
with him to get the crack cocaine. The officers agreed and fol-
lowed the suspect into the bar. The suspect then asked for
money. The undercover officers advised the suspect to get them
$20.00 worth first and he agreed. The officers then paid the sus-
pect $20.00 of JSO funds. The suspect met a heavy set black


male and an exchange was made. The undercover officers fol-
lowed the suspect outside and he handed them one (1) crack
Rock. The officers then paid the suspect $40.00 of JSO funds for
facilitating the deal. The suspect told the officers that if they
needed more drugs he would be in room #177. The undercover
police officers read the suspect his rights and then placed him
under arrest. The crack cocaine field tested positive and was
placed in the property room. The suspect "drug dealer" was
transported to jail and booked on felony charges.


Your Weekly Horoscope


(MARCH 5, 2005-MARCH 11, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) A
concern that's
weighing on your
mind this week L
has you off-kilter. You'll find
'it difficult to concentrate as
a result. You need to get
away from this for a bit to
clear your head.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) You're
usually pretty per-
ceptive about
people and their
motivations: This
week, though, you're not as
sharp. You could fall for
someone's snow job.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) You
need to resist the
temptation to
blow your budget. "
Sure, there seem to be lots of
"bargains" around.
However, if you do your
homework, you'll find that's
not really the case.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) You can't be the
only one trying to
S;-. ;. solve a domestic
dispute. You need
the cooperation of
all involved. Until then, stop
hitting your head against
that proverbial brick wall.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22) YouI
feel the need to
break out a bit
creatively. In fact,
this could lead to an exciting
new career or lucrative ven-
ture. Later in the week,
you're in no mood to enter-
tain at home.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22)
Someone close to
S you has good
E ., advice concerning
S financial inter-


ests. While this may surprise
you, this person really
knows about such things.
This weekend, you're a bit
out of sorts.
LIBRA (September
23 to October
22) You're usual-
ly a pretty forgiv-
ing sort.
However, this time, you're
very upset over a sharp
remark made by a'loved one.
It's best to clear the air hon-
estly about how you feel.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21)
You're looking
i forward to having
Sa good time
socially.
However, be sure that what-
ever you choose to do does-
n't cost a lot of money. Your
budget can't accommodate
that right now.
SAGITTARIUS
(No ember 22 to
December 21)
Something which
requires you
entering into a
legal agreement may not be
all that it's cracked up. to be.
Be sure you research this
thoroughly. Over the week-
end, you focus on your
home and family.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19) You need to
take a deep breath
this week and get
S away from the
hustle and bustle.
This will clear your head
'and result in great new
ideas. Just be sure you have
them all sorted out before
pitching them to the proper
people.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18) Hold on to


Elderly Couple Accused

Of Selling Marijuana

DANVILLE, W.Va. A 78-year-old woman faces
drug charges and authorities are searching for her 72-
year-old boyfriend after police found more than a pound
of marijuana stashed in a freezer on her property.
State police arrested Mollie Williams last week after
responding to a dispute between her granddaughter and
the granddaughter's husband, who were arguing over
drugs. Police learned the man allegedly had bought mar-
ijuana from Williams, State Police Cpl. Larry O'Bryan
.said Monday.
Armed with a search warrant and a drug-sniffing dog,
troopers went to Williams' residence near Danville.
The dog led troopers to a freezer in an outbuilding
where the marijuana, worth an estimated $4,000, was
hidden under frozen meat and other food, O'Bryan said.
Williams was jailed 'and later released on $15,000
bond. Her live-in boyfriend, Jack White, who was recov-
ering from heart bypass surgery, was given the opportu-
nity to turn himself in but failed to do so, authorities
said. He remained at large Monday.
"They appear to be the typical grandma and grandpa
individuals. However, they sell marijuana," O'Bryan
said.
The granddaughter was charged with possession of
marijuana and released on bond.

