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Taco times ( July 10, 2013 )

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Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
System ID:
UF00028361:00457

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
System ID:
UF00028361:00457

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald


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Full Text

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Inside todayMonths of preparation will culminate in a four-day celebration for Taylor Countys forestry industry starting today (Wednesday) and continuing through Saturday with the 58th annual Florida Forest Festival. Schedule highlights can be found in the special festival edition inside todays Taco Times. Author to speak at library Oct. 28David J. Mather, author of One for the Road, will be guest speaker at the Taylor County Public Library on Monday, Oct. 28, at 5:30 p.m. One for the Road is a novel about Chilean family life through the eyes of a young Peace Corps volunteer. Mather grew up in Sarasota and was a volunteer with the Peace Corps from 1968 to 1970. He and his wife now split their time between Lima, Peru, New Hampshire and Horseshoe Beach. The program, sponsored by Friends of the Taylor County Public Library, is free and the community is invited.en Application deadline extendedThe application deadline for Taylor County Habitat for Humanitys new program called A Brush With Kindness has been extended to Friday, Nov. 15. The program serves lowincome families who struggle to maintain the exterior of their homes; it will focus on landscaping and exterior clean-up with volunteers working alongside the homeowner to revitalize a homes exterior. Applications are available at the Florida Drug Alcohol DNA Screening ofce located at 3498 Highway 19 South, Suite 2 (across from Taylor Technical Institute).Workshop to focus on management plan for museumOn Monday, Oct. 28, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Recreation and Parks will hold a public workshop to review updates in the management plan for Forest Capital State Museum. The workshop will be held at Forest Capital Hall, starting at 7 p.m. The public is invited to attend. Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1961 TacoTimes 50 Three Sections52nd year, No. 42www.perrynewspapers.comWednesdayOctober 23, 2013 Index Editorial . .................. A-2 Living . ...................... A-4 Community . .............. A-5 Religion . ................... A-6 Sports . ..................... A-8 Classieds . ............ A-10Weather Wednesday 79 5810% Thursday77 46 News Forum Good deed leaves Perry man in serious condition A Perry man sustained serious injuriesincluding two broken armsafter falling headrst into a dumpster at the Harrison Blue Roll-Off site Friday. The man, whose identity has not been released, was airlifted to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and remains in stable condition. According to family members, he had surgery Tuesday morning to replace an elbow joint that was shattered in the fall. The accident occurred while the man was attempting to help another man retrieve a rake that had fallen into the large dumpster. Emergency personnel responding to the incident had to lower a ladder into the dumpster in order to reach the man; he was secured on a backboard and Emergency responders had to strap the injured man onto a backboard and pull him out of the dumpster. Please see page 2 Investigation remains on-going in October 2012 hit-and-run death The one-year anniversary has passed and the investigation is still ongoing in the Oct. 5, 2012, hit-andrun death of Hugh Poppell, 41. The Perry Police Department has had a person of interest in the case for more than a year and continues to build its case. A premature arrest can lead to issues as far as prosecution goes. We only get one chance and thats why we like to have the investigation complete before we le charges, Capt. Jamie Cruse said. The crash occurred around 10:15 p.m. near the intersection of Dove Road and Old Dixie Highway. Police were dispatched to the scene initially to investigate a report of an injured person. However, when ofcers arrived, they determined they were dealing with a vehicle crash. Poppell, who lived on Dove Road, was pronounced dead at Doctors Memorial Hospital. Parts of a skateboard were found at the scene and investigators said they did not know if he (Poppell) was on it or carrying it when the crash happened. A vehicle was seized in relation to the investigation shortly after the crash occurred and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement processed it for evidence. County secures $103,000 for airport updates Taylor County has received $103,000 from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) to update Perry-Foley Airports master plan and provide engineering services for a future aircraft storage building at the facility. The county commission recently approved two jointparticipation agreements with FDOT to accept the funding and will be seeking additional money from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the master plan update. The county received $19,980 from FDOT to update the airports master and provide engineering services for a future aircraft storage building at the facility.Please see page 2 B&G Club powered by Duke The Duke Energy Foundation awarded the Boys & Girls Club a $14,500 grant to fund its Learning STEMs from Duke program. This grant will support the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) Director Emily Weed Ketring said. Duke representative Bobby Pickels (back, left) joined Ketring and club members for the grant presentation. Suspension or tobacco ed class?Following a request from local Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) members, the Taylor County School Board is considering changing its district tobacco policy to give students who are caught with tobacco products on campus the option of cessation education programs instead of suspensions. The SWAT students, along with representatives from the Tobacco Prevention Program at the Taylor County Health Department, rst approached the board in August, requesting they consider adopting the nal two points to complete a recommended 12-point comprehensive plan. One of those points was adding a tobacco education program (to the student discipline matrix) to be provided by the health department. After collecting more information on how other districts were implementing similar programs, the school board discussed the issue at two subsequent meetings before unanimously agreeing on Tuesday, Oct. 15, to hold a public hearing on the proposed changes to the board policy and the student discipline matrix. The hearing will held during the boards regular meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 10.Please see page 2

