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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
January 22, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00003

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
January 22, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00003

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text



NORTHEAST FLORIDA'S OLDEST AND LARGEST AFRICAN AMERICAN OWNED NEWSPAPER
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"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


FLORIDA'


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


thefloridastar.com


Correction Officer


arrested


For Aggravated Battery


and he had received notice. He was carrying a taser in
his left pants pocket when arrested and searched. He is
being held on a $10,000 bond.
Sheriff Rutherford requested the U. S. Attorney to
add this incident to the other investigations presently
underway in the Department since the original report
regarding the beating, according to witness, contained
false information. In the other incidents, medical
reports state that Sammie Evans died of a broken neck,
Ezra Jones died of stress stemming from the use of
cocaine and being held in a restraining chair. Rafael


Souffront, the third case during a six-week period, died
from bleeding after an accidental fall.
SCorrectional Officer Mincey has been released from
the Clay County Jail after posting a $25,000 bond.
This was not the first complaint against Mincey for
excessive force. He has been with the Jacksonville
Sheriffs Office since November 1999.
The Sheriffs Office Integrity Unit is asking that all
complaints of possible criminal behavior involving
members of the Department be reported to the Unit.


Ronnie Forest


The Jacksonville Sheriffs Office announced that
Correction Officer Edward Mincey, 28, had been
arrested and charged with Aggravated Battery and
Official Misconduct after being accused of kicking
inmate, Ronnie Andrew Forest, 35, in the head at the
Pre-Trial Detention Facility on January 7, 2005.
Forest was arrested on January 7, and charged with
fleeing/attempting to elude law enforcement officers.
His drivers' license had been suspended in September

Super Show-Time Multi-Cultural
Festival For Super Bowl Weekend


America's First
Super Bowl Event
For Minorities
Near Stadium






FE A t-

City Councilwoman
Pat Lockett-Felder said
that Super /Showtime
Festival, which will be
held from February 3 to
February 6, 2005, is still
open for churches and
vendors to participate.
This particular festival
will bring together the
African-American,
Latino, Caribbean and
Pan-African communities
of Jacksonville in a four-
day multi-cultural festival
that will take place at the
A. Phillip Randolph Park
located at the covers of
Jessie Street to First Street
on A. Phillip Randolph
Boulevard.
The Councilwoman
said this is the first time in
history that Jacksonville
and this historic neighbor-
hood can experience an
event of this magnitude.


'"I am
hope-
ful and
prayer-
ful that
t h e
festi-
v a 1 Pat Lockett-Felder
will have a positive eco-
nomic impact on
small/minority business-
es, area non-profits,
churches and
local/national corpora-
tions, as they participate
in the Jacksonville Super
Showtime Festival," said
Ms. Lockett-Felder.
The prices to partici-
pate in this event, accord-
ing to Ms. Lockett-
Felder, are less than any
Super Bowl in history.
All participants must first
register with the city in
order to get a booth space
by calling (904) 713-
9201. She is also asking
churches to bring their
choirs to be a part of this
magnificent event that
will get worldwide expo-
sure. Several entertainers
are expected to perform
as well as local talent,
starting with the high-
stepping marching bands
at the International
Parade on Thursday,
February 3 at 5:00 p.m.




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President Bush In Jacksonville

To Announce New Higher Education Goals


President Bush traveled to Jacksonville to announce
his plan to increase grant money for higher education.
Before a crowd of 1500 invited guest, the President
spoke with students who had returned to college after
many years, utilizing the Pell Grant.
He said he plans to increase the amount of the grant
from $4,050 to $4,550 over a five-year period and will
give an extra $1,000 to low-income students with top
grades as an incentive. He wishes to make the grant
available year-round.
Eric Matthews said the grant provided him the abili-
ty to return to college even though he has a wife and
young son. He presently works with the Jacksonville
Fire Department.

News in brief

Alicia Keys At Super Bowl

K The beautiful Alicia Keys
will sing "America the
Beautiful" at Super Bowl
XXXIX in Jacksonville.
Students from the Florida
School of the Deaf and Blind of
St. Augustine will join her. The
S: late Ray Charles attended the
school and also sang the same
Alicia Keys song for a Super Bowl.

Thousands Of Jax Residents
To Receive $4,300

Thousands of area residents are entitled to as
much as $4,300 in Earned Income Tax Credits
(EITC) this filing season, and United Way's
RealSense Prosperity Campaign wants to make sure
they collect them. From January through April 15,
RealSense is working to provide free income tax
preparation.
In 2004, RealSense helped hundreds of
Jacksonville residents receive more than $1.6 mil-
lion in EITC. For more information call United
Way's 2-1-1.

Best Companies to Work For

Publix and Mayo Clinic made Fortune 's list of

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President Bush chats with FCCJ student Eric Matthews.
100 best companies to work for in the U. S. Mayo
clinic with 36,909 U. S. employees was number 81
on the list and had a negative in job growth. Publix,
with 123,826 U. S. employees was number 94 on the
list and had a moderate job growth. So when Publix
says, "It's a pleasure," it is not only a pleasure to
shop there, it's a pleasure to work there.

New Archbishop Of Atlanta


The first black leader of the U.
S. Conference of Catholic Bishops
was installed as archbishop in
Atlanta during the week of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.'s holiday.
Archbishop Wilton Gregory
became Atlanta's sixth archbishop.
The Chicago native was elected Ar
president of the bishops' confer- W.
ence in November 2001.

Bob Marley Due To Leave Jamaica


Bob Marley, the regga
a wife is not happy with his p
iat nlarc and nlan fto ehulr


rebury him in his "spiritual resting place" Ethiopia.
No date has been set for the reburial but it will not
happen before the end of February, according to
reports.

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RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA.DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, NOREEN ERCOLINO, LAURENCE GREENE,
LAVERA THOMAS, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DESIREE SANDLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON' AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County

The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in.Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed bycolumnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


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This month, Mississippi
authorities arrested a reputed
longtime leader of the state's
Ku Klux Klan for one of the
most dastardly crimes that
struck the Civil Rights
Movement of the 1950s and
1960s: the murder of three
civil rights workers in
Neshoba County, Mississippi
in June, 1964.
The suspect, Edgar Ray
Killen, now 79, pleaded not
guilty at his arraignment today
in Philadelphia, Mississippi,
the county seat, according to
news reports and is being held
without bond.
The three activists-James
Chaney, a 21-year-old black
Mississippian, Michael
Schwerner, 24, and Andrew
Goodman, 21, two New
Yorkers-were abducted on
June 21, 1964 by Klan mem-
bers with. the connivance of
law officers of Philadelphia,
and the surrounding Neshoba
County and brutally murdered
because they, like their co-
workers during the
Movement's "Mississippi
Freedom Summer" campaign,
had been fearless in challeng-
ing the perverted laws and the
extra-legal violence white
racists used to rule
Mississippi. Killen, a preach-
er, was one of eighteen white
,men-some reputed Klan mem-
bers, others local law officers-
brought to trial in 1967 in that

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small town on federal charges
of, not murder, but of violat-
ing the victims' civil rights.
Seven of the men were
convicted; none of them spent
more than six years in prison.
Eight were acquitted of the
charge; and three were
released because the jury
deadlocked in reaching a
unanimous verdict about
them.
Killen was one of those
three. According to news
reports, he was identified dur-
ing the trial as having been the
coordinator of the Klan's role
in the crime and having been
specifically ordered by a top
Klan official to kill
Schwerner.
According to a dispatch in
the New- York Times, Killen
has always denied being
involved in the crime.
Nonetheless, the story
noted, he referred to the
killers of the three during an
interview last year in the
Jackson (Miss) Clarion-
Ledger by saying, "I'm not
going to say they were wrong.
I believe in self-defense."
Edgar Ray Killen is of
course entitled to, the pre-
sumption of innocence. But I
am heartened by this signal
that Mississippi authorities do
not intend to let those who
murdered the three civil rights
workers so long ago-eight of
the suspects are, still alive-


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


To Be Equal
By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League

The Mississippi Arrest: Bending Toward Justice


escape the judgment of con-
temporary society and of his-
tory, for they in their old age
remain the face of the evil that
ruled the American South for
two-thirds of the twentieth
century.
During that time it was
often referred to with obscur-
ing euphemisms, from "Jim
Crow" to "the Southern way
of life."
But now let us speak
plainly: It was an era of a
reign of terror.
The whole of America
now has a broad a n d deep
understanding of what "ter-
rorism"-the amoral targeting
for violence of innocent civil-
ians-is. Many African
Americans, and Black
America in general, have long
known what terrorism is-
because for a century after the
Civil War black Americans
endured a reign of terror
throughout the Old
Confederacy: thousands of
them, bereft of protection
from local, state and federal
governments, had their homes
and-businesses and churches
burned, and grieved for their
neighbors and members of
their own families who were
beaten and murdered.
The perversion of democ-
racy and of human decency-
that produced in the White
South has been poignantly
documented in many books
and articles by black and
white authors. Certainly, one
cannot read such. accounts of
this case as William Bradford
Huie's 3 Lives for
Mississippi, and Jack
Mendelsohn's "Brotherhood
Beneath an Earthen Dam" in


his The Martyrs: Sixteen Who
Gave Their Lives for Racial
Justice, without realizing the.
enormity of the evil Southern
segregationists were fighting-
and murdering-to preserve.
For decades many civil rights
veterans, and many segrega-
tionists, too, no doubt, were
convinced the civil rights
murders of these years in
Mississippi and elsewhere
would never be truly pursued.
But since 1989 prosecutors in
the Deep South have re-exam-
ined at least 19 civil rights-
related killings, and gained
nearly ten convictions, one
mistrial, and one acquittal.
Equally important, that
they long-ago crimes are
being pursued shows a deter-
mined refusal on the part of
black and white prosecutors
and other law officials, and
ordinary citizens in the South
to let the great crimes of the
region's past go unpunished.
We trust-and we use the word
deliberately and sincerely-that
Mississippi state authorities
will continue their pursuit of
justice for the murder of the
three civil rights workers.
Their actions' are another
example of the power of the
insights of the Movement's
chief spokesman, Martin
Luther King, Jr., who said in
one of his speeches that "the
arc of the moral universe is
long, but it bends toward jus-
tice."
Yesterday's arrest in a
crime that still pierces the
heart of any decent person is a
sign that at last in this case we
are bending toward its proper
resolution: justice.