Nude Nacho Man Gets Probation

MARYVILLE, Tenn. A man caught by police last
summer on his 23rd birthday running naked and covered
in nacho cheese pleaded guilty Monday to burglary and
four other charges.
Michael David Monn of Maryville appeared before.
Blount County Circuit Court Judge D. Kelly Thomas'
and pleaded guilty to burglary, theft, vandalism, indecent
exposure and public intoxication. In a plea bargain with
prosecutors, Monn was sentenced to three years in
prison but was given supervised probation. He also was
given a judicial deferral, which means if he stays out of
trouble for the next three years the charges will be
expunged from his record. Thomas warned Monn that if
he violates the sentencing requirements, he must serve
the sentence in a state penitentiary.


your objectivity
this week.
Although a close -
friend wants to
involve you in something,
it's not your place. Stay out
of it.
PISCES (February 19
to March 20) You're tempt-
ed to blow your
diet or exercise
regimen this
week. It's not a
good idea. Just remember


i


how hard you've been work-
ing at it.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Willard
Scott, March 7; Aidan
Quinn, March 8; Jeffrey
Osborne, March 9; Prince
Edward, March 10; Lisa
Loeb, March 11; Liza
Minnelii, March 12; William
H. Macy, March 13.

(c) 2005 DBR Media,
Inc.


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PAG B- FLRID4 SAR ARC 5 i2


VARIATIONS


(Notes & Views)
By Ron Williams


A Bad Case Of Forgetitis
I am guilty and I am begging you, the readers, for forgiveness.
Sometimes we can become so euphoric over things that we forget
important matters.
I was so caught up and perhaps exhausted from all of the
Super Bowl hoopla and caught up in my other day-to-day strug-
gles that I forgot to celebrate a very important reality that the
NFL Hall of Fame Class of 2005 includes halfback Frederick
Douglas "Fritz" Pollard. The Class of 2005 will be inducted
on August 7, 2005 in Canton, Ohio. Pollard's classmates include
quarterbacks Benny Friedman, Dan Marino, and Steve Young. It
took the NFL Hall of Fame voters--that includes sports writers--
quite a long time to vote this long forgotten African American
athlete into the prestigious Hall of Fame for professional football.
We often forget to give credit where credit is due until we take an
antidote to cure us of our "forgetitis".
Pollard was one of the first three African American players in
early pro football. He went
on to become the first
African American head "'
coach in the NFL with the .
Hammond, Indiana Pros .
and was also the first :.
African American quarter-
back in the NFL (1923).
Okay, I have had a
double dose of medicine
and I think it's about time .-
that I tell you about Fritz.
He was born one of eight
children in 1894 in Rogers
Park, Ill., a Chicago
Suburb. Pollard attended
Lane Technical High .
School (1912) and was a
three-year All Cook ..
County halfback. He spent
three years on the track
and baseball teams. During the 1915 season as a freshman at
Brown University, Pollard led Brown to the Rose Bowl vs.
Washington State becoming the first African American to play in
the Rose Bowl (1916).
In spring 1916, Pollard set a world record in the low hurdles
while the on Brown track team. He qualified for Olympic team.
During the 1916 season he led Brown to an 8-1 record with 12
touchdowns. Against Yale, Pollard gained 144 yards rushing, 74
on kickoff returns, and 76 on punt returns (1 TD).
In Brown's first ever victory over Harvard he gained 148
yards rushing, 44 on punt returns, and 51 as a pass receiver (2
TD's). With Pollard as a player, Brown was the first college to
defeat Yale and Harvard in the same season. He was named to
Walter Camp's All-American first team, the first African
American in the backfield, and was later (1930's) named to
Grantland Rice's "Dream Team." From 1919-20 Pollard coached
at Lincoln University, a historically black university near
Philadelphia, doing so while in the military.
His professional football career blossomed froml919-26 in
the American Professional Football Association which later
became the National Football League. He started with the Akron
Pros, a team that became part of the APFA in 1920.
Akron won the first professional football national champi-
onship as an unbeaten team in 1920. Pollard was a player/coach
with Akron and Recruited prominent black players for APFA and
NFL. He is credited with organizing the first inter-racial all-star
game in Chicago to showcase African American players. Pollard
fought hard for integrated competition in professional football
(1922).
Frederick Douglas "Fritz" Pollard was also the first African
American to play in the Pennsylvania Coal League. he was hired
drawing card for the Providence Steamrollers-Chicago Bears
exhibition game at Braves Field, Boston, in December 1925 pro-
viding a Pollard vs. Red Grange battle. Pollard organized the All-
Star African American team (Chicago Black Hawks) to promote
inter-racial football. He hired aspiring young players as well as
NFL veterans and coached an all-black team in New York ( the
Brown Bombers) from 1935-1938.
That wasn't all Pollard did in his lifetime. As a businessman
he founded the first black investment firm, F.D. Pollard and
Company, established a weekly black tabloid (N.Y. Independent
News), managed Suntan Movie Studio in Harlem, founded coal
delivery companies in Chicago and New York, booked black tal-
ent in white clubs in New York as a theatrical agent, and was a Tax
consultant.
Pollard received numerous honors and recognition throughout
his lifetime as a business man and athlete. He was the first
African American elected to National College Football Hall of
Fame (1954), elected to R.I. Heritage Hall of Fame (1967), elect-
ed to Brown Athletic Hall of Fame (1971, the inaugural year),
elected to National Black Hall of Fame (1973), received an
Honorary Doctor of Letters (LL.D.) conferred by Brown
University (1981), and was selected for Brown's 125th
Anniversary All-Time Team (2003). Pollard died May 11, 1986
at the age of 92.
Brown University and the Black Coaches Association co-
sponsor an annual award for the male college coach of the year,
named in Pollard's honor. The BCA selects the male Coach of the
Year and presents the Fritz Pollard Award at its annual awards
banquet. A trophy is inscribed each year with the recipient's
name, and an annual $10,000 prize is presented to the Pollard
Award winner. The University also brings the Pollard Award win-
ner to the Brown campus for an annual presentation to the
University community.
You have heard my excuse, but what's the NFL's excuse for
forgetting Fritz Pollard? It's a known fact that on 42 previous
occasions the selectors and voters of the inductees to the Pro
Football Hall of Fame ignored Frederick Douglas "Fritz" Pollard.
Reality is a bitter pill to swallow. I can still hear Pro Football Hall
of Fame selectors and voters gagging-