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As Taylor Countys annual salute for forestry swings into high gear this week, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service are also celebrating the benets of Floridas forests during National Forest Products Week, which runs Oct. 2026. National Forest Products Week provides an ideal opportunity to highlight the economic and environmental value that Floridas 17 million acres of forestland provide for our residents, said Putnam. In addition to countless forest products and amenities, Floridas forest industry contributes more than $14 billion to Floridas economy and supports more than 75,000 Florida jobs. Floridas forests provide more than 5,000 types of consumer goods that most people use on a daily basis. Some are easily recognized, like paper goods and lumber, while others are not. By the time forest products reach consumers, many retain very little resemblance to the trees from which they originated. These products include cosmetics, paint additives, medicines and fabrics used to make clothing. Pharmaceuticals developed to treat cancer have also originated from chemicals extracted from trees. Trees also provide important benets to Floridas ecosystem, including clean air and water, shade and energy conservation, carbon absorption and habitat for birds and mammals. Putnam recently commissioned the rst statewide inventory of 17 million acres of forest land. The study evaluated the distribution, availability and sustainability of Floridas timber resources. Some of the ndings included: forestland covers 49 percent of the land in Florida. 7 million are in North Florida. Pine accounts for about one-third of all forest land. is privately owned, mostly in non-corporate ownership. land is owned by federal, state, county and municipal governments. the state are made up mostly of sawmills, mulch, chipand-saw and pulp mills. mostly pine, is in the highest demand among all timber products. exhibit sustainable forests where growth meets or exceeds timber demand. pressure for both hardwood pulpwood and saw timber, with hardwood forests sustainable throughout the state. million acres of forests are predominantly in water--almost 4 million acres are mangrove, cypress or other forested wetlands. forests are more than 40 years old, predominantly older hardwood forests. The Florida Forest Service manages 1 million acres of public forest land while protecting more than 26 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wildre. A-2 Taco Times October 23, 2013 then pulled up the side of the metal container. In addition to breaking both arms, the man also sustained neck fractures. Family members said Tuesday he is expected to make a good recovery. plan and layout plan, which has a total projected cost County Grants Coordinator Melody Cox. The county is submitting a grant application to FAA requesting funding assistance in the amount of project will be 100-percent grant funded. The county is not providing a match. FAA and FOOT Aviation require the county to update the master plan once every 10 years at a minimum. The master plan has not been updated since scal year great deal of change to the existing master plan over the past 10 years as the new terminal and the t-hangars did not exist at that time. FDOT is also providing used for the design and engineering of a new aircraft storage facility at the airport. The county will have complete the project, Cox said. The design of the facility will be completed in conjunction with the airport master plan project which will assist in determining future airport needs. The design of the facility may be completed to accommodate one of the following: an eight-to-10-unit t-hangar facility, a corporate hangar or a hangar facility that could be used for an xed base operator. The county will not be required to provide a match for this project either. Under the proposed changes, students found with tobacco products will have the option of attending the tobacco education program instead of suspensions for the rst three offenses. The program will be two hours for the rst offense, four hours with cessation resources outlined for the second offense and six hours with cessation resources for the third offense. Existing punishments vary based on the grade level and are as follows: ISS and suspensions can be replaced by the education recommendation for expulsion. day suspension. suspension and recommendation for expulsion. third offense, one-to-three-day suspension. AIRPORT Continued from page 1 $83,000 marked for engineering and design work TOBACCO ED CLASS Continued from page 1 Now, suspensions are mandatory GOOD DEED Continued from page 1Man also sustained neck fractures Forestry has $14 billion impact on state SWAT member Catherine Crawford addresses the Taylor County School Board, stating a comprehensive tobacco policy protects both students and faculty at local schools.

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A-3 Taco Times October 16, 2013 North Florida Community Colleges (NFCC) Allied Health Department is currently accepting students for its new pharmacy technician certicate program. The new program is set to begin Jan. 8 and according to NFCC Allied Health Advisor Debbie Bass, now is the time to contact NFCC and complete the application process. We are seeing a lot of interest in the Pharmacy Technician program, said Bass. Approximately 1520 students will be selected for this rst class and its important for anyone interested in applying to the program to contact me before the Nov. 15 deadline. The program takes less than a year to complete, approximately 10 months, and prepares students to enter the workforce as trained professionals. Pharmacy technicians perform technical and clerical duties in pharmacies while working with licensed pharmacists to dispense prescription medications. Graduates who achieve a passing score on the National Pharmacy Technician Certication Exam and register with the Florida State Board of Pharmacy can seek employment as certied and registered pharmacy technicians. The pharmacy technician certicate is a great addition to NFCCs Allied Health offerings, said Julie Townsend, Allied Health director at NFCC. Employment in this area of healthcare is expected to grow over the next several years and we are looking forward to training our communities future pharmacy technicians. According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS), employment of pharmacy technicians is expected to increase more than 32 percent from 2010 to 2020. The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Labor Market Statistics Center projects a 22 percent increase in employment of pharmacy technicians by 2019 for Workforce Region 6, the counties NFCC serves. The NFCC Allied Health Department has a reputation for producing high student pass rates, offering exceptional training opportunities and being student oriented, said Townsend. You can expect the same quality standards and opportunities from our new pharmacy technician certicate program. Student applications will be accepted through Nov. 15. For more information, contact NFCC Allied Health Advisor Debbie Bass at (850) 973-1662 or bassd@ nfcc.edu. At NFC CPharmacy tech program accepting students

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A-4 Taco Times October 23, 2013 Living Prices for landscape and indoor plants have been reduced by the Special Needs Adult Program (SNAP) at Taylor Technical Institute (TTI). We need to move these plants out so we can start with some new things, said Connie Gibson, instructor. Prices listed below are per pot: Christmas cactus: salmon, white, yellow, orange, pink/ white, mixed and spring pink, $5. (Remember, its time to get them transplanted or leave them in pots until after they blooom to transplant); (Only a few) Pansies: yellow and burgundy, $2; Spider plants: $2; Azaleas: white, red, lavender, $1; Nandina: 25 cents per piece or $1 for tray; Podocarpus: $1; Grapevines: $2; Boxwoods: $1-2; Lacebark Elm trees: $1; Ann Magnolia trees: $3; Tiger Lilies: $1-2; English Dogwood: $2; Peace lilies: $3-4; Mother-in-Law (snake) plant: $4; Swedish Ivy: $1-2; Assorted houseplants, prices vary. Gibson encourages interested shoppers to please call 838-2545 and ask for the SNAP class to make sure were here. For Hamp, Iona Walker Board from historical Bloodworths building pays tribute to love story Luau celebrates marriageDavid and Almira Lee invite friends and family members to a luau celebration of their union in marriage. The luau begins at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26, at their home, 1013 East Drew Street. Casual attire is suggested; no formal invitations will be issued. By FLORRIE BURROUGHS Shady Grove correspondent Stories can be found in the oddest of places. Doyle Lundy knew he was investing in history when he purchased the Bloodworth building earlier this year. Im sure he did not know he was also purchasing someones love story. Now, to understand this story, you will need to know or remember that the Gulf Telephone Company was once housed upstairs in the Bloodworth building. There was the switchboard with an operator always on duty as well as a pay phone for citizens use as there were very few, if any, phones available at that time. When Doyle began removing the sheetrock walls, he found a wooden wall underneath and on one of the boards he saw the names: Hamp Walker and Iona Walker. Doyle brought the board to Hamp. The story goes like this. In 1952, Hamp was in the United States Army. When he came home on leave he talked Iona Morgan into marrying him (in his words). After they were married, they went to the Gulf Telephone Company to use the pay phone. It was there that Hamp Walker called in to ask for extended leave since he had taken a wife. His request was granted. And there on the wall, perhaps waiting for a call back, Hamp carved his name and the name of his bride, Iona. Iona was born in Shady Grove, Hamp in Perry. After their marriage they traveled some due to the military and Hamps work and then settled in Shady Grove. Hamp and Iona are beloved members of this community. When you see the love this couple has for each other, you know that this marriage was a match made in Heaven. I tried to take a picture of the board but the wording was not bright enough to show. Hamp says he will post the board at the Opry House for all to see. Upcoming activities:Dec. 20 Christmas tree lighting at Shady Grove Community Park. The Pleasant Grove Baptist Church choir will present several selections from their Christmas cantata. You wont want to miss this, so make plans to join us. Dec. 21 Shady Groves 4th Annual Country Christmas. We start with a parade at 11 a.m. Lineup is 10 10:30 a.m. The parade ends at the park where we will serve hotdogs and chili. If you would like to be in the parade, please call me at 584-6343. Hamp and Iona Walker at their Shady Grove homeFall is a great time to plant: do you need shrubs, trees?

