<%BANNER%>

Florida star

HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Historical...
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Science
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Entertainment
 Section B: Local
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B: Communications
 Section B continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
February 26, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00008

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
February 26, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00008

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: Historical Foods
        page A 5
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: Science
        page A 7
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 8
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 9
    Section A: Main: Entertainment
        page A 10
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
        page B 2
    Section B: Sports
        page B 3
    Section B continued
        page B 4
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 5
        page B 5A
        page B 5B
        page B 5C
    Section B: Communications
        page B 7
    Section B continued
        page B 8
        page B 9
        page B 10
Full Text





6I6 .6 I -



:- s GetT
'6 -S SI


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


FLORIDA'


THE


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


thefloridastar~com


I FEBUAR2,2C 4 ,2NS I


Case #1974-455422 No Longer


Cold; Suspect Discloses


30 Years Of Haunting


on Saturday, February 19,
2005 around 11:30 p.m.,
he decided to end his
mental torture and went to


JACKSONVILLE,
Fla.--Anthony Benito
Williams was 18-years-
old when he and his 16-
year-old friend, Albert
Holland had a disagree-
ment over some stolen
items. Anthony was dat-
ing Albert's 15-year-old
sister during this period
yet; he stabbed Albert to
death on October 13,
1974 in the 1000 block of
East 1st Street.
Anthony's actions
have haunted him for
more than thirty years so,


the Sheriff's Office on
East Bay Street to turn
himself in.
The suspect was given


his Miranda warning prior
to the interview and began
to give full details of the
(See "Haunting", A-4)


nmons and Jim Crookes. (PHOTO BY MARIAN MURRAY, WJCT)


Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes

Exposing Prejudice And Bigotry


JACKSONVILLE,
Fla.--Internationally
known Jane Elliott talked
to a filled auditorium at
WJCT-TV-7 and 89.9 FM
Tuesday, giving the atten-
dees the opportunity to
examine the negative
effects of racism, sexism
and other discriminatory
treatment while exploring


our shared responsibility
for eliminating them from
our environment and our-
selves.
Mrs. Elliott's is truly
gifted in her ability to help,
one bring the prejudices
forward, even for those in
attendance who would
have probably made a bet
on how they have no signs


of racism or sexism in
their hearts or souls. She
was able to get help from
the audience from such
participants as
Jacksonville Human
Rights Commission
Chairperson, Jim Crooke
when he and Missionary

(See "Exposing", A-4)


What If There Were No Black People...


A little boy named Theo woke up one morning and
asked God, "What if there were no Black people in the
world?"
God thought about that for a moment and then said,
"Son, follow me around today and let's just see what it
would be like if there were no Black people in the
world. Get dressed and we will get started." Theo ran
to his room to put on his clothes and shoes. But there
were no shoes, and his clothes were all wrinkled.
He looked for the iron, but when he reached for the
ironing board, it was no longer there. You see Sarah
Boone, a Black woman, invented the ironing board and
Jan E. Matzelinger, a Black man, invented the shoe
lasting machine. "Oh well," God said, "go and do your
hair." Theo went to his room to comb his hair, but the
comb was not there.
You see, Walter Sammons, a Black man, invented
the comb. Theo decided to just brush his hair, but the
brush was gone. Lydia O. Newman, a Black female
invented the brush. Well, he was a sight -- no shoes,
wrinkled clothes, hair a mess without the hair care


inventions of Madam C. J. Walker, well, you get the
picture.
God told Theo, "Let's: do the chores around the
house and then take a trip to the grocery store." Theo's
job was to sweep the floor. He swept and swept and
swept. When he reached for the dustpan, it was not
there. You see, Lloyd P. Ray, a Blackman, invented the
dustpan. He then decided to mop the floor, but the mop
was gone. You see, Thomas W. Stewart, a Black man,
invented the mop. Theo thought, "I'm not having any
luck."
"Well son," God said, "We should wash the clothes
and prepare a list for the grocery store." When he was
finished, Theo went to place the clothes in the dryer, but
it was not there. You see, George T. Samon, a Black
man,. invented the clothes dryer. Theo got a pencil and
some paper to prepare the list for the market, but
noticed that the pencil lead was broken. Well, he was
out of luck because John Love, a Black man, invented
(See "What If', A-4)


News in brief

Mother Arrested For Child Abuse

Klan', imai, have heard
about children being hit
\ ithl ectenlsion cords but
.\as i reall\ real? Well,
34-'"ear-old Sa idanya
NlcCo\ a Nliddleburg
mother \iith live chil-
dren. made sure that it
0w1 would be know" n as a fact
kh ilen she lashed two of:
her children. She had
her oldel son video her
hittinre his 8-\car-old sis-
Sayidanya McCoy ter S4 times and the 10-
\ear-old 16 times, both w ith the cord..\ teacher obser ed
the children's scars but the\ immediately\ justified the
scars by claiming fights or falls. Ms. NlcCo\ is a single
mother. employed at Shands as a certified nursing assis-
tant. The children haie been placed \ith the state
Department of Children and Failies. Their mother has
been released on bond.

IRS Has $2 Billion For Taxpayers
\ho Did Not File In 2001

Unclaimed refunds totaling more than S2 billion are
awaiting about 1.7 million people \ho failed to file an
income ta\ return for 2001. the Internal Re\enue Ser\ ice
said. Ho\ev.er, in order to collect the money a return
must be filed \with the IRS no later dhan April 15, 2(005.
The IRS estimates that hal f of those \ho could claim
refunds x\ould receive nlore than .'54-4. Some of these
taxpayers ma\ also be eligible for the refundable Earned
Income Ta\ Credit In Florida. the median refund is S482
and the total amount owed Floridians is $161.371. For
more information dial 2-1-1 The Prosperitr Campaign
or IRS help line. 1l-X410-.'29-I11140.

No Tasers Now

Thanks to ministers like Re\. R. L. (Gund\. SCLC, the
Jackson ille Leadership Coalition and the NAACP. there
has been a moratorium on the use of Tasers in Duxal
Count. Sheriff Ruthei ford is also requiring all homicide
nterrogations, not jut us confe'sionls be videotaped effec-
tlie immediately. So. all use of Tasers has been suspend-
ed until a more detailed police\ and training program has
been created. In addition. at least tmo correctional offi-
cers ha e been arrested since the Sheriff called for inv es-
tigations. The ministers >aid the\ are still not satisfied: the
cit\ still needs an independent police ire ie.I board.
Cla\ Couint\ is also iequiing their staff to notify cor-
rectiols Imedical staff and or ENIS immediately if a sub-
ject displa.s s -ini of distress as \'ell as 15-minute obser-
ation peniiods for a minilum111 of Iour hours if an officer
has utilized a Conducted Energy \\Wapon or Oleoresin
Capsicum Spray.

New Book On Post Traumatic
Sla er, Disorder

Dr. O mar Reid. Sekou NIlm in
and Larrin ligginbotiom ha'e co-
authored a Ine% book "Post
Traumatic Slaier\ Disorder-
Definition. Diagnosis and
Treatment."' .Accordinu to, tile
authors; Post TraumLatic
Sla\erN Disorder has a direct rela-
tionship with post-traumatic sitres, disorder anrd
the resulting drug abuse. broken tamnilie. crime and low
educational attainment in seCments or the Black commu-
niit. According to the report, the book %w ill c the read-
er an understanding of howt sla' ern, contributed to many of
the d,,sftlnctional behaviors that aie exhibited by Black
people today For questions, contact .anine Fondon at
1-1 13) '34-64-144 or JIfondoniii'unit\ fiisi.conm.


Looin for0cstomrs t patonizyou


business or utiizyorsvieIyu


1L1 BRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.06)
GA\I NFSVIILLE FL, 32611 .7007


Anthony Benito Williams


I I
~.~.~..,~.___ _~







SFERRRARY26. 2004


IrtorrnfA ,VTAR


EA-2 PLUIUIJI OAA--


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/ WEB MANAGER
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, NOREEN ERCOLINO, LAURENCE GREENE,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DESIREE SANDLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinons .nupre,- ed by columnists in this
Snewspapei do not necessarily represent
the policy of thispaper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
Narin.,l Nt p'.ip,- r
S Pubhl.hers ,..iLiirlon
Cmilge.r'n.;ud Pdlh-hor, Ine,
J.i Lontllri Ch,,mb r i-1 C),innrce
Firl C.ha Mirilan o ner.in
S Chamber of Commerce


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


5AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION












-, -R -F1TION
vERIFICATION /
'[sslalsslln


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


gtpfIt
wftl ft


*&lb

0*


ag

Nm


,r


* -
-


I








O.



*C0
3,






3a 0
3 aa)
-MI


, A
o--

--r --


z

*CD


- 11%

I 'CIdI


-9


0






C,)


0 d

0!1















CD


0.


II

CD


iPLe


Sharing And Celebrating Our Rich History


Since acquiring this 54-
year-old publication, it
appears that February is the
month that gives us the great-
est pleasure..It is a pleasure
to be able to reflect on the his-
tory of our race and our fore-
fathers.
It is a pleasure to be in a
position to share these people
and events with so many oth-
ers through the pages of The
Florida Star.
Each year we look at what
else can we do through the
pages of The Florida Star and
through our radio audience on
IMPACT to make an impact
of great significance to our
readers and listeners. We
don't want to make an impact
just in February but we wish
to do so all year long.
But, it feels so good to
search the records and
explore the trials, tribulations,
contributions and attributions
of Africans in America, West
India, Haiti, Africa and around
this wonderful world.
Black History Month gives
more Americans and the
world, an opportunity to focus
on the African American com-
munity.
This, year, we will again
provide information about the
history of African Americans
that is not usually available to
you. But, we also recognize
that current issues will be his-
tory tomorrow.
S The Bible tells us that the
early Christians faced many
trials and many sufferings.
But Christians survived, and


never lost faith. They never
forgot that God was always
there to encourage them.
They received encouragement
from God and each other.
They took time to remind
each other that they had some-
thing special, something that
could never be taken from
them.
We are grateful that we
have the month of February;


* (k.


even though it is the shortest
month of the year. February
gives us as a group, a period
to reflect.
It opens the door for oth-
ers to join us in remembering
that we should never fear and
we should never, ever have
not even a minor lapse in
integrity. As long as we
maintain a personal relation-
ship with our God almighty,


Ft..


we shall overcome.
We hope you will find this
special Black History Edition
as enlightening as those in the
past. We truly thank you for
your continued support.
Looking back, thank Him.
Looking ahead, trust Him.
Looking around, serve Him.
Looking up, expect Him.


-. F.r- I 'lL'S~
tj;> IF.:
;.',


Dea. Samuel and Clara McLaughlin Criswell


they flourished because they ........ ''-.... i ,<'-;:.*.


F.-. -;


-m




IP..


,:. A


















2''0. F. t








^ ._^- -. ,

-.' !. I .
Iii .. .
d ........ C.. -,
., ,.
: ; i ,.
; .__ ".. .. :.4












.. ; ,:'..
'~~~~ .....: ;
I. : :" ~I



















oo ..i..-.., e


Q *






A"*


PRO


* *I




*/


Kurry! Special firiarcirg available! To find a CLib Cadet I mr vo.'tt ,
ww .cubcadetcor,0 or cail 1-877-CL'B-TOIJCH.
,1,) C r s&Ld S I .I, crI I. SI., )a. JS T ,71.


Dea.Samul ad Clra, c~aghli C~iwel


F IV


~8ipJa~ra~nwts~


abolb ON


I


0%








PAGL A-9 IAA-.I" 1 L. IA U


"Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority is 97"
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. is the first African
American Greek organization founded by African
American women. In .1908, nine Howard University
women in Washington, D.C.: Mses. Marjorie Hill, Lucy
D. Slowe, Lillie Burke, Ethel Hedgeman Lyle, Anna E.
Brown, Marie Woolfolk Taylor, Beulah E. Burke,
Margaret Flagg Holmes, and Lavinia Norman created
an organization that has grown into a membership of
170,000 women in the United States, the Caribbean,
Europe, and Africa.
Founder Ms. Ethel Hedgeman Lyle of St. Louis,
Missouri formulated the idea of an organization that
would enhance the intellectual, service and social fea-
tures of the college experience. The organization was
incorporated in 1913 to perpetuate its existence and has
spread out as a means to enhance the socioeconomic
environment ini our cities, states and nations throughout
the world.
Alpha Kappa Alpha'Sorority, Inc. is a sisterhood com-
prised of women of various races and creeds who have
knowingly chosen this organization as a path of fulfill-
ment through various volunteer services. Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority, Inc. develops and promotes superior
scholastic and moral standards, encourages unity and
friendship amongst women; continues an evolving inter-
est in college life and the community; and provides
"Service to All Mankind."
Locally, the Gamma Rho Omega chapter became
chartered in 1942 by community-minded women: Mses.
Daisy Brookins, Edna Calhoun, Thelma Harris,
Vivian Ingram, Elizabeth Jasmin, Coatsie Jones4
Hattie McKissick, Lois Roberts, Aldonia Seabrook,
Louise Sheffield, Melba Sunday, Helen Taylor, and
Mildred White. Since becoming chartered the member-
ship has grown to over two hundred women.
Under the present leadership of Mrs. Patricia Hill
Mitchell, Gamma Rho Omega sponsors numerous schol-
arships every year to young women attending historical-
ly Black colleges; supports literacy programs with local
public schools; science and computer summer programs;
clothes the disenfranchised locally and throughout the
world; promotes our right to vote; the arts and'most
importantly the family. Every program, every task is car-
ried out with "Service to All Mankind" in the forefront.
This year, during the first weekend in April, the
Cluster III members of the South Atlantic region of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. will host over 3,000 members
during the 52nd South Atlantic Regional Conference in
Jacksonville, Florida. The conference chair Mrs. Bertha
M. Padgett is a member of the local Gamma Rho Omega
chapter. This past weekend sorority members from the
North Florida and South Georgia areas gathered at the.
Adam's Mark Hotel to celebrate the 97th Anniversary of
its founding and to continue planning for the 52nd
Regional meeting. The South Atlantic Regional Director
Mrs. Irene Westbrooks McCollum-Orangeburg, SC
was speaker for this occasion. Chairpersons for the
Founder's Day Cluster celebration were Mrs. Ora
James-Williams and Ms. Beverly Harper.
******#*
"FCC's 2005 Black History Month Calendar
Unveiled"
In a partnership that began in 1997 with Burger King
and First Coast News, FCCJ unveiled the 2005 edition
of the Jacksonville Black History Calendar at a reception
hosted by HSBC.
The Niagara Movement is the theme for the 2005 cal-
endar and in this year's calendar Forward Dr. Brenda
Simmons, who in 1989 along with Mrs. Clovia Russell
conceived of the African American History calendar for
Florida's First Coast, writes," The Niagara movement led
to the founding of the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)...The pages
of the 2005 Jacksonville Black History calendar cannot
begin to tell the whole story; instead it presents images
that will invoke reminiscences that have left indelible
marks on the history of race relations in Jacksonville".
The calendar has treasured and memorable photos
from the collections of Mrs. Mary Pearson, widow of
the late Civil Rights leader Rutledge Pearson, Lloyd
Pearson, brother of the lhte Civil Right leader, Mrs.
Sandra Thompson, Mrs. Willye Dennis, Mrs. Elnora
Atkins and Rodney Hurst.
This community is privileged to have such a mar-
velous keepsake each year. Make sure you get your copy
I at your nearest Burger King, Florida Copnmunity College
campus or WTLV headquarters.


Southeast Regional Conference Vice-Chair-Mrs. Eddye K. Walden; Lzrn
International Supreme Basileus Dr. Norma Solomon White; South Atlantic
Regional Director Mrs. Irene Westbrooks McCollom; Regional Conference
Chair Mrs. Bertha M. Padgett; National Secretary Mrs. Carolyn House
Stewart, Esq.; Regional Conference Vice-Chair Mrs. Ann Taylor and Cluster
III Coordinator Mae Frances Davis. (Photo by Betty Asque Davis)


r .r


Gamma Rho Omega President Mrs. Patricia Hill Mitchell had
supreme congratulations for Founder's Day Chairperson Mrs. Ora
James-Williams and Ms. Beverly Harper. (Photo by Betty Asque Davis)


The brother, widow and daughter of Civil Rights leader the late
Rutledge Pearson-Lloyd Pearson, Mrs. Mary Pearson and Ms.
Patricia Pearson. (Photo by Richard Snipes)
.**S****..