Bob Hayes Invitational Continues


To Showcase Nation's Best


Track And Field Athletes


Bob Hayes Invitational Track & Field Meet Founders, Left to Right: Charles "Bobby"
Grover, Jimmy Johnson, Willie Richardson (Deceased), James Day, Meet
Director/Developer, Robert "Bob" Hayes, (Deceased), Edwin Lawson, Nathaniel
Washington, Originator, and Earl Kitchings. (Not Shown) Oliver Walker. Nathaniel
Washington, Originator, and Earl Kitchings (Not Shown) Oliver Walker.
high school athletes. It's Thursday, March 17-
amazing how much the stu- The Bob Hayes Hall of
dents develop their skills Fame Banquet (invitation


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--
Each year since its incep-
tion, scores of middle and
high school track and field
athletes long for a chance to
compete in the The Bob
Hayes Invitational. Track
and Field Meet (BHITM)
held at William M. Raines
High School in Jacksonville.
When the 41 st running of
the event on March 18-19,
organizers hope to continue
to expose young athletes to
reknown track and field
coaches, officials and ath-
letes.
At least 176 teams from
South Carolina, Georgia,
Alabama, Louisiana and
Florida (over 3500 partici-
,pants) are expected to com-
pete in the 2005 BHITM.
S"The BHITM was found-
ed by some of the best track
and field coaches in the
southeast, if not the nation.
And its namesake, Bob
Hayes was a gifted athlete
who touched the world
through his God given tal-
ents," said Coach James
Day, event director. "We are
dedicated to providing stu-
dent athletes with a 'world-
class experience' and to cel-
ebrate the achievements of
Jacksonville's number one
athlete of the 20th century,"
added day.
The meet was founded in
1964 by coaches Nathaniel
Washington, Earl Kitchings,
Willie Richardson, Charles
Bobby Grover, Edwin
"Butch" Lawson, Jimmy
Johnson and Oliver Walker
in honor of Jacksonville's
champion, "Bullet" Bob
Hayes after his double gold
victory in the 1964
Olympics.
"Allowing Middle
School athletes to partici-
pate in an event of this cal-
iber is uncommon. These
students have the opportuni-
ty to really glean from the


between their middle and
high school years," said
Day.
Many of the high school
participants hold state and
national titles and are touted
as hometown champions.
Thousands of fans are
expected to fill the stands at
Raines High.
The schedule of events
include;
Sunday, March. 13-
Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.
(TBA).
Tuesday, March 15-
James "Coach" Day
Scholarship Golf
Tournament, 8:30 a.m. at
Mill Cove Golf Club, 1700
Monument.


only), 7:00 p.m., River Place
Tower (The River Room),
1301 Riverplace Blvd.
Friday, March 18-Bob
Hayes Developmental
Clinic, 11:00 a.m., Middle
School Track Meet, 2:00
p.m. in Earl Kitching
Stadium at Raines High
School, 3663 Raines Ave.
(Admission-Student $2.00,
Adult-$3.00).
Saturday, March 19-
BHITM, 8:00 a.m. at Earl
Kitchings Stadium (General
Admission $5.00 for the
entire meet).
Supporting sponsors are
Church's Chicken of Lewis
Siplin Enterprises, the City
of Jacksonville and WJXT.