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Ff R inA STAR


JANUARY 22. 2005


Socially Speaking


Betty Asque


Davis


"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"


"Matthew W. Gilbert's 7th Annual Student/Teacher
Grand Class Reunion Celebration"
The members of the class of 1955 celebrating the 50th
Anniversary of their high school graduation awaited with
enormous enthusiasm, anticipation and excitement for the
limousine arrival of their former teachers. This weekend, as
has been the custom on the first weekend of the New Year,
was the Matthew W. Gilbert Panther's Grand Class Reunion.
This was the seventh annual alumni event.
Pausing for photos and warm greetings following their
arrival, the stylishly dressed former teachers followed by the
Class of 1955 along with their guests entered the beautifully
all white decored Radisson Riverwalk Hotel ballroom to the
strums of "Pomp and Circumstance" preceded by a trumpet
fanfare to commence the Saturday evening activity (the
grand reunion activities had begun the night before).
Matthew W. Gilbert School, named for the Reverend
Doctor Matthew William Gilbert who was both a member
of the Class of 1887 and the first confirmed African
American to graduate from Colgate University, has a rich
history. Beginning as the Franklin Street Junior High
School, names that are now synonymous with the schools,
William M. Raines and Eugene J. Butler were among the
renowned principals. And the graduates of both the Franklin
Street and Matthew W. Gilbert schools are loyal, steadfast
and faithful alumni brimming with great zeal and love for
their dear school.
Each year during the banquet Coach Nathaniel
Washington dons a curly Afro wig before calling the roll of
graduating classes from Franklin Street Junior to the last
high school graduating class of Matthew Gilbert School.
Alumni from DC, Arizona, Georgia, New York, Nevada,
Maryland and California joined their local classmates as
each class being presented took their turn with an individual
dance creation representative of their graduation era. For
one class each of the members were carrying noisemakers
and using them effectively as they were putting on their
'dance routine.'
The Grand Reunion Committee from the Matthew
Community family Dr. William Scott, Jr. described as the
Voice of the Gilbert Panthers, always leading the school
song during half time at football games and being the
announcer for Gilbert's football games; Mrs. Thelma I.
Pinkney Geiger a Jacksonville native, educated in the local
schools of Boylan-Haven and Old Stanton High School
who began as a physical education teacher later becoming a
counselor at Gilbert is remembered for the radiant personal-
ity permeated there and in the other positions she held dur-
ing her professional career; and Mr. Nelson Grant
described as a true legend and as a teacher who instilled in
every student he encountered the need to stay neat and
organized as the 2005 Legend honorees and Mrs. Tiny
Thomas was presented the 2005 Humanitarian award for
her caring and commitment to improving the lives of other
people. As a member of the Matthew W. Gilbert Mrs.
Thomas worked hard and was the 1957 PTA's Mother of the
Year.
There were sightings at this popular first of the year
weekend event of graduates of the school's arch rival school,
New Stanton High. That's right! We shared a table with
Mrs. Armenia Green who indicated that this was her fifth
year attending the event.
It was great seeing childhood friends Zean Clayton who
was the guest of 1964 Gilbert grad Mrs. Dee Callahan and
William and Mrs. Iva Baker Smith; college friends Mrs.
Margie Alvarez Witherspoon and from Washington, DC-
Ms. Yvonne Robinson; and colleagues, Duval County
School's area superintendent Mesdames Mary L. Brown
and Lula Brown. I had not seen either Zean Clayton or Ms.
Robinson since we were students on 'the hill' (FAMU). Of
course that was a few years ago (?)! Clayton retired from the
nation's Department of Education and Ms. Robinson retired
as DC's Division of Reading Supervisor. Presently Ms.
Robinson is a Reading E4ucation Consultant and coordi-
nates the Reading First Initiative with DC's public schools.
Participants on the pleasurable banquet program were:
Matthew W. Gilbert Middle School principal Tony Bellamy,
Jordan Baker, Mrs. Earline Seabrook Floyd, event chair-
person Elbert Robinson, Attitude Performing Arts
Studio, James Daniels, George Brown, Alabaster Box
Dance Group, Johnnie McCray, James Cotton,
Lawrence Fisher, Mesdames Veliria Shuford and Eddie
L. Pugh.
With the music of the Jazzy Jeff Band, dancing and fel-
lowship culminated the weekend affair. And with a reunion
committee led by Elbert Robinson and the hard working
assistance of committee members as Mrs. Almetya Lodi
this was again a magnificent weekend affair! This is an invi-
tation that we look forward to receiving!
***** **
Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834; E-mail socially@thefloridas-
tar.com or you may reach me directly at imajol@aol.com,
(telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904) 285-7008.
See you in the paper!


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FLORIDA STAR


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Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
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Jacqueline Y. Bartley


HELP NEEDED
FOR A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT!

Give to: The Samuel W Smith Fund Raiser
for Kidney Transplant,
Account #234-5528-5
Compass Bank
Jacksonville, FL


IMPORTANCE OF PLANNING


Often one works for a life-
time, makes countless sacrifices,
and does a great deal of planning
in order to provide financial
security for one's heirs. On the
other hand, often too little time
and thought is spent on other
considerations involving one's
survivors.
What should be done in the
event of one's death is of pri-
mary importance. It is a difficult
enough time for spouse and close
relatives without having to make
decisions regarding your wishes-
-particularly if these have never
been expressed. Discuss the
subject openly and, better yet,
include your wishes in written


form (called Letter of
Instruction).
Plan ahead concerning other
matters. Should the survivor
stay where he or she is and live
alone/ would it be be better to
move in with grown children,
another relative, a friend, a
retirement community? Unless
this type of question is explored
and answered, one has not fully
provided for one's survivors.


A.B. COLEMAN
MORTUARY, INC.
"Our Alm Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
se60 Moncrief Rd.l
Tel: 768-0507
S ,wwwABColeman.comm


Faith In Our Community The Church Directory
-Schedule of Events and Services- "Come and Worship With Us"


2005 NEW YEAR'S REVIVAL-A 2005 New Year's
Revival will be held January 26-28 at Greater New Mt.
Moriah Missionary Baptist Church, 1953 W. 9th St. Service
schedules and speakers include: January 26, 7:00 p.m.-Rev.
Darien K. Bolden, First Missionary Baptist Church of
Fernandina Beach, Fla. January 27, 7:00 p.m.- Rev. R.E.
Herring, Mt. Bethel Baptist Church. January 28, 7:00
p.m.- Overseer B.E. Williams, Greater New Jerusalem Full
Gospel Baptist Church. Transportation is provided. Call
904/354-0145. The Rev. Dr. Percy Jackson, Sr. and The Rev.
Dr. Percy Jackson, Jr., Pastors.
FAMILY AND FRIENDS DAY-Mt. Sinai Missionary
Baptist Church, 2036 Silver St., invites the public to help
celebrate Family and Friends day at the church on Sunday,
February 13 at 10:45 a.m.
EIGHTH ANNUAL WOMEN'S CONFERENCE-Holy
Tabernacle 'Church, 6416 Miriam St., presents the 8th
Annual Women's Conference on Saturday, february 12,
beginning at 10:00 a.m. For more information contact the
church at 764-3754. Paul R. Cordona, Pastor. Bishop
Robert L. Jones, Senior Pastor.


Family, Residents Celebrate
Homegoing Of Frank B. Priestly

Homegoing servcies for Frank B. Priestly, who
served for 38 years as an educator in the Duval County


School system, were held on Friday,
January 21 at Historic Mt. Zion
AME Church. Mr. Priestly was a
member of the church pastored by
the Rev. Frederick D. Richardson,
Jr. Interment for Mr. Priestly was
held in Evergreen Cemetery under
the direction of Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc. He passed away on
Monday, January 17.
A native of Jacksonville, Fla,


. J .

.....


... ,

; .
Frank B.
Priestly


Mr. Priestly was educated in Duval County public
schools. He served in the U.S. Army and was a mem-
ber of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., and Club
Barons (20 years).
Predeceased by his wife, Mrs. Brenda A. Priestly,
Ms. Coatsie G. Jones (sister), and Cassius Jones
(brother), he is survived by: Sons, D'Wayne L.
Priestly Senior (Cynthia) and Cassius G. Priestly;
Daughter, Mrs. Brenda A. Priestly Jackson (DeAndre);
Six grandchildren, Imani J. Jackson, Malik S. Jackson,
Lauren A. Priestly, D'Wayne L. Priestly, Jr., Kalif H.
Jackson and Kya P. Jackson.
Stepson, W. DeLando Williams; Sisters-in-law,
Mrs. Ann Hurst and Mrs. Patricia B. Miller; Brothers-
in-law, Rodney L. Hurst, Sr. and Robert A. Albertie;
Cousins, Mrs. Winona Britt and Mrs. Verdell Bradley;
Nephews, Rodney 1. Hurst, Jr. (Danita) and Todd M.
Hurst; Godson, Kendall M. Salary, and other sorrow-
ing relatives and friends. Memorials can be made to
the Frank B. Priestly Memorial Scholarship Fund,
Office of Institutional Advancement, Virginia Union
University,. 1500 North Lombardy St., Richmond,
Virginia 23220.







Anger and a thirst for revenge are natural reactions
when a wrong is committed against you. I understand that.
However, acting on those feelings iswrong. As impossi-
ble as it seems, you must try to find, it in your heart to for-
give, as Christ commanded.
If you can do this, you will be practicing what I do
every day. There is nothing I won't forgive provided the
sinner is truly repentant. That is the key. The sinner's heart
must be pure when he comes to Me. Simply saying, "I'm
sorry," is not enough.
If at all possible, if someone has wronged you, they
should not only be truly sorry, they should make an effort
to make amends. This will be their way of atoning.
By way of atonement for sinners, I ask that they not
only try to right the wrong they've done. I ask that they
"Go and sin no more." If a person is committing the same
sin over and over again, they are not making a true effort.
They are not showing a genuine repentance.
(c) 2005 DBR Media, Inc.



GRAVE SITE FOR SALE
RESTLAWN
MEMORIAL PARK


Section L, Lot#409, Site #2
$850
(904) 757-6285


If There had been a death
in .louer .l il.r .l'esterdal,
w'iha would. ou be doing
today ?


Deborah West


I


PAGE A-4


5 :-:
~.


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School 9:30 a.m. -
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m. ; :-i
Sunday School Review............8:00 p.m. i1 1 1L
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


SCHRISTIAN FAMILY


A WORSHIP CENTER
,a Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday.
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
'. Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
S- Sunday Praise & Worship 8:00 a.m.
S Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
A A Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service...................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities
:"y-

Coming Event...

Town Hall Meeting
For Citizens 16 to 30 years old
Who Have had incidents
With The Police.

