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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B continued
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
February 12, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00006

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
February 12, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00006

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text









lote


Birthplace Of The
florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
SFor 54 Years"


THE


tFLORIDaA

thefloridastar.com


-------- ---~---------


-EBU -Y 2,205- EBURY18 205VL.54NO 100 ENS


Couple's Love



Couldn't End


in the Navy.
They are survived by
four children and many
family members and they
all have the same story


about the couple they
were in love, they were
inseparable then and now.
A true unending love.


Teen Robbers Held

Without Bond


Snoop Dogg drops his west coast flavor at Florida
Theatre. (PHOTO BY KELVIN PRYER)

Snoop Heats Up Concert
By DeShayla Bryant

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-"Aint no party like a
Snoop Dogg party cause a Snoop Dogg party don't
stop," screamed the crowd, repeating after Snoop at
his concert held Wednesday, Feb. 2 at the Florida
Theater.
The diverse audience at this concert was outra-
geous but few. At nearly midnight, the west coast

(See "Snoop", A-6)

EWC President Resigns;

Brunson Takes Interim Seat
JACKSONVILLE Fla.-- Amidst the tears and
:cheers, Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins, Sr. received several
standing ovations
as he gave his
farewell address to
s the Edward Waters
College family.
Over 400 students,
faculty, staff and
SJenkinso Bronson alumni' were in
attendance in
the capacity-filled Milne Auditorium. Dr. Jenkins
resigned Tuesday, February 8, 2005, citing a personal
decision to do so. Presently, Dr. Oswald P. Bronson,
President Emeritus of Bethune Cookman College has
been named interim president of dward Waters. Dr.
Bronson served as President at BCC for 29 years.
Dr. Bronson is a prominent figure among historical-
ly black colleges and universities (HBCUs). He has
been named a "key power broker for the nation's black
colleges" by Black Issues in Higher Education. While
serving as the president of Bethune-Cookman, the col-
lege doubled its enrollment to 2,700, saw its endow-
ment increase from $1.2 million to $25 million and
increased its total operating budget from $6 million to
more than $45 million.
Dr. Jenkins told the audience, "I am blessed that
God gave me an opportunity to lead EWC for eight
years." "Our 139 year old private institution was and
is the embodiment of the hopes and dreams of freed
slaves and the African Methodist Episcopal (AME)
Church." "Over the years this institution has had peaks
and valleys but has managed to remain open and con-
tinued to make significant contributions in the lives of
our students, the city, the state and beyond."


JACKSONVILLE,
Fla.--February is Black
History month and the
month of love since
Valentine's Day fall right
in the middle of the
month.
The Jacksonville cou-
ple, Derrick "Ricky"
Walker, 42 and Yvonne
McGruder-Walker, 53,
who had been married for
12 years spent as much
time as possible together.
But for the past week,
they were not able to
spend as much time
together because Ricky, a
Navy veteran had been
admitted to a hospital
about a week earlier
because of pneumonia.
While Ricky was hos-
pitalized, Yvonne decided.
to go to the gym and work
out. During her workout,


she experienced a mas-
sive heart attack and died.
Ricky was in the hospital
and when he was given
the news of his wife's
death, he said, "I can't
live without her." The
next day, he died.
The couple was funer-
alized Saturday, February
5 at Grace Baptist Church
in a joint funeral service
and was buried side by
side at Edgewood
Cemetery.
Mrs. Walker was a
1969 graduate of
Matthew Gilbert High
and continued her educa-
tion at FCCJ. She' was
employed with the City
of Jacksonville. Derrick
"Ricky" is a 1980 gradu-
ate of New Stanton High.
He underwent a kidney
transplant at age 20 while


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Richard Benton Marcus A. rooms Jarvis Johnson
Richard Benton Marcus A. Crooms Jarvis L. Johnson


Two of Three
Jacksonville teenage
males, Richard Benton,
18, Marcus Alton
Crooms. 19" aad Jard- i
Leviticus Johnson, 18,
wearing some. type of
masks 'or caps to partially
cover their faces entered
the south door of the
Wachovia Bank located at
10675 Philips Highway
Tuesday, pointed a gun at
the people inside of the
bank while one jumped
the counter and started to


get the money from the
teller drawers. The two
left the same way they
entered.
A witness followed the
vehicle they were driving,
keeping the police updat-
ed on their movements,
which allowed the group
to be quickly apprehend-
ed.
At their hearing
Wednesday, the judge did
not set a bond.
Their arraignment will
be held next month.


Changes Must Be Made By
LA Police Said Mayor

After the shooting death of an unarmed 13-year-
old Los Angeles teenager by the Police Department,
Mayor James Hahn said, he was angry and frustrat-
ed and demanded the police department revise its
policy governing when officers can fire on moving
vehicles. Devin Brown was shot early Sunday when
he reportedly backed a stolen car into a police car
after a very short chase.

Law Sought Against Baggy Pants

A Virginia lawmaker from Norfolk has intro-
duced a bill that would impose a $50.00 fine on any-
one whose pants expose his or her underwear.
Louisiana proposed a $500 fine for "low-riding
pants. The lawmakers said, if the parents can't reg-
ulate what their children wear, then the law should.

Jimmy Smith, A Musical pioneer, Dead At 76

Hammond B3 Organist, Jimmy Smith, died
Tuesday, February 8. He was 76. The great organ-
ist was known for his brilliant infusion of gospel,
blues and R&B on the organ and became one of the
world's greatest jazz musicians.


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007 (01.10.05)
r-ATAIR f Q TI F F 2/ )I 1 7i 17


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VOTE TDAY AD DEFIITELY0- DA


1____ Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Th Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


m
Editorial .................... A-2
ELifestyle .................. A-3
N State ........................ A-6
National .................. A-7
hurch. ........ .... A-4
Loca ........ --1
Prep Rap .............. B-3
LD Jail Or Bail..,.,,. ....... B-5
E Sports ........... .......... B-6
L
Business Network-B-7
c







PAGECC A-


r A V A 'I


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
RON WILLIAMS, SR. SAMUEL CRISWELL
NEWS EDITOR ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
CHERYL COWARD MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR. REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
DISTRIBUTION: LIZ BILLINGSLEA
WILLIAM GREEN ACCOUNTS MANAGER
ABEYE AYELE WORK BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST
FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, DeSHAYLA BRYANT, LAURENCE GREENE,
KEVIN PRYER, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send cheek or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


.AAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association VERIFICATION
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. VE IFIC I
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce C ln-IL
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce
Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


--
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Never again.
Those were the words-the
promise-made with a shocked
fervor by the Westn alliance
nations six decade ago after
having seen in the last days of
the war against Nazi Germany
the concentration camps of
Auschwitz, Treblinka,
Dachau, Bergen-Belsen,
Buchenwald, and the others
Adolf Hitler had spread across
Germany and eastern Europe.
Those prisons contained
the horrible evidence of an
evil the pre-war world had
foolishly thought no advanced
society was capable of: a cam-
paign of genocide simultane-
ously aided and masked by the
processes of a perverted
bureaucratic rationalization
and an even more perverted
pretense of "scientific
inquiry." The Third Reich,
fueled by ridiculous claims of
an Aryan racial purity and
racial supremacy, was at bot-
tom a criminal enterprise. It
was built on murder; it lived
for murder. Its leaders intend-
ed to murder all the Jews in
Europe, and it murdered near-
ly half of them, along with
European Roma, the people
once derogatorilyy called
"Gypsies," homosexuals,
political dissenters, and other
"undesirables." Six million.
men, women and children per-
ished in all.
The Auschwitz death camp


I'55q


was the largest of them all and
the worst-more than one and a
half million people perished
there, suffocated in its gas
chambers or executed by its
firing squads and burned in its
crematoria.
On January 27, sixty years
to the day after the Russian
Army liberated the camp in
the waning days of the Third
Reich, leaders of government,
camp survivors, and ordinary
people from more than thirty
nations gathered to mark that
long-ago moment and, as the
number of the survivors of the
camps shrink more and more,
to urge the rest of the world
not to forget what happened
there and throughout the rest
of the hell Nazi Germany cre-
ated.
World leaders spoke, of
course. But from the news
dispatches I saw, perhaps the
most poignant moment
occurred at the end of the cer-
emonies when a former camp
inmate, Merka Shevach,
Polish-born, but now an
Israeli citizen, seized the
microphone and, according to
the New York Times,
declared: "I was here naked as
a young girl; I was 16. They
brought my family here. and
burnt them; they stole my
name and gave me a number."
She then pulled back her
sleeve to show those gathered
the awful evidence tattooed


To Be Equal
By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League


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on her arm-the number
15755-before ending: "Now, I
have a ountIr'. IT hae an
armyJ'hiae e'-.presideil, I
have a" flag. nfid this will
ne\ er happen aga"n.
The question which
should haunt us all is: Can we
be so sure?
After all, we live in a time
riddled with searing evidence
of the great capacity of indi-
viduals, and groups, and
heads of states with vast
bureaucracies at their disposal
to commit the most heinous
mass crimes. We have seen,
and continue to see, cam-
paigns of genocide waged
with horrific brutality in the
Balkans, in Rwanda, in Dafur.
We have looked into the faces
of men and women who
countenance the murder of
thousands upon thousands of
innocents to satisfy their own
egos. We have mourned the
innocent, whose tragic fate
seemingly defies explanation.
My predecessor, Hugh B.
Price, considered this very
issue in a column more than.
two years ago celebrating the
awarding of the 2002 Nobel
Prize for Literature to the
European writer Imre
Kertesz.
The Nobel Prize jury's
proclamation stated that his
novels and essays had
"upheld the fragile experience
of the individual against the
barbaric arbitrariness ofhisto-
ry"-those instances in which
innocent people are caught up
in events of profound tragedy.
Kertesz, a Hungarian-born
Jew, had witnessed and sur-
vived two of the most
destructive examples of the


ry. As a -teenager, he wa:*:*
imprisoned in Auschwitz an
Buchenwald. Afterward, ht.
lived in Hungary during :h
entire time of its domination
by the Soviet Union.
But, although he lived ii.
an environment where go\
ernments demanded a rigid
stifling conformity, his no\ el-
and essays, the Nobel com7i
mittee noted, have- al.i\ta s
expressed a relentless resist-
ance to unjust social and polit-"
ical conformity, to accepting,
the rule of history's barbaric'
arbitrariness over the impor-:
tance of the individual. That
fact-of cruel fate overtaking
the innocent-is the oldest of
human stories, one that has
been visited upon many indi-
viduals and many peoples. It
did not end with the liberation
of the Jews and others from
the Nazi concentration camps,
as the West promised it
would; and, sadly, the likeli-
hood is great that after Dafur
the world will face more tests
of its capacity to quickly stop
a genocide.
That is another reason to
embrace the survivors of the
Nazi concentration camps as
both individuals and as repre-
sentatives of those who per-
ished, and to remember what
they endured.
Because the world has not
kept its pledge of never again,
we must make certain that we
never forget.

74 -.F4 ,P:K ,


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FEBRUTAR Y 12, 20t'


FLORIDA STAR






hC~~l'F'. 7 fPFASA


FERRUIARY 12. 2005


Socially Speaking
By
Betty Asque
Davis
"There's Always Something
i Happening On The First Coast"
: Scenes From Super Bowl XXXIX"
SWhat a memorial week for the First Coast! It was so excit-
Sing!
S Among the 'lucky locals' attending the game were The
Henry Sellers and Floyd Willises. Both couples report
having had a glorious time. They found the game and
entertainment breathtaking, spectacular, wonderful and so
proud of their hometown! Each couple found themselves
'surrounded by out of toners who were so positive about
Jacksonville and expect that we'll be a host city again per-
haps sooner than later.
Here are scenes from the sundry of events leading up to
the actual Super Bowl XXXIX game that included the Mill
Cove Golf Club's Pre-Super Bowl Open House event,
Councilwoman Pat Lockett-Felder's SuperFest VIP
Reception, Congresswoman Corrine Brown's Super
Bowl Bash with Magic Johnson, The NFL Wives Fashion
Show and Luncheon and of course the Super Bowl XXXIX
game.
See you in the paper!
****;***
"Super Bowl Partying With The Jacksonville
Moles"
Since 1986 when the group was merely an 'Interest
Group' The Jacksonville Moles have had a Super Bowl
Party. This year Host and Hostess Extraordinaire, Wendell
and Mrs. Jacquelyne Holmes in their lovely Hidden Hills
Home hosted the annual party. When the Super Bowl
XXIX logo Super Party invitation arrived we all knew that
it was not going to be your ordinary Super Bowl Party.
Invitees were told that their 'Skybox' designation would be
given upon arrival, dinner would be served from 5-6 PM
and that the 'Dessert Special' would arrive during the
game's half time.
When guests arrived for the Super Bowl Party the
Holmes home was encircled with Super Bowl XXXIX and
Football Balloons. As the host and hostess greeted
Jacksonville Moles members and their guests in crisp white
shirts bearing the Super Bowl XXXIX Logo, they instruct-
ed each to take a stapled note from a crystal bowl for their
'Skybox' assignment. There were four 'Skyboxes' for
guests to view the game. Each 'skybox' had a giant Super
Bowl XXXIX souvenir bottle filled with popcorn and bas-
kets filled with individually wrapped chips and candies.
The kitchen had been transformed into a 'Food and
Libations Court' and the dining room became the 'Dessert
Special Court' during halftime. During dinner and dessert
guests moved about from one 'skybox' to the other, return-
ing to their assigned 'skybox' during the game.
Assisting the Holmeses with the spectacular party was
grandson, Wendell Holmes, IV. In addition to Jackson-
ville Moles members were special guests Mesdames Bar-
bara Jones, Cynthia Jones Jackson of Clinton, Md., Toni
Amos of Ft. Washington, Maryland, and Fred and Mrs.
Yvette Kinsey Daniels from Atlanta, Georgia.
*****#^s
Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834; E-mail socially@thefloridas-
tar.com or you may reach me directly at imajol@aol.com,
telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-7008.
See you in the paper!