The life and.legacy of
Bob Hayes will be cleebrat-
ed during meet events.


Reports Say
Settlement

Reached

In Bryant Case

DENVER, Colo.-ABC
News Radio reported
Tuesday, March 1 that the
NBA star Kobe Bryant and
his 20-year-old accuser have
reached an agreement in
principle, with a possible
settlement.
Earlier, the woman's
attorneys had scheduled a
seven-hour questioning ses-
sion with Bryant on Friday,
but it was scratched,
prompting speculation a set-
tlement was close.
Allegations in the law-
suit echoed those of the
criminal case: The woman
said Bryant flirted with her
during a tour of the Vail-area
resort where she worked in
June 2003.
After the two ended up in
his room, they began to kiss
and Bryant became more
aggressive, holding her by
the throat while he raped her
from, behind. The lawsuit
seeks unspecified damages
for mental injuries, humilia-
tion and public scorn.
Bryant, a married father
of one, issued an apology to
the woman but maintained
the sex was consensual.
Bryant's agent, Rob Pelinka,
did not return a call Tuesday.


MAD DADS, Gateway Community Services, Inc.

Sponsor Andrew Jackson Basketball Team,

Cheerleaders Trip To Play Jones High In


Elder Donald Foy, Jacksonville MAD DADS Chapter
President with Jackson High School Cheerleaders
Before regional play-off game against Orlando Jones
High School.


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
Jackson High Shool basket-
ball team won a change to
play in the regional finals
against Orlando Jones High
School on Tuesday, March
1, but the final score of 66-
58 in Jones' favor ended the
Tigers' dream of a champi-
Onship.
Their lost was not all
bad, especially after receiv-
ing special support from the
Jacksonville Chapter of
MAD DADS and Gateway
Community Services, Inc. a
local behavioral health facil-
ity.
The head basketball
coach at Jackson, Creswell
Foy, Jr., is the nephew of the
Jacksonville Chapter
President, Elder Donald Foy
who attended the game, in


Orlando.
Orlando Jones (25-4)
used a 22-12 fourth- quarter
spurt to race past the Tigers
(13-14).
Jones moves on to
Saturday's regional finals
against Raines in Orlando.
Jackson led by 11 at half-
time, but Jones brought the
margin to a basket at 46-44
entering the fourth quarter.
Raymond Sykes, Jackson's
6-foot-9 center, was held to
6 points.
A special lunch and
words of encouragement
were on the agenda prior to
the game, thanks to Gateway
Community Services, and
Elder Donald Foy.
Elder Foy said, "The
team played exceptionally
well, even though they lost.
*%


They are to.be commended
for even making the region-
al play-offs. There's always
next year!" Coach Creswell
Foy, remarked, "They were
dropping in baskets and we
missed too many lay-ups."
Elder Foy enjoyed the
game and taking pictures
with the Jackson High
School cheerleaders.

Jax Teams Move
On To Region Finals

Two-time defending
state champion Raines (23-
4) routed Cocoa High 92-58
in a Region 2-4A semifinal
game
The Wolfson Wolfpack
(23-4) turned a six-point
deficit into a 54-48 win over
Melbourne Eau Gallie.
Wolfson plays Winter
Park Lake Howell (25-4) in
the Region 1-5A finals on
Saturday.
The Potter's House Lions
(24-4) defeated Graceville
53-46 in a Region 1-A semi-
final. The Lions face
Apalachicola at 7 p.m.
Saturday, March 5 in the
regional final.
Ribault (22-7) converted
turnovers into baskets en
route to a 56-46 win over
DeFuniak Springs Walton
in a Region 1-3A semifinal
game. Ribault plays Havana
East Gadsden in Saturday's
regional finals.
411


PAGE B-6


FLORIDA. STAR


MARCH 5, 20(,









Dr-7 n 7


1~'I nTR A 'TAR


B- 7


EMPLOYMENT

RIDA COMMUNITY
iLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
.earn about a wide variety of
bloyment opportunities at
,J. E.O.E.