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A-5 Taco Times October 23, 2013 Religion St. Johns, Courts of Praise present FREE family fun on reworks night Two churches have combined forces to present a free night of family fun, coinciding with the Florida Forest Festival Fireworks Show Thursday, Oct. 24. The event will be held in the parking lot of Courts of Praise located at 3385 Puckett Road, a prime location to view the reworks, said Pastor Jeff Bryson. His church, along with St. John Christian Fellowship, will provide bounce houses, prizes and live entertainment featuring The Taylor Chafn Band. Come early to get a good spot, urged Cody McNeese, who serves as pastor of St. John Christian Fellowship. The event begins at 5 p.m. Hamburgers, hotdogs and drinks will be available for purchase at the concession stand. Church super sizes; Fall Festival planned Oct. 31 The sanctuary of First Presbyterian Church, 310 Plantation Road, dedicated 10 years ago. (Photograph by Walt Beers) In October of 2003, the First Presbyterian Church of Perry dedicated its new sanctuary on Plantation Road. This year, the congregation marked the 10th anniversary of the dedication with a reception showcasing the stages and groundbreaking ceremonies which lead to the sanctuarys completion. We also marked the one-year anniversary of the dedication of our All Saints Prayer Garden and newly-renovated plaza, said the Rev. Larry D. Neal, pastor of the church. For the service which followed a reception in the plaza, the congregation sang a hymn written specically for the church in 2003, by former member Skip West, son of longtime members, the late Margaret and Erdman West. We see the cross high. Against the soaring sky. The congregation of the Lord is here today. The Word of God is read. We live it in our lives and bear our witness everywhere. Our families Christian lives, our fortress and our refuge. Our witness to the world that God is eternal love! The church was organized in 1905 by 15 members. The history of this church bears clear evidence of Gods continual working in our corporate life. As a church we have been richly blessed over the years. We look back with grateful hearts. But God is not through with us and so we look ahead in the knowledge that God calls us into his will. We pray that our response to Gods call will honor and glorify His name, Neal said. Obituaries At First Presbyterian Anniversaries marked for sanctuary, prayer garden Super Size Sunday Temple of God is planning a Super Size Sunday on Oct. 27 with worship at 11 a.m. Guest speaker for the occasion will be Minister Altramese Kimble. Everyone is invited. Fall Festival Lakeside Baptist Church will stage its Fall Festival on Thursday, Oct. 31, from 5-7 p.m. Friends and neighbors are invited to bring their children and enjoy the games, food and fellowship.Maggie Elizabeth MusselwhiteMaggie Elizabeth Musselwhite, 90, of Perry, died Sunday Oct. 20, 2013, at Brynwood Center in Monticello. She was born July 26, 1923, in Perry, to Alec and Irene (Dixon) Humphrey. Mrs. Musselwhite was preceded in death by her parents as well as her husband of 49 years, W. H. Howard Musselwhite, Sr.; and two sisters, Mae Dell Whitted and Emma (M.A.) Sadler. She is survived by: her son W. H. Howard (Teresa) Musselwhite Jr. of Lamont; her daughter Elota (Bill) Calhoun of Perry; grandchildren, John and Steve Calhoun; and 2 great grandchildren, as well as several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Tuesday, Oct. 22, at 7 p.m. at Burns Funeral Home with Pastor Eddie Pridgeon ofciating. A private burial will be held at a later date in Carlton Cemetery. The family received friends from 6-7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 22, also at Burns. Memorial contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice at www.bigbendhospice.org or Alzheimer Association at www.alz.org. James Edwin CoullietteJames (Jim) Edwin Coulliette, 65, of Perry, died Oct. 18, 2013, at Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee. He was born Dec. 5, 1947, in Iddo, to Wiley and Ila (Grantham) Coulliette, now deceased. Mr. Coulliette was a member of the First Baptist Church of Perry. Survivors include: his wife of 47 years, Cheryl Coulliette of Perry; one son, Steven Edwin (Michele) Coulliette of Crawfordville; his daughter, Robin Coulliette (Val) Deer of Summit, Miss.; nine grandchidlren; two great-grandchildren; one brother; ve sisters; and a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. on Oct. 20 at Mt. Gilead Baptist Church in Eridu. Interment followed in Mt. Gilead Baptist Church Cemetery. The family received friends from 1:30 until 2 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013 at the church. All arrangements were under the care of Joe P. Burns Funeral Home. Dear Friends/Class of : No words could express our appreciation for the love and support you have shown to us after the passing of Jimmy W. Fuller Sr. We are deeply grateful. With warmest regards, The Fuller, Adams/Hall Family Card of Thanks

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A-7 Taco Times October 23, 2013 Furnishing the Cabin in the Woods The American Legion Ladies Auxiliary recently donated a love seat, rugs, Promoting the festival Florida Forest Festival Board Member Mark Viola

