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Florida star

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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
January 14, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00002

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
January 14, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00002

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text






City Hall (117 W.Duval St.), the City Hall Annex (220 E. Bay St.), the Courthouse (330 E. Bay St.), the Yates
Building (231 E. Forsyth St.), business offices of the JEA (JEA Plaza, 21 W. Church St.), the Office of the
Tax Collector, including all Tax Collector branch offices; the Property Appraiser's Office, all public libraries
(open on Sunday, January 16), and the offices and clinics of the Duval County Health Department will be
closed on Monday, January 17, in observance of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday.


"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


THE


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Another Black




Man Is Dead!


William Henry Cohen, III
1984-2004
Article written and
released by the MAD DADS
Jacksonville Chapter
with the permission of the
Cone family.
That's right! Another
young Black man is
dead! A victim of a
cowardly drive-by
shooting at 1055 St
Clair Street, in the
Paxon area of
Jacksonville.
Another Mother
can't stop crying over
her baby, "William
Henry Cone III."
Christine Cone last vis-.
ited Jacksonville in
November for William's
wedding.
Just a month later,
she's back in town
again, this time to
attend his burial. Now,
she will return to
Chicago, never to hear
her son call her "Mom"
again ...never again!
Another young wife


Denisha, will never know
what family life could
have been with her hus-
band William and their
11-month old baby girl,
Jamia.
Tragically, their
daughter will have to be
raised without her
father...and it's not her
fault.
Another little-brother,
Shadarrian, will no longer
be able to shoot basket-
ball with, his big brother
William! And William's
sister. Shamika, won't
have this brother around
to tease, laugh with, or
get advice. ...Another
family will have another
reason to be sad at this
time of year, when oth-
ers are starting the new
year with hope.
The question is WHY?
Who gives anyone the
right to take the life of
another? What will it
take to get the African
American Community to
react and respond to the
senseless Black-on-Black
homicides that occur
almost weekly? Whose
fault is it?
Well, there is enough
blame to go around
...William lived in o u r
"VILLAGE!"
Why is it that Black
leaders only get outraged
and call for a march when


a member of our com-
munity is killed at the
hands of white law
enforcement officers?
Is not William just as
dead? When, will we
learn that any and all life
is a gift from God? No
one; least of all another
black man, has the right
to take the life of anoth-
er mother's son; some-
one's loving husband; or
some child's daddy.
Shouldn't we collec-
tively afford 'the same
outrage and sense of
urgent loss when our
children are driving
though neighborhoods
shooting and killing
each other?
MIAD DADS are.-
pleading N ith the entire
African American
Community... STOP
THE KILLING! Stop
killing our potential; our
destiny; our babies.
If you have any infor-
mation that will lead to
the arrest and conviction
of, the individuals
responsible for this hor-
rible crime, please con-
tact the Jacksonville
Sheriffs Office at 904
630-0500.
To join MAD DADS
in this effort to rekindle
love within the African
American Community
call 904-388-8171.


From left: Angela Spears, Alvin Brown, Jasmine Williams, Benjamin Holliday, Willie
E. Gary, Mrs. Coretta Scott King, Ashley Allman and Rev. Rudolph McKissick, Sr.


Mrs. MLK In



Jacksonville


Mrs. Coretta Scott King addresses the audience attend-
ing the Wilie E. Gary/Martin Luther King, Jr. Luncheon
on Tuesday, January 11 at the Adams Mark Hotel in
Jacksonville.


The Florida Star Staff

JACKSONVILLE,
Fla. Mrs. Coretta Scott
King, widow of the late,
great Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. graced the city of

Jacksonville Tuesday at
the Willie E. Gary/Martin
Luther King, Jr.
Luncheon program, held
at the Adams Mark Hotel.
With the theme,
"Continuing. The Dream",


Mrs. King was able to
hear the three essay win-
ners express their dreams
in making a difference.
One could see her
approval of their state-
ments as she nodded her
head.
Her nod of approval
was even more apparent
as she smiled when the
middle school winner,
Jasmine Williams
expressed her goal to


become America's first
black female president.
The crowd of about
500 stood on their feet as
the lady stood before them
to first remind them that
the celebration of her late
husband's birthday is a
day of service, not a day
of leisure. She further
voiced her approval of the
student essays by stating
that she was touched
because our children are
our future.
The "first lady" for
black African Americans
said that we can recognize
her husband by being a
part of community proj-
ects such as tutoring,
mentoring, joining in
neighborhood cleanup ini-
tiatives and being a part of
activities that raises funds
for scholarships. She said
that everybody can be
great because everybody
can serve.
Dr. King's birthday is
celebrated by millions of
people worldwide, in over
100 countries. Mrs. King
played a significant part in
.her husband's efforts and
spearheaded the campaign
to establish his birthday as
a national holiday.


Black Leaders Express Demands For Justice To City Officials


The Florida Star Staff

JACKSONVILLE,
Fla.. A few hours after
the 18th Annual Martin
Luther King, Jr. Breakfast
held at Jacksonville's
Veterans Memorial Arena
with more than 1,800 in
attendance, some of the
city's community leaders
held a press conference
and reiterated
Jacksonville NAACP
president Isaiah Rumlin's
statement that Dr. King's
dream is still not a reality
citing the recent cases of
the deaths of men while in


police custody. Even
though Sheriff John
Rutherford has initiated
the help of the FBI, the
group of ministers and
organization leaders again
voiced their dissatisfac-
tion.
Regarding the Sheriffs
office, the group, with
Rev. R. L. Gundy and
Rev. James Sampson as
lead spokesmen, said they
feel the City Council has
not moved quickly
enough to form a Police
Review Board to monitor
Jacksonville police offi-
cers and they therefore


Rev. R.L. Gundy reads a statement issued by communi-
ty leaders .


demanded such a board be
organized expeditiously.
The group's major
demand focused on the
proposed Tasers being
placed in the Duval
County School System.


Rev. Gundy said there is
no legitimate reason for
tasers to be in the system
and said they will request
all of Duval County
School PTAs' to join them
in fighting this proposal


which could cause great
harm to the lives of our
children. He asked that
parents attend the MLK's
"Celebration of Justice"
which will be held on
Sunday, January 16 at
3:30 p.m. at Mount Sinai
Missionary Baptist
Church. The organizers
said they are prepared to
seek court injunctions to
stop the tasers if neces-
sary.
A demand was also
made to increase more
early voting sites. The
interim Supervisor of
Election announced that


ten sites would be avail-
able for early voting from
February 7 through
February 13. Prior to the
November 2 elections,
this same group of con-
cerned citizens protested
because Jacksonville only
had one early voting site.
Other sites were opened at
that time and has now
been expanded to ten
sites.
Another demand was
that the children attending
school on the toxic waste
site in Forest Park be
removed.to another safe
school location.


ADM I E3TE
PEMI N. 61


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BiThe3woiiBKtanrwi


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Editorial .................... A-2
Lifestyle .................. A-3
N State ........................ A-6
S National .................. A-7
Church .................... A-4
I Local- ... *,*,*,*,*,,*,,*,,,B-1
Prep Rap ................ B-3
qD Jail Or Baif ............... B-5
E Sports ..................... B-6
-7
Business Network..B I


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SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUE DAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS, ESTER DAVIS, NOREEN ERCOLINO, LAURENCE GREENE,
LAVERA THOMAS, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Ne%;paper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33.00
Half Year-$18.50
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions .. pr, bi.t ,lnni,, in this
newspaper hr, ,I n.11 t iarr" l r/'pr. tntl
i/ire p.i ,/Li ,, ~ parer
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
i.,r;-.a. N -,p.,p r % o.-Lmlinon
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
lak.or'n ilic Chamtl. r of r Cmir erce
Fir Chamber of Commerce.. n
Chamber of Commerce


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
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SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


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RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


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'Tis the season, as they
say, when the rhetoric about
kindness and goodwill toward
all rings out across the land-
scape. It shines through even
the commercials which
accompany the televised
reruns of those traditional hol-
iday-season movies that have
warmed the hearts of
Americans for generations.
Unfortunately, this year, as
every year, there is consider-
able grim evidence that all too
often life does not imitate art.
2004 and 2005 mark the
fortieth anniversary of two of
the greatest monuments to
American ideals of democra-
cy, the Civil Rights Act of
1964 and the Voting Rights
Act of 1965. Yet, in recent
weeks several policy studies
and news stories have under-
scored how far from the prom-
ised land of equal opportunity
American society remains.
That sad fact tolls in a lower
register than the usual peals of
festive cheer, almost like a
per erse echo reminding ,us
that prejudice and heartless-
ness never take a holiday.
-For example, statistics
compiled by the Federal
Bureau of Investigation indi-
cate that racial bigotry was the
cause of more than half of the
nearly 7,500 hate crimes
reported to the agency in 2003
and that the 2,500 acts of big-
otry against African


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


To Be Equal
By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League
Ideas That Are Never Out of Season


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Southern Poverty Law
Center, a respected monitor of
acts of bigotry and extremist
groups and individuals, con-
tends the federal statistics
substantially underreport the
reality.
Noting that that because
several states have weak hate-
crime laws (some don't recog-
nize bias against sexual orien-
tation as a basis for a hate
crime) and the reporting done
to the FBI by local law
enforcement agencies is
entirely voluntary (less than
20 percent of the nation's
11,900 law enforcement
agencies do so), the Center
estimates the real annual
number of hate crimes is
about 50,000-nearly 7 times
the federal estimate.
Thus, it's even more
alarming to read that a recent
study by the Transactional
Records Access
Clearinghouse at Syracuse
University concluded from its
review of Justice Department
data that federal criminal and
civil court actions against vio-
lations of civil rights laws
have fallen significantly since
1999-to less than 100 in the,
former, and about 1,900 in the
latter-even as the total number
of complaints has held steady
at about 12,000 a.year.
But it's not only govern-
ment inaction that causes con-
cern: Whether it be an ill-con-
sidered comment by NBC's
new network anchor, Brian
Williams, that seemed to sug-
gest diversity at the top of the
network's news division need-
n't be a matter of great con-
cern. Williams later expressed
his commitment to diversity


Americans were far greater
than the number against any
other racial group. The year's
totals, which-were slightly
above 2002 figures, are large-
ly comprised of acts of intim-
idation, vandalism and
destruction of property. But
they also include a total of 14
murders, more than 2,700
assaults and 400 robberies,
burglaries and thefts, and 34
incidents of arson,
The Federal documents
shows that crimes categorized
as anti-Islamic remained at
about the same level as in
2002: 149, although some
question whether these crimes
are significantly under-report-
ed. By far, most of the hate
crimes motivated by religious
bias were against Jews: the
927 incidents were about the
same as in 2002. Spokesmen
for civil rights groups said the
figures show a need for
stronger federal laws against
hate crimes as well as
increased Justice Dept assis-
tance to local law enforce-
ment agencies' to prosecute
such crimes.
Such legislation passed
both Houses of Congress this
year but was tabled when dif-
ferences in the House and
Senate versions couldn't be
reconciled. The need for a
stronger federal tools takes on
an even greater urgency when
one considers that the


at NBC as well as elsewhere
after a protest by the National
Association of Black
Journalists;
Or the bizarre behavior of
a Louisiana judge who wore
blackface makeup, handcuffs
and a jail jumpsuit to a
Halloween party (his wife
went as a policewoman), yet
contended he meant no insult
to blacks. (The Louisiana
Supreme Court voted to sus-
pend the judge for six months
and dock him $50,000 in
pay.); Some seem to feel that
issues of race and a commit-
ment to tolerance and inclu-
sion now can be pushed lower
on the pecking order of the
public agenda. Certainly, the
most bizarre example of this
was the astonishing vote in
November of a majority of
Alabama's white electorate to
keep language in the state's
constitution mandating segre-
gated schools "for white and
colored children" along with
language referring to the poll
taxes that in the era of segre-
gation were used to disenfran-
chise blacks.
This mean-spirited and
pathetic clinging to the now-
unused remnants of the anti-
democratic regime of the Old
South-some of which still lit-
ter several other southern state
constitutions, too-contrasts in
this season even more sharply
to the vision for America the
Civil Rights Movement of the
1950s and 1960s advocated:
One in which the meaning of
such words and phrases as
freedom and justice and the
pursuit of happiness are not
limited to one class of
Americans but are a living
reality that applies to all.


