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Florida star

HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Editorial
 Section A: Main: Lifestyle
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: State
 Section A: Main: National
 Section B: Local
 Section B: Prep Rap
 Section B continued
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
January 8, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00001

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
January 8, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00001

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 2
    Section A: Main: Lifestyle
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: State
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: National
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Local
        page B 1
        page B 2
    Section B: Prep Rap
        page B 3
        page B 3A
        page B 3B
        page B 3C
    Section B continued
        page B 5
    Section B: Sports
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
        page B 8
Full Text














"Birthplace Of The
Florida Religious
Hall Of Fame"

"Serving Florida
For 54 Years"


TE


eFLORIDAs


thefloridastar.com


People


Congresswoman
Corrine Brown (D) We
watched her in 2004 real-
ly working hard for the
Democratic Party and for
voting rights. She repre-


Murder

Suspect

Caught,

Arrested













Ricky Lydell Taylor
JACKSONVILLE--
A Crime Stoppers report
requesting help in locat-
ing murder suspect,
Ricky Lydell Taylor, 26,
for the December 1,
2004 murder of 28-year-
old Derrick Jerome
Brown was released in
early December. Brown
sustained injuries during
a fight with the suspect
who fled the scene.
Brown was announced
dead within hours of
being transported to
Shands and a warrant for
Taylor's arrest was
issued.
A plea for help by
Jacksonville Sheriff's
Office provided support
from the community and
on January 3, 2005 at
approximately 2:45 p.m.
an officer observed
Taylor with another
male. Taylor ran
through a schoolyard but
the officer was able to
catch, handcuff and
arrest him for Brown's
murder. Ricky has a
long arrest record start-
ing in 1994, that includ-
ed grand theft, simple
assault, drugs and other
offenses.


To


sents the 3rd District of
Florida.
State Representative
Jennifer Carroll (R) -
The lady demonstrated
strength in her first politi-
cal elected position as a
State Representative.
Clara McLaughlin
Criswell
Publisher/Editor, The
Florida Star. Host,
IMPACT radio talk show
on WCGL-AM 1360. In
2004, under Clara's lead-
ership, the paper grew


Tune In To IMPACT
Real Topics...Real
Issues
Produced By
The Florida Star
Each Saturday
6:30 p.m.
On WCGL-AM 1360


Watch In 2005


and developed a new look
and stronger news. The
paper made the
Jacksonville Minority
Business List and she was
honored as a Successful
Role Model.
Joyce Morgan
Danford After 17 years,
Joyce moved from behind
the news anchor desk and
as a reporter and became a
beauty consultant and
broadcast coach for
BeautiControl. She also
has a bi-weekly column


on Health and Beauty in
'The Florida Star.
Linda Davis-
Fructuoso Market
General Manager, TAMA
Broadcasting: Smooth
Jazz-105.3 FM and 105.5
FM; Rejoice Musical Soul
Food 92.5 FM and Hot
105.7FM
Elder Donald Foy -
President, Jacksonville
MAD DADS. In 2004
helped to get money to
give as rewards for infor-
mation leading to arrests.


Citizens Rally For Justice, Peace


,-. .- I
4 *-.

TOP FRAME: Citizens hold signs with names of victims
who allegedly died in custody of the police in
Jacksonville for over a decade. BOTTOM FRAME: The
crowd of marchers listen to speakers demanding justice
and peace in the city.


Many Jacksonville res-
idents on New Year's Day
marched from Bethel
Baptist at Laura Street to
the steps of the Police
Department on Bay Street
in an effort to gain sup-
port in receiving justice
and peace in the
Jacksonville area.
The march stemmed
from the death of two
black males while in
police custody but the


NAACP and other organi-
zations involved said they
want peace and justice
among the citizens as
well.
Their goal is to stop
police brutality as well as
black on black violence.
Prior to the march, the
organizations received a
number of reports from
citizens advising of unfair
treatment by officers dur-
ing arrests, so many of


those complaining, joined
in the march with about
300 other participants.
The group was also not
satisfied with the medical
examiner's report that one
of the men who died with-
in days of each other
while in police custody,
death was cocaine related.
They felt that Ezra Jones
was homeless and cold
not afford cocaine.
Pastor R. L. Gundy of
Jacksonville Leadership
Coalition said that the
black on black crime is
related to social and eco-
nomic depravation but is
not an excuse for the vio-
lence and drug use seen in
Jacksonville or police
brutality.
He stated that the
organizations are pre-
pared to continue to
march and take all actions
deemed appropriate to
end all violence by the
police and by the people
of Jacksonville.


Corrine Brown Joyce M. Danford Rev. R. L. Gundy Elder Donald Foy

Corrine Brown Joyce M. Danford Rev. R. L. Gundy Elder Donald Foy
A ok:.& .


Kezia H. Justice McKinley Young Jennifer Carroll






Deborah Maiden Ronald Williams Mia Jones


Andy Johnson Andrea Giggetts
Such an effort led to the
arrest of the men who
killed EdJ ard Waters
College's student,
Jolmathan Glenn.
State Representative
Audrey Gibson (D) -A
new politician that has
proven to be an asset for
her community.
Andrea Giggetts -
After serving as a strong
Human Relations
Director, left MODIS and
is now President/CEO of
Winning Solutions, USA,
Inc., partner in Winning
Concepts USA, Inc. Just
started a talk show at
WCGL-AM 1360:
"Andrea-The People's
Advocate."
Rev. Reginald L.
Gundy Pastor, Mt.
Sinai Missionary Baptist
Church, CEO, Credi and
President, Jacksonville
Leadership Coalition -
fighting for human rights.
State Senator Tony
Hill Florida State
Senator with compassion
to improve the circum-
stances for his con-
stituents.
Tony Jenkins Vice
President of Diversity
Strategy and
Development, BlueCross


BlueShield of Florida.
Andy Johnson Talk
Show host of "Down to
Business on AM 970
daily except weekends
and theme is: "Florida's
Best & Most Efficacious
Talk Show." He, at the
last minute decided to run
for 'Supervisor of
Elections' as the only
Democrat and has been
already endorsed by "The
Concerned Citizens of
Jacksonville."
City Councilwoman
at Large, Glorious
Johnson (R) She is a
first time politician and is
fully dedicated. to serving
the people, regardless of
their party affiliation.
City Councilwoman
Mia Jones (D) A first
time politician but is giv-
ing all that she has for her
constituents.
Kezia Hendrix
Justice
Founder/ Executive
Director, Jacksonville
Centre of the Arts; owner
Northside Center of the
Arts, Owner, Kezia
Cosmetics; National
model and actress,
Producer, Choreographer
and instructor, LaVilla
School of the Arts
Bryon Leftwich -
Starting Quarterback, The
Jacksonville Jaguars.
Deborah Maiden -
Owner, President and
(See "Watch", A-7)


SPTIDA H11STOF- V
4~'JJ'L OF FLORID)A
QQ /~ n o 7 (01 10. 05)B
F I 7 F T- I 1I1 7 0 -7


I___ _~ __ _


I


----r~-- ------ .rr-ssalru~


----


d9 A








IA PAG A-II A VIL IL- V.J1x A --W


CLARA McLAUGHLIN CRISWELL
PUBLISHER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


RON WILLIAMS, SR.
NEWS EDITOR
CHERYL COWARD
WRITER/GRAPHICS/WEB MGR.
DISTRIBUTION:
WILLIAM GREEN
ABEYE AYELE WORK


SAMUEL CRISWELL
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR
MARSHA DEAN PHELTS
REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
BETTY ASQUEDAVIS
COLUMNIST


FREELANCE REPORTERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS:
RON ADAMS,-ESTER DAVIS, NOREEN ERCOLINO, LAURENCE GREENE,
LAVERA THOMAS, RONALD WILLIAMS, JR.,
DISIREE SANDLIN, DELORES MAINOR WOODS
SALES: ROSEMARY THORNTON AND ROBERT GORDON
GEORGIA BUREAU: (WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS/SALES)
WILLIAM GREEN, HATTIE COLEMAN, CASSIE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM KING, CLARISSA DAVIS


PRINTER: OCALA STAR-BANNER


(904) 766-8834.
FAX: (904) 765-1673
Serving St: Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Leon, Alachua, Flagler,
Marion And Glynn County


The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida


SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$33,00
HalfYear-$18.50


CONTRIBUTORS: DBR MEDIA, INC.


To reach The Florida Star
via electronic mail:
info@thefloridastar.com
On the Web:
TheFloridaStar.com



sAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


Send chetk or money order
with subscription amount to: )
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsible
for the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent
the policy of this paper ',"
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National NewspaperAssociation
National Newspaper
Publishers Association ERIFICATI
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. VE
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First CoastAfrican American
Chamber of Commerce

Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


ACCU Wsprw F
All forecasts and maps provided by A:u.:uWealhei Inr c' 20'i5


World AIDS Day came
and went December 1.
If only the devastating
scourge of HIV/AIDS itself
would go as quickly and
easily. But of course
HIV/AIDS is not going to
disappear easily or quickly,
neither'here in the United
States nor around the world.
Instead, the coming of
World AIDS Day brought
forth a fresh set of grim sta-
tistics from the United
Nations Program on AIDS
and the World Health
Organization mapping the
continuing spread of
HIV/AIDS in the United
States and around the
world. More than 39 million
people now have
HIV/AIDS-a figure that
includes nearly 5 million
new cases diagnosed this
year-and more than 3 mil-
lion people worldwide have
died from it this year alone.
That number is expected to
rise to 5 to 6 million deaths
within two years.
There is some good
news. The world's govern-
ments and scientific com-
munity has mobilized
against AIDS with increas-
ing urgency: funding for the
struggle has increased from
$2.1 billion in 2001 to $6.1


billion this year, and there
are telling success stories.
And yet, the scope of the
-problem remains stagger-
ing.
For example, many
believe the development of
an anti-AIDS vaccine is at
least a decade away, and
that- vaginal microbicides,
which women could use to
protect themselves from the
risks of unprotected sex, are
at least five years away.
Furthermore, although the
funds devoted to combating
HIV/AIDS have risen
sharply, some estimate that,
with the effects of
HIV/AIDS deaths de-popu-
lating large swaths of Black
Africa, and the disease
approaching epidemic, sta-
tus in India and China, with
their billion-plus popila-
tions, the world will soon
need $20 billion a year for
the fight.
A new disturbing devel-
opment, according to the
UN-WHO report, is that the
pandemic is now increasing
at a faster rate among
women than men in almost
.every part of the world.
Most often, the women are
being infected by either
their husbands or steady
partners-who have contract-


To Be Equal

By Marc H. Morial
President And CEO
National Urban League

Reversing AIDS's Momentum


through sex with other men,
or through drug use, or hav-
ing sex with prostitutes-
rather than the casual sexu-
al encounters.
In India, for .example,
where 5.1 million people
have HIV, women account
for one-quarter of the new
cases. Such ratios have
become common through-
out East Asia, and are much
higher in sub-Saharan
Africa and the Caribbean.
The trend is being driven
by the fact that in many
poor countries and tradi-
tional societies women (and
teenage girls, who are often
taken as sexual partners by
older men) have little
power to refuse male
demands for sex, or compel
males to wear condoms
during sex, or, finally, to
gain access to treatment
once they are themselves
infected.
Ironically, Vishakha N.
Desai, president of the Asia
Society, in New York,
pointed out in a recent
newspaper column, in
many countries where the
disease is significant, "hav-
ing a husband is itself a risk
factor for HIV."
.Nor is the United States
immune from the trend
toward what some are call-
ing .the "feminization" of
HIV/AIDS.
Here, women represent
a growing part of the
850,000 to 950,000 people
infected with HIV/AIDS,


forecast for Jacksonville, FL
AccuWeather.com


I flAL 7.-fAv FnIOrAST


Thursday



Patchy fog in
the a.m..


Thu. night



Patchy fog
late.


78 57

THE WEEK AHEAD


Friday



Patchy fog in
the a.m..


78/57


Saturday



Patchy fog in
the a.m..


78/57


U.S. TRAVELER'S CITIES


City .
Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Cleveland
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Houston
Ir,,jla,-, ol;s
Karisas dCry
Los Angeles
Miami
Minn.- St. Paul
New Orleans
rjNe '~'Ark. Cr,
Omaha
Ph.L.eri]
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC


Thursday
Hi Lo W
64 44 sh
36 34 i ,
26 16 sf
38 26 sf
40 14 pc
13 12 pc
30 22 sf
54 48 sh
35 25 sf
22 18 pc
62 48 c
81 70 pc
18 8 c
68 56 sh
38 34
16 8 pc'
60 44 pc
55 46 r
40 30 sn
56 40 r;


Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
-': '"*'. -*'" ~ -':"- .-:
-"a ~- "-r '. ^ *^-.2. ..

Patchy fog in Times of Some sun. Times of
the morning, clouds and clouds and
sun. sun.