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FEBRUARY 12, 20(


Happy Birthday! Worship Place And The Citadel Of Hop(
To Celebrate Black History Month


Gospel Recording artist Keith "Wonder Boy" Johnson (left) congratulates Debra
Maiden (right), during her 49th birthday celebration sponsored by WCGL-1360 AM
radio. Maiden is General manager/President of WCGL. The celebration was held on
Saturday, January 29, at the Household of Faith Ministry Center, 1440 W. Edgewood
Ave. Rev. Bruce Allen, Pastor of The Church Fellowship Ministries, was the host for
the free semi-formal event. Special guests included Johnson, True Believers, local
choirs, groups, soloists, and dance teams.


-Schedule of Events and Services-
EVENING OF ELEGANCE-The Worship Place, 2627
Spring Glen Rd., presents an Evening of Elegance Valentine
Gala on Saturday, February 12, 6:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. A
social hour begins at 6:00 p.m. with games, door prizes and
entertainment. Dinner will be held at 7:00 p.m. For addi-
tional information call 396-0540. Harold A. Rollinson,
Pastor.
CHURCH AND PASTOR'S ANNIVERSARY-The con-
gregation of West St. Mark Baptist Church will observe the
church's 47th Anniversary and the Pastor's 11th
Anniversary. Services will be held on February 16-18,
nightly at 7:00 p.m. The concluding service is scheduled for
Sunday, February 20, at 3:30 p.m. The pubic is invited to
attend. The church is located at 1435 W. State St. Sis. Vera
M. Jones, Chairperson. Nicole Klyes, Co-Chairperson. Rev.
Willie J. Jones, Sr., Pastor.
NEW FIRST CORINTH CALLS PASTOR-The Pulpit
Committee of New First Corinth Missionary Baptist Church,
6119 Bagley Rd., reminds candidates seeking the pastorship
at the church that they have until February 15 to contact the
church for consideration. Resumes will be reviewed and
respondents may be called upon and asked to officiate a
service including but not limited to Communion Service.
Rev. Louis C. Parker is serving as Interim Pastor.
FAMILY AND FRIENDS DAY/BRIDES OF JESUS
CANDLELIGHT CELEBRATION-Mt. Sinai Missionary
Baptist Church, 2036 Silver St., invites the public to help
celebrate Family and Friends Day at the church on Sunday,
February 13 at 10:45 a.m. The Senior Women's Ministry
invites the public to attend The Brides of Jesus Candlelight
Celebration on Sunday, February 20, at 6:00 p.m. Ladies are
asked to wear red dresses or suits, men are asked to wear red
ties or suits. George B. Lowe, Assistant Pastor, is the speak-
er. Sis. Ruby Herndon, Chairperson. Rev. R. L. Gundy,
Pastor.
EIGHTH ANNUAL WOMEN'S CONFERENCE-Holy
Tabernacle Church, 6416 Miriam St., presents the 8th
Annual Women's Conference on Saturday, February 12,
beginning at 10:00 a.m. For more information contact the
church at 764-3754. Paul R. Cordona, Pastor. Bishop
Robert L. Jones, Senior Pastor.
WOMEN'S CONFERENCE-Holy Tabernacle, Church,
6416 Miriam St., presents the 8th Annual Women's
Conference on Saturday, February 12 at 10:00 a.m. Mary
Ann McCoy of We're For Jesus House of Prayer is the
speaker. Paul R. Cardona, Pastor. Bishop Robert L. Jones,
Senior Pastor.
AME CHURCH FOUNDER'S DAY SERVICE-Greater


ORIGIN OF
Do you know what the ori-
gin of the wake is? Well, it orig-
inally began as a 24-hour vigil or
watch at the side of the newly
deceased. Family and friends
would rotate the duty of watch-
ing over the body to be certain
that if there was movement,
someone would be "awake' to
notice and summon the doctor.
It was a way of insuring that no
one was buried alive.
It was similar in purpose to
attaching a chord from the hand
of the deceased to a bell above
ground--should he or she happen
to waken..
Social customs and diagno-
sis of death have changed a great


THE WAKE
deal since then.
No one is concerned that a
body prepared for burial will
suddenly leap to life. Today's
wakes or visitations are more an
opportunity for freinds of the
family to share their sympathy
and extend condolences. The
"laying out" of the body is
intended to facilitate the grief
process, giving people a last
opportunity to see this individ-
ual and to pay their last respects.

A.B. COLEMAN
MORTUARY, INC.
"OurAim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
6660 Moncrief Rd.'
Tel: 768-0507
www.ABColeman.com


In celebration of Black
'History Month, The
Worship Place (Pastor
Harold Rollinson) and The
Citadel of Hope (Pastor
Ivory James, Jr.) will pres-
ent Dr. John L. Johnson
(Four Thousand Years of
Black
Biblical
History)
in a
work-

series
entitled.
Fact or
Dr. John L. Fiction:
Johnson T h e
History of People of Color
in the Bible.
A $20 donation is
requested to cover the cost
of a Friday reception,


Grant Memorial AME Church, 5533 Gilchrist Rd., invites
the public to attend African Methodist Episcopal Church
Founders Day Services on Sunday morning February 13.
The pastor, Rev. Tony Hansberry, will deliver the sermon
during the 7:45 a.m. service. Seventeen year-old brother
Stephen Andrew of New Bethel AME Church of Bonifay,
Florida will be the speaker for the 11:00 a.m. service.
FEEDING THE HUNGRY-The HOPE Ministry of New
Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, 1231 Tyler St.,
is offering a free meal, free clothing (upon request), and
spiritual nurturing to needy individuals in the community
from 9:00 a.m. until 12 noon on Saturday; February 19. Arts
and Crafts will be provided along with fun and games for the
children. The Rev. William H. Lamar, IV, Pastor.
FRIENDS AND FAMILY DAY-Bishop Virgil C.
Jones, First Lady Mary Jones and the Philippian
Community Church, invites the public to, annual
Friends and Family Day at 11:35 a.m. on Sunday,
February 13. The church is located at 7578 New Kings
Rd.
ANNUAL CHURCH AND PASTOR'S ANNIVER-
SARY MUSICAL-St. Nicholas Baptist Church, 2006
San Diego Rd., invites the public to attend a Musical at
5:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 12. The public is also
invited to the annual Church and Pastor's Anniversary
February 27 through March 6, beginning nightly at 7:00
p.m. For more information call 904/768-4233 or
904/268-7945. Rev. Dr. R.W. Jackson, Senior Pastor.
WOMEN'S CONFERENCE-Holy Tabernacle
Church, 6416 Miriam St., presents the 8th Annual
Women's Conference on Saturday, February 12 begin-
ning at 10:00 a.m. Mary Ann MCoy of We're For jesus
House of Prayer is the speaker. Sis. F.S. Jones,
Chairperson. Paul R. Cardona, Pastor. Bishop Robert
L. Jones, Senior Pastor
CHRISTIAN BLACK HISTORY PROGRAM-Mt.
Charity Missionary Baptist Church, 1417 North Laura
St., will conclude Black History month with a Christian
Black History program on Sunday, February 27 at 4:00
p.m. The church is using the same theme for Black
History month as selected by the Florida Department of
Corrections-Niagara Protest reborn. Like last year, the
offering collected during this program will be dedicat-
ed specifically for orphans at the Children's Home
Society in Jacksonville.





Evangel

Temp-e

Vl~ m .1 i I'_/- 6 Ck1nvdI. 11 .
'' Weklormef to~ Jar'ksotfnI lr-it


"Where People Care About People"

Sermon Sunday.
Februar~Y 12th
8:25 a.m 1 0:-45 a.m.. 6:00 p.m.
THERE'S A HEALER IN THE HOUSE.
i Do) You Need Heulinm.':
Arc You 3Battlirg Sio'klnes. &' 1Disease?;
SSpecial Praver For the Sick.


rI
4r


"47


Jim Raley
Sunday, February 27th
6:00 p.m.

5755 Raiornta Blvd.
Jaick-oi illc. Ff.392205
904-781-9393


Saturday continental
breakfast and a light lunch.
Workshop dates are:
Part 1, February 26, 7:00-
9:00 p.m.; Part II, February
27, 9:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m.;


and Part III, February 2S
10:00 a.m.
For more information o
for directions, cal
904/396-0540.


SThe Church Directory

"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208

Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m. .
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m." ''
Sunday School Review............8:00 p.m. ... Nh
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


4 WORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
S Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
A Baptism-Praise & Worship
m^ g (Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth-Bible Study & Activities

Mount Sinai Community Development Enterprise
Community Resource Education
And Development Institute
2049 North Pearl Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 798-8733

GED Program, FCAT, Tutoring, Mentoring, After School,
Job Skills Training, National Parenting Program, Ex-Offenders,
Computer Skills Training for Youth and Adults.

For More Information
Call (904) 798-8722 or 798-8733.

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Prison Outreach 1:00 p.m.
Saturday Nursing Home Outreach 3rd and 4th Saturdays
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remiission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)

JeusPope iin W r C urh Ic


e a- s ..
Pastors Alan &
Rennee Dawson


Our New Location
(The Old Tyson Chicken Plant)
5421 West Beaver Street
Building B, Suite 202
Jacksonville, FL 32254
FOR MORE INFO. CALL 891-8802
Our Service Schedule
Sunday: Early Morning Worship 8:30 a.m.
Mid Morning Worship 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday:
Bible Study & Personal Development 7:30 p.m.
JOIN US FOR OUR 4TH ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION, FEB. 25-27TH 2005 AT 7:30 P.M.


HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT!
Call 904/765-9773
Give to: The Samuel W. Smith Fund Raiser
for Kidney Transplant,
Account #234-5528-5
Compass Bank
Jacksonville, FL
j j ,


"Ae


PAGE A-4


FLORIDA STAR


i:"1 .







TfRUARY 1220 0PA
151(UAI(X~._ L4au .


I FROMTHE RTMV APIAL


NO to Social Security


What most struck me in the President's State of the Union
-ssage was the supposition in his overriding theme, Social
icurity. Namely, the President continues to maintain that.:
)cial Security will start taking in less in payroll tax revenue
an it pays out in benefits by 2018. This statement, I
.!ieve, is entirely untrue, and in fact, is even being rebutted
the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO),k '
which has assured Americans that Social Security will be sol-
ent for nearly 50 years. .
The White House's poorly thought out plan is essentially :'.
,ased on an idea to allow younger workers to create private '.,.
accounts to invest.toward social security. The White House -
4fers-to the plan as "ownership." whereas in reality, it is a Rep. Corrine Brown
.lay to privatize the system, just as they plan to do with
medicare and Medicaid. In fact, even partial privatization of the system would take away
Early $2 trillion from Social Security in the next decade alone, endangering the benefits of
current retirees and people with disabilities. What's more, the President's plan, if enacted,
wouldd lead to direct benefit cuts by almost 50 percent for future generations of Americans. For
iny state of Florida, where nearly 20% of the State relies on Social Security, this precipitous
decrease in funding would be disastrous for residents, forcing them to revert to near 1940s liv-
ing standards.
As Vice Chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, I pledge to fight the President head on
over this issue. Indeed, having access to health care is a right, not a privilege, for the people
of our nation. And not only does Social Security improve the lives of the more than 33 mil-
lion senior citizens who receive its benefits, it also provides a measure of independence for
ivorkers who have become disabled, and the children and spouses of those who have become
disabled or passed away.
I am in strong agreement with the three point alternative plan laid out by the Democratic
leadership on Social Security. This plan consists of the following:
First, in accordance with the Democrat Party, I insist that changes to Social Security will
hot add to the deficit, which is already completely out of control because of wasteful
Republican tax cuts for the wealthy. Certainly, any plan for Social Security needs to begin by
paying back the money that has been borrowed from the trust fund so as not to strap future gen-
erations with tremendous debt. Second, I agree that any change in Social Security should
begin not by slashing benefits, but by attempting to keep the system solvent; and third, I too
believe that any change in the system must be fair for everyone, and veer away from propos-
als like Representative Bill Thomas' plan to provide women and minorities with different ben-
efit levels. Lastly, the idea of saving Social Security must also be viewed in the context of the
larger retirement picture. Perhaps what is really needed is greater promotion of pension porta-
bility, and assistance for Americans to save and create wealth by strengthening and expanding
access to 401(k)s, IRAs, and other pension plans.
In conclusion, I remain prepared and energized to take on The White House and House
Republicans over this issue, and I will go so far as to organize community groups and stage
rallies. I repeat that I will not let the President destroy Social Security. I wholeheartedly
believe that we can solve the challenge of Social Security funding without entirely dismantling
the system, and without allowing the Administration to continue to deceive the American peo-
ple b' telling them there is a crisis to justify privatization. I absolutely will not let Social
Security wither on the vine on my watch!

