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Taco times ( July 10, 2013 )

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Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
System ID:
UF00028361:00450

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
System ID:
UF00028361:00450

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald


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Farm Bureau hosts annual meeting this ThursdayTaylor County Farm Bureau will hold its annual meeting on Thursday night, Sept. 5, at the Catholic Parish Hall. President Helen Houck invites members and guests to attend. Local ofcials and legislators are expected to be present. Fellowship begins at 6 p.m.; a barbecue meal will follow at 6:30 pm. Senator Bill Montford will be the guest speaker for the meeting. A short business session will be held for the election of a board of directors, followed by an award recognition program and drawing for door prizes. The traditional cake auction will close out the evening with proceeds going into the Henry Davis 4-H Scholarship Fund for deserving 4-H club members, Houck said. Serving with her as directors are Billy Wayne Murphy, vice president; Coleen Agner, treasurer; Billy LaValle, Henry Davis, LaDonna LaValle, Ernest Houck, Rudolph Parker, Lamar Dice, Jerry Register and Auley Rowell. Farm Bureaus agency manager is Freddy Pitts and Ryan Perry is agent, with staff including LaDonna LaValle and Lorie Russell.Call before you digAs part of the City of Perrys Pipeline Damage Prevention Program, residents are reminded to contact Sunshine State OneCall of Florida, Inc., prior to beginning any project that includes digging. In case of a gas pipeline emergency, please call (850) 584-7940. The line is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.Siren tests announced for Sept. 12Taylor County Emergency Management will be conducting live tests of the outdoor warning sirens along the coastal communities of Steinhatchee, Keaton Beach and Dekle Beach Thursday, Sept.12, between 10 and 11 a.m. The test sirens will be turned on for one 30-second long wail siren broadcast during the test. For further information, please call the Taylor County Emergency Operations Center at (850) 838-3575. Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1961 TacoTimes 50 One Section52nd year, No. 35www.perrynewspapers.comWednesdaySeptember 4, 2013 Index Editorial . .................. A-2 Living . ...................... A-4 Religion . ................... A-6 Sports . ..................... A-8 Classieds . .............. A-9 Community . ........... A-10Weather Wednesday 92 7240% Thursday93 7140% News Forum $5 monthly increase?Council raises utility ratesCity utility customers may see a slight uptick in their monthly bills with a number of rate increases slated to take effect Oct. 1. Members of the Perry City Council amended its water and sewer rates as well as added a $1 monthly xed fee to gas bills at last weeks regular meeting. All totaled, the changes should be a difference of approximately $5 for each city customer. The council will hold a public hearing on its proposed 2013-14 budget Thursday, Sept. 12, starting at 5:30 p.m. The increased utility rates were in response to a projected shortfall in the coming budget and during general discussion the council said it would rather opt to adjust rates rather than raise taxes. The council also elected to leave the current gas rates as is, with Mayor Daryll Gunter stating he would hate to see some of our elderly residents having to try and save money by not using their heat in the winter. I dont want them to have to choose whether or not to have heat. Councilman Don Cook expressed his feelings by stating he recalled a time when the city was forced to make steep increases on its rates just to keep the municipality aoat. Everyone said they would much rather have smaller rate increases over a period of time instead on one big jump, he said. The budget includes a three percent raise for city employees, who face a rise in their health insurance costs (the city pays 60 percent of monthly insurance premiums; employees pay 40 percent). Colonial style City under re for road closure, special magistrate proposals A proposed road closure, and changes in how city code violations are judged, will top the agenda for the Perry Citys Council upcoming Thursday, Sept. 12, meeting. Due to scheduling conicts with other local governmental boards, the council was forced to change its meeting schedule for September. (The boards normal schedule is the second and fourth Tuesday of each month.) At last weeks meeting, the council had the public reading of an ordinance that would give it the option of utilizing a special magistrate Please see page 3 In wood exports Taylor County: Tree Capital of the South Living up to its name as the Tree Capital of the South, Taylor County exports nearly 700,000 tons of lumber and wood products annually, according to the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). In an overview of the countys freight and logistics, FDOT named the countys top ve exports and imports as well as its top trading partners. According to the report, which cites 2011 gures from IHS Global Inc.s Transearch, lumber or wood products were the countys top export with a 698,686 truck tons, followed by pulp, paper or allied products with 524,360 truck tons, nonmetallic minerals with a truck tonnage of 297,636, food or kindred products with 44,910 truck tons and fabricated metal products with 11,751 truck tons. Taylors top export partner was Chatham County, Ga., with 404,368 truck tons, more than the next four counties combined. The rest of the top ve were Suwannee