74157 74152 74152 74153

THE WEEK AHEAD


THE NATIONAL SUMMARY


Friday
HI Lo W
57 46 sh
42 30 pc
28 22 pc
37 30 sf
36 18 pc
32 24 pc
28 22 pc
62 54 sh
37 33 pc
43 35 pc'
60 46 r
82 70 sh
22 14 pc
70 58 sh
46 36 pc
28 22 pc
58 46 r
53 44 sh
38 30 sn
50 38 c


Saturday
HI Lo W
64 48 sh
42 32 pc
38 28 sn
45 37 sh
42 20 pc
41 26, sn
36 30 'sf
70' 56 sh
50 41 r
50 35 sh
60 48 pc
82 70 pc
24 16 sn
74 58 r,
46 38 pc,
32 22 sn
.60 46. pc
53 46 r
36 30 sn
52 42 pc


Sunday
HI Lo W
64 48 r
44 36 r
40 30 pc
50 34 c
48 24 pc
43 28 c
49 30 c
74 54 sh
51 35 c
51 34 c
62 48 c
82 71 s
27 '10 c
72 56 sh
52 41 r
41 24 c
58 44 pc
54 45. r,
40 28 c
60 43 r


Monday
HI Lo W
65 48 sh
43 37 c
42 28 c
41 36 r
48 14 pc
40 20 c
41 33 r,
76 60 c
50 36 c
46 29 c
64 46 r
79 66 sh
17 7,
72 57 pc
49 41 pc
38 17 c
65 41 r
52 39 sh
'38 25 c
53 43 c I


- ".:r ':.. ",, .- .. -

WORLD TRAVELER'S CITIES
Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday
City Hi Lo W HI Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Amsterdam 42 41 c 54 42 r 43 32 sh 44 31 pc 41 39.c
Berlin 36 32 sn 49 42,r 50 35 a 47 27 sh 36 33 pc
Buenos Aires .90 64 pc 84 66 t 86 66 t 94 64 pc 79 55 pc
Cairo 61 42 pc 63 41 pc 59 41 pc 64 45 pc 65 43 s
Jerusalem 50 36 pc 51 31 pc 45 30 r 52 36 pc 56 45-pc
Johannesburg 89 65 pc 91 69 pc, 91 66 pc 85 63 pc 85 59 pc
London 48 45 c 54 41 sh 42 30 sh 45'33 pc 46 35 r
Madrid 56 43 s 55 40 s ,51 34 s 48 39 sh 54 42 c
Mexico City 72 47,s 71 48 pc 71 45 pc 74 47 s 67 41 pc
Moscow 20 10 sn 26 20 c 29 21 pc 31 21 sn 22. 8 sn
Paris 43 40 c 52 40 pc 43 30 pc 44 28 pc 41 37 i
Rio de Janeiro 76 67 t 80 71 t 82 72 t 81 72 'sh 84 72 pc
Rome 57 43 s 58 45 pc 58 42 s 55 41 pc 53 43 c
San Juan 82 72 s 84 73 pc 84 72 sh 84 72 s 82 71 c
Seoul 37 22 pc 31 10 s 23 5 s 21 7 s 26 15 s
Sydney .79 59 s 74 54 s 73 53 pc 74 54 pc 73 54 s
Tokyo 44 39 c 54 39 pc 43 34 s 46 29 s 44 43 s
Toronto 30 24 sn 33 27 sf 38 31 pc 39 30 sn 39 30 sf
Winnipeg 10 -1 pc 15 7 sf ;6 3 sn 5 -8 c -3-12 an
Zurich 39 32 c 48 41 pc 9 34 s 42 29 r 44 37 c


Cold and stormy, weather will
remain over the West through the
period.Temperatures across much of
the region will average 10 to 15
degrees below normal. Rain and
mountain snow will be common
across the Southwest.
Unseasonable warmth will continue
over the Southeast and Middle
Atlantic. Storms will bring
precipitation to the. Midwest and
Missitsippi'Valley.


SWeather (W):s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
,-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain,.sf-snow flurries, sn-snowi i-ice.

SUN & MOON

Sunrise .Sunset
Thu., Jan. 6....... 7:24 a.m. 5:41 p.m.
Fri.,Jan.7 ..........7:24 a.m. 5:42 p.m.
Sat., Jan.8 ...... 7:24 am. 5:43 p.m.
Sun., Jan. 9......... 7:24 a.m. 5:43 p.m.
Mon., Jan. 10......7:24 a.m. 5:44 p.m.
Tue., Jan.11 .....7:24a.m. 5:45 p.m.
Wed., Jan. 12 ....7:24 a.m. 5:46 p.m.
Moonrise Moonset
Thu., Jan.6 ........3:11 a.m. 1:55p.m.
Fri.,Jan.7 ..........4:22a.m. '2:42 p.m.
Sat., Jan.8 ........5:34 a.m. 3:39 p.m.
MQon Phases
New First Full Last


Jan Jan Jan Feb
10- 17 25 2
'1111


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This has struck African-
American females hard
because black Americans,
although just 13 percent of
the general population,
comprised more than 51
percent of all HIV/AIDS
cases diagnosed between
2000 and 2003. A recent
report by the federal
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention found that
black women make up 72
percent of US women with
HIV/AIDS.
The welter of statistics
about HIV/AIDS-and the
tragic'stories of individuals,
communities, and indeed
entire nations behind them-
make it clear that, despite
its having been pushed off
the front pages of the
American media,
HIV/AIDS lives. It's those
suffering from it, in the
United States and around
the world, who are dying.
Our recognizing that must
stir us to action. No matter
where the HIV/AIDS
scourge has rooted itself,
the response of the healthy
and those with resources
has to be the same: More
money and more resources
have to be devoted to put in
place the treatment and pre-
ventive programs that will
beat back this disease.
It's no exaggeration to
say that the stability of the
world and the future of
humanity'depend on it.


p io'
Tilit'll -. -


--


FU -


L.UVjL I'LIA FUMCUM01


---- ------ -


U.S. TRAVELER'S CITIES


I he, ~


111


IANUTARY 8, 2005i


FT. OTJIA STAR


"Ae'7 A '


~pB~rj 01






I V1AL AR- I-- S R2--T- 5


Socially Speaking

By
Betty Asque
Davis
"There's Always Something
Happening On The First Coast"
The holiday season on the First Coast was just as daz-
zling as ever! As always it's fantastic seeing each and
every one at a. variety of events. Everyone was looking
marvelous! Whether it was a Jaguar game, retirement cel-
ebration, holiday party, office party, or the formal dances,
each was great fun!
"Lifetime Achievement Winners Fannie Green and
Theresa Pringle's Retirement Party"
During their thirty-five years of working together,
singing together in a. trio and being just friends, Ms.
Fannie Green and Mrs. Theresa Johnson Pringle
retired together from the Department of Children and
Families. For decades these wonderful ladies have been
the 'heart and soul' of children's protective services.
During an early managerial period through my tenure
with the department I was both grateful and pleased to
have these fine ladies on my team. And very fittingly dur-
ing the spring of 2004 both Ms. Green and Mrs. Pringle
received Lifetime Achievement Awards at the annual
Child Abuse Prevention Recognition Award Luncheon.
Friends and former staff and co-workers (some from
Tallahassee and surrounding areas) filled the Davis Street
Center's Conference Room to bid these committed com-
munity servants farewell. It was a wonderful reunion of
family, friends and colleagues for two amazing ladies!
*********
"New Stanton's 1956 Class Holiday Party"
The University Club was the setting for the very fes-
tive Christmas, Dinner/Dance for the New Stanton 1956
Class. One class member came from the Washington, D.C
(Mrs. Shirley Childs Miller) and The John Wards trav-
eled from their Florida home in Tallahassee en route to
their home in Mesa, Arizona for the merry affair.
The class members were very, very fashionable in their
beautiful and festive attire for the occasion. The holiday
mood was enchanting as the class members and their
guests were entertained during dinner by William
"Sleepy" Gilliard and The Gang Band and of course
following the elegant and delectable dinner the class
members and their guests, with their dancing shoes in full
gear, danced the night away.
Among the terrific planners of the Class Dinner were:
Mesdames Marva McKinnon, Pat Greene, Juanita
Wilson, Frances Baker, Delores Robinson, and James
Mosley. Each class member received a souvenir writing
pen and this year the class chose sponsoring foster chil-
dren making the transition from foster care to independ-
ent living.
Each year the Christmas Dinner Party is very, very
special, as some of the classmates have not seen each
other since graduation or the Christmas before. There was
loads of fun the entire evening!

"New Stanton's Class of 1958's Breakfast Festivity"
The planners for the Class of 1958 Mesdames
Barbara Dailey Davis, Geraldine White Martin
Rometa Graham Porter, and Mary Hilliard Roper
along with George Barnes and Johnnie Hill chose The
Hilton at Riverplace for the holiday breakfast festivity.
There was an abundance of excellent cuisine to enjoy as
the class members and their guests shard memories since
their last gathering. There was Christmas caroling, fun-
filled games, gifts and wonderful fellowship for all on a
picture perfect morning in a beautiful 'room with a view.'
In town for the party were from New York, Al and
Charlene Hall Frazier and Robert Warren from D.C.
The class is planning a holiday cruise for their
Christmas 2005 activity. If you're a member or friend of
the 1958 Class and are interested in participating in the
pre-Christmas Holiday Cruise on the Celebration Cruise
Ship December 17-22, 2005 with ports at Key West and
Nassau contact: Mrs. Barbara Davis at 768-5481 or
Mrs. Clara Cross, Travel Consultant (904) 721-0129
(home) or (904) 641-4444, ext. 209 or e-mail ccross@dis-
counttvl.com or crossll22@bellsouth.net. This sounds
like great fun and we don't plan to miss it!
********
"Flajax's 74th Annual Dance"
The Flajax Club's 74th Annual Dance was beautiful,
well attended and immensely pleasurable! As guests
arrived Flajax president Chief Sgt. Major Henry Sellers
greeted them with his lovely wife Mrs. Sharon Sellers at
his side. When the guests entered the ballrooms at the
Radisson Riverwalk Hotel they saw a 'sea' of beautiful,


crisp white. The tables and chairs were covered with
white linen and it was quite eye-catching! Music from
The Elite Band kept everyone dancing the entire
evening. As always the Flajax members were gracious
and splendid hosts for the entire evening. Three new
members were presented at the annual event: Rev.
' Thomas Anderson, Major Kenneth BeVoe (Ret.) and
Lt. Commander James Andrews.


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It was great sharing our table with Eugene and Mrs.
Harriett Witsell Bowens from Atlanta, and Robert
Warren from D.C. and seeing Mrs. Diedra Sherard
Thompson also from D.C.
.How wonderful it is that this holiday tradition contin-
ues. Special kudos to this years' dance chair Flajax
Samuel Allen. He coordinated a splendid dance. Yes,
splendid indeed! *******
Don't forget to let us know of your upcoming events.
Contact us at 904 766-8834; E-mail socially@theflori-
dastar.com or you may reach me directly at
imajol@aol.com, telephone (904) 285-9777 or fax (904)
285-7008. 4
See you in the paper!


I


,


JAN UAR Y8 ,.2005


FLORIDA STAR


PDAGf A3


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FLORIDA STAR


Rev. Charles B. Dailey

Remembered During

Homegoing Celebration

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--The Rev. Dr. Charles B
Dailey, one of Jacksonville's most prominent civil rights
leaders and advocate, was laid
to rest on Tuesday, January 4
S following a Homegoing celebra-
Stion held at First Baptist Church
of Oakland where he led as pas-
tor and religious leader for near-
ly five decades.
Dailey, 76, passed on
Wednesday, December 22 fol-
lowing an extended illness.
Family members, friends,
members of the congregation,
elected officials and public ser-
Rev. Charles B. Dailey vants packed the East
Jacksonville church to pay their last respects to a man who
championed the rights of the disenfranchsied throughout
his lifetime. A victory service was held later at 6:30 p.m.
on Tuesday.
Born in Louisville, KY., the Rev. Dailey was a gradu-
ate of Butler University, the Graduate School of Religion
at Anderson College and Central Baptist Seminary in
Indianapolis. He pastored churches in Indiana untilmov-
ing to Jacksonville in 1959.
Dailey is remembered for many acts of unselfish serv-
ice to mankind. Among the memories was his being one
of about 24 local ministers arrested and jailed in the early
1960s for trying to integrate Morrison's Cafeteria and the
Robert Meyer Hotel in downtown Jacksonville.
Survivors include his wife of 41 years, Gwendolyn
Dailey, and five children: Charles Bradley Dailey of Ft.
Myers, Fla., Rev. Jerry W. Dailey of San Antonio, Texas,
Tammy P. Dailey of Jacksonville, Tonya Dailey Williams
of Ashland, Kentucky and Rev. Torin T. Dailey of
Jacksonville. Marion Graham Mortuary, Jacksonville, was
the funeral director of note.



-.4...