Right On Right Now!
*by Aki\'asi Evans
'"Blacks are applauded in mid-January, celebrated throughout February and
forgotten for the rest of the year."
Flowing into Black History Month on the heels of celebrating the enormous contributions of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr., a spotlight is being focused on Black culture in America. With King as our
nost recent Moses, we now begin to recollect on the contributions of Harriet Tubman, Denmark
Vesey, Nat Turner, (John Brown), John Rushworm and Samuel Cornish, Fredrick Douglass,
Sojoumer Truth, Tousaint L'Overture, Henry Flipper, Madame C.J. Walker, W.E.B. DuBois, Booker
T. Washington. Jack Johnson, Marcus Garn e. Paul Robesofi,.Elijah Muhammed, Adam Clayton
Po\\ ell; Muhammad Ali, Malcolm X and Shirley Chisholm. These are but a few of the great African
American leaders and pioneers who courageously sacrificed and struggled for respect for themselves
and justice for their race. The- struggle for justice and equality for African Americans has always
been an endea\ or to achie% e respect for the persons and abilities of the Americanized Africans. The
demand to be permitted to do what one is capable of doing well and to live as well as one's ability
allowed has always been a cornerstone in the construction of every barrier removal movement.
Toda\ people like Jesse Jackson, Maxine.Waters, Barack Obama, Barbara Lee, Colin Powell,
,Henry Louis Gates, Bob Johnson, Oprah Winfrey, Randall Robinson, Spike Lee, Danny Glover,
Cynthia McKinney and the like lead that struggle on a national level. More importantly, people like
Gary Bledsoe, Mario Salas, John Wiley Price, Carl Mack, Farrah Gray, and thousand of specialists
first class in their respective communities are risking life, limb and liberty in calling upon those
' empowered to do so to tear down the barriers to access and opportunity for African Americans. As
we celebrate Black accomplishments and contributions to this country and the world we also must
:address the lack of opportunity and access that most Blacks still face. Whether it be in business, gov-
:ernment or society in general, Black Americans are always the most excluded of all cultures. Blacks
are applauded in mid-January, celebrated throughout February and forgotten for the rest of the year.
We face being feared and unwanted almost everywhere we turn or try to go. Whether it is in col-
lege or in court, we get.the least counseling and the most convictions. Whether it is in the.corpora-
tion or the cemetery, we get the fewest bonuses and the smallest headstones.
Last week the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) held its Mid-Winter
-Convention in Las Vegas. There, hundreds of Black newspaper publishers from across the nation all
shared the same concern. They were collectively reaching over 30,000,000 households with a buy-
,ing power of nearly $700,000,000,000 and corporate America still treats them as an insignificant
marketingg tool.
: Seven hundred billion dollars is more than the gross national income of all but seven or eight
nations. Regardless of that reality, in most. markets major auto, appliance, retail, communications,
travel, and food suppliers greatly downplay the influence of the Black press upon Black people. They
:refuse to respect the ability of the Black Press to make a market share difference in their competi-
:tive businesses. Many are so blatantly racists that they would rather lose business than be saved by
:Black consumers if Black media has to be used. And as ludicrous as that seems, that is exactly how
they operate. Black consumers help reinforce that racist consciousness by paying to be disrespected.
Last year, we ran a series of stories about a litany of discriminatory practices against Blacks by
'Dillards Depamnent store. We didn't expect Blacks to, boycott the stores, although we wish they
:had, but we where shocked to see them shopping there in increased numbers after the series ran.
'Clearly our people have been adversely conditioned and nappily we must begin to recondition our-
;selves.
It is the same in every field of endeavor. Black Americans have to demand and fight for the
:respect they deserve 24/7-365. We have to shout at those who are not listening and march in front of
:those who do not want to see. We are here, we have paid our dues and we will protest until we get
all the rights our constitution guarantees. That's right, it's our constitution too!
Remember Crispus Attucks? We want and deserve respect for our persons and our culture. We
:have contributed much toward the making of this society and we should be above begging for what
'is unjustly being withheld. Looking back at history we see that Fredrick Douglass was correct when


,marks on State of the Union and a Firm
ivatization Plans


'he said, "Power concedes nothing without a struggle". We know we must remain diligent in demand-
ing that our persons and our culture be respected and that our contributions be rewarded.
For far too long we have been punished for contributing and Black History Month 2005 is an
:ideal time to call an end to those shenanigans. As you celebrate or commemorate Black History
: lonth look at the source of the informatioinyou are receiving. Look behind the source and see who
:supports it, then look beyond the supporters and see who doesn't. Next look in your wallets and
:purses and a decide where your share of $700 billion should go. Paraphrasing the words of Dr. King,
:no company should get your money without showing you respect. Remember the motto of the
:Tuskegee Airmen, "Straighten up and fly right, straighten up and stay right." And the reader said,
:"Right On!," and then they thought, "right now!"
Akwasi Evans is the.publisher ofNOKOA news upper in Austin, Texas. You can rcicthl(imi via e-mail
tk akwasievans@lotmail.com or'by phone at (Jf2) 499-8713. 1


Laney High School is Simply the Best

During the month of February I am blessed to visit 4.
many of our local area schools to do Black History Month .
programs. This year has been like all others, I am out
almost everyday in one of the schools. Thus far one school
has stood out-Lucy Craft Laney High School in Augusta, blankE in the ty
Georgia. This wasn't my first time at Lucy C. Laney. I had
been there many times before, but never have I been more
impressed with our young people, their teachers and -
administrators. ..i
Prior to going over to Laney that afternoon I was at ,
Augusta State University teaching my classes. I was talk- F.. 'c w,. w.,
ing with my students about my going to Lucy Laney to do
a program later that day. Some of my students moaned and groaned and made deroga-
tory comments. I told them I was doing my interactive lecture on hip-hop. This lecture
includes tons of music, video clips, is high energy and begs for audience participation.
Many of my students looked at me like I was crazy. "Those kids at Laney are going to
go crazy." The Laney graduates who were in my classes were quick to defend their
alma mater. I was comfortable with the presentation and felt it was something that
would interest students.
When I arrived on Laney's campus, I felt something was different. I walked in the
office, and the principal, Dr. Hawthorne Welcher Sr. and his administrative staff greet-
ed me. Dr. Welcher immediately took me around the school and began to introduce me
to every person we ran into, faculty, staff and students. As he toured me around the
school he pointed out what was going on in every part of the building. What impressed
me was his professionalism and the fact that it appeared the he knew everyone. It was
like he was introducing me to his family and this was their house. This spirit of profes-
sionalism and family breathed through the entire school.
As the program began, Dr. Welcher directed the students to their seating areas by
grade level. On the floor of the gymnasium seated in the chairs were the juniors and
seniors in the bleachers. On each side, respectively, were the freshmen and sopho-
mores. Dr. Welcher called the group to attention, and he directed the underclassmen to
look at the juniors and seniors as examples of how they should behave. At that moment
the juniors and seniors, were standing at attention. The teachers were seated with the
students, not away from them. The family we call Lucy C. Laney High School was
Assembled and ready to learn.
The students were the most attentive and bright group I have worked with this year.
They were engaged, and they pulled everything out of me. Their desire to learn more
about their history and culture is a direct result of the great work the teachers, staff and
administration is doing with them. Laney is a model school. Where others give excus-
es of what can't be done, Dr. Welcher and his team of educators are doing what has to
be done. I have never been as impressed with a high school as I was with Lucy C.
Laney. If you want to see a great high school in the making, I'point to Lucy C. Laney
High School. When was the last time you visited your old school and gave something
back? Is it time for us to go back to our alma mater and see what is going on?
Dr. Watkins is a'syndicated columnist, author professor of sociology at Augusta
State University and the president of Unity Council Inc. He can be reached via his


Send email to: info@thefloridastar.com
6" 0 O


9


PAGE A-5


F )T/ifTA cTAr


,""TT A-n-y" I nII








JI'JI.. D.IIFJID T A-tRI IE A.
-


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Sh Stopp LET THE POST OFFICE
ow er DELIVER THE FLORIDA STAR
TO YOU
~rila~?L~?~,~I"1"'~; s~d% %$~larsh3Ps~:*-~' L~~5~~i~S:1


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The world famous Florida A&M University Marching 100 band was a crowd pleaser
during pre-game festivities at Super Bowl XXXIX on Sunday, February 6, 2005 at Alltel
Stadium in Jacksonville. The Marching 100 performed precision dance routines with
intricate dance moves while playing popular Hip Hop and R&B tunes. (PHOTO RICHARD
MCLAUGHLIN)


g-
Twenty eight members of the Bethune-Cookman College Marching Wildcats appeared
on the The Ellen DeGeneres Show Super Bowl edition which aired Friday, February 4.

Five Amtrak Travel Scholars Announced From EWC


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
The United Negro College
Fund (UNCF) and Amtrak
have announced that five
students from Edward
Waters College are recipi-
ents of the "Amtrak Travel
Scholars Program."
The program was devel-
oped to reward academic
achievement and promote
passenger rail to college stu-
dents at 20 of the nation's
Historically Black Colleges
and Universities (HBCU)
including Edward Waters
College in Jacksonville.
The 20 HBCU's were
chosen because of their
proximity to an Amtrak
Station.
The Edward Waters
College Travel Scholars are:
John C. Jones (Gainesville,
FL); Donna R. Calloway
(Jacksonville, FL); Alonzo
J. Watkins (Jacksonville,
Florida Named Among'
Top Ten Pro-Business
States In Nation
TALLAHASSEE '
Governor Jeb Bush
announced that Pollina
Corporate Real Estate, Inc.,
has named Florida as one of
the "Top Ten Pro-Business
States 2005."
Presented during the
2005 International
Development Economic
Council (IEDC) Leadership
Summit in Litchfield Park,
Arizona, the Top Ten survey
ranks Florida among the
best places in the nation for
conducting and succeeding
in business due to its pro-
gressive pro-business poli-
cies, quality workforce and
overall economic climate.


FL); Brandon T. Smith
(Waldorf, MD); and,
William E. Thomas
(Lithonia, GA).
Full-time students were
invited to apply for the
scholarship program last
November and UNCF
administered the selection
.process.
At each school, five stu-


John C. Jones


dents were selected from the
applications and granted
travel stipends through the
financial aid department
based on financial need and
academic achievement.
Each recipient will
receive up to $1,000 in train
travel valid for use through
December 10, 2005.


Donna F. Calloway


Alonzo J. Wari '"
Alonzo J. Watkins


William E.. I nomas


Dr. Mae C. Jemison blasted into
orbit aboard the space shuttle
Endeavor on September 12, 1992,
the first woman of color to go into
space. This historic event was
only onfof a series of accomplish-
ments For this dynamic African-
American women.


D- I want a One Year Subscription to The Florida Star!
Please donate 10% of my paid Subscription to:
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Please send my Subscription to:

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ADDRESS
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"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"


Where Christ Gets Lifted
-.. """




The Victory is in the Word & Music

Andrea-The People's

Advocate

Saturday 1-2:00 p.m.
Topic For Saturday, February 12, 2005:
"The Slave Haven"
Andrea Giggetts interviews Elaine Turner,
President, Heritage Tours in Memphis,
Tennessee. They will discuss how Mr. Burkle, a
German immigrant, risked his life by harboring
runaway African slaves in his home as they made
their way from the South and eventually to freedom.