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Socially Speaking

By

Betty Asque

Davis

"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"

"A Joyous Birthday Event"
SThere are birthdays and there are birthdays! This
was one of those very special birthdays even though the
lovely honored lady belies all signs of increasing years.
With joy and great admiration for a wonderful person,
family, friends and colleagues filled the beautiful holi-
day motif decorated Mill Cove Golf Club to honor
Mrs. Pamela Quarles on her very special and momen-
tous birthday.
Birthday parties are always wonderful! They are
wonderful and splendid when you have your hubby,
children and grandchildren all there to celebrate with
you. Add to that the sumptuous dinner (that we've
learned to expect at the Mill Cove Golf Club), libations,
groovy music, dancing, and magnificent camaraderie,
you've got a great party! This party had all of that and
much, much more! It was also an instance of immense
gratefulness to hear the prayer of the young Luther
Quarles, IV before dinner.
The Floyd Willises in their roll as host and hostess
for the party put their creative skills to work and solicit-
ed notes to the honoree from guests, choosing the more
'profound' notes to share with the entire group.
A family friend, Rev. Ross Cullins of Houston, TX
using his camcorder captured the congratulatory words
of each guests as they arrived. There was also a lovely
video displaying pictures of Mrs. Quarles from her
early childhood to the present played throughout the
evening. DJ Rodney Hdrst played a full array of
oldies and present day songs for everyone's pleasure.
Among the local guests joining in the celebration
were: The Alvin Whites, The Ezekial Bryants, The
Carlton Joneses, The Lawrence Dennises, The Van
Dyke Walkers, The Ron Austins, The Jimmie
Jenkinses, The Wendell Holmeses, The Chester
Aikenses, The Bill Codys and The Nathaniel Davises
(It was just marvelous seeing Mrs. Davis doing so
well!).
This was a wonderful party! And may you have
many, many more Mrs. Pamela Quarles!

""Bravo! Bravo! Four Curtain Calls for Ms. Tai
Murray"
Violinist Tai Murray captured the hearts of the
wider First Coast musical community when she played
with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra this past
weekend. Ms. Murray was both marvelous and magnif-
icent. This diminutive and gifted artist who made her
debut with the Chicago Orchestra at the age of nine was
the winner of the Julliard School Concerto Competition
enabling her to make her New York concerto debut at
Lincoln Center's Tully Hall. As the Sacramento Bee
newspaper singled out her 2002-2003-season perform-
ance with the Sacramento Philharmonic as the classical
concert of the year, I'd say it's ditto for her perform-
ance with the Jacksonville Symphony for the 2004-
2005 season.
For those of us who have attended the Ritz Chamber
Players concerts, Ms. Murray's brilliant performance
with the JSO is what we've been accustomed to hear-
ing. And she had numerous local fans in the audience.
JSO Chorister Mrs. Cynthia Clark Blaylock brought
two of her piano students Ashley Walker and
Dominique Jones with her to the Friday evening per-
formance. While chatting with Mrs. Blaylock during
intermission, I learned that her piano students will be
featured in a recital on May 20, 2005 at the Friday
Musicale.
You can hear Ms. Murray again on January 15 when
she performs with the Ritz Chamber Players at the
Terry Theatre for their annual Dr. Martin Luther King
Celebration Concert. This is a must for your calendars!
********


Tell me about your Super Bowl Party. I'll be doing a
special column following the Super Bowl weekend of
local Super Bowl traditions. Contact us at 904 766-8834;
E-mail socially@thefloridastar.com or you may reach me
directly at imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or
fax (904) 285-7008.
See you in the paper!


Luther and Mrs. Pamela Quarles took a moment for a photo between
greeting guests at the holiday party in honor of Mrs. Quarles' birth-
day. (Photo by J. Carl Davis, Sr.)


I h..- F, I
Home to celebrate their mother and grandmother' Mrs. Pamela
Quarles' birthday was The Ford family from Washington DC- Son in
law, Christopher Ford Daughter, Mrs. Kim Ford, Granddaughters,
Simone and Sabrina Ford. (Photo by J. Carl Davis, Sr.)

-I


Mill Cove Golf Club Owners T. C. and Mrs. Ruby Newman were on hand
to make sure everything went well for the Quarles party and as always
everything was wonderful! (Photo by J. Carl Davis, Sr.)


Mr. and Mrs. Quarles with son in law, Christopher Ford, Daughter,
Mrs. Kim Ford Granddaughters, Simone and Sabrina Ford from
Washington, DC and son Luther Quarles, IV.(Phoro byJ. Carl Davis, S:)


Mesdames Betty Cody, Jacqueline Holmes and Cynthia Austin, Esq.,
radiantly sharing Christmas tidings before dinner at the Quarles
party. Photo by J. Carl Davis, Sr)


Violinist Tai Murray poses with Ritz Chamber Players Founder and
President Terrance Patterson following her astounding performance with
the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra. (Photo by J. Carl Davis, Sr:)


JSO Season ticket holders The Harold Perrys travel from Amelia Mrs. Cynthia Clark Blaylock with her piano students Ashley Walker
Island for symphony concerts. They were immensely pleased with Ms. and Dominique Jones who will join Mrs. Blaylock's other students at
Murray's performance. (Photo by J. Carl Davis, Sr) the May 20 Recital at the Friday Musicale. Mrs. Blaylock has also
been singing with the JSO Chorus for nearly two decades. Photo by J.
Carl Davis, SI:)


First Coast Arts supporters from American Beach Mrs. Bobbi Morgan-
Jones and Ben Carter. (Photo by J. Carl Davis, Sr.)


Mrs. Angie O'Bryant and Van Eewis were sure to attend this concert to
hear Violinist Tai Murray and they were thrilled with Ms. Murray's per-
formance. (Photo by J. Carl Davis, Si:)


American Legion Post 197 New Year's Party
American Legion, Post 197 welcomed the New Year in
with a blast. Music was provided by Larry Douglas
(Georgia Boy) entertaining as usual. Champagne flowed
freely and delicious food was served and enjoyed by all who
attended. Post 197 is making preparations for their Super
Bowl Party. They are looking forward to seeing your face in
the place.


Guests move to the groove of of the music supplied by "Georgia Boy"
Larry Douglas during Post 197's New year's Party.


FLORIDIA STAR


JANCUARY15, 2005


PDA A3








PAGEA-4 FLORIDA STAR JANUARY15, 2005


In Concert


i~~~lN.1J~~fI
{. ~


The East Florida Conference Lay Organization of the
African Methodist Episcopal Church presents the world
Class Edward Waters College Concert Choir In Concert
on Saturday, January 22, 7:00 p.m. at St. Paul AME
Church located at 6910 New Kings Rd. The Rev. Marvin
C. Zanders, II, Pastor. The public is invited to share in
an evening of musical elegance. For more information
contact Joseph S. Coppock at 764-2755 or 710-1837.

IMA To Host Celebration Of Justice
sa e ...... .....""I


Rev. Rev. Willie Bolden of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference in Atlanta,
Ga. is the guest speaker for the
annual Martin Luther King
Celebration sponsored by the
Interdenominational Ministerial
Alliance (IMA). .
The celebration will be held at
'~~ :' > 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, January 16
Sat Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist
Church, 2036 Silver St., where the
Rev. Reginald L. Gundy is Pastor.
All clergy and the public are
Rev. Willie Bolden
Rev. Willie Bolden invited to participate. Proceeds
from the celebration will fund a scholarship at Edward
Waters College. "A Celebration of Justice" is the theme
selected by IMA to honor the legacy of the Rev. Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
The celebration is held as an inspiration to continually
and actively address the issues'of the thriving Jacksonville
community.
Martin Luther King, Jr. was called a drum major for
justice. The IMA, under the leadership of its President,
Elder Lee Harris, Pastor of Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist
Church, will celebrate Dr. King's legacy in standing for
justice in Jacksonville.
Issues facing African-Americans in Jacksonville as
cited by the IMA include environmental toxic waste sites,
disparities in the educational systems, failing schools
mostly within the African-American communities, voting
disenfranchisement of black vote, use of unnecessary
,force by officers in the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office,
unequal distribution of funding resources and unequal
economic development projects.


t j
,i^" ;a s -


CONSIDER THE SURVIVOR


Unfortunately, when the
income producer .in the family
dies, often the survivor mode of
living has to be change dramati-
cally. The effect of this can be
devastating if it has not been
anticipated. During their joint
lifetimes, a couple should evalu-
ate what the net estate will be
and what income it can reason-.
ably be expected to produce.
They should then consider how
the survivor can best arrange
affairs so as to live on that
income.
For example, it might be
clear that the family residence
cannot be maintained and that it
should be sold. In such a case,


consideration should be given to
what might be realized from the
sale of the residence, what
should be done with this capital,
what other arrangements for the
survivor's habitation should be
made.
If this sort of evaluation is
done carefully, the survivor will
suffer a minimum of surprises
and and will make the transition
with a minimum of difficulty.


A.B. COLEMAN
MORTUARY, INC.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5660 Moncrief Rd.'
Tel. 758-0507
www.AtColeman.com


Faith In Our Community
-Schedule of Events and Services-

DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. ANNUAL CELE-
BRATION -- Duval County-January 17, 7:00 p.m., conclu-i
sion of MLK Celebration Services, Greater New Jerusalem
Full Gospel Baptist Church, 207 W. 6th St., Rev. B.E.
Williams, Pastor. The 6th Annual Prayer Breakfast will be
held Saturday, January 15, 8:00 a.m. at Philippian Multi-
Purpose Center, 7540 New Kings Rd. Limited seats are
available. Tickets are $20. For more information call
904/765-3111. The service is sponsored by The Baptist
Ministers' Conference of Duval and adjacent counties. The
Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, President.
I HAVE A DREAM-Pastor Darrell L. Gilyard's sermon
topic during the 10:00 a.m. service on Sunday, January 16 is
"Love Knows No Color." Service will include the recitation
of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have A Dream"
speech. The church is located at 1118 W. Beaver St.
THIRD ANNUAL TRIBUTE TO A KING-Epiphany
Baptist Church, 663 South McDuffAve., will host a program
honoring the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on
Saturday, January 15, 6:00 p.m. "A Non-violent Approach
To Saving Our Children" is the theme. Ms. Shara Mondy,
President/CEO of Suited For Success, is the keynote speak-
er. Sis. Markisha Andrew is Mistress of Ceremony. The
evening will be filled with songs, history, and food. Black
History moments will be provided by the Women
Intermediate Auxiliary (WIA). Sis. Patricia Jones,
President, Epiphany Baptist Church. Sis. Shirley Henley,
Regional President. The Rev. Dr. Edward Fields, Jr., Pastor.
2005 NEW YEAR'S REVIVAL-A 2005 New Year's
Revival will be held January 26-28 at Greater New Mt.
Moriah Missionary Church, 1953 W. 9th St. Service sched-
ules and speakers include: January 26, 7:00 p.m.-Rev.
Darien K. Bolden, First Missionary Baptist Church of
Fernandina Beach, Fla. January 27, 7:00 p.m.- Rev. R.E.
Herring, Mt. Bethel Baptist Church. January 28, 7:00
p.m.- Overseer B.E. Williams, Greater New Jerusalem Full
Gospel Baptist Church. Transportation is provided. Call
904/354-0145. The Rev. Dr. Percy Jackson, Sri and The Rev.
Dr. Percy Jackson, Jr., Pastors.
SPRING BOARD KICKOFF FOR SPRING CONFER-
ENCE 2005-The public is invited to enjoy singing and
preaching on Sunday, January 16, 4:30 p.m. at Faust Temple
Church of God in Christ for the Spring Board Kickoff for the
Spring Conference 2005. The church is located at 3328
Moncrief Rd. The Honorable Bishop R.L, Dixon, Pastor.


MAD DADS, New BethelAME Church,
Groups Plan Neighborhood Events;
Street-A-Month Prayer Projects Set

New Bethel AME Church, 1231 Tyler St. (Rev. William
H. Lamar, IV, Pastor) and MAD DADS will video tape a day
in New Town/EWC area on Saturday, January 15 beginning
at 12 noon.
The Moms Division of MAD DADS, the Potter's House
Street ministry and New Bethel AME Church will conduct a
"Squeaky-Clean Saturday Neighborhood Clean Up".
The groups will be at 1217 Tyler St. with music, hot dogs
and sweets, The public is invited to participate.
The MAD DAD/New Bethel AME Church
Neighborhood Street Patrols will move throughout the
EWC/New Town area.
The groups will meet at 12 noon to assist in the clean up
and will conduct street patrols around the area. The patrols
will recruit men and women who wish to join efforts to make
the community safer for children, Edward Waters College
students and area residents.
Information concerning the MAD DADS "Black On
Black Love" campaign will be distributed along with infor-
mation regarding the organization. MAD DADS and mem-
bers of the Moms Division will also.participate in the Dr..
Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade on Monday, January 17.
SThe 2005 Street-A-Month Prayer Project schedule of
dates and locations are: Thursday, January 20, River Oaks
Apartments-11291 Harts Rd.; Thursday, February 17,
Central Methodist Episcopal Church-4611 Pearl St.;
Thursday, March 17, Daily Outreach Ministry-2542
Firestone Rd.; and Thursday, April 15, Washington Height
Apartments-4229 Moncrief Rd. "We are asking the praying
citizens of Jacksonville to join MAD DADS in prayer for an
end to violent crime in our city," said Elder Donald Foy,
Jacksonville Chapter MAD DADS President.
Quoting I Chronicles 7:14 of the Bible Foy said, "Prayer
changes things! We believe that God. will hear our prayers
and heal our land, if we, God's people, will humble our-
selves and pray, seek God's face, and turn from our wicked
ways ."
MAD DADS has targeted 52 locations in neighborhoods
throughout Jacksonville for the past two years. Church lead-
ers and congregations continue to request continuance of the
project. MAD DADS project goals include helping residents
raise up new and positive standards in each neighborhood,
helping to empower residents to fight for their neighbor-
hoods and their families, helping each neighborhood express


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review............8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


.. WORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion'A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
SBible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
S. Baptism-Praise & Worship
N (Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
*First Sunday Only Praise & Worship.......8:00 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.

Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

Mount Sinai Community Development Enterprise
Community Resource Education
And Development Institute
2049 North Pearl Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 798-8733

GED Program, FCAT, Tutoring, Mentoring, After School,
Job Skills Training, National Parenting Program, Ex-Offenders,
Computer Skills Training for Youth and Adults.

For More Information
Call (904) 798-8722 or 798-8733.

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)


their outrage at the violerrce, and especially black-on-black
crime, and asking residents to turn their car and or porch
lights on during scheduled prayer services as a show of sup-
port.
Pastors are asked to encourage their congregations to
attend and participate. Churches seeking more information
should contactt MAD DADS at 904/388-8171


The Church Directory

"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


'V







JANVUARY 15, 20053 ~


Bush's Meaningless Meeting with Mfume
by Ron Walters, NNPA Columnist

For the life of me, I don't know what to make of the last minute invitation George Bush gave
to Kweisi Mfume, the outgoing president and CEO of the NAACP. But I'll try out some ideas.
The first question is: Why did Kweisi Mfume try to meet with Bush in the first place? After all,
Bush wouldn't speak at the organization's annual conference while in office and turned the IRS
loose on the organization for criticizing his policies.
Mfume then sent Bush a congratulatory note for winning re-election, a step some might say was
protocol in Washington politics. It could also be looked at as the head of the major organization in
the Black community tucking its tail and doing an undignified shuffle. The point is, how much did
that gesture represent the sentiments of the 89 percent of the Black community that voted against
Bush and who might have felt that the last thing to do was to congratulate him on winning, espe-
cially since the way he might have won is tainted.
Look at that gesture against what happened in Ohio. It was very different than in 2000, when
the national NAACP was visible in Florida, holding hearings, joining demonstrations and the like.
By contrast, the weight of the national NAACP has largely been absent from the fight in Ohio.
I was asked recently, "Where is the NAACP in Ohio?" I said, "I don't know, but it could be that
since Mfume is leaving, there is a leadership gap of some sort or the organization might be reticent
to take on such a role while it's looking for a new chief." Then, they said, "But there was not enough
of a leadership gap to keep him from going to the White House to discuss the future relations with
the organization, when he would not be responsible for them." I said, "You've got a point."
At the time, Mfume was the "lame duck" head of the organization, and granted, he wanted to
improve relations for future NAACP presidents. Okay, but why not send Board Chair Julian Bond
to the meeting? Bush appears to be setting the terms of the kind of Black leadership with whom he
will meet. He told Mfume that he did not accept the invitation of the NAACP to speak at their con-
ference because he was concerned about the potential for humiliation. Mfurnie was reported to have
said about that: "I think he does have some validity in the fact that protecting the presidency from
public humiliation, whether it's he or someone else, as president, is important."
I am astounded. If the mission of the NAACP is to criticize the agenda of a sitting president
when it is deserved and the president uses that criticism as the basis to reject invitations on grounds
of possible humiliation, why was Mfume so understanding? Using that logic, then why did Bush
go to Britain and Canada, where there were hundreds of thousands of protesters? I think this is a
double standard. And I strongly oppose Mfume letting Bush off the hook.
This isn't about civility as the basis of a leadership meeting between the president of the coun-
try and the president of Black America. It is about whether the NAACP will refrain from criticiz-
ing a sitting president, for fear of not being received at the White House, under the vacuous ration-
ale that the president might be humiliated.
The positive aspect of the meeting was apparently an exchange of views on issues such as Social
Security, the image of law enforcement (racial profiling?), affordable-health care and education.
reform. I understand that on most of these, they agreed to disagree. But the IRS investigation was
not discussed. I wonder why not?
This brings me to the central issue of Bush's new posture. Emboldened by his re-election, he
feels he has earned "political capital" and the way he wants to spend it is not to seek accommoda-
tion across lines of difference, but to strengthen his own conservative agenda by associating only
with those who agree. Witness the recent White House Economic Summit. Most Blacks are work-
ers, but there was no labor representation there, and neither youth nor adult Black male unemploy-
ment were discussed. Instead, Bush kept the pressure on Blacks with an immigration policy that
admits people from outside this country "to do jobs that Americans won't do." What are those jobs
that Black people won't do?
As long as the basis for a meeting with the NAACP has to be on the president's terms alone,
then what is the reason for going? It's a question of dignity. And the dignified thing to do is not to
meet at any price.
Ron Walters is the Distinguished Leadership Scholar, director of the African American Leadership
Institute in the Academy of Leadership and professor of government and politics at the University
of Maryland-College Park. 'His latest book is "White Nationalism, Black Interests" (Wayne State
University Press).


What church could Dr. King pastor today?

What church in your town would call Dr. Martin L.
King Jr. to be their pastor? Would he be welcomed at the .
"Faith Churches?" Would he be welcomed at the "Word 1
Churches?" Would he be welcomed at the "Name it and
Claim It Churches?" Would he and Pastor Creflo Dollar
or Bishop Eddie Long be friends? Would T. D. Jakes '
march with Dr. King? Would Juanita Bynum pray with ,-:
him? Would Charles Stanley support his civil rights agen- b i e
da? Would Gilbert Earl Patterson or Joel Osteen invite
him to preach? Would Dr. King be a keynote speaker and
the Man Power Conference? Where does Dr. King's view of.a gospel of liberation fit
in the church today? What churches are marching for justice? Who led the last sit in
or march for justice in your city? Did the dream die with the dreamer?
Today's church is preoccupied with the individual pain of the parishioner.
Everyone is praying and waiting for his or her breakthrough. They are waiting and
praying for a miracle. They are waiting on their season. We celebrate new cars and
testify about new homes while the poor are getting poorer. We live in calm and safe
neighborhoods while Iraqi babies are dying in the thousands. While our sons and
daughters are fighting an unjust war we wave the flag in church on Sunday. While we
America practices gun diplomacy and unilaterally destroys a sovereign nation we sit
back in the pew as if all is well.
If Dr. King were alive he would be marching against this war. He would have
stood up to President Bush and his attacks on the poor. Dr. King would have made a
fuss about tax breaks for the rich. He would have fought for the salvation of public
schools. Dr. King would have stood up against President Clinton and his destruction
of the social services as we knew it. Dr. King would be marching and protesting the
injustice of the inner city quarantining of the poor. He wouldn't do woman thou art
loose sermon series? He would be talking about free the prisoners on death row that
are in prison unjustly.Who wants to hear those types of sermons today? What church
would want Dr. King for their pastor?
As we pause this year to celebrate the life and ministry of Dr. King we have to ask
the question how,is the church being true to his legacy? How do we as the Body of
Christ fight for things that he believed? To go to an event this week and listen to a
speaker is not enough. When we leave that event and go back to business as usual is
an insult to the life and death of Dr. King. The injustices in our society have grown
since his death. His battle transcended racial issues. Dr. King was on the side of God
fighting for justice and equality. So as we pause to.remember him this week, and the
children have a day off from school, at least ask the question what are we doing to
extend the struggle? After we have asked the question and come up with the answer
the next question becomes now what are we going to do?

Dr Watkins is a syndicated columnist, author, professor of sociology at Augusta
State University and the president of Unity Council Inc. he can be reached via his
website: ww.ralphwatkins.org.


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: info@thefloridastar.com
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'POS p i ] i shoulder

WjIGP want to go private?
LMIRL: let's meet in real life
HOOP: help delete online predators


1 in 5 children is sexually solicited online.


You don't know what your kids are saying online. Or who they
are saying it to. A lot of times neither do they. So get involved.
To protect your kid's online life or report an incident,
call 1-800-THE LOST or visit cybertipline.com.


CHILDREN'

HDOP: help delete online predators


CRITICAL ELECTION DATE




SPECIAL ELECTION


FEBRUARY 15T


(VOTERS MUST BE REGISTERED BY JANUARY 18TH)


Thank your for reading
The Florida Star!










On the Web @
TheFloridaStar.com
... .. ..............................................................


--------------


I


I


PAGE A-5


FLORIDA STAR


. TTT A 7V IV I C ,n C


CURi


For moreI information ca~lIInlll (904 630141






PA4ibc A- iflln A011-n I


aig









This Saturday | n a.m.-3 p.m.

THE JACKSONVILI.F FAIRGROUNDS


'i*..gnE t Mania is a r.l1 chaI e to learn more about il dozens

of':,':iinii. magnet r7...;r!%i.- in the Duval C.uti i Public Sdch ol

system. It's a fun event for the whole frnul',. with live

entertainment, r a; :i;l demonstration, and more!


'Y.-li discover nr:,i .t! programs in '-' ilinr areas Iajlgina,

from for.eil l;.i.,ua!ge immtlersion and military science to

law studies and medical professions. Mgnjpi,:i programs

are offered to students -..fall .gs. in retiii.ir Ty, ;

middle and high schools,
MAGNET
PROGRAMS
tln&a t iwoem. CnU 390-308



C(Lai 6A uA olitt tk neat %GWaxiot o^.t purnhfli -

Inspireions 9lool
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i I


"The Lord prepares His
arrows before He releases
them." William David
Tatum
Perhaps Edward Orval
Gourdin's name has been
forgotten in the neighbor-
hood and city of his birth;
however, Gourdin has left a
historical trail that has been
recorded. Gourdin's
nephew, William David
Tatum has launched a
national campaign to raise
Gourdin's legacy from
obscurity.
Edward Orval Gourdin,
son of Walter and Felice
Garvin Gourdin was born in
Jacksonville in 1897. The
Gourdins lived at 1515
Davis Street. Edward's
father was a butcher at
Canepa Brothers Meat Store
and his mother was one of
the earliest organists for St.
PJilip's Episcopal Church
where they were married in
1887.
Through out his lifetime,
Edward Gourdin distin-
guished himself in all that he
set out to accomplish. His


WC G L
.'


feats lined up with the galax-
ies. He graduated valedicto-
rian of his class in 1916
from Stanton High School.
His family sacrificed all
their material valuables and
moved to Cambridge,
Massachusetts in order for
young "Ned" to enter
Harvard the next year.
In addition to his aca-
demic record, Gourdin let-
tered in baseball and basket-
ball at Harvard. On July 23,
1921 at the annual Harvard-
Yale vs. Cambridge-Oxford
meet, Gourdin stunned the
crowd by leaping 25 feet, 2
inches, setting a then, world
record.
At the 1924 Olympics in
Paris, France, Gourdin won
a silver medal. He received
his Bachelor of Arts and L. -
L.B. (law) degrees from
Harvard in 1921 and, 1924
respectively. In 1936
Gourdin received an
appointment from President
Franklin D. Roosevelt as
assistant U. S. Attorney. In
the course of his career he
served in the National Guard


JANUARY15, 2005


Floridian Left Historical Trial


and was Commanding offi-
cer of the 372 Infantry dur-
ing World War II retiring as
Brigadier General. Edward
O. Gourdin was also a mem-
ber of the Massachusetts and
the Federal Bar and became
the first Black on the
Massachusetts Supreme
Court. Hie remained a pro-
ponent of civil-rights, the
NAACP and numerous
social, civic and recreational
organizations.
At the time of his death
in 1966 Gourdin was serv-
ing as National President of
the United States
Olympians. A portrait of
Edward O. Gourdin hangs
on the marble walls of the
Old Suffolk County
Courthouse in Boston.
In honorable remem-
brance of his ancestor,
Gourdin's nephew, William
Tatum has commissioned a
bust and Statue of Edward
Orval Gourdin to be placed
in Jacksonville at the Ritz
Theatre La Villa Museum
and at Edward Waters
College. Statues will also be
placed at Harvard
University, the National
Track & Field Hall of Fame
in New York City and the
African American Museum
in Washington, DC.
Direct members of
Gourdin's family living in
Jacksonville are Gloria
Parsons, Sidney White.
Bacon and Yellowcard
drummer, LP Longineu
Parsons, III.


You 're



Invited


To A Birthday Celebration

For


DEBORAH


MAIDEN

General Manager,
President
Of Victory AM 1360 WCGL


Saturday, January 29, 2005
6:00-9:00 p.m.
Household Faith Ministry Center
1440 W. Edgewood Avenue
*Dress is Semi-Formal
SPECIAL GUESTS:
"True Believers"
"Keith 'WONDERBOY' Johnson"
Plus local choirs, groups, soloists,
dance teams, more!