The FLAJAX Club officers for 2004.
Jacksonville Club History: The FLAJAX Club
The FLAJAX Club was founded in October 1930. The
ideas, qualities and actions of the founders have been
maintained by all subsequent members. The organiza-
tion's first major project was a Christmas Dance at the
Odd Fellows Hall located at 829 Pearl Street. From the
beginning and even during the economic depression
years, the club has enjoyed a position of prominence in
the civic, social and cultural activities of African
Americans in Jacksonville. Membership included resi-
dents of St. Augustine, Ocala, Palatka and Gainesville.
The FLAJAX Club has made many financial con-
tributions in areas that were beneficial to the African
American community, including the Urban League, the
NAACP and Edward Waters College.
In 1980, the organization adopted a logo designed
by FLAJAX Cornelius R. Lockett, Jr.
The logo is encircled with the words Leadership,
Integrity and Fidelity.


Golden Sorority members at the recent 97th Founder's Day were
Mesdames Ernestine Bivins, Barbara Robinson and Ruth Wheaton.
(Photo by Betty Asque Davis)


Ms. Cassandra Blackman-FCCJ Calendar Committee Chair; Dr.
Brenda R. Simmmons-Administrative Liaison/Advisor; Ms. Angela
Spears-TV 12 News Anchor; Charlie Bradley, manager of the Kings
Road Burger King presenting Arthur Lee, President of Lee Wesley
Restaurants; Dr. Steve Wallace-FCCJ College President; Ms. Mari-
Esther Norman-HSBC Exec; and Mrs. Irma Lindsey-Parker-2005
Black History Month Calendar Cover Designer. (Photo by Richard
Snipes)
The design incorporates the club's colors of red and
green as two bands across the symbol of Florida. The
upper portion has a diamond which represents a star
shining across the state indicating membership from
cities other than Jacksonville.
The first officers of FLAJAX were President, John
A. Ross; Treasurer, A. St. George Richardson; Secretary,
M. Rowell Kyler; Business Manager, Ted Redding;
Financial Secretary, Robert Peppers and Chaplain, John
Simms. Others founders were Leroy R. Baker, John
Broadnax, Joseph Higdon, Dr. William L. Redmon,
Payton Roberts and James A. Whittington

Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834 or you may reach me direct-
ly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax
(904) 285-7008. See you in the paper!


-Servrin1g v tr pjws s aps Waurf wfd Since 9 g'

SHave an office, factory, warehouse, or
construction site that desperately needs
to be cleaned?
S Do you have a broken machIne that
needs to be repaired?
Need to rent or lease a machine and don't
want to buy one?

Maintenance Supplies, Paper,
Equipment, Rentals, Repairs
and Cleaning Services

Wae mrrusak r ow chemicmjfs, prnwom to got dcisr results
Earth Horne Janitorial Supplies
1100 N. Main Street
Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 358-2500 or (904) 613-4139
FAX 904-356-7212
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
wvw.earlhorne.com


,* .- -







t 'I '


, ," : .. ..




Source: The Me

Audit, 2004 Bla
Newspapers

Readership Rep


nnpa.org


ck ii



II
1 ;

:: _


FEBRUAR Y 26,2005


F[ IM I A STA R


yA ^i A 1








PAGE A-4 FLORIDA STAR FEBRUARY 26, 2005


What If
(Continued From A-l)


Haunting
(Continued From A-l)


It was getting late so, they walked to the market, got
their groceries and returned home.
Just when they were about to put away the milk,
eggs and butter, they noticed the refrigerator was gone.
You see, John Standard, a Black man, invented the
refrigerator. So they put the food on the counter. By
this time, they noticed it was getting mighty cold.
Theo went to turn up the heat and what do you know,
Alice Parker, a Black female invented the heating fur-
nace. Even in the summer time they would have been
out of luck because Frederick Jones, a Black man,
invented the air conditioner.
It was almost time for Theo's father to arrive home.
He usually took the bus, but there was no bus because
it's precursor was the electric trolley, invented by
another Black man, Elbert T. Robinson.
He usually took the elevator from his office on the
20th floor, but there was no elevator because Alexander
Miles, a Black man, invented the elevator. He usually
dropped off the office mail at a nearby mailbox, but it


was no longer there because Phillip Downing, a Black
man invented the letter drop mailbox and William
Barry invented the postmarking and canceling machine.
Theo sat at the kitchen table with his head in his
hands. When his father arrived, he asked, "Why are
you sitting in the dark?" Why?? Because Lewis
Howard Latimer, a Black man invented the filament
within the light bulb.
Theo quickly learned what it would be like if there
were no Black people in the world. Not to mention if
he were ever sick and needed blood.
Dr. Charles Drew, a'Black scientist, found a way to
preserve and store blood, which led to his starting the
world's first blood bank. And what if a family member
had to have heart surgery, this would not have been
possible without Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, a Black
doctor who performed the first open heart surgery.
So if you ever wonder, like Theo, where we would
be without Black folks it is plain to see, we could very
well still be in the dark!


homicide of Albert Holland when he was 16-years-old
and he, the suspect, was 18. Holland had been stabbed
in the chest until he died. Williams took the detective
to the scene of the murder and his detailed testimony
was consistent with the elements surrounding the mur-
der. He was therefore arrested and charged with the
murder.
For Williams, who had been a heavy user of crack
but had only one simple assault on his record, which
occurred in 1995 and one worthless checks arrest in
2002, 2003 and 2004, his torture was over. He no
longer desired to be indebted to crack. Anthony Benito
Williams surrendered.




.. ,.~


Bigotry
(Continued From A-l)


Educator Jane Elliott and audience volunteers explore how maps and other tradi-
tional educational tools can perpetuate prejudice and discrimination. (PHOTO BY MARIAN
MURRAY, WJCT)


tl IT 1 tC A [ E L E CT


I a N D aT'E


SPECIAL ELECTION


MARCH


(VOTERS MUST BE REGISTERED BY FEBRUARY 28T')


Ella Simmons voluntarily
compared feelings he
being a tall, white-hair
Caucasian male and she
being a black female. Her
demonstrations further
enlighten the audience
when she showed the
map that is used in
schools that makes the
countries that are pre-
dominantly populated
with whites to those pre-
dominantly populated
with non-whites appear to
be superior in size and
assets.
Jane Elliott is truly an
educator. She is a recipi-
ent of the National Mental
Health Association Award
for Excellence in
Education. She first
achieved notice for "Blue
Eyes/Brown Eyes" a
classroom exercise she
devised after Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. was
assassinated in 1968.
The controversial les-
son became the subject of
the Peabody Award-win-
ning 1970 film "The Eye
of the Storm," and was
featured on PBS'
"Frontline" in 1985.
For more information
on Remembering for the
Future and Jane Elliott,
visit WJCT Online at
wj ct.org.

Report Said
Pregnant Women
Risk Murder
A U. S. Government
research reported
Wednesday that murder is
a surprisingly common
cause of death among
pregnant women in the
United States.
According to the
report, Black women are
especially vulnerable to
being killed while preg-
nant, said the team at the
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
"Homicide is a leading
cause of pregnancy- asso-
ciated injury deaths," said
Jeani. Chang and col-
leagues in the latest issue
of the American Journal
of Public Health.
The homicide rate for
pregnant black women
was more than triple that
for white women, the
researchers said.


'WANT CUSTOMERS?

ADVERTISE IN AND
SUBSCRIBE
TO
THE FLORIDA STAR!

TO PLACE YOUR AD
AND SUBSCRIBE
CALL US TODAY
AT
904/766-8834


ove your job?

Share it with a kid,


V-
It


<7


, FEBRUARY26, 2005


PA GE A-4


FLORIDA STAR


For moe infomatio call 904) 60-141


"'
''
;ii







ER&UJAV 20RASRPGA


Come And Get Your Soul Food!


Abby Fisher was probably the first African-American to author a cookbook, What Mrs.
Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking (San Francisco: Women's Co-Operative Printing
Office, 420, 424 & 430 Montgomery Street; 1881).
She describes herself as having thirty-five years of experience at the time her book was
published. She was born a slave in Alabama, and moved to San Francisco with her husband
sometime after the Civil War. There she worked as a cook or caterer and also was in the busi-
ness of making'pickles and preserves with her husband.
Credit for bringing the cookbook back into print belongs to Applewood Books and noted
culinary historian Karen Hess, who began researching Mrs. Fisher in 1984 after seeing the
cookbook at an auction for the first time. According to "Mrs. Fisher's recipes: A first in black
history," an article by Candy Sagon, Karen Hess went through library records and old direc-
tories to prove that Mrs. Fisher was indeed a former slave from Alabama.
According to an excerpt from "Dallas Morning News" article, "The New South," by Kim
Pierce, "...no group has had a greater hand in Southern cuisine than Africans, who brought
with them foods, techniques and spices and used them liberally."
Her cookbook was finally obtained and reprinted in 1995 by Applewood Books, with his-
torical notes by Karen Hess. If you're interested in food history, you'll treasure this book.
Here is some information on some of Mrs. Fisher's recipes..
Gumbo is an Americanization of an African word for okra. (See: Dongo-Dongo and Okra
& Greens) Yet despite the fact that the Oyster Gumbo Soup recipe has the word "gumbo" in
the title, the recipe does not use okra. Instead it uses file powder, which Mrs. Fisher calls
"gumbo". Fil powder is made from dried sassafras leaves. It was used in cooking by Native
Americans in Louisiana. and was adopted by Louisiana African-Americans, Creoles, and
Cajuns. The Ochra Gumbo and Chicken Gumbo recipes do use okra (ochre or ochra). They
are much simpler than Gumbo recipes of a later date.
The Corn Fritters recipe resembles African Fritters recipes. The "butter" used in deep-
frying in old recipes is clarified butter.

Chicken Gumbo
Salt and pepper chicken before frying it. Take a chicken, separating it from all thd joints
and breaking the bones, fry the chicken in one and a half teaspoonful of lard or butter. First
well mix the chicken in dry flour, let the fat be hot, put chicken to fry until brown, don't burn
chicken. After fried put it on in soup kettle with half a gallon of hot water, one and a half
quarts of green ochre cut into thin pieces, throwing the end away, and let boil to three pints;
season with pepper and salt. Chop half of an ordinary sized onion fine, and fry it with the
chicken; chili pepper chopped fine if added is nice when liked.



Corn Fritters
To one dozen ears of corn add three eggs, half a teacupful of powdered crackers, one
tablespoonful of sifted flower. Cut off the corn very lightly from the cob -- say half of the
grain -- and then scrape the other half clean with a knife. Add the crackers to corn and beat
together light. Beatthe eggs light and add with the flour and a quarter of a teacupful of sweet
milk. Season to taste and beat the whole light. Have your lard or butter hot when you go to
fry, and drip the batter into the hot fat from off the end of a spoon, letting it fry quick and
brown. Have young and tender corn. The fat ought to be hot enough to brown the fritters in
two minutes.


r-------------- -- ---------------------------------
LET THE POST OFFICE
DELIVER THE FLORIDA STAR
TO YOU
-] I want a One Year Subscription to The Florida Star!
Please donate 10% of my paid Subscription to:


Please send, my Subscription to:

NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE ZIP CODE




EXCELLENCE


-Ct'" II B I h I I

iE ''.' 1 ", li.ii.i ,- .' ld_ I .
F _RID" TE -t LO I S : ..

I FIRST BLACKS FOR FLORIDA _1.

_




() 6 Months -$18.50
r m( ) Year-$33.00 () 2Years $65.00
'SEND TO:
The Florida Star
P.O. Box 40629
Jacksonville, FL 32203-40629


1 Check, Money Order and Credit Card r.
Accepted.
i


A Creative Way To Cook

"Soul food" is the term used to describe African-
American cooking as it evolved from the days of slav-
ery in the U.S.
Soul food has been heavily influenced by Southern
cooking. Soul food cookbooks contain many of the
same recipes as one would find in a Southern cook- -
book, and vice versa.
Though many soul food dishes are traditionally
thought of being high in fat content, soul food actual-
ly served as an important and hearty diet for the slaves.
Ingredients such as wild game, nuts, beans, fresh
fruits and starchy vegetables provided early slaves .
many of the basic dietary recommendations still in '
effect today.


Soul food sprung from much ingenuity on the part of the slaves. Usually left with just
scraps to prepare foods for themselves, slaves invented creative and hearty meals from few
and often poor ingredients.
Today the culture surrounding soul food is purely African-American and it is so
engrained in the culture that entire films have been built around the African-American
kitchen.
UI


WCGL Aa




"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"

Where Christ Gets Lifted
-
&4

The Victory is in the Word & Music

Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.
Topic For Saturday, February 12, 2005:
"The Slave Haven"
Andrea Giggetts interviews Elaine Turner,
President, Heritage Tours in Memphis,
Tennessee. They will discuss how Mr. Burkle, a
German immigrant, risked his life by harboring
runaway African slaves in his home as they made
their way from the South and eventually to freedom.

6050-6 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW WCGL1360.COM


PAGE A-5


FLORIDIA STAR


FEBRUAARY26.2005n








PAGEA-6 PLUVLUA &' i


Remarks on National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

In recognition of National Black HIV/AIDS
Awareness Day on February 9th, I wholeheartedly sup-
ported the legislation sponsored (H. Con. Res. 30) by
my colleague, Congresswoman Barbara Lee, which
calls for Americans to 'support the goals and ideals of
National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day.'
Although it is well known that there have been
tremendous advancements made in HIV/AIDS treat-
ment, there are still far too many Americans that
remain without access to the necessary health care and
continue to become infected with HIV every year.
What worries me personally, particularly being an -
African American woman, is that African Americans, Rep. Corrine Brown
especially African American women, are becoming infected at a disproportionate
rate.
In 2003 alone, African Americans accounted for 50% of all new HIV infections,
despite representing only about 12.3% of the population. The Centers for Disease
Control (CDC) has stated that at the end of 2003, over 172,000 African Americans
were living with AIDS, representing 42% of all cases in the U.S. Moreover, African
American women represented 67% of all new AIDS cases among women, and were
23 times more likely to be infected than white women.
As a Member of the Congressional Black Caucus, I will fight tooth and nail to
increase funding for programs, such as Ryan White, that were flat funded in the
President's budget. While the President maintains that he will increase funding for
the global fight against HIV/AIDS, the Administration's budget proposal increase for
Ryan White funding is not enough; indeed, Ryan White funding needs to be at least
$2.6 billion. As a Member of Congress, I will do everything within my power to fght
to increase awareness of this disease, and help ensure that those who are particular-
ly vulnerable to HIV infection have the necessary information and access to all effec-
tive forms of prevention against this insidious disease.


1l lim* 7


e -

S -

- -


ST CD


"3


S

0


(UVf o
IA


'5,;r




'S..



55/ "


-'''5 1


SI


310 1 I' j r-''tisl" 1 ifhiEs 1r eItp tol- .Help lis) ri i f l'pi .Iiz fl at ue -,Ila' e.L ki- ci' e t
c IIor 'Fia.-Tvisit inrt rj oGil .rr-w:~* i,.'e ti tiMe United Negro College Fund.


C

0


3


3

ID

<^
2)


mmm




(D


.=


-


I--~









ago d









C=




Im









CDI

(1D


~0'


*0sub


Uwp 0 -m


- w 0 -


* -


CI '


C L Um..



MVM. NO -4w wo D 4-a lo
v w WO .M -- III,,- .

We__ We-m
r

.~ ~- -


a '0qmwp


0 .4D


, 0


m ~.-


..... :. .'" ..*,...;...- .... .* ...t-?;.l -. > ,
* -"..i **" ':!M ; : a : "
*" ~ ~ ~ .* .. ..^*^ *v ^ < ^ .
,* o' ... -

..
.'. ,'":' [-: "


:: ,.. ..............
. .. ..


AIL


FEBRUARY26.20052nn


T7, "TnnTT\ A CVTA D


-- -


j I


.





0


k:
""


:.,~:
ilj~ ;'::rl. -i .-;-t
2!s~.
;', :i.:
...,.i .
; ;-5;
~,
L~ r:t
:I-
,'"-'.:
Ylr? :
''
...r
.