(


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FORE-

THOUGHT


Funeral

'planning

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FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED

ALPHONSO WESTJVIORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354
Directors


Faith In Our Community 2 The Church Directory
-Schedule of Events and Services- / "Come and Worship With Us "


DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. ANNUAL CELE-
BRATION SERVICES AND PRAYER BREAKFAST-
Defining the Moment and the Movement is the theme for the
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Celebration Services and
Prayer Breakfast scheduled for January 13-17 in several
Florida counties. The services are sponsored by The Baptist
Ministers' Conference of Duval and adjacent Counties, The
Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, President. Scheduled celebra-
tions, locations and dates include: Baker and Nassau
County-January 13, 7:00 p.m., First Missionary Baptist
Church, 20 South 9th St., Fernandina Beach, Fla, Rev. D.K.
Bolden, Pastor. Clay and St. Johns County-January 14,
7:00 p.m., St. Johns Missionary Baptist Church, 1920
Mound St., Orange Park, Fla., Rev. C.E. Preston, Pastor.
Duval County-January 17, 7:00 p.m., conclusion of MLK
Celebration Services, Greater New Jerusalem Full Gospel
Baptist Church, 207 W. 6th St., Rev. B.E. Williams, Pastor.
The 6th Annual Prayer Breakfast will be held Saturday,
January 15, 8:00 a.m. at Philippian Multi-Purpose Center,
7540 New Kings Rd. Limited seats are available. Tickets are
$20. For more information call 904/765-3111.
FRUITS OF THE SPIRIT-The Fruits of the Spirit
Deaconess Program will be held Friday, January 14, 7:00
p.m., 1435 W. State St. Rev. Willie J. Jones, Pastor.
ANNIVERSARIES-Zion Hope Missionary Baptist
Church, 2803 W. Edgewood Ave., invites the public to share
in the celebration of the church 76 Church Annivesary and
the Pastor's anniversary. Services begin at 11:00 a.m. on
Sunday, January 9 concluding with the Childrens' Ministry
at 6:00 p.m. Nightly services will be held January 10-14
beginning at 7:30 p.m. and concluding on Sunday, January
16 at 3:00 p.m. .Dea. Gary Bronner and Sis. Susie Mae
Gilbert, Chairpersons.
2005 NEW YEAR'S REVIVAL-A 2005 New Year's
Revival will be held January 26-28 at Greater New Mt.
Moriah Missionary Church, 1953 W. 9th St. Service sched-
ules and speakers include: January 26, 7:00 p.m.-Rev.
Darien K. Bolden, First Missionary Baptist Church of
Fernandina Beach, Fla. January 27, 7:00 p.m.- Rev. R.E.
Herring, Mt. Bethel Baptist Church. January 28, 7:00
p.m.- Overseer B.E. Williams, Greater New Jerusalem Full
Gospel Baptist Church. Transportation is provided. Call
904/354-0145. The Rev. Dr. Percy Jackson, Sr. and The Rev.
Dr. Percy Jackson, Jr., Pastors.
ANNUAL FEAST CANCELED-The annual feat hosted by
Elder Bobbie and Eliza Sheffield at 5913 Briley Ave. on the
second Saturday in January has been canceled due to Elder
Sheffield having major surgery.
I HAVE A DREAM-Pastor Darrell L. Gilyard's sermon
topic during the 10:00 a.m. service on Sunday, January 16 is
"Love Knows No Color." Service will include the recitation
of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have A Dream"
speech. The church is located at 1118 W. Beaver St.


.' ..',' 1 ..










F.-
?(. s~-o L


Alphonso West


Jacqueline Y. Bartley


If you wish, you may
choose not to do anything at all
about prepaying your financial
expenses. Let the money come
out of your estate's assets when
you die. If it's obvious that
there will be money in your
estate--in the form of savings,
insurance, cashable stocks or
bonds, or other liquid assests--
that's probably all the protection
your survivor needs. The money
you would otherwise tie up for
funeral payments could be
invested or put into savings
instead.
The disadvantage of this
course is that your estate may
never be so large as to cover the


funeral costs adequately.
Another possibility is the event
if you are well off now, your
financial fortunes may change to
such a degree that there won't
be much money in the estate if
you die. In such cases, your sur-
vivor would be under great
financial strain to meet the cost
of your funeral and burial. It
.may require going into insur-
ance money or other resources
more urgently needed

A.B. COLEMAN
MORTUARY, INC.
"Our Aim Is Not to Equal, But Excel"
5680 Moncrlef Rd."
Tel: 766-0507
www.ABColeman.com


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208


Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Afternoon Bible Study
(Except First Sunday) 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School Review............8:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Joe Calhoun
(904) 764-5727 Church
(904) 768-0272 Home


I-


CHRISTIAN FAMILY


WORSHIP CENTER
Dr. Lloyd S. Williams, Pastor

220 NE. 1st Ave. CHURCH-(386)-454-2367
P.O. Box 2187 HOME-(386) 454-8251
High Springs, FL 32655 CELL-(386) 344-0058


Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday
Fulfillment Hour Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Every 2nd & 4th Thursday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry 6:30 p.m.
201 East.Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church
2036 Silver Street.* Jacksonville, FL 32206
Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor
(904) 354-7249 Church
Bible Power Enrichment Hour
Sunday School 9:15- 10:15 a.m.
Baptism-Praise & Worship
(Sanctuary) 10:30 a.m.
*First Sunday Only Praise & Worship.......8:00 a.m.
Youth Church-2nd & 3rd Sundays
Fellowship Hall 10:30 a.m.
Mid-Week:
Wednesday, Noonday Prayer 12 Noon
Inspiration Wednesday Worship Service....................6:00-8:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study, Youth Bible Study & Activities

Mount Sinai Community Development Enterprise
Community Resource Education
And Development Institute
2049 North Pearl Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206
(904) 798-8733

GED Program, FCAT, Tutoring, Mentoring, After School,
Job Skils Training, National Parenting Program, Ex-Offenders,
Computer Skills Training for Youth and Adults.

For More Information
Call (904) 798-8722 or 798-8733.

MT. CHARITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1417 North Laura St. Jacksonville, Florida 32206
George Harvey, Jr., M.A., M. Div., Pastor
Telephone: (904) 356-0664 or 768-4453
"Christ died for our sins...was buried and Rose again" (see I Corinthians 15:1-4)
Sulzbacher Outreach Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday & Friday Night Services 7:30 p.m.
International Sunday School...........5:00 p.m. Saturday on WYMM AM 1530
A Bible Preaching, Bible Believing and Bible Practicing Church
"Without the shedding of Blood, there is no remission of sin" (Hebrews 9:22)


Evangel

Termpie
.'1 A c. 11/1 1 / ,/,/ <. I nt.

O/'er'm)j A V/tc'ce ,/' hi/,;


"THE DAY OF MIRACLES IS NOT OVER"
(;,'i i ./ rn l a I, \,1 Itn ildr a l.lrj .


Sunday, January 9th
8:25AM 10:45AM 7:00PM


Jackoronvill C'onvy'u f Hope


ow,


Sa-urdavy. February 5th
Brenv%%ood Park
FRIA Gicc'I rit ,.. Hoct Foodi.
Medical ~ &I )cnial Sc reenings.


(904) 781-9393


Deborah West


.,, o fAI*


JANUARY, 2005


ZI"~P






,/1ATT fh 0 -- STARA- E A -


DBPR Florida Department of Business and
ii. Professional Regulation

Program Description:
Isn't it a crime what some people will do? Unlicensed individuals take advantage of Florida's citizens each year through many
different professional services. To protect the citizens of Florida, the Department of Business and Professional Regulation
created the Unlicensed Activity Program. Through proactive enforcement operations such as stings and sweeps, as well as
outreach efforts that educate citizens on the dangers of doing business with an unlicensed entity, the program strives to
identify and eliminate unlicensed activity. Don't let yourself be a victim. Verify an individual's licensure, file a complaint, or
report unlicensed activity 24 hours a day, seven days a week online at www.MyFlorida.com/dbpr or by calling 850.487.1395.


Secretary's Letter:

The Department of Business and Professional
Regulation licenses more than one million
individuals in 22 professions that touch your life
every day. Each has the training and experience
necessary to be awarded a Florida license.
Whether you are participating in a construction
or real estate transaction, receiving cosmetology
services or eating in a restaurant, you can have
peace of mind knowing that these professionals
have taken the time to get the appropriate
education and experience. The Unlicensed
Activity Program is working to protect you from
individuals who are not properly licensed.







FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF 10 Reasons to fdopt a Teen

CHILDREN
1. No messy diapers or baby food jars.

S & F.A MI.LIES 2. We already sleep through the night.
3. We'll be in college soon but we'll come home for
the holidays.

4. We get free college tuition.

5. No more carpools we can drive you around.

6. We can program the remote, the VCR, the DVD and
teach you how to operate your computer.

7. We can help you appreciate new music and the
latest fashions and dance steps.

8. We can help you with those quiet evenings.

9. We can learn from you.

.,, ;-, "T!I ~10. So many of us really need to belong to a family.


Did You Know?


Uall us about adopting a teen. In Florida, 43% of children in foster care are
12 or older.
1-800-96ADOPT
Of all the foster children adopted last year, only
21% were 12 and older.

,.. rj


,r


JANUARY 82005


m


. FLORID STAR


PAGE A-5






PAC4III k 14' 11SAJNUY820


i n











This Saturday | II a.m.-3 p.m.

THE JACKSONVILLE FAIRGROUNDS


'..ipiivN Matia is a i-,-'1 chance to: larn more about the dozens

of-', i, mp, t ii,, .,gIu-rt : I!...I; i in tl.e Duval C.:u'u'I PL'0ic ScIl, ol

system. It's a fat event tbr the whole r fauly,. itih live

entertainment, exciting demonstrations, and more!


"-.;, ll diSCover m i' piie P*rr'p,.ini* in -aI .i iil ; aIr.eas [., .il l

from foreignt l gT:ni'ge immersion and 1ii1l i '- .science to

law ;sIidcs and medical professions. Magnet programs

are 7,T.-e.d t a students -.:rall li ,s, in elEeneitay,

middle and hj:1i schools,
MAGNET
PROGRAMS
IioII I IIw Iv Il. I1 3I 90-308I ".. L ..



Carne" kADAi ablbt tthi./t gnewt eglL a t tA "Tw"mL -

Inspirp&aions cools
S------ ---------------------------
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L-----------------llll--------------------------------l


B-CC President Speaks At

Jackie Robinson Ballpark

Renovation Groundbreaking


Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed (foL
ing.
DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla. -- As a ninth-grade stu-
dent attending an NAACP
convention, Bethune-
Cookman College President
Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed met
baseball legend Jackie
Robinson.
"He asked us what are
our goals for education," Dr.
Reed recalled at Tuesday's
groundbreaking ceremonies
for renovations at Daytona
Beach's Jackie Robinson
Ballpark. "I will never for-
get that moment."
Representing the role of
Bethune-Cookman College
and College Founder Dr.
Mary McLeod Bethune's in
Robinson's ascent to the


Major Leagues, Dr..Reed
was one of six speakers oh a
crisp, cool morning at the
ballpark where Robinson
played his first spring train-
ing game March 17, 1946.
Dr. Bethune provided
accommodations for
Robinson and his family
when they arrived in
Daytona Beach in 1946.
Daytona Beach was the only
Florida city that allowed
Robinson to play, thanks in
part to Dr. Bethune's influ-
ence and political clout.
Dr. Reed stated that Dr.
Bethune recognized the
importance of Robinson
breaking baseball's color
barrier. After a year in the


minor leagues, Robinson did
that in 1947 with the
Brooklyn Dodgers.
"She saw something
great in Jackie Robinson,"
Dr. Reed said of Dr.
Bethune. "She opened doors
in the days of Jim Crow and
made it possible."
Bethune Cookman
College presented an hon-
orary degree to Robinson in
1953.
The Wildcat baseball
team, who Ihave won six
consecutive Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference cham-
pionships, play their home
games at the ballpark
renamed in ,Robinson's
honor in 1990.


"Jacksonville's Long-Time Friend"








Where Christ Gets Lifted

&

The Victory is in the Word & Music











6050-6 MoncriefRd., Jacksonville, FL 32209
Office (904) 766-9955 Fax (904) 765-9214
Request Lines (904) 766-9285 & (800) 445-9955
Web address: WWW WCGL1360. COM
S#


PA GE A-6~


JANUARY, 2005


FLORIDA STAR







TAPNjTAD 1, /IfPA


Shirley Chisholm Remembered As r


'Servant Leader' And 'Trailblazer';


Burial Scheduled In New York


PALM COAST, Fla.--A
memorial service will be
held on Saturday, January 8
at First AME Church for for-
mer U.S. Congresswoman
Shirley Chisholm. She was
a member of the church.
Public viewing is sched- '
uled for the morning fol-
lowed by a service later that
afternoon.
The bold advocate for
justice was known as a trail-


MINORITYAIDS COALITION
OF JACKSONVILLE, INC.
Presents the

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blazer who exemplified ser-
vant leadership.
Chisholm, 80, died
Saturday, January 1 in
Ormond Beach
Her health had dimin-
shed following a series of
strokes she suffered last sum-
mer.
A spokesperson for Leo
C. Chase & Son Funeral
Home in St. Augustine stat-
ed that Chisholm, the first
black woman elected to the
United States Congress, will
be buried in New York
where she represented a
Brooklyn district for 14
years. She served in
Congress from 1968 until
1983.
In 1972, with a slogan of
"Unbought and Unbossed",
Chisholm ran for president.
She lost the Democratic
nomination to Senator
George McGovern.
McGovern eventually lost
the presidency to incumbent
Richard M. Nixon.
The former Brooklyn
school teacher was an out-


spoken advocate for women
and minorities during seven
terms in the House.
Following career as a
public servant, Chisholm
continued her fight for equal
rights by establishing the
National Political Congress
of Black Women.
"As a founding member
of the Congressional Black
Caucus, she was a driving
force behind the Caucus'
mission to serve as the
'Conscience of the
Congress', and to fight to
include women, children,
African Americans and all
people of color in the public
policy debate that so deeply
affects their lives," said U.S.
Representative Elijah E.
Cummings (D-Md.),
Chairman of the
Congressional Black
Caucus.
"Our country has lost a
civil rights icon who made
extraordinary contributions
to American history," added
Cummings.