6050-6 MoncriefRd., Jacksonville, FL 32209

Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955

Wyeb address: WWWWCGL1360.CQM


PAGE A -


FLORIDA STAR


FEBRUARY 122005






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dIR UAIY12,2 005


Presidential Presence


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(News from Press Release and wire services)


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Rice Puts Iran And Europe On Notice


argue well for negotiations
with three European coun-
tries that are trying to per-
suade Iran to cease perma-
nently the enrichment of
uranium and have promised
economic and technological
aid in return. Khatami said


Condoleeza Rice
BRUSSELS, Belgium -
Nearing the end of a fence-
mending tour of European
S allies, U.S. Secretary of
State Condoleeza Rice said
the United States had set no
deadline, on the Iran talks,
but she also said the Bush
administration had not
changed its view that the
United Nations should step
in to get tougher on Iran.
"I think the message is
there," Rice said at a news
conference at NATO head-
quarters. "The Iranians need
to get that message," she
said, adding that Tehran
should know that "there are
other steps" the international
community can take.
Iran says its program is
for nuclear power, not
-- weapons.
In Tehran, President
Mohammad Khatami said
Wednesday that no Iranian
government would ever
abandon the progress the
country has made in devel-
oping peaceful nuclear tech-
nology.
The comment did not


Snoop

(Continued From A-l)

artist took the stage in a red
fur coat and Patriot's jersey
as members of the audience
yelled "Snooooop!" A word
that can be easily mistaken
as "Boooo!" if not correctly
recognized.
But there was no booing
Snoop that night. The rap-
per was joined on stage by
his band, the Snoop-a-delics
and his uncle June Bug,
Along with other affiliates.
"Yall know I don't
smoke no more," said
Snoop, after smelling miari-
juana in the audience. "But
I see yall blazed it up."
A bra and a pair of
underwear were thrown on
stage during his perform-
ance.
There was much love
shown for this long-time
rapper.


that if the talks with Britain,
France and Germany fail,
his government will not be
bound by its undertaking to
suspend enrichment.
"If other parties are not
committed to their promises,
we will not be committed to


The opening act was per-
formed by Bad Boy record-
ing artists B5, a new group
consisting of five brothers
from Atlanta, GA.
Their' performance was
commended by the crowd
and several young girls
received autographs and pic-
tures from them after their
show.
The group was highly
energized, entertaining and
said to be. the next Jackson 5
by 92.7's DJ Dr. Doom.
Two other groups took
the stage prior' to Snoop's
arrival.
Three rappers from
Houston, TX and a phenom-
enal hip-hop dance group,
which were both followed
by intermissions as long as
30 minutes.
There were many
celebrity sightings that
evening. Former NFL play-
ers Terrell Davis and Carnal
Lake, also former NBA star
John Sally were just a few


our promises at all,"
Khatami told a meeting of
foreign diplomats.
The Bush administration
has long viewed the
European process as futile
and thinks Iran is stalling.


recognizable faces in atten-
dance.. Comedian Chris
Rock and host of the Best
Damn Sports Show Period
Tom Arnold were also sight-
ed by audience members.
It's been said that after
the show is the after party.
The supposingly official
Snoop Dogg after party was
held at Bourbon Street on
St. Johns Bluff Road on the
Southside without Snoop.
Snoop finished the show
at 1:00 a.m. leaving the
majority of the crowd
pleased and ready to party.
While he was not able to
attend his parties, Snoop
Dogg made an appearance
at Raines High School for
the event he called the
Snooper Bowl featuring his
son's Pee Wee football
team. Snoop Dogg is the
coach.
Snoop' All-Stars defeat-
ed the Jacksonville all-Stars
34-20.


- -


PAGEA-7


,,4 Y T1 1%, V 1 e,,






A/- UL.R ...-


Shani Pride: Cutie Pie On The Rise!
by Rych McCain

To the fellas, she is the unassuming quiet type that .. -,4 -r"
slips in the room unnoticed until you look around, spot
her and then have to take a second "ogling" look! Her
shapely slim figure, soul searching eyes and radiant
smile are definitely attention getting. This is young
actress SHANI PRIDE. If the last name sounds famil-
iar, yes, she is related to the famed, superstar Country '7'"
Singer Charlie Pride. '
This young thespian originally started out as an ath- .-
lete. 4
"Basically, I was running track in high school and "
was aspiring to go to the Olympics," she says. "During
my freshman year, I had to take an elective class which ,;
was theater. I went on stage and had no lines in this play '
but I was completely blown away by how the audience ., .
was effected by what was going on, on stage, how we ;
made them laugh and made them cry and was totally
moving them around. From that opening night in the .,., .-
play, I was completely hooked and was like, this is what
I want to do the rest of my life." -,
During her first two years in high school, Pride -:
starred and ran the 200 and 400 meters on the
Claremont High girls track team in Claremont, .... '
California and also ran for a private track club called-,
The West Coast Express, which traveled all over the Shani Pride (Photo 2005 Andre' B. Murray/A Bern
Agency Photo)
country. She devoted a lot of time to her sport practic-
ing but couldn't do that and act at the same time, so she quit track to the dismay of her coaches etc., to
pursue acting full time. She also left Claremont High and transferred to the LA High School for The Arts
where she graduated.
In her quest to make it in the biz, Pride was fortunate enough to obtain Oscar winning actor Sidney
Poitier as her mentor as well as studying with famed acting coach Chip Fields (mother of actress Kim
Fields). Pride's TV guest appearances include; "Boston Public," "Strong Medicine," "Hang Time" and
MTV's "The Real World Movie." She has done a string of independent movies, co-stared with Nick
Cannon and Christina Milian in the Warner Bros. flick Love Don't Cost A Thing! Pride will also be on
Whoopie Goldberg's new series, set to begin on Nickelodeon. She and Cedric The Entertainer are co-
producing and starring in a new film that is set to start principal photography soon titled Grand Larceny.
How has the so-called Hollywood experience been for this budding starlet so far? She lights up, "For
me it is amazing. I've been blessed. I have a lot of great people around me. I've always been fortunate
to have people come around me who have been inspiring and talented."
"All of the negative things you hear about in Hollywood, I haven't experienced. I think I'm really
fortunate God has his hand over me and I'm basically moving in circles that are positive and inspiring.
It has been great, I have no complaints."


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Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
Actor/activist Ossie Davis has made his transition to our
ancestors at age 87. Davis and his wife of over 50 years
Ruby Dee, were veterans of many movies and stage plays,
often together. They were very active in the civil rights
strgtl~ke. In fact, Davis delivered the eulogy at the funeral of
his close friend Malcolm X.
Capitol Records, R&B singer Houston, who scored big
ith his smash hit "I Like That, with Chingy and Nate
Dogg, gouged his left eye out in a reported suicide attempt
while on tour in London. According to reports, Houston was
retrained by his security people after attempting to jump off
a hotel balcony. He was then locked in a bathroom where he
gouged out one of his eyes. I personally interviewed and
clocked backstage time with Houston for several S.E.A.P
concerts in LA. He was cool people. Our prayers are with
him.
When the tables are turned, who dogs who? BET
Pictures in association with Strange Fruit Films (a Black-
owned and operated Hollywood film company), have pro-
duced a made-for-television, "Mock-U-Mentorv." titled
BOOK OF LOVE-THE DEFINITIVE RE.4SO.A If HY
MENARE DOGS. The film explores a tale of unrequited
love and female/male relationships gone bad nith a comical
twist. Written by Jeffrey W. Byrd and Eric K. George, the
all-star cast includes Robin Givens (Head of State,
Boomerang),, Salli Richardson (Biker Boyz, Antwone
Fisher), Richard T Jones (Twisted, "Judging Amy"),
Anthony "Treach" Criss (Players Ball, Jason s Lyric), Mari
Marrow (National Security, How To Be A Player), and Erick
K. George ("NYPD Blue" and "The Practice"). "Book of
Love" premieres on BET, Monday, Feb. 14th at 9PM ET/PT.
NEWLINE CINEMA has two interesting features drop-
ping this month. The first is SON OF THE MASK. It's a
sequel to the Mask starring Jim Carrey. This is a good
movie for the children and thus the entire family. The com-
bination of special effects and cartoon animation is amaz-
ing! Jamie Kennedy stars as Tim Avery a cartoonist whose
career has not taken off yet. He has issues with his success-
ful corporate wife (played by sexy Traylor Howard), want-
ing a baby and he is not ready for fatherhood. He discovers
the mask and fathers a son who is born with the mysterious
powers of the Mask. Alan Cumming, whom you X2: XMen
United fans will remember his role as "Nightcrawler,"
played the villain, Loki. The youngstaz will get off on this
flick.
The second offering by New Line Cinema is The Upside
Of Anger, written and directed by Mike Binder starring
Joan Allen and Kevin Costner. This is a look at an all girl
family with issues that come to a head when the father of the
house disappears. Costner is an ex-baseball player, radio talk
show host who doesn't want to talk about baseball, who
lives next door that eventually becomes part of the all girl
family via his relationship with their mom. It is the type of
flick that could generate some Oscar talk next award season.
Erika Christensen, Evan Rachel Wood, Keri Russell and
Alicia Witt round out the cast. If you like classical type
drama, this might be your cup of tea.
Maat-Hotep!


Soul Train Awards Nominations Read By Nick Cannon

by Rych McCain

Actor/Comedian/Rapper
Nick Cannon met with the
press at Spago Restaurant in
Beverly Hills to read the names
of this year's Soul Train Music
Awards nominees. Cannon was
upbeat and playful as usual
with the press. He was the per-
fect choice to read the list of
this year's nominees. Leading
the pack with five nominations
as expected was Usher. His
blockbuster release CONFES-
SIONS continues to rake in the
sales and the awards. He is up
for Best R&B/Soul Single,
Male, ("Confessions Part II");
Best R&B/Soul Album Male,
("Confessions"); Best R&B
/Soul Single, Group, Band or
Duo, ("My Boo" featuring Alicia Keys); The Michael Jackson Award For Best
R&B/soul or Rap Music Video, ("Yeah!" featuring Ludacris & Lil Jon) and Best
R&B/Soul or Rap Dance Cut, ("Yeah!" featuring Ludacris and Lil Jon).
The Princess of Crunk, Ciara was next with four nominations. She is up for Best
R&B/Soul Album, Female, ("Goodies"); Best R&B Single, Female; Best R&B/Soul
or Rap New Artist and Best R&B/Soul or Rap Dance Cut, all for ("Goodies," featur-
ing Petey Pablo). Alicia Keys followed with three nominations; Best R&B/Soul
Single, Female, "IF I Ain't Got You"); Best R&B/Soul Album, Female, "The Diary
of Alicia Keys") and Best R&B/Soul Single, Group, Band or Duo, ("My Boo," with
Usher).
Prince, Beyonce, Destiny's Child, Jill Scott and New Edition all earned two nom-
inations, while twenty other artists earned one nomination each. This year's gala will
be co-hosted by Motown Records crooner, Brian McKnight, 2004 American Idol
Champion Fantasia Barrino, film/TV/Music star Nick Cannon and "The Simple
Life" co-star Nicole Richie. The 2oo5 Sammy Davis, Jr. "Entertainer of the Year
Award" (Male and Female) will be presented via a special tribute to Ciara and Usher.
The show's highest honor, The Quincy Jones Award for Outstanding Career
Achievements will be presented to hip-hop/rap superstar and gifted film
actor/writer/director Ice Cube.
The telecast is executively produced by Don Cornelius and produced by Katie
Jones. Morris Abraham will direct with maestro George Duke as Musical Director.
The 19th Annual Soul Train Music Awards will be videotaped on Monday, February
28th at Paramount Studios and broadcasted on March 12th. Check your local listings.


Thank you for reading

THE FLORIpA STAR! ,


I


FLORIDA STAR


FEBR UARYY12, 20ii


PAGf A8_







F171nRIA STAR


Out On The Town


PAGE B-i


Publix Celebrates


Living History


There were concerts and parties galore in the Jacksonville area leading up to Super Bowl XXXIX. Out on the town
before the Super Bowl are from left, Congresswoman Corrine Brown, recording artist/actrist Melba Moore, record-
ing artist Patti LaBelle, and former NBA great and entrepreneur Earvin "Magic" Johnson.


COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
Events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

w"'l.ly w i .-.......... w ,. r = .. ........a ..... ?M W .-
THE RAND TOUR-Florida Community College
DramaWorks presents "The Rand Tour" Readers
Theatre presentation directed by Ian Mairs, February
18-19 at the Nathan H. Wilson Center for the Arts-
Studio Theatre at Florida Community College South
Campus, 11901 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. General
admission/general seating is $5.
National Condom Week February 14th-19th, 2005--
Calling all Teens! The Advocates of the FACES Teen
Program will host their first free block party to educate
and entertain their peers about the prevention of teenage
pregnancy and the transmission of sexually transmitted
diseases. Come out and enjoy FREE FOOD and enter-
tainment provided by local high school STEP TEAMS
and live music from DJ "Bigga Rankin" on Saturday,
-February 19 at 12:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. at A. Phillip
Randolph Park (located at the corner of A. Phillip
-Randolph Boulevard & East 1st Street) Families are
:welcome.
:BLACK HISTORY SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET--
The National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc. Delta
Delta Chapter's Annual Black History Scholarship
Banquet will be held on Saturday, February 19 at the
Haskell Company's Plaza Cafe at 6:00 p.m. The
Haskell Building is located at 111 Riverside Ave. "A
Year of Enlightenment" is this year's theme.
Jacksonville City Councilman Reginald Fullwood is the
speaker. For Additional information contact Joanne
Parks at 904/502-7899.
JHA 'S ANNUAL BLACK HISTORY CELEBRA-
TION-The Jacksonville Housing Authority (JHA) will
host its Annual Black History Celebration on Saturday,
February 26, beginning at 1:00 p.m. in the Eugene J.
Butler Middle School Auditorium. Warren Jones, fore-
imer president of the Jacksonville City Council, is the
speaker. Youth residing in public housing and Section 8
communities will compete for cash prizes during a
Spelling Bee, Brain Brawl and a Cheerleading/Step
Dance Contest.
AIDS SUMMIT 2005-EDUCATE, UNITE, FIGHT!-
The Minority AIDS Coalition of Jacksonville will pres-
ent AIDS Summit 2005 on February 17 and 18 at the
Radisson Riverwalk Hotel in Jacksonville. Sponsors
include River Region Human Services, Florida A&M
University College of Pharmacy, The AIDS Institute,
Commcare Pharmacy, and the Florida Dept. of Health
This year's AIDS Summit features renowned experts
who will 'be presenting timely information on topics
related to AIDS.


S .... r" .t_.L .l.* ...I-JUM lJ- ..-.. .. .....lf ..__. ... .


Jonathan Green's


Paintings Dancing


'Off The Wall'

By Marsha Dean Phelts

Jonathan Green's name is in the league with renowned
artists that include Pablo Picasso, Romare Bearden Elizabeth
Catlett, Edward Hopper and Jacob Lawrence. Green's paint-
ings focus on South Carolina's Low Country and Gullah peo-
ple. Green who was born near the Sea Islands in a place
called Gardens Corer; honors his heritage through nearly
two thousand original paintings that document the Gullah
people and region.
The Off the Wall and Onto the Stage presentation is
unique in that Green's paintings will come to life from the
large screen backdrops as model dancers step out from the
paintings onto the stage. The women that he paints wear
their clothes with boldness, pride is seen in their movement.
Green's use of yellow competes with the rays of the sun, his
red reminds one of a beautiful blazing fire, his blue can be as
deep as the blues.
William Starrett, Artistic Director and principal choreog-
rapher for the Columbia (SC) City Ballet teamed up with
Green and interpreted Green's art through dance. Off the
Wall and Onto the Stage is a ballet and the dancing will be
as bold and brilliant as Green's paintings. The balletis set to
music rooted in the history of the region. Music from the
show produced by Marlena Smalls will be available for pur-
chase.
The premier of this production played before sold out
audiences in Columbia, South Carolina last month.
Everybody showed up including the Governor, policy mak-
ers, and citizens. Green premiered the show in his home
state to take the art back to the people for them to see how
their culture is being portrayed and preserved. He wanted to
get the nod from his people, they adored the performance.
The second stop is in Jacksonville, Friday, February 18,
beginning 8:00 p.m. at the Florida Theatre. Two matinees
will allow school children to see the show earlier in the day.
This is an international show that initially will tour the major
port cities in the southeastern states from North Carolina to
Florida. Green chose this tour to launch the show because
the Gullah culture that he seeks to preserve extended from
Wilmington, North Carolina to Jacksonville, Florida. After
the southeastern tour the show will tour other parts of the
United States, Europe and Asia.
Serving, as co-chairwomen of these premiers are the First
Ladies of Florida, Mrs. Bush, Georgia, Mrs. Purdue and
South Carolina, Mrs. Sanford.
Please don't miss this opportunity to meet Jonathan
Green and William Stareet and see the integration of their
creativity. For ticket information call 632-3373 or toll free
1-888-860-2929. For a sneak preview of this magnificent
production visit tltp:/www.dancingtheart.com


JACKSONVILLE--
Publix Super Markets
launched its My Recipe for
Living, My History cam-
paign to honor African
Americans for their commit-
ment to their communities
and contributions to
American culture through
their food.
During the Living
History campaign, African
Americans from across the
South shared their personal
"recipes for living". The
campaign will feature Leah
Chase (Dooky Chase
Restaurant, New Orleans),
Thelma Grundy (Thelma's


DEATH
NOTICES
BENYARD-Lillie E., died
February 1, 2005.
BISHOP-Cassie, died
February 1, 2005.
BLAIR-Don Dewayne, 20,
died January 31, 2005
BLOUNT-Joseph, died
February 4, 2005.
BYRD-Caretta M., died
February 4, 2005.
CRAWFORD-Carlie J., died
February 2, 2005.
CRUMBLEY-Jessie, died
February 2, 2005.
DEVINE-James G., died
February 2, 2005.
GANTT-Berteis, died
January 30, 2005.
JESUP-Richard, died
February 3, 2005. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
JOHNSON-Roosevelt, died
February 2, 2005.
MARSHALL-Diane, died
February 1, 2005.
ROBERTS-Ike, died
February 2, 2005.
SANDERS-Elsie, died
February 2, 2005.
SILAS-Randolph Jr., died
February 5, 2005.
THOMAS-Harold, died
January 29, 2005.
WILLIAMS- Dorothy, died
February 5, 2005.

--- --- ----- *
MEMORIAL
In Loving
Memory
Of The Late











I,.

JOHN H. WHITE. SR.
March 27, 1919-
February 17. 1990
Fifteen years ago God
called you home.
He released you from all
of your pain and suffering.

The void left in our hearts
can never be replaced.

Love Always:
Wife, Katherine White;
Children: Emma, John,
Jr., Trudell, David, Memiel
and Anthony. Thirteen
grandchildren and sixteen
great-grandchildren. i


Kitchen, Atlanta), Elizabeth
Omilami (Hosea Williams'
Feed the Hungry
Foundation, Atlanta), and
Joe Randall (Joe Randall's
Cooking School, Savannah,
Ga.
While in stores, cus-
tomers can experience the
living history of each hon-
oree through signs promi-
nently posted in the win-
dows. As a part of its com-
mitment to education,
Publix is providing compli-
mentary activity sheets and
posters of those featured in
the campaign to more than
700 elementary schools
throughout the Southeast.
These materials will pro-
vide an opportunity for stu-
dents to learn about the
important cultural contribu-
tions of these community
champions, as well as
inspire each student to
develop their own recipe for
living. Teachers may order a
classroom set of these mate-
rial by e-mailing
Stella.Smith@mail.publix.c
om while supplies last.



SME IMORIAM I
In Loving
Mlemory
Of IMy Wife













OLLIE STEWART
March 29, 1952-
February 1. 2003
liu 'ie gone jirwt and I
remain to walk the road
alone, I'll live in memories
garden dear, with happy
days we've known.

In spring I wait for roses
red, when faded,
the lilacs blue.
In early fall when
brown leavesfall, I'll
catch a glimpse of you.

I'll hear your voice, I'll
see your smile, though
blindly I may fumble. The
memory of your helping
hand will buoy
me on with hope.

I want to know each step
you take, so I may take the
same. For someday down
that lonely road you'll
hear me call your name.

We love and miss you:
Husband, Kenneth
Stewart; Three Sons,
Kenneth Lamar, Shawn
Antoine and Christian
James Stewart; Daughter,
Brenda Ruth Stewart and
11 grand children.

(Please see
The Florida-Times Union
for additional information)


! PITA VV V) '711C


.K"KyIIC I.Z, 2uu) 1,11







PAGrE 1)-,Z 7'Iful"I 0 1/11TJAJA&2 t


Ask Deanna! Is an advice column known for its fearless
approach to reality-based subjects!

Dear Deanna:
I'm tired of the way you treat people. As a degree and edu-
cated physician, I feel the advice you give lacks passion and
sensitivity. You're so cold and act as if you don't consider peo-
ple's feelings and emotions when they write you. I would like
to see you take it easy on some of your responses.
Dr. H. Washington, DC

Dear Dr. H.:
I don't know which is the silliest---you or 50-Cent wearing a bulletproof vest. Yes, peo-
ple are hurting but they receive advice based upon reality and the spirit of keeping it real
which society often fails to do. I believe you're a doctor all right. More like Dr. Seuss. With
that said, take my prescription and go Hop on Pop or eat some Green Eggs and Ham.

Dear Deanna!
My wife and I are an affluent black couple in our early thirties. We're having a hard time
meeting black couples on our financial and mental level. We don't want to hang with people
in their late 30's or 40's just to have friends, but it seems that's the only people on our level.
We've both "outgrown" our previous friends. Any suggestions on meeting other couples to
have fun with that aren't a financial burden?
Anonymous Denver, CO

Dear Anonymous:
If you want to make friends; stop being an arrogant snot rag. Instead of thinking people
aren't on your level, maybe you're not on theirs. In a nutshell, you lack the polish you need
to penetrate the circles you're looking for. Affluent people socialize but you're immaturely
looking to hang out. Regardless of age, if you have things in common with other couples
you need to get in where you fit in. In your area, look into the Denver Chapter of the National
Black MBA Association. If not, you and your wife will continue to be on an island alone.

Dear Deanna!
I have a problem with my boyfriend. Every time we go somewhere he looks at other girls
walk by or those at the bus stop or in traffic. When I catch him looking he gets a blushing
smile on his face. We always argue over this so I'm wondering if I have the problem. With a
2-year history, I love him a lot.and often tell him so. He used to tell me he loves me too but
now he doesn't. Is he losing interest?
Simply T. Online E-Mail

Dear T:
Some men have a "stupid vein" in their neck that makes their head turn and look at other
women when they shouldn't. There are a few problems in this deal. The blushing smile needs
to be slapped off his face and his disrespect is making you insecure. Lay your cards on the
table and tell him how you feel about his behavior and his missing love expressions. If things
don't change, kiss those two years good-bye and keep it moving.
Write Ask Deanna! Email: askdeannal @yahoo.com or Deanna M, 264 S. La Cienega, Suite
1283, Beverly Hills, CA 90211. Visit her Web site at www.askdeanna.com.


Gladys Knight's Night


Gladys Knight
By Marsha Dean Phelts

The Gladys Knight show at the Florida Theatre exemplified all the elements for multi-
generational entertainment. Her first class performance was energized from start to finish.
Knight's audience rambunctiously sprang to their feet as she stroked the memories sing
melodies of "With Every Beat of My Heart." This song put Gladys Knight and the Pips on
the top of the Rhythm and Blues Charts. At her Super Bowl XXXIX Concert, Knight
whipped out all of the songs that placed the group in the Music Hall of Fame.
Knight's baby brother, Bubba joined the stellar performance and made a few attempts to
steal the show from Gladys and the Super Bowl. Bubba Knight was hilarious and the audi-
ence loved his cameo appearance. Timing was everything. As the fireworks went off at
10:00 p.m., baby brother Bubba credited the light show and fireworks as a salute to him. The
audience erupted with uncontrollable laughter. At the finale, the audience joined Gladys
Knight and her fabulous band singing The Midnight Train to Georgia. Knight adores her
millions of fans, and globally, they are still in love with her.. Through the concert, the audi-
ence reminisced with Knight the slow dancing, slow dragging and grinding the evening
away. Gladys Knight is a Super Bowl Performer.


WHAT TOOK YOU AA'l TIME

TO LEARN CAN BE LOST iI MINUTES.





WTASTROKE, TIME LOST S BRAIN LOST.
WITH A 'STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.


Learn lo warning signs at
StrokeAssociation.r! ) or 1-888-4-STROKE.
Americitn .W6:~
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can be viewed on the World Wide Web at http://rev. tamu. edu/pettalk/
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Don't guess whether you qualify for the EITC, Know.