For More Information:
Call 354-7249

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M.,Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see I Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530'
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)








JAJUARY 0 0i",-IL.1
.'A'-r '


Black Caucus Grows in Numbers but not Power

This week we commemorated the birthday of Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr.: a minister, a civil rights leader, a father, and
a Nobel Laureate. Dr. King led the fight to reform America's
ideas of equality and civil rights and to forcefully dispel the
notion that the American dream was only limited to
Americans of a certain color or background.
Dr. King understood the right to vote was invaluable to
every American citizen. Without it, individuals, would be
without a voice in our nation's government. He told us, 'There 'i
is nothing more dangerous than to build a society, with a
large segment of people in that society, who feel that they -
have no stake in it; who feel that they have nothing to lose.' _
But as we observe Dr. King's birthday, we are acutely aware f.
that, more than half a century later, the stake that he was talk- Rep. Corrine Brown
ing about was more than the right to vote. He also was talk-
ing about the right that all Americans share the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happi-
ness. And in today's world, if Martin Luther King were still among us, his message would be
directed towards the growing disparity, in wealth that our country is facing. Because of the
Bush administration's policies of tax cuts for the wealthy during the last four years, the gap
between the classes has widened tremendously, as the rich grow richer and the poor go poor-
er.
I would like to point out however, that a special tax credit exists to offset some of these poli-
cies. This tax credit is called The Earned Income Tax Credit or "EITC." If one earns between
$1 and $35,458 per year, one can qualify for this special tax credit. The EITC is a special cred-
it to boost the incomes of working families. This credit reduces the amount of income tax
owed, if any, and is intended to offset some of the increases in living expenses and Social
Security taxes. To receive this credit, one must meet the eligibility requirements and must file
a tax return. (For further information, or to order forms 1040, 1040A, 1040EZ and Schedule
EITC, call 1-800-TAX-FORM (1-800-829-3676), or order forms over 1he internet at
http://www.irs.ustreas.gov. You can also get free assistance from the IRS by calling 1-800-829-
1040.)
Today we face a struggling economy that is not producing enough jobs, and it has imposed
even greater hardships on minorities.-Since March of 2000, black unemployment has soared to
nearly 11 percent, almost double that of whites. And there is still a glaring wage'gap con-
fronting minorities in the workforce. Black men earned 73.9 percent of what white men earned
in 2002, measured by median full-time wages and salaries. That's barely up from 73.4 percent
a decade ago.
In our health system, minorities still repeatedly receive inferior care. An Institute of
Medicine report found that health care delivery is very unequal depending on the race or eth-
nicity of those being served. That inequality is thought to be a major reason that African-
Americans frequently have worse health outcomes than whites. In addition, the black infant
mortality rate in fact remains twice as high as the-rate for whites, and 20 percent of black
Americans lack regular access to health care compared with less than 16 percent of whites.
Without early and advanced education, individuals face a great handicap in this world. Yet
in our school system today separate and unequal is still the reality in far too many places. Here
once again. we see terrible failures in the policy of the Bush administration with respect to
minorities. The No, Child Left Behind Act, promoted and signed by President Bush a few years
ago authorized millions and millions of dollars for education funding for our nation's children,
yet when it came down to it, over half of the funding that was authorized never made it to the
schools, even though Democrats in Congress and teachers around the nation begged for more
money! And even in higher education, thereremains to be a large gap between the percentage
of whites with a college degree and the percentage of blacks.
Dr. King knew that leadership was more than photo ops and eloquent rhetoric. He knew that
leadership ieant proposing and pushing education, health and economic policies that give
every citizen an equal shot at the American dream. As Dr. King so eloquently said, Human
progress is neither automatic nor inevitable... Every step toward the goal of justice requires
sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated
individuals.
Today we must redouble our commitment to the America that was envisioned by Dr. King
nearly four decades ago. We have not yet reached the Promised Land, but it'is up to us to ensure
'that America achieves the full measure of its promise.
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King and the split in the Baptist Church

by Zenitha Prince, Special to the NNPA from the Afro Newspapers

BALTIMORE (NNP.-A Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is generally viewed as the civil rights
activist who hada dream and led the masses in an attempt to achieve it. People usually forget
where he came from.
"People often forget that he was a Baptist preacher," said Bishop Douglas Miles of Koinonia
Baptist Church in Baltimore. "On the anniversary of his birthday, many celebrate a plastic Dr.
King who is being peddled by the media as just a dreamer."
But King's faith was the bedrock of his life and work, and just as he transformed a nation, so
too did he leave his stamp on the Black Church.
"He challenged and led the church," said Miles. "I think that, more than any individual in the
late part of the millennium, he positioned the Black church to be the voice of sanity and moral-
ity in America."
The church historical\ had been that voice. Since the days of slavery, the African-American
church had always existed at the hub of Black activism and leadership.
: But after years of freedom, the church may have become too complacent, mired in a White
Republican religious ideal of going along to get along, which, said Miles, is mirrored today.
"The Black Church ceded the stage of protest and prophecy to the White evangelical church
that has an agenda that is.not in the best interest of poor or Black people," Miles says.
King, and others of the civil rights movement, rebelled against that status quo and, in doing
so, brought division to the Black church.
"There was ambivalence in the Black church and the White church when MLK stepped for-
ward," recalls the Re\. Mlarion Bascom, a contemporary of King and a member of the infamous
"Goon Squad."
In 1961, King and his associates broke away from the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A.
at its con\ mention in CinLinnati, Ohio, to form the Progressive National Baptist Convention.
Disagreements arose o\ er the election of officers and the tenure of the convention president, but
there \\as also disagreement o\ er the methods of King and others in the civil rights movement.
"Most didn't support him out of fear and misunderstanding of the gospel," says Miles. "Many
thought of him as just a trouble maker, and they did not see that God was leading him to not only
lead America, but open the eyes of the world."
But, contends the Rev. Vernon Dobson, a compatriot of King, the struggle was between "old-
school Republicanism" and a new Democratic ideal.
"We divided because of our pure politics," he says.
"About the third day of the convention, the younger turks, like Martin Luther King and Jesse


Jackson, started their conversations about reactions to Republicanism that seemed to be against
us in our struggle, and that's \\ hen the argument started, Dobson continued.
The mindset among the patriarchs of the church at that time was like his father's, Dobson
remembers, \\ ho used to tell him," 'Vernon, if you run your mouth too much, you're going to get
yourself in trouble. You got to'learn to keep it to yourself."'
Adversely, said Dobson of himself and the rest of the 'young turks': "We were all right out of
college, all preachers, all came out of religious families and were all as God-centered as anyone
else; but we were also more aggressive in our reaction and [were] putting at risk other people
who had learned to use the system to get us into college."
Both Basconi and Dobson agree, however, that jealousy also played a part in the disagree-
ment.
"(King) had television and news media (coverage) in a fashion that was never seen before,"
Bascom says.
S"They split o\ er personal jealousies," Dobson says. "Some preachers did not lille the kind of
power he had."


What Iraqi elections?

A nation devastated and made completely unstable by
an unjust and poorly planned war has left Iraqis with few
choices. Days before the election there have been no i th e
debates; no positions made public, and the voters still
don't know what options they will have at the polls.
Candidate list have not been published. The only candi-
date who has been able to aggressively campaign has
been the USA hand picked successor to Saddam interim*
SR&. Dr. RapW C V~OaM
Prime Minister lyad Allawi. Is this going to be an elec- I c+RcwKs
tion or a selection?
SLess than 5% of the public is expected to vote and they will have to vote for can-
didates they don't know. They don't know the candidates positions on any significant
issues. They are unsure where the polling places will be and which method they will
be using to vote. The voting is scheduled to take place amongst chaos and fear. The
vale of violence that covers the elections is whose fault? Is it the fault of the poorly
planned war which destabilized the country by completely destroying the infrastruc-
ture of this sovereign nation? Was Iraq this out of control prior to the war? Was
Saddam leading this type of campaign of terror? Did we hear of daily murder, death
Sand suicide bombings?
Prior to the unilateral invasion and occupation Iraq was a stable country. The sit-
ting president had his obvious limitations, as do many leaders. President Bush's deci-
sion to attack and dethrone a sitting president wasn't enough. President Bush, against
the advice of some of his most seasoned advisers, decided to annihilate the nation
along with its infrastructure of order and civility. He attacked their beliefs, security
and way of life. Now at the end of a gun barrel he is trying to force upon them a sys-
tem that doesn't fit their culture. President Bush's desire for power was stronger than
his love for people. While President Bush touts his faith as the impetus behind his
action I must admit that I pray to a different God. My God would not condone the
policies of this president.
The selection process of January 30, 2005 will deliver Allawi as the leader. Things
will not get better because the people of Iraq will not respect the outcome of an elec-
tion process that wasn't. Just like they were supposed to be so much happier when
Saddam was removed from power once again we. will see that President Bush is
wrong. The cultural and civil infrastructure of Iraq must be rebuilt. The occupation,
mock elections, and terror diplomacy will not achieve these ends. President Bush and
his cowboy diplomacy will continue in the same direction because conservatives put
"stay the course simple mind" back in office. We are now paying for the sins of a
tyrant we elected. While he marches back in the White House thousands of men,
women, boys and girls in Iraq are marching to jail with no due process and crying
over the graves of their people and our people. It is only going to get worst. As
President Bush said during the debates, "This is hard work." Did you vote'for this
future? If you did do you like what you see?
Dr Watkins is a syndicated columnist, author professor of sociology at Augusta
State University and the president of Unity Council Inc. he can be reached via his
website: www.ralphwatkins.org.

Contact us at:
info@thefloridastar.com
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HDOP: help delete online predators


1 in 5 children is sexually solicited online.


You don't know what your kids are saying online. Or who they
are saying it to. A lot of times neither do they. So get involved.
To protect your kid's online life or report an incident,
call 1-800-THE LOST or visit cybertipline.com.


NATIONAL
CENTER FOR
C H I L D R E N"


HDOP: help delete online predators


/1
That power, however, has trickled down through the ages, forming another legacy of King's
within the Black Church-generations of Black preachers like Miles and the Rev. Dr. Harold
Carter, who learned from King and used that knowledge to groom other young men and women
in the ministry.
"I talked to him when first I talked to anybody about becoming a minister, and he embraced
me and made me one of his first sons in the ministry. And at that time, the civil rights movement
was just growing, so I was able to share his thinking and preaching at a time when the
Montgomery Bus Boycott was going on," Carter recalls.
At King's knee, Carter says he learned that "the minister can no longer be comfortable behind
his pulpit, but he had to be in touch with the people whose lives were hurting" and that "the real
church could not be locked in buildings, but its true worth had to be felt where people's needs
existed."
"I think (King) gave a framework for clergy who want to remain true to the message of Jesus
to operate in," said Miles, adding that King challenged him and others to be "prophets" and to
willingly "take on the powers and principalities of the world." 'or, "whenever there is a king," he
si 1, "there has to be a prophet to keep his actions in line with God's command."


I


PAGE A-5


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L---------------------------------------------------


College Freshman


To Travel To South Africa


Sherika Clark


Sherika Clark, 20,
Edward Waters College
freshman has qualified for
the 2005 International
Scholar Laureate Program
Delegation on Medicine
which will give her an
opportunity to observe how
modern medicine interacts
with different cultures.
Her dream is to become a
pediatrician.