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A-10 Taco Times October 23, 2013 Community AARP: last Wed., 10 a.m. at Perry Shrine Club. Kiwanis Club: Wednesdays, noon, Perry Elks Lodge on Puckett Road. MainStreet Perry: fourth Tuesday, 5:30 p.m., Perry Historic Station. NAACP: rst Sunday, 5 p.m., at Jerkins Community Center. Optimist Club: Thursday, noon at Rosehead, downtown Perry. Perry Garden Club: third Wednesday, 10 a.m. Perry Elks Lodge: second and fourth Tuesday, 7 p.m. Perry Lodge #187: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m., Masonic Hall. Perry Masonic Lodge 123: meets rst and third Monday, 7:30 p.m. Perry Shrine Club: fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. (club house located on Courtney Road). Perry Womans Club: second Wed., noon (September to May). Rotary Club: Tues., noon at Rosehead Junction. Taylor County Leadership Council: second and fourth Friday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Vogue XIII: rst Mon., 7:30 p.m. Call 584-2404. Airport Advisory Committee: fourth Wednesday, 12 noon, Perry-Foley Airport. City Council: second and fourth Tues., at 5:30 p.m. County Commission: rst Mon. and third Tues. at 5:30 p.m., courthouse annex; workshop, fourth Tues., 5 p.m. Planning Board: rst Thurs., 6 p.m. Courthouse annex (old post ofce). Taylor County Construction License Board Meeting: third Fri., 2 p.m., courthouse annex. Taylor County School Board: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m. Taylor Coastal Water and Sewer: fourth Tuesday at 18820 Beach Road, 3 p.m. Taylor Soil & Water Conservation District Board: fourth Monday, 7 p.m., Foley Airport terminal conference room. Diabetes classes: every Tuesday, 3 p.m., Doctors Memorial Hospital. FAMU Alumni Chapter: second Monday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Friends of the Taylor County Public Library: last Monday of the month, 5:30 p.m., public library. Girl Scouts Service Unit: rst Tuesday, 7 p.m., Scout Hut. Habitat for Humanity: second Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Capital City Bank, Rm. #208. Helping Hands of the Shelter: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., Chamber of Commerce. Home Educators League of Perry: Forest Capital Hall. Call 584-6866 or visit on-line htt:taylor. ifas.u.edu. Muskogee Creek Indian Nation: second and fourth Sat., 7 p.m. Tribal grounds, Lyman Hendry Road. Muskogee Creek Indian Tribe: second Saturday, 3 p.m., Oak Hill Village on Woods Creek Road. National Wild Turkey Federation (Yellow Pine Drummers): holds open monthly meeting on rst Thursday, Golden Corral, 7 p.m. Call 584-9185. Parrot Heads in Perry-dise Club: meets the rst and third Wednesday, 7 p.m. Call 843-1469 for location. Perry Alliance of Ministers & Pastors (P.A.M.P.): meets second Sunday, 2:30 p.m., Little St. John P.B. Church. Pet adoptions: Taylor County Animal Shelter, open Monday through Friday. Call 838-3525. Republican Party of Taylor County: second Thursday, 6 p.m., at Rigonis Cookhouse on Highway 19 North. Call 2232648. Search & Rescue Riders #1135 of Christian Motorcyclists Assoc.: 4th Saturday, 9 a.m. at Golden Corral Restaurant. Taylor Adult Program (TAP): Thursdays, 10 a.m., 502 N. Center Street. 223-0393. Taylor Coastal Communities Association: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., at the district building on Beach Road. Taylor County Beekeepers Club: second Monday, 6:30 p.m., Forest Capital Hall. Taylor County Brotherhood: meets on Mondays, 7 p.m., at New Brooklyn; every third Saturday, 9 a.m., at Stewart Memorial. Taylor County Brotherhood Choir: meets every Thursday, 6 p.m., at Stewart Memorial. Chamber of Commerce: second Thurs., 8 a.m., chamber board room. Taylor County Development Authority: second Mon., noon, at Historic Perry Station. Taylor County Historical Society: third Mon., 7 p.m. Historical Society building. Societys museum is open every Thursday, 1-5 p.m. Taylor County Horsemans Association Horse Show: practice roping every Friday, 7 p.m.; second Saturday, registration, 3 p.m.; ride, 4 p.m. Arena is located on Bishop Blvd. Free admission. Taylor County Quilters: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to noon, public library. Taylor County Reef Research Team: second Tuesday, 7 p.m., Forest Capital Hall. Taylor County Senior Center: Executive Board of Directors meeting, last Wednesday of the month, 10:30 a.m., Senior Center. Taylor County United: second Mon., 7 p.m., Evangel Christian Fellowship. Tourism Development Council: second Thurs., noon, Chamber of Commerce. Whole Child Taylor-Shared Service Network: fourth Mon., 9 a.m., Alton H. Wentworth Administrative Complex. Yarn Lovers Circle: rst and third Thursday, 9:30 a.m., Taylor County Public Library. AL-ANON: meets every Thursday at noon, St. James Episcopal Church. Alzheimers Support Group: meets every fourth Thursday, 10:30 a.m., First Presbyterian Church. Big Bend Hospice Advisory Council: fourth Tuesday at 1 p.m., Big Bend Hospice ofce. Friends and Family of Sexual Assault Survivors Support Group: fourth Tuesday, 6-7 p.m., Glorious Rain Church. For information, call 843-0158. Narcotics Anonymous: Sun., Tues., Wed., Fri., 7 p.m.; Sat., 12 noon Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception (Parish Center), 2750 S. Byron Butler Pkwy. Call: (877) 340-5096. AMVETS Post 20: third Saturday, 10 a.m., at 107 East Green Street. American Legion Post #291 (Steinhatchee): second Thursday, 7 p.m. American Legion Post #96: rst Tues., 7 p.m., American Legion Hall, Center St. Sons of Confederate Veterans: fourth Thursday at North Orange Street. Call 5845725 or 838-2045. VFW Post #9225: second Tuesday, 7 p.m. (American Legion building). CIVIC GROUPS GOVERNMENT INTERESTS SUPPORT GROUPS VETERANSTo add your organization free of charge, please call 584-5513 or e-mail newsdesk@perrynewspapers.comCommunity CalendarPlease call 584-5513 to update your current calendar listing or e-mail newsdesk@ perrynewspapers.com Expanded Calendar of Events available at: www.perrynewspapers.com Logger of the Year will serve as King Tree Parade Grand MarshalSubmitted by: THE SOUTHEASTERN WOOD PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Floridas 2013 Logger of the Year Tim Southerland, owner/operator of K&B Land & Timber, will serve as grand marshal of the 58th annual Florida Forest Festival King Tree Parade Saturday, Oct. 26. Southerland, along with wife Stacey, was presented the award at this years Southeastern Wood Producers Association Annual Meeting held at Lake Blackshear Resort in Cordele, Ga. The company was established in February 1999 and currently employs nine full-time employees and utilizes two contracttrucking providers. Southerlands business education began as a young man working in his familys funeral home business. It was during this time that the importance of excellent care and service was ingrained. However, he eventually chose to go into the timber business due to his love of the outdoors. Southerland holds a degree in forestry graduating from Lake City Community College in 1989. He began his career in the timber industry when he fullled his college internship for St. Joe Timberland Company. Upon graduation from college he took a job with Stone Container Corporation. From there he was offered a job in his hometown with North Florida Woodlands and worked there for seven years until he had the opportunity to go into business on his own. In the early years of K&B the company managed timber for land owners as well as purchasing and selling timber. As the business evolved the company eventually turned their primary focus toward quality logging operations. K & B has had a contract with St. Joe Timberland Company for 14 harvesting timber on their lands. Southerland previously served on the Florida Forestry Associations Loggers Council and currently serves on the Southeastern Wood Producers Association (SWPA) Board of Directors. As an SWPA board member he has been a strong advocate of the logging industry at both the Florida legislature in Tallahassee and in Washington, D.C. When asked what specic goals Southerland has in his role as the 2013 Florida Logger of the Year he stated: I want to establish periodic producer-consuming mill relationship workshops in as many of the consuming facilities as possible over the next year. In addition, I would like to increase the publics awareness of the reality that loggers, in general, are good stewards of the environment by working with media outlets statewide whenever and wherever possible. Getting our story in front of local, regional, state and federal policy makers as well as the general public is critical to the health of our forests and the logging industry. He also stated his belief that we will have healthy forests and healthy communities as well as a healthy economy in both rural and urban areas when we understand that a productive forest is a sustainable forest. K & B Land and Timber continually not only strives to be the best logging contractor possible but also to fulll the primary mission of the company: to have a positive impact on everyone and everything they touch. It is their extraordinary approach to doing business that makes K & B Land and Timber an excellent choice as the 2013 Florida Outstanding Logger of the Year. Logger of the Year Tim and Stacey Southerland of K&B Land & Timber Visitors welcome be limited to event participants Friday evening Parking tips for downtown paradewatching Saturday With so many events happening in downtown Perry and the Grand Pavilion at Rosehead Park this coming Friday night and Saturday morning, parking will be limited to those attending a park event. No overnight parking will be allowed at the site and vehicles will be towed at the owners expense. The pavilion will play host to the Strutt Your Mutt dog parade and contest Friday evening, with registration starting at 5:30 p.m. It will also be a stop in the Kids Kilometer Adventure happening that same evening. A combined Farmers Market/ Flea Market will open Saturday morning. Interested? Call 843-1279.