:I '


I








F RIHJ V2 -z! R STyARA A


Pathfinders To The Advancement Of Science


William Montague Cobb was born on October 12, 1903
in Washington D.C. As the only black
SPhi sical Anthropologist with a Ph.D.
before the Korean War, Cobb held
the only black perspective on
S physical anthropology for many
i years (Harrison and Harrison,
-;. i 1999, pp. 101). He served as
S the Chairman of the
S"Anthropology Section of the
... :' .-' American Association for
\A advancementt of Science and
':was the first African American
ii President of the American
Association of Physical
Anthropologists (Mabunda, 1997, pp.
1067). However, Cobb was not only a famous physical
anthropologist because of his race, but also because of the
great contributions he made to the field of anthropology. He
was Founder & First Basileus of Kappa Psi Chapter of
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity at Howard University.
During Dr. Cobb's 41 years as a teacher, editor, writer,


historian and physician, he fought for racial integration of
American hospitals and medical schools, advocated national
health care coverage legislation before Congress and was
one of the invited principal guests of President Lyndon B.
Johnson at the signing of legislation for the 1965 Medicare
Bill.
W. Montague Cobb grew up pondering the question of
race, which ultimately led him to his studies of anthropolo-
gy (Harrison and Harrison, 1999, pp. 107). He graduated
from Dunbar High School, which was the premier African-
American high school of the time. Cobb continued his stud-
ies at Amherst College where he studied a wide variety of
subjects and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree.
After his graduation from Amherst, Cobb researched
embryology at the prestigious Woods Hole Marine Biology
Laboratory in Massachusetts. Cobb next attended Howard
University Medical School, where he earned a Medical
Degree in 1929 and would later spend much of his profes-
sional career at the university as Chairman of the
Department of Anatomy and Editor of The Journal of the
National Medical Association.
The next few years Cobb spent his time at Case Western


Reserve University, where he earned a Ph.D. and worked on
the Hamann-Todd Skeletal Collection (Harrison and
Harrison, 1999, pp.111-112).
Cobb returned to Howard University in 1932 and began
working on a laboratory of his own to conduct skeletal
research. He also continued his research on human cranio-
facial union at the Hamann-Todd Collection and the
Smithsonian Institute during the summers. In Cobb's mind,
his two best papers on this subject were The Cranio-Facial
Union and the Maxillary Tuber in Mammals (1943), and
Cranio-Facial Union in Man (1940).
These publications established Cobb as a functional
anatomist (Harrison and Harrison, 1999, pp.112). Cobb also
made significant contributions in the issue of race in athlet-
ics, where he claimed race was insignificant to athletics and
he also profiled the biology and demography of the African
American race during the 1930's (Harrison and Harrison,
1999, pp. 115-120).
With his death on November 20, 1990, Cobb left his lega-
cy of skeletal research with the Laboratory of Anatomy and
Physical Anthropology at Howard University. This collec-'
tion of over 600 skeletons is considered one of the premiere
collections of its kind (Harrison and Harrison, 1999, pp. 124-
126).


Rebecca Cole

(1846-1922) Rebecca J. Cole was born
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on
March 16, 1846. She was the sec-
ond United States African
American woman physician and
was the first Black woman to
graduate from the Woman's
Si Medical College in
Pennsylvania. Rebecca Cole
received her secondary education
from the Institute for Colored
Youth (ICY -- now Cheyney
IUniversity). She graduated from ICY
in 1863. Rebecca Cole received her
medical degree from Woman's Medical
College in 1867. She joined Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, the
first white woman physician, in New York and taught
hygiene and childcare to families in poor neighborhoods.



Edward Alexander Bouchet

(1852-1918) Edward Alexander
Bouchet was born in New Haven. I.
Connecticut on September 15.
1852. He was the son of
William Frances and. Susan
(Cooley) Bouchet. William
Bouchet migrated to New
Haven from South Charleston,
South Carolina in 1824.
Edward Bouchet attended the
New Haven High School (1866-
1868) and graduated from Hopkins
Grammar School (1870) as valedicto-
rian of his class. Bouchet entered Yale
College in 1870 and was the first African American to gradu-
ate Yale College in 1874, On the basis of his academic record
he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Although Bouchet was
elected to Phi Beta Kappa along with other members of the
Yale class, of 1874, the election did not take place until 1884.
Bouchet continued the study of graduate physics at Yale, where
he was awarded a Ph.D. in Physics in 1876. Bouchet was the
first African American to earn a doctorate degree from an
American university.


George Washington Carver

S(1865?-1943) Born into slavery in
Missouri, Carver later earned
degrees from Iowa
S!Agricultural College. The
Director of agricultural
I research at the Tuskegee
S.. I Institute from 1896 until his
death, Carver developed
Hundreds of applications for
farm products important to
S/g the economy of the South,
S including the peanut, sweet pota-
to, soybean, and pecan.

Archibald Alexander

(1888-1958) Iowa-born
Alexander attended Iowa / i!
State University and earned a
civil engineering degree in
1912. While working for an \,
engineering firm, he designed
the Tidal Basin Bridge in
Washington, D.C. Later he formed
his own company, designing Whitehurst Freeway in
Washington, D.C. and an airfield in Tuskegee,
Alabama, among other projects.
1. r


Benjamin Banneker


(1731-1806) Born into a family of free blacks in Maryland, Banneker learned the rudiments
Sof reading, writing, and arithmetic from his grandmother and a Quaker schoolmaster.
Later he taught himself advanced mathematics and astronomy. He is best known for pub-
lishing an almanac based on his astronomical calculations. In 1980, the U.S..Postal
S Service issued a postage stamp in his honor.


Charles Henry Turner


'Roger Arliner Young

(1889-1964) Ms. Young was bor in Virginia and attended Howard
University, University of Chicago, and University of Pennsylvania,
where she earned a Ph.D. in zoology in 1940. Working with her mentor,
Ernest E. Just, she published a number of important studies.


(1867-1923) A native of
Cincinnati, Ohio,
Turner received a B.S.
(1891) and M.S. (1892)
from the University of
Cincinnati and a Ph.D.
(1907) from the
University of Chicago.
A noted authority on the
behavior of insects, he
was the first researcher
to prove that insects can
hear.



Ernest Everett Just


(1883-1941) Originally
from Charleston, South
Carolina, Just attended
Dartmouth College and
the University of
Chicago, where he earned
a Ph.D. in zoology in
1916. Just's work on cell
biology took him to
marine laboratories in the
U.S. and Europe and led
him to publish more than
50 papers.


'r
i

d
r:,
-
r
'r

i ,


Ir


0 i.
rili ~ t~~"~4,
.~iA~4*~~
iir~ 4



LL Iise~~





PAGE A-7


FEBRUARY26. 2005n


i


FLORIDA STAR


P







FEBRUARY26, 2005


First Baptist To Come To Florida Were African American Slaves


A number of churches were organized by Black Baptist.
Prior to 1784, blacks had organized a Baptist church in
Silver Bluff, South Carolina and one in Savannah, Georgia.
In Burke County, Georgia lived George Liele, the first black
ordained Baptist minister in America. Liele was born in
Virginia in 1750 but had moved with his master to Georgia
African Attire Day


TOP FRAME-Ladies in African wear on the front row are
Sisters Jackson, Hooks and Armstrong. On the second row
are Sisters Thomas and Keith. On the back row are Sisters
White, Biggins and Troy. BOOTOM FRAME: The congregation
departing service at New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist
Church. Shown are Rev. W. Smith, and Rev. Hansley after
being greeted by Deacon Jackson followed by Sister White in
their African attire


I
I
IA
I

I
I
I
I


I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Lu....


GATOR I

UTO INSURANCE I
1606 N. Main St.
Jacksonville, Fla.
356-6305



Porter Says I

....^ "Call my

Grandma
Lue

Sfor car

S. SM insurance!"



Free Gift


With Quote


In Our Office


And This Ad!


31st Year

In Jacksonville's

Springfield Area
llm m m m m m m m m m m m ..*I


I A.B.COLEMAN DIRECTOR

COMFORTING HAND
A study whose results isolation of people in our socie-
reported in the New England ty and the fractionalization of
Journal od medicine indicates the family often make the needs
that funeral directors have been of the bereaved very acute.
very helpful in dealing with The modem funeral director
families suffering the grievous is aware of and sensitive to
loss of a child due to disease, these needs. Often, because of
Most of the families expressed frequent experience, working
very positive feelings toward the with grieving families, the
funeral director for the services director can make an invaluable
rendered during their bereave- contribution to meeting these
ment. The authors conclude that needs.
the funeral directors' experience
with grief reactions make them
skilled in offering solace to
A.B. COLEMAN
grieving families. MORTUARY, INC.
This role as' counselor/com- "OurAim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
forter may be more important 5660 Moncrief Rd.
than ever before. The increasing wwwsBo ancom
*

where his talents for preaching led to his becoming ordained.
The history kept by the Silver Bluff Church indicates that in
1773 a Mr. Palmer had been baptized by George Liele while
on his way to Kingston, Jamaica, where he was ordained as
the first pastor. The research ofW. H. Brooks showed that a
Negro Baptist Church, George Liele, pastor, was in
Savannah from 1779 to 1782.
Florida has four major Baptist conventions. Two are
missionary Baptist, the Florida General Baptist State
Convention (formerly called the General Baptist State
Convention of Florida) and the Progressive Baptist
Missionary and Educational State Convention of Florida. In
addition, there is the Florida State Primifive Baptist
Convention and the United American Free Will Baptist
Convention.
It was established that the very first Baptists to come to
Florida were Black people who fled to the area to escape
slavery. The first Baptist church to be established in Florida
was integrated. The Pigeon Creek Baptist Church, founded
in Nassau County on January 7, 1821, the same year Florida


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-

CHRISTIAN BLACK HISTORY PROGRAM-Mt.
Charity Missionary Baptist Church, 1417 North Laura
St., will conclude Black History month with a Christian
Black History program on Sunday, February 27 at 4:00
p.m. The church is using the same theme for Black
History month as selected by the Florida Department of
Corrections-Niagara Protest Reborn. -Like last year,
the offering collected during this program will be dedi-
cated specifically for orphans at the Children's Home
Society in Jacksonville.
BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION-In cel-
ebration of Black History Month, The Worship Place
(Pastor Harold Rollinson) and The Cifadel of Hope
(Pastor Ivory James, Jr.) will present Dr. John L. Johnson
(Four Thousand Years of Black Biblical History) in a
Workshop series entitled. Fact or Fiction: The History of
People of Color in the Bible. A $20 donation is requested
to cover the cost of a Friday reception, Saturday continen-
tal breakfast and a light lunch. Workshop dates are: Part
1, February 26, 7:00-9:00 p.m.; Part II, February 27, 9:00
a.m.-1:00 p.m.; and Part III, February 28, 10:00 a.m. For
more information or for directions, call 904/396-0540.
CALENDAR OF EVENTS/SERVICES-St. Paul AME
Church, 6910 New Kings Rd., invites the public to share
in several planned events and services. The Men of Allen
will sponsor their annual Prayer Breakfast on Saturday,
February 26, at 9:00 a.m. March 17-The Women's
Progressive Club presents the Ritz Voices. March 17-
Service of Welcome at 7:00 p.m. for Bishop McKinley
Young. March 20-Palm Sunday Service at 7:30 a.m. and
10:55 a.m. March 23-Holy Week Worship Service at 6:45
p.m. March 24-Maundy Thursday Worship Service at
6:45 p.m. March 27-Easter drama at 9:30 a.m., Easter
Worship Services at 5:45 a.m.-7:30 a.m., Bishop
McKinley Young preaches at 10:55 a.m. Rev. Marvin
Zanders, III, Pastor.
GOSPEL BENEFIT MUSICAL-Sisters Network
Northeast Florida, a support group for African American
women surviving breast cancer presents a musical on
Sunday, March 6, 6:00 p.m. at Grace Baptist Church of
East Springfield. The church is located at 1553 E. 21st St.
Rev. John J. Devoe, Jr., Pastor. Guests include Nu-
Testament, New Creations, Jerry Cannon & The
Caravans, The Miracles, and soloist Pastor Stephanie
White. Special guests are Rev. Eugene White and Ribault
Senior High School Chorus, soloist Bro. Brandon Jones
(Douglas Anderson School of The Arts.





Evangel

Tempe


It's Time To Visir W\ith Us!
lI.\citrn Cl'ildrcn & Yourl',i 1, I '.t,', 1-
Iln ',,C l in I Inlp "- .i,,i l" ,: l, t, t' ,l ic l I '- t .- |

Sermon Sunday
F9 Li t,:I-1-v 2-t[i
:;2 ,a.m1 & I --I.- .: .m .
Jletsus Still Hel.ils I the Sick Tosdav.
.' IK.\ s o Ic e l .ing ]lc.,l ,n_
.' It, ,, llm r ( ,r ,' t i.: (d i iri- in, I i.,[. *| I, .


Jim Iu al-e
Suida\ FIebrum- 2r7th
i I6:00 p.mi.


90-4-7 81-n93 'l9l3

901-4-81-9393


became a territory of the United States, have records show-
ing that a slave named Peter presented himself for member-
ship and was received.
Immediately after the Civil War, blacks came to Florida
by the thousands from Virginia, Georgia and the Carolinas
seeking refugee. Their predominant faith was Baptist. In
1860, there were 62,677 blacks in Florida. Of these 61,745
were slaves and 932 were free. Most were Baptist.

The Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review............8:00 p.m. F' 1~ .4
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


SCHRISTIAN FAMILY

WORSHIP CENTER

Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
'. Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.
Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

Mount Sinai Community Development Enterprise
Community Resource Education
And Development Institute
2049 North Pearl Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 798-8733
GED Program, FCAT, Tutoring, Mentoring, After School,
Job Skills Training, National Parenting Program, Ex-Offenders,
Computer Skills Training for Youth and Adults.
For More Information
Call (904) 798-8722 or 798-8733.
MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530 I
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22) i|
S... ^KH H -- *


Pastors Alan &
Rennee Dawson


Our New Location
(The Old Tyson Chicken Plant)
5421 West Beaver Street
Building B, Suite 202
Jacksonville, FL 32254
FOR MORE INFO. CALL 891-8802
Our Service Schedule
Sunday: Early Morning Worship 8:30 a.m.
Mid Morning Worship 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday:
Bible Study & Personal Development 7:30 p.m.
JOIN US FOR OUR 4TH ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION, FEB. 25-27TH 2005 AT 7:30 P.M.


HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT!
Call 904/765-9773
Give to: The Samuel W. Smith Fund Raiser
for Kidney Transplant,
Account #234-5528-5
Compass Bank
Jacksonville, FL
.,.c,.onv., i:


4 1


PAGE A-8


FLORIDA STAR







PPRPI4RVI 2 FLR1 SRA


The F rw Co Syd S ov ^d ~ pv w- ws













SCopyrighted Material '


SSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"










a a 00ft --% 0- q.w 0o mn 4010010


During the Reconstruction, African Americans from former slave-owning states were elected to Congress in remark-
-able numbers. These politicians played important roles until the South successfully drove blacks away from the polls and
from Congress.
Tunis Campbell (1812-1891)
Tunis G. Campbell was the highest-ranking and most influential African American politician in nineteenth-century
Georgia. Born on April 1, 1812, in Middlebrook, New Jersey, he was the eighth of ten chil-
dren of free black parents. From ages five to eighteen he attended an otherwise all-white
= Episcopal school in Babylon, New York, where he trained for missionary service with the
,5 American Colonization Society's program of transporting African Americans to Liberia.
-- _Upon graduation-which coincided with the onset of the second Great Awakening and the
-- rise of William Lloyd Garrison's abolitionist newspaper, The Liberator -Campbell joined
the Methodist church and threw himself into evangelical uplift. In 1832 he founded an anti-
Q colonization society and pledged "never to leave this country until every slave was free on
I 2 American soil."
S- While he preached against slavery and established schools, Campbell worked as a hotel
S~ < steward in New York City and Boston. His Hotel Keepers, Head Waiters, and Housekeepers'
Guide (1848) provides practical information for supervising and running a first-class hotel,
but the book is more valuable for its instruction in interracial social skills, its insistence that
^ managers recognize the dignity of labor, and its emphasis on the need for workers to be edu-
c a ^ cated, well paid, prompt, clean, and competitive. White employers described Campbell as a
S, man disposed "to elevate the condition and character of persons of his color."
Sf After Union General William T. Sherman captured. Savannah in December 1864 and
S* Congress. set up the Freedmen's Bureau in March 1865, Campbell was appointed to super-
_rC vise land claims and resettlement on five Georgia islands: Ossabaw, Delaware, Colonels, St.
Catherine's, and Sapelo. Georgia planters, who received pardons from U.S. president
SAndrew Johnson, regained control of these islands in 1866. Campbell quickly purchased
1,250 acres at Belle Ville in McIntosh County and there established an association of black landowners to divide parcels
and profit from the land.
In 1867 Congress ordered a further Reconstruction of the South. As vice president of the Republican Party in Georgia,
Campbell worked to register voters before being elected as a justice of the peace, a delegate to the state constitutional con-
vention, and a state senator from the Second Senatorial District (Liberty, McIntosh, and Tatnall counties). In the legisla-
ture Campbell pushed for laws for equal education, integrated jury boxes, homestead exemptions, abolishment of impris-
onment for debt, open access to public facilities, and fair voting procedures. As a justice of the peace, minister, and polit-
ical boss, Campbell organized a black power structure in McIntosh County that protected freed people from white abus-
es, whether against their bodies or in labor negotiations. He headed a 300-strong African American militia that guarded
him from reprisals by the Ku Klux Klan or others, even though his home was burned, he was poisoned, and his family
lived in constant fear.
After Democrats regained state power in 1871 by forcing Republican Governor Rufus Bullock to flee the state, they
began a concerted effort to overturn Reconstruction. Campbell's seat was taken, and a series of lawsuits kept him in legal
trouble. He traveled to Washington, D.C., where he met with U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant and Senator Charles Sumner
to urge that the government intervene actively to save Reconstruction. Finally, in 1876, while the U.S. attorney general
tried to free him, Campbell was convicted of malfeasance in office, taken from a Savannah jail, handcuffed, chained, and
leased out for one year to a convict-labor camp. Upon.release he went immediately to Washington to meet with U.S.
President Rutherford B. Hayes and wrote, a small book, Sufferings of the Reverend T. G. Campbell and His Family in
Georgia (1877). He died in Boston on December 4, 1891.


5 5


yo


for reading



The FloridaStarn



TheFloridaStar com


5
5
e
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
0
5
5
5
5
5
C
5
5
5


o 0e *e *0 00
~S


w IC







w0 -m
(0
nM o
Ma
L_





















ta
.. .
20 5



o E

E"E




-i i
LM 0




>,Vo















Florida's First

African American

Congressman

Josiah Thomas Walls
Politician (1842 1905)
Impressed into the Confederate forces, later joining
Union forces by
choice, Josiah Walls
carved out a politi-
cal career in the
rough days of
Reconstruction.
He was born in
Winche s te tr, .
Frederick County,' l
Va., December 30,
1842 and received a
limited schooling.' .'
Walls engaged in m" ,-'
truck farming, .




Walls won elec-
tion to the Florida House of Representatives in 1868, to the
Florida Senate in 1869 and became Florida's first African
American Congressman in 1870.
He served three terms, promoting the cause of black
education including a bill to grant one million acres of land
for a college now known as Florida A&M University .
Congress eventually granted the college 90,000 acres.


A Gainesville attorney, Walls preferred farming but was
wiped out financially when a freeze destroyed his orange
groves. He then became assistant to the superintendent of
farms at Florida Normal and Industrial School for Negroes.
Walls died in Tallahassee, Fla., May 15, 1905.
Interment was held in the Negro Cemetery.



ffff


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE A-9


FEBRUA~dRY26.2005n













UNSTOPPABLE: An Original Production Highlighting the Extraordinary Careers of Three African


American Legends in Cinema
On February 13, 2005, about two weeks after the
death of Ossie Davis, Black STARZ paid tribute to
three men who defied expectations and became
masters of cinematic expression in the original spe-
cial UNSTOPPABLE: A Conversation with Melvin
Van Peebles, Gordon Parks and Ossie Davis.
Between 1969 and 1970, Parks, Van Peebles and
Davis were the first African Americans to direct
Hollywood features. These three highly influential
"renaissance men" of cinema paved the way for
today's generation of African American filmmak-
ers. In an hour-long conversation, filmed in New
York, they sat down with filmmaker Warrington
Hudlin to explore their collective achievements and
experiences in filmmaking, photography, writing,
producing, acting, theater, composing and civil
rights.
Also featured in the special are testimonials from
actor/writer/director Reginald Hudlin, director Julie
Dash, actress/director Ruby Dee, writer/filmmaker
Nelson George, and actor/director Mario Van
Peebles who comment on the trio's influence on
their careers, our culture arid society.
Ossie Davis was born on December 18, 1917, in
Gogdell, Georgia. He graduated from high school
in Waycross, Georgia. In 1935 he moved to
Washington, D. C. to live with relatives. There he
received a scholarship and attended Howard
University. In 1939, he moved to-New York and
began his career as a writer and actor with the Rose
McClendon Players in Harlem.
Deeply committed to the civil rights movement
from its earliest days, Davis consistently spoke out
on social and political issues. In 1949, he married
actress Ruby Dee.
Davis delivered the eulogy for Malcolm X in
1965 and was a major speaker at the funeral of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968. In 1989 both he
and his wife, Ruby Dee were named to the NAACP
Image Awards Hall of Fame and in 2004 they were


both the recipients of the Kennedy Center
Honors.
GORDON ROGER ALEXANDER
BUCHANAN PARKS was born on November
30, 1912 in Fort Scott, Kansas. He began working
for the Farm Services Administration as a photo-
journalist in 1942 and in 1948 became the first
Black staff photographer at LIFE Magazine. He
wrote and published The Learning Tree, several
volumes of poetry combined with his photos and
directed Shaft starring Richard Roundtree and
more. He received the NAACP's Spingam Medal
in 1972. The Learning Tree is one of the first
films to be registered by the National Film
Registry of the Library of Congress.
MEL VAN PEEBLES was born on August 21,
1932 on he southside of Chicago. He received his
B.A. from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1953,
served in the U. S. Air Force and released his first
film from France in 1968. In 1970, he directed
Watermelon Man, a comedic racial satire, starring
Godfrey Cambridge for Columbia Pictures.
In 1971, he wrote, produced, directed, scored,
distributed and starred in the radical groundbreak-
ing Sweet Sweetback Baadassssss Song. The film
is one of the highest-grossing independent films at
the time and ushers in a new era of Black inde-
pendent filmmaking.
His other directing credits include Don't Play
Us Cheap (1973). In addition, he wrote the Tony
Award nominated Broadway musical Ain't
Supposed to Die a Natural Death," and "Classified
X." In 1995, his son, actor/director Mario Van
Peebles directed his screenplay "Panther."
No matter the hardships or the roads they trav-
eled, these three gentlemen were truly "unstop-
pable." As Reginald Hudlin stated, "For them to
have overcome all of those obstacles, grab their
boot straps and to achieve a the highest level,
they're a different kind of man."


Reginald Hudlin, Ossie Davis, Gordon Parks and Mel
Van Peebles.


Gordon Parks.


Mel Van Peebles.'


'uTLMA I3A OADCcAsTINGu INC-


C1d PM
I"s 6.

v"014tm(
wwM^sa SS$pw


105.7 FM
Meia~|m


TAMA Broadcasting, Inc.


The largest privately Black owned media company in the State of Florida.
Three (3) Stations here in Jacksonville.

Our listeners spend nearly 1.4 Billion Dollars each year in retail sales
Invite them to shop at your business....they will come!
Call for your free, no obligation marketing analysis.

9550 Regency Square Blvd.
Suite #200
Jacksonville, Fl 32225
Office (904) 680-1050
Fax (904) 680-1051
www.tamabroadcastini.com


lw-. w


m

c-




cc


a)



cQ)

a)


Au


a)






E.
a-


U)

a)


C-)
E
E


c-)


Thank you for reading
THE FLORIDA STAR!


TheFloridaStar.com


I


mmmmmmmmi


ob.:o I i* I ":im* ... *,*- %* ;; "M -0-p. :


W 0. k varPI. 40








FORIDA/ STAR PAGE- i -


Extensive First CoastAncestry


ent Cruise Ship Depot off of
August Drive at Dames
Point.
When she cruised on the
maiden voyage of the SS
Miracle Cruise Ship she
could recall vividly the large
homes where her ancestors
and parents and siblings had
once lived.
Livestock and gardens
flourished. Fishing, crab-
bing, shrimping and boating
was commonplace. She
recalls that the Depression
era had little impact on her


family. Food was plentiful.
They owned the land and
their homes.
"Grandmother 'Luella'
graduated from Edward
Waters High School and
later became superintendent
of New Berlin's Bethel
A.M.E. Church Sunday
School. My sisters and
brother grew up in a
Christian home and I'm
grateful that that same
Christian legacy continues
with my descendents", states
Mrs. Asque.


First Coast Native


Is A First For LVPD


With her only child; Elizabeth and Moira Jean and parents, Roy and Keba Coast is very extensive, with
Florida Star Columnist Betty Singleton (twin sisters) Stewart Christopher, octoge- her paternal ancestry dating
Asque Davis, her only holding original photo- narian Mrs. Inez Christopher back to the 1600s and her
granddaughter Mrs. graphs of her great-grandfa- Asque has such fond memo- maternal ancestry dating
Michelle Davis Singleton their Fred Brill, grandparents ries of growing up in a back to the early 1800s.
and two of her six great- Charlie Stewart and Mrs. close-knit family. Mrs. Asque's maternal
granddaughters, Maria Luella Brill Stewart Hooper Her ancestry on the First great grandfather was a
builder and ordained African
Methodist Episcopal minis-
ter.
TeHe purchased acres of
S.' land for each of his children.
SFamily members maintained
ownership of much of the
_. same land that was sold to
S7*A .1. the Jacksonville Port during
the mid 1990s for the pres-


HAPPY


MANNIE "Ru-Ru"
MIXSON
February 24. 1982-
December 18, 2004

Ru-Ru, it's been two
months since you left us.
We miss you day by day as
the months go by. It will
never be the same without
seeing your smiling face.

We are trying to make
the best of each day.
Ru-Ru, we thank you
for all the beautiful things
that you gave us, while
here on earth.

You will always have
a specialplace in our
hearts. We pray and ask
God for guidance and
strength everyday.
How sweet your memories
are, but death has left
an empty space that
will never be filled again.

We Love You 'Ru-Ru"

Love Always & Forever-
Tammy, Tinacha,
Shavocka & Bookoo.


James C. Davis, Jr.


Making history recently
for the second time in La
Vista, Nebraska was James
C. 'Jimmie' Davis, Jr. son of
this column's writer and
photographer The James
Carl Davises, Sr., who was
sworn, in as LaVista,
Nebraska's first African
American police sergeant
and county supervisor.
In 1995 he was named
the first African American
police officer with the
department. James
C.'Jimmie' Davis, Jr. was
sworn in recently at a swear-
ing-in ceremony before the
La Vista City Council and a
very proud family that
included his father, James
'Carl' Davis, Sr., his wife
Mrs. Suzanne Davidson
Davis, daughters Tiffany
Nicole and Mariah Marie
Davis, mother and father-in-
law The Rollie Davidsons,
sisters and brother-in-law,
Mrs. Jerome Stolinski and
The Dave Insingers.
'Jimmie' (as family and
local friends fondly call
him) a second-generation
police was the La Vista
Police Department's first
school resource officer, later
working in the department's
community affairs bureau.
He transferred back to uni-
form patrol to prepare him-
self for the next level of ser-
geant.
In their interviews with
the Papillion Times newspa-
per, La Vista Police Chief
Bob Lausten stated,
"...'J.D.' Davis (as local
Nebraskans call him) has
been a field-training officer
for several years and his
communication skills ab ve
all are great. He provides a
very good example for the


officers to follow in how he
deals with people". The
newly sworn in Sergeant
Davis stated, "Being a sec-
ond generation police officer
and seeing what my father
did on the job, the one thing
he taught me was no matter
what you do, always do your
job. Your integrity and your
ethics are the most impor-

(See "Native", B-2)


MEMORIAL
In Loving
Memory
Of My Wife













OLLIE STEWART
March 29, 1952-
February 1. 2003
You've gone first and I
remain to walk the road
alone, I'll live in memories
garden dear, with happy
days we've known.

In spring I wait for roses
red, when faded,
the lilacs blue.
In early fall when
brown leaves fall, I'll
catch a glimpse of you.

I'll hear your voice, I'll
see your smile, though
blindly I may fumble. The
memory of your helping
hand will buoy
me on with hope.

I want to know each step
you take, so I may take the
same. For someday down
that lonely road you'll
hear me call your name.

We love and miss you:
Husband, Kenneth
Stewart; Three Sons,
Kenneth Lamar, Shawn
Antoine and Christian
James Stewart; Daughter,
Brenda Ruth Stewart and
11 grand children.

(Please see
The Florida-Times Union
for additional information)


PAGE B-1


FLOnRIDA STAR


F7FRRII RV 26. 2005











Dr. Benjamin Eljah Mays: A Powerful And Credible Educator


Dr. Benjamin E. Mays


4v?.
\ '


was a powerful, credible,
smooth speaker who
captured the audi-
ence's full attention
in the first few min-
utes and held it until


the end.
Benjamin Elijah
Mays, was born in
1895 in South
Carolina. He spoke
early and often
against segregation
and for education.
He received nearly
thirty honorary doc-


torates and other honors and awards including election


to the Schomburg Honor Roll of Race Relations, one of
a dozen major leaders so honored.
As a minister, educator, ecumenist, counselor, civil
rights activist, and author, Benjamin E. Mays achieved
national and international renown. After earning a
Ph.D. in Christian theology from the University of
Chicago Divinity School, Mays became dean of the
Howard University School of Religion. Serving in that
capacity from 1934 to 1940, his contributions gained
national recognition for the School of Religion and
earned him an invitation to become the sixth president
ofAtlanta's Morehouse College.
From that post until his retirement in 1967, Mays
inspired generations of students to strive for moral and
academic excellence and to work for racial justice in
America. His 1948 chapel address introduced a young
student named Martin Luther King Jr. to Gandhi's phi-


AIDS Summit 2005



A Huge Success


From left are, Dr. Robert Fullilove (Columbia University
Executive Director for River Region Human Services), Rev
of Tabernacle Bible College), Tom Liberti (Chief, Florid.
deadra Green (AIDS Summit Chairperson).


;: .






~
Owl MM


-MT ww~nA "1* Ah
Faith-Based Panel- Rev. Bruce Cobb (CEO of Fresh
Ministries in Jacksonville), Michael Payne (Executive
Director of the Mayor's Office of Faith and Community
Based Partnerships in Jacksonville), Minerva Bryant
(VP. Clinical Operations for River Region Human Ser
ices), and ken Stokes (Duval County Health
Department).


P aw- WIE- M.IME
Shown here from left are, Rom Liberti (Chief, Florida
Bureau of HIVIAIDS), Deadra Green \(AIDS Summit
Chairperson), and Dr. John Agwunobi (Florida Secretary
of Health)


From left are, Kim McPherson (River Region), Jose
Campos (FAMU), Yvette Malone (River Region), and
Nicole Turner (FAMU).


DEATH
NOTICES

BELL-Herbert, 75, died
February 17, 2005.
Alphonso West Mortuary,
Inc.
BOYNTON-Leroy, Sr.,
died
February 18, 2005.
BROWN-Vander, Jr.,
died
February 21, 2005.
BUTLER-Solomon, died
February 18, 2005.
CAMPBELL-Pearlie,


died
February 21, 2005.
CLARE-Gladys,
February 17, 2005.
COBB-Mose,
February 20, 2005.