WM 5s Wwwb


2005 Martin Luther


King Jr. Breakfast


Wednesday,January 12, 2005
7:30 9:30 a.m.
Jacksonville Veteran's Memorial Arena
Guest Speaker: Dr. Mel Gravely,
President
The Institute for
Entrepreneurial Thinking
Contact Kathy Bolesworth at 366-6675 for tickets
Or sponsorship information. Tickets can also be
Purchased at the chamberss Small Business Center,
S5000-3' Norwood Ave., 924-I 100&


"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice
everywhere,'
Or, Mortin Luther Kng"Jr


rxrcs,,mifl iplreiciatiorr for N. X -rgs v~g~i

dfv~veloping a uniiffed vision forjocksolryh'ci v fljt Ijir

brincinc our c-n 'nunity tap'-mt'


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THE FLORID
STAR!
TO PLACE
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Bush Continues Push for Jury Award Limits
SCOLLINSVILLE, Ill. President Bush said that large
malpractice awards have increased the cost of business so
much that doctors have to close their businesses or scale
back services. He said it also drives up the cost of personal
health insurance.
The President pressured Congress on Wednesday,
January 5 to pass legislation limiting jury awards for med-
ical malpractice, saying the legal system favors attorneys
who file baseless cases that drive up the cost of health care.
"What I'm here to do is say as clearly as I can -- the
United States Congress needs to pass real medical liability
reform this year," Bush said, standing on stage in front of
dozens of doctors in white lab coats.
"Lawyers are filing baseless suits against hospitals and
doctors, that's just a plain fact," Bush said. "They are doing
it for a simple reason they know the medical liability sys-
tem is tilted in their favor."

Rev. Jesse Jackson Announces 2005
Wall Street Project Conference
New York, NY (PRWEB) -- The Reverend Jesse L.
Jackson, Sr. announced that the Eighth Annual Wall Street
Project Conference will take place January 11-13. at the
Hilton New York Hotel, 1335 Avenue of the Americas. The
theme of the conference is ""Beyond Diversity, Equity and
Parity: A New Covenant."
"As we come together this year, seeking participation in
America"s economic engine, we must be ever more vigilant
in protecting the rights we have gained, even the right to
vote," said Rev. Jackson. "At the same time, we must extend
the gains we have made to include economic parity and equi-
ty in the boardroom, in the managers" offices and in the
owners" boxes," said Rev. Jackson.
The 2005 conference will be co-chaired by Charles
Schumer, the United States Senator from New York, and
Bruce Gordon, former president of the Verizon Foundation.
JkJ***~*******


Powell Promises Continued U.S. aid
And Support To recover From Tsunami disaster
FREETBANDA ACEH, Indonesia Not even wartime
combat could prepare him for the shock of the Tsunami dev-
astation, Secretary of State Colin Powell said after inspect-
ing the Indonesian island of Sumatra 'where giant waves
washed away whole neighborhoods."I cannot begin to imag-
ine the horror that went through the families and all of the
people who heard this noise coming and then had their lives
snuffed out by this wave," Powell said. "The power of the
wave to: destroy bridges, to destroy factories, to destroy
homes, to destroy crops, to destroy everything in its path is
amazing." The United States is helping bring rice, soybeans
and water-purification kits. Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, along
with Powell, is leading the U.S. delegation.

Watch
(Continued From A-l)
General Manager, WCGL-AM 1360.
Michael Payne Director of the Office of Faith and
Community Based Partnership. A newly
created office.
Isaiah Rumlim President,
? Jacksonville's NAACP. Working hard
with understanding of police brutality
since he personally experienced difficul-
Michael ties with the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office
Payne immediately following Hurricane Bonnie
and the storm that came afterwards.
Ronald Williams News and sports editor for The
Florida Star; co-host for radio talk show, IMPACT on
WCGL-AM and teaches and writes church plays.
Bishop McKinley Young Presiding Prelate of the
Eleventh Episcopal District AME Church, which over-
4 sees Edward Waters Coll6ge.


PAGE A-7 -


FLORIDA STARR


T A %TTT A DV 0 YC


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PA'AjL/-0


Kenan Thompson Brings Fat Albert To Life!
by Rych McCain

Between 1972-79, "Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids,"
became one of the longest running Saturday morning car-
toon series in history. The show was later reprised as "The
Fat Albert Show," which ran from 1979-84. Its creator, Dr.
Bill Cosby based the characters on his personal friends he
grew up with in a Philadelphia neighborhood. The cartoon
has now been made into a fun, light-hearted dramatical
comedy starring NBC's SNL (Saturday Night Liwe), star
KENAN THOMPSON. d -
Just like his cartoon persona, the movie Fat Albert tries E, 3
to solve people's problems. He comes to the aid of a lone- CU c
ly school girl name Doris (played by UPN's One On One "
and The Disney Channel's "The Proud Family," star --_
Kyla Pratt), by coming through her TV set with his bud-
dies. Thompson is a genuine acting talent who is fast ris-
ing through the ranks. This is his second movie out this
year. He was Ice Cube's bungling rookie barber cousin in
MGM/UA's BARBERSHOP II. Last year he was Nick
Canon's nerd running buddy in Warner Bros. LOVE -
DON'T COST A THING Thompson is a regular feature ..
player in his second season on NBC's SNL.
he first thing I inquired about was the Fat Albert Red
Carpet Premiere held in Cosby's home town of Philadelphia. Thompson lights up.
"It was wonderful. Philadelphia really came out to show us a lot of love. They had cheerleaders out there
carrying on with Fat Albert sweat shirts. They had a big 30 foot balloon figure of Fat Albert. It was nice!"
Other than Cosby himself and his brother Russell, Thompson didn't get to meet the other real life friends
on which Cosby's cartoon characters were based.
Thompson did watch the re-runs of Fat Albert but never imagine himself ever playing the role. As
Thompson puts it, "I never really thought about it until the audition came up. I said, you know what, I might
as well go on and book that because it's a good role. How did he land the starring role?
"I auditioned the first time when Forrest Whittaker was directing and they ended up wanting to go with
someone taller, so I didn't get the job at first. But then they changed directors and wanted to go in a different
direction and I auditioned all over again and made a special little tape for Mr. Cosby and then I got the part."
According to the film's director Joel Zwick, Cosby viewed 15 seconds of Thompson's audition tape and
commanded, "Hire Him!"
In terms of the cast and their chemistry working together, Thompson was re-united with some long time
friends as well as bonding with new ones. "I just met Dania (Ramirez) who played his on screen romantic
interest, but I've known everybody else a long time. I know Marcus (Houston), "Dumb Donald," from GOOD
BURGER and I've know Kyla (Pratt), "Doris," for ever, since she was a little girl. It was really exciting to see
everybody all grown up and driving themselves to work and we just had a lot of fun with it. This was like a
real family, I've got five new brothers and two new sisters!"
Fat Albert is a wholesome, fun movie for the entire family, as you would expect from Dr. Cosby. It has
"blockbuster," written all over it! Fans ofthe cartoon run 3 to 4 generations deep worldwide and it is strategi-
cally set for a Christmas Day release! Without question, this film will catapult Thompson to the next level of
leading m-ale film star! He carries this film well and his role in it will become a classic for future generations!


AK4AMA I3ROADCASTIN01 INC.


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105.7 FM

ommba


TAMA Broadcasting, Inc.


The largest privately Black owned media company in the State of Florida.
Three (3) Stations here in Jacksonville.

Our listeners spend nearly 1.4 Billion Dollars each year in retail sales
Invite them to shop at your business....they will come!
Call for your free, no obligation marketing analysis.


9550 Regency Square Blvd.
Suite #200
Jacksonville, Fl 32225
Office (904) 680-1050
Fax (904f 680-1051
www.tamabroadcastingcom

(904) 680-1050


JANUARY 8, 2005


Wassup in Hollywood
by Rych McCain

Rapper Loon has started his own label, "BOSS UP
ENTERTAINMENT" He left Sean "P Diddy" Combs
Bad Boy organization on very good terms. At The recent
Prism Awards, Loon explained that he fulfilled his obliga-
tions and learned a lot at Bad Boy Entertainment but he
wanted more control of his career and took advantage of
the opportunity to move on.
Rapper Kurupt is currently filming a Western which
takes place immediately after the Civil War. David
Carradine is his co-star along with other actors, Clifton
Powell, Glenn Plummer, Clifton Powell and Kenya
Moore. WyclefJean makes his acting debut as well.
Out of the competing movies, 267 films made the cut
and are eligible for the 77th Academy Awards considera-
tion. BET's hot picks of the week include a new year's eve
party special of 106 & Park Crunk Style, on Friday, Dec.
31st at 1 :pm. Guest include, LiL Jon & The East Side
Boyz, Jadakis, Ludacris, Ashanti, Lloyd Banks, Young
Buck, Avant, Clara and Nore to name a few. The most
anticipated video countdown show of the year BET's
Notarized Top Video Countdown 2004, will air Friday,
Dec. 31st at ll:am and Sat., Jan 1 at 9:am. Finally, BET's
Coming To The Stage Marathon hosted by actor/comedi-
an Bruce Bruce and celeb judge anchor Kim Coles airs
Wed., Dec., 29th at 8:pm
Kenan Thompson's FATALBERT took the #2 spot at
the box office with a $10,021,510 gross via 2,674 theater
screens. Of course, the #1 flick, MEET THE FOCKERS
got 3,518 theater, screens! That's 844 MORE theater
screens than FAT ALBERT! Now you can clearly see the
head game that Hollyweird plays to insure that certain
movies don't out do others! Be sure to check your tickets
when you enter the theater. Those dirt balls at the theater
will sometimes sell you a ticket to a flick that you DIDN'T
come to see, but allow you to enter the screen room of the
one you DID specifically come to see anyway. What's the
harm? The flick that you supported doesn't receive the box
office credit! Then those weird, racist Hollywood execs
who have the power to green light or reject film projects,
use these vary box office figures and statistics to justify
their racist decisions to limit or reject Black filmmakers. To
the brothas and sistahs in Detroit, push on and make Afrika
Town a reality! We fully support you Dr. Claude Anderson
and The Harvest Institute, Black Think Tank, for making
this happen!
Maat-Hotep!


Celebrating Super Bowl Week
Super Soul Concert Series
Live at The Florida Theatre







Jacksonville, FL -Three electric entertainers celebrating the 2005 Super Bowl! The Florida
Theatre presents the Super Soul Concert Series starring Snoop Dogg, Gladys Knight and
Chaka Khan produced b) JUBA Entertainment. Tickets are now on sale
Snoop Dogg kicks off the series Wednesday, February 2 at 9 PM. Tickets are $72.50 and
$39. Snoop is venturing into a project that is close to his heart. He is heading up the "Snooper
Bowl" football tournament in which he coaches his son's team. The Inaugural "Snooper Bowl"
is an upcoming charity football event being put on by Snoop, the Super Bowl Host Committee,
The Firm, and Jacksonville-based Axcess Sports & Entertainment. This event will pit Snoop's
youth all-star team from California against an opposing Jacksonville youth all-star team. The
game will be played the day before Super Bowl XXXIX (February 5th, 2005) at Raines High
School in Jacksonville, where the teams will compete for the "Snooper Bowl Trophy," which
is being provided by the world-renowned Tiffany & Co, makers of the Lombardi Trophy given
to the winners of the actual Super Bowl. All proceeds from the "Snooper Bowl" will go to
Snoop's Save A Life Foundation, which works with inner-city youth and children's hospitals.
Gladys Knight celebrates her gifts of voice and spirit with Jacksonville Friday, February 4 at
9 PM. Tickets are $200, $172.50 and $147.50. Georgia born, she #gan performing gospel
music at age four in her church and as a special guest soloist with the Morris Brown College
Choir, remained a quartet until 1989 when they decided to pursue different career paths. (Note:
The Pips have disbanded.)
Chaka Khan best known for her superb 1984 cover of Prince's "I Feel for You," R&B singer
Chaka Khan enjoyed solo success as well as popularity as a member of the group Rufus. Chaka
Kahn's electric performance is Saturday, February 5 at 9 PM. Tickets are $200, 172.50 and
$147,50.For tickets or information please call the Florida Theatre Box Office at (904) 355-2787
or visit us at www.floridatheatre,com. The Florida Theatre is conveniently located at 128 East
Forsyth Street in Downtown Jacksonville, Tickets are also available through TicketMaster.


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tfJ ll r I.l lI A U0 i ...


Signs Of Winter


Austin Sams and his friend Ron Austin, Jr. blast sounds
of New Year.

By Marsha Dean Phelts define this dormant season.