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B5, a family of five brothers: Dustin 16, Kelly 15, Patrick 14, Carnell 13 and Bryan Breeding 10 began their
career by winning Radio Disney competitions in 1999. B5 was the opening act for Gladys Knight and
Snoop Dogg concerts held in conjunction with Super Bowl XXXIX in Jacksonville. (PHOTOS BY KELVIN PRYER)


Youthful Group Opens For Gladys Knight


BN MIarsha Dean Phelis


Along the countless acti, ties sponsored b\ Super
Bo\\ I. a fresh and tine group of brothers kno\\ n as B5
opened the sho\\ for Graminm\ inning sonl!gter.(jlad\
Kniuhlt at the Florida Theatre.
B5. the youthfull tfauml\ liteam1 \\,as inmuniftiicent.
Hundreds of Kni-htl's fans that filled the a-uditoriumllll of


the Florida Theater or the Concert \ere in store f 'o a
double and triple treat.
The 5 Breedin brothers. \\ ho originated oui of St.
Peter-sburg. Florida set the state' a fire \\ ith their ener-
C. songl and dance. Tlie brothers do their o%, n chore-
ographl\.
B5. a funmill of lite brothliers: DuI Iin I 0. Kell\ 15.
(See "-iuthful Group B3.-)


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'Honorary Caddy' Event Benefits



Clara White Mission


By Betty Asque Davis

Children from the Clara
White Mission's Greater
Expectations program in
Jacksonville,Florida really,
really enjoyed the Super
Bowl weekend. Along with
meeting well-known NFL
players, taking pictures, par-
ticipating in golf activities
and receiving autographs


from some of football's leg-
ends and stars, they were
honorary caddies to some
NFL greats.
Mill Cove Golf Club and
John Deere hosted the
National Football Players
Father's Association
(NFPFA) in a Living
Legends Golf Tournament
with lawn tractor raffle pro-
ceeds benefiting the Clara


White Mission's Greater
Expectations Youth Program.
Doug Williams; James
'Shack' Harris, and Donovan
McNabb were honored dur-
ing the luncheon. Our own
Jaguar quarterback Byron
Leftwich was on hand during
the event as was Golf
Instructor and Youth
Advocate Bill Ford.
The Clara White
Mission's Greater


Expectations Program targets
school-aged Youth residing
in underserved areas in the
Jacksonville community.
The program involves the
children in positive activities
such as a golf and tennis
instruction program and aca-
demic tutoring.
The John Deere
Company donated the use of
equipment to help Mill Cove
Golf Club prepare its course


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(Continued From Cover)

TPatrick 14, Carnell 13 and Bryan Breeding 10 began
their career by winning Radio Disney competitions in
1999. B5 won all of the Disney amateur shows they
entered and soon were bared from competition. Their
mother, Adrian Breeding knew that her beautiful and tal-
ented baby boys were ready for the road.
They now live in Atlanta and their mother travels
with them along with their tutor. Jim McMahan manages
the group. It wasn't long before the group caught the eye
of P Diddy who signed them up with his Bad Boy
Entertainment Label. These B5 Brothers are popping!


for upcoming tournaments
and raffled off an LT150 rid-
ing lawn tractor during sever-
al tournaments at Mill Cove
the week prior to The Super
Bowl. Malcolm Jowers, a
retired Florida State Trooper
won the tractor. Jowers
retired recently and for twen-
ty years he was assigned to
the University of Florida.
Raffle proceeds were pre-
sented to the Clara White
Mission at the NFL Living
Legends Tournament on
Friday along with an addi-
tional $10,000 contribution
from John Deere. It was a
wonderful day for Clara
White Mission's Great
Expectations program as the
Mill Cove Golf Foundation
in partnership with the Eric
Campbell Roofing Company
donated an additional
$10,000 to the Clara White
Mission program. Needless
to say Mrs. Ju'Coby Pittman-
Peele, CEO/President of the
Clara White Mission was
absolutely thrilled not only
with the magnificent dona-
tions but also the opportuni-
ties the day brought to the
children.
Along with the Mill Cove
and John Deer staff that
included Mrs. Deborah
Taylor, the associate director
of Global Diversity at Deere,
Mses. Melody Douglas and
Artrice Weaver were among
the Mill Cove Golf
Foundation volunteers.
Mill Cove Golf Club
owned by T.C. and Mrs.
Ruby Newman is one of four
African-American-owned
courses in the United States
and the only one in Florida.
It is an Arnold Palmer
Signature Design course.
John Deere (Deere &
Company (NYSE: DE)) is
the world's leading manufac-
turer of agricultural and
forestry equipment; a leading
supplier of equipment used in
lawn, grounds and turf care;
and a major manufacturer of
construction equipment.












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B--CIFEBRUARY'12 '2005 '''''


I Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein

TOP SINGLES
1. The Documentary, The Game
2. All The Best, Tina Turner
3. American Idiot, Green Day
4. Be As You Are: Songs from an Old Blqe Chair, Kenny
Chesney
5. Get Lifted, John Legend
6. Red, White & Cre, Mtley Cre
7. Encore, Eminem
8. 2005 Grammy Nominations, various
9. Crunk Juice, Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz
10.'Confessions, Usher
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. Bless The Broken Road, Rascal Flatts
12. Mud On The Tires, Brad Paisley
3. You're My Better Half, Keith Urban
4. When I Think About Cheatin', Gretchen Wilson
5. Nothin 'Bout Love Makes Sense, LeAnn Rimes
6. Monday Morning Church, Alan Jackson '
7. Nothin' To Lose, Josh Gracin
8. "Awful, Beautiful Life, Darryl Worley
9. Some Beach, Blake Shelton
10.I fe Gets That From Me, Reba McEntire

TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Silence 2004" Delerium Featuring Sarah McLachlan
(Nettwerk)2. "The Wonder of It All
(Escape/Gomi/Trendroid/I. Pavlin/O. Nissim Mixes)"
Kristine W. (Tommy Boy Silver Label)
3. "Without Love"- Sun (JH)
4. "My, My, My" Armand Van Helden (Southern Fried
Tommy Boy Silver Label)
'5. "Vertigo (Jacknife Lee Mixes)" U2 (Interscope)
6. "Killer. 2005 (P. Rauhofer/Morel/DJ Monk/J. Albert
Mixes)" Seal (Warner Bros.) New Entry
7, '"Copacabana (Remixes)" Barry Manilow (Concord)
8. "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy? (Remixes)" Rod Stewart
(Warner Bros.)
9. "Feel You" Alyson (alysongrooves.com)
10. "Lose My Breath (P. Rauhofer/P. Johnson/M. Joshua
Mixes)" Destiny's Child (Columbia)


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B UAI Y 1., 20J 0 AllunL' Al~r


JAIL OR BAIL


)ITOR 'SNOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
ilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
hitter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the cor-
unity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
RAND THEFT OF. COUNTERFEIT SUPER BOWL
ICKETS-On Sunday, February 6, 200$ at 12:00 noon, a police
officer responded to 100 Festival Park Ave. where a suspect from
:16 Bent Street, Atlanta, Georgia was holding a sign that read
Buy and Sell Tickets." A person approached the suspect from
:ranbury, New Jersey in reference to purchasing super bowl
tickets. The suspect stated. "I have Super Bowl tickets for sale
t $2,000.00 a piece. I will sell you (3) three tickets for
34,200.00." The suspect handed the person from New Jersey
3 diree counterfeit super bowl tickets, and the person from New
Ierse\ handed him $4,200.00 in cash. The suspect from Georgia,
after the sale, fled the scene. The suspect had a co-defendant
working with him \ ho was a lookout for him and had (2) two
additional counterfeit Super Bowl tickets on him. Both the sus-
pect and co-defendant from Atlanta, Georgia, who had only been
in town for one day, were later positively identified by (2)two
witnesses from Trenton, New Jersey, and (1) one witness from
Kissimmee, Florida. They were apprehended and arrested and
taken to jail by a JSO patrol police officer and booked on felony
charges for scalping.
BATTERY THAT CAUSED BODILY HARM-On Sunday,
February 6, 2005 at 3:30 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to
10 EastBay Street in reference to a battery. Upon arrival, police-
officer met with two witnesses, who stated that there was a fight
in the middle of the street, at Bay and Main Street. They said that
they saw the suspect punching and kicking the victim in the
head. Both witnesses said that the suspect beat the victim in the
head until he was unconscious. Both witnesses also saw the sus-
pect punch victim #2 to the ground when she attempted to break
the fight up. Victim #1 was transported to Shands Hospital by
rescue #20. The police officer read the suspect his rights. He told
the police officer that he did not strike either victim. The police
officer made contact with victim #1 who was unconscious in the
"Trauma Center" at Shands Hospital. The police observed sever-
al bruises and abrasions on victim #1's head and back. He also
had a large knot in the right rear of his head. The victim was
unable to talk due to him being unconscious. The police officer
was unable to make contact with victim #2. An evidence tech
was assigned by HQ to photograph the injuries on victim #1. The
suspect was arrested and taken to jail and booked on felony
charges.
DRIVING WITH SUSPENDED LICENSE-On Saturday,
February 5, 2005 at 11:12 p.m., a police officer stopped the sus-
pect for a headlight violation. When the police officer made con-
tact with the suspect driver he stated that he did not have any
identification with him. The police officer obtained his name and
date of birth and it was checked through DHSMV. It returned
that his license was not valid, listing several suspensions with the
latest being on 8-20-98, revoked 60 months for "Habitual Traffic
Offender". He was read his rights arrested and charged with
driving while license suspended, unsafe equipment, open con-
tainer, and taken to jail.
THREE MEN IN BLACK ENTER CREDIT UNION ON
EDGEWOOD. Witness reported that three black male suspects,
all wearing dark colored ski masks, and one armed with a silver
handgun, entered the Educational Community Credit Union on
Edge\\ood. Suspect #1 was about 5'10", skinny, blackhood,
black pants, black scarf, black sunglasses and black gloves.
Suspect #2 was wearing all black clothing and was taller than
Suspect #1. Suspect #3 was wearing all black clothing, approx-
imately 5'10" 6' and skinny. All of the tellers were behind bul-
letproof windows. Witness stated that suspect#1 pulled out his
handgun, observed the security of the tellers and stated "Oh
S t" and then all three fled the bank and got into a van that was
waiting outside the front doors.
BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On
Saturday, February 5, 2005 at 6:13 p.m.! a police officer was dis-
patched to a domestic violence battery at 6100 Arlington
Expressway. Upon arrival, police officer met with the boyfriend
(victim), who told the police officer that he was having an argu-
ment with his girlfriend (suspect) who struck him in the face
with a closed fist two times. He said that he did not hit her back.
He only wanted a police officer to talk with her. The police offi-
cer read the suspect her rights. The suspect told the police offi-
cer that they were involved in a verbal argument. She admitted
to striking 'the victim on the face twice. The .police officer
observed a small bump on the right eye of the victim's face.
There were no witnesses to the incident. The E. T. didn't respond
to the scene due to the victim also being arrested for "Writ" Child
Support". Per the suspect's request, the child that was in the back
bedroom at the time of the incident was left in the care of a
neighbor. Both the boyfriend and girlfriend were arrested and
taken to jail, one for battery on another, and the other for back
child support.
PETIT THEFT OF PATIO FURNTURE-On Sunday,
February 6, 2005 at 1:17 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to
439 West 16th Street in reference to a theft. Upon arrival police
:officer met with the victim, who stated that on 2-6-05 at 1:00
a.m. she heard a noise on her porch. When she came outside, she
noticed her patio furniture had been stolen. Due to the time in
which the incident occurred, a neighborhood canvas was not
conducted. The victim was given a case information card. Case
not cleared. Patrol efforts suspended.
SPOUSE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On Sunday, February 6,
2005 at 1:06 a.m. a police officer was. dispatched to 11868
Cherry Bark Ct.. in reference to a battery that had just occurred.
Upon arrival, police officer spoke with the wife (victim). The
victim and the husband (suspect) have been married for 37 years.
The victim told-the police officer that she and the suspect were
., arguing. The suspect believes that she has been having an affair.
The intensity of the argument increased and the suspect pushed
" the victim. The victim went into the hallway bathroom to call the


'. police. The suspect broke the door down to the bathroom and
Continued to strike the victim. After the police officer was called
Sthe suspect fled the scene. He was apprehended by, the police
Officer, in the 1 800 block of Harts Rd. The victim sustained sev-
eral scratches to her face during the struggle. An evidence tech-
nician was dispatched by HQ to photograph the victim's injuries.
SThe victim declined to make a written statement. She also
declined an offer to be taken to a "safe place." The victim was
given domestic violence literature. The suspect was read his con-
sttutional rights, and taken to jail.