County, Lowndes County, Ga., Madison County and Dixie County. Lumber or wood products were also the countys largest import, with 448,022 truck tons. Bulk movement in boxcars was second with 68,488 truck tons, followed by clay, concrete, glass or stone with 15,716 truck tons and farm products with 13,309 truck tons. Working toward a GED? Major changes comingTaylor Technical Institute (TTI) ofcials are urging students who have passed one or more portions of the General Educational Development (GED) test but have yet to complete the exam, to take the remaining portions before the end of the year, when a new GED test comes online and any existing partial results become null and void. This nationwide change will take place on Jan. 1, 2014, after which students will have to take the new version of the test and will only be able to take the test via a computer. The new GED is completely aligned with Common Core Standards, TTI Director Judy Johnson said. Its a very, very challenging test. Countering the opinion by some that GED tests are easy, she said, The test is comprehensive. It is challenging and its about to become more so. The GED is administered by the GED Testing Service and features ve portions: language arts (reading), language arts (writing), mathematics, science and social studies. Students can take any number of the separate tests at a given time. If a student fails a particular section, but passes others, he or she does not have to retake the passed portions. At least, not until Jan. 1, 2014. Johnson said the issue with partial test results being nullied happened the last time the text was updated as well. The same thing happened in 2002 when the current test Please see page 3 Farmers Market Fall Kick O

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A-3 Taco Times September 4, 2013 went into effect, she said. TTI is working to contact its students who have yet to complete all ve portions of the GED tests and are working with family members to locate students they cannot contact. Meanwhile, TTI is prepping its new test lab and will begin offering GED testing opportunities every other Wednesday beginning Sept. 25, according to Director for Programs David Dunkle. Students will be able to take the test in paper form (at a cost of $70 for all ve portions) or on a computer (at a cost of $130 for the complete test). The computer test is costlier, but students get their results instantly instead of having to wait, Dunkle said. Starting Friday, students can go online to TTIs website (www.taylortech. org) to register and pay online. Both the registration and payment is made through GED Testing Service. Those with questions about the GED test or their status are asked to contact TTIs Student Services Department by calling 8382545 and asking for Christy Moody. for code enforcement hearings. The ordinance does not do away with the Code Enforcement Board. It simply gives the council the option of using a special magistrate. Even if the ordinance is adopted, they would still have to take another vote to disband the Code Enforcement Board and replace it with a special magistrate. It provides council members with the exibility to do one or the other, City Manager Bob Brown said Tuesday. Most communities are going to a special magistrate because they are nding it better to have somebody trained in the law because they are seeing more and more local ordinances that are detailed in legalities. A number of communities comparable to our size have already gone with a special magistrate. The county did it several years ago and they are happy with it. The ordinance provides that the magistrate for the city would have to be licensed to practice law in the state of Florida and must be in good standing with the Bar. The proposed change has sparked action by at least one member of the Code Enforcement Board, Tonya Holton, who spoke against the move last week. Also triggering debate is a proposal before the council to close a portion of Washington Street to encompass the strip within the downtown city lake under development along Spring Creek. It really is a safety issue because people on one side of the park wouldnt have to cross a street to get to the other side of the park, Brown said when initial discussions were held in late August. Main Street Perry board representatives said they were percent behind the street closure proposal. However, at least one local resident isnt so happy with the proposal. Madelyn Collins presented a petition against the street closure to the council last week and said she planned to speak at the upcoming hearing. GED Continued from page 1 Register online starting Friday SPECIAL MAGISTRATE Continued from page 1 Main Street board supports road closure, local citizen organizes petition against it Taylor County commissioners are moving forward on an application to the Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) for a grant to fund improvements at Hodges Park in Keaton Beach. The board held the second of two public hearings on Tuesday, Aug. 20, with one nearby homeowner speaking out on the issue. Robert Sadousky said he saw that the county was considering seeking funds for additional sand as part of the grant and urged the commission to x the existing problems of sand blowing away from the beach onto neighboring properties before adding more sand. He said the level of the beach has risen over the years and suggested the county clear away a layer of dirt underneath the sand so wind would be less likely to carry away the sand. The board continued the discussion of sand at Hodges Park at its workshop held last week. As for the grant, the commission agreed to seek a $50,000 FRDAP grant, which will not require a