"I could have chosen the
program in Australia, China
or Brazil but I chose South
Africa because I am con-
cerned about the children
who are suffering from
AIDS in that country," said
Clark. "After watching a
special on Oprah, regarding
the children in South Africa,
it inspired me to want to
help them; now I will have


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'


the chance." Clark's trip
takes place this summer,
May 16 June 4.
While in South Africa,
Clark will visit a rural health
center and learn about the
efforts that are being made
at that level to stem the
spread of HIV/AIDS. She
will witness how, with limit-
ed infrastructure and med-
ical supplies, doctors bring
medical care to impover-
ished communities.
Clark will study and
learn from distinguished
medical leaders and
researchers at The
University of Natal Nelson
Mandela School of
Medicine and The Medical
University of
Witswatersrand.
As a member of The
National Dean's List, Clark's
exemplary leadership, out-
standing performance and a
commitment to a career in
the field of medicine, gar-
nered her nomination to
actively participate in the
program. Clark is a 2003
graduate of Raines High
School and gives thanks to
LaTanya Mitchell, EWC
alumni, for encouraging her
to attend Edward Waters
College.
Clark is the first of four
siblings to attend college.


JANUARY22, 2005


FL.ORIDA STAR


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Advice To Presdent Bush


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.JANUARY 22. 2004


Coach Carter: Hollywood World Premiere!
by Rych McCain
'It had rained in the Los Angeles, Southern California area daily, i
for two weeks straight, setting all kinds of rainfall records!
Flooding, swift water rescues and mudslides were the daily head-
lines. I wondered if this would have an adverse effect on the
crowning night of the Paramount Pictures/MTV Films World
Premiere of Coach Carter (which opened over the weekend as the
#1 Box Office Film, racking in $23.6 Million)! Apparently not!
The skies cleared and the cold temperatures warmed up, as if on
cue! This night would not be denied! It also did not disappoint!
As the film's stars and guests begin to arrive and exit their
limos, the excitement built into a frenzied state with the adoring
fans that lined Hollywood boulevard across thestreet from the
Mann's Chinese theater. The film's cast for the most part did their
best to accommodate most of the press. However, there are always
a few "bonehead," reporters who hog too much time with the cast
members and the rest of the reporters down the line suffer because
those cast member's time is limited to be on that carpet and they
are then "bum rushed," by their sometime "rude," publicists who
abruptly shout a fake apology then snatch their clients to get inside
the theater! These same publicist later "beg," for their clients to be
covered in our publications! Heck of a game-isn't it?
Coach Carter is based on the real life story of Richmond,
California high school basketball coach Ken Carter, who in 1999,
padlocked the gym and kicked his entire, undefeated basketball
team out for failing to keep their grades up according to a contract
the players and their parents had signed.
The entire community was in an uproar and Carter made
national headlines. The players shaped up with their grades and
eventually went on to win the State Championship two years in a Samuel Jackson and Ashanti (Photo @2005 Andre' B.
row. Several of the players went on to college and graduated. This Murray/A Bern Agency Photo)
film is a "must see," for young, inner city youth and all young peo-
ple of any background for that matter! The story and the settings are very accurately depicted just as it is in the hood. Samuel
L. Jackson portrays Carter extremely well and is supported by a great, believable cast.
All of the main cast members delivered standout performances. Rick Gonzalez was especially strong in several emotion-
al scenes with Jackson. For platinum singing star Ashanti, this was her, film debut. Her sensuous, angelic beauty, magnifi-
cently glowed on that giant silver screen in every scene which featured her. She delivered a solid performance as kyra, the
girlfriend of team member Kenyan, played by Rob Brown, who went through pregnancy and relationship issues that many
teenage girls experience in real life.
What was Jackson's impression of the real life Ken Carter after meeting him?
"After I had met Ken for the first time, I knew that. he had a forceful personality, he was very charismatic, a strong per-
sonality. I had to find a way to translate that into myself and get it out into an audience and use the honesty of the script and
the earnestness of Ken to hopefully bring this whole story together and make it stick."
The cast went to a basketball camp for a month prior to shooting. Jackson wasn't part of the camp but he did drop in to
check it out. Jackson said, "I actually went by and watched to see how the guys ran the drills. I talked to the basketball coach-
es about different plays that they had to learn. They gave me diagrams of them. So I read the plays and knew what they were
and learned a lof of different basketball terminology that I didn't know before. It was informative."
When asked what message he hoped the young people will get out of this film, Jackson responded, "I hope that they all
realize that playing sports is really a great thing, but there comes a time when you get slower, you might get injured, you
may not be able to play that game anymore, but your education is the one thing that can't be taken away from you. That's
the tool that will take you furthest!"


* TAMAw BRcWxDCASTINN, Nc-

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105.7 FM
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TAMA Broadcasting, Inc.


The largest privately Black owned medp company in the State uf Florida.
Three (3~ Stalins here in JacksonvlUIe.

Our ito s spend nearly 1.4 Billion Dofars each year in retail sak
Invite them to shop at yewr bie si....they will come!
(al for your free, no oboigaio market$ng analyst,.


95SL& i llCIRN2
JlwaclMUt. I 3 222
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SUPER,


S t laves a heD...
Super Bowl XXXX Weekend
February 3rd -6, 2005
A. Philip Randolph Park
Hon. Pat Lockett-Felder, Festival Chair


Come Out and Enjoy ... The Hottest Tiike In Town !
A Multi-Cultural Fun Fest I!

Food I Music Live Entertainment I
a The VIP Zone Grown Folks Pary

For Sponsorship. Vendor Applications & Information
Contact Festival Office at: (904) 713,9201
Anr offically, J.1ixnlt'nd e e mt Ih[ e1.rk16;01a Sirr GRodi V\1\ H.,i LmInlIett



IW4Ko


AUDITIONS FOR SUPER BOWL PARTY


SPORTS ILLUSTRATED Magazine is looking for club style attractive female dancers to perform

their Superbowl party:
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2005
9:00 p.m. until 1:00 a.m.
Quality Suites at the Beach
Jacksonville Centre of the Arts will be hosting the auditions.
Wednesday, January 26, 2005 8:00 p.m.
2049 N. Pearl Street in historic Springfield

Dancers must be 18 years old or older and must be physically fit and comfortable dancing in a

swim suit. Dancers will be compensated. No prepared dance music is needed.
PLEASE COME IN DANCE, ATHLETIC OR SWIM ATTIRE.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT

K--EZIA JUSTICE
(904) 463-4529 Cell
or


(904) 355-5551 Studio


1 111- -r. I -~r --


FLORIDA STAR


SA rrd-1 A 0


Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain
Last summer I predicted that the Wayans Brother's
movie "White Chicks," should be up for a Best Make-Up
Oscar. Well, despite the fact that special effects make-up
artists Greg Cannom (who won an Oscar for Mrs.
Doubtfire) and Keith Vanderlaan did an unbelievable job on
transforming Shaun and Marlon Wayans into White girls,
the movie didn't get a nomination nod! The seven films that
are up for the award are: The Aviator, De-Lovely, Harry
Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban, Hellboy, A Series Of
Unfortunate Events, The Sea Inside and The Passion of The
Christ! Go figure!
Queen Latifah will host the 47th Annual Grammy
Awards, which will be broadcast on CBS, Feb. 13th at 8PM
(ET/PT) from the Staples Center in LA. The Multicultural
Special Events Professionals Conference will take place at
the beautiful Riviera Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas,
Nevada, Wednesday through Friday, April 20-22, 2005.
Events and Promotion students and professionals are invit-
ed to attend this incredible affair. For more information go
to www.multiculturalevent.com or call 310-330-0540. Fans
of the late, great singer Sam Cooke, will attend an annual
tribute for him in Los Angeles, at the airport Marriott Hotel,
January 21-22. This event is sponsored by The Sam Cooke
Tribute Foundation Inc., a non-profit organization dedicat-
ed to the preservation of Cooke's legacy and music.
Talk about all of these tsunami relief events, who is
looking out for the tsunami victims on the African side of
the Indian Ocean? I'll have some answers next column.
Singer Michael Eugene Archer PKA singer D'Angelo, was
arrested and charged with drunk driving and drug posses-
sion during a traffic stop by police in Virginia. D'Angelo
hasn't been on the charts in a while. Could it be, because he
got high?
King of Crunk Lil Jon & The Eastside Boyz have signed
with Vivid Entertainment, the top hardcore porno movie
company, to make two movies. Lil Jon will be involved
with the directing, casting, editing, music and partying! In
case you fine wine connoisseurs want the inside skinny on
what wine will be offered at the Governor's Ball following
the Oscar ceremonies, we've got the 411! Sterling
Vineyards, a prestigious California Napa Valley Winery
will be serving their Red Carpet Reserve Wine, which is a
special Cabernet Sauvignon Blend created just for the
Oscar celebration.
Maat-Hotep!


I







PAGE B-1


r n.nm A .TAR


JAIUARY L22, .dW/ .& ,--


American Beach Celebrates 70 Years


Seventy years ago the
Pension Bureau of the Afro-
American Life Insurance
Company founded
American Beach on January
31, 1935 on the southeastern
end of Amelia Island.
In celebration of the
National Historic American
Beach a 5-day cruise leaving
out of the Jaxport Cruise
Terminal on Memorial Day,
May 30, 2005 is in the mak-
ing.
Sign up today for an
exciting ocean voyage to
Key West and Nassau
aboard Carnival's Fun Ship
the Celebration. Then for
the next five days and five
nights surround yourself in
luxury with your family and
friends.
Think about the unparal-
leled entertainment venues
whether in the Red Hot
Piano Bar, the Bourbon


Street Casino, the Galaxy
Dance Club or the extrava-
gant Astoria Theatre
Lounge.
Make time for soothing
Epicurean spa visits. Dine
on gourmet cuisine at every
meal and promenade
through Mardi Gras Square
to see as well as to be seen
while shopping for bargains
galore.
Travel with the Historic
American Beach 70th
Anniversary Celebration
and find yourself irresponsi-
ble of mundane chores for
five days and 5 nights.
If you can still remember
all the fun times on
American Beach and want
to be on this historic voyage
then guarantee your reserva-
tion today by calling AAA
Travel, 280-8181, ext. 226
or Marsha Dean Phelts, 904-
261-0175.