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A-6 Perry News-Herald October 23, 2013 Loggers Dream Shes called the Loggers Dream and while she may be showing her age, back in the day she more than held her own anchoring a sixman logging operation. Original owners of the loader were T.H. (Buck) Chancey and Myers Williams, who hailed from Wacissa. Myers Williams was the father of Fred M. Williams and grandfather of Bradley A. Williams, owner of Williams Timber Inc. Richard A. Williams (Myers half-brother) recounts how the logging industry operated back in the day and the role the Loggers Dream played in the daily operation. Like many today, a loggers day began well before sun-up and lasted until well after sun down. In the 1940s and 50s, the Loggers Dreams six-man crew included one cross-cut saw (with two men), one ramp, one loader with one man and one log truck with one driver. The pay scale was slim, starting at less than $6 a day and sometimes a tad moreproviding it was on a full, good work week. But employees had to work a while to get the raise of earning $6 a day. Everyone on the job received the same pay per week, $30 for ve days of long hours. When payday arrived, they were issued checks, but were paid in cash carried around in a brown paper sack. A load of logs consisted of 13 to 19 logs per load, 18-24 feet long on a singleaxle log trailer. The loads weighed approximately 16 tons per load and mills were paying the logger $2.75 a ton. Within a good working day by the sweat of their brow and with no breakdowns, the crew was able to get three or four loads a day, Richard Williams said. The driver would strap down the logs and ease out of the swamp on his way in the Chevrolet truck (that hauled 45 miles per hour bob-tailed) to Alberta Crate & Box Company in Tallahassee. The journey was a two-hour and 45 minutes-plus roundtrip to unload and venture back to the woodsproviding there were no breakdowns. The Loggers Dream was a new adventure that help provide a new and better way to move the wood faster and more efciently. It helped to get more loads of logs per day, which meant generating more revenue. Today, the Loggers Dream sits as a silent reminder of the early days of Taylor Countys logging industry, an industry that continues to ourish today. Loader anchored a six-man logging operation in its heyday with payouts of $2.75 a ton

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A-7 Florida Forest Festival October 23, 2013 Taylor Countys Run For Your Life track club is introducing a new event for children at this years Florida Forest Festivalthe Kids Kilometer Adventure. Children in grades kindergarten through sixth grade are eligible to participate in the event that will be held Friday, Oct. 25, in downtown Perry, starting at 7 p.m. at Java Connection. During the Kids Kilometer, children will enjoy an exciting adventure through downtown Perry as they uncover prizes along the way. Each child will also receive a special set of runners dog tags at the end of their run/walk, Run For Your Lifes Charles Praytor said. Kids Kilometer registration forms are available at Little Pine Pediatrics, Sunrize Stitches or Java Connection. Entry fee for the Kids Kilometer is $10 before race day or $12 on race day. The money raised will benet our local Boys and Girls club and help to encourage healthy lifestyles in our Run For Your Life Kids Program. Kids Kilometer Adventure hits the ground running Friday night