match from the county. Grants Coordinator Melody Cox said the Hodges Park project would include improvements to the parks playground and pier, adding that she would have a more detailed proposal available when she brought back the grant application for approval from the commission at its Sept. 20 meeting. The county has received a number of FRDAP grants in the past, including one for Hodges Park. The other grants helped fund improvements twice at the Taylor County Sports Complex and once at Steinhatchee Park. According to Cox, the county hasnt applied for a FRDAP grant in four years because the state legislature either did not fund the program at all or funded it at a reduced rate. During the last cycle, some 93 applications were received by Florida Department of Environment Protection (FDEP), which oversees the program, and only 13 projects were funded. FRDAP provides grants for the acquisition or development of land for public outdoor recreation use or to construct or renovate recreational trails. County seeks grant for playground, pier improvements at Hodges Park Diabetes awareness Cyclist John Rhodes of Gainesville rode into Perry Monday to share his message of diabetes awareness. The next leg of his journey will take him north and across the Florida Panhandle. The Perry Rotary Club is offering chances to win two tickets to the UF/FSU football game to be played Saturday, Nov. 30, in Gainesville. The tickets are Champions Club seating (valued at $700 total). Tickets are available for a $5 donation. The drawing will be held at the club meeting on Nov. 19.Win tickets to UF/FSU game

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A-4 Taco Times September 4, 2013 Living Helen Houck, left, is shown with other members of the Florida Farm Bureau Womens Committee (District 2) which recently presented $1000 in Tallahassee, and $12,000 state-wide. How much have Farm Bureau women donated to Florida? Helen Houck and other members of the Florida Farm Bureau Womens Committee (District 2) recently presented a $1,000 check to the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Tallahassee. The donation will help provide a home-awayfrom-home for families who have seriously ill or injured children receiving medical treatment, Houck said. ( The Tallahassee donation is just one of a series of presentations that will be taking place statewide on behalf of the Florida Farm Bureau Womens Leadership Group. This month the volunteer group will be presenting checks totaling $12,000 to Ronald McDonald House Charities throughout the state. The committee distributes funds to non-prot charitable organizations that focus on the community, health and wellbeing of Florida residents. Farm Bureau Women have donated more than $200,000 to charitable organizations on the behalf of Florida County Farm Bureaus. The project exemplies the helping hand of Florida agriculturists, Houck said. ( ( The group also play a vital role in the development of policies and programs of Farm Bureau. They provide opportunities for individuals to become grassroots leaders of Florida agriculture. In addition to donating funds and food to charitable organizations, the women work with schools to educate children and their local communities about agriculture. ( ( Florida Farm Bureau is the Sunshine States largest general agricultural organization with more than 147,000 member-families representing Farm Bureaus in 60 counties. Membership provides a multitude of benets, Houck said, and you dont have to be a farmer to be a member.Red Hats pay tribute to Wells as summer events come to endBy CHERYL GREGORY Much has been happening within the Roseheads of Perry, chapter 2207 of the Red Hat Society, in the recent past. Sadly, our publicity chair, Bonnie Jo Wells, passed away on Saturday, Aug. 3. For Bonnie Jos funeral held on Aug. 4, Roseheads were joined in attendance by members of the Sandy Toes chapter as a tting farewell service was dedicated to an amazing lady who loved people and found life full of adventures. She is greatly missed.Catching upBecause May was such a busy month for the Roseheads, the May luncheon was held on Saturday, June 1. The committee of Norma McGuire, Nancy Hendry, Teresa Jackson and Cheryl Gregory held the luncheon at the Honey Lake Plantation Resort & Spa in Greenville. Twenty-seven members and one guest were seated in the White Ballroom located on the rst oor of the Gathering Hall. Special china, atware, crystal and linens are reserved for use in this beautiful room. The ladies were served a four-course meal of soup, salad, entre and dessert. Chef Bill made a surprise appearance and was applauded for his tasty talents. Each of the four birthday ladies received a hat box from the committee. Everyone enjoyed a guided tour of this spectacular resort in the comfort of an air-conditioned bus. Then the ladies took extra time to explore on their own. Events Planner Kelly Beach helped the May committee with planning this unique experience for the Roseheads. June meeting Doris Cruce, Linda Wiles, Joan Bailey, Leianne Carnes and Barbara Patrick chose Steel Magnolias, a restaurant in downtown Valdosta, Ga., as the location for the June 29 luncheon. Fifteen members and two guests were welcomed with special appetizers and entrees. Marie Hill was presented with a birthday gift from the June committee and a large assortment of door prizes was awarded. Before leaving, the ladies were invited to the downtown crafts and produce market. $200,000 The annual cake auction--a tradition at the Farm Bureau meeting held each year--will be Thursday night featuring some of Taylor Countys best cooks. Members and guests are invited to attend; the bbq meal begins at 6.Need a cake?