Jonquill Flowers Wanton at The Blue Palace after
Hurricane Dora in 1965.
Donna Richardson Joyner To Appear In Jax
JACKSONVILLE--Donna Richardson Joyner, Wellness
Expert, to appear at the Touchdown for Life: Super Wellness
Health Fair on Sunday, January 30, 2005 from 1:00p.m. to
5:00p.m at the Gateway Mall. Joyner, wife of syndicated
talk show host Tom Joyner, will join the Super Wellness
Health Fair to promote nutrition and fitness as ways of
achieving and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.
Richardson Joyner, the creator of top-rated fitness video,
"Sweating in the Spirit", will help encourage lifestyle
changes among African Americans. Commonly identified
health disparities disproportionately affecting African
Americans include: diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular dis-
ease. "Eating more fresh fruit and vegetables and.exercis-
ing daily is the first step to a healthy lifestyle," said Mrs.
Joyner. "Exercise doesn't have to be difficult or intimidat-
ing. Starting off at a sensible pace with reasonable, achiev-
able goals is important. Just 30 minutes of physical activity
each day -- including walking, taking the stairs and stretch-
ing -- is a positive start. The important thing is to begin now.
In addition to the health benefits, you'll look and feel better."

DEATH

S" NOTICES

BARTLEY-Edward.
BUIEY-Terrell T.
CARSWELL-Theodore,
died January 17, 2005.
COOK-Florida H., died
January 15.
DANIELS-Edwin P.
DUBENION-Baby girl
Elaijah Shamarelle, died
January 8, 2005.
JACKSON-Bernice R., 92,
died January 11, 2005.
JACKSON-Wilson, 89,
died January 10, 2005.
JOHNSON-Ruth Delores,
died January 7, 2005.
JOHNSON-Vinell Johnson,
82, died January 15, 2005.
JORDON-Deacon Elvey
Buck, died January 5, 2005.
LEE-Josephine, died
January 17, 2005.
MARCUS-Bobby Lee, Sr.,
died January 6, 2005.
MARTIN-Hattie, died
January 15, 2005.
PARKER-Hannah Louise
Coger, 90, died January 9,
2005.,
PRIESTLY- Frank B., died
January 17, 2005. Alphonso
west Mortuary.
RICHARDSON-Little
Miss Nyla Alissa.
SEALS-Hattie, died
January 15, 2005
SIMPSON, SR.-Deacon
Albert, 90, died January 12,
2005.
SMITH-Thelma B., 73,
died January 16, 2005.
THOMAS-Luberta
Jackson, died January 18,
2005. Alphonso West
Mortuary.
WILLIAMS-Rev. Leon,
45, died January 16, 2005.
WYCHE-Willie Mae, died
January 7, 2005 A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
YULEE-Bennie J., died
January 6, 2005.


LEFT FRAME: Skeeter and Mabel in the 1950s popping
on American Beach. RIGHT FRAME: Jeanie Caldwell
and Mabel Ward ride to the salt in a new car during the
early 1950s.



COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.


POST 197 ANNOUNCES NEW HOURS OF OPERA-
TION/SUPER BOWL PARTY-American Legion Post
197 will observe new operational hours effective January
30 through February 5 to coincide with Super Bowl
XXXIX activities. Hours are 5:00 p.m. until 2:00 a.m.
(closing). Food and drinks are available during these
hours. A Super Bowl Party will be held at the Post, 2179
Benedict Rd., on Sunday, February 6.
FREE SEMINARS HELP PROTECT ELDER CON-
SUMERS FROM SCAMS AND FRAUD-Stetson
University College of Law's Elder Consumer Protection
Program will warn Jacksonville area elderly citizens
about the dangers of identity theft and home services
fraud at several free consumer protection seminars.
Dates, times and locations include- January 24, 11:00
a.m., Oceanway Senior Center; January 25, 11:00 a.m.,
Hammond Community Center; and January 27, 11:00
a.m., Jacksonville Beaches Senior Center, South
Jacksonville Beach.
HAIR CUT-A-THON-a Hair Cut-A-Thon will be held
on Sunday, February 13 from 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. at the
American Academy of Cosmetology (1330 Blanding
Blvd.) across from the Winn Dixie on Knight Boxx in
Orange Park. The event is planned to raise money for
Jewels Rogers, a local girl, who was injured in an auto-
mobile accident by a drunk driver and is paralyzed. The
hairdressers and volunteers are not getting paid they have
doanted their time to the event. The haircuts are $10 and
all proceeds will go to the victim. Two local entertainers
will sing, a clown will be available for face painting.
Other highlights include balloons for the kids, raffles, a
50/50 drawing, and a rose for each person getting their
haircut.
UNF GREAT AMERICAN JAZZ SERIES-There is
life in Jacksonville after the Super Bowl, too ... and, plen-
ty of it. The legendary Dave Brubeck Quartet is coming
to the University of North Florida on Friday, February
11, at 7:30 p.m. five days after the National Football
League's crown jewel event. The concert the Quartet will
present in Lazzara Performance Hall of the Fine Arts
Center is part of Brubeck's "85th Birthday Celebration
Tour." That gives one reason to say the legendary jazz
virtuoso wants to spend part of his 85th birthday at UNF.
Brubeck has every reason for wanting to include UNF in
his celebration. It is home to one of the country's great
jazz programs, and has welcomed him and his Quartet to
campus once before, in 2003, just as UNF has played host
to a veritable "Who's Who" in the jazz realm. The
February 11 concert is the highlight performance of the
17th annual UNF Great American Jazz Series, and also
features the oft-honored UNF Jazz Ensemble 1. Directed
by Dr. Keith Javors, it's a band worth celebrating in its
own right, and one that Brubeck himself has praised as "a
real powerhouse." JE1 also has accepted an invitation to
tour China for two weeks this summer.
JACKSONVILLE ORCHID SHOW-The Jacksonville
Orchid Society will host the Jacksonville Orchid Show on
Saturday and Sunday, March 19 and 20, 10:00 a.m.-
5:00 p.m. each day at the Garden Club of Jacksonville,
1005 Riverside Avenue.- Admission Free to the public.
The Jacksonville Orchid Society is a not-for-profit organ-
ization whose sole purpose is to encourage the study,
appreciation and growing of orchids, both species and
hybrids.
-ir ---:rtv -*.I -' ----- -- -- -r .--,


r A 7 TYr A73T7 I'l'I n







JANUARY 22, 20014 rLVOi u A o 1. .



Ask Deanna! Is an advice column known for its fearless
approach to reality-based subjects!

Dear Deanna:
My neighbor really upsets me by the way she puts her chil-
dren on the church bus on Sunday morning. She comes out in
her robe with a cigarette in her mouth and sends her kids,to
church but she doesn't go with them. This makes me so mad f
that I'm at the point of knocking on her door so I can tell her .
about herself. Would I be wrong for doing this? .,
LaTanya Oklahoma City, OK


Dear LaTanya:
Don't be foolish by going to that woman's house and get yourself knocked out. People
tend to be touchy when you come at them the wrong way concerning religion. Her business
is her business but as a Christian, you should invite her and the children to come to church
withyou instead of judging her current actions. God wants you to do his work by seeking
the unsought, teaching the untaught and bringing the unbrought.

Dear Deanna!
I'm 33 years old and have been in a relationship for 11 years. We both are ready to get
married but my boyfriend wants to wait. He says our finances aren't in order but I think he's
lying. What do you think?
Confused Columbia, SC

Dear Confused:
You both are lying. He's living a lie because after 11 years, there should've been a mar-
riage of love with or without finances. Married couples build together. He's very comfort-
able and has no plans to marry you and will use excuse after excuse. You're lying to your-
self in believing he'll marry you. With your age and the time you've been in the relationship,
you should know the status of your finances. You both need to come together, lay your cards
on the table and decide to commit or split and keep it moving.

Dear Deanna!
I just graduated from high school and started college. I haven't gone to class since the first
semester began. I'm tired of school, but my family forced me to go to college so I went along
with the plan. Now I feel guilty because of the money spent on tuition and the loans. How
do I tell them I want to drop out?
Talisha Atlanta, GA

Dear Talisha:
It's good your conscience is kicking your behind. You need to wake up and realize you're
blessed to go to college when so many people can't go because they can't afford it. You need
to change your mind and do the right thing and stay in school. Seek assistance from your
guidance counselors and talk with your parents and get yourself back on track. In the long
run, you'll greatly benefit as an educated adult with a degree. If not, prepare to say, may I
take your order please?
Write Ask Deanna! Email: askdeannal@yahoo. corn or Deanna M, 264 S. La Cienega, Suite
1283, Beverly Hills, CA 90211. Visit her Web site at www.askdeanna.com.



Sy Cecil Rockins

His name is Sy Cecil Rockins and if you ever meet
him, you will give yourself an achievement award. I can
personally guarantee you a fully unconventional,
unbleached, convincing and complimentary experience
that will amuse and challenge you. Sy Cecil Rockins is a
living-in-vivid-color African American history maker. '"~. .
He is a politician, preacher, chauffeur, bartender, librari- '
an, tour guide, stockbroker all saddled in a slightly limp-
ing, stooped Malc6lm X eyeglasses wearing scholar. He
is self-taught, unbridled with an air of mischief that is res-
ident with confident African American men. He is com-
fortable navigating around the Internet, referring to it as a
'widow-maker' because once you get on it, it's hard to get off. Sy Cecil Rockins is
funny, entertaining and focused on strictly business. .economic development for
young incarcerated African American males
Why, you might ask is this unusual or uncommon? My initial answer is that I am
not sure how old Sy Cecil Rockins is. He is quite simply ageless. I never feel as
though I am talking to an old man. He refers to his age as being three(3)days older
than Lookout Mountain. My guessament is maybe plus eighty(80)years old. What's
most unusual is that Sy Cecil Rockins lives in a retirement center. His apartment is
small and tidy. He has a home office, a fax machine, e-mail, a comprehensive roller-
deck of names, addresses, telephone numbers of everybody in influential positions
overlooking a library and a mini-mountain of miscellaneous books and papers. The
last time I visited with him, he set the table for our healthy lunch of grapes, cheese
and crackers, napkins and place mats in tow and we talked about world events and
some television shows he wanted me to consider doing. Larry Basheer says that you
have to be intellectually prepared to visit Mr. Rockins. His first question after his
jovial greeting is "have you read the paper today"?. His primary discussion with Mr.
Basheer is about money, international trade and Africa. Mr. Basheer says that the
money issue,is always for somebody else. Mr. Rockins told him once that 'he did not
.need any money except to help somebody else. What do I look like needing money
with one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel". So, for the past ten years
he has worried, harassed politely, visited, written and revisited every politicians and
governmental entity on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean about the dismay and awful
plight of the African and African American's shameful population explosives incar-
cerations. He has been to Africa several times. The last time he contracted a severe
case of malaria and had to be airlifted back to the states. He was not expected to sur-
vive. Returning home, cutting his trip short, he put all concerned on notice that the
Lord was not through with him yet. He. had already survived cancer years earlier.
He has plans now to conclude his mission in Africa and will be returning soon.
Sy Cecil Rockins thinks big, big, big and for an old man with a litany of ideas and
a menu of in roads, has an impressive track record for getting things done. He still
has thoughts of an educational exchange program where the African comes to learn
certain trades from the African American, i.e., auto mechanics, or more specifically
putting a motor in a car.
I am enlightened, amazed and encouraged when I talk to Mr. Rockins. I have
never heard him complain about anything, the children not calling me, the grandchil-
dren not visiting, my legs hurt, nothing. His total agenda is on working everyday to
build a better world for the young, globally. For those of us that talk to him regular-
ly, the one word that is clearly befitting is 'energized'. He is fueled with curiosity and
flexibility and warns all to 'stay young, you will live longer'. Now, there's a message
for the aspiring and already retired talent.
Ester Davis is the AARP Texas Communications Leader, AARP and an award win-
ning host/producer on PAX-TV, with a #1 Neilsen rated talk show. She is a recent
recipient of SISTERS-CEO Award from OfficeMax and Black Enterprise. She can
be reached at esterdavis.com.