We associate snow, ice
and freezing, temperatures
with the winter season. On
the First Coast of northeast
Florida other tell tale signs

DEATH

NOTICES
ARMSTED-Baby Girl
Karen, died December 12,
2004.
BLAKE-Marcus, died
December 29, 2004.
BROWN-James C., died
December 25, 2004.
BROWN-Willie L., died
January 2, 2005 A. B.
Coleman Mortuary Inc.
CARTER-Alma B., died
December 31, 2004.
CONE-Williams III., died
December 28, 2004
DAVIS-Hubert, died
January 3, 2005.
FELDER-Eartha L.,
January 3, 2005.
GOGGINS-Nathaniel, died
December 28, 2004.
JONES-James Jr., died
December 30, 2004.
KIRK-Shirley E., died
December 26, 2004. A. B.
Coleman Mortuary, Inc.
LEE-Hattie S., died
December 27, 2004.
LUCAS-Victoria, died
January 3, 2005.
MARTIN-Norman, died
December 29, 2004.
McARTHUR-Joann, 47,
died December 28, 2004.
MITCHELL-Louise, died
December 29, 2004.
MITCHELL-Michael D.,
42, died December 25,
2004.
PERKINS-Thelma, died
December 27, 2004.
PORTER-Pearlie, died
December 27, 2004.
SHANKS-Sharika D., 31,
died December 29, 2004.
SHARP-Willie R., died
December 30 2004.
SHERMAN-Claudest, died
December 28, 2004.
STRANGE-Jerry, Sr., died
January 2, 2004.
TREMBLE-Lucy .Ling,
died December 23, 2004.
Alphonso West Mortuary,
Inc.
WALTON-Georgia, died
December 27, 2004.
WEATHERS-Willie M.,
died January 2, 2005.
yK v%


The average winter tempera-
ture for January is 67
degrees.
Rarely do we see snow
and ice and seldom do tem-
peratures drop to freezing
points. However, on the
first day of the winter sol-
stice the thermometers in the
area registered 22 degrees.
This week we find ourselves
basking in nearly 80 degree
temperatures. For one mil-
lion First Coast residents the
signs of winter can be recog-
nized in the environment
and by our calendar of activ-
ities. Entertainment and
social opportunities soar to
another level in winter and


there are activities to enjoy
on a daily schedule. Here
are 16 cool ways to savor the
sometimes chilling days of
winter from December 21
through March 20.
1. Ring in the New Year
and begin the final count-
down to Super Bowl
XXXIX in Jacksonville,
Where Florida Begins.
2. Watch for the sun
slowly rising over the hori-
zon at 7:39 a.m. Each day
there after the sun rises one
\minute later.
3. Get in by 5:51. p.m. if
you don't want to be out
after dark.
4. Shop at the Beaver
Street Farmer's Market and
corer produce stands for
the winter's best greens,
oranges, apples, sweet pota-
toes, pecans and other sea-
sonal produce.
5. See Verdi's tragic
opera, Aida live on stage at
the Times-Union Center,
January 14.
6. Attend a program cel-
ebration in honor of the
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Birthday Holiday.
7. Enjoy the Ritz.
Chamber Players' 4th
Annual Concert in honor of
Martin Luther King, Jr. with
your children and family.
8. Participate in the 18th
Annual Zora Neale Hurston
Festival in Eatonville near


---- -



By Robert Gordon

Hi everybody! What up. Welcome
to the Bus Stop!

This column is devoted to all of our
School Bus Drivers in Duval County.
Every week we will have photos of our most wonderful and
highly trusted heroes; YOU the Driver Every week there
will be color photos of you and yourfamily members show-
ing up and showing off just to have a good time!. There are
contests with prizes gifts and give- aways.

DRIVER APPRECIATION AWARD:

Otto Kirk Land, First Student driver, bus number 79, you
are iny





Originally
T f r o m
S79 Tampa,
Florida, he
happily
confesses
his true
devotion to God Almighty. Now, dear brother the spotlight
is on you all over Jacksonville!!
To Otto, and all of the other school bus drivers at all of
the fabulous bus companies serving the schools and families
in Duval, we hope you had the HAPPIEST HOLIDAYS
ever!!
Now...I want to see YOUR'pretty smile, too. So call me
.at 210-7031 if you are a School Bus Driver and want to
enter my Pretty Smile contest. The e-mail 'address is.
Robert@florida.usa.com. I want to see the Prettiest smile
you have!! To Learn More About The Legal Services Plan
Call GORD'.V & ASSOCIATES (904) 210-70-1


Orlando the last weekend in
January.
9. Celebrate the 70th
Anniversary Year of
American Beach on Amelia
Island, January 22-31, 2005
and throughout the year.
10. Increase the number
of programs that you attend
during Black History Month
Celebration.
11. Nominate your min-
ister to The Florida Star's
Religious Hall of Fame.
12. Participate in a Super
Bowl XXXIX activity in
anyway that you can.
13. Treat yourself to
"Dancing the Art of
Jonathan Green" live at the
Florida Theater, February 18
and 19
14. Throw doivn with a
Saturday night pork pot and
invite everybody worthy of
handling such delicacies.
Don't leave out. the chitter-
lings with a side of crackling
corbread, collard greens,
and all the traditional trim-
mings.
15. Towards the end of
March take your winter gar-
ments to the cleaners for the
last time and store them for
next year.
16. Cruise from the mild
winter waters of Jaxport to
the tropical waters of the
Bahamas and Break for
Spring.

Dr. Mel Gravely II
To Speak During
Chamber's 2005
MLK Breakfast


The 18th 'Annual Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
Breakfast will be held on
Wednesday, January 12,
7:30 9:30 a.m. at the
Jacksonville Veterans
Memorial Arena.
Hosted by the
Jacksonville Regional
Chamber of Commerce, the
Jacksonville Branch of the
NAACP, the Jacksonville
Urban League and the City
of Jacksonville, the break-
fast recognizes Dr. King's
work and it's effects on the
Jacksonville Community.
Dr. Melvin Gravely II, an
expert on entrepreneurship
and business development,
is the keynote speaker.
As founder and president
of The Institute for
Entrepreneurial Thinking,
he has spent the last 14 years
helping people and busi-
nesses get the results they
expect. For ticket informa-
tion call (904) 366-66g5.


"COMMUNITY


CAPTIONS

Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community
events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.2
-.


ONE M.-N, ONE DREAM, ONE


C hII a mi b e i
Plj',ers present
the third annual.
I n
Remembrance
of the Dieam'"
Concert salut-
inl thle legac',
of Di Martin
Luther King. Ir
on Jdliual \ I 5.
at S.i .m ji
the Timnes-
Lnion Center
for the
Pe r fo t i m In
.-\A I T e r
Theatre. The
concert also


TRIBLTE-The Ritz


a .a -


. .


*- fB J


In New York City, the BBC's lain Burnside
(left) join Alison Buchanan and Terrance
Patterson of the Ritz Chamber Players.
and Margaret Juntwait of WNYC, voice of
the New York Metropolitan Opera, (right)
for a Ritz Chamber Players concert that
was broadcast to 40 countries last month.
(WNYC/Elena Park).


celebrates the harmonious fiber in all of us Considered the
nation's onl, all-black fill-seasIon classical chamber ernem-
hle. the three-, e:ar-old Ritz C chamber Pla, ers nort o:nl'. perform
standard repertoire but conmissiion music b', black com-
posers This month's concert %.ill once again feartre the
group's Brtish soprano Allison Buchanan. The giotip %ill
also pa% tribute to this ', ear's MLK honoree. Reierend
Rudolph MNcKisick. Sr. co-pa.stor of Jack-on\ ille's Bethel
Baptist Instiruriontal Church for his ears ,of coinmunit,, ser -
ice and outreach thrc uihout Northeast Flii da. Tile cioup
,kill host a pot-concert gala at the Terr. Theater in Re\
NIcKissck's honor For ticket information call the
Jackson\lie S,. mphoin, Bo\ (O)ffice at 354-55-4" or ii
ritzchamberpla e 'rs ,r o on the internet
CAFI NIGHT- Cummer C(afi Nihti -il be held Thu irdaj .
.iJniar', 1 3. I'-o li ) ui.i p in at The Cijinimm r N uI-seuml o'f Art
& Gardens located it .S2c Ri'.eiside A\e Thil Cfll Niglu
hiighlclts Florida .is Paradise F'.F e Centrurtie of Art e\.lbi-
lion and features food. drnks., ai no\ e and li e !mulic bi
Tamlllei in E xperilnce ihe opelninr of the photo cianeo e\11-
bition Fnsit C'oa;st Paidicse: Throu.'2h Our E\es This e\llibl-
tion i. collection of personal photos tubmnined b, area resi-
dents that il liutrate their o\ri interprectaton of paradise on the
Firs Coast NMembers fiee. non-nimbers 5,6
FEENE1 TO BRING "FOLKSONGS' FOR TROUBLE-
MAKERS TO LUNF- Folk siige i and .ictir;is Anne Feene',
i.ill peltfrrin Satuld.l;, Jai. 22. at S p.m. in the Robinson
Theatre on the Uini\ersitr of Notll Florida ca1rmpul Feene\.
\\ ho once practiced la.'. ill present an e.ecning ot
"Folksongi, foi Tiouiblemikeis." Her songs speak for the
'Aorking cla-, and social change. '.Lih ideas firnnli looted in
the labor lmo\emnenit Feene\'s gi.a-ndfather \\as a mine'.ork-
ers' oiganizei Since c19 1. Feenc\ has ia'. eled across the
United States and to Canad.i. Ne\ico, Ireland and Sweden
The concert is fiee and open to the public. but a donation of
S11i is suig .tcld. Tle Robinson Theatre is in Building 14.
Room 1700. The event is sponsored by the UNF chapter of
United Faculty of Florida. For information, contact Stan
Swart at sswart@unf.edu or 620-1654. For information on
Feeney, visit her Web site at www.annefeeney.com.
Lorraine Hansberry's
A RAISIN IN THE SUN- The play that "changed American
theater forever," according to the New York Times. A Raisin
in the Sun will be held Fridays January 14, 21 at 8:00 p.m.,
Saturday January 15, 22, at 2:00 p.m. & 8:00 p.m., and
Sunday January 16, 23, 2005 at 3:00 p.m. in the Ezekial
Bryant Auditorium at FCCJNorth Campus (Building E)
located at 4501 Capper Rd. A Raisin in the Sun is sponsored
in part by the Department of State, Division of Cultural
Affairs, Florida Arts Council, the National Endowment
of the Arts, the City of Jacksonville, and the Cultural
Council of Greater Jacksonville. Additional funding is
provided by W. W. Gay Mechanical, Wal-Mart, Sams Club,
and the Educational Community Credit Union. For ticket
information call the Stage Aurora Box Office at (904) 765-
7373. Stage Aurora Theatrical Company, Inc.- a non- profit
organization- Founder Darryl Reuben Hall.
JAX SYMPHONY CHORUS ENLISTING NEW
SINGERS-The Jacksonville Symphony Chorus, now at mid-
season in its 20th anniversary year, is enlisting new singers.
Auditions for the Jacksonville Symphony Chorus will be held
on Saturday, January 8. beginning at 10:00 a.m. at
Jacksonville University in the Phillips Fine Arts Building,
Room 220. Singers interested in auditioning should phone
(904) 354-5479, ext. 271 or inquire online atwww.jaxsym-
phonychorus.org for audition information and to schedule an
audition appointment. Directed by Jon O. Carlsori, the all-
volunteer Jacksonville Symphony Chorus is earning high
accolades this season for its wonderful concerts with the
Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, having just performed
Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, Handel's Messiah and Holiday
Pops "Home for the Holidays." Upcoming concerts include
Verdi's Requiem, a Gilbert & Sullivan tribute and a fully
staged grand opera production of Puccini's La Bohhme.
FLIGHT TO FREEDOMrThe Fort Mose Historical Society
;I v-n ~lr, -tVin tj 1W -,


PA GE B-1


FLORIDA STAR


.IAIVIIARYR- 2005







J/11 LI/lltl 0, zuui --AAV 1. -- --


Ask Deanna! Is an advice column known for its fearless
approach to reality-based subjects!

Dear Deanna:
I've been dating my boyfriend for 8 months. I love him
because he's attractive and popular among other things. He
hasn't said he loves me, but I tell him that I love him and
he responds by telling me I am infatuated with him and my
heart is lying to me. What does that mean?
Hopeless in Love Lanham, MD

Dear Hopeless:
Time to head back to Biology class. The heart has nothing to do with love. The pri-
mary function of the heart is to pump blood throughout the body. Love is mental and
requires maturity, emotional balance and common sense. He's arrogant and full of him-
self to tell you that you are infatuated. Unless you have time to waste, get away from
this man and his smoke screens and get on a train that's really going somewhere.

Dear Deanna!
When I met the woman I'm with, I wasn't saved. Now I've given my life to the Lord
and she doesn't understand why I won't have sex with her. I asked her to marry me but
she said no. I don't feel as if I can continue this relationship because my salvation is
more important. What should I do?
Dennis Memphis, TN

Dear Dennis:
You're doing the right thing by avoiding fornication which is a sin. It's not worth it
to send your soul to Hell over lust-a moment of passion with someone who isn't your
spouse. Lead her to the Lord and help her become saved. God doesn't want you to be
unequally yoked so don't sweat the marriage rejection. Pray for her and continue to
walk with God so she'll see your faith and obedience.