ARIES
You can fly through the
week if you keep
your level of
cooperation high.
By this week's
end, you'll have many plans,
romantic and otherwise for
the time period Be patient
at the workplace and things
will go fine.
Soul Affirmation: I take
it easy on myself this week.
Lucky Numbers: 5, 6, 43

TAURUS
You may feel as if you'll
never get every-
thing done that's
asked of you, but
stay steady and on
course, take things one step
at a time, and you'll be
amazed at what you accom-
plish. Celebrate with a spe-
cial friend.
Soul Affirmation: This
week is a gift that I deserve.
Lucky Numbers: 10, 20,
38

GEMINI
It's a great week for
catching up on
chores and left-
over tasks from
last week. You'll
also have the opportunity to
spend some time thinking
about the direction you want
your life to flow.
Soul Affirmation: I face
each day with a smile and
the day smiles back at me.
Lucky Numbers: 1, 6, 8

CANCER
Communication vibes
are highlighted,
and you are in
your element.
Many ideas will
be presented, and everyone
will be very receptive and
agreeable to what you say.
Romantic interests are easily
pursued this week. Smile
on!
Soul Affirmation: The
slowness of my pace gives
me time to refresh my ener-
gy.
Lucky Numbers: 17, 49,
51

LEO
Love and
romance vibes are
all around you this
% eek. They will
soothe your spirit and uncoil
your tensions resulting from
having too much work to do.
Delegate some of the minor
tasks so that you can do your


best at the big stuff. Have a
loving, lovely week.
Soul Affirmation: New
intuitions create new plans
and a new cast of characters.
Lucky Numbers: 2, 5, 16

VIRGO
Financial mat-
ters are highlight-
ed during work-
ing hours.
Everything to do with your
money, or money under your
care, goes smoothly.
Another party invitation
arrives. say YES! Give
yourself chances to enjoy
your life more.
Soul Affirmation: I admit
what I really want out of life
this week.
Lucky Numbers: 14, 22,
36

LIBRA
Happiness with partners
remains the order
of the week.
Rel nations
between partners
are exceptionally harmo-
nious right now. You are in
sync with loved ones. Much
is being accomplished by
your attitude. Don't overdo
your physical workout.
Soul Affirmation: I mas-
ter fear by knowing that all
is well.
Lucky Numbers: 2, 19,
37

SCORPIO
The time has come to
forgive and forget. Take the
S first step in recon-
If ceiling a friend-
ship. You thought
no one knew, but
you may be romantically
attracted to an old pal. Take
time out to advance some of
your career goals by learn-
ing something new.
Soul Affirmation:
Friendships are treasures I
cherish.
Lucky Numbers: 14, 44,
54

SAGITTARIUS
If you are finding it hard
to concentrate on
a project at work,
begin imagining it
successfully com-
pleted. Work steady and stay
calm this week. This week is
a good time for personal
inventory. Who are you?
What do you want?
Soul Affirmation: I will
take time to enjoy the simple
things in life.


Love your job?
Share it with a kid.
.lui c .,l i nrrll / t.( n ill" *
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Jiun ior 'chi 'vement'
'Al .u.ir> ^ ^


Lucky Numbers: 11, 33,
44

CAPRICORN
Mental fog
lifts and you are
sharp as a tack
once again. You'll
be making decisions about
partnerships and joint
finances. A very happy
week is in store. Take a step
back to see the bigger pic-
ture.
Soul Affirmation: My
smile is a radiant light to
those I encounter.
Lucky Numbers: 19, 23,
41

AQUiARIUS
.Exercise pru-
dence this week
in your handling
of personal funds.


Let your mind wander into
the future and you'll receive
the happy answer that you
are looking for. Time shared
with a partner this week will
be very enjoyable.
Soul Affirmation:
Helping others is the true
measure of my worth.
Lucky Numbers: 13, 15,


PISCES
Work with a
partner or col-
leagues goes
exceptionally
well this week. You receive
praise for a job well done!
Feel free to change your
mind regarding a personal
issue. News from a distance
arrives.
Soul Affirmation: I. go
inside myself to find peace
and joy this week.
Lucky Numbers: 12, 16,


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ce C'rfi "top


FLORIDA LOTTO WINNING NUMBERS
03-05-13-15-21-26 Sattirday, February 5 SEVEN WINNERS!!


Your Weekly Horoscope

(JANUARY 22, 2005-JANUARY 29, 2005)


356-TARA

(8272)


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STAR!


TO PLACE
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__1~____n____l__l__l_______I/


-- -W


______


PAGE B-5


i'I nOIrnA crTA


TnD Dr r T A "DV1,1 71 C


i







PAGEB-6FLOIDA TARFEBUARY12,2QI


NFL Commissioner Paul Taglibue (fourth from left) awaits his moment to present the
Lombardi Trophy to New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft (fourth from right). Fox
Sports' Terry Bradshaw (second from left) congratulates the Patriots for winning their
second consecutive Super Bowl championship. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)


New England Patirots quarterback Tom Brady (#12 in white jersey) takes the snap
from center and prepares to make a read of the Eagles' defense. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE
GREENE)


The Patirots defense (white jersies) flush Phildelphia quarterback Donovan McNabb
(#5 in green jersey) out of the pocket. McNabb looks for an open receiver. (PHOTO BY LAU-
RENCE GREENE)


McNabb


Refutes


Sickness


Claim

PHILADELPHIA, Pa.--
Philadelphia Eagles quarter-
back Donovan McNabb set
the record straight after his
first practice for the Pro
Bowl on Wednesday,
February 9.
Following the Eagles'
24-21 Super Bowl loss to the
New England Patirots in
Jacksonville on February 6,
the word spread that
McNabb was too sick to
have a productive game.
McNabb said he wasn't
ill during the fourth quarter
of their loss to New
England, as center Hank
Fraley claimed earlier this
week. He made it clear that
receiver Freddie Mitchell
certainly didn't call any
plays for him.
No, Freddie didn't call a
play," he said. "I get the
plays in my helmet, so he
couldn't call a play."
The Eagles' offensive
struggles were caused only
by the Patriots and the ten-
sion of a Super Bowl, not
due to sickness, assured
McNabb who completed 30-
of-51 passes for 357 yards
and three touchdowns. He
also threw three intercep-
tions.

Super Bowl

Ratings Slide

New England's triumph
in Super Bowl XXXIX was
the least-watched of the
team's three Super Bowl vic-
tories in the past four years.
The day after the uper
Bowl, Nielsen Media
Research revealed the game
was viewed on television by
an estimated 86.1 million
people, down 4 percent from
last year's game.
Last year, the Patriots'
win over the Carolina
Panthers in 2004 attracted
89.8 million, Nielsen said. A
competitive game helped
keep fans interested. The
two teams were tied entering
the fourth quarter and the
Patriots won by three points;
Fox said viewership peaked
after 10 p.m. EST Sunday, in
the game's last quarter.


Boxing Fans Treated With Super Bouts


Oscar De La Hoya along
with Golden Boy
Promotions and Juba
Entertainment presented the
Super Fight-The Fight
Before the Fight on Friday,
Feb. 4, 2005 at the
University of North Florida
arena.
The fight featured mid-
dleweight contender
Librado Andrade who
defeated Nicolas Cervera
that night.
The main event fighters
were Javier Jauregui and
Cristian Favela. Jauregui
won unanimously over
Favela with scores of 99-90,
99-90 and 97-92. Jauregui
is a lightweight champion.
A previous six-round
fight between Oscar
Andrade and Paulino
Villalobos concluded in vic-
tory for Andrade who won
over Villalobos.


Boxers engage in some hot and furious action as part of the Super Fight before the
Super Bowl on Friday, February 4 at the UNF arena. (STORY BY DESHAYLA BRYANT AND PHOTO
B1 KELVIN PRYER)


SUPER

NOTES
By Ron Williams


Super Bowl XXXIX has come and gone and the City of
Jacksonville will never again be the city by the side of the
road on the way to Disney World. If you live in or around
the city "Where Florida Begins" you ought to be beaming
with pride. Jacksonville glistened like a polish Diamond on
worldwide television!
While the Mardi Gras continued in Nawlins (New
Orelans) Bay Street in downtown Jacksonville was trans-
fored into a festival showplace. For several days leading up
to the big game, it was the place where the in crowd went to
enjoy live music, good food, and fellowship.
Walking from Alltel Stadium down Bay Street after the
New England Patriots' 24-21 win over the Phildelphia
Eagles, was like being caught in a human traffic jam. It was
a tight squeeze between jubilant Patriot fans and not so
happy Eagles fans. Yet, it was beautiful sight to behold.
First Coast residents will long remember how the city
sparkled at night as the most magnificent display of fire-
works ever seen here blasted across the night skyline on
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights before the Super
Bowl. What a blast!
And oh yeah, I had a ball at the Super Bowl. Being one
of over 3,000 credentialed journalist covering the game at
Alltel Stadium was not bad at all. Joining me as part of The
Florida Star's Super Bowl News Crew were Richard
McLaughlin from Dallas, Texas. Richard, the son of Florida
Star Publisher Clara McLaughlin Criswell, roamed the
stands during the game to get the fan angle.
My fellow Jacksonville Jaguars news coverage teammate
Laurence Greene provided the photography leg work dur-
ing the Super Bowl. I can't leave out the fine work done by
our other Florida Star Super Bowl news team buddies--
Marsha Dean, Phelts, Betty Asque Davis, and University
of North Florida students DeShayla Monique Bryant and
Kevin Pryer. We all had a ball!
Go ahead Jacksonville. You can smile with a sense of
pride. You are now one of America's Super Cities.
MOST VALUABLE
OPPORTUNITY-It never
hurts to dream. That's
exactly what I did standing
next to a red Cadillac XLR
at the NFL Media Center
in the Prime Osborn
Convention Center. The
expensive vehicle was
eventually given to Super
Bowl MVP Deion Branch
of the .New England
Patriots. I found myself
thinking "I could been a
contender!" instead of a (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)
pretender.
BIRD
WATCH-
ING-Was it
S a Falcon,
Cowboy, or
A 49er? No,
on i I Ag it was a
8 4i Baltimore
Deo .il '"- Raven in the
Deion Sanders of the Baltimore Ravens persona of
livens up a Sporting News Radio broad- N e o n "
cast. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE) D e i o n
Sanders. Walking in radio row at the Convention Center on
Saturday, February 5, the lens of photographer Laurence
Greene focused on Deion who was live and on the air with
Sporting news network. After his bird talk on the radio,
Deion moved about the media center flashing that winning
smiles in front of waiting cameras.
THEY HAD TO BE COLD!-As I shivered underneath
the media canopy in Alltel it warmed my heart to see the
scantly clad -I
Philadelphia
Eagles
cheerleaders
showing that
Philly pride!
The more the
wind
whipped off
the St. Johns
River on a (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)
frigid
February night, the more the Eagles cheerleaders jumped
around with that old Philly spirit. Who am I kidding? They
were jumping around trying to keep warm like all the rest of
us chilly fans!
HEY JUDE!-Paul McCartney's halftime finale of"Hey


Jude" was hot. Can't
you tell from this
photo? Man, I won-
der how it felt to the
scores of young folk
down on the field in
i 'l front of the stage.
S Well, at least they
Il- 7 hadhbeat.


PAGE B-6


FLORIDA STAR


FEBRUARY12,20t)









'E B-7 LLUIn I//IAM-


EMPLOYMENT

)RIDA COMMUNITY
.LEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
Learn about a wide variety of
)loyment opportunities at
:J. E.O.E.
Cargo Specialist
Sthe Army Reserve to your life,
J receive extra pay and excel-
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oose from. And earn up to
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'ce of a lifetime, call, Sgt. 1st
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INVITATION FOR BIDS
Pavement Repairs
lount Island Marine Terminal
JAXPORT Project
No. B2004-09
JAXPORT Contract
No. C-1122
ealed bids will be received by the
;lacksonville Port Authority until
,:00 AM, local time, March 8,
2005, at which time they shall be
opened in the Public Meeting
Room of the Port Central Office
Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue,
Jacksonville, Florida, for
Pavement Repairs Blound
Island Marine Terminal.
All bids must be submitted in
accordance with specifications and
drawings for Project No. C-1122,
which may be examined in, o.r
obtained from the Engineering &
Construction Department of the
Jacksonville Port Authority, located
on the second floor of the Port
Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville,
Florida 32206. (Please telephone
904/630-3062 for information.)
PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL
BE HELD ON February 17, 2005,
AT 10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC
MEETING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR
OF THE PORT CENTRAL
OFFICE BUILDING LOCATED AT
ADDRESS STATED ABOVE.
ATTENDANCE BY A REPRESEN-
TATIVE OF EACH PROSPEC-
TIVE BIDDER IS REQUIRED. A
BID WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED
FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS
NOT REPRESENTED AT SUCH
CONFERENCE.
Bid and contract bonding are
required.

There are 20% mandatory
MBE/WBE Participation Goals
established for this project

S Randy B. Murray, P.E.
Director Engineering & Construction
Jacksonville Port Authority

Want to purchase minerals and
other oillgas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201


I SERVICES

*^-lmlf----^


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
POOL ENCLOSURES
TRAILER AWNINGS
CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
#SCC 055764






THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852





Lowest Prices in Town'
Guaranteed
JULIUS BACON
(904) 766-0240
Fast Checks Fast Funds
Electronic Bookkeeping* Notary
4932-2 Moncrief Road West
(At Richardson Road)


FEBRUARY SPECIALS
Perm Retouch-----$35.00
Curls $45.00
(new.customers only)
Call: 924-7417 or 764-5888
Ask for Jackie
Walk-ins Welcome
1510 Palmdale St.

IMPACT

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THE FLORIDA STAR

REAL TALK

REAL TOPICS

SATURDAY 0 6:30 P.M.