Hosted By Dr. Bruce V. Allen
Pastor Of The Church Fellowship Ministries
General Admission: FREE!
~A Love Offering will be received-
For Mory Details Or Directions, Call 904/766-9955/1-809-331-1359


-. ,--~4-~. u~ ~VTUW& ~~7


Edward Orval Gourdin (1897-1966)


r Rn RnA .cr n


nDA 7 A


L -I ~------ll-11 11--- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --a







PAGEA-7


rr torD A CTAd


JANUARY-13, 20053 p JU 3I I ff


Ghana Wooing African Americans


ing American members of
the African diaspora, echo-
ing Israel's offer of automat-
ic citizenship for Jews.
Fresh out of college four
years ago, Marcus Manns
landed in Ghana's swelter-
ing, exhaust-choked capital
with only $1,200 in his wal-
let, no contacts, and no tick-
et home.
"I thought I'd set up my


a a



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Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday'
The third Monday of January is celebrated as the Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. On this day schools, feder-
al offices, post office and banks across America close as the
nation celebrates the birth, the life and the dream of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
-Fifteen years after
Dr. King's death
President Ronald
Reagan signed a bill
into law making the
third Monday of
January a national holi-
day in memory of Dr.
King.
Mrs. Coretta Scott King (lift) The holiday pro-
watches as President Ronald vides a time for the
Reagan signs the Dr. Martin Luther nation to remember the
King, Jr. Holiday Bill into law.
injustices that Dr. King
fought. We also remember his fight for the freedom, equal-
ity, and dignity of all races and peoples. The King Holiday is
time to remember the message of change through non\ i0-
lence.
There was much opposition to the idea of holiday for Dr.
King. Only honored ti\p American statesmen had been hon-
ored with national holidays George Washington and
Christopher Columbus. Critics felt that there were other
Americans more deserving a national. holiday, such as
Presidents Abraham Lincoln and John F..Kennedy.
Others in opposition feared the King holiday was meant
as a way to make up to African-Americans for slavery. Some
feared the cost of the holiday, because of the extra overtime
paid to federal workers who'had to work on the holiday as
\well as millions to federal employees who were paid for the
day.' Before.'the holiday was deemed official, many
African-Americans celebrated the birthday themselves.
Several states declared King's birthday as a state holiday. A
bill was finally passed by both the House of Representatives
and the Senate and was signed into law on November 2,
1983.
The first national celebration of the Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. holiday took place January 20, 1986. This year the
King holiday will be celebrated on Monday January 17,
2005. The theme of this years holiday is Remember!
Celebrate! Act! A Day On, Not A Day Offy.
** **** *


ACCRA, Ghana--A
growing number of black
Americans trading potential-
ly lucrative careers and rela-
tive comfort back home for a
new life in Africa, where the
former slave-trading hub of
Ghana is wooing Americans
with some of the easiest
immigration rules on the
continent. That includes a
"right of abode" for qualify-


Chairman and CEO, Symantec Corp.;
Lloyd G. Trotter, CEO and President, GE
Consumer and Industrial; and R.L. "Bob"
Wood, Chairman, (EO, and President,
Crompton Corp.


booth and there'd be people
lined up for days," the 30-
year-old from Bassett, Va.,
said as he played golf-
recently at Accra's Achimota
Golf Club. He punched a
shot through a tangle of
weeds and laughed. "Boy,
that just wasn't the case."
Manns may have been
alone in thinking that his
ancestral homeland had a
great need for a decent chi-
ropractor.
Some Ghanaians had
never even heard of chiro-
practors, he said.
The country's expanding
economy, stable government
and laid-back, English-
speaking population makes
it an easy holiday choice for
tourists, who flock to the
chain of slave forts that still
line Ghana's coastline.
For some, Ghana offers
incentives to stay: It is the
only African country to offer
black Americans "right of
abode," allowing those who
qualify to work and own
property, said Janet Butler,
president of the African
American Association, a
support group for expatri-
ates. Applicants must live in.
Ghana seven years before
fully qualifying.
President John Kufuor--
who won a second term in
Dec. 7 elections -- wants to
attract African-American
businesses, particularly
those in the communica-
tions, technology and enter-
tainment industries, said a
spokesman, Kwabena
Agyepong.
As many as 1,000 black
Americans are living in
Ghana, Butler said. They are
a varied lot: aid workers,
pan-African nationalists
here since the 1960s, entre-
preneurs, retirees,
Rastafarians. A few live in
mud huts, embracing the
agrarian life of their ances-
tors.




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The list inlcudes: Kenneth I.
Chenault, Chairman and CEO, American
Express; Erroll B. Davis Jr., Chairmain
and CEO, Alliant Energy; Reginald E.
Davis, CEO, \'adro ia: W:H."Bil" Eaqir
III, Chairman. CEO. and Pri.idtnl Duke
Energy Field Services; Ann M. Fudge,
Chairman and CEO, Yodng & Rubicam
Brands; Arthur "Art" H. Harper, CEO
and President, GE Equipment Services;
Carl Horton, CEO and President, The
Absolut Spirit Company Inc.; Alwyn
Lewis, President and CEO, KMART;
Renetta McCann, CEO, Starcom
Americas; E. Stanley O'Neal, Chairman,
CEO, and President, Merrill Lynch &
Co.; Clarence Otis, Jr., CEO, Darden
Restaurants; Dan Packer, CFO and
President, Entergy New Orleans; Richard
,D. Parsons, Chairman and CEO, Time
Warner; Franklin D. Raines, former
Chairman and CEO of Fannie Mae;
Pamela Thomas-Graham, CEO and
President, CNBC; John W. Thompson,


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JTA cares about its riders and will maintain regular bus service during Super Bowl and
the week leading up to it. There will, however, be some route detours in the Downtown
area .felciiv. Wedneida'/. February 2 ihouihli Sunday, February 6. For detailed information,
information ,.. llaiabkl J L F CC.1J ;taln, on JTA buses or j' killingn g Customer Service at
(904) 630-3100 or TDD (904) 630-3191. Information is also available at www.jtafta.com.




A JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

S Rol:,i / Transportation Solutions


L (90q) 630-3100 TDD (904) 630-3191 vww.jtafla.com


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PAE FORD SARJNURY5 20


Terri J. Vaughn: Inspirational Actress Keeps It Positive!
by Rych McCain
She has endeared herself to millions of TV viewers as
coach Cedric "Ceedy's," love interest Lovita Jenkins on
the Steve Harvey Show. She is currently in her seventh
consecutive regular season on network TV as Jonelle
Abrams on UPN's ALL OF US. We are talking none other
than the adorable, fun loving actress Terri J. Vaughn!
Vaughn came to our Burbank studio to shoot photos and
do this interview and it was "love-at-first-sight," for my
photographer Andre' and myself. Vaughn stepped in the
door ready to enjoy herself She has an outgoing, fun lov-
ing personality that makes anyone around her feel perfect-
ly at ease. However, there is a very serious side to this foxy
thespian. She created her own foundation. Vaughn then
explains, "my foundation is called TAKE WINGS FOUN-
DATION. It's based in the Bay area. We work with girls
that are 13 through 18, growing up in public housing, fos-
ter care and foster homes throughout the whole Bay area."
Vaughn was reared in the rough, Ridgeview Terrace
Housing Projects in the Hunter's Point area of San
Francisco. She knows first hand, the trials and tribulations .. -'
of surviving in that type of violent, negative atmosphere TerriJ. Vaughn (Photo by Andre' B. Murray/A Bern
and environment. Vaughn continues, "When I was a Agency Photo)
teenager, I had a lot of friends that were drug dealers, gang bangers and boosters. I lost a lot of friends when I
was a teenager to drug and gang violence. I've been jumped a few times when I was in high school. I always
felt sorry for the girls that were doing that, because they were really angry, and glad that I wasn't caught up
into what they were doing. Even though I would go home and all of my friends were into these things. Me or
my sister never got caught up in doing the things that they were doing."
"These girls were bitter and it runs deeper than just hating. They didn't have the proper guidance at home,
they didn't have goals and aspirations outside of the four walls that we lived in, and so I always felt sorry for
them more than I was angry at them. I've always said that once I became successful (which I didn't know what
I was going to do for a living), but I always wanted to do something for the girls that were growing up in the
same situation so that they would make the right choices and not have to be the bullies in the neighborhood.
It's really sad. There are some beautiful girls there and they are smart."
As she is speaking and describing these roughneck girls, I made a gesture of a girl spitting like a man.
Vaughn laughs and says; "I'm a little ghetto at times, but being from the ghetto don't have nothing to do with
it.
I too confessed that I'm from a similar hood in my hometown.
How did Vaughn stay so rooted and grounded to get out of her situation? She resjlonds, "you have to have
a vision of yourself. Have an actual picture in your head of yourself, of what you're trying to see yourself, as
you grow older. This is what I teach my girls! I've always had a vision of myself being a successful woman,
not knowing what I was going to be, but I had a (mental) picture of myself in a business suit, carrying a brief-
case and I worked toward that vision of myself."
Well, the result of that strategy certainly speaks for itself. Vaughn is technically just getting started! She has
other irons in the fire that we will definitely be hearing about in due time. For more info on her worthy foun-
dation and tax deductible donations go to www.takewingsfoundation.org or call 510-733-1073.


Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain


Some of the music industry's more famous record-
ing studio engineers have teamed to create (META)
The Music Engineering and Technology Alliance.
This organization's objective is to create standards
and practices that will provide the highest quality of
music recording by unifying audio professionals,
technology providers and consumer electronics manu-
factures.
Veteran comedian Paul Mooney has joined the
morning team at WBLS Radio in New York City.
Gospel Centric Records vocalist, Dorinda Clark-
Cole will be recording her sophomore CD and DVD
"Live," as part of The Stellar Awards week in
Houston, Texas. The date is January 16, 2005 at The
St. Agnes Baptist Church, where The Rt. Rev. Gene
Moore, Sr. is the pastor.
UPN will debut its new mid-season comedy
CUTS, a spin off of their hit show ONE ON ONE!
The cast includes Marques Houston, Tiffany
Sherwood, Shondrella Avery and Rashaan Nail. Nas
and his long time love interest Kelis officially tied the
marriage knot in an Atlanta private ceremony. Look
for him to begin promoting his double album, Street
Disciple. Congrats to the couple! Talk about his big
hit "Busted," 63 yr. old, silky smooth crooner Ronald
Isley has been smacked with Tax Evasion charges
from the I.R.S., for alleged failure to report perform-
ance and royalty income between 1997 and 2002. The
five count indictment could make this songbird a jail-
bird for 20 long ones!
Maat-Hotep!


.`TAMA Sw 3i"AcSTING, INC.


105.7 FM


The People's Station


"King" A Musical Tribute


Join us for a three hour exclusive
program available only on
The People's Station
Saturday, January 15th
Noon 3pm
Monday, January 17th
Noon 3pm


TAMA Broadcasting, Inc.
9550 Regency Square Blvd. Ste #200
Jacksonville, FL 32225
www.tamabroadcastinacom


(904) 680-


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1/TJzQz


'(904) 680-1050


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Q lave The es *
Super Bowl XXXIX Weekend
February 3rd -6, 2005
A. Philip Randolph Park
Hon. Pat Lockett-Felder, Festival Chair
Come Out and Enjoy ... The Hottest Ticket In Town!
A Multi-Cultural Fun Fest !!
Food Music Live Entertainment I
The VIP Zone! Grown Folks Party I
For Sponsorship/Vendor Applications S Information
Contact Festival Office at: (904) 713-9201
www.supcrshowtimne.con
An officially sanctioned cwnt of the Jacksonille Super [;. i \MI H.,i Coinittee


I 06


FE STIoAL


I-r-l~ II~I~)II~I- -rI ---- -I~


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
HOLIDAY PARADE


WALKERS MOTORCYCLES FLOATS RANDS
1 1 Dr. Mdrlis Lnuthr Kiig, Jr., rmuiri biwdFo ntion. Inc, b is curdijdh, inviting Ai lluvNl
County itrarl chun-bes, i1u KU ,ur-itiLuhn~. b5ooa nd ia dividtuds tojoin in tfrb ixdnrttiun of
the birthdmv of Dr.Him-. rMartin Luther hing. Jr., on Nluuidai.Janusn- 17,20L5.
Plwsr rcgp'trr early this Year to jamrc your organizations of prime pniitminig in what we
anticipatr eiml be a 44N+- unit parade.


hiawk % V. d % -IIfl IGolrr If)I%%;i-%i3& d J';I IilIIr II I)I 'Aing Lul J"
riuimdc Il Lod; Whktle1U(neJcd1- ni.uj StMAS


FLORIDA STAR


JANUARY15. 2004


PAGE A-8


: 1








JANIVUAR 13, 200 3 --- ___


Happy New Year! House To House


-%,"-.AM Ii-
LEFT FRAME: Barbara and Carlton Jones with Cynthia Austin preparing to ring in the
New Year. RIGHT FRAME: Grand prize winners: Demetries Weston, Rose Judge,
Isabelle Kelly, Thelma Geiger and Barbara Harper.