Jacksonville, Florida

February 8- February 13, 2005

Norwood Shopping Center

5290 Norwood Ave.


For immediate information call 800.316.7439
To purchase tickets log onto www.ticketmaster.com

www.universoulcircus.com


A 9D00000 H0000 00
ANDY JOHNSON
Jg-^ I ^1IMP K ^ ^iTi I 1 ^mP>xf' ^i


FOR


SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS:

**Andy was the ONLY candidate in his race to show up at all, for*
even a moment, at the January 1 rally against police brutality:
and,in favor of fairness for all people.

,*Andy has been a life-long fighter against racism, teaming up,
*with Dr. Arnett Girardeau as far back as 1979 to work for reform
*of the fleeing felon law.

*Andy has used his radio show to fight for reforms needed right'
*now in the sheriffs office, the same reforms urged by Pastor*
.0 0
eGundy and Pastor Sampson and other leading pastors from.
SJacksonville's minority community.

**Andy is fed up with the office of Supervisor of Elections. Andy*
will change things. Andy will make sure each vote counts. Ahdy.
,will make sure each voter counts. Andy says that integrity is the
Issue.
* "
.*Andy will create and distribute by mail, each election, a Voter.
SPamphlet, just like in California, where each candidate gets one
page to say his or her thing, uncensored.

*Andy will institute longer hours and will institute other policies,
,too, designed to create greater accessibility and greater con-
venience for voters.

*Andy will make sure there is a verifiable paper trail so that
*there is absolutely no doubt about the election results.

GET INVOLVED! ANDY'S H.Q. PHONE IS 720-1913.
ANDY'S WEBSITE:

http://www.andyjohnson.us
INTEGRITY IS THE ISSUE!
Andy Johnson is a candidate for Duval County Supervisor of Elections.
SPaid political advertisement, paid for and approved by
4 ,ndy Johnson Campaign Furn, DEMOCRAT.
0 000 O0 00 0 0 0 000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0*******


PAGE R-2


r r orn A VITAR


I I I TT 1% 1% It Aln 4








Three In Four African-American Teens


Say American Dream Is Achievable


WASHINGTON, DC -
- According to a new poll
from the Job Shadow
Coalition and Harris
Interactive, 72 percent of
African-American teens
say the American Dream is
achievable today, com-


pared to 73 percent of
White and 75 percent of
Hispanic teens surveyed.
When it came to reach-
ing the American Dream,
82 percent of African-
American teens say some
level of Higher Education


is essential, compared to
64 percent of White teens
and 73 percent of Hispanic
teens.
The poll of 644 teens
between the ages of 13 and
18 was conducted in
December 2004 and has a


LP From Yellowcard To Ocean Avenue


By Marsha Dean Phelts

Some days are' better
than others are; January
12, 2005 was actually one
of those days. I was privi-
leged to accompany Gloria
Parsons in a visit to her
grandson, Longineu
Parsons, III to deliver pic-
tures from their family
gathering over the holi-
days.
Upon our arrival
Longineu and a couple of
his friends warmly greeted
us. Longineu, a drummer
is a founding member of
Yellowcard, heralded as
"one of Americas biggest,
fastest-growing bands."
It wasn't too long
before I noticed a gold
album on Longineu's east
wall. A gold plate in the
framed album read,
Presented to Longineu
Parsons to commemorate
RIAA certified sales of
more than 500,000 copies
of the Capitol Records
Compact Disc "Ocean
Avenue."
Parsons stated that
"Double Platinum Albums
(sales of over 2,000,000)
are expected to arrive any
day now."
These Gold and
Double Platinum Albums


has the Jacksonville origi-
nated group living out
their dream on Ocean
Avenues from the Atlantic
to the Pacific.
Longineu Parsons, III
a.k.a. LP is the son of jazz
trumpeter Longineu, II and
Beverly Parsons, an inter-


Longineu
Ybllowcard.


national dancer. At the age
of 18 months, LP's dad
worked alongside world-
renowned drummer Max
Roach on Broadway.
Numerous times he
carried his toddling son to
the practice sessions.
(See "Yellowcard", B3C)


Parson, III, founding member of


margin of error of +/-
4%.
Nearly half of the
African-American
teens surveyed (46%)
defined the American
Dream as "Simply
Being Happy, No
Matter What you Do,"
consistent with
responses from White
teens (48%) and
Hispanic teens (43%).
One-in-three
African-American
teens (31%) defined the
American Dream as
"Being Rich and/or
Famous," compared to
one-in-five White teens
(18%) and Hispanic
teens (17%).
Responses to other
definitions of the
American Dream
included:
*"Having a House,
Cars and Good Job":
African-American
teens (42%); White
teens (34%); Hispanic
teens (48%)
*"Being Able to
Provide for My
Family": African-
American teens (32%);
White teens (27%);
Hispanic teens (33%)
*"Having the
Career of My Dreams":
African American
teens (28%);
White teens (22%);
Hispanic teens (35%)
*"Owning My Own
B u s i n e s s :
African-American
teens (11%);
White. teens (4%);


(See "Teens", B3C)


w


U


W






Page B-3AlJanuary 22, 2005


Yellowcard

(Continued From Coyer)


LP's oceanfront home he
presented us with a set of
his signature drumsticks
and the "Yellowcard
Beyond Ocean Avenue
DVD recorded Live at the
Electric Factory."
Imagine my amaze-
ment upon discovering
that the three other people


I met at LP's home were
lead vocalist-guitar, Ryan
Key, Debra Shaw whose
picture is on the cover of
the Ocean Avenue CD and
Henry Bordeaux, the
group's production manag-
er. My day on Ocean
Avenue was sent as a
"View From Heaven."


Gloria Parsons with famous grandson, LP, Longineu Parsons, III,
ber of Melodic Punk Rock Bank, Yellowcard.


SDuring one of those
practices, LP teeter tot-
tered his way up to
Roach'sdrum kit. Upon
striking the drums with his
hand, the toddler listened
for the tone that each sec-
tion of the drumhead
made.
Roach noticing how
the tyke naturally took to
the beat and the tone gave
little Longineu his first set
of drumsticks. After clam-
oring to play around on
Roach's drum kits, LP's
day came when his dad
gave him his first set of
drums at the age of two. .
Due to his father's tute-
lage'LP has been playing
on stage since the age of
five when he debuted at
Smalls, New York City's
most famous after hours
jazz club.
For an hour and a half
the kid played one song,
"Straight No Chaser," as
trumpeters, pianists, and
saxophonist took their
turns playing off against
him working him into
shape. LP and his dad left
the club as the sun began
to peep on the horizon.
LP crosses the conti-


nents with a band he
founded with Benjamin
harper. Other band mem-
bers are Peter Mosely,
Ryan Key and -Sean
Mackin.
Yellowcard a rock
band formed in 1997, is a
unique fraternal society.
Its members are musician
friends who attended the
Douglas Anderson School
of the Arts.
They were taught jazz
and classical music at
school. In their after hours
they infused the rhythms
of their hearts with the
music genres they learned
in school. As they prac-
ticed, jammed and partied
at each other's homes, the
term yellowcard was fre-
quently used.
Yellowcard in soccer is
a penalty, where players
are- issued a warning
before being thrown out of
the game.
When these band mem-
bers yelled "Yellowcard,"
it meant, "Whoops, don't
spill that beer on my
mom's white carpet".
There were many yellow-
cards issued in the band's
formation days and the


catchy warning call stuck.
Like the lyrics in many
of their songs, it wasn't too
long before Yellowcard
relocated "Way Away",
leaving their hearts on
"Ocean Avenue" and like
another title song, they fre-
quently come "Back
Home." Once on the West
Coast they were signed by
Capital Records and cata-
pulted to the galaxies
while developing loyal
fans the -world over
through their music.
From his birth in Paris,
France 24 years ago, LP
has traveled globally. He is
bilingual and talks about
cities and countries with
the ease that locals refer-
ence streets in their neigh-
borhood.
Tours with Yellowcard
have carried them all over
the contiguous United
States to Down Under and-
throughout Europe and
Asia. Yellowcard won the
House of Blues Award and
the Big in 2004 Award.
They were surprised out of
their minds upon winning
the most recent MTV2
Award.
As Gloria and I left


Teens

(Continued from Cover)

Hispanic teens (11%)
"It is evident from this poll that many teens know
education is essential to achieving their dreams and find-
ing happiness," said Keith Gall, Acting Director of the
Job Shadow Coalition. "It is the goal of Job Shadow Day
to help young people understand that it is important to
find a career that truly makes you happy, whether or not
it makes you wealthy, while exploring the role that edu-
cation can play in helping you achieve your dreams."
The poll was conducted in support of Job Shadow
Day 2005. On February 2, 2005, more than one million
young people will have a chance to explore their futures
when they "shadow" workplace mentors as part of the
eighth annual Groundhog Job Shadow Day initiative.
Job shadowing is a yearlong national effort to enrich
the lives of students by acquainting them with the world
of work through on-the-job experiences and a carefully
crafted school curriculum that ties academics to the
workplace.
National job shadowing is a coordinated effort of
America's Promise, Junior Achievement, the U.S.
Department of Education and the U.S. Department of
Labor. ING is the national title
sponsor of Job Shadow Day 2005. Nelnet
and Valpak pak.com/> are co-sponsors.
Last year, more than one million of America's youth
were able to experience more than 100,000 workplaces
throughout the nation. For additional information includ-
ing a How-to Guide, brochure, and an online training
presentation on how to coordinate job shadowing, visit
www.jobshadow.org For
more information contact info@jobshadow.org.