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A-6 Taco Times September 4, 2013 Religion Baker is speaker for Mens Day at St. Peter Mens Day will be held Sunday, Sept. 8, during the 11 a.m. worship hour at St. Peter Primitive Baptist Church. Elder James Baker will be the guest speaker for the occasion. Choir rehearsal is planned Friday at 7 p.m. Everyone is encouraged to participate. Gods gracious help is petitioned for this nation...Editors Note: Lynn Milam requested that we publish her original poem, and the timing before the anniversary of Sept. 11 seemed appropriate: What did they do to the nation I knew, The star-spangled banner, the red, white and blue? Oh, God of our fathers, please rise again, To care for our nation, our homeland defend. They gave it away to those with the power, And strangers destroyed our dreams and our towers. To us who were silent, we let it expire Like babies who died in less than an hour. Now who can come to rescue our nation While Benghazi burns with no revelation? Christians get down on your knees and beg God To reclaim our nation, a once holy sod. Arise, now Babylon, awake from your sleep, Cherish your warriors and families who weep For the country we knew and the home of the brave. Come, now, our Father, our liberties save! Restore amendments, come back without strife, The Ten Commandments, our laws for our life. We beg renewed mercies, Lord, from above, Awaken, America, return life and love! Arise, now, Babylon, return to the past Leave abominations, or you will not last. God is our founder and Hell heal our land, By His gracious and merciful righteous right hand. If we turn from our sins and remember His ways, Hell restore our land and add to our days. And we shall confess that God is alive! To Him bow our knees, then we can survive. --by Lynn Milam TIDBITS: Did you know that By SARAH HALL A Fond FarewellThelma Walker Newberry For we are only here but a moment in time. Our days are numbered. We know not when the time will come when we must journey on. The journey of life for the late Thelma Newberry began 91 years ago. Through the years, some of us shared precious moments and times with her--traveling, studying, worshipping and sharing the things she loved and enjoyed. During her reclining years, her sicknesses, we called, we visited, we supported with prayerful messages and showed Christian love. The family will always remember all these acts of kindnesses. And then that nal day came, the separating of life to eternity. The sad goodbyes, we loved her, we were there. A beautiful, well-spent life was ceased. We did our part, now she rests with the angels. For all the love shown, the family sincerely thanks you. Vera, Gregory, The Newberry Family and friendsSchools back!Taylor County Fifth Sunday Union Christian Leadership School will resume Sept. 7 and 14. Course No 2023 (Creative Ways of Teaching) will be led by Vera Newberry, associate dean, on Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. at New Mt. Zion Church. The Rev. Izell Montgomery Jr. is pastor/ teacher, and Sister Juanita Scott is dean.Grandparents DayCity Wide Mission will be held Sunday, Sept. 8, at 2:30 p.m. in Antioch M.B Church where the Rev. Tony O Graham is pastor/teacher. A special invitation is given to all grandparents by President Geraldine Sparrow because this is Grandparents Day. Come and join us in the celebration! Happy Grandparents Day to all on Sunday. Show some love to your grandparents. They are a treasure worth keeping.CongratulationsCongratulations to Betty Bell on your retirement, and welcome to the world of retirees!Prayer listPray without ceasing: Lelia Tina Rhines, William Monroe, Reguther Crowell and Thelma Fletcher(all at home); Sherry Baskins Wiggins (Gainesville/rehab; Hazel James Williams (Tallahassee/Rehab); Kay Francis Thompson and Arthur Daniels (both at Tallahassee Memorial); Laura Taylor and family;and Peggy Glanton. Also remember the families of the late James (Jay Jay) Johnson Jr. and the families of Nettie Miller in the loss of her son, Freddie Miller.Remember:Whenever you are discouraged, world seems cold and grey; whatever your care and sorrow, God is just a prayer away. He shares your every heartache and knows your smallest needs; theres never an earnest