), Derya Williams (CEO and
v. Leon Seymore (Chancellor
a Bureau of HIVIAIDS), and


Dr. John Agwunobi,
Florida's Secretary of State
gave participants at the
Minority AIDS Coalition of
Jacksonville's AIDS
Summit 2005 a slice of real-
ity.
"AIDS isn't only about
people losing their ability to
fight disease. AIDS can
affect the health of entire
commuinities...The Florida
Department of Health will
be the last to lay down their
weapons in the fight against
AIDS," said Dr. Agwunobi
during the kickoff for the
summit on February 16 at
the Radisson Riverwalk
Hotel in Jacksonville.
The summit, whose
sponsors' included River
Region Human Services,
Florida A&M University
College of Pharmacy, The
AIDS Institute, Commcare
Pharmacy, and the Florida
Department of Health con-
tinued February 17-18 at the
Radisson.
Dr. Robert Fullilove,
Associate Dean for commu-
nity and minority affairs and
a professor of clinical
sociomedical sciences at the
Milman School of Public
Health of Columbia
University, addressed the
topic "HIV/AIDS and
Substance Abuse: New
Challenges for 2005 and
Beyond" on February 18.
Micahel Payne,
Executive Director of the
Mayor's Office of Faith and
Community Based
Partnerships moderated a
discussion of faith-based
initiatives in the war against
AIDS.
Lorenzo Robertson, a
professional actor, presented
his one-man show, Me,
Myself, and I, a poignant
voyage through a man's life,'
where each act brought
'forth strong messages of
self-image, AIDS, family
values and personal respon-
sibilit3#


died

died


COLSTON-Robert, died
February 15, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
DAISE-Micheal, 51, died
February 21, 2005.
DEMERY-Louise, 89,
died
February 22, 2005.
DEVORE-Emily, died
February 20, 2005.
GREEN-Richard, died
February 19, 2005.
HAGAN-William, died
February 17, 2005.
HARDY-Joan, died
February 20, 2005.
HOWARD-James,died
February 20, 2005.
JACKSON-Gladys, died
February 16, 2005.
JOHNSON-James, died
February 20, 2005.
JOHNSON-Linda, died
February 21, 2005.
KEE-Trinity, died
February 14, 2005.
KING-Augusta, died
February 18, 2005.
MITCHELL-Ralph,
died
February 21, 2005.
OWES-Robert, 49, died
February 21,,2005.
PORTER-Estelle, died
February 19, 2005.
RICHES-Cheri-Kim,
died
February 20, 2005.
RUMMAS-Glenda, died
February 18,2005.
SIMMONS-Patricia,
died
February 19, 2005.
SLATER-Eloise, died
February 16, 2005.
SURRENCY-Leonard,
54, died February 20,
2005. A. B. Coleman
Mortuary, Inc.
SWAIN-Robert, died
February 17, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
THOMAS-Alvania A.,
92, died February 21,
2005.
WILLIAMS-Johnnie
Mae, died February 18,
2005.
WILKERSON-Terry,
died February 19, 2005
4


Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. and ABE
classes are held on Tuesda\s and Thursdays from 9:00
a.m. until 1:.00 p.m. This free program offers indi id-
ual in-depth instructions Free childcare is available to
parents \ ith children from age six weekss to three years
old. Also. transportation is pro\ ided for persons in 06,
08. and 09 zip codes areas. For additional information
call '64-5686. Carla Mclntosh, Program Director.
L -u


M4,


losophy of nonviolence. He served the young minister
as an unofficial senior advisor. He gave the eulogy at
King's funeral. He also served his community well,
becoming the first black president of the Atlanta school
board.
Among his books were the first sociological study
of African-American religion, The Negro's Church,
published in 1933; and The Negro's God, of 1938;
Disturbed About Man, of 1969; and his autobiography
Born to Rebel, of 1971. These books reveal a combina-
tion of sharp intellect with religious commitment and
prophetic conviction. Such a legacy made Benjamin
Mays one of the most influential educators of twentieth
century America.


Native

(Continued From B-I)

tant part, because once you lose those, you never get them
back. So I've been very conscious of doing everything the
right way and I'm getting to take that into my supervisory
duties... There are a lot more African Americans working in
Sappy County than when I started. For years I was the only
black male working in law enforcement besides the state
patrol. Hopefully being promoted, that's going to give more
minorities a sense of thinking, 'If it can be done once, it can
be done again.' Hopefully it can affect recruiting officers in
a positive light."


"COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
Seventh scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area. 2


POINTS OF EXCELLENCE BANQUET- the annual
Points of Excellence Banquet to be held SamurdaN.
February 26. 2005 at the Jackson\ ille Omni Hotel. The
banquet presented b\ The Points of Excellence
Foundation. features Janet Ow ens. \ice President of
Nlarketing and Communication. United \a\ of
Northwest Florida. as the keynote speaker. Ken Amaro
of NBC Affiliate \VTL\- TV 12 in Jackson\ille is the
Master of Ceremony. Activities include a Jazz Social
beginning at 6:00 p.m. The banquet begins at "):00 p.m.
Honorees and categories of recognition are: Faith
Leadership-Dr. Rudolph McKissick. Jr.. Economic
Development-Carlton Jones. Healthcare-Comnnunit-
Hospice Of Northeast Florida.. Education-Iartha
BaiTett.. and Community Ser' ice-Dr. Charles
Simmons.
RAINES MAGNET PROGRAMS TO CONTINUE-
T\\o magnet programs--En\ ironmental Studies and
Information Technology--hate been extended through
the 2005-2006 academic year at Raines High School.
Students interested in participating in either program
maN apply b\ entering "Raines High School" on the
magmet application, those w ho do not have an applica-
tion may obtain one at the district office at 1701
Prudential Drive or download an application from
\\wA\.magnetprograms.com. Completed applications
must be turned in at the district office. Although the
deadline for magnet program applications is Fridaa.
February 25. late applications will be accepted for these
two programs. For additional information, contact the
Du\al Counts Public School's Magnet Programs Office
at 390-20_2.
REGINA CARTER VIOLINIST/BAND LEADER
AT FLORIDA THEATRE-The 100 Black Men.
Ri\erside Fine Arts Series and The Florida Theatre
present Regina Carter Saturday, March 26 at S:00 p.m.
at the Florida Theatre. Ms. Carter is classical\ trained
and also maintains a solo concert schedule. She has
appeared with the Nlinnesota Orchestra, Atlanta
Symphon\ and the Milwaukee Syinphon'. among oth-
ers. In December 2001. Mls. Carter became the first jazz
artist and the first African-American to be chosen to
play Paganini's famed Guarneri "Cannon" \iolin, in the
city of Genoa, Italy, \\where it resides under lock and key.
She subsequently went back to Genoa to employ the use
of the Paganini violin for her latest recording. Paganini:
After a Dream. In No ember 2003. the coveted imolin
\\as flo\\n to New\ York Cit. \\here Ms. Carter per-
formed on the instrument one more time at Lincoln
Center's Alice Tullv Hall to a sold-out crowd. For tick-
ets or infonnation please call the Florida Theatre Box
Office at 19041 355-2787 or \isit us at w-\x\.floridathe-
atre.com. The Florida Theatre is conveniently located at
128 East Forsyth Street in Do\w ntown Jackson\ ille.
COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS'A.L. LE\\ IS
CENTER OFFERS FREE GED AND ABE CLASS-
ES-Applications are now\ being accepted for the spring
semester GED and ABE classes at Community
Connections A.L. Lew is Center. 3655 Ribault Scenic
Drive. GED classes are held on Rlondays and


FEBRUARY26, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


P Af" jl R-


I


.""~
i.,


ci
I~3iic31S I


W-0










FERURY26S205FORIDASTRPGB-


Edward "Ned" Gourdin Was



Jacksonville's First Olympic Medalist


Jacksonville native Edward "Ned" Gourdin (born in
1897, died in 1966), was the first Olympic medallist from
Jacksonville.
He graduated valedictorian from Old Stanton High
School in 1916, and went on to become the first man in his-
tory to long-jump 25 feet.
His parents recognized his abilities as a scholar and ath-
lete and decided to move to Cambridge, Massachusetts,
where he completed one year of college preparatory work at
Cambridge High and Latin before entering Harvard in the
fall of 1917.
Gourdin distinguished himself in track and became the
National Amateur Athletic Union's junior 100-yard dash
champion in 1920 and the national pentathlon champion in
1921 and 1922.
At the revival of the Harvard-Yale versus Oxford-
Cambridge track meet, in 1921, Gourdin won the 100-yard
dash and set a new world record (25 feet, 3 inches) in the
broad jump. In 1924, having completed his law school
exams, he traveled to Paris for the Olympics and won a sil-
ver medal in the broad jump.
He missed Commencement week and did not get to see
his classmates celebrating their third reunion by larking
about in Ku Klux Klan outfits, complete with white robes
and peaked hats.
In 1923 Gourdin had married Amalia Ponce of
Cambridge. They had three daughters and a son. and he
worked as a postal clerk while in law school. Gourdin kept
that job as he strove to establish his practice, finally resign-
ing in 1927, citing the toll on his health. He was admitted to
the Massachusetts bar in 1925 and to the federal bar in 1929.
When no law firm offered Gourdin a position, his atten-


tion turned to the public sector.
He became active in politics, first as a Republican; his
conversion to the Democratic party in the early 1930s led to
many relationships with political -figures and attorneys in
Boston, including Francis J. W. Ford '04, LL.B. '06, an influ-
ential lawyer whose classmate, Franklin Delano Roosevelt,
had named him U.S. attorney for the district of
Massachusetts in 1933.
In 1936, with Ford's backing, Roosevelt appointed
Gourdin assistant U.S. attorney, a position he would occupy,
save for the war years, until 1951. Gourdin had joined the
Student Training Corps as a sophomore at Harvard, and
enlisted in the National Guard in 1925.
In 1941 he was assigned to the 372nd Infantry, a segre-
gated regiment, and became its commanding officer, serving
until 1947. A much-decorated soldier, he chafed at the racial
separation: a 1945 diary entry notes, "We have been plagued
for 5 years with newcomers (Reserve officers and grads of
OCS) who seem to assume that Negro soldiers do not know
anything." Yet he rejoined the National Guard after his dis-
charge, retiring in 1959 with the rank of brigadier general,
another "first" in Massachusetts.
In Boston, he resumed his duties as assistant U.S. attor-
ney and had been promoted to chief of the civil division
before his elevation to the bench in 1951.
During the civil-rights era, he made a conscious choice to
maintain his judicial neutrality, but his interests included the
NAACP, the Roxbury Youth Program, and the New England
Olympians. He died in office a few weeks after his forty-fifth
reunion; his class-report entry reads, "Still grinding out jus-
tice. Elected president of the United States Olympians."


The Negro Baseball League's Jax Red Caps

The Jacksonville Red Caps joined the Negro American League in 1938. After their initial
year in the league,
the team moved to
Cleveland and :'1.V.
played as the '? "
Cleveland Bears '
from 1939 to 1940.
The team dropped -, -
out of the Negro
American League in
I .'... V;
1942. The original ..
Barrs Field which s -
became Durkee Field .
and is now known as. -
James P. Small. -. -:
Stadium on Myrtle ...."
Avenue in Jacksonville, served as a home field of the Jacksonville Red Caps in 1938. The
City of Jacksonville purchased Barrs Field from J.H. Durkee March 13, 1926, as was report-
ed in the Jacksonville Journal.


Stanton's Charles "Boobie" Clark

Was 'Rookie Of The Year' In NFL

Charles "Boobie" Clark was one of the crowd favorites dur-
ing his years, in the NFL with the Cincinatti Bengals. Fans
would often yell "BOO-BEE" every time he made a good play.
Clark, who was born on November 8, 1950 in Jacksonville, Fla.
was known as a solid runner and receiver for six years with the
Bengals and two years with the Houston Oilers. ',
"Boobie" was a standout player for the Blue Devils at New
Stanton Senior High School. He played collegiately for.
Bethune-Cookman College in Daytona Beach, Fla. and was
drafted by Cincinnatti in 12th Round in 1973. Clark was f
named Rookie of the Year in 1973 after rushing for 988 yards -
and scoring 8 tocuhdowns. He rushed for 2,978 yards from**
1973-78 as a running back for the Bengals, and is fifth among the team's all-time rushers.
He died in Jacksonville on October 25, 1988.
The City of Jacksonville named one of it's parks in honor of Clark. Charles "Boobie"
Clark Park is located at 8973 Sibbald Road

Lucas Developed, Nurtured Talent For Braves' Future


A young, innovative Ted
Turner believed in
Jacksonville native Bill
Lucas enough to name him
the Braves'
director of
player per-
sonnel on
September
19, 1976.
Turner, a
hands-on owner at the time,
kept the general manager's
title for himself. But it was
Lucas who performed the
GM duties.
When Lucas held this
lofty position, there were
only two cyher African-


Americans who had similar
roles in professional sports.
They were Wayne Embry,
with the Milwaukee Bucks,
and Bill Russell, with the
Seattle SuperSonics.
Lucas served as a bat
boy for the minor league
team in Jacksonville, Fla.,
which included a young
slugger by the name of Hank
Aaron, who would later be
married to Lucas' older sis-
ter Barbara.
He signed with the
Milwaukee Braves in 1956
and played in their minor
league organization until
1964.


Lucas' years running the
Atlanta Braves' front office
were ones in which he
developed and nurtured tal-
ent for the future.
He .made sure the team
was stocked with young
players, such as Murphy,
Bob Horner and Biff
Pocoroba.
But before he could
enjoy the success of his
labors, Lucas died on May 5,
1979, one day after suffering
a massive stroke. He was 43.
Three years later, the Braves
won the National League
West Divisipn title.


Willie Mays


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) You're
in the mood to
make a change in
your professional
life. However, it's best to
slow down a bit. Examine
all the options and possible
repercussions first.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) You're at your best
this week with
group activities.
In fact, you're a
model of coopera-
tion. Later, you're able to
deal with a minor crisis on
the homefront quite
admirably.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) You're
focusing too r
much on a materi- ,
al item you've
been wanting for a while. It
would be nice if you could
indulge yourself. However,
be more.practical and decide
whether or not this item is
necessary at all.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) You're
full of opinions, :
and that's fine. '"
However, you
have to learn when NOT to
express them. Others could
be easily offended by your
strong views.
LEO (July 23 to August
~ 22) A person you'd
S iad a falling out
j f ith in the past


A -












Collections shows Jacksonville native Edward "Ned"
Gourdin setting a world record in the broad jump in
1921.






Hank Thompson was the first black player to play for
a different team in each Major League : American
League in 1947 with the St. Louis Browns and National
league in 1949 with the New York Giants.
.** *
Did you know that on.May 12, 1955, Sam Jones
became the first black pitcher to throw a no-hitter in the
major leagues?

On April 30, 1961, Willie Mays became the first black
player, and only the sixth player overall, in Major
League history to hit four home runs during a single
game.


suddenly asks your forgive-
ness. Reach into your heart
to find the answer.
Sometimes, it's best to let go
of a grudge.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) Family
members could be
very demanding
S this week.
However, that
doesn't mean you have to
jump at their every wish.
Take some time for yourself;
you deserve it.
LIBRA
(September 23
to October 22)
You've been on
the fence too long
concerning a career deci-
sion. This is the week to say
yea or nay. Just be sure
you're not taking the easy
way out.
SCORPIO (October
23 to
November 21)
Your mental acu-
ity stands you in
good stead this week. Use
this to good advantage when
dealing with co-workers and
higher-ups. This weekend,
keep the lines of communi-
cation open with loved ones.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22
to December
21) Someone's
visit you'd been'
anticipating falls through.
Don't allow this disappoint-


ment to spoil your entire
week. There's work to be
done!
[C CAPRI-
'/i C O R N
(December 22
to January 19)
You're not normally a
pushover. Still, there's
someone trying to rope you
into a financial deal who's
trying to snow you. Be
aware and trust your
instincts.
AQUARIUS
(January 20 to
February 18)
You're in no mood for inter-
ruptions at the workplace.
At the same time, avoid
being too abrupt with the
offending parties. A careful-
ly placed word will do the
trick.
PIECES
(February 19
to March 20)
Someone new comes into
your life. This person could
become a trusted friend. For
some, this means romance.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: Bernadette
Peters, February 28; Ron
Howard, March 1; John
Irving, March 2; Miranda
Richardson, March 3;
Bobby Womack, March 4;
Dean Stockwell, March 5;
Shaquille O'Neal, March 6.

(c) 2005 DBR Media,
Inc.