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The Great Race is making a return to the Florida Forest Festival and local volunteers invite residents to join them in recharging this traditional favorite of many. The race will be held Saturday, Oct. 26, with the starting line at Java Connection, located at 105 East Ellis Street (in the Old Depot). It is open to all ages and tness abilities. The course is mainly at with just a few elevations. It is ideal for those athletes looking for a new PR (personal record) on a scenic neighborhood course of downtown Perry, said Charles Praytor with Run For Your Life track club. Event highlights include: top quality tech running shirt to all pre-registered participants; fun and festive post-race refreshments; medals for Overall 5K winners in each age group; and the Florida Forest Festival King Tree Parade will start right after the event. Entry fees for race day registration are: $25 for the 5K Run and $20 for the one-mile Fun Run. The 5K course starts in downtown Perry at the Java Connection (105 East Ellis Street) and nishes back at the Java Connection. The course will be mainly at with only a few elevations. Baby joggers/strollers will be permitted in both the 5K and the Fun Run, but must start at the back of the line. No dogs, pets, roller blades, skateboards or wagons are allowed in any of the races. Participants in the 5K will be timed using timing chips to ensure accuracy. The 5K Race course has a one-hour time limit, to allow for the awards ceremony before the parade starts. Participants in the Fun Run will not be timed. The money raised from The Great Race will help children in our community that are ghting for their lives with a life threatening disease, Praytor said. We would like to encourage both runners and walkers to participate in this great cause. A-8 Florida Forest Festival October 23, 2013 The Great Race returns! 5K course starts on Ellis Street Hush puppies have long been a staple at the Florida Forest Festivals World Largest Free Fish Fry and organizers are introducing a new contest where the tasty fried treats will be the main attraction--a Hush Puppy Eating Contest. The event will be held Festival Day (Saturday, Oct. 26) at Forest Capital Park. The contest will be limited to 12 competitors (ages 18 and up); registration is free and forms are available at the festival ofce (located adjacent to the Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce). For more information, contact the festival ofce at 584-TREE (8733). The contest will start at 2 p.m. in front of the main stage. Contestants will have 60 seconds to eat as many hush puppies as they can. The winner gets bragging rights and a trophy. Hush Your Puppy! The Taylor County Sheriffs Ofce and festival ofcials remind everyone to be mindful of trafc concerns when traveling to the Forest Festival this year. A limited number of reserved parking tickets are still available at the festival ofce located at the PerryTaylor County Chamber of Commerce for $5. They will be on sale through Thursday, Oct. 25. The tickets will not be available festival day (Saturday). Reserved and handicap parking on festival day will be at Taylor Technical Institute. Law enforcement asks that all handicap parking permits be prominently displayed for easy identication. Reserved parking is by permit only. Due to safety and security concerns, the amount of through-trafc on Industrial Drive festival day will be restricted. Free parking areas will be located in front of the airport and a free shuttle service will be provided throughout festival day. Festival-goers are also reminded that no golf carts, go-carts or ATVs will be allowed on festival grounds. Drivers are asked to please be patient during any trafc delays.Where to park?

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By MARK VIOLA Staff writer Music was the connecting theme Saturday night as the 2013 Distinguished Young Women Program celebrated Motown Madness. This years four contestants more than made up for what they may have lacked in numbers by lling the stage at Forest Capital Hall with poise, energy and exuberance before a crowd of cheering family and friends. Taylor County High School senior MaKenzie Cannon was named the 2013 Florida Forest Festival Distinguished Young Woman of Taylor County, and will reign over this years festivities and represent her community at the state program in January. She is the daughter of Ron and Jessica Cannon, and Dawn Arnold. Although Motown was the nights theme, and the contestants opening number and physical tness routine were choreographed to classic hits such as My Girl and I Feel Good, it was a much newer song that seemed to encapsulate the evening: Katy Perrys Hear Me Roar. In the nal segment before the awards were announced, Distinguished Young Women Program Co-Chair Tonya WilliamsBenziger introduced a video slide-show of the four contestants-Cannon, Annsley Bohlman, Jessica Welch and Brittany Stalans--by stating that she could not nd a song from her Motown collection which represented the determination and passion of these girls. I got the eye of the tiger, a ghter, dancing through the re, cause I am a champion and youre gonna hear me roar, Perrys voice sang as the audience watched photos and video clips from the girls journey to that evening. Although several additional contestants joined the program and later left, these four were there from the beginning to the end, Williams-Benziger said. When it was time for the awards, Cannon took home the physical tness and talent awards before receiving her title. Claiming the rst runnerup spot was Jessica Welch, who also received the scholastic award. In addition to their titles and plaques, both contestants also received scholarships. Contestant Brittany Stalans was awarded for A-10 Perry News-Herald October 23, 2013 Distinguished Young Women(L to r) Contestants Annsley Bohlman, MaKenzie Cannon, Jessica Welch and Brittany Stalans. MaKenzie Cannon, the daughter of Ron and Jessica Cannon, and Dawn Arnold, was named the 2013 Distinguished Young Woman Saturday, Oct. 5. Please see page 11Cannon claims 2013 title (Photos by Photos, Frames & Trophies)