prayer to which he gives no heed. No cause then to dread the future, Hell always be with you; Accept now the peace He offers and it will see you through. Sunday is Grandparents Day? Precept studies begin on Tuesday The next Precept study will feature the book of Matthew, and a cordial invitation is extended to all women in the community. The study will explore The King and His Kingdom, a study of Jesus, king of all kings Classes begin on Tuesday, Sept. 10, at 9:30 a.m. and again at 6:30 p.m. The morning class will meet in the First Baptist Church Student Center at the corner of Green and Orange Streets. The night class will be held at the annex located on the corner of Main and Center streets. Precept studies are structured for seven weeks; the study book costs $15. For additional information, please contact Melody Greene at 584-7619 or Ena Reed at 584-5718. Precept studies are structured for those who wish to study the Bible inductively, view the world biblically, make disciples intentionally and serve the Church faithfully. women, and students. The ministry reaches nearly 185 countries and offers studies in 70 languages. Morning, evening classes

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A-10 Taco Times September 4, 2013 Community AARP: last Wed., 10 a.m. at Perry Shrine Club. Kiwanis Club: Wednesdays, noon, Perry Elks Lodge on Puckett Road. MainStreet Perry: fourth Tuesday, 5:30 p.m., Perry Historic Station. NAACP: rst Sunday, 5 p.m., at Jerkins Community Center. Optimist Club: Thursday, noon at Rosehead, downtown Perry. Perry Garden Club: third Wednesday, 10 a.m. Perry Elks Lodge: second and fourth Tuesday, 7 p.m. Perry Lodge #187: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m., Masonic Hall. Perry Masonic Lodge 123: meets rst and third Monday, 7:30 p.m. Perry Shrine Club: fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. (club house located on Courtney Road). Perry Womans Club: second Wed., noon (September to May). Rotary Club: Tues., noon at Rosehead Junction. Taylor County Leadership Council: second and fourth Friday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Vogue XIII: rst Mon., 7:30 p.m. Call 584-2404. Airport Advisory Committee: fourth Wednesday, 12 noon, Perry-Foley Airport. City Council: second and fourth Tues., at 5:30 p.m. County Commission: rst Mon. and third Tues. at 5:30 p.m., courthouse annex; workshop, fourth Tues., 5 p.m. Planning Board: rst Thurs., 6 p.m. Courthouse annex (old post ofce). Taylor County Construction License Board Meeting: third Fri., 2 p.m., courthouse annex. Taylor County School Board: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m. Taylor Coastal Water and Sewer: fourth Tuesday at 18820 Beach Road, 3 p.m. Taylor Soil & Water Conservation District Board: fourth Monday, 7 p.m., Foley Airport terminal conference room. Diabetes classes: every Tuesday, 3 p.m., Doctors Memorial Hospital. FAMU Alumni Chapter: second Monday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Friends of the Taylor County Public Library: last Monday of the month, 5:30 p.m., public library. Girl Scouts Service Unit: rst Tuesday, 7 p.m., Scout Hut. Habitat for Humanity: second Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Capital City Bank, Rm. #208. Helping Hands of the Shelter: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., Chamber of Commerce. Home Educators League of Perry: Forest Capital Hall. Call 584-6866 or visit on-line htt:taylor. ifas.u.edu. Muskogee Creek Indian Nation: second and fourth Sat., 7 p.m. Tribal grounds, Lyman Hendry Road. Muskogee Creek Indian Tribe: second Saturday, 3 p.m., Oak Hill Village on Woods Creek Road. National Wild Turkey Federation (Yellow Pine Drummers): holds open monthly meeting on rst Thursday, Golden Corral, 7 p.m. Call 584-9185. Parrot Heads in Perry-dise Club: meets the rst and third Wednesday, 7 p.m. Call 843-1469 for location. Perry Alliance of Ministers & Pastors (P.A.M.P.): meets second Sunday, 2:30 p.m., Little St. John P.B. Church. Pet adoptions: Taylor County Animal Shelter, open Monday through Friday. Call 838-3525. Republican Party of Taylor County: second Thursday, 6 p.m., at Rigonis Cookhouse on Highway 19 North. Call 2232648. Search & Rescue Riders #1135 of Christian Motorcyclists Assoc.: 4th Saturday, 9 a.m. at Golden Corral Restaurant. Taylor Adult Program (TAP): Thursdays, 10 a.m., 502 N. Center Street. 