Your Weekly Horoscope

(FEBRUARY 26, 2005-MARCH 4, 2005)


FEBRUIARY26,2005


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE B-3








PAGr Ef R-4 A TAREY2 0


YIAfA7 0 i


JAIL OR BAIL I

EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of lanw Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the conm-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
THREATENING PHONE CALLS-On Sunday, February
20, 2005 at 5:00 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 9803
Evans Rd. in reference to receiving threatening phone calls.
Upon arrival, police officer met with the girlfriend (victim)
who stated that her ex-boyfriend called her phone at 4:58 a.m.
on 2/20/05 and stated "Your dad called threatening me today."
The suspect told his girlfriend, "I will deal with and do what
I have to do. I know where your dad lives. What happened
was all up to you. You asked me to do that once you dropped
me off." The victim stated that the phone call suddenly ended.
The police officer listened to the phone via the victim's phone
answering service. The victim told the police officer that the
suspect on 2/19/05 sexually assaulted her. The victim could
provide no other suspect information. The witness, the victim's
father told the police officer that on 2/19/05 he called the sus-
Spect's cell phone and told the suspect not to call.his daughter
again. When the police officer attempted to contact the sus-
pect via his cell phone, the answering machine advised that
the.phone was temporarily disconnected. The police officer
'said that this case would be routed to "Sex Crimes'
Department". Patrol Efforts suspended.
GRAND THEFT OF AN UNEMPLOYMENT CHECK-
On Monday, February 21, 2005 at 9:57 a.m. a police officer
was dispatched to 447 8th Street. (Ethio's Discount Beverage
Store) to a forged document call. Upon arrival, police officer
met with the owner of the store, who stated that the suspect
stole an unemployment check on 2/18/05. The owner of the
store did not witness the offense, but learned of the incident
from a third party whom he declined to name. The owner of
Sthe store is reporting the incident in order to get the unemploy-
ment office to re issue a new check. The police officer spoke
with the owner of the store who said, that the suspect came to
the store on 2/18/05 between 2:00 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. to cash
an unemployment check for his friend. The storeowner had let
the suspect cash checks for his friend in the past. He did not
think anything was wrong when the suspect asked to cash the
check. The suspect handed the storeowner the signed check
with his ID card, and the storeowner cashed the check but later
learned that the check was forged. He then called the police.
The police officer took possession of the unemployment
check, placed it in the property room, and contacted the SAO
to request a warrant for the suspect's arrest.
BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-
On Monday, February 21, 2005 at 10:35 a.m. a police officer
was dispatched to 1595 West 36th Street in reference to a dis-
turbance call. Upon arrival, police officer met with the girl-
friend (victim) who stated that her boyfriend (suspect), started
an argument, with her, and blamed her for his cell phone not
being charged. The suspect physically grabbed the victim by
the arm and started punching her with a closed fist in the face
and mouth. The police officer observed bruises to the victim's
upper right arm and a swollen top lip as a result of being
struck. After committing the act, the suspect fled the scene to
an unknown location. The police officer gave the victim liter-
ature in reference to being a victim of domestic violence. The
police officer will attempt to make, contact with the suspect
prior to consulting with the state attorney's office about the
case. Patrol efforts are continuing.
POSSESSION OF CONTROL SUBSTANCE-On Monday,
February 21, 2005 at 4:30 a.m. a JSO while on patrol noticed
that the listed vehicle's tag light was not illuminated. The offi-
cer conducted a traffic stop at 3800 North Main Street and
made contact with the driver (suspect). The police officer
asked the suspect for his driver's license, and he presented it to
the officer. A check of the suspect'sinformation revealed that
he had a possible warrant for his arrest. The police officer read
the suspect his rights and detained the suspect. The police
officer then conducted a search of the suspect's person and
found marijuana, powder cocaine, and cracks cocaine in the
suspect's right front pants pocket. The suspect told the police
officer that the drugs were not his. The suspect was taken to
jail, and booked on felony charges. Case cleared by an arrest.
ESPOUSE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On Monday, February
21, 2005 at 6:10 a.m. a police officer was dispatched to a bat-
tery domestic violence at 10621 Monaco Dr. Upon arrival
police officer met with the wife (victim) who stated that her
husband (suspect) walked down the stairs and started talking
to himself. She stated that he grabbed both of her arms and
pulled her arms behind her and threatened to "kill her." She
told the police officer that he also punched her in the face. The
: police officer made contact with the suspect and advised him
of his rights. He stated that he has not touched his wife and he
does not know what she is talking about. The police officer
observed the suspect was wearing a sheet between his legs
and several items of clothing. The police officer took the sus-
pect into custody. The police officer observed the victim and
did ndt see any signs of injuries to the victim. The victim was
given'a state attorney's card and advised how to seek prosecu-
tion. The police officer transported the. suspect to the MHCJ at
3333 West 20th Street where he was "Baker Acted". The MIC
Office will follow-up this case. Patrol efforts are suspended.
BURGLARY TO A DWELLING-On Monday, February 21,
2005 at 4:00 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 5959 Ft.
'Caroline Rd. Apartments in reference to a burglary to a resi-
dence. Upon arrival, police officer spoke with the victim who
resides at the apartment with her young children. The victim


advised that she secured all windows and doors when she left
her apartment with the children yesterday afternoon. When
she returned today, she found her sliding glass door unlocked
and the listed property items stolen. A (TV, VCR, Computer,
and ETC.) The victim told the police officer that no one has
access to her apartment other than herself and the kids.
However, there appeared to be signs of forced entry. HQ dis-
patched an E. T. to process the scene. The police officer con-
ducted a neighborhood canvass but did not obtain additional
information.The victim was given a case, information card.
Case suspended, unless further suspect information become
available.


Admission Of A Black Lawyer



To The U.S. Supreme Court


Samuel Lowery was
born December 9, 1832 in
Nashville, Tennessee. His
father was Elder Peter
Lowery, a slave, who pur-
chased the freedom of
himself, his mother, three
brothers, two sisters and a
nephew, and became the
first Black pastor of a
church in the South,
preaching in Nashville
from 1849 to 1866.
His mother. Ruth
Mitchell was a free
woman who added the
pecuniary results of her,
energy to the funds Peter
had accumulated for the
purchase of his freedom.
The amount, $1,000..
At the age of twelve he
was placed at Franklin
College, Tennessee where,


in spite of his color, com-
manded respect of the fac-
ulty and pupils. At the
close of the war he began
reading law, and was the
first man of color ever
admitted to the Supreme
Court ofTennessee and the
Courts of Northern.
Alabama.
In 1878, Mr. Lowery
was in Washington, D. C,
on the afternoon of
February 2, where he was
one of a group of persons.
A motion had been made
before Chief Justice Waite,
that the Hon. Joel Parker,
twice Governor of New
Jersey, be admitted to the
Bar of the Court.
Mrs. Belva Lockwood,
who was admitted to prac-
tice before that court by


Judicial Achievements in Florida

Judge Marva L. Crenshaw; 13th Judicial Circuit Judge, 2000,
appointed by Governor Jeb Bush. First African-American
woman to serve as Circuit Court judge for the 13th Judicial
Circuit Court.

Melvia Green, Dade County Circuit Judge, 1989. First African
American woman circuit judge.

Judge Hubert L. Grimes, Seventh Judicial Circuit Judge, 1999,
appointed by Governor Jeb Bush. First African-American to
serve as circuit court judge for the seventh circuit.

Joseph W. Hatchett, Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals, 11th Circuit,
appointed by President Jimmy Carter. First African American
since Reconstruction to serve on Florida's Supreme Court '(1975
- 79). First African American elected to remain on the court: first
African American elected to public office in a statewide election
in the South.

James E. C. Perry, 18th Judicial Circuit Court Judge, 2000,
appointed by Governor Jeb Bush. First African-American ever
appointed to the 18th Circuit Court bench.

Leander J. Shaw, Jr., appointed to Florida Supreme Court in
1983, retained by statewide vote. First African American judge
to become Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, for a two-year
term (1990 92).

Lawson E. Thomas, Judge, Miami Police Court, 1950. First
African American judge in the south since Reconstruction.

Peggy Ann Quince, Justice, Florida Supreme Court, 1998. First
African-American woman appointed to the Florida Supreme
Court, appointed by Governor Jeb Bush and the late Governor
Lawton Chiles. Quince was also the first African-American
female to be appointed to one of the district courts of appeal in
1993 by Governor Lawton Chiles to the Second District Court of
Appeal.

Leah Aleice Simms, Dade County Judge. First African
American woman judge in Florida, appointed by Governor Bob
Graham in 1981.

Judge Sandra Edwards-Stephens, 5th Judicial Circuit Court
judge, 2000, appointed by Governor Jeb Bush. First African-
American ever appointed to the 5th Circuit Court bench.

Thomas E. Stringer, Sr., Second District Court of Appeal Judge,
1999, appointed to the Second District Court of Appeals by
Governor Jeb Bush. First African-American graduate of the
Stetson University College of Law in 1974.

Judge Joyce H. Williams, Escambia County Court Judge, 2005,
appointed by Governor Jeb Bush. First African American woman
to serve as a County Court judge in the 1st Judicial Court.

Karla Foreman Wright, Polk County Court Judge, 2000,
appointed by Governor Jeb Bush First African American woman
to serve on the Polk County bench.


special Act of the last
Congress, rose immediate-
ly and moved the admis-
sion of a lawyer from


Alabama, who, she testi-
fied upon honor, pos-
sessed the necessary qual-
ifications for practice
before the Supreme Court
of the United States. The
lawyer whose admission
she moved rose, and
proved to be Samuel
Lowery.
Mr. Parker and Mr.
Lowery then stepped for-
ward to the clerk's desk,
placed their hands upon
the same Bible and were
sworn in together, stand-
ing very near to the niche
where the bust of Chief
Justice Taney, the author
of the Dred Scott decision
was placed.


Tara 's Bail

247 Bonds
Service
931 North Liberty Street Jacksonville, Florida 32206

S 356-TARA

(8272)





REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.
FAMILY PRA CTICE
3160 Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32209


WE PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR:
*Hypertension
*Diabetes
*Elevated Chlesterol
*Obesity and Weight Management
*Women's Health
PChildcare and Immunlz-atios
*Preventive Care -- I .
*Inipotence and erectiieDysfunction ./"

Dr. Reginald S.'iea.veKi Ait's .plo-Tnvya Hollinger
,. to the r qlice.
NO W A IC I OPTING
N EW P'lAT7Ef" N T S
fle invite you to wei i, 'as your provider
of choice ftrWietItilcare needs.
TO SCHEDULE AN "PRIINTMENT CALL
76$'8'22
FAX: 90-1482-0373
\E ACCEPT ALL M.AOR HEALTH PLANS
HMIOs, PPOs, NIEDICARE, And MEDICAID
3160 Edgewood A enueeJackso nville, FL ~32209
OFFICE HOURS:


M-F 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M.


&i





-.u ft


payi but v



C'-l


I


Wed. 2P. M. TO, P.M.


FLORIDA LOTTO WINNING NUMBERS
03-17-19-28-33-48 Saturday, February 12 RPLLOVER!!


WANT
CUSTOMERS?


ADVERTISE IN
THE FLORIDA
STAR!


TO PLACE
YOUR AD
CALL US
TODAY
AT
904/766-8834


I ., I


,i --


i


FEBRUARY26, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


)
'
-, -L~
''' ;f ~..,


I
II
1 :I


N, T,, e sz- N o c e N,, Hai,-, szalc




























Students and others from Wisconsin and Minnesota pose at Jacksonville Beach. They were in town
recently to learn how to start abstinence clubs in schools and youth organizations with the help of Project
S.O.S. (Strengthening Our Students).


National Abstinence Club


Training Held In Jacksonville


Participants from as far a\\ a, as Wisconsin and
lMinnesota came to Jacksonlille Beach to learn ho\\ to
start abstinence clubs in schools and youth organizations.
The. got their inspiration and guidance from the largest
abstinence organization in the state of Florida. Project
S.().S. (Strengthening Our Students i.
Attendees of the conference \\ent back to their
schools and South organizations kno\\ing ho\w to
empower south to be leaders in the field of abstinence
from sex. drugs, alcohol, suicide. violencee and eating
disorders.
Project S.O.S. is the largest abstinence pro\ ider in th'e
state of Florida and one of the most successful in the
nation in teaching teens ho\\ to make and keep a commit-
ment to abstain from sex. drugs, alcohol, suicide and \ io-
lence.
Reaching o\er 23.000 teenagers and their parents
each school year, the organization has reduced teen birth
rates and STD's in all of the follo\\ing counties:
Bradford, Du\al. Clay. Flagler. Nassau and St. Johns.
Project S.O.S. has been holding abstinence clubs in
middle and high schools throughout Northcast Florida
for the past six ears. Recent evaluations sho\\ that o\er
'0"o of the teens mentored in SOS lMentorinn Clubs sa\
the\ hale enough refusal skills to a\oid all risk beha\-
iors. Another 75'-', sa\ the\ are committed to abstinence.


ProJect S.(O.S. Club Nlentors are recent college
graduates that serxc as rolle models and heroes for a
media generation that is lacking in role models. One
of the full-time mentors is JohnnN Llo\d. former
pitcher with the California Angels, \\ho is a club
mentor working with o\er 1.000 males in schools.
Another club mentor is Latisha Perr % \ho played col-
legiate basketball at the University of Cincinnati and
the Liniversity of North Florida and is mentoring over
1.)00 females.
Club mentors help their members become profi-
cient in the follow~ ing skills:
Setting goals and staving focused on them
Avoiding unhealthy relationships that could
lead to abuse or rape
Using refusal skills elfecti\ elO
Setting boundaries
Communicating with parents
Discerning media messages
Some writtenn commilents from attendees said.
"(0\erall. absolutely \\ wonderful conference ... worth
e\er~ penny. Your team is awesomee" "I'le been to
local, state and national conferences for o\ er 20 ears
in mI field and this \\as one of the \ern best I' e
attended. You made me feel like it \\as all about me!"
"I \want to be just like e\ er member of Project SOS "


VOL. 11 NO. 1
Published Weekly
By The Florida Star

February 19, 2005


I.


INSIDE:

TO P OF THE CHARTS................................................................................................. B-5C
CO M ICS........................................................................................................................ B-5C


I -




Page B-5A/February 26, 2005
Aunrcan Tone
Want To Go
Dow. To SBu .ns

: ;- .---H ^ l: -

Twis Say 'Bng Happy'
Is Thn A m can Dram
"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"




B-5B/FEBRUAKT ~r o,


W mA P


4


1Chao" &&I pI
?( 4 r


It


~

~~c~cc
r


iA A -


9
U'.,


I
I-
'I.
I


opyrig hted Material

Syndicated Content !
romI ImCo News.Prov' *
rom Commercial News. Providers"

XdEW3IU741 117-- --


-a tf u, -


1~


r


~- .9


4ua


m ~~i'~


U


92


-o--


4 1 -


O J f &t


I


- ~. ~-.
,U **

-E
-4

.4

Ut
4
.4

I a. a. -


,---~-----~-------- -


1~

rW: ai~u~olr ~1


R A


L J1I
sY


i;;s

r





-.,-oircrbKUARY 26, 2005


SChart Busters by Allan Ornstein

TOP SINGLES
1. "Let Me Love You" Mario
S "Candy Shop" 50 Cent Featuring Olivia
3. "Boulevard Of Broken Dreams" Green Day
4. "1, 2 Step" Ciara Featuring Missy Elliott
5. "How We Do" The Game Featuring 50 Cent
6. "Disco Inferno" 50 Cent
7. "Lovers And Friends" Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz
Featuring Usher & Ludacris
8. "Soldier" Destiny's Child Featuring T.I. & Lil Wayne
9. "Since U Been Gone" Kelly Clarkson
1' "Rich Girl" Gwen Stefani Featuring Eve
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. Bless The Broken Road, Rascal Flatts
2. You're My Better Half, Keith Urban
3. Mud On The Tires, Brad Paisley
4. Nothin' To Lose, Josh Gracin
5. Monday Morning Church, Alan Jackson
6. Nothin 'Bout Love Makes Sense, LeAnn Rimes
7. That's What I Love About Sunday, Craig Morgan
8. Baby Girl, Sugarland
94 e Gets That From Me, Reba McEntire
10. Let Them Be Little, Billy Dean

TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Silence 2004" Delerium Featuring Sarah McLachlan
(Nettwerk)2. "The Wonder of It All
(Escape/Gomi/Trendroid/I. Pavlin/O. Nissim Mixes)"
Kristine W. (Tommy Boy Silver Label)
3. "Without Love" Sun (JH)
4. "My, My, My" Armand Van Helden (Southern Fried
Tommy Boy Silver Label)
5. "Vertigo (Jacknife Lee Mixes)" U2 (Interscope)
6. "Killer 2005 (P. Rauhofer/Morel/DJ Monk/J. Albert
Mixes)" Seal (Warner Bros.) New Entry
7. "Copacabana (Remixes)" Barry Manilow (Concord)
8. "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy? (Remixes)" Rod Stewart
(Warner Bros.)
9. "Feel You" Alyson (alysongrooves.com)
10. "Lose My Breath (P. Rauhofer/P. Johnson/M. Joshua
gMixes)" Destiny's Child (Columbia)
"* e- *


"Copyri


Syndi


Available from Co


WOULD YOU LIKE
TO APPEAR IN PREP RAP?
FOR INFORMATION
CALL (904) 766-8834
W- .. '


Gas-
-I -. -- ~-


*


ghted Material


cated.Content :


mmercial News Pro


0* SO SOS
0 0


0 0 0






i'iders"


0
@5@~ *
0 5








DAC1t' fl~7 F! L)R I 011Ar F1?RR1 2005 ZIU


Black Newspapers...The First


In America...The First In Jacksonville


Frederick Douglass was
born around 1817 and even
though he was reared as a
slave, he secretly taught
himself how to read and
write.
In 1845, he published an
autobiography and visited
England for about two years.
When he returned, he estab-
lished the first newspaper for
African Americans --The
North Star, but afterwards
changed the name to
Frederick Douglass's Paper
in Rochester, New York.
Through his paper, he
advocated the use of African
American (colored) troops
and the emancipation of the
slaves in the South. When
such was granted, in 1863,
he discontinued the publica-
tion of his paper and dedicat-
ed himself to lecturing. In
1870 he moved to
Washington, D. C. and
became the editor of the
New National Era.
We don't have the dates
of the first black newspapers
in Jacksonville but we are
aware of The Florida
Sentinel, which was estab-
lished by C. Blythe
Andrews, It was also noted
that General Dennis Taylor
of the Knights of Pythias,
had financial interest in the
paper so his son, Porcher L.
Taylor, born in Jacksonville
in 1902 worked for The
Florida Sentinel.
In 1930, Porcher Taylor
followed his dream and pur-
chased the Afro printing


plant and established a plant
Taylor & Son Printing
Company on Broad Street
and in 1934, The Florida
Tattler, a tabloid, was born.
The paper sold for two cents
and did very well.
It was Mr. Taylor's
desire to be independent so
that he could have the ability
to expose and without fear,
print the truth about the
problems perpetrated against


Blacks in Jacksonville.
Using the tabloid format of
gossip type news, he was
able to attract more readers
to the paper who would, after
getting the paper, focus on
the more important issues.
The Florida Tattler sur-
vived for about thirty years,
fighting for the rights of
African Americans in
Jacksonville and the sur-
rounding area.