Dear Deanna!
I'm 22 and learned that the man who raised me is not my real father. I feel empty
as I look at him as just another man instead of my dad. How do I deal with this and
keep from hurting his feelings?
Signed N.T. Boise, ID

Dear N.T.:
All Daddies can't be classified as Fathers. Your step dad may not be the sperm
donor, but he's the one that fed you, clothed you and kept a roof over your head. Look
at him for the good he has done. Don't cheapen his efforts because he lacks the offi-
cial title of "Real Daddy." You must care for him if you are concerned about his feel-
ings.i Be glad he was in the home for you and not on a child support poster.

Write Ask Deanna! Email: askdeannal@yahoo. com or Deanna M, 264 S. La Cienega,
Suite 1283, Beverly Hills, CA 90211. Visit her Web site at www.askdeanna.com.

Challenge to Make Cancer Chronic, Manageable Disease Holds Promise
for African Americans
by Dr Andrew C. von Eschenbach and Dr LaSalle Leffall

Three decades ago, a diagnosis of cancer was considered by many to be an. automatic death
sentence. Today, thanks to promising advances in cancer research and the wonders of technolo-
gy, there is hope that using new avenues of detection and treatment using proteins and nanotech-
nology, among other things, cancer will become a non-fatal disease for everyone. We are mak-
ing progress. In fact, there are now 10 million cancer survivors: 30 years ago, there were just 3
million.
We believe today marks just the beginning of a new day in cancer. While medical science will
always pursue a cure for this debilitating disease, we are much closer to a time when cancer
becomes a manageable disease that people can live with as diabetes and heart disease are today.
We believe that suffering and death due to cancer will become a thing of the past. Cancer patients
are already benefiting from powerful new drugs, the advent of personalized therapies tailored to
an individual's unique genetic makeup, the application of advanced technologies to cancer
research and treatment, and innovative, new tools for predicting and detecting cancer at the ear-
liest possible time.
People have responsibility, too. That is why we want to encourage a health-promoting
lifestyle, urging people to heed preventive advice to eat better, exercise more and avoid tobacco.
We believe so strongly in the promise of the new molecular medicine that we the National
Cancer Institute along with Howard University Cancer Center and other partners in the cancer
community have put forward an ambitious, unprecedented challenge goal to eliminate suffer-
ing and death due to cancer by the year 2015. We are not saying that we will "cure" or eliminate
cancer by that time. Rather, we aim to pre-empt the worst outcomes of the disease. An end to suf-
fering and death would have a significant impact on African-Americans, perhaps more than any
other population group. That is because African- Americans cany the greatest cancer burden in
our society and have some of the highest incidence and mortality rates: We will prevent more
cancer, we will detedt cancers earlier and eliminate their side effects, and we will modulate the
aggressive spread of cancer.
This strategy is made possible because of many advances. Groundbreaking research is chang-
ing the way we approach and treat cancer. For example, NCI's laboratory of tumor immunology
and biology has had early success with recombinant vaccines to treat gastrointestinal, prostate
and lung cancers. These vaccines would equip the immune system to attack tumor cells that oth-
erwise would not be recognized by the body.
Promising new research in the treatment of colon cancer -- a disease that disproportionately
affects African-Americans -- has shown that patients with newly diagnosed metastatic colon can-
cer, who received the therapeutic agent bevacizumab (AvastinT) along with standard
chemotherapy agents, had substantially longer overall survival times than patients who just
received the standard chemotherapy without the drug bevacizumab. With these results, beva-
cizumab becomes the first agent aimed at stopping the flow of blood to cancer cells that has
proven effective in a randomized 'trial that compares the new treatment to the existing best stan-
dard of care for this cancer.
Also, scientists in NCI's Centers for Cancer Research are working to convert substances with
antitumor activity into use for what is known as adoptive immunotherapy, which uses drugs, gene
therapy and cell transfer to more effectively influence the body's immune system to combat can-
cer.


With temperatures dropping, you may be wondering if Trigger needs any special cold
weather provisions. He might.
While horses are better suited to winter than most humans, there are a few things you can
do to make sure your horse gallops through the chilly season both happy and healthy.
In general, a horse's metabolic needs will go up as temperatures go down. "For all horses,
the ideal diet will closely mimic a horse's natural diet in the wild," said Dr. Peggy Marsh, a
veterinarian at the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M
University.
"This means that no matter what the temperature, a horse's diet should be primarily made
up of forage what the horse can graze from the pasture or hay," Marsh adds. She notes that
concentrates, such as grain, can be given to help meet energy requirements. This is important
if the horse is being exercised when it is cold outside.
A supplement can supply vitamins and micronutrients that may be missing from the ration.
For many horses, colder temperatures can mean less exercise simply because owners are
less inclined to be outside themselves. However, every horse in good health should be given
ample opportunity to keep moving, Marsh believes.
"Just like cats and dogs, horses can become frisky in wintertime and will run and play on
their own when giyen the freedom to do so," said Marsh. As with diet, a horse should be
allowed to follow its natural behavior tendencies.
Changes in housing are not usually necessary, Marsh says.
"Horses can withstand cold temperatures more easily than when they are combined with
windy and wet conditions. When winter brings strong, icy winds or wet ground, it is a good
idea to provide some kind of structure the horse can be inside of or next to in order to block
itself from the wind," Marsh confirms.
"Also, be sure to give your horse plenty of dry ground to prevent the hooves from devel-
oping thrush (a bacterial infection caused by moisture)."
Contrary to popular opinion, it is usually not necessary to blanket your horse in the winter.
Marsh says a horse's coat will adapt to the colder temperatures, even standing on end to insu-
late the horse with a layer of warm air.
Marsh does recommend, however, that a horse be blanketed if its coat is clipped during the
winter or as a grooming aid to keep the coat flat and smooth.
"Most changes in diet, exercise and housing will depend on the horse's normal activities,"
said Marsh. "For instance, working horses will have different requirements than those used
only occasionally for recreation. Also, with winter's first frost, it may be useful to consider
deworming against bots, a fly larvae parasite.
"As with humans, winter conditions can be more harmful to very old or very young hors-
es," Marsh adds. You should consult your veterinarian for guidance on how to provide the
proper diet, exercise and protection for your particular horse, no matter what the age or weath-
er."
Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University. Stories
can be viewed on the World Wide Web at http://rev.tamu.edu/pettalk/


The 3rd Annual 'In Remembrance of the Dream' Concert salutes the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. and celebrates the harmonious fiber in all of us. As we listen to the impassioned performance, let us
remember how broad and embracing music has become, and how it represent an enormous array of
cultural and ethnic backgrounds. It is this synergy and vitality between music and our emotions that
makes music today so unique and outstanding, especially in America.



Business
Joium al s''", :i herburgos


Comcast
SPO(TLIG HT


And at Howard's cancer center, led by Lucile Adams-Campbell, Ph.D., researchers are suc-
cessfully unraveling the mysteries of why prostate cancer hits African-American men hardest,
perhaps based on a genetic predisposition. This work, which focuses on families with a history
of prostate cancer, could lead to the development of a genetic test for early.detection and treat-
ment of the disease.
These are just some examples of the tremendous advances that are redefining how we
approach and treat cancer. We believe these advances, along with improved access to cancer
screening, diagnosis and treatment services for underserved cancer patients, will bring about an
end to cancer suffering and death. Help us help you by adopting healthy habits that encourage
hope in all of us for better statistics on cancer from the African American community stop
smoking, exercise regularly and eat more fruits and vegetables for better health. Together, we can
meet the challenge of eliminating suffering and death from cancer by 2015.
Dr von Eschenbach is the Direcgr of the National Cancer Institute. DLLeffall is the Charles
Drew Professor or Surgery at Howird University Hospital.


FLORIDA STAR


-fANr[IRVX- 2t)05


PAGE B-2





- -t-j-- -


Links 'Team Building'


Beneficial To Local Students


E


Link Pamela Prier interacts with team members at Highlands Middle School.


LEFT FRAME: Link Jean Aikens conducts a workshop.
game activity.


JACKSON\ILLE. FLA.--Prior to the recent holidaN
season. Bold Cit' Chapter of the Links,. Inc. members E
Jean Aikens and .Arlinda .dams conducted a xw'orkshlop
on "Team Building" l'or 150 students in the Team-iUp
Program at Hl-ighland llddle School
The students an\lousl\ participated in se\.ieal team
building including \\ord game and career act\ ities.


RIGHT FRAME: Students participate in the word

The workshop \\, held to help culti\tate and ftis-
ler n11 111mon11112 the \ lllng tea.m Ilembers enabllnl-
tlhem to \\ork together as a lemin
Seei\al other succe',still '.\orksh-lp \.re held
throughout 21(.104


I


Workshops


I


...
~- -......~-,.; --- .: -. .-, '


(See "TeIIIII Building". B30)





Page B-3A/January 8, 2005


learn Building
(Continued From Cover)


Jax Housing Authority Youth
Sports Participants Can
Win Universoul Circus Tickets


Link members prepare goodie bags for the young participants.


Link member Jacquie
Gibbs of the Services to
Youth Committee
presided.
Workshop consultants
were introduced by Link


JACKSONVILLE,
FLA.--The Florida
Department of Education
has named Patrick Barrett,
a 2004 graduate of Stanton
College Preparatory
School, as Duval County's
Academic Top Scholar for
the 2004 graduating class.
Barrett is a student at
the University of Florida.
Florida Academic Top
Scholars who received


member Janice Nelson.
Link members who
assisted in the workshop
were Gracie Chandler,
Shelly Thompson, Delores


state funding for the fall
term at any eligible
Florida post secondary
institution are selected on
the basis of their Bright
Futures Scholarship
Program grade point aver-
ages (GPAs) and their best
composite SAT/ACT.
scores as reported for their
Florida Academic
Scholars award eligibility.


Mitchell, Barbara
Shuman, Ernestine
Bivens, Diana Spicer, Vice
Chair Pamela Prier and
President Norma White.


The Academic Top
Scholars award provides
$1,500 annually to the top
scholars, in addition to
their Florida Academic
Scholars awards.
For more information,
contact JoAnn
McGonagill, Director of
Initial Eligibility, Florida
Bright Futures Scholarship
Program, (850) 410-5175.


FIND OUT HOW YOU

CAN APPEAR IN PREP RAP


CALL 904/766-8834


JACKSONVILLE-The Universoul Circus is com-
ing to town in February and youth who participate in
Jacksonville Housing Authority Youth Sports activi-
ties -can win tickets to attend the circus on Tuesday,
February 8 at the Norwood Shopping Center located
at 5290 Norwood Ave.
Youth can win family tickets by entering an essay
contest. They must write an essay entitled "What is a
Family?" The. contest is open to all Jacksonville
Housing Authority Youth Sports participants who
were active during the 2003-2004 season.
Participants must have been enrolled in activities
such as basketball, flag football, soccer, kickball,
karate, golf, cheerleading, talent show competition or
the black history program. Winners will win four
tickets per family. At least five families will win tick-
ets to Universoul Circus for February 8 during the
7:30 p.m. show.
Each household can only enter one essay. The
essay should be no more than 300 words and no less
than 250 words in length. Submitted must include
head of household name plus one to three family
member's names (not exceeding a total of four,
including the head of household). They should also
include your home address, telephone number, the
school the children attend and their grade level.


Stanton Prep Grad


Named Top Scholar


I ,




B-3B/JANUARY 8, 2005
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B-.C/JANUARY 8, 2005
Chart Busters by Allan Ornstein

TOP SINGLES
1. "Drop It Like It's Hot" Snoop. Dogg Featuring Pharrell
(Doggystyle) Last Week: No. 1
2.-1., 2 Step" Clara Featuring Missy, Elliott (Sho'nuff
MuisicLine LaFace) No. 2
3. "Lovers and Friends" Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz
Featuring Usher & Ludacris (BME) No. 4
4. "Let Me Love You" Mario (3rd Street J) No. 6
5. "Soldier" Destiny's Child Featuring T.I. & Lil Wayne
(Columbia) No. 9
6. "Wonderful" Ja Rule Featuring R. Kelly & Ashanti
(The Inc. Def Jam) No. 5
7. "What You Waiting For?" Gwen Stefani (Interscope)
No. 3
8_My Boo" Usher and Alicia Keys (LaFace) No. 8
9. "Over and Over" Nelly Featuring Tim McGraw
(Derrty Fo'Reel Curb) No. 7
10. "I Don't Want to Be" Davin DeGraw (J) No. 13