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A-11 Perry News-Herald October 23, 2013 self-expression and was also the recipient of the Spirit of Distinguished Young Women, which was voted upon by the contestants themselves. The nights program opened with greetings from Williams-Benziger and CoChair Sondra Shaw, before they turned the proceedings over to Mistress of Ceremonies Tracey Smith, who earned an early cheer from the crowd by pointing out that the Taylor County High School Bulldogs beat the Madison County Cowboys the previous night for the rst time in 22 years. Smiths husband is the head football coach of the Bulldogs. The program quickly left football behind, but the four contestants were not done with exercise as they were soon on stage for the physical tness portion of the event, with the judges looking for physical well-being, coordination, stamina and agility as they worked through a ve-and-ahalf-minute routine choreographed by WilliamsBenziger. While the girls readied themselves for the talent portion, 2012s Distinguished Young Woman of Taylor County Molly Wilson returned to the Forest Capital Hall stage with the full version of her talent performance from last year, singing Taylor the Latte Boy. She was followed by 2012s Distinguished Young Woman of Perry Megan Huyck, who won last years talent award, singing her rendition of Nina Simones Feeling Good while playing the ukulele. Then it was time for this years contestants to show off their talents with a 90-second performance each. Bohlman began with a euphonium performance of Antonio Vivaldis Violin Concerto. Cannon was next with a rendition of You Cant Get a Man with a Gun from the musical Annie Get Your Gun. Welch then sang Like My Mother Does, made famous by Lauren Alaina. Stalans concluded the talent portion with a skit entitled Hard to be Humble. Smith then welcomed this years Forget Me Nots, past Distinguished Young Women, Junior Misses and Florida Forest Festival Queens, who were in the audience. The next guest entertainer was Casey Copeland, who performed a lyrical dance to Regina Spektors The Call. The nal portion of the program was selfexpression, during which each contestant was asked a question based on answers given in an earlier interview, including the biggest challenge facing their generation, what they would change in their school system, who they admire the most and what they are most proud of from their generation. As for this years four Distinguished Young Women contestants, everyone at this years program denitely heard them roar. CANNON Continued from page 10 Contestants let audience members hear them Roar Contestants opened the show with a lively dance number paying homage to the theme Motown Madness. Timberrrrrrrrrrrrrrr LumberjacksThey opened the land to farms and cities, help build America and became the legends of the forest. The tales of their feats are as big as a pine tree and lumberjacks always claimed to be the best. The legend lives on in the All American Lumberjack Show, which brings two teams, 10 exciting lumberjack events, and 10,000 gallons of water to the 58th annual Florida Forest Festival Saturday, Oct. 26. Admission is free to all shows, which begin at 12 p.m., 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. A special Kids Lumberjack Sport Camp will be held at 2:30 p.m. and is free to young and old. Lumberjack events of cross-cut sawing and log rolling will be taught by the pros. Remember, bring a towel because you are going to get wet. Do you want to make your life easier on Forest Festival Day? Then come to the 15th annual Scout Pancake Breakfast where-for just $5--you can enjoy pancakes, sausage, juice or coffee. All the money earned from this event stays in Taylor County to help local scouts. You can purchase your tickets at the door or catch up with a Boy Scout or Cub Scout before Festival Day and they will be happy to sell you a ticket. The breakfast will be held at First Baptist Church from 7-9:30 a.m. Make your life easier: let the Scouts cook your breakfast Main Street Perry couldnt be happier to see the downtown district turned into a hub of activity on Festival Day! The King Tree Parade always brings neighbors from far and near, but this year the Grand Pavilion hopes to get its share of the action--early in the day--with a farmers market and ea market opening at 8 a.m. It will be similar to most Saturdays and we hope to have a good number of farmers there, although fall crops are just getting underway. Tuten Farms plans to be represented as well as other several other produce vendors, said Tracey Smith, director of Main Street. Those farmers will share the space with ea market booths featuring Love Me Knots (dolls, purses), original artwork and homemade soaps. This is a really good opportunity for farmers to use the space and a great opportunity for those who havent visited the pavilion to come and browse or shop, Smith added. She will be assigning spaces in advance, so if you wish to be included, please contact Smith at 8431279. All booth spaces are $5 (unless you have a season permit). We will be so pleased to see people enjoying the downtown district and all it has to offer, Smith said, adding, Dont miss Katies Courtyard, either. Events are planned up and down Jefferson Street! Its all happening DOWNTOWN!

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B-1 Florida Forest Festival October 23, 2013 By ANGELA M. CASTELUCCI Staff writer Whenever Hudson Harvey needs advice on how to handle his duties as the newly-crowned Florida Forest Festival Little King, he wont have to look farbig brother Hunter Harvey shared the same honors in 2008. Hudsons big brother was on hand to congratulate him Oct. 12 at Forest Capital Hall during the 58th annual Florida Forest Festival Little King & Queen Pageant. Joining Harvey on the royal festival court were his queen, Kaylan Kirk; rst runners-up Grant Turner and Gracie Simmons; and second runners-up Nicholas Kinsey and Kaylee Mae Strickland. Proud parents of the newly-crowned royals are: Nick and Elizabeth Harvey; Kim and John Kirk; Roger and Katrina Turner; Andy and Kim Simmons; Tonia Sprow; and Chris and Britney Strickland. Jadon Harley Herring, the son of Kesha and Leon Herring, and ZyMya AKaria Flowers, the daughter of Khalilah King and Wayne Flowers, were recognized for having the most ads for the pageant program. Audience members set sail with 24 little king and queen contestants for a high seas adventure celebrating the theme A Pirates Life For Me. A towering pirate ship anchored the stage and provided a colorful background for the groups opening number, which was a rollicking performance that had contestants talking like pirates and brandishing (toy) swords. The boys and girls were dressed in their best pirate wear, boasting everything from irty tulle skirts and eye patches to knee-highboots and a parrot-on-theshoulder accessory. Mistress of Ceremonies Kim Pegg herself sported an eye patch, pirate hat and sassy red sash. Entertainment for the evening included performances by Taylor Countys 2013 A pirates life for me! Harvey, Kirk crowned Little King, Queen Please see page 6 Look for complete coverage of the 2013 Florida Forest Festival in the next weeks Taco Times (Photos by Photos, Frames & Trophies)

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SMELLS LIKE Bread & Butter By BARBARA ALEENE EDWARDS Im the daughter of a mill worker. I grew up in the north Florida woods a mile from Buckeye Cellulose Corporation, a pulp mill built by Procter and Gamble in Foley, Florida, in the early 1950s. Making pulp from pine trees is smelly business. When the wind blew the wrong way Id think I just couldnt stand it another minute. If I complained, Whew, Buckeye stinks today, one of my parents would always shush me with these words: Thats your bread and butter. That was confusing to a child who did not grow up during the Great Depression as my parents had. When I was older and thoughts of economic security entered my consciousness, I came to understand what my parents had been talking about. Ive had an idea for a long time to do a portrait-project documenting people from Taylor County who worked at Buckeye. Who are they? What do they look like? What are their stories? I started shooting in January of 2004. For obvious reasons, I began with the oldtimers. I took a tape recorder and asked each person a predetermined set of questions that prompted the telling of their stories. I visited with the subjects in their homes and photographed them in the setting of their choice. For example, I photographed my dad in his workshop, surrounded by old televisions, tubes and transistors. He took a correspondence course in electronics when I was about 12 years old and then ran his own radio/tv repair business on the side while he pulled full-time shift work at the mill. Like many from his generation that Ive interviewed, the desperation of the Hoover Days (his term for the Depression) left a permanent mark on him. He loved tinkering with old, discarded TVs and radios, and his shop was the place he felt most at home. When I asked where the subjects wanted their picture taken, many of the retirees said, Right here in my easy chair because I never got a chance to relax when I was working. Other people wanted their pictures taken with a favorite horse or herd of cattle, an airplane, by the pool, on the deck of a beach house. Taylor Countys story is an American story. One of the things these people have in common is their connection to the pulp mill, thought by many to be the economic savior of Taylor County. I hope my photographs will put a face on, and give voice to, these particular individuals that make up a larger story-a personal and true version of the American dream. About the photographer:A 1967 graduate of Taylor County High School, Barbara Edwards is currently associate professor of art at Tallahassee Community College. She grew up in a family whose bread and butter depended on the pulp mill built by Procter and Gamble. She is the daughter of the late Verner and Ruby Edwards. In 2004, she launched this project focusing on the faces of those whose lives revolved around pulp and paper here, in Taylor Countys version of the American dream. AS BUCKEYE PASSES GAVEL TO GEORGIA PACIFICProcter & Gamble pioneers remembered Elvena Johnson Dewey Mauldin Ray Jones Forest Lee Thomas Sr. Reet Tanner Wilson Bethea Lloyd Parrish Arthur Flowers Ponce Morgan Orion Giddens Elston McKee Geraldine Perryman Bobby McDonald Fred Roberts Fred Ogilvie Henry Summers Verner EdwardsB-2 Florida Forest Festival October 23, 2013