223-0393. Taylor Coastal Communities Association: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., at the district building on Beach Road. Taylor County Brotherhood: meets on Mondays, 7 p.m., at New Brooklyn; every third Saturday, 9 a.m., at Stewart Memorial. Taylor County Brotherhood Choir: meets every Thursday, 6 p.m., at Stewart Memorial. Chamber of Commerce: second Thurs., 8 a.m., chamber board room. Taylor County Development Authority: second Mon., noon, at Historic Perry Station. Taylor County Historical Society: third Mon., 7 p.m. Historical Society building. Societys museum is open every Thursday, 1-5 p.m. Taylor County Horsemans Association Horse Show: practice roping every Friday, 7 p.m.; second Saturday, registration, 3 p.m.; ride, 4 p.m. Arena is located on Bishop Blvd. Free admission. Taylor County Quilters: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to noon, public library. Taylor County Reef Research Team: second Tuesday, 7 p.m., Forest Capital Hall. Taylor County Senior Center: Executive Board of Directors meeting, last Wednesday of the month, 10:30 a.m., Senior Center. Taylor County United: second Mon., 7 p.m., Evangel Christian Fellowship. Tourism Development Council: second Thurs., noon, Chamber of Commerce. Whole Child Taylor-Shared Service Network: fourth Mon., 9 a.m., Alton H. Wentworth Administrative Complex. Yarn Lovers Circle: rst and third Thursday, 9:30 a.m., Taylor County Public Library. AL-ANON: meets every Thursday at noon, St. James Episcopal Church. Alzheimers Support Group: meets every fourth Thursday, 10:30 a.m., First Presbyterian Church. Big Bend Hospice Advisory Council: fourth Tuesday at 1 p.m., Big Bend Hospice ofce. Friends and Family of Sexual Assault Survivors Support Group: fourth Tuesday, 6-7 p.m., Glorious Rain Church. For information, call 843-0158. Narcotics Anonymous: Sun., Tues., Wed., Fri., 7 p.m.; Sat., 12 noon Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception (Parish Center), 2750 S. Byron Butler Pkwy. Call: (877) 340-5096. AMVETS Post 20: third Saturday, 10 a.m., at 107 East Green Street. American Legion Post #291 (Steinhatchee): second Thursday, 7 p.m. American Legion Post #96: rst Tues., 7 p.m., American Legion Hall, Center St. Sons of Confederate Veterans: fourth Thursday at North Orange Street. Call 5845725 or 838-2045. VFW Post #9225: second Tuesday, 7 p.m. (American Legion building). CIVIC GROUPS GOVERNMENT INTERESTS SUPPORT GROUPS VETERANSTo add your organization free of charge, please call 584-5513 or e-mail newsdesk@perrynewspapers.comCommunity CalendarPlease call 584-5513 to update your current calendar listing or e-mail newsdesk@ perrynewspapers.com Expanded Calendar of Events available at: www.perrynewspapers.com Go B-U-L-L-D-O-G-S Second place winners Submitted by HELPING HANDS OF THE SHELTER Patches is a 15-year-old, grey, miniature poodle. She lives with a family, who loves her and has a fenced yard to play in. The neighborhood children know her and often come by to pet her. One day as her guardian was working outside, the yard gate was accidentally left open. Patches went looking for someone to play with. When her guardian noticed she was missing, he began checking the neighborhood, talking with the children who knew Patches. One child told him a lady in a silver van had stopped and picked up the dog. A few blocks away, the poodles collar was found. Fliers went up, the shelter was notied Patches was missing and an ad was placed in the local paper. The rst few weeks the guardian checked the shelter daily with no luck. As the weeks went by, shelter visits became fewer. Three months after Patches disappeared, a shelter volunteer called to say the poodle had been dropped off and was available for pick-up. Because Patches had a micro chip, the animal control personnel knew to whom the dog belonged. She was soon reunited with her delighted family. Stories like this are common when missing dogs and cats have a micro chip. Micro chips can help bring lost pets homePlease see page 12 Animal Discount Vaccination Clinicen Saturday, Sept. 7 BCFCU lot

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