Issues That Address
Concerns Of The
African American Community
In Jacksonville AndThe World


--------- I----------


I I

ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
S(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L ----------------------


FHA/VA MORTGAGE HOLDERS
Streamline Refinance No Employment Verification
Reduce Interest Rate No Appraisal
Reduce Payments No Out-of-Pocket Costs
No Credit Check No Asset Verification

Call (561) 995-1418 to see f/you qualify

Homestead Funding Corp.
621 N. W. 53rd St., Suite 240
Boca Raton, FL 33487
Licensed Mortgage Lender
New York Florida




CASH NOW.

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS,
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUT


(800) 794-7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!





2x2 Rates 2x4 Rates
Statewide $1200 Statewide $2400
Regional or national Regional placement
Placement also available also available
Regions: North, South, Central Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million Circulation: 2.2 Million


To place an ad:


CAll: (904) 766-8834

* *
FAX: (904) 765-1673
*. A 00000000.000000000000000
.-' .


IRM Interstate Realty Management Co.

Convenience 2&3 Bedroom Apartments
*Walking distance to schools *A/C and heating
*Easy access to public transportation *Spacious bedrooms
*Many churches and other house of *Appliances provided
worship

Visit us today!!! Without a doubt you will see why our
residents are moving into our community!!

*Affordable rents *24 hour maintenance
*Community Activities and planned *New Playground facility
outings *Newly renovated and painted
*On site laundry facilities

Employment Opportunities are always available for:
Manager and Maintenance Positions
Fax resume to 904-766-3239
or Email Resume to: paltmterl@bellsouth.net


(94 766-PALM



I am eracSAart e t
481 0 -cifRoa


(904)63-1437IAn~II~


Jacksonville, P F~.~L 32209[1


Thank you for reading

THE FLORIDA STAR!






TheFloridaStar.com


PRZEIIER FO0~DS
cOF JACKSOIIILLE


Adoption
PR i.\N r. : CN i IrFRi t \ .ir'rit-l ; i 11 .. i.
,' ,, r,- i ..~ fl ,, ,i ,. .. .. ., ,- .. 1 ,,,, i, i li lies
iillhbirthmothers. TOLL FREE 24/7 (866)921-0565. ONE TRUE
GIFT ADOPTIONS www onietruegif corm

Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? R:'-d Irf N 'PTTc h-. Ron L..
Hubbard Call i :- -:' or f. ".J '.'* i r.. i '..... '. 3102
N. Hubaia Ave., Tampa FL 33607.

BuildingMaterials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From Manduacturer.
20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quickturn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities
It I. \H COW' 90 Vending Machine Hd. Yno approve Loc's-
i. (800)836-3464 #B02428.
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995. (800)814-6323
B02010033. CALL US: We will. not be undersoldl
LOOKING TO START YOUR OWN BUSINESS? NOT SURE
HfOW TO GET STARTED? Start Up Power is the ultimate AT
" ,.lei r. ..i ir .r.. 0 it 1 '. I ItIH ii t ` il I i il I "
own business and need to save time aid money, visit us at
www startnppowr com FREE' 20 miinute evaluation.
New Concept, Cash Cow, Unique Distributorship, Hershey's,
Nestle, Tic Tac, Mylanta, Advil. Tylenol, Excedrin. Most versa-
a1.1, q,.,r',,.,.i 15K required Ain# B02480 Call

Educational Services
1R,. 'O Lr ; ,h l p t .* h1'd ool ,.,,l ,, .... ,..
., 4 e -A ".. IL, ._,

Snimplo niint
iI l RT r f)OD % I T, ,. ir. '. I .,-,;,, i-..r ._i i ,,\ ,, .~
A-- ,1.2 ::,


financial


\lST ieoi 'r .'.l "..u' l. '_ .li N,_,V i l ,., i t.I l_ lt "' .. ..'..
i.hrwp kNtv coih now op,.ii'-- Ildi-,. m.ii1i Jr.;
.C Id e-nC Lii. I- rLrnuiiii,. ui L l- 1. ,11 j ll i i 'i I I

Cnsh Loans up to $1000.00 .No Credit Check! Cash in your
checking account within 24 hrs E .i.,. t,-.,.ni Req. Go to
www payclcecktoday com or call *t t,, 'I
Mortgages, Refinance or Purc-i 16- 7,i .i, ., l'ai
Income. low rules. All credit ',.,1J l...i. d....'. may
apply) No mobile homes hi. '4 I'4.' or
www AccentCapilal com Licensed C- ... ".J..-.M L, ,i.,
RAISE ALL THE MONEY YOU NEED FOR A BUSINESS
WITHOUTOGIVINGU PANYEQUITY ANDGUARANTEEYOUR
INVESTORS PRINCIIALINVESTMENTAMOUNT
(321)206-9318.

For Sale

CHURCH FURNITURE. Does your church need pews, pulpit
set, baptistery, steeple, windows. carpel? Big Sale on new
cushioned pews and cushions for'l rd pews. (800)231-8360.
SAWMILLS -$2,695.00 -LumberMate-2000 & LumbcrLite.
24, Norwood Industries also nlanfactures utility ATV atttch-
ineats, log skidders. portable hoard edges iand t'nastry equip-
ment. www norwooditndustries coin -Free information:
L (800)578-1363 ext3()0N.


Health Care

NEW ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIRS & Diabetic Supplies At
No Cost. If eligible. S .,,.;. ti-, fold-up. Medi-
care/Private Insurance ,.. .L i. '.1, ,I Supplies, Inc
(888)6(11-0641.

Help Wanted

Rnl\1 I sT i '. ... i. r... No License OK.
nhbelieveable training NOW with income to transition to full
time high commission realty., www ProfitinReany coin or
(407)314-8904.
Love to Shop? M yster "i-. p.... -* ., t
FT, Make your own I.... iJ,,, i .. I ,J i.'j L......I
required. (800)218-9871.
$1500 WEEKLY GUARANTEED NOW ACCEPTING ( IAPPL-
I' 1 1... 1 1'. ... I. l, l I ,1: 1 I Ii r i. II I 1 ..ll ,l


HELP WANTED Earn up to $409 a week assenblingi CD cases
at home. No experience necessary. Start Immediatelyl (800)811-
0347 EXT 658 www.easvwork-g'ptcal~pa.com.
Drivers We Want You! Class A CDL required. Solos & Teams
apply today! Excellent benefits XM satellite rdilol (800)CFI.
Drive (800-234-3748) or www.cfldrivc.com.
ltrlt I t it.1l 1r N I1< N ruti" 1 r., ii .. I'..; & Benelits
; i r...a... ,J in r i :, I ,, graduatee Stu-
dents. Bonuses Paid Weekly. Equil Opportunity Lmployier.
(888)MORE PAY (888-667-3729).
r..rld. I Ituna. Ptli-,k.I 1l Icrdl.. \'.I, Physical Therpupist
. ..i. ir i. n~,c, .'. J ,, ..u 1 .. IH.I.I in North Florida Call
(800)973-2271 or Fax Resume to (850)973-8158.
iIr 10 l in \ i I lK l i II.i ..I) i %I ..%., & 1".ll,.r.[
a', t'V I II-
,., *.r .1"1,,' ., ..^ O I.....; (i-lE IFi'JIF' I i -I.,N I_ rLL

DETErN IIO'J .II Ill.R PI5r.,,, \ir.,'-, nrlnr .. a '."i i
'Sbhcrifr I i'1; L ', 'i ,, p I-,,, i. .ik.11,,i,,, r, ii: rJ- :, pl .
w w w 111 n i i ... ..l i ii. ",, l i_.J. 1 .-- it l..r .
AWC Carriers, Inc hiring drivers. Van. Flatbed, Lease Pur-
i i. r ...r... ( l. .' -. j i i i V l II '. I T. l :
www awc-curriers corn
D ri r i 14R H ( l, r I I2 l i .1 I .h1. .... 1 .J. .. :' I '.'
( 8 6 6 U74 8 l P--,< ,I2 ,l F -.N .: .. F 71, ,. .
(866)748-6285,


llit1ing


Miscellaneous

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM includes standard
installation. 2 MONTHS FREE HBO & Cinemax! Access to over
225 channels! Limited time offer. S&H. Restrictions Apply.
(866)500-4056.

Real Estate

COASTAL GEORGIA- GATED COMMUNITY Large wooded
water access and marshfront homesites. Ancient Live oaks,
pool. tennis, golf. Water access lrom $64,9(0). Pre-constructon
discounts. www cooperspointlcom (877)266-7376.
NEW LOG I11.lr l-iHrl I '***...." i.,iul log home shell
nestled oon lF i, i .1 .11 -1.. .,. orth of Boone.
Won't last! Ist lime offered. (800)455-1981, x119.
,rl.iiii.nh, t..,l IIn..,..fli .' i .., ... community weaving
I **.. 1 -.1 I 0 ,. .... 1 -ii i ,,- p- I
(866)334-3253, x759.
"MAKE THIS SUMMER THE BEST" E Tennessee's Norris
Lake & GColf properties make every; ,:.l .1 'i,,,I;.l -...1
$24,900- Call Lakeside ,.. a' .* -
k.y2.a'ialinidcrel.ly-lacm.otri.
OCALA area New Log Cubin mn 20+ AC $359.90( Nerw 1.800
sqft log cabin w/ wirap-around deck set among ita uge satmrd of
pines, Miles of bridle paths to enjoy. Just west of Ocula close to
1-75. Ampli rd frontage w/t .tI..i t. ...... ...... I.t
see. Call now (866)352-224 \5ti
; \hl \ il\\ Im <( \IN '*iW'. .,% ,.. r .,11 hi )111.1 :1. J
I.. ... ,., ail wooded ........1 ... ; from ti ionul forest on
,1,,,,1,1 .,. croationu al ,, Ir, Paved roads, u/g utils.
central water. sewer, more. Excellent financing. Call now
(800)704-3154, ext. 608. Sutset IBay. LLC.
FORECLOSED GOV'T HOMF.S $0 or Low down! Tax repos
and' binkruplcies! No Credit O.K. SO to low down. For listings
(800)501-,1777 ext, 1299.
III.\111 II I'I r i> ll '( \Kll til.lI, \ s in t. '..- .l ,t ir'l ':ld l-',
' I. I t' t. I lte. l.lfll- It I L I-LL ft.'LN- I tN 4 i l-'
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS.Homes. Cabin,. Acreage& Invest-
.... i. ...., M.,1,,1, Realty GMAC Real, Estate, lMurphy
l,. .. utih,,i .,r.i Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.
\\1 1 II 1. MtIO NI.\IN% ni. ( .. I..,i 'A rlt ire. ,..
CALL FOR FREE BROCHURE OF MOUNTAIN PROPERTY
SALES; (800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy 317 Peachtree St.
Murphy, N.C. 289H6. swww realtyofmitrphy com.
Steel Buildings


-__ .- .- BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bottom Pricesl" Last chance. Beat
Next Price Increase. Go direct/save. 20x26. 25x30. 30x40.
35x50. 40x600. 45x90. 50x1100. 60xl80. Others. Pioneer
... (81l)668-5422.


ARGENTINA, WINGSHOOTING and Big Game H hunting: he
Best Bang for the $ anywhere in the world. Winter season:
April-August. 2005. Weekdays: (314)219-9800; Evenings:
(314)894-3776.
HUNT ELK, WILD BOAR, Red Stag and Bufftilo in Missouri'
until 3/31105. Guaranteed Hunting It. .. ,. Only $5.00..
Our policy NO Game, NO Pay, Reasotuble Rates, Call
(314)293-11610.

Legal ServiceS

l 'i ll % iC, tl" i, Im'ii i C t.tii I .l .ii : r.0e .iir..


\( I L 1 1M I I l 1 li( LiI 11( I,)I \[ILI.D" %lt', ...
I.r h I j,- ill., \ 'l[ -N ii I, I in i lJl (.'. ( F
' \LI. ir.,. ~1 1 "ir< "r ,i .i i, it R it ',lrI


(INI ( \1 1.1 I UNHI I t I I N1 1LRIL lINl .1unrt.'.I
lions of potential customs. Place your advertisement in die
F1. Classified Advertising Network. For $4510 your ad will be
placed in over 150 papers. Chek out our 2x2 and 2x4 display
network tool Call this paper. or Heather Mola, FL Stutewide
Network Direct&r at (866)742-1373. or e-mail
ltnola@flpress.com for more information. (Out of Stule place-
ment is also available.) Visit us onlinte at www6.norida-
classifieds.com.




FCAN


Week of February 7, 2005


" I,, I ,,,,,, I I' ..., f ', 1. 1, 1: r l i r ,,., ,, collegee F d.
i,. ,., ,,[ ,i ,.i,..,, il .i, i ...' I,.1 Uniled Negro College Fund.


IMPACT


MWC GL


AM 1360


THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAY 0 6, 0 P.M.


BUSINESS NETWORK


I


FEBRUARY12.2005n


fnJ /1Dn rr A Or' A D


I


'1





PAUL B-8 .. 1.


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FEBRUARY 12, 20ff.


FLORIDA STAR


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