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B-3 Perry News-Herald October 23, 2013BY DON LINCOLN The recent sale of Suwannee Lumber Co. in Dixie County ended more than 60 years of ties to sawmilling families in Taylor County. Suwannee Lumber, which sits on the old Putnam Lumber site in the town of Shamrock just north of Cross City, got its start in 1954 when two Taylor County businessmen decided to purchase and operate the old mill. The old Putnam Lumber Co. mill was founded in 1927 and it ran until 1946 producing southern yellow pine and cypress lumber. It was thought by many that the timber supply had run out in the late s prompting Putnam to close the plant. In 1948, members of the Foley family, which long had ties to the huge BrooksScanlon mill in Taylor County and for which the town of Foley is named, bought and operated the mill until 1952 when it was once again closed. Two years later, two Perry businessmen purchased the sawmill and formed Suwannee Lumber Co. Judson B. Faircloth and George T. Dickert were friends and business partners in Perry when the opportunity arose in 1954. Faircloth was the Perry dealer for International Harvester and Dickert was working for his father at Perry Lumber Co. At the time, the pair owned a small portable sawmill that they used to make extra money when they werent working their primary jobs. In the early 1950s a revolution was happening in the timber industry. Pulp mills were being built, reforestation had begun and, for the rst time, more trees were planted than harvested. There was a lot of small timber around and sawmillers soon found they could harvest mid-sized trees to produce chips for pulpwood as well as small dimension lumber. Joe Foley joined Faircloth and Dickert as a partner in 1965 and the trio operated Suwannee Lumber until 1992. The markets turned sour in the early s and as the trio of owners were getting older, the operations were turned over to their sons. Bump Faircloth and John Faircloth joined Daniel and Michael Dickert as well as Michael Foley as the new generation to operate the plant. Since the younger owners got involved, production has increase 10-fold. In 1994 Suwannee Lumber was producing 15 million board feet per year. Over the next two decades a variety of investments and improvements would increase annual production to 150 million board feet. In 1996 the company constructed a new $8 million mill that eventually helped increase production to 35 million board feet. In 1998 the planer mill was rebuilt from the ground up and in 2000 a new chip-nsaw sawmill was installed increasing production to 50 million board feet. A major expansion was completed in 2004 that saw the mill get a new trim trimmer, a log line and sharp chain extention. In April of 2005 Suwannee Lumber double shifted the mill, increasing production to 120 million board feet. In 2008 the company was the rst to install a southern yellow pine HewSaw -a device that scans and sets timber for maximum production. Suwannee Lumber also operates a rewood business in Lake City that distributes throughout the eastern seaboard and a lumber shipping facility in Adel, Ga. The company operates a ground cover division that provides manufacturing and bagging of various mulch and soil products as well as a retail hardware store. The company currently employs 330 people with a $10 million annual payroll. They are the largest private employer in Dixie County. Earlier this summer Suwannee Lumber was acquired by an afliate of Blue Wolf Capital. The companys CEO Bump Faircloth and its President Daniel Dickert have invested alongside Blue Wolf and will remain as part of Suwannee Lumbers management team. Employees gathered for a panoramic group portrait in 1939 in front of the cypress sawmill of the Putnam Lumber Co. in Shamrock, Florida. Photo courtesy of the State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http:// Suwannee Lumbers roots run deep with Taylor County sawmilling families Taylor Countys Distinguished Young Woman MaKenzie Cannon will assist Rick Patrick in emceeing the 58th annual Florida Forest Festival, welcoming visitors to the annual forestry celebration during opening ceremonies Saturday, Oct. 26, at Forest Capital Park. Ceremonies will begin shortly before noon (11:50 a.m.) with members of the Taylor County High School JROTC Color Guard raising the ag and Kaitlyn Smith singing the national anthem. Special guests, including 2013 Florida Forest Festival Little King Hudson Harvey and Little Queen Kaylan Kirk, will be introduced following the invocation.Opening ceremony: 11:50 a.m.

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Distinguished Young Woman (DYW) MaKenzie Cannon and rst runner-up Jessica Welch, along with DYW contestants Brittany Stalans and Annsley Bohlman. Contestants returned to the spotlight dressed in outts that answered the question What I Want to Be When I Grow Up loud and clear: everything from a nurse (Because my mom is one) and an engineer (Because they make a lot of money) to country singer Jason Aldean (Because I like his songs). Following a slide show featuring the contestants, the boys and girls took a spin on stage dressed in formal wear. Each was asked a question drawn at random, ranging from, What happens if it rains lollipops? to Why do you have to take a bath? Capping the program was a farewell appearance by 2012 Little King Kingston Williams, the son of Quantasha and Brett Denmark, and Willie Williams, and Little Queen Miley Hill, the daughter of Tyson and Juanita Hill. When it came time for the winners to be announced, contestants cheered for one another and clapped as the new royalty stepped forward to accept their crowns. Co-Chairs Bowden and Freeman expressed their thanks to all the volunteers who assisted with the program, including: The Buddys Relay For Life team, Stacey and Abby Fike, Hannah and Tammy Davis, Sarinah Anthony, Haley Johstono, Magan Bowden, Marti Skow and Rusty Nowlin along with Lana Norborg, Bernice Island and Cheryl Nix. LIT KING, QUEEN Continued from page B-1 Williams, Hill bid farewell B-6 Perry News-Herald October 23, 2013

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