S Safety Specialists
,-IT Designers & Planners (D&P)
Seeking Safety Specialists at its
riolk, VA and San Diego, CA
ices to provide motor vehicle
d recreational safety to Navy
.rsonnel. Candidates should
;ssess experience as an instruc-
'r in one or more of the following
areas: AAA Driver' Improvement
program, Motorcycle Safety, ATV
safety, Snowmobile Safety and
recreationall Safety. A Bachelors
degree in an occupational safety
nd health (OSH) related disci-
', line with minimum 5 years expe-
rience is preferred but not
requiredd. Organizational skills,
,,training experience, communica-
:tion skills, ability to travel required.
Email or fax resumes with subject
line "ESH010" to
SMPirrera@dandp.com or fax 703-
920-7177. No phone calls please.

ROOMS TO RENT
Best deal in Jacksonville.
Large furnished rooms.
Heat/air. Share kitchen/bath.
On bus/trolley routes.
$75/week. 877-333-8486.

HOUSE TO RENT
Unfurnished. E 16th St.
Roomy 4/ 1 1/2 recent rehab,
heat/air, no app. fee. Special
March move-in. $500. Then
$650/mo. incl. deposit. 877-
333-8486

HOUSE TO RENT
1995 W. 6th St., 3BR/1BA.,
Handyman Special. Fenced,
Lg back yard. Reasonable
rent/buy. 764-0726 .


Rooms for Rent
Adults preferred
Nice clean quiet area
Cal: Mike or Cynt
:1 722-3830


Advertised
Place your ad in the
Florida Star
Call: 904-766-8834


Want to purchase minerals and
other oillgas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201


I SERVICES

AluminumAwni


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764"






THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852





Lowest Prices in Town
Guaranteed
JULIUS BACON
(904) 766-0240
Fast.Checks Fast Funds
Electronic Bookkeeping* Notary
4932-2 Moncrief Road West
(At Richardson Road)

Bid Announcement
ATTENTION ALL INTERESTED
CONSTRUCTION CONTRAC-
TORS AND SUB CONTRACTORS'
The Brentwood Park Apartment
Associates, Ltd. c/o the
Jacksonville Housing Authority has
advertised the bid for the construc-
tion of Brentwood Park Apartments.
The project is for the physical site
improvements for infrastructure
and utilities. Bid specifications are
now available to interested con-
tractors and subcontractors. If you
Would like more information regard-
ing these construction projects
please call 904-366-3456

Pollock's Clip-N-Curl
Beauty Salon
2905 Moncrief Rd.
387-1781 or 343-7197
"March Specials"
Carefree Curls, Leisure,
Wave Nouveau. Design
wave. Relaxers. Roller Sets.


BU INES NETWOR


Hollis Law Firm, P.A. 1-800-701-3672


CASH NOW

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS,
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUT .


(800) 794-7310 _

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW<
for Structured Settlements!


IkRunfiYorAd "Statide I


S2x2 Rates
Statewide $1200
Regional or national
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Tntal Cirnculation: 1.9 Million


2x4 Rates
Statewide $2400
Regional placement
also available
Regions: North,.South, Central
Circulation: 1.9 Million


MARCH 5, 2005


.- -- -- -- -- - 1



ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
I 764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L .. -----------------------------.


AbdoII[ alAorticAneu[ysIImSIuIrgery I
'Endovascular Technologies orp., pledg to nine felony
felonies and agreed to pay more han $92millon in penalties
for not disclosing that its Ancure Endograft Stent System had
failed in thousands of patients. These devices were inserted
through the patient's groin to repair abdominal aortic
anuerysms. If you or a loved one had complications from
surgery to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm after 1999,
please contact us.


INVITATION FOR BIDS
C-1081A Remote Operated
Radiation Portal Monitor
Talleyrand Marine Terminal
Sealed bids will be received by the
Jacksonville Port Authority until
3:00 PM, local time, April 5, 2005,
at which time they shall be opened
in the Public Meeting Room of the
Port Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville,
Florida, for Remote Operated
Radiation Portal Monitor