I /


i'.". '.


LEFT FRAME: Debra and Gregory Morrison dual residents of American BeachlAtlanta
celebrating 2005. RIGHT FRAME: Anita Mitchell singing as Sylvia Brown calls for
another solo.


By Marsha Dean Phelts

To begin the New Year,
Sylvia Jenkins Brown
assembled a few friends
from her childhood. Ten of
Brown's chums assembled
for an evening of festivity
and games. These old
friends didn't need an ice-
:breaker to get the party start-
ed. An exciting gift
exchange kept them on the
edge of their seats wonder-
ing if they would get to keep
the selection of their choice.
As gifts were opened one at
a time the next person could
take your gift away from
you rather than risk opening
an unknown gift. This
method added fun as well as
good-natured anxiety to the
exchange. After the gift tug
of war, each guest had to
sing a song assigned to them
by the hostess. Aided by a
Karaoke set the ladies readi-
ly stepped up to the mike
and. belted out tunes made
popular by Ray Charles, The
Supremes, The Isley
Brothers, James Brown and
other noted soul singers.
While entertaining them-
selves whiffs of deviled
crabs baked in deep colossal
4-inch cockle shells floated
through the air. After
singing for their supper
Delores Callahan, Patricia
Cherry, Ophelia Fogle,
Beverly McCallum, Anita
Mitchell, Marsha Phelts,
Tina Polk, Marva Salary,
Jonquill Wanton and Ada
White charged the heavily
aden dinner table to feast on
i abundance Jof savory


home cooked entrees, salads
and sweet treats. The grand
finale of the evening came
as Sylvia pleasantly sur-
prised each guest with the
gift of a Coleman battery
operated table lamp.
On American
Beach, Carlton and Barbara
Gillum Jones rang in the
New Year with a Multi
Generation Celebration.
Family and friends represen-
tative of three generations
assembled for an enchanted
night by the shore.
Barbara's sister-in-law,
Zenoba Gillum spent the
day preparing twenty bunch-
es of collard, mustard and
turnip greens for the event.
Gurests raved over the com-
bined flavors of this tradi-
tional New Year's Eve dish.
Blue crab lovers ate their fill
of jumbo garlic-buttered
crabs. Acclaimed Chef
Andre Combs of Lauren-
Steven's Catering, Inc. used
the choicest shrimp and
snow crabs to prepare the
succulent "Low Country
Seafood Boil". Fried chick-
en, lemon roasted chicken, a
variety of homemade three
layered cakes and lots of
other good foodstuff were
ravenously consumed
throughout the evening.
Celebrants ranging
from pre school age to col-
lege, careers oriented to
retirees and all in between
found their niche and com-
fort zones in the broad mix.
As the New Year was ush-
ered in the ladies were
crowned with tiaras and the
gentlemen donned top hats.


At the stroke of midnight
revelers cheered and made
toasts then stepped outside
to watch a magnificent
shower of fireworks burst-
ing under the night sky.

DEATH


NOTICES
ASHLEY-Bryan U., 27, died
January 6, 2005,
BARTLEY-Edward, died
January 9, 2005.
BLACKSHEAR-Aldora, 90,
died January 3, 2005.
CARTER-Caphas E., 88, died
January 3, 2005.
CLEARE-Katherine, died
January 4, 2005.
CORNELIOUS-Ida Frances,
diedJanuary 3, 2005. Alphonso
West Mortuary, Inc.
GREEN-Thelma A.,. 94, died
January 2, 2005.
GRIFFIN-Leroy, died
January 7, 2005.
GRIFFIN-Mary, 70, died
January 4, 2005.
HOFFMAN-Margaret, died
January 4, 2005.
JOHNSON-Ruth D., died
January 7, 2005.
JONES-Nakia, 5, died
January 4, 2005.
JORDAN-Elevy B., 91, died
January 5, 2005.
KELLY-Mildred K., died
January 4, 2005.
LAWRENCE-Cynthia, died
January 3, 2005..
MARCUS-Bobby Lee. 63, died
January 6, 2005.
McCRIMAGER-Joseph A., died
January 1, 2005.
MIXON-Gloria J., died
January 3, 2005.
PARKER-Hannah, died
January 9, 2005.
PINKNEY-Mamie, 94, died
January 3, 2005.
RICHARDSON-Infant Nyla A.,
died January 7, 2005.
RODGERS-Herman, died
January 5, 2005.
SINGLETON-Frank, III, died
January 6, 2005.
STRANGE-Jerry C., died
January 2, 2005.
VINA-Franklin, died
January 7, 2005.
WATERS-Ronald, died
January 6, 2005.
WATSON-Donald, died
January 6, 2005.
WESTMORELAND-Eva Mac,
diedJanuary 5, 2005.
WILBERT-Arthur J., died
January 2, 2005.
YULEE-Bennie, died
January 6, 20tb.


The Luvenia Newman
Bridge Club meets every
Tuesday at the Moncrief
Community Center where
they play bridge. To cele-
brate the New Year club
members trekked to
American Beach. They
wanted to see the positive
changes taking place at the
beach. While there they
reminisced of the fun times
that they too spent on
American Beach in years
gone by. Club member Eva
Lamar hosted her colleagues
in the home of her daughter
and son-in-law, Marsha and
Michael Phelts. They
arrived in a caravan led by
Lillian Poole, Evelyn
Hughes, Marion Walker and
Ann Bodison. Mrs.
Newman who founded the
group in 1991 and Curlue
Huger planned this picnic
befitting the occasion.
Marion Walker baked a sour
cream pound cake while
Evelyn Galvin brought a
hearty box of Panera Bread
assorted sandwiches and
chips. Margaret Day, Vivian
Lewis and Sacia Pandley
brought salads, sodas, hot
wings, and fried and roasted
chicken. Hopping Johns
seasoned with a ham bone
and smoked ham hocks were
served for good luck along
with tender slow oven
cooked barbecued pig's feet
that dissolved effortless with
the slightest chew.
After playing three
rounds of bridge the big
prize winners were Barbara
Harper with first place, sec-
ond place Thelma Geiger,
third place Isabelle Kelly,
fourth place Demetries
Westoh and the fifth prize
was awarded to Rose Judge.
January 4, 2005 was a mild
and sunny beach going kind
of day. The club plans to
meet on American Beach
before next year.


MEMORIAL
In Loving
Memory
Of Our
Dear Loved One













ANESHIA Z. DAVIS
Sept. 27, 1978- Jan. 15, 1999
We will always dream,
patiently waiting for
Streams to come true.
Looking to the future.
"Ne-Ne", our lives will not
be the same without you.
You will always -
be in our hearts.
Love,
Mom, Dad, Sister, brother,;
Grandparents, Aunts,
Uncles, Cousins
and other
Relatives A
I ________ ._ *L


Newly weds Damon and Kiala Givehand relish their first
New Year as Mr. and Mrs.


/COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.


PUBLIC MEETING-The First Coast Metropolitan Planning
Organization will continue public meetings in January. All
meetings will be held at the First Coast MPO Office, 1022
Prudential Dr., unless otherwise noted. The
Bicycle/Pedestrian Advisory Committee meets on Thursday,
January 20'at 5:00 p.m. The Duval County Transportation
Disadvantaged Coordinating Board meets on Thursday,
January 27 at 9:00 a.m. Persons with disabilities requiring
special accommodations should call at least 48 hours prior to
the meeting. For more information, call Marci Larson or
Ginny Montgomery at (904) 306-7500 or email
mlarson@fcmpo.com or vmontgomery@fcmpo.com.
COMMUNITY MEMBERS TO MARK KING HOLI-
DAY WITH CLEANUP-The Northwest Jacksonville
Community Development Corporation (NJCDC) and the 29th
and Chase Neighborhood Association are sponsoring their
second annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service. All
community members are invited to participate in a neighbor-
hood-wide clean up on Monday, January 17 10:00 a.m.-1:00
p.m. A free lunch will be provided as well as bags and gloves.
Participants are asked to meet at the corer of Myrtle Avenue
and Golfair Boulevard. The service project is one of hun-
dreds of activities being organized in various cities through-
out America to honor the legacy of Dr. King.
BOYLAN HAVEN SCHOOL FOR GIRLS ANNUAL DR.
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR BIRTHDAY OBSER-
VANCE--The Boylan Haven Alumnae Association
Jacksonville Chapter of Boylan Haven School for Girls will
host its annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. observance on
Monday, January 17, 11:00 a.m. at St. Paul African Methodist
Episcopal Church located at 6910 New Kings Rd. The Rev.
Marvin Zanders, II, Pastor. Clinton King (documentary and
film produce, lecturer, and educator) is the guest speaker. The
Ribault Senior High School Chorus, directed by Dr. Eugene
White, will perform.
CANDIDATES FORUM-The American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 197 will host a forum for the candidates vying for the
office of Supervisor of Elections on Tuesday, January 18, 7:00
p.m. at 2179 Benedict Rd. The public is invited to attend.
For more inofrmation, contact Mrs. Anna Matthews at 764-
3616.
POST 197 ANNOUNCES NEW HOURS OF OPERA-
TION/SUPER BOWL PARTY-American Legion Post 197
will observe new operational hours effective January 30
through February 5 to coincide with Super Bowl XXXIX
activities. Hours are 5:00 p.m. until 2:00 a.m. (closing). Food
and drinks are available during these hours. A Super Bowl
Party will be held at the Post, 2179 Benedict Rd., on Sunday,
February 6.
47TH ANNUAL EBONY FASHION FAIR-"Lving It Up" is
the theme for this year's Ebony Fashion Fair on Friday,
January 21. The show begins at 8:00 p.m. at the Times-Union
Center for the Performing Arts. The Ebony Fashion Fair is
sponsored by Alpha-Jax Foundation for Community Projects
of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Gamma Rho Omega
Chapter.
FREE SEMINARS HELP PROTECT ELDER CON-
SUMERS FROM SCAMS AND FRAUD-Stetson
University College of Law's Elder Consumer Protection
.Program will warn Jacksonville area elderly citizens about the
dangers of identity theft and home services fraud at several
free consumer protection seminars. Dates, times and loca-
tions include-January 20, 10:30 a.m., Mary Singleton Center
(City of Jacksonville will transport seniors from several sur-
rounding centers for this presentation); January 24, 11:00
a.m., Oceanway Senior Center; January 25, 11:00 a.m.,
Hammond Community Center; and January 27, 11:00 a.m.,
Jacksonville Beaches Senior Center, South Jacksonville
Beach.
H .->,. _r___r__ -.l ,i...lf. .lr-- i7\w- it ifJl ,w-c.-iJfbTil -.-NirF JrYifUlwrlifM--,,


PAGE B-1


FI niRIDA STAR


, r jTT IC '71111Cn








AlAJlAH 200 F......STAR.PAG....


Ladies, Don't Get Mossed

It's time to eliminate the phrases that men are dogs, the good
ones are in jail and men are players. Simply put. A man will
only do as much to a woman as she allows. Now that we have
that out of the way, lets go into 2005 and realize that women
control how men treat them.
Ladies, you set yourself up to get Mossed which means
played, deceived, used, abused, disrespected neglected or
cheated on by not keeping the power you possess. What's this
power you say? The power to hold on to your standards,
refusal to be disrespected and enforcing and holding men in general to a higher expectation.
Keep the standards you have for yourself. Here's a good one. If you normally go to
church every Sunday but your boyfriend visits on Saturday night and you forget about
church the next morning. You're going to get Mossed because you put a man before your
Lord. Ladies, keep your faith first in your life because unlike a man, the Lord will never
leave you nor forsake you.
If you don't curse and don't like to hear cursing but a man curses in your presence and
won't stop, you're going to get Mossed. Especially when he curses you like a dog during an
argument or if you break up. If you always bless your food before eating, keep doing it. If
you're used to having doors opened, chairs pulled out, emotional moments, returned phone
calls and eating at certain restaurants make it known. Keep it simple and don't get Mossed.
You can hold on to your standards in a relationship by making them known in the begin-
ning and as situations occur. The man can't be trained to learn, enforce and accept your stan-
dards if you don't open your mouth.
Don't allow yourself to be disrespected. Aretha Franklin certainly kept it real when she
wrote the song R-E-S-P-E-C-T. If you're out in public or private and your man flirts or eye-
balls another woman. Don't get mad or develop an attitude. You put him in check on the
spot that you will not tolerate that behavior. Period. If you don't, the woman he was flirt-
ing with will have his phone number when you go to the bathroom or be his next girlfriend.
Every man has a sister, mother oi aunt who they'll go to jail for if a guy calls them the B-
word. You deserve the same respect so stand up and insist that you will not be called any-
thing other than your name. Your time is valuable and your man should know it. Make it
known that you don't appreciate being stood up for dates or late for dinner. Maintain your
integrity and respect. Make it known that you will absolutely not call in sick to your job,
neglect your children nor forsake your friends just to be with him.
Women must hold men to a higher standard. Of course a woman should have her own
money and maker her own money, but a man's money is also her business. Let's start this
one off with a bang. Ladies, you only get Mossed by a man with a low paying job if you
allow it. The woman has the power to encourage her man, motivate him and make him want
to use his full potential and capabilities to obtain prosperity. A lot of women are too busy
complaining and "nit picking" to focus on building up theirman as they should. The expres-
sion that "Behind Every Good Man Is a Woman" is certainly true. Become builders and
encourage your man to empower himself, boost his self-esteem, obtain more education or
seek a better job. Most importantly, help him grow. Think about it. You'll reap the bene-
fits.
If you have a degree, more worldly wisdom and make more money than the man you're
with. You have options. Be happy in the relationship and work together as a team to reach
new levels or find a man that meets your expectations. It's not worth your time staying with
a man when you complain behind his back that he's not on your level. Don't get Mossed and
be unhappy because you choose to stick around and be unequally yoked.
This is not rocket science and is quite simple to apply if you don't want to get Mossed.
All it takes is a little strength, steady focus, self-esteem and holding on to your standards.
You take these things and then apply them to the male you're with and accept, reject or merge
his qualities with yours and take it from there.
Ladies, if you still don't get it, just know that a woman's power to make a man do right
is in the mind, and certainly not in the element of sex. If you think otherwise, prepare to get
Mossed.
Deanna's column will resume next week. Write Ask Deanna! Email:
askdeantial@yahoo.com or Deanna M, 264 S. La Cienega, Suite 1283, Beverly Hills, CA
90211. Visit her Web site at www.askdeanna.com.