FIND OUT

HOW YOU

CAN APPEAR

IN PREP RAP

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Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "1, 2 Step" Clara Featuring Missy Elliott (Sho'nuff
NkisicLine LaFace) Last Week: No. 2
2. "Soldier" Destiny's Child Featuring T.I. & Lil Wayne
(Columbia) No. 4
3. "Disco Inferno" 50 Cent (Shady Aftermath) No. 3
4. "Drop It Like It's Hot" Snoop Dogg Featuring Pharrell
(Doggystyle) No. 1
5. "Lovers and Friends" Lil Jon'& The East Side Boyz
Featuring Usher & Ludacris (BME) No. 5
6. "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" Green Day (Reprise)
No. 6
7. "Let Me Love You" Mario (3rd Street J) No. 7
$ "Only U" Ashanti (The Inc. Def Jam) No. 9
9. "Since U Been Gone" Kelly Clarkson (RCA) New
Entry
10. "How We Do the Game" Featuring 50 Cent
(Aftermath G Unit) No. 15
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Some Beach" Blake Shelton (Warner Bros.) Last Week:
No. 1
2. "Mud on the Tires" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) No. 8
3. "Awful, Beautiful Life" Darryl Worley (DreamWorks)
No. 3
4. "When I Think About Cheatin'" Gretchen Wilson (Epic)
No. 7
5. "You're My Better Half' Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 10
& "How Am I Doin'" Dierks Bentley (Capitol) No. 5
7. "Back When" Tim McGraw (Curb) No. 4
8. "Bless the Broken Road" Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street) New
Entry
9. "Party for Two" Shania Twain with Billy Currington or
Mark McGrath (Mercurys) No. 2
10. "The Woman with You" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 6
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Without Love" Sun (JH) Last Week: No: 1
2. "Silence 2004" Delerium Featuring Sarah McLachlan
(Nettwerk) No. 4
3. "The Wonder of It All (Escape/Gomi/Trendroid/I.
Pavlin/O. Nissim Mixes)" Kristine W. (Tommy Boy
Silver Label) No. 3
4. "Lose My Breath (P. Rauhofer/P. Johnson/ M. Joshua
MJixes)" Destiny's Child (Columbia) No. 2
5. "Vertigo (Jacknife Lee Mixes)" U2 (Interscope) No. 10
6. "My, My, My" Armand Van Helden (Southern Fried
Tolnn Boy Silver Label) No. 7
7. "Copacabana (Remixes)" Barry Manilow (Concord)
No. 8
8. "You Lift Me Up" Martha Wash (Purple Rose) No. 6
9. "Walk into the'Sun" Dirty Vegas (Capitol) No. 5
10. "What You Waiting For?" Gwen Stefani (Interscope)
No. 9
** e.


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"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commecil News Providers"
Available from Commercial News Providers"


WOULD YOU LIKE
TO APPEAR IN PREP RAP?
FOR INFORMATION
,: CALL (904) 766-8834


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JAIL OR BAIL

EDITOR 'SNOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
BATTERY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-On Monday, January
17, 2005 at 10:10 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to an
unverified 911 call at Morehouse Rd. Upon arrival police offi-
cer was met by the girlfriend (victim). She informed the police
officer that she had locked her keys in her car. Her boyfriend
(suspect) became angry and began arguing with her. He then
punched her with his fist in the right eye. His ring on his hand
cut her right eye above the eyebrow. He then left the scene. The
police officer observed a cut that was approximately 1 inch in
length above her right eye. The police officer was unable to con-
tact the suspect, and the victim refused to give a written state-
ment. The victim and suspect have a child in common, but have
never lived together. The victim did not want medical treatment
at that time. The police officer will go to the state attorney's
office and seek a warrant for the suspect's arrest. The victim was
given a domestic violence pamphlet. Case not cleared. Patrol
follow-up.
ATTEMPTED GRAND THEFT OF A MOTOR VEHICLE-
On Tuesday, January 18, 2005 at 12: 44 a.m. a police officer was
dispatched to an attempted auto theft at 1339 West 15th Street.
Upon arrival, a witness met police officer. The witness advised
that he observed the suspect attempting to steal the victim's
vehicle. The police office contacted the victim, and she advised
that she left her vehicle locked around 8:00 p.m. on 1/17/05. She
reported that the witness advised her that the listed unknown
suspect was attempting Jo steal her vehicle around 12: 40 a.m.
hours. The victim told the police officer that the rear.passenger
side window had been smashed. She stated that she did not
know who attempted to steal her vehicle. The witness provided
a description of the suspect and last direction of travel. The
police officer observed that the rear passenger window. of the
vehicle had been smashed, and aired a BOLO for the suspect. A
canvass was conducted for the suspect, but with negative results)
The victim was provided a case information card. Patrol efforts
suspended.
SPOUSE DOMESTIC BATTERY-On Monday, January 17,
2005 at 5:47 p.m. a police office was dispatched to the 5300
block of Archery Ave. in reference to a domestic dispute. Upon
arrival police officer made contact with the wife (victim), who
reported that she was visiting friends at the above listed address
when her husband (suspect) came over. He started yelling at her
for being at her friends' home, and struck her on the left side of
her face with an open hand. Afterward he got into his vehicle
and "rammed" into the back of the vehicle she was driving. The
suspect then exited his vehicle, with a crowbar in hand, and
smashed the windshield and several other windows of the vehi-
cle she was driving. The victim told the police officer that prior
to leaving, the suspect told her you can call the police, but they
can't do anything because the vehicle you are driving is in my
name too and I have cancelled the insurance." The victim told
the police officer that she and her husband had been married for
18 years, and separated for 1 year. She has her own apartment,
but occasionally stays overnight in the home she had shared
with her husband so she can see her children. The victim told the
police officer that her husband has'been violent towards her for
most of their marriage and is very controlling. However, she had
never called the police because she was afraid her husband
would take their children and she wouldn't be allowed to see
them. When police officers spoke with the friends, the victim
was visiting they conform that's the way the incident happen.
The police officers observed no visible injuries on the victim, so
she was given a state attorney's card and advised how to seek
prosecution, and to seek an injunction for protection. Case not
cleared. Pending State Attorney's Office Disposition.
BURGLARY RESIDENT DWELLING-On Tuesday January
18, 2005 at 2:20 a.m. a police officer was dispatched to a bur-
glary at an apartment at 5020 Cleveland Rd. Upon arrival,
police officer met with the victim, who stated she left her resi-
dence on 1/17/05 at 4:45 p.m. and returned at 2:20 a.m. on
1/18/05 when she found the rear door open and the residence
had been burglarized. She told police officer that a bathroom
window was left cracked open and another window was left
unlocked. The rear door was locked when she left. The robbers
(suspects) took a TV, VCR, Playstation with controllers and 2
games, but left other electronics and jewelry in plain view. The
victim is concerned about the maintenance crew. She told police
officer she looked at all of the windows, which were locked and
covered with dust. None of the windows appeared to have been
open from the outside. A DVD disc covered with moisture was
found outside behind apartment #168. No evidence technician
was requested due to no piocessable surfaces located that were
not disturbed by the victim. A canvass was not conducted due to
the late hour. The victim was given a case information card.
Patrol efforts suspended.
ARMED ROBBERY WITH A FIREARM-On Monday,
January 17, 2005 at 5:57 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to
a robbery to an individual on Kings Rd. Upon arrival, police
officer spoke with the (victim), he advised that he had just pur-
chased some Bar-B-Que and was walking to his vehicle. The
suspect, who claimed he had a gun, approached him from
behind. The suspect reached into the victim's back pocket and
took his wallet. The suspect told the victim not to turn around as
he walked away towards Hiram St. The suspect then fled on foot
in an unknown direction of travel. The 'victim told the police
officer he did not see a gun, but did feel an object poke him in
his back when the suspect stated he had a gun. A canvass for the
suspect was unsuccessful. The victim was given a case informa-


tion card. Patrol efforts suspended due to lack of suspect infor-
mation.
SHOT BY AN UNKNOWN ACQUAINTANCE-On Monday,
January 17, 2005 at 8: 25 a.m. police officers were dispatched to
a shooting at a place in the 4600 block of Portsmouth Ave. Upon
arrival police officers met with the victim. The victim stated that
he was driving a friend home, when an unknown suspect driv-
ing a Toyota Camry headed south bound on the same street in
the 9300 block of Waynesboro Ave. shot him. The victim told
police officers that he did not recognize the suspect or vehicle.
The victim believed a shotgun shot him. The victim was trans-
ported by rescue to Shands Hospital for medical treatment. A
neighbor told the police officers that she heard several gunshots,
however did not see anything. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts
,ispended. -


EDITOR'S NOTE: The information and opinions
expressed here are of the authors and not those of
The Florida Star. This is for information only-not
legal advice.
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This occurs even if you're doing nothing and don't get
arrested. The more FI reports cops have about you, the
more thoroughly you'll be interviewed. The cops are
thinking, not illogically, that if other cops are stopping
you all the time, you must be up to something, right?

So remember Uncle Dale's Golden Rule #1:

If cops can't see you, they can't arrest you.
Here's my advice in a nutshell:
Stay away from cops.
*Hang in, not out.
Stay out of sight, and be all right.


Prospective Jurors Called

'Jury Pool From Hell'

MEMPHIS, Tenn. Defense attorney Leslie Ballin
called it the "jury pool from hell." The group of prospec-
tive jurors was summoned to listen to a case of
Tennessee trailer park violence. Right after jury selec-
tion began last week, one man got up and left, announc-
ing, "I'm on morphine and I'm higher than a kite."
When the prosecutor asked if anyone had been con-
victed of a crime, a prospective juror said that he had
been arrested and taken to a mental hospital after he
almost shot his nephew. He said he was provoked
because his nephew just would not come out from under
the bed.
Another would-be juror said he had had alcohol prob-
lems and was arrested for soliciting sex from an under-
cover officer. "I should have known something was up,"
he said. "She had all her teeth."
Another prospect volunteered he probably should not
be on the jury: "In my neighborhood, everyone knows
that if you get Mr. Ballin (as your lawyer), you're prob-
ably guilty." He was not chosen.
The case involved a woman accused of hitting her
brother's girlfriend in the face with a brick. Ballin's
client was found not guilty.


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21-31-46-47-50-52 Sturday, January 15 ROLLOVE.!!