:.'V *"'~ '.*








_rl
C.-,_




K'Iti I

~~~ '' ,Ue~'t...: ..C1 flU,..,.,I.'O ', 1rR il ii






ir"/


The Fla. Tattler 2
*ltn Tisttler to publlush wde lt, ad la e tlng or ro per wpy.
Vol. I JacksonviUe, Fla. Saturday, Dec. 1, 1934 No, 1

Florida Negro Secret Orders: ailing
S* ue aK those raoaT Tt* g a sre
Dr. S P .Livingston Dies TMt be Rs O-
tared that will u&e us to Ae that
ecret orga-ilstfonB so tar haas bzn
ProminentlPhysician Negro Secret Organ- a oattr l-mt fo h o
and Churchman izations in lorida O o e a, cty.: mplmt e
Dies Se mayay that thaor le in&ftt.
O Secret argwiiattoms WaVe done and other cbtlclami!,oH<;rbl. hut we
more for the Negro thn any other cannot be honet to outrctver and
Dr, -mart' Pope fivngston was means Ot holding NM6g'oe together, to the men ot by-gone ay. if we
hbor t at 'an a Florida some 42 other than the.Christan churches fall to lgive.o r-it to them ot prt-
yeor act a The public buUditga of Jackton- paring plAces where we can congre-
lie attended e.any Medical Coa. vile and lorida owned by oUr aoup gate o our own, s mettng *ltph n.
lHe a, ih'l1e, Tenn,, wh re he e- were built by secret orgenlzatons, and p;nr:...: op-boiratory to our
SvIV hImxis n deg wie ~l hig h The"s organ~ad forcea h ave rtray- own a ,U.. n' bu.lldinge that
heiovrtd hir M. L. gte mov to e" d way fr0om the reqgtreentoD aind wml ever t$antt asa m monument t
clksonvle, lre d, Uiltrt ne' oe gur at they rarted out with. tho e whob hav lon lat ago to
yea"go.1 Helping the nicvk and distressed. the Gr*Ut y4-. I
Hye ws. admitted o p rat &e mdl. huryl Ute dead, aid rviny a spoc 8 Ine in the tte oa Flrida. i t attetl to the dow aBd wa0dw Bno O f me, ,n-gt a elat9O nmm to
.first big job was n the capacity am phan. think iMey s 4a lw, and that
CXty Physician of th city for 11 Poitilc have crept Into the ranlai th ey .oia -. do a d ot as they
yearans nd itth* time he was opbr brotherly love has vlnhed, tb seo' fit, lmnt tt re is a reckoning da
rting the Davis ltustimDrl BtWore, nw pancpl c thrown aside, too ahead. wikowvr ad saphane ore ant-
Wte pretce and oeltiO rn WtO much f.vo m ect witrhot r n rtai, eoan i -most be dunw .
outstanding that he eigleed the merilt and to ftct with eontlnuationn SAT T=Vi 5 ATIWArTON8.
City tyalsanl' pa t and ifcoslptsd .f rtaid t eatie will be conldered
the poKition s Medxcalis r ector Of a 1 raket" with the publl 1P 17t wpm c dr 1j"u God
the AroAmean Lfe Insurance If t sOcret organMlmatio o Expect to 3ml C .--:3 ArY=tiy at
Co ie aervd in this capacity tintl live anong our groip, they will e T,.LA
i health began falling He ably cOmpelled it bask to the bsg-i Mder Js a seph and ieter s-
fld the A ro-Amrlneb aigt -_d op.at. on the a.me pOitt- te W -IBS .-a --d e.con,. e and
cflredibly for 10 year, at that tm they were floEed. No sane reary of the aboveC lrd
a bot of r e tng y .people ware Mta.e grOp of oen nor .women onea e5chureh at Owanve and Brod RlS'..
happy byoat hif t ent work and a pct a bi buitne to succeed with were r.vw .re1an from 3 Jackon
happy tby efftcet wor ~ a hed of no bullets etxperlieno. ville to ume ...,m'r The meeting
vicAfter resigning this po t he organlzatlonz who are holditn lasted etigt dovA. at.tndance over
went to locheste r,im, aiee theulvee togetu, arts the o 1,000, money re:ee4 g0o1aS. which
.ed .the ayBros.Hoplfor.. over wboas heads arer doing' erything will be ugd a toUows: One-third
aead tlhe ryo Bro. home and or possible to keep those whom they to blehope' alar: one-thtrd exteneen
.we tey He re ume hoto.e and W h*a blbtenes, with satedatd, and of meetlnt onee tlrd lirto to "gn-
we taken care of bty hvis esteamedauring aL, that their intrtset a etral church treasury. Meeting closed
wife, Ms. ertNu lAvinzlt bei n cared for properly. Any otBh last aBdaty n-ight and mnot wucese-
The City of aFlorida has lost a& e means of operation will come-what ful sver held. Next Assembly le
iend. a generous man, smdt te t o itl to happen to some o our MiamI l st week in Jnnuary.
Chrilatle, He did not know thet IVrd bi'g seret organixft .5 ?
,no" when called upofurt fvooofTh despwlon has siqed a lteo k iahop A. Mulle ao *th Panic-
"eo" wreo e a on aof M llg by thd young, it Is said, ot; l et sttd ehureb of Lo will
SDrf.Avington at one t.waM atreifdous f g off of the onoduct their annual Assembly De-
'the backbone of the People's indl- old. nt w nincanily able to keep up
the bnurKnc of the0 Pepre '*a ha their obligationa, but why the Wap ember -14 on E6as tUnion street.
Ivetled over ae o. 0 re a of thiausa who wears e bl t eo.n- nar r Foida Avre Al .saints Usked
On Monday lnght. NoSwbe 0r t ugtter.-n-taw. Mres ,mar LI. to attend and man meeting a sun
he passed away at hbl home, 00 aton, Jr., and other relative pand a e". Elder H. W, Cowsn ruling
Stawart street Wh hS e t toi hf osrowein friends ha ftru eldr, Mother P. A. wIlam, State
ard family at Mhi bed d1. Beral will take plres rday. NXO=t Mtef.
SHe leaves to mBotr la 1tit h r a s, e R0 p. bt. eaio lA t. M.
*~rS Wife one* m nt' t JM as on u.lMta, Somi eT T lit ta BlRE'AD TRE TAT tlRI
*agyter, Ma. Thtlma Roset, onil j a orti W an etact at i *
Pstroniee 6W Advoastr t m. rwment2. a PItro f' oWr Advrtisems


Real PeopleRealAdvic


Ask Deanna! Is an advice column
approach to reality-based subjects!


known for its fearless


Dear Deanna:
I met a woman who feels that since I asked her out for a date
then I'm supposed to pay for dinner. I took it upon myself to
suggest we each pay for our own meal and take it from there.
She canceled the date and doesn't want to see me. She made it
worse by calling me cheap. How should this work?
Robert P. Las Vegas, NV


Dear Robert:
A man that doesn't want to spend his money should be respected just like the fool that
wines and dines just to get laid. Women need to learn that some men view money-spending
dates as an investment. It's the man's choice if he wants to spend his money and the woman's
choice if she wants to spend hers. You should discuss these things during the "getting to
know you" process. You can certainly separate women's lib when it comes to a woman pay-
ing for a.date or changing her own flat tire! Find another date and keep it moving.

Dear Deanna!
I'm a 24-year-'old black man on the down low for two years now. There are many under
cover males that see this as sex instead of a gay thing. Some men I talk to have families.
Young kids are doing it now thanks to phone lines and the internet. If this keeps up, HIV will
be worse than in Africa because believe it or not, down low brothers is worldwide. Don't you
thinkk so?
Down Low Brother Toledo, OH

Dear DL Brother:
You're honest in admitting your down low lifestyle. This is wrong because women don't
reserve the betrayal and sexual risks. You and other down low brothers are simply bi-sexu-
al if you're romancing men and women. HIV is already out of control and can only decrease
i the co\ ard \, selfish and greedy down low brothers keep it real and stop hiding in the clos-
e and putting women at risk.,

Dear Deanna!
Whenever times are bad and I have no one to talk to, how do I get comfort from the
Bi le? I hear people say turn to the Word and read scripture but it doesn't help me. I read but
do 't feel anything and never see anything happen. How can I get solutions from the Bible
if feel this way?
herri Jacksonville, FL

ear Sherri:
Yo earthly vessel is empty. You need to fill your heart with God's Word, your mind with
Fait and open your soul to the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. Then as you pray and read the
Bibl you'll hear the voice of God and recognize His presence as He orders your steps. If
/ou' still in doubt, John Chapter 3 Verse 16 should give you a boost as you realize that God
;acri ced his only Son for you, me and others.

frit Ask Deanna! Email: askdeannal@yahpo.com or Deanna M, 264 S. La Cgenega, Suite
i''3 Beverly Hlts, CA 90211. Visit her WeA site at www.askdeanna.com.


F.On )R A .CTAR


FEBRUARY26.2005nn


DAC R-7







JAIqJIQ- JL?-U .. ... 2


,i "


P U B L I X


C E L E B R A T E S


HI S T O R Y


my recipe for living, my history.


Thelma Grundy
Chef, Restaurateur, Symbol of Strength
Thelma's Kitchen I Atlanta, GA
Main Ingredient: Compassion


Thelma Grundi's desire to serve didn't start
with dishing up plates of her down-home
Southern cooking to politicians, celebrities
and "jusr regular folks"; bur instead as a
practical nurse. After realizing she could
Stake care of people and fulfill her love
of cooking. lIiss Thelma opened her
first restaurant. More than 25 years later,
she is still warming hearts and nourishing souls.
And noStiust \-ith her food.


.




- "'_
,='


*f ,
" "'--i


'. .
.., -


A-.


Publix. .
WHERE SHOVP-Ph bSiA P FAI SURE

www.pu~blix.com
-:>')()5 I'r Pulixi Asct N'1i fa~acnli' I tc,


I


\\


i


FEBRUARY26, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


PDAGF R


li-


ft


r..:
1!~


LC;~L

f










IPA GE B-9I~v~U1 ll


EMPLOYMENT

FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at
FCCJ. E.O.E.
Cargo Specialist
Add the Army Reserve to your life,
and receive extra pay and excel-
lent benefits, Age 18-34. Train near
home in Over 120 specialties to
choose from. And earn up to
$22,000 for college. For an experi-
ence of a lifetime, call Sgt. 1st
Class Sebastian (904) 771-8670
U.S. Army Reserve.
SALES POSITIONS
The Florida Star
904-766-8834

Seeking AD Sales Rep
for teen Web site and news-
paper. Work from home.
Excellent commission.
904-880-5059.

INVITATION TO NEGOTIATE
The First Coast Workforce
Development, Inc., (DBA
Worksource), has released an
Invitation to Negotiate to provide
Youth Services for July 1, 2005
through June 30, 2006 with an
option for renewal for 4 addition-
al years.
A copy of this request is
available at:
http://w.orksourcefl.com/busi-
nesses/youthservices.pdf
or at 2141 Loch Rane Blvd.,
Suite 107, Orange Park, FL
32073. For additional informa-
tion contact: D. Nevision
904/213-3800 x2010. DEAD-
LINE TO SUBMIT 2:00 PM
(EST) 4/1/05.

SENIOR HOUSING
Unfurnished Studio
Apartments Available
utilities included.
Call: 904-353-6111 L[

Rooms for Rent
Adults preferred
Nice clean quiet area
Cal: Mike or Cynt
722-3830
Advertised
Place your ad in the
Florida Star
Call: 904-766-8834

Want to purchase minerals and
other oillgas interests
Send.details to:..
PO. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201


I SERVICES


Aluminum Awning


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764






THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852





Lowest Prices in Town
Guaranteed
JULIUS BACON
(904) 766-0240
Fast Checks Fast Funds
Electronic Bookkeeping* Notary
4932-2 Moncrief Road West
(At Richardson Road)

Bid Announcement
ATTENTION ALL INTERESTED'
CONSTRUCTION CONTRAC-
TORS AND SUB CONTRACTORS
The Brentwood Park Apartment
Associates, Ltd. clo the
Jacksonville Housing Authority has
advertised the bid for the construc-
tion of Brentwood Park Apartments.
The project is for the physical site
improvements for infrastructure
and utilities. Bid specifications are
now available to interested con-
tractors and subcontractors. If you
would like more information regard-
ing these,.construction projects
please call 904-366-3456



IMPACT

WCGL AM 1360


THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
SATURDAYS @ 6:30 P.M.


Announcements

CENTRALFI.ORIDA'SBIHEAD,.JEWEILRYANDART EX-
TRAVAGANZA Findbeadsjewelry,art, andelasses.March 5th
and 6th. Volusin County Fairgrounds, Exit 114 off of 1-4.

11th. 1 h,.andl ..1.. ll 4.00l 1.00 lloff *, .
1 th, 12th, and 13th. $4.00- $1.00 off with ad.


Auctions


17 CABINSNEARPIGEON EORGE,TN.selling at Auction
March 12,10:30 a.m. Guaranteed financing available with 25%,
down. Fum)w AuctiouCo (800)4FURROW;

AIBSOLUTEAUCTION! Lakefront Real Estate237 NELakeview
Dr. Sebring,FL 1 IAM. Sat Mar 12.2 spacious homes 2 lakefront
homesites Directly on Lake Jackson. Call for details: (800)257-
4161 Higgenbothaam Auctioneers www.higgcnbotham coin
ME Higgenbothain,CAI FLLic#AU305/A 1358.


Building Materials


METALROOFINGSAVE$$$ BuyDirectFrom Manufacturer.,
20 colors iin stock with all Accessories. Quick tur around!
Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335,

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn S8()/day? 30 Ma-
cl., I .. Ci.uJ \iI I.. '* i'"i ~11 ~ e 14-6323BO2000033.
CALL US: We will note undersold!

.ln riu li.Id ilkt Illd ill tour pitunl jll. dill]j injom: DD.,
justaclickaway. www.startuppower.ceom
211 \tndiing I.Jl hinks .ii. v. .., L.. ..., (L il
Toll Free (800)261-9001.

THOUSANDSOFBUSINESSES ForSaleByOwnes Nation-
wide. Preview Business for free! Interested In Buying or Selling
A Business Call: GW Merger (877)21,7-8231 or visit

#1 CASH COW 90 Vending Machine Hd. You approve Loc's-
$10,670 (800)836-3464 #B02428.

An Incredible Opportunity. FREE 20 minute evaluation.
www sl;rtuppower comr Savetime and money -VisitToday!

Financial

FUNDSFORYOU www cwfnidingservices cornCash advance'
for pending lawsuits, structured payments, seller held
mortgage notes, we purchase receivables. More on website or
call Cindy (813)885-1501.

For Sale

CHURCH FIURNITURE. Does yourchurch needpews. pulpit
set, baptistery, steeple. windows, carpet? Big Sale on new
cushioned pews and cushions 'or hard pews. (800)231-8360.


Help Wanted


Drlver.COVENANTTRANSPORT,.Excellent Pay& Bcncl
for Experienced Drivers, 0/0. Solos,Temis & Gtraduate
Students. Bonuses Paid Weekly. Eqtull Opportunity Enploye
(888)MORErPAY(888-667-3729).


lorldu I.,ieensed Physical Theraplst AND Physical Therapist
Assistant wanted in Rural Hospital in North Florida Call
(850)973-2271 or Fax Resume to (850)973-8158.


WESTERN NCMOUNTAINS North Carollia Wherethercis:
Cool Moiulnin Air, Views &Streamt.Homes,Cubins & Acreage.
CALL FORFREEBROCHUREOFMOUNTAINPROPERTY
its SALES. (800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy 317 Pacalitlre St.
Murphy. N.C. 28906. www rcaltvofinurphy comn.


I* BUINES NETORK


I *0000000* *
0
*6
0
*0
0
0
*0
*0
*0
0
**0 ****


N *- ..inuPF. 1-S1N ii~~h~~~rriien ~ -aorea~p' -8tF~1


ROri 'I* :I''II I a lj


WANTED)PAIDPARTICIPANTSEARN$400-$1 150/WEEK,
GUARANTEED!Medical research studieson new products. Our
r..n..,c iis... N, M .. .1 -.rk involved. Easy
,,,.,,'...,,.,, .> i.,,,. C I :l l .ii.(800)689-2076

STARTNOW! PaidTraining $12.50/hr+bosnus!$25-$4k yr!
Portrait Fund-nrising for Volunteer Emnergency Services. Mgt
Opt! Local Area! Auto Required! (2(H))644-2822 Ext 137.

$1500WI EKIYGUARANTEEDNOWAC CEPT1NG APPIJ-
CATIONS$50CASHHIRING BONUSGUARANI'IEDIN
WRITING (888)318-1638Ext 107www USMailingGmrp.com,

UPTO$4,000 WEEKLY!! Exciting Weekly Paycheck! Written
Guarantee! It Year Nationwide Company Now HIiring! Easy
Work. Sending Out Our Simple One Page Brochure! Free Post-
age.Supplies!AwesomeBonuses!!FREEINFORMATION,CALL
NOW!! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.

DELIVERTRAVELTRAILERSFORPAY!T housandsof30ft
travel Itrilers originating from Florida cities. We need pickup
truck owners to deliver. www.h0rizontransport.conm.

DI)vers-OwnerOps &Co. Drivers NeededNowl Rutn SE Only
orSE.MidAtll,MWRegional,O/O's-No Forced Dispatch,G(ood
Pay plus Fuel (866)250-4292.

Hunting

ARGENTINA,WINGSHOOTING andSigGame Hunting:The
Best Bang for the S anywhere in the world. Winter season:
April-August, 2005, Weekdays: (314)209-9800;
Evenings: (314)894-3776.

HUNTELK, WILD BOAR, RedStag andBuffaloin iMissouri
until 3131/05. Guaranteed Hunting License, Only $5.00. Our
policyNO Oae, NOPay,ReasonableRutes,
Call (314)293-0610.

Legal Services

DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS childrcn.etc.Onlyonesigna-
ture required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays (800)462-
2000. ext.600. (8im-7pm) Divorce Tech. Established 1977.

ACCIDENTVICTIM,INJURED,HURT,DISABLED?Weare
hieretolhdpanyACCIDENTS ivolvingINJURYorLOSSOF
LIFE.AAAATTORNEYREFERRALSERVICE
(8H0)733-5342CAILL24hr.PROTECT' YOURRIG(;IHS.


Miscellaneous


FREE4-ROOM )IRECTVSYSTEM includesstandardinstal-
lation.2MONTHS FREEHBO& Cinemax! Accesstoover225
channels! limited time offer, S&H. Restrictions Apply.
(866)500-4056.


Real Estate


BEAUTIFULNORTHCAROLNA.WINTERSEASONISIERE!
MUSTSEETHEBEAUT[FULPEACEFOLMOUNTAINSOF
WESTERN NCMOUNTAINS. Homes.Cabins,Acreage& Invcst-
ments. Chlerokc Mountati ReallyGMAC Real Estate. Murphy
cherokeenumotui5inteltv.cbm Call forFrec Brochure
(800)841-5868, -.


KENTUCKY 50-1)00 acres. Incredible trophy deer & turkey
huIling. Somu wi/lukes. creeks. rivers, ponds. & timber. Great
reieatllinvesiment. New survey, starting $795 per acre. Owner
will finance. (270)791-2538 m xwtacmioliufitl.sCom.n


To place an ad:


CAII: (904) 766-8834


FAX: (904) 765-1673


... 0@


0-



0


ii


PREMI HER FFO
0E P.CVSe~rdVELLE


NEWL1OG HOMESHI1ELW.L99.900.Beautiful log home shell
nestled on private wooded lot off Parkway north of Boone.
Won't last! 1st time offered. (800)455-1981, x125.

WNEDORENTALS!SOUTHERNVERMONTSRENTALCEN-
TER.MOINTSNOWWESTDOVER,VERMONT.B1YWBEK/
WEF.KFNIMOnNIORSEASON!INCL.UI ESRBEA'nONAl/
CULUZRAI ACI'I [ 'IES.WE OIlTFERIHILLSIDECONDOS.
,TOWNHOUSES.CA3LE'S,(LAROGESMALLHOMES.)MOUN-
TAINRrFSORTRENTAI.S,P.O.BOX 804,WESTDOVER.VER-
MONT 05356. wWvw tounmtainresortrentals com. e-mail:
rentveni@sovertet. (888)336-1445, (802-464-1445).

N.C. MOUNTAINS: 2.3 acres with new log cabin shell in se-
1,JdLk 1j L. n ~. 'ol ... .,, I I. Illblh b= ,1 11i ,l .lhlng lilL.Ull
.11 1 '.I.. r' ll ,1 I,, ,,, JII.ll.lL I :." -_i 6l
Golf View Home $249,900. Spectacularnew Carolina moun-
tain home at 18 hole course near Ashville, NC. Enjoy mild
climate, greal golf. low taxes, low cost ofliving! Call toll-free
(866)334-3253 x790 www cherokeevallev.coin

N.C. WAT'ERFRONT $39,900. Coming soon on All-sports
Lake. Boat, fish & swim. Will sell fast! Call MLC to get on the
priority list today! (866)920-5263,

ASHEVILLE,NC AREA. SpectacularMountain view&River
honesites. Paved roads. clubhouse & more. NEW RELEASE!
Homesites fron $49,900. Bear River Community Call Now
(866)41t1-5263.

LAKE VIEW BARGAIN$29,900. Freehoatlsip! High eleva-
tion beautifully wooded parcel. Across from national forest on
35,000 acre recreational lake in TN. Paved roads, u/g utils,
central water, sewer, 'more. Excellent financing. Call now
(800)704-3154. ext. 608. Sunset Bay. LLC.

FORECLOSE I) GOV'T HOMES $OorLowdown!Tax opos
and bankruptcies! No Credit O.K. SO to low down. For listings
(800)501-1777 ext. 1299.

RVs/Campers

GIANT RV- SELLOFF- #1 Selling RV's- Remaining 2004
Models...low Selloff Prices- Florida's Motorhone- Towable
Headquarters- Giant Recreation World, Melbourne- (800)700-
1021. Daylona- (800)893-2552. Orlando- (800)654-8475.

Steel Buildings

BUILDING SALEI "Rock Bottom Prices!" Last-chance. Beat
Next Price Increase. Go direct/save. 20x26. 25x30. 30x40.
35x50. 40x60. 45x90. 50x100. 60xl80. Others. Pioneer
(801)668-5422.

STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory Deals Save $$. 40x60' to
100x200'. Example: 50x 00x 12' is S3.60/sq ft. (800)658-2885
www rigidbuilding.crom

Your Ad Could Be Here

ONE (: ALlSTANDS BETWEEN YOUR BUSINESS andmil-
lions of potential customers. Place your advertisement in the
FL Classified Advertising Network. For $450 your ad will be
placed in over 150 papers. Check out our 2x2 and 2x4 display
network too! Call this paper. or Heather Mola. FL Statewide
Network Director at (866)742-1373. or e-mail
hmnola@flpress.con for more information, (Out o State place-
icent is also available.) Visit us online at www.tlorida-
classifieds.coin.



FCAN


,Week of February 21, 2005,


- - -


Thank you for reading

THE FLORIDA STAR!






TheFloridaStar.com


IMPACT


WCGL


AM 1360












THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 6:30 P.M.
00gees0 0 0 e000e e e e 00 0 0 0 0*0e0 e0 0 0 ***
* 0
Get online @:


" 0i
O O Of O R R


k


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITYIPLUS PIP
L------ ---------------- -------


FHA/VA MORTGAGE HOLDERS
Streamline Refinance No Employment Verification
Reduce Interest Rate No Appraisal
Reduce Payments No Out-of-Pocket Costs
No Credit Check No Asset Verification

Call (561) 995-1418 to see ifyou qualify

Homestead Funding Corp.
621 N. W. 53rd St., Suite 240
Boca Raton, FL 33487
Licensed Mortgage Lender
New York Florida




CASH NOW

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMEn
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUT


(800) 794-7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH
for Structured Settlements!





2x2 Rates 2x4 Rates
Statewide $1200 Statewide $2400
Regional or national Regional placement
Placement also available, also available
Regions: North, South, Central Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million Circulation: 2.2 Million


AUTO INSURANCE


II liJ


- - I I I -


_1__ _


FEBRUARY26.2005n


171F)nftn A RTAR


I
I


I


IRM Interstate Realty Management Co.

Convenience 2&3 Bedroom Apartments
*Walking distance to schools *A/C and heating
*Easy access to public transportation *Spacious bedrooms
*Many churches and other house of *Appliances provided
worship

Visit us today!!! Without a doubt you will see why our
residents are moving into our community!!
*Affordable rents *24 hour maintenance
*Community Activities and planned *New Playground facility
outings *Newly renovated and painted
*On site laundry facilities

Employment Opportunities are always available for:
Manager and Maintenance Positions
Fax resume to 904-766-3239
or Email Resume to: paltmterl @bellsouth.net









REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Competitive sealed proposals will be received by the St. Johns River Water
Management District, at 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 32177, until 2:00 p.m.,
Thursday, March 24, 2005 and publicly opened at that time for:
PROPOSAL NO. SI355RA
INSTALLATION OF A REDUNDANT RADIO TELEMETRY SYSTEM
The Governing Board of the District is inviting sealed Proposals to provide for the pur-
chase of equipment and installation of a complete, two-way, self-contained redundant
radio telemetry system. Provide for'the storage and access of data from an offsite,
protected facility that will not be affected by. hurricane conditions experienced in
Florida. The estimated budget for this project is $200,000.00. The contract may be
renewed for three (3) additional one (1) year terms upon Governing Board approval.
A NON-MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE IS SCHEDULED
FOR 1:00 P.M., TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2005
E-MAIL RSVP TO crozier@sjrwmd.com
NO LATER THAN MARCH 4, 2005 AT 5:00 P.M.
MEET ATTHE DISTRICT'S PALM BAY SERVICE CENTER
525 Community College Parkway, SE, Palm Bay, Florida 32909
DIRECTIONS: 1-95 south; 13 miles pass Melbourne, Exit 192. Go to second exit
for Palm Bay- Malabar Road; turn right on Malabar Road, go to first traffic light
and turn left; go to first traffic light and turn left (across from Home Depot's side
entrance). Go past the Community College on the right and Ring Power on the
left. The Palm Bay Service Center is on the left. A map is also available on the
District's web site at www.sjrwmd.com.
The pre-proposal conference is intended to provide Proposers the opportunity
to receive clarification of any requirement of this Request For Proposal.
Proposal packages may be obtained on or after February 25, 2005, by contact-
ing DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com or by calling (800) 711-1712.
Proposal packages may also be obtained from' the District by calling Connie
Rozier, Contracts Administrator, at (386) 329-4211. Proposers (hereafter
"Respondent(s)") requesting packages through the District will be charged copy-
ing and shipping/handling costs as stated at DemandStar by Onvia or as provid-
ed for in Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., whichever is less.
Proposal packages will also be available at the non-mandatory pre-proposal
conference. Attendees may purchase these packages at that time for the cost
as stated at DemandStar by Onvia. The District requests that those interested
in purchasing a package at. the pre-proposal meeting have a company or
cashier's check, made payable to the St. Johns River Water Management
District, or, if paying with cash, have the exact amount.
Proposals received after the day and time stated will not be considered and will
be returned to the Respondent unopened.
Proposals will be evaluated by a staff evaluation committee. The evaluation
committee will meet at District Headquarters at 10:00 a.m., April 6, 2005, to dis-
cuss the evaluations and finalize its short list. The Evaluation Committee may
determine that it will assist their evaluation for some or all respondents to make
an oral presentation of their qualifications and credentials. In such event the
District will schedule such presentations at the District's Headquarters on April
14, 2005. Respondents who have been selected for such presentations shall be
notified in advance of said date. After evaluations have been completed all
respondents will be notified in writing of the stafs intended recommendation to
the Governing Board at the May 10, 2005 meeting. Following approval of the
top-selected Respondent, contractual negotiations will commence with the top-
ranked firm.
" If, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate in any
activity relating to this Bid, please contact the Division of Procurement Services
at the above address or telephone number or, if hearing impaired, by calling
(386) 329-4450 (TDD), at least five (5) business days before the dates and
times specified herein.
The District reserves the right to reject any and all Proposals. The District also
reserves the right to waive any minor deviations in an otherwise valid Proposal,
and to accept the proposal that will be in the best interest of the District.


t n ~I


er.





ADAr E..- DIll fJiJ I KI tiRJK 0 W.
U I


ON DEMAND.

IT'S FREE WHENEVER YOU AE.

ONLY FROM COMCAST DIGITAL CABLE.
Not from satellite. With FREE ON DEMAND, a library of thousands of great programs start
the minute you're ready: kids' shows, music videos, sports and more.


Digital Cable subscribers, simply tune to Channel 1.


374-8000
www.comcast.com


ON DEAND programs are limited. ON DEMAND programming not available in all areas. Offer expires March 19,2005 and is limited to new residential customers located in Gomcast Cable wired and serviceable areas who have not had service in the last 30
days. Not available to current or forer Comcast customers with unpaid balances. Installation offer limited to standard installation and connection of up to three cable outlets and one digital converters Custom installation charges are additional. Additional digital
converters are available for an additional montiy charge. Some On Demand selections are subject to the charge indicated at the time of purchase, and On Demand programming is limited. DVR recording time is limited. Digital converter and remote required
and must be returned to Comcast upon termination of service. A minimum service subscription is required. HO0 and HBO On Demand are service marks of Home Box Office, Inc.


PLBK"KY ZbY L LI.)


HI lIKIlA \1IAW


Af;JR_ aW fI"


A


----Now

c.omcast
ilillpe--


,X,