Remembering Shirley Chisholm

by Laura W Murphy, Special to the NNPA from the Washington Afro

The late Shirley Chisholm taught me a lot about being
a woman. At the tender age of 22, I had the opportunity s
to work as one of her legislative assistants from 1977 to
1979 while she was a Member of the United States House
of Representatives. During her 14 years in Congress,
Shirley Chisholm gave dozens of women the opportunity
-to hold professional positions on Capitol Hill when most .
of her male colleagues in Congress would only give sec-
retarial or clerk positions to women like me. People
would stare at her when she walked down the hall, _--'
because invariably a large entourage of professional staff ? g'
women like me followed her wherever she went.
The women who passed through her office called 'f~.I
themselves the Chis-ettes. And we referred to our boss .*S
fondly as "Miss C." We loved her because she embraced t L a
us and encouraged us and she dared to tell men and all Shirley Chisholm in 1972
Americans that women were in the halls of power and were
here to stay. But if you read her obituaries that have been printed in major newspapers
around the country you get the impression that she was an "in your face" firebrand femi-
nist. However, those of us who knew her well also knew that she had class and manners.
While she could raise her voice with passion and conviction she did so in a way that never
undermined her appealing femininity.
It enraged me that during his lifetime comedian Red Foxx would call "Miss C" ugly.
Yes, she had a broad nose. Yes, she wore oversized glasses topped off by a toothy grin. Yes,
she wore a wig that gave her big hair. No, she did not have the shape of Pamela Anderson
or Brittany Spears. Notwithstanding the American standard of blond, blue-eyed so-called
good looks, when you were in the presence of this woman, you felt something else beau-
ty. She had a personality that just sparkled and the wits and brains to match. She was
charismatic. She always did her homework before she spoke and rarely spoke in anger. She
respected her listeners even if they were the most racist sexist men on the planet. And what


really surprised me as I followed her around was that she was quite flirtatious.
She could whisper things in men's ears that would put them at such ease that she could
find out what made every one of her colleagues tick. She laughed at their jokes, even the
ribald ones. She touched their arms when she spoke, but never doing so in a way that was
sexually suggestive. She moved with grace when she walked and, she was one of the best
dancers I've ever seen. She was a femme fatale, but not a hussy. Shirley Chisholm was a
very smart, endearing, classy, outspoken and determined lady who taught me two pivotal
life lessons: 1) I could be a "feminine feminist" in a man's world and still earn the power I
needed to get the job done and, 2) Beauty comes in many forms and when we limit our con-
cept of beauty to appearance we are really missing the boat.
Thank you Shirley Chisholm. You will always be beautiful to me.
Laura W. Murphy has spent 28 years in government and advocacy positions. For the last
13 years she has been director of the Washington Legislative Office of the American Civil
Liberties Union.


The 3rd Annual "in krmembrzine of the Dream' Concert slutet he lega cy Dr. Mirrin Luther King.
Ir. and ielbrmr.,a rLa h.rmuoniou fiber in alII '( us. vA He lstn r.t' rL rhpmpasonid p rf,:. .nc..l. e us
remember how t rrad and embracing mmrir chs beomme, md bow it iepr.lnrn aan enormous r3.m ,:
cultural and euhinc backgrounds. It is rbi ssynergy and viriliry birween music nan our emotins n that
mnake musi. raoday m. unique and ourtstanding. espcialk in America.


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FOR SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS
*Andy was the ONLY candidate in his race to show up at all, for even a moment, at the
January 1 rally against police brutality and in favor of fairness for all people.
*Andy has been a life-long fighter against racism, teaming up with Dr. Arnett Girardeau as
far back as 1979 to work for reform of the fleeing felon law.
*Andy has used his radio show to fight for reforms needed right now in the sheriffs office,
the same reforms urged by Pastor Gundy and Pastor Sampson and other leading pastors
from Jacksonville's minority community.
*Andy is fed up with the office of Supervisor of Elections. Andy will change things. Andy
will make sure each vote counts. Andy will make sure each voter counts. Andy says that
integrity is the issue.

*Andy will create and distribute by mail, each election, a Voter Pamphlet, just like in
California, where each candidate gets one page to say his or her thing, uncensored.
*Andy will institute longer hours and will institute other policies, too, designed to create
greater accessibility and greater convenience for voters.
*Andy will make sure there is a verifiable paper trail so that there is absolutely no doubt
about the election results.
GET INVOLVED! ANDY'S H.Q. PHONE IS 720-1913.
ANDY'S WEBSITE: http://www.andyjohnson.us
INTEGRITY IS THE ISSUE!
Andy Johnson is a candidate for Duval'County Supervisor of Elections.
Paid political advertisement, paid for and approved by
IAndy Johnson Campaign FiAd, DEMOCRAT.


FLORIDA STAR


JANUARY15 2 004


PAGE R-2








Students Continue


To Live The Dream


ONE


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The students from Duval
County Schools were pre-
sented as essay winners
during the Willie E.
Gary/Martin Luther King.
Jr. Luncheon program on
Tuesday, January 11 at the
Adams Mark Hotel in
Jacksonville. Fla. The
essays detailed their
thoughts concerning their
dreams. TOP FRAME:
Benjamin Holiday, a senior
at Ribault High School is
interviewed by the news
media following the lunch-
eon. His 250-word essay, .
which he addressed from
memory, spoke of his
desire to be a leader and
living a righteous life. MID-
DLEFRAME: Ashley
Alman, a fifth grade stu-
dent at Timucan
Elementary School, aspires
to be a singer. She says
dreams are sacred and
cannot be taken away from
you. BOTTOM FRAME:
Jasmine Williams, an eight
grade student at Stillwell
Middle School, wants to be
an inspirational writer, a
sought-out lawyer who
would one day become the k
first black female President
of the United States. (PHO-
TOS COURTESY OF HEAD SHOTS
PORTRAITS) K


1.. .I~ r ri n.?


More High
School All Star
Players Picked
For USA Roster


The Bolles School head
coach (. oik', R .-,cts
has, selected a lu-hrel
I (h p JLd\ C i l- 111 11,Ce uL
thle 316-11.ln romtel that
\ ill C mi pete Ill in tie
NFL Global Junior
Championship IX dJm-
Imn the \\eek of Super
Bo I XXXIX.
Tw\ent\ scholar tlih-
letes \Xer. oniinaIll.
named v, hen Ro,_er
started building his all-
-stfi juaidd in December

He IS noV\ piepar-
ing to take his complet-
ed roster to the practice
field ahead of the first
round games, x\hich
will be played on
February 2.
TwentL foul
schools tro ll ,\ enl
north Florida counties
of St Johns, Du\al,
Nassau, Chla.- Putnam,
Baker and L.niln are
represented.
"It's over\\ helming
to be representing the
United States in an
international e\ ent.
said tightend Colin
Peek, one of three ne\v
players added from
Florida 3A state cham-
pions, The Bolles
School. "I'mn excited to
have the chance to put
Imy pads on again for a
few more games C' enl
though my high school
career is over."
The 16 players
added to Team LISA.'
3h-man roster are:

(Seet "IS. RI.'osr, B3C)


---- ONE!






Page B-3A/January 15, 2005


High School Graduation

Dates Scheduled

In Duval County

Duval County students are back in schools after the
recent holidays. For most highs school seniors, visions of
graduation are dancing in their minds.
All Duval County high school have set dates for grad-
uation ceremonies.
The graduation schedule is:


TIME
1 p.m.

1 p.m.
4 p.m.
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.


SCHOOL
Mandarin

Jackson
Stanton Prep
Sandalwood
Dou. Anderson
Baldwin


May 17, 1 p.m. First Coast
2005 1 p.m. Raines
1 p.m. Wolfson
4 p.m. Englewood
5 p.m. Terry Parker
7 p.m. Riabult
7 p.m. Alden Road
Exceptional
7 p.m. The Marine
Sceince Ctr.


May 18, 1 p.m.
2005 4 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.

7 p.m.


May 19, 1 p.m.
2005 1 p.m.

5 p.m.
7 p.m.


Forrest
Lee UNF
Fletcher
Palm Avenue
Exceptional
A.P. Randolph
Academies

Paxon School
Mt. Herman
Exceptional
Edward White
Frank Peterson
Academies


LOCATION
Jax Arena

UNF
UNF
Jax Arena
Moran Theatre
Florida Theatre

Jax Arena
UNF
Jax Arena
UNF
Jax Arena
Moran Theatre

JU/Terry Hall

Fletcher High

UNF

Jax Arena

LaVilla School

Moran Theatre

Jax Arena

Mt. Herman
Jax Arena

Moran Theatre


USA Roster

(Continued From Cover)


OL/DL Rance Powell
(Sandalwood), OL JW
Myers (Episcopal), TE
Colin Peek, WR Rocky
Ross, DL John Russell (all
The Bolles School),
FB/LB Tremayne Edwards
(Jackson), WR Rick
Taylor, OL Buster Garrett,
DL Matt Staver (all
Nease), OL Matt Stevens
(Trinity), DL Michael
Johns, OL Chris Brooks
(both Mandarin), RB Nick
Daniels (Lee), DB Zach
Whittenburg (Hilliard),
DL Ryan Southwell
(Union County), LB Rico
Butler (Raines).
Team USA will take on
international junior all-star
teams on Wednesday,
February 2 in a fast-flow-
ing shootout tournament.
The USA's first opponent
will be European champi-
on France (3:40 p.m.) fol-
lowed by Canada (5:20
p.m.), Japan (7:50 p.m.)
and Mexico (9:30 p.m.) at
Bolles' Skinner-Barco
Stadium.
Games are played over
two seven-minute halves
to determine the top two
teams that will contest the
Championship Game, on
Saturday, February 5 at
4:00 p.m. Tickets are.
available from The Bolles
School and Nease,
University Christian and
Mandarin high schools,
priced at-$6 per day.