PAGE B-5


FLORIDA S.TARR


TATTTADIV 77 2/0n0


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I/I L D-U '3 L1v(J A AiA -


McNabb Is Steady As


Pressure Mounts


Donovan McNabb


PHILADELPHIA
Donovan McNabb sat in a
dark room with his two dogs
and watched film of the
Philadelphia Eagles' loss to


Carolina in last year's NFC
championship game.
"My dogs talked to me
and told me to keep my head
up and I think I was all
right," McNabb joked.
As the Eagles (14-3) pre-
pare for their fourth consec-
utive NFC title game against
Atlanta (12-5) on Sunday,
McNabb certainly doesn't
appear to be feeling the pres-
sure of having lost the last
three conference champi-
onships.
The five-time Pro Bowl
quarterback cracked jokes,


mimicked reporters and
never stopped smiling in a
10-minute news conference
on January 19.
McNabb threw more and
ran much less this season,
finishing with a career-low
41 carries -- 30 fewer than
last season. Having All-Pro
wide receiver Terrell Owens
for the first 14 games made
it easier for McNabb to stay
in the pocket and have the
best season of his six-year
career. McNabb set a team
record with 3,875' yards
passing.


Avery Johnson Becomes


Mavericks' Acting Coach


DALLAS--Avery
Johnson was going to serve
as the third-string point
guard for
the Dallas .4
Mavericks
while -
learning
how ,to
one day
run the
t e am.
Now he's
coaching the team.
Johnson became Dallas'
acting head coach
Wednesday, Jauary 19 fill-
'ing in while regular head


coach Don Nelson gets his
right shoulder repaired.
Nelson, had surgery
Thursday, January 20 to
reanacli an almost complete-
ly torn rotator cuff and
expects to miss about three
weeks.
Johnson retired as a play-
er just before training camp
and has- spent the last four.
months being groomed to
eventually succeed Nelson.
His apprenticeship has
included running practices
and even coaching four
games, three with Nelson as
his assistant and another


after Nellie was ejected in
the second minute. Dallas is
3-1 in those games and 24-
12 overall, good for second
in the Southwest Division
While Johnson is confi-
dent, he also knows he'll
have plenty of help.
Longtime NBA coach Del
Harris will be right next to
him, with the league's most
extensive staff close by.
He'll also talk often with
Nelson. The timetable
would leave Johnson calling
the shots for 10 games, eight
against teams currently
under .500.


-.




: .








JANUARY 29-30, FEBRUARY 3-6, 2005
JEA PARK

Your ti ket to football fi a has arrived as "Anlerica Cn line Presents the NFL EXPE RIENCE,'
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America ILI
Online. ~


*MOTOrOMLA'
SWrt Lacket

J/avo


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4.
B"


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) A i
business deal
goes better than
expected.
Socially, you gad about
quite happily this week.
Take time to catch ybur
breath over the weekend.
TAURUS (April 20
Sto May 20) In
defending a
friend, don't get
into a fight with
your mate. Sometimes,
you're too involved in oth-
ers' problems. Loved ones
can take offense.
GEMINI N
(Ma) 21 to
June 20) A .
minor- delay in
your plans throws you off
track. However, things clear
up by midweek. Later, travel
and romance go hand-in-
hand.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) Take
some time this ,
week to recon-
nect with your
mate. Some quiet, alone
time is just what you both

need. This weekend, tackle
some chores you'd been pro-
crastinating on.
LEO (July 23 to
August 22), .
Look for ways to "
improve yourself. .
Believe it or not, -
it can be done. Ultimately,


You 're




Invited


this aids in your success.
VIRGO (August 23
to September
22) You're tempt-
1 I ed to give in to
Stress. This isn't
good for you emotionally or
physically. If need be, don't
be afraid to ask for help.
LIBRA (September
23 to October l.
22) You've been '
somewhat oblivi- -.iJ
ous to a close
friend's ploy for attention.
Experience will tell you that
you're right to ignore this.
You don't need to be this
person's crutch.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21) It's
unlike you to be reticent
About anything'
you have to say.
Don't worry. You
can speak your
mind tactfully and still get
your point across.
SAGITTARIUS
(November 22
to December
21) Financial
matters are
favored. However, domestic
matters are another story. By
week's end, you sort every-
thing through satisfactorily.
C A PRI C ORN
(December 22 to
January 19)
S Stay out of the
I'' fray this week on
the home, front.
------"


Others will strive mightily
to get you involved.
However, this really has
nothing to do with you, and
you're wise to realize it.
AQUARIUS (January
20 to February --
18) Early in the ,w~r
week, business *'" t
meetings prove
frustrating. Put that mind to
work and come up with a
new plan. You're certainly
up to the challenge!
PISCES (February
19 to March
20) Friends are
making unfair
demands on your
time. Feel free to say no.
You don't have to attend
every party or event.
Nastassja Kinski,
January 24; Dinah Manoff,
January 25; Ellen
DeGeneres, January 26;
Bridget Fonda, January 27;
Alan Alda, January 28;
Oprah Winfrey, January 29;
Phil Collins, January 30.
(c) 2005 DBR Media,
Inc.





'. S '1
TO' '
i T

-1


To A Birthday Celebration

For


DEBORAH


MAIDEN

General Manager,
President

Of Victory AM 1360 WCGL


Saturday, January 29, 2005
6:00-9:00p.m.

Household Faith Ministry Center
1440 W Edgewood Avenue
*Dress is Semi-Formal
,, SPECIAL GUESTS:
"True Believers"
"Keith 'WONDERBOY' Johnson"
Plus local choirs, groups, soloists,
dance teams, more!



Hosted By Dr. Bruce V. Allen
Pastor Of The Church Fellowship Ministries
General Admission: FREE!
~A Love Offering will be received-
For More Details Or Directions, Call 904/766-9955/1-800-331-1359




Your Weekly Horoscope
(JANUARY 22, 2005-JANUARY 29, 2005)


JANUARY22, 2005


FLORIDA STAR


PAC~P 6 A


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TAArrTADV 7 ')nnf<


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE B-7


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Resumes accepted until Jan. 17,
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Request for Qualifications
ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS NO. SI317FO
FOR WATER WELL CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
The St. Johns River Water Management District (District) is requesting qualifications
submittals from firms licensed in the State of Florida to provide water well construction
services. The firms will be employed by the District to provide drilling services asso-
ciated with construction of the lower Floridan aquifer monitoring network, and ground-
water exploration and testing tasks. Although the majority of the Work shall be per-
formed within the District's 18 counties, the firm may on occasion be required to per-
form work outside the District boundaries. Qualified firms must have water well con-
struction experience as outlined in the Request for Qualifications (RFQ).
The District shall qualify all firms that demonstrate the qualifications necessary to suc-
cessfully perform the activities as outlined in the RFQ. Each of the qualified firms
selected shall be required to execute a contract with the District, with the first term
ending September 30, 2005. These contracts may be renewed for two additional
twelve-month periods. Award of these contracts does not preclude the firms from sub-
mitting letters of interest for any other projects advertised by the District.
The pool of qualified firms will have the opportunity to submit bids for individual Work
Orders. For each new project throughout the life of the contract, the District will pro-
vide a Statement of Work (SOW) and a blank Schedule of Costs to each of the qual-
ified firms. The firms will be allowed up to two weeks (14 calendar days) to submit a
bid to the District for total costs for performance of the work outlined in the SOW.
Award of the work will be made to the firm with the lowest bid, with the District reserv-
ing the right, at its discretion, to reject all bids. The District will issue a Work Order to
that firm based on the costs included in the firm's Schedule of Costs submitted in his
bid.

In accordance with the Public Records Law, Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., the District's proj-
ect budgets are a matter of public record. As a courtesy to the interested respondents
on this project, this information is being provided with the RFQ package. The estimat-
ed budget for the first term of this contract,,ending September 30, 2005, is $600,000.
Respondents are cautioned that this amount is an estimate only and poses no limita-
tion on the District. It is anticipated that the budget for each subsequent renewal peri-
od will be $600,000.
Interested firms may obtain a project information package by contacting DemandStar
by Onvia at www.demandstar.com or by calling (800) 711-1712. Packages may also
be obtained from the District by calling (386) 329-4237. Firms requesting packages
through the District will be charged copying and shipping/handling costs as stated at
DemandStar by Onvia or as provided for in Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., whichever is less.
If hearing impaired please call (386) 329-4450 (TDD).

A District staff evaluation committee will evaluate qualifications submittals. The com-
mittee will meet at District Headquarters at 9:00 a.m., February 11, 2005 to discuss
the evaluations and to determine the qualified firms. After evaluations have been
completed and determination of the qualified firms has been made, all respondents
will be notified in writing of the staff's intended recommendation to the Governing
Board at the March 9, 2005 meeting. Individual agreements with each qualified firm
will be executed following Governing Board approval of the qualified firms and the
associated agreements.
The District reserves the right to reject any and all qualifications submittals. The
District also reserves the right to waive any minor deviations in an otherwise valid sub-
mittal package, and to accept submittal packages that will be in the best interest of the
District. In the event the District determines that the number of respondents who are
qualified to perform the work exceeds the number considered to be manageable in
subsequent bid offerings, the District reserves the right to reject all submittals and re-
solicit through an alternate procurement methodology that will select a limited number
of the most qualified respondents.
Qualifications must be delivered to the attention of the Contracts Office, Division of
Procurement Services, District Headquarters, 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida, no
later than 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, February 2, 2005. Responses received after this
date and time will not be considered.
If, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate, contact the
above address or either of the above telephone numbers at least five (5) business
days before the date and time specified.

INVITATION FOR BIDS
Competitive sealed Bids will be received by the St. Johns River Water Management
District (hereafter "the District") at 4049 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 32177, until 2:00
p.m., Friday, February 4, 2005, and publicly opened at that time for:
BID NUMBER S134513
IMAGING OF PERMIT DATA FILES
The Governing Board of the District is inviting sealed bids to index and scan District
Permit Data files into a format to be migrated onto the District's Global Regulatory
System (GRS), beginning April 1, 2005 through September 30, 2007. The estimated
budget for the period beginning April 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005 is
$200,000.00. Funding for the remaining periods is contingent upon annual appropri-
ation by the Governing Board.
Bid packages may be obtained on or after January 18, 2005 by contacting
DemandStar by Onvia at www.demandstar.com or by calling (800) 711-1712. Bid
packages may also be obtained from the District by calling Connie Rozier, Contracts
Administrator at (386) 329-4211. Bidders (hereafter "Respondent(s)") requesting
packages through the District will be charged copying and shipping/handling costs as
stated at DemandStar by Onvia or as provided for in Chapter 119, Fla. Stat., whichev-
er is less.
If, due to disability, you require a special accommodation to participate in any activity
relating to this Bid, please contact the Division of Procurement Services at the above
address or telephone number or, if hearing impaired, by calling (386) 329-4450 (TDD),
at least five (5) business days before the dates and times specified herein.
After evaluations have been completed all respondents will be notified in writing of the
staffs intended recommendation to the Governing Board at the March 8, 2005 meet-
ing. The District reserves the right to reject any and all Bids. The District also reserves
the right to waive any minor deviations in an otherwise valid Bid and to accept the Bid
that will be in the best interest of the District.


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JANUARY YV22.2005


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