INVITATION FOR BIDS
Pavement Repairs
Design/Build New Inspection
Station
Blount Island Marine Terminal
JAXPORT Project
No. B2002-07
JAXPORT Contract
No. C-1131
Sealed bids will be received by the
Jacksonville Port Authority until
2:00 PM, local time, April 5, 2005,
at which time they shall be opened
in the Public Meeting Room of the
Port Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville,
Florida, for Design/Build New
Inspection Station at Blount
Island Marine Terminal.
All bids must be submitted in
accordance with specifications and
drawings for Project No. C-1131,
which may be examined in, or
obtained from the Engineering &
Construction Department of the
Jacksonville Port Authority, located
on the second floor of the Port
Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville,
Florida 32206. (Please telephone
904/630-3062 for information.)
PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL
BE HELD ON March 17, 2005, AT
10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC MEET-
ING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR OF
THE PORT CENTRAL OFFICE
BUILDING LOCATED AT
ADDRESS STATED ABOVE.
ATTENDANCE BYA REPRESEN-
TATIVE OF EACH PROSPEC-
TIVE BIDDER IS REQUIRED. A
BID WILL NOT-BE ACCEPTED
FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS
NOT REPRESENTED AT SUCH
CONFERENCE.
Bid and contract bonding are
required.

There are 20% mandatory
MBE/WBE Participation Goals
established for this project

Randy B. Murray, P.E.
Director, Engineering & Construction
Jacksonville Port Authority


m OOv O OO O OO OOOO OO. i..OO. OO OO


* To place an ad:
CAll: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673.
*O OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 0.* OOOO** OO** *0


Adoption

AREYOUPREGNANT?Feelitngalone?Talkwithcaringpeople
who listenandcan help. LIVING EXPENSES PAID.Toll free
24/7 One True Gift Adoptions. (866)921-0565,

Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Yourife? Read DIANETICS by
Ron L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 orsend $7.99 to Dianetics,
" II b[ i ',ll lr s ,l' T.e lia ,,',.,i--I c 1,11


Auctions


17 CABINS NEARPIGEON FORGE,TN, selling atAuction
March 12,10:30 a.m. Guaranteed financing available will, 25%
down. Frrow Auction Co, (800)4FURROW-www.furrow.com.
TNL..ic62.

Auction: 855+/- Acres-Divided Beautiful homesies. excellent
J, .p:'ir,..V',[ r. ',. i;J \1I l 1 in \?M p '..r,, ,. :. i ,; a FL.
Ii'l iPl :lll'll. i .;_.. ;- .- .J-l- :-.IgII -il ( i 1i

GIGANTIC3-D)AY Auction. Marclh9,10,11,2005. Montgom-
ery, AL. Single, Tandem & Tri-Axle Dumps (49 of which are
2004-2005 ycar),Truck Tractors. Lowboys, CrawlerLoadcrs &
Tractors. Excavators, Motor Graders & Scrapers, Backhoes,
Rubber Tired Loaders, Forkliflt. Paving, Skidders, Feller
Bunchers, Log loaders, Farm Tractors & Cotton Pickers. J.M.
Wood Auction Co., Inc. (334)264-3265. Bryant Wood AL
Lic#1137.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFINGSAVE$$$BuyDirectFronmManufacturer.
20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn around
Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day? 30 Ma-
chines, FreeCandy All for$9,995. (800)814-6323 B02000033.
CALLUS: We will notbe undersold!

INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY!!! Looking fora fewexcep-
rional people to make an above average income. Call Lori at
(800)489-8930.

$$$$$WeeklyUse Baytoget Paid. Get $250 inFREE products -
to Start No Inventory Required Training Provided Call
OnlineSupplier For More Infof"800)940-4948 Ext. 5314.

#1 CASH COWl 90 Vending MachineHld.,You approve
Loc's-$10,670 (800)836-3464 #B02428.

Financial

$$$Attention: Homeowners! Mortgages Fast & Easyl All
credit types accepted. 1st.2nd, Home Etit ly Save $S$! We can
help. Call (800)898-3931 7 days.

I im. hIn plInlt. I i, : ill' lr 11. J. r', i. l r I l,.l i n i-'i

Mortgages, Refinance or Purchase. No money down. No In-
come. low rates. All credit considered. (higherrates may apply)
N.i, i..llhiI.,,,. i, I 74- 48'9or0ww AccentCapltal.corm


Health Care

Too Much GAS? Anti-latulent tablets cure gas from eating
problem foods, OUARANTEED. it's 1/2 price of Beano, FREE
shipping. $6.95/100, (817)605-1745.


Help Wanted

Driver-COVENANTTRANSPORT. ExcellentPay &Benefits
for Experienced Drivers, 0/0 Solos, Teams & Graduate Stu-
dents. Bonuses Paid Weekly. Equal Opportunity Employer.
(888)MOREPAY (888-667-3729).