TEAM USA ROSTER (by school)


Pos.
LB
OL/DL

TE/DE
OL
RB/DB

LB
FB/LB
DB
DBZach
QB/DB
FB/LB

RB/DB
RB
DE
DL
OL
DE
WR
OL
DL
WR
DE
LB
FB/LB
OL/DL
OT
QB Riley

TE

WR

DL

OL


OL
DL
K/P


Name School/County
Kris Linster Baker County/Baker
Jeff Griffin Bartram Trail/
St Johns
Elijah Charles Clay/Clay
JW Myers Episcopal/Duval
Travis Williamson
Fernandina/Nassau-
Ryan Stampler First Coast/Duval
David Donohue Fleming Island/Clay
Joe Singleton ForrestDuval
Whittenburg Hilliard/Nassau
Michael Hicks Jackson/Duval
Tremayne Edwards


Craig James
Nick Daniels
John McClean
Michael Johns
Chris Brooks
Kenny Brown
Rick Taylor
Buster Garrett
Matt Staver
Reno Fells
Charles Owens
Rico Butler
Brett Bonds
Rance Powell
Randall Cox
Skinner

Colin Peek

Rocky Ross

John Russell


Jackson/Duval
Lee/Duval
Lee/Duval
Mandarin/Duval
Mandarin/Duval
Mandarin/Duval
Nease/St Johns
Nease/St Johns
Nease/St Johns
Nease/St Johns
Palatka/Putnam
Raines/Duval
Raines/Duval
Ridgeview/Clay
Sandalwood/Duval
St Augustine/St Johns
The Bolles
School/Duval
The Bolles
School/Duval
The Bolles
School/Duval
The Bolles
School/Duval


Jim Bob Williams
Trinity/Duval
Matt Stevens Trinity/Duval
Ryan Southwell Union County/Union
Clay Gregory


FIND OUT HOW YOU

CANAPPEAR IN PREP RAP


CALL 904/766-8834


University
Christian/Duval
RB/DB Brandon Higginbotham.
W. Nassau/Nassau
WR Rod Owens Wolfson/Duval


DATE
May 16,
2005




B-3B/JANUARY 15, 2005


S r"?Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

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B.3C/JANUARY 15, 2005


Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein
TOP SINGLES
1. "Drop It Like It's Hot" Snoop Dogg Featuring Pharrell
(Doggystyle) Last Week: No. 1
2 '"l. 2 Step" Ciara Featuring Missy Elliott (Sho'nuff
MusicLine LaFace) No. 2
3. "Disco Inferno" 50 Cent (Shady Aftermath) No. 6
4. "Soldier" Destiny's Child Featuring T.I. & Lil Wayne
(Columbia) No. 4
5. "Lovers and Friends" Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz
Featuring Usher & Ludacris (BME) No. 3
6. "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" Green Day (Reprise)
No. 8
7. "Let Me Love You" Mario (3rd Street J) No. 5
8. "My Boo" Usher and Alicia Keys (LaFace) No. 9
9,A'Only U" Ashanti (The Inc. Def Jam) New Entry
10. "Wonderful" Ja Rule Featuring R. Kelly & Ashanti
(The Inc. Def Jam) No. 7
TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Some Beach" Blake Shelton (Warner Bros.) Last Week:
No. 1
2. "Party for Two" Shania Twain with Billy Currington or
Mark McGrath (Mercurys) No. 2
3. "Awful, Beautiful Life" Darryl Worley (DreamWorks)'
No. 4
4. "Back When" Tim McGraw (Curb) No. 3
5. "How Am I Doin"' Dierks Bentley (Capitol) No. 5
6. "The Woman with You" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 8
7. "When I Think About Cheatin'" Gretchen Wilson (Epic)
No.. 9
8. Mud on the Tires" Brad Paisley (Arista Nashville) New
Entry
9. "Nothing on but the Radio" Gary Allan (MCA Nashville)
No. 7
10. "You're My Better Half' Keith Urban (Capitol) No. 17
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Without Love" Sun (JH) Last Week: No. 3
2. "Lose My Breath (P. Rauhofer/P. Johnson/M. Joshua
Mixes)" Destiny's Child (Columbia) No. 2
3. "The Wonder of It All (Escape/Gomi/Trendroid/I.
Pavlin/O. Nissim Mixes)" Kristine W. (Tommy Boy
Silver Label) No. 7
4. "Silence 2004" Delerium Featuring Sarah McLachlan
(Nettwerk) No. 8
5. "Walk into the Sun" Dirty Vegas (Capitol) No. 1
6. 'You Lift Me Up" Martha Wash (Purple Rose) No. 5
". "My, My, My" Armand Van Helden (Southern Fried "
Tommy Boy Silver Label) No. 4
S. "Copacabana (Remixes)" Barry Manilow (Concord)
No. 16
9. "What You Waiting For?" Gwen Stefani (Interscope)
No. 6
10. "Vertigo (Jacknife Lee Mixes)" U2 (Interscope) New
Entry


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WOULD YOU LIKE
TO APPEAR IN PREP RAP?
FOR INFORMATION
CALL (904) 766-8834


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JAIL OR BAIL

EDITOR 'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law. Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
BUSTED FOR POSSESSION OF CONTROL SUB-
STANCE-On Saturday, January 8, 2005 at 11:25 p.m. a cou-
ple of undercover police officers contacted a suspect at 1407
Jefferson Street upon walking up to the bridge, which cross-
es a retention stream. The undercover officers observed the
suspect toss something over the concrete wall and into the
stream. They observed a small plastic baggie floating on top
of the water. All other trash located in the stream near the
area where the suspect tossed the baggie was submerged
under the water and /or covered by leaves. The undercover,
officers obtained the small plastic baggie and noticed it con-
tained crack cocaine. Also located on the ground where the
suspect was standing was a small plastic baggie, which was
torn open and had marijuana on and around it. The suspect
was read his rights taken to jail, and book on a "felony"
charge.
BOYFRIEND/GRILFRIEND DOMESTIC VIO-
LENCE-On Saturday, January 8, 2005 at 11:40 p.m. a police
officer was dispatched to a battery with injuries at 1065 W.
4th Street. Upon arrival, police officer was met by the girl-
friend (victim), who stated that she was struck on the head
by her live-in boyfriend (suspect). The victim told the police
officer that the suspect came home drunk and on drugs. She
began to argue with him, and he struck her on the head with
a closed fist. The blow caused a small cut to her forehead
from a ring he was wearing. The victim fled from the home
and called the police from a nearby payphone. A witness
stated that he was in the same room where the suspect and
victim were arguing but all he saw was the suspect strike the
victim in the head. The police officer observed a small cut on
the victim's forehead. The victim refused to complete a writ-
ten statement and to have an E.T. respond. The victim was
given a domestic violence pamphlet. The police officer will
consult \\ith the state attorney's office. Case not cleared.
Patrol follow-up continue.
SHOOTING OUT OF DWELLING WITH A DEADLY
WEAPON-On Saturday, January 8, 2005 at 1:09 a.m. a
police officer was dispatched in reference to someone shoot-
ing into his or her residence. Upon arrival, police officer was
met by a female (victim).' She told the police officer that she
and her male friend were in her bedroom asleep when an
unknown person threw two bricks into her bedroom window
sending glass flying all over her bedroom. She was not
-injured by the missiles or flying glass. The bricks or flying
glass also did not injure her friend. The police officer
observed two large holes in the bedroom window glass, the
corresponding window screen, and bullet holes in the win-
dow adjacent to the bedroom. After initially denying any
shooting out of the house, and even the existence of a gun,'
the victim told the police officer the gun was under the mat-
tress in her child's room (the child was not in the house).
Later the victim admitted that her friend fired her gun from
inside her bedroom at the suspects. The victim's friend was
read his rights and taken to jail, and book on a "felony" for
possession of and discharging a firearm in a residential area.
Case cleared by an arrest.
GRAND THEFT AUTO-On Sunday, January 9, 2005 at
10:20 a.m. a police officer was dispatched to an auto theft on
Art Museum Dr. Upon arrival, the police officer met with the
victim. He stated an unknown suspect stole his vehicle dur-
ing the night. The victim stated he had parked his vehicle in
a parking space in front of his apartment on 1/8/05, at 10:00
p.m. He added on 1/9/05, at 9:30 a.m.,he went to the space
\\here he parked his vehicle and discovered it missing. There
w ere no signs of force entry. The victim has both keys to the
vehicle. I contacted NCIC and was given a dispatch number.
I did not see any broken glass on the ground where the vehi-
cle \\as taken from. The victim signed an auto theft affidavit
form.
THREATENING TELEPHONE CALLS-On Sunday,
January 9, 2005 at 12:58 a.m. a police officer was dispatched
to 9030 9th Ave. in reference to a threatening phone call.
Upon arrival, the police officer made contact with the victim,
who stated between 12:45 and 12:50, he received a phone
call from an unknown male. After answering the phone the
male stated Punk Mother F***** I'm going to come over
there and kill you." After asking the male caller if he had the
right number the conversation ended. Using his caller ID, he
called the number back, and reached the same male. He
asked the male again if he had the right number and the nimale
told him You aint gonna treat my Ho like that, she my Ho".
He told the police .officer he then hung up the phone and
called the police. He further stated he is gone for 5 to 6 days
out of the week and that he believes his wife has a boyfriend
and that the caller may have been he. The police officer
checked through NCIC, which revealed the phone number,
was a "Sprint Wireless" number. No other information was
available. Patrol efforts suspended.
TIRE SLASHED BY GIRLFRIEND-On Sunday, January
9, 2005. at 12:45 an off duty police officer was working at
Jax Lanes Bowling Alley on Beach Blvd. The off duty police
officer was approached by the victim (boyfriend) in refer-
ence to him having problems with his girlfriend (suspect).


\\1iile talking with the victim, the victim pointed out to the
off durt police officer that his girlfriend (suspect). had just
pulled up beside his parked car. The off duty police officer
observed the suspect exit her vehicle, walk to the back pas-
senger side of the victim's vehicle, bent over and cut the right
rear tire. The off duty police officer detained the suspect as
she attempted to flea the parking lot in her vehicle. The
police officer asked the suspect why she cut the victim's tire.'
She admitted to cutting the tire with a razor blade and that
the blade was in the front seat of her car. The suspect stated
that she is mad with the victim over him lying to her con-
stantly. The suspect was read her rights, arrested and taken
to jail. Case cleared by an arrest.


EDITOR'S NOTE: The information and opinions


expressed here are of the authors and not those
The Florida Star. This is for information only-
legal advice.
























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FLORIDA LOTTO WINNING NUMBERS
04-25-28-30-39-43 Oaturday, January 8 ROLLOVEI!!


I


.


PAGE B-5

that is respectful and will have the greatest chance of
keeping you free. Here are the magic words:

Student version:

Officer, I'd like to answer your questions, but my
momma told me that in a situation like this, I should not
say anything unless she and our attorney are present.

Adult version:


Officer, I'd like to answer your questions, but my
attorneys told me that in a situation like this, I should not
say anything unless they are present.
Note that these statements are respectful refusals.
They are better than yelling, "I want a lawyer," because
they tell police that you already have a lawyer. What
you're also telling police is that you are not clueless. You
are not meat for the Criminal Justice Sausage Grinder.
At this juncture in the interview, you have not been
arrested or searched. Because you have stopped the
interview, the cops are on the spot. They have to arrest
you or let you go. If you're not carrying drugs or guns,
have not confessed to a crime, and have not lied or
assaulted the officers, they cannot make a good arrest.
You have a reasonable chance to go free.

What to Say If You're Guilty?

NOTHING. If you're caught with drugs, guns or
stolen merchandise, or if you were caught in the act of
committing a crime, nothing you say will help you, so
say nothing. You are going to be arrested. By saying
nothing you will make it more difficult for the prosecu-
tor to make a case and convict you. The most common
advice that criminal attorneys give clients is to stop talk-
S. ing to police. You have now received valuable legal
advice practically for free. This is Uncle Dale's Golden
Rule #3:

Give cops your name and basic info, then shut the
HECK up!


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Pro Scouts To Get Lool


At EWC Players In First


HBCU All-Star Classic


Johnny Rembert
Edward Waters College's
8-3 record in it's fourth sea-
son of play after rejuvenat-
ing it's football program, has
achieved national notice.
EWC head coach
Lamonte Massie and two of
his Tigers football players--
wide receiver Dexter Gant
and defenisve linesman Jeris
E. White, will be showcased
in the inaugural HBCU
(Historically Black
Colleges and Universities)
All-Classic to be played
Monday, January 17 in Tad
Gormley Stadium in New
Orleans.
The game, to be played
in an East versus West for-
mat kickoff at 4:00 p.m.
and will air live on ESPN2
in high definition.
Professional scouts and
millions of television view-
ers will focus on the game.
Massie, named Coach Of
The Year" highlighting
EWC's 8-3 2004 season,
joins six other HBCU assis-
tant coaches for the game.
Gant and White will be a
part of the West Team.
"We are excited about
this venture and feel very
privileged to be associated
with the Classic," said
Johnny L. Remebert, EWC
athletic director and ex-NFL
Pro-Bowler, with the New
England Patriots.
"This Classic will pro-
vide the type of national
exposure that will bring cre-
dence to the outstanding
football programs at
HBCUs."


a r G t






Dexter Gant


Lamonte Massie


The HBCU All-Star
Classic's goal is to broaden
exposure for HBCU ath-
letes.
The selection process for
the game began with 43
HBCU coaches and sports
information directors nomi-
nating at least four players
from each school and two
players from other teams
within their conference. The
conferences include the
CIAA, MEAC, SIAC,
SWAC, and HBCU inde-
pendents.
"The young men that
will participate in this game
have needed for this to hap-
pen," said Richard Harvey,
retired 12-year NFL veteran,
who is. president and co-
founder of the Classic.
"Black college players
have not been afforded the
same opportunities and
exposure in-line with ath-
letes coming from Division
1-A institutions."
The selection committee
consists of Will Shaw
(retired NFL defensive
coach), Ray Brown (NFL
veteran guard, Detroit
Lions), Milt Jackson (retired
NFL offensive coach),
Tyrone Wheatley (NFL vet-
eran running back, Oakland
Raiders), and Richard
Harvey (retired NFL veter-
an, New Orleans Saints).