TOP COUNTRY SINGLES
1. "Back When" Tim McGraw (Curb) Last Week: No. 1
2. "Some Beach" Blake Shelton (Warner Bros.) No. 5
3. "Party for Two" Shania Twain with Billy Currington or
Mark McGrath (Mercurys) No. 3
4. "Awful, Beautiful Lie" Darryl Worley (DreamWorks) No.
6
5. "Nothing on but the Radio" Gary Allan (MCA Nashville)
No. 2
6. "Nothin 'Bout Love Makes Sense" LeAnn Rimes
(A; himn Curb) No. 8
7. "How Am I Doin'" Dierks Bentley (Capitol) No. 7
8. "The Woman with You" Kenny Chesney (BNA) No. 4
9. "Monday Morning Church" Alan Jackson (Arista
Nashville) No. 10
10. "Mr. Mom" Lonestar (BNA) No. 9
TOP DANCE/CLUB PLAY
1. "Walk into the Sun" Dirty Vegas (Capitol) Last Week:
No. 2
2. "What You Waiting For?" Gwen Stefani (Interscope)
No. 1 t
3. "Raindrops Will Fall (H. Hector & J Vasquez Mixes)"
Tamyra Gray (19) No. 3
4. "My. My, My" Armand Van Helden (Southern Fried
Tommy Boy Silver Label) No. 10
5. "Eight Easy Steps (Remixes)" Alanis Morissette
(1Nverick) No. 5
6. "Lose My Breath (P. Rauhofer/P. Johnson/M. Joshua
Mixes)" Destiny's Child (Columbia) No. 14
7. "You Lift Me Up" Martha Wash (Purple Rose) No. 7
8. "(Reach up for the) Sunrise" Duran Duran (Epic) No. 4
9. "Whatever U Want (Dance Remixes)" Christina Milian
Featuring Joe Budden (Island) No.-8
10. "Without Love" Sun (JH) New Entry


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WOULD YOU LIKE
TO APPEAR IN PREP RAP?
FOR INFORMATION
CALL (904) 766-8834


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JA"YKU/JI 0, UU.J


JAIL OR BAIL


EDITOR'S NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven
guilty in a court of law Jacksonville Sheriff's Office reports are a
matter ofpublic record. The Florida Star seeks to educate the com-
munity in the hopes of keeping our community safe.
GRAND THEFT OF A VEHICLE-On Sunday, January 2, 2005
at 6:18 p.m. a police officer was dispatched to 1255 Stimson
Street to investigate an auto theft. Upon'arrival, police officer met
with the victim. He reported that his 1989 Buick Park Avenue was
stolen from his sister's driveway. The victim's sister used the
vehicle to go to the store. At 3:00 p.m. the groceries were
removed from the vehicle. The keys were removed, but a spare
key was left in the center console. At 4:00 p.m. the car was dis-
covered missing. The victim stated his tag. number was,
"FM15ZME". This tag number is not on file. NCIC has no record
of the victim's vehicle using a name check. A canvass of the
neighbors revealed no information. The police officer was unable
to obtain a dispatch number due to the lack of information. The
police officer advised the victim to contact his insurance compa-
ny to update this report. The victim signed an auto theft affidavit
and signature form. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts suspended.
DOMESTIC BATTERY-On Tuesday, January 6, 2005 at 2:40
p.m. a police officer stopped the suspect to check for a tint viola-
tion. The suspect stated he never had a driver license. Per a record
check, the suspect had an active warrant for domestic battery. On
9/30/04 the suspect struck his baby's mother in the head and face
at her apartment, at 2131 James Hill Dr. The responding police
officer, observed a small lump on the victim's temple. A neighbor
who saw the victim on the floor after the battery, called the
police. The police officer obtained a warrant against the suspect
for domestic battery. The suspect was read his rights, and taken to
jail. Case cleared by an arrest.
BURGLARY ON A 1992 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE VEHI-
CLE-On Sunday, January 2, 2005 at 2:00 p.m. a police officer
was dispatched to an auto burglary at 5405 Beach Blvd. (Hess).
Upon arrival, police officer met the victim. He stated he parked
his vehicle in the parking lot of the business and noticed his vehi-
cle had been burglarized. The suspect gained entry by unknown
means. Once inside the vehicle, the suspect stole, radios, televi-
sions, speakers, and VCR's, and fled the scene. The police officer
observed the damaged console where the radio and speakers were
taken from. The police officer also noticed the vehicle had been
ransacked. The vehicle was processed for prints. They were
unreadable. No canvass was conducted due to the parking lot
being isolated by closed businesses. The victim was given a case
information card. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts suspended.
FATHER BATTERED HIS DAUGHTER ON NEW YEAR'S
DAY -On Saturday, January 1, 2005 at 12: 59 a.m. a police offi-
cer was dispatched to 41 East 32nd Street in reference to a domes-
tic battery involving a father (suspect) and his daughter (victim).
Upon arrival, police officer was met by the victim and her step-
mother (witness). The victim had several bruises and scratches
under both of her eyes, nose, lips, neck, and arms. The stepmoth-
er reported that her ex-husband (suspect) came over to visit with
the children, when he became involved in a heated argument with
his daughter who is 17 years old. The suspect confronted the vic-
tim about twenty dollars that she owed him and she became angry
and belligerent towards him. The suspect walked up to the victim
and pointed his finger in her face three times, and the victim
pushed his finger away three times. The suspect then told her that
he was her father and that she had better not move his finger or
hand again and that she will respect him. When the victim pushed
his finger away for the third time, the suspect, "slapped his
daughter with an open hand in her face several times and wres-
tled her to the floor." The stepmother mother pulled the suspect
off his daughter and told him that she is a girl and for him not to
hit her like that. The victim ran into the bathroom and closed the
door. The suspect followed her and kicked open the bathroom
door, and began struggling with the victim in an attempt to con-
trol her. He grabbed her around the neck and she started kicking
him. The suspect then removed his hands from around her neck,
and walked away when his ex-wife (the stepmother) told him that
she was going to call the police. The suspect was stopped approx-
imately four blocks north of the location. He told the police offi-
cer that his daughter became disrespectful towards him, and that
he was just trying to correct her when she slapped his hand away.
The suspect was read his rights and taken to jail. Three of sus-
pect's other children were in the house when the incident occurred
and concurred.the above account of the incident. The police offi-
cer contacted DCF abuse hotline, and spoke to "agency # 5166"
in regards to this case. The victim was given a domestic violence
pamphlet. Case cleared by an arrest.
ARMED ROBBERY WITH A DEADLY WEAPON-On
Saturday, January 1, 2005 at 12:55 a.m. a police officer was dis-
patchedit6 an armed robbery to an individual at 1587 West 10th
Street. Upon arrival, police officer met with the victim, who stat-
ed that she and her friend (witness) were at Magic City at 7977
Soutel Dr. waiting outside the establishment for a ride home at
approximately 12:30 a.m. Suspect #1 & #2 who were standing
approximately 50 feet away approached the victim and witness.
Suspect #1 began a conversation with the victim. Suspect #1 then
pointed a gun at the victim's face and took her cell phone and
grabbed her necklaces from around her neck. Suspect #1 walked
away and was joined by suspect #2. Both of the suspects got into
an older model red Toyota Celica and drove away in an unknown
direction. The police officer did not conduct a canvass of the area
because the victim and her friend left the scene of the crime and
went home. to call the police which was approximately an hour
and twenty minutes later. The victim and her friend were given a
case information card. Case not cleared. Patrol efforts suspended.
BOYFRIEN'D/GRILFRIEND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-
Sunday, January 2, 2005 at 4:52 p.m. a police officer was dis-
patched to a battery in progress at 6755 Miss Muffet Lane S.
Upon arrival, police officer was met by the girlfriend (victim).
She stated that she and her boyfriend (suspect) got into a verbal
dispute pver money/ The victim told the police officer that the
suspect became angry and punched her in the face. He then fled
the scene on foot in an unknown direction. The victim advised the
police officer that the incident occurred while her 10-year-old son


was present. She also advised that the suspect has hit her multi-
ple 'occasions in the past but she has never reported him to the
police. The victim and suspect have lived together as family for
over two years. The police officer made contact with the suspect
at his listed address. The suspect stated that he and the victim had
a verbal dispute over money. The victim demanded that he leave
because he had no money. The suspect denied hitting the victim.
"ie suspect was red his rights and taken tojail Case cleared by
an arrest. Patrol efforts suspended.


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"square grouper"* just unloaded from a mother ship off-
shore.
Dark tinted windows. When cops can't see inside a
car, they like to stop the vehicle and have a look.
Driver slouch. People slouching in seats appear to
be hiding from cops. Since Hide 'n Seek is what police
work is, in essence, cops always like to check anybody
who appears to be hiding. By the way, cops like to see
your hands on the wheel. They like this a lot.
Overly scrupulous use of turn signals. See perfect
driving, above.
Brake squeals. Many brake linings have metal studs
embedded in them that squeal when the brake pads wear
to the point of needing replacement. When police hear
these squeals, they will pull you over for an extra thor-
ough equipment check, with document perusal and con-
traband search tossed in at no charge. At the first brake
squeak, run, don't walk, to get those pads replaced.
Inappropriate vehicles. Police are extraordinarily
attuned to incongruities, and one of those that most
attract their attention is drivers whose visible status is
different from that of the cars they're operating. If you're
dirty and wearing scruffy clothes while driving a
Mercedes Benz, expect police attention.
Shooting birds at police. Yes, people do that. Cops
love it. The constitutional right to be an idiot was estab-
lished by Adam at the Clap of Creation and has been
upheld by courts ever since.


WANT

CUSTOMERS?

ADVERTISE IN

THE FLORIDA STAR!

TO PLACE

YOUR AD

CALL US

TODAY

AT 904/766-8834



REGINALD L. SYKES, SR. M.D. P.A.


Y C~


I I


PAGE B-5


FInRnIDA STA R


r A TTTrT A 17 0







FORIDA STAR JANUARY8


FSU Rushes Past Mountaineers


. ... .. .. -




Florida State tailback Leon Washington (#3 in white jersey) tries to elude a West
Virginia defender for a significant gain. Washington played high school football for
the Tigers at Andrew Jackson High School in Jacksonville. It took Washington just
three carries to rush for over 100 yards against the Mountaineers in the 2005 Gator


Bowl at Alltel Stadium. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.--
Leon Washington's 69-yard
touchdown run with 14:38
second left in the frist quar-
ter set the
pace for the
Florida
Seminoles'
30-18 win
over the West
Virginia n'
Mountainers Leon
in the 2005 Washington
Toyota Gator
Bowl.
Washington's touchdown
run on FSU's first drive of
the game was the longest
touchdown run in Gator
Bowl and Seminole history.
The two play drive took
22 seconds off of the game
clock and was the earliest
FSU (9-3) had scored in a
game during the 2004 sea-
son.
Washington, who played
high .school football at


Andrew Jackson High
School in Jacksonville car-
ried Florida State much of
the day, finishing with 195
yards rushing.
Florida State's Lorenzo
Booker had 101 yards rush-
ing on 20 carries. The
Seminoles were penalized
17 times for 174 yards, both
Gator Bowl records.
Quarterback Rasheed
Marshall and West Virginia's
running
backs rocked
the nation's
top run
defense for
238 yards.
Kay-Jay
Harris car-
Rasheed ried 25 times
Marshall for 134 yards
and scored twice.
But the Mountaineers (8-
4) failed to find the end zone
three times after advancing
inside the 20-yard line.


U.
Marshall hurt his ribs
earlier in the week in prac-
tice, took a day off and was-
n't sure he was going to play
Saturday.
It was West Virginia's
llth loss of its last 12
bowls. The Mountaneers are
0-5 in the Gator Bowl.
West Virginia was the
only unranked team playing
in a New Year's Day bowl.
Special teams problems
continued to haunt West
Virginia. Similar errors were
costly in earlier losses to
Boston College and
Pittsburgh to end the regular
season.
Two West Virginia kick-
ers missed extra points, Brad
Cooper booted a kickoff out
of bounds, and the
Mountaineers later faked a
27-yard field goal attempt,
but did not convert the first-
down run.
Bowden, facing his for-


West Virgnia's Kay-Jay Harris scampers for a big gainer as FSU defenders are in hot
pursuit. Harris carried that ball 25 times for 134 yards against the Seminoles. (PHOTO
BY LAURENCE GREENE)


mer school for the first time
since the 1982 Gator Bowl,
moved within one bowl win
of Joe Paterno's NCAA
(news web sites) record of
20 at Penn State.
FSU Coach Bobby
Bowden faced his former
school for the first time
since the 1982 Gator Bowl,.
Bowden moved within
one bowl win of Joe
Paterno's NCAA record of
20 at Penn State.


Family members cheer for West Virginia quarterback:
Rasheed Marshall. (PHOTO BY LAURENCE GREENE)


Private Church


Held For Reggi


I



'4




C.


Your Weekly Horoscope
(JANUARY 8, 2005-JANUARY 14, 2005)


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) You
find yourself
intellectually I
challenged this
week. Tap into that brain
power. You have the right
stuff to handle what comes
your way.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) Creativity is high-
I lighted this week.
SThose of you into
Starts and crafts
could turn a
hobby into a money-making
venture. Later in the week, a
combative relative should be
avoided.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) You're brisk and
efficient this
week on the job. I
The opposite is .
true at home.
Prioritize domestic chores
for best effectiveness.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) Don't give into
that urge to let
things go this
week. You need to
stay on top of
everything. Over the week-
end, travel is possible.
LEO (July 23 to


August 22) Sign up for a
course this week in anything
that interests you. For some,
this could be a
career-changing
move. Interests of
the heart are high-
lighted over the weekend.
VIRGO (August 23
to September 22) A new
. -acquaintance
yI could turn out to
Sbe helpful in your
career. Follow up
on all leads. Later, pay atten-
tion to the needs of a child.
LIBRA (September
23 to October 22) Your
charm and per-
sonality open
doors for you this
week. Whether
it's business or personal,
you're at your best. The
weekend is a good time to
effect changes on the home
front.
SCORPIO (October
23 to November 21)
SYou're able to
explain yourself
S quite well this
week. In fact,
your communication skills
are tops right now. Take full
advantagee of this.