FloridaLicensed Physical Therapist AND Physical Therapist
Assistant wanted in Rural Hospital in North Florida
Call (850)973-2271 or Fax Resume to (8501973-8158.


DELIVERTRAVELTRAILERSFORPAY!n'hotusanidsof30t
"r i.'l 1 1I ..n i',I.al.r Ir ,.ni 'i-.'nJr tl. W e need pickup
truck owners to deliver, www hori ontransport coin


Now Hiing 2005 P,,.nl I',.slion.. I-,it.,l slate & Local.
$14.80/$48+/Hr. L ,L N r:. -'.. r. f..i,,- Levels. Full
Benefits. Paid Training. Call 7 days (888)826-2513 Ext. 2203.

N alk", .5110l % ickl "-., ,1 p'.].. 1,i i II ,,,. ,. J, ,I ... ...u ,
you! 2-3 confirmed appointments daily! Benefits Available.'..
Call Catherine McFarland (888)563-3188.'

liPT() l.0 nA l\ lEE1 l.N "t -.i r,1 ',\. 1 1, I I.- ......' .. I, r.
S'.,1|. 0 n.. J];.' L ,,Il l Jj, o 'l'u. k -. I;'.,. B ...1 L l I'r. I
Ie( >.q I i. ,' .,,,,i.:lh.'. I uc." NOW!! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.
SIsicI I Il .(,L' \K Ml IlIl):,c -i i l-'Ti ., 'ri
INOG (888)318-1638 Ext 107 www USMntilinpiGroup.cotn.

Cool Travel Job!!! One Month Paid Training! $500 Sign on
Bonus Mist be tfrte travel & Slart todayy (800)735-7462.

Drivers- Owner Ops & Co. Drivers Needed Now! Run SE
Only or SE, Mid-All. MW Regional, O/O's -No Forced
Dispatch, Good Pay plis Fuel (866)250-4292.

Instruction

EARN YOURDEGREE- Online from home. Business, Parale-
gal, Compuiers. Networking and more. Financial Aid available,
job placement assistance, and computers provided. Call free
(866)858-2121.

'LegalServices

DI\ O RLL1 r 5 "52 7 '-, LI_ ,IJ,.h t. *.,_ i .,.... IL..,-
I.. 1..au, .'d E, I.,:1 .S i 1 ',ri.an Lu.I.OJA ,
(8(0))462-2000(. ext.60. (8am-7pm) Divorce Tech.
Established 1977.

l : l' \ I \l ( x \ 'IOI "- j 'L'. l 'l- W'il, -1. ,J r .i r. D ill| "L- 1. i e u.) p r,.
sion *Parole *Probation *Domestic Violenc6 *Drugs "Protect
YourRights" A-A-AAttorneyReferrl Service(8(K))733-5342
24HOURS DAYS WEEK.

Miscellaneous

FREE4-ROOM DIRECTVSYSTEMincludesstandardinstal-
lation.2MONTIISFREE50)+PrnmiumChannels.Accessto over
225 channels! Limited time offei. S&H. Restrictions Apply.
(866)500-4056.

RealEstate

BEAUTIFULNORTHCAROLINA.WlNTERSEASONISHEREI
MUSTSFETHEIEBEAUTIFULPEACEFUI.LMOUNTAINSOF
WILST'ERNNCMOUNTAINS. Homes.Cabrins, Acreage&lJvest-
ments. Cherokce Mounlain Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
chcrokeemoqnptainretlly.com Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.


IRS auction.- 200+ acres Waycross. GA has large home. steel
building, planted pines and hunting land. March 18. 10 a.m..
Ware County Courthouse, www ustreas gov/auction/irs or
(850)445-4625 for more information.

N.C. MOUNTAINS; 2.3 acres withnew log cabinshell in
secluded setting $89,900. Acreage available with stunning
mountain views! Free info available. (828)247-0081.

KENTUCKY 50-1000 acres.Incredible trophy deer & turkey
hunting. Some w/lakes, creeks, rivers, ponds, & timber. Great
retreat/investment. New survey, starting $795 per acre. Owner
will finance. (270)791-2538 www.actionoutfitler corn.

.A %HEL- II.LL.NC RE1 A i .,. i ,.u.l ... ,,.,i 1, .r
liomesites. Paved roads, clubhouse & more. NEW RELEASE!
Homesites front $49,900. Bear River Community Call Now
(866)411-5263.