Jeris E. White


- CANTON, OH --
SMichael Irvin, Dan Marino,
Derrick Thomas, and Steve
Young, four first-year eligi-
ble candidates, are among
the 15 finalists who will be
0i considered for election to
the Pro Football Hall of
Fame when the Hall's Board
of Selectors meet in
Jacksonville, Fla. on
Saturday, February 5.
Joining the four first-
year eligible players as
finalists are eight other mod-
ern-era players, a. highly
successful team/league
administrator, and two play-
ers nominated earlier by the
Hall of Fame's Senior
Committee.
The Senior Committee
nominees, who were
announced in August 2004,
are Benny Friedman and
Fritz Pollard.
The other modern-era
player finalists include
S defensive, ends Richard
Dent, Claude Humphrey,
and L.C. Greenwood; line-
F backer Harry Carson; offen-
sive linemen Russ Grimm
and Bob Kuechenberg; cor-
nerback Roger Wehrli; and
wide receiver Art Monk.
The team/league administra-
tor is George Young.
To be elected, a finalist
must receive a minimum
positive vote of 80 percent.
Listed alphabetically, the
15 finalists with their posi-
tions, teams, and years
active follow:
Harry Carson -
Linebacker 1976-1988
New York Giants
Richard Dent -
a Defensive End 1983-1993,
1995 Chicago Bears, 1994
San Francisco 49ers, 1996
Indianapolis Colts, 1997
Philadelphia Eagles
Benny Friedman


Quarterback
Cleveland Bulldogs,
Detroit Wolverines,


1927
1928
1929-


SDan Marino

Michael Irvin


Steve'Young


1931 New York Giants,
1932-1934 Brooklyn
Dodgers
L.C. Greenwood
Defensive End 1969-1981
Pittsburgh Steelers
Russ Grimm Guard -
1981-1991 Washington
Redskins
Claude Humphrey -
Defensive End- 1968-1978
Atlanta Falcons, 1979-1981
Philadelphia Eagles '
Michael Irvin Wide
Receiver 1988-1999
Dallas Cowboys
Bob Kuechenberg -
Guard 1970-1984 Miami


Dolphins
Dan Ma
Quarterback -
Miami Dolphins


rino -
1983-1999


Art Monk Wide
Receiver 1980-1993
Washington Redskins, 1994
New York Jets, 1995


Derrick Thomas
Philadelphia Eagles
Fritz Pollard
Back/Coach 1919-1921,
1925-1926 Akron
Pros/Indians, 1922
Milwaukee Badgers, 1923-
1924 Gilberton Cadamounts
(independent pro team),
1923, 1925 Hammond Pros,
1925 Providence Steam
Roller
Derrick Thomas -
Linebacker 1989-1999
Kansas City Chiefs
Roger Wehrli -
Cornerback- 1969-1982 St.
Louis Cardinals
George Young -
Contributor 1968-1974
Baltimore Colts, 1975-1978
Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997
New York Giants, 1998-
2001 National Football
League
Steve Young -
Quarterback 1985-1986
Tampa Bay Buccaneers,
1987-1999 San Francisco
49ers.


Your Weekly Horoscope

(JANUARY 15, 2005-JANUARY 21, 2005)


ARIES (Mlarch 21 to
April 19) It's
clear sailing this
week. You're able
to accomplish all
tasks by set deadlines. Later,
physical activities are
favored.
TAURUS (April 20 to
Ma) 20) Diplomacy serves
m you well at work
this week. Two
[jj feuding co-work-
ers finally get the
point. This weekend, you're
the leader when it comes to
social activities.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) Avoid
giving into dis-
couragement
where your career
is concerned. Things will
pick up soon. In fact, keep
your eyes open for an excit-
ing opportunity coming your
.way.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) Stop I ..-
pressing that spe-
cial someone into |
a decision. This -
will all resolve itself in due
time. Patience is the key.
LEO (July 23 to August
22) You're able to see your


financial picture
clearly. Dscuss
your insights %ith v
your mate. Over
the weekend, browse
through some travel infor-
mation.
VIRGO (August 23 to
September 22) Don't give
up on your exer-
cise regimen. It
will help you
focus mentally.
Later in the week, a work
project challenges your abil-
ities.
LIBRA (September 23
to October 22)
You're highly
motivated to suc-
ceed as the week
begins. Just be sure your
expectations are realistic.
Ultimately, you make.much
progress.
SCORPIO (October 23
to November 21) You're
finally through
with a daunting
work project. Feel
free to reward
yourself. However, in the
process, avoid being overly
self-indulgent.
SAGITTARIUS
(November : 22 to


December 21)
YO:Lu'le so focused ,
onl 1 goil. you'Ie
b e c o me
enmeshed in tunnel vision.
Widen your scope. Once
you see the bigger picture,
you're more effective.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to January
19) Introspection serves you
Swell this week.
S However, some
[ J perceive you as
being too aloof.
Be sure to keep your people
connections strong.
AQUARIUS (January
20 to February 18)
Something you
overhear acciden- -
tally wasn't meant
for your ears. Try
to forget it. If not, there's
trouble down the road.
PISCES' (February 19
to March 20) You
surprise family
members with
your sociability
this week. However, you're'
in an overall good mood.
This weekend, curl up with
a good book.
CELEBRITY BIRTH-
DAYS: Muhaimad Ali,


JanuarN 1": Ke\ in Cotner.
Janua,\ IS: Kate\ Saoal.
January\ I1; Buzz A.ldrn.
January 20; Geena Davis,
January 21; Olivia D'Abo,
January 22; Richard Dean
Anderson, January 23.

(c) 2005 DBR Media,
Inc.





-.,U ,
I T

.."




/ *. :.. .


JANUARY 15, 2005


PAGE B-6


FLORIDA STAR


i 7r









TAAXTTARDV '- 9/0t)


FLORIDA STAR


--------------------------


EMPLOYMENT
FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at
FCCJ. E.O.E.

Housing Manager
Qualifications for Housing
Manager Degree in
Administration or related field or
a minimum of five years of
responsible experience in hous-
ing related programs, administra-
tion or community action, social
work or related fields; Must have
experience in working with the
poor and disadvantaged and
making public presentations;
Computer knowledge of NEAT
(National Energy Audit Test) and
FLASH Certification preferred,
but not required. Apply in person:
421 W. Church St. Ste. 705,
Jacksonville, FL 32202 or fax
resume, to: (904) 791-9299 Attn:
Human Resources Dept.;
Resumes accepted until Jan. 17,
2005.
New You for a New Year?
3 FREE 30-day weight-loss.
programs to chose from.
Call 904-223-1705.
www.dreambig.amsonline
.com/invite/free



Lowest Prices in Town
Guaranteed
JULIUS BACON
(904) 766-0240
Fast Checks Fast Funds
Electronic Bookkeeping*
Notary
4932-2 Moncrief Road West
(At Richardson Road)

Want to purchase minerals and
other oillgas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201


I SERVICES

Aluminum Awnn


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764-9852


IMPACT

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1360




THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 6:30 P.M.





Issues That Address
Concerns Of The
African American Community
In Jacksonville AndThe World


I'Run, YO: Ad StateN


-iunt LrU... :jr L SkIL \.


\4 aw~





Itk--rz: iixiU4 Sw' P ilrdlx


I OINUA I

I ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
( (Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
L -------- ----------------


I BUSINESS NETWORK


9 a.m.-io a.m.

i. a.m.-i1 noo0i

i p.m.- p.m.,


Remember, the application deadline
is Friday, February z5!


..- w. ,.


We are bom with limitless potential. Help us make sure that we all have the chance to achieve.
Please visit uincf,gor call 1-800-332-8623 Gie to the United Negro College Fund.




CASH NOW.

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS,
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS.4

(800) 794-7310

J.G. WentwofIfh means CASH NOW N
for StnactiIed Settlewentsi



ro gookmarks Tools ielp
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SI I I a : I
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Adoption

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Full
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Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by Ron
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Auctions

GOVERNMENT SURPLUS Great deals on local and
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Building Materials

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Financial


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Mortgages, Refinance or Purchase. No money down. No
income, low rates. All credit considered. (higher rates may
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For Sale


CHURCH FURNITURE. Does your church need pews.
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STEEL BUILDINGS EZ BUILD YOUR OWN AISC
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BUSINESS FOR SALE. RV Dealership, 5 major lines
represented. Large RV, parts & service departments. 9 Acre
campground with 65 campsites in beautiful Western North
Carolina. Living quarters on property. Long-term lease
available. Owner willing to train. Serious inquiries only, call
(828)231-8849.


Help Wanted


Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams
& Graduate Students. Bonuses Paid Weekly. Equal
Opportunity Employer. (888)MOREi PAY (888-667-3729).

DETENTION OFFICER: Phoenix, Arizona. Maricopa
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No experience necessary Contact (602)307-5245,
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including civilian.

ADVANCE YOUR DRIVING CAREER! Increase in Pay
Package. Contractors & Company Needed. Flatbed -
Refrigerated- Tanker. Over-the-Road. Some Regional.
Commercial Driver's License Training. (800)771-6318.
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Non Ililing 20.15 Poilal IPoilliln- I .:.sc. Slate & Local.
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Hunting

HUNT ELK, WILD BOAR and Buffalo in Missouri until
3/15/05. Guaranteed Hunting License, Only $5.00. Our
policy NO Game, NO Pay. Reasonable Rates, Call
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Instruction

EARN YOUR DEGREE Online from home. Business.
Paralegal, Computers, Networking and more. Financial Aid
available, job placement assistance, and computers provided.
Call free (866)858-2121.

Legal Services

DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS children, etc.. Only one
signature required! *Excludes govt.' fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000 ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce Tech.
Established 1977.

AUTO ACCIDENT NEED A LAWYER? ALL Accident
& Injury Claims' *AUTOMOBILE *BIKE/BOAT/BUS
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*WRONGFUL DEATH *NURSING HOME INJURIES
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(800)733-5342 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK.


Miscellaneous


FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM includes standard
installation. 2 MONTHS FREE HBO & Cinemax! Access
to over 225 channels! Limited time offer. S&H. Restrictions
App)ly. (866)500-4056.


Real Estate


BEAUTIFUL NORTI CAROLINA. WINTER
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PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN NC MOUN-
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Mountain Golf Homnesites! Prestigious community
weaving throughout Dye designed 18 liole championship
course in breathtaking Blue Ridge Mms of South Carolina,,
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Steel Buildings

BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bottom Prices!" Final
Clearance. Beat Next Price Increase. Go direct/save. 20x26.
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Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine SteelMaster Buildings.
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your ad will be placed in over 150 papers. Check out our 2x2
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hmola@flpress.com for more information. (Out of State
placement is also available.) Visit us online at
www florida-classifieds com.


r *




FCAN


Week of January 10, 2005


A -J


When we let freedom ring, when we let it
ring from every village and every hamlet,
from every state and every'city, we will be
able to speed up that day when all of God's
children, black men and white men, Jews
and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will
be able to join hands and sing in the words
of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free


at last!
last!"


thank God Almighty, we are free at


IMPACT



WCGL


AM 1360


THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAY @ 6.30 P.M.


PAGE B-7


JAIVUA.Ki li, zuuo


I i I


-1 1 I
II;Y11-r"lislsr~"""""" ~B~iCCdP~B~-r


ft _n~i" RL


Sc&60t 0(eOMt 80 Ubz


Wednesday, Janualy 19

Are you still deciding %lwit i Ill,.;ro-;.t /

schoolsyou'd like ,, I i. I "

attend? Parents can i,, .h.li I t-, I

about any of the doze i- it [ i-i... t...i i ,,

magnet schools on J.I n ir i.- .J ,, ,r

these times: -
r *


--------------


!


t:'l


r :i;





FIr(WIFl ASI'IIIAUAY 5 20
4AG1E B-8l A LlAA- -l


a-_


PREMIER FOODS
OF JACKSONVILLE


*3118
Edgewood
Avenue
PH: (904) 764-2476
FAX: (904) 764-0298
STORE HOURS:
MON-THURS 7AM-8PM
FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM


*27
East
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STORE HOURS:
MON-THURS
7AM-8PM
FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM
SUNDAY
7AM-7:30PM


*1824
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PH: (904) 354-0665
FAX: (904) 354-4543
STORE HOURS:
MON-THURS 7AM-8PM
FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM


a

g


We Cash
Government Checks'
WE ACCEPT:
DEBIT CARDS &
MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS,
FOOD STAMPS & EBT CARDS
*BEAVER STREET STORE
CASHES ONLY


MAIN STREET PHARMACY
(904) 355-5646


FAMILY PACK
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L 37


40 LB. BOX................ 15.95


1 : ,: + ."-
01




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Meaty Beef
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REGULAR OR LIGHT
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12 PK. LNNR BTLS.
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JIANUARYIS5 2005


FT O nrn A STA R


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