SAGITTARIUS
(November 22 to
December 21)
a The news you'd
been anticipating
finally arrives.
Fortunately, it's all good.
Over the weekend, you're
faced with a difficult choice.
CAPRICORN
(December 22 to
January 19) Romance
comes from a sur-
prising source.
S While you hadn't
previously con-
sidered this person as a
match, you're pleasantly
surprised. Later, finish up
work projects.
A Q U A R I US
(January 20 to
February 18)
Use your brain
power to tackle
research projects.
Just be sure the information
you come up with is accu-
rate. Later, friendships are
accented.
PISCES (February
19 to March 20) You're
captivated by
someone you've
just met. Be care- I i
ful, 'bough. You --


sometimes tend to jump into
a relationship before really
getting to know the other
person.
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS: George
Foreman, January 10; Mary
J. Blige, January 11; Rush
Limbaugh, January 12;
Orlando Bloom, January 13;
LL Cool J, January 14; Chad
Lowe, January 15; Laura
Schlessinger, January 16.
(c) 2005 DBR Media,
Inc.



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Jaguars Get Rid Of Musgrave

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. Jaguars offensive coordinator
Bill Musgrave was fired Tuesday after Jacksonville finished
last in the AFC and 29th in the league in scoring. *
Musgrave was heavily criticized during the season for
not getting the most out of an offense that featured running
back Fred Taylor, receiver Jimmy Smith and emerging quar-
terback Byron Leftwich. Musgrave, who started his coach-
ing career working with quarterbacks for the Oakland
Raiders in 1997, was offensive coordinator for two seasons
at Virginia before joining Del Rio in Jacksonville in 2003.
He also was an assistant with the Philadelphia Eagles and the
Carolina Panthers The Jaguars finished 9-7, one victory shy
of returning to ihe postseason for the fili time since 1999':


JANUARY8,,2005


FLORIDA STAR


PAGE B-6.









JANUARY 8, 2005Q) 3


EMPLOYMENT
FLORIDA COMMUNITY
COLLEGE at JACKSONVILLE

Call 904-632-3161
To Learn about a wide variety of
employment opportunities at
FCCJ. E.O.E.
Housing Manager
Qualifications for Housing
Manager Degree in
Administration or related field or
a minimum of five years of
responsible experience in hous-
ing related programs, administra-
tion or community action, social
work-or related fields; Must have
experience in working with the
poor and disadvantaged and
making public presentations;
Computer knowledge of NEAT
(National Energy Audit Test) and
FLASH Certification preferred,
but not required. Apply in person:
421 W. Church St. Ste. 705,
Jacksonville, FL 32202 or fax
resume to: (904) 791-9299 Attn:
Human Resources Dept.;
Resumes accepted until Jan. 17,
2005.


New You for a New Year?
3 FREE 30-day weight-loss
programs to chose from.
Call 904-223-1705.
www.dreambig.amsonline
.com/invite/free


Lowest Prices in Town
Guaranteed
JULIUS BACON
(904) 766-0240
Fast Checks Fast Funds
Electronic Bookkeeping*
Notary
4932-2 Moncrief Road West
(At Richardson Road)
Want to purchase minerals and
other oil/gas interests
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, CO 80201


I SERVICES

Aluminum Awnings


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
PATIOS SCREENED
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CARPORTS
MARQUEES & CANOPIES
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THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852


IMPACT

WCGL AM

1360



THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAYS @ 6:30 P.M.





Issues That Address
Concerns Of The
African American Community
In Jacksonville AndThe World


-r.- ------------------------


i


ISAIAH RUMLIM
5600 Kings Road Suite #4
(Opposite Flowers Bakery)
764-1753
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
10-20-10
LIABILITY/PLUS PIP
------------------- -


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION AND GUARDIANSHIP DIVISION
IN RE: FILE NO: 16-2004 CP
2169
ESTATE OF ANGELAA. BIGELOW
DECEASED
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ANGELA A. BIGELOW, deceased,
File Number 16.2004.CP.2196, is pending in the Circuit Court for
DUVAL County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 330 E.
Bay Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the descendent and other persons having claims or
demands against the descendent's estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served
must file their claim with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DATYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the descendent and other persons having claims or
demands against descendent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this COURT WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NO SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DESCENDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
Attorney for Personal Personal Representative:
Representative: Louise M. Doty
Barbieri, Screnci, Weprin.& 3814 Tara Hall
Rubino, PLC Jacksonville, FL 32277
Attorneys at Law
3200 N. Military Trail, Suite 200
Boca Raton, FL 33431
(561) 997-5700
Todd D. Weprin



r CASH NOW;

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMEfNT "
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(800) 794-7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH N
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!o i ,ol.kmarks lools telp
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tar: Florida's Statewide....
Tune in on WCGL-AM 1360 ot .i ; ., ;


*M;Lt' .a S 1 as e ? .' e :.'L*i _. *;, i

t ''.w i 'S ^ -'-t: ,r !. : ." .


C Catch t/, Chbarnz oit

RIVERFEST 2005

-J January 7-9


NEW SMYRNA BEACH
For More Information:
www.Vis TNEWSMYRNA.COM 1.800.541.9621


Adoption

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION?
Full service nationwide adoption agency specializ-
ing in matching families with birthmothers. TOLL
FREE 24/7 (866)921-0565. ONE TRUE GIFT
ADOPTIONS. www.onetruegift.com.

Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read Dl ANETICS
by Ron L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send
$7.99 to Dianetics, 3102 N. Habana Ave., Tampa
FL 33607.


Auctions


2Sealed Bid Acreage Auctions- Bidsdue:Jan. 10,
2PM, Abbeville, AL. 10% B.P: (800)942-6475
www.tranzon.comTranzon Hagen ALLic.# 194.

Automotive

AAA Rated Donation. DONATE YOUR CAR,
Boat or Real Estate. IRS Tax Deductible Free Pick-
Up/Tow Any Model/ Condition. Help Underprivi-
leged Children (800)598-9211 Outreachcenter.org.


Building Materials


METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accesso-
ries. Quick turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Doyou earn $800/
day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995.
(800)814-6323 B02000033. CALL US: We will
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#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine Hd. You
approve Locations-$9,995 (800)836-3464
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Financial


Help Wanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent
Pay & Benefits for Experienced Drivers. 0/0,
Solos, Teams & Graduate Students. Bonuses Paid
Weekly. Equal Opportunity Employer. (888)MORE
PAY (888-667-3729).

Indiana company has new contracts in Georgia
and Florida and is seeking drivers to delivermotor
homes, busses and trucks. You will be most suc-
cessful if you possess a CDL B and have a small tow
vehicle. Backhauls available. Check us out at
qualitydriveaway.com or contact recruiting at
(800)695-9743.

ADVANCE YOUR DRIVING CAREER! In-
crease in Pay Package. Contractors & Company
Needed. Flatbed- Refrigerated- Tanker. Over-the-
Road. Some Regional. Commercial Driver's Li-
cense Training. (800)771-6318.
www.primeinc.com.

$1500 WEEKLY GUARANTEED NOW AC-
CEPTING- APPLICATIONS $50 CASH HIR-
ING BONUS GUARANTEED IN WRITING
(888)318-1638 Ext 107
www.USMailingGroup.com.

UPTO $4,000 WEEKLY!! ExcitingWeekly Pay-
check! Written Guarantee! 11 Year Nationwide
Company Now Hiring! Easy Work, Sending Out
Our Simple One Page Brochure! Free Postage,
Supplies! Awesome Bonuses!! FREE INFOR-
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3800.

Drivers/OTR-Tanker looking for Professional
drivers! NEW 2005 Equipment, Top Pay, BO-
NUSES, Prepass & EZ Pass, Rider Program &
Much more! North AmericanTankLines (866)748-
6285.

Now Hiring2005 Postal Positions Federal, State &
Local. $14.80/$48+/Hr. No experience necessary.
Entry Levels. Full Benefits. Paid Training. Call 7
days (888)826-2513 Ext. 201.


Legal Services

DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS children, etc.
Only one signature required! *Excludes govt. fees!
Call weekdays (800)462-2000, ext.600. (8am-7pm)
iDivorce Tech. Established 1977.

Miscellaneous

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM includes
standard installation. 2 MONTHS FREE HBO &
Cinemax! Access to over 225 channels! Limited
time offer. S&H. Restrictions Apply. (866)500-
4056.

SPA! Overstocked! New 7 person spa-Loaded!
Includes cover, delivery & warranty. $2999, was
$5999. (888)397-3529.

Real Estate

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. WIN-
TER SEASON IS HERE! MUST SEE BEAUTI-
FUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN
NC MOUNTAINS. Homes, Cabins, Acreage &
Investments. Cherokee Mountain Realty GMAC
Real Estate, Murphy cherokeemountainrealty.com
Call for Free Brochure (800)841-5868.

Mountain Golf Homesites! Prestigious commu-
nity weaving throughout Dye designed 18 hole
championship course in breathtaking Blue Ridge
Mtns of South Carolina. Call for pkg (866)334-
3253, x759.

Your Ad Could Be Here

ONE CALL STANDS BETWEEN YOUR
BUSINESS and millions of potential customers.
Place your advertisement in the FL Classified Ad-
vertising Network. For$450yourad will be placed
in over 150 papers. Check out our 2x2 and 2x4
display network too! Call this paper, or Heather
Mola, FL Statewide Network Directorat (866)742-
1373, ore-mail hmola@flptess.com for more infor-
mation. (Out of State placement is also available.)
Visit us online at www.florida-classifieds.com.


Instruction


d Kodak J ei M hRWIGET TOYOTA

Tune In January 8, 2005 on WJWB WB at 7:00 p.mT
Check your local listings for additional stations and times



IMPACT


WCGL


AM 1360


AS SEEN ON TV $ All Your CASH NOW $
ProgramFL Company offers best cash now options.
Have money due from Settlements, Annuities, or
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Cash Loans up to $1000.00. No Credit Check!
Cash in your checking account within 24 hrs.
Employment Req. Go towww.paychecktoday.com
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$$$$$GET CASH NOW We buy STRUCTURED
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Heavy Equipment Operator CERTIFIED. Train-
ing atCentral FloridaCommunity CollegeCampus.
Job Placement Assistance. (866)933-1575. Asso-
ciated Training Services 5177 Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Fl. 34461.


FCAN


(Week of January 3, 2005)


THE FLORIDA STAR
REAL TALK
REAL TOPICS
RADIO SHOW
SATURDAY @ :6.0 P.M.


U 11 1-1 A 1 ^1-1 IM IKI


- --- --- -


. -


I


BUSINESS NETWORK


Y


I-Run Your Ad StateNN


PAGE B-7


FLORIDA STAR


]


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i;];lt~~~~l~: I; Wl 11I





F!AUE D0 S R ~R---2-


are invited to attend a


Town


Hal


Meeting

p.m. Monday, Jan. 10,


I



2005


Forrest High School Auditorium
5530 Firestone Road
Directions from Downtown:
Travel south on 1-95 to 1-10 West.
Travel west on 1-10 to 1-295 South.
Travel south on 1-295 to the 103rd Street/Firestone Road exit.
Stay in middle lane on exit ramp and follow directional sign to Firestone Road South.
From the intersection of the exit ramp and 103rd street, turn immediately into far left
turn lane to make a left turn at the first traffic light for Firestone Road.
Once on Firestone Road, turn right into Forrest High School.
Follow signs to the auditorium.
For more information call Tree Kilbourn,
Neighborhood Services Division, 630-7043.
This Town Hall Meeting is sponsored by the Southwest CPAC
(Citizens Planning Advisory Committee)

john Peyton Lee Martin
Mayor SChair
Southwest CPAC


The Willie Gary Classic celebrates
the dream and legacy
of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Tuesday January 11, 2005
12:00 p.m. r
Adams Mark Hotel
225 Coastline Drive East


Special Guest of Honor
Coretta Scoff King,
Tickets are $100 per person
for more information call (904) 353-3008.


We Cash
S Government Checks'
PREMIER FOODS S!
DEBIT CARDS & MOST MAJOR
OOFOOD STAMPS & EBT CARDS
*3118 Edgewood Avenue e27 East 7th Street *1824 West Beaver Street BEAVER STREET STORE
PH (904) 764-2476 FAX: (904) 764-0298 PH: (904) 356-0972 FAX: (904)356-9943 PH: (904) 354-0665 FAX: (904) 354-4543 CASHES ONLY PAYROLL CHECKS
STORE HOURS. STORE HOURS: STORE HOURS: MAIN STREET PHARMACY
MON-THURS 7AM-8PM FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM MON-THURS 7AM-8PM FRI-SAT 7AM-8:30PM MON-THURS 7AM-8PM FRI-SAT 7 AM-8:30PM (904) 355-5646
SUN. 7AM-7:30PM SUNDAY 7AM-7:30PM SUN. 7AM-7:30PM


3-DAY SALE ONL
Sa.,Su .,& Mo .,Ja t- al. xI I I0


You


What's on your mind?

Tell Mayor Peyton


EYI SAVE! SAV! SAVE!


PACE RB


FLORIDA STAR


JAN UA R Y ,20051


r
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