FORECLOSEDGOV'T HOMES$0 or Loowdown!'axrepos
and bankruptcies! No Credit OK, $0 to low down. For listings
. (800)501-1777 ext. 1299.

. AKIEVIEW BARGAIN $29,900. Free boat slip! High eleva-
t ion beautifully wooded parel. Across frm national forest on
35.000 acre recreational lake in TN. Paved roads, u/g utils,
.T'ih l l,:r *. .' ,,,. L ..ll. lancing. Call now
I~l lll -i | '. .. l J 1. i l" 3,,i.. I 6l[ l-L(

COASTAL GIiORGIA-GATIII)COMMUNITYIlargewoodex
water access and marshl'ront homesites. Ancient Live oaks,
pool, tennis, golf. Water access. From $64,900. Pre-construc-
lion discounts, www.cooperspoin corn (877)266-7376.

I al.t. \ IL Iiirlr lI' i ., 1 ''- :j. waltrfrontcoronu-
nily on one of largest, cleanest, inountain lakes in Americal
llardwoods. views,common area w/beach! Country road. water.
utilities. Low financing. Lakelront available.
Call (800)564-5092 x96.

NEW LOG HOME SHELL-$99.900. Beautiful log home
nestled on private wooded lot off flue Ridge Parkway nortriof
Boone. Only one!! (800)455-1981, x125.

NORTH' CAROLINA LAKEFRONT ONLY $39,900.
Great All Sports lake to fishl, boat, swim or jdst relax. Call
for details, MLC (866)920-5263.

Steel Buildings

Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine SteelMaster Building., fac-
tory direct at HUGE Savings! 20x24, 30x60. 35x50. Perfect
Garage/Workshop/Barn. Call (800)34.1-7007.
www StcelMasterUSA corn.

STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory Deals Save $$$.40x60' to
100x200'. Example: 50x 100x12' = $3.60/sq ft. (800)658-2885
www.rigidbailding.com.

Your Ad Could Be Here

ONECALLSTANDSBETWEEN YOURBUSINESSandmil-
lions of potential customers. Place your advertisement in the
FL Classified Advertising Network. For $450 your ad will be
placed in over 150 papers. Check out our 2x2 and 2x4 display
network tool Call this paper, or Heather Mola, FL Statewide
Network Director at (866)742-1373, or e-mail
hmola@flprcss.com for more information. (Out of State place-
meni is also available.) Visit us online at
www.florida-classilicds.coin
r .



FCAN

Week of February 28, 2005
L.-


We are born'with limitess potential. Help us make sure that we all have the chance to achieve.
l,.srg Please visit unct.orgorcall1-800-332-8623. Give to the United Negro College Fund.


Thank you for reading

THE FLORIDA STAR!


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Installation At Trail.
All bids must be submitted in
accordance with specifications
and drawings for Project No. C-
1081A, which may be examined
in, or obtained from the
Engineering & Construction
Department of the Jacksonville
Port Authority, located on the sec-
ond floor of the Port Central Office
Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue,
Jacksonville, Florida 32206.
(Please telephone 904/630-3062
for information.)
PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL
BE HELD ON March 10. 2005. AT
10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC
MEETING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR
OF THE PORT CENTRAL
OFFICE BUILDING LOCATED AT
ADDRESS STATED ABOVE.
ATTENDANCE BY A REPRE-
SENTATIVE OF EACH
PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS
REQUIRED. A BID WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER
WHO IS NOT REPRESENTED AT
SUCH CONFERENCE.
Bid and contract bonding are
required.

Federal funs are being utilized in
conjunction with this project.
Therefore, in addition to MBE or
WBE firms, Federal DBE firms may
be sued. Any -combination of
MBE/WBE/DBE participation will
satisfy this requirement.

There are 5% mandatory
MBE/WBE Participation Goals
established for this project

Randy B. Murray, P.E.
Director, Engineering & Construction
Jacksonville Port Authority


I _


f 40


I j


:Ir.m~, I.~ !(,II~ 1.".''.: "' "'''' ''" --I''. .~~,I-~~ ~ ~~~. ~11~1~ .~ ~.~II~ ~ ~~~


. .. .. .. .





PAGEf 7) A 1f 2


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days. Not available to current or former Comcast customers with unpaid balances. Installation offer limited to standard installation and connection of up to three cable outlets and one digital converter. Custom installation charges are additional, Additional digital
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FrLORnIDA STAR


MARCH 5. 20,


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