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Taco times ( July 10, 2013 )

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Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
System ID:
UF00028361:00448

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
System ID:
UF00028361:00448

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald


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Radio station back on airPower Country 102.1 FM (WQLC) returned to Northern Floridas airways today, about two months ahead of schedule. The station had suspended operations last month in order to re-tool its country music format. Originally planned to return this fall, the expedited restoration of WQLCs 9,000 watt FM signal was a result of a lease agreement between the owner of Power Country, Inc., Nick Bolton, and Dockins Telecommunications, owned by Fred Dockins. Dockins Telecommunications owns and operates the Perry, Florida stations WFDZ 93.5 FM, WPRY 1400 AM and WSFD-TV (Channel 15), along with radio and TV stations throughout Florida and Missouri. According to Bolton, Im very pleased to have signed this agreement with Dockins Telecommunications, which allowed Power Country to return to the air ahead of schedule and resume its service to Northern Florida. Fred is a very well-respected broadcaster and I look forward to working with him. Also included in the agreement are WNFK 92.1 FM in Perry and WGRO 960 AM in Lake City. Those stations are planned to return to the air in the fall.The Great Race is back!Run For Your Life is launching the return of The Great Race during the 68th annual Florida Forest Festival and is looking for sponsors. Interested businesses and individuals are asked to contact Monica Blount at (850) 843-0259 or e-mail monica@ plantationbookkeeping.com. The race will include a 5K and one-mile fun run through historic downtown Perry festival morning (Saturday, Oct. 26) starting at 7:45 a.m.Tax Collectors close earlyThe Tax Collectors branch ofce (located inside the old FHP building) will close early Thursday, Aug. 22, at 4 p.m. for a state computer system upgrade. The ofce will re-open Friday, Aug. 23, at 8:30 a.m. We are sorry for any inconvenience this may cause, Tax Collector Mark Wiggins said.School board rescheduled September meetingThe school board has postponed its meeting scheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 3, until Thursday, Sept. 5. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. at the Alton H. Wentworth Administrative Complex. Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1961 TacoTimes 50 Two Sections52nd year, No. 33www.perrynewspapers.comWednesdayAugust 21, 2013 Index Editorial . .................. A-2 Living . ...................... A-4 Religion . ................... A-6 Sports . ..................... A-7 Community . ............. A-8 Classieds . .............. A-9Weather Wednesday 92 7240% Thursday94 7240% News Forum Take to the sky Mike DeGuire (shown at right in bottom left photo) credits the help of By MARK VIOLA Staff writer It has long been Mike DeGuires dream to y a helicopter, beginning with his service in Vietnam when the aircraft provided him passage through the wartorn country. His passion was rekindled in 2007 when he learned about kit helicopters which enthusiasts could build themselves. He then set out to purchase and build his own. As with the pursuit of most dreams, there has been a certain measure of luck involved in the journey, although DeGuire prefers to call the instances moments of serendipity. The rst such moment came when he met Mark Peterson, a builder and yer who runs a business helping others take to the sky. His counsel and guidance led me to a slightly different path where I purchased a partially built helicopter with his assistance, DeGuire said. The ship had had a lot of the heavy lifting done in terms of tail boom, engine and main rotor mast already installed, but there was still a large amount of detail work, electrical wiring and some revisions to handle larger landing gear. This took nine months and a certain amount of rework since everything had to be right, he said. It was during this process that I rst met DeGuire, with his RotarWay Exec 162F partially completed in the workshop he built specically to house his helicopter during its Buckeye Technologies Inc., announced Thursday that its stockholders approved the Agreement and Plan of Merger at a special stockholders meeting on Aug. 15 among GeorgiaPacic LLC (GeorgiaPacic), GP Cellulose Group LLC (Purchaser) and Buckeye (the Merger Agreement) dated as of April 23, 2013. More than 84 percent of the total outstanding shares of Buckeye common stock eligible to vote as of the July 8, 2013, record date were voted in favor of the adoption of the merger agreement. Buckeye stockholders also approved the non-binding advisory proposal regarding mergerrelated compensation with a vote of more than 83 percent of the total outstanding shares of Buckeye common stock eligible to vote as of the July 8, 2013, record date. Upon the closing of the transaction, Buckeye will become an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Georgia-Pacic, and Buckeye stockholders (other than Buckeye stockholders who have properly exercised rights of appraisal) will be entitled to receive $37.50 in cash, without interest and subject to any withholding of taxes required by applicable law, for each share of Buckeye common stock owned at the time of the transactions closing. Consummation of transaction remains subject to the expiration or termination of the waiting period under the HartScott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976, as amended, along with the satisfaction of other customary closing conditions. Stockholders back Buckeye, GP merger Please see page 3Pilots journey began in the skies over Vietnam, touches down in Perry Trial date set for McNutt On Dec. 9, 2011, a longsimmering dispute between neighboring landowners boiled over and not only left two people dead, but also a third suffering injuries he will bear a lifetime. A month from now, the alleged shooter will have his day in court and face a jury of his peers. The latest trial date for Paul McNutt, 70, has been set for Sept. 23-27 at the Taylor County Courthouse. (The trial was previously scheduled for August.) Arrest records in McNutts court le detail how what began as a verbal disagreement quickly escalated to violence. It all started earlier in the day when Taylor County Sheriffs Ofce (TCSO) Inv. Donna Lee returned a phone call to the residence of McNutt and his wife, Diane. The sheriffs ofce Smooth start for new school year After a summer that saw many changes within the Taylor County School District, students are now back in class and the 201314 school year is ofcially underway. According to Superintendent Paul Dyal, the reports he has received so far are describing a smooth start to the new year. All of the reports Ive received from the principals are saying we had a good rst day, Dyal said Tuesday. The buses were on time, although they were a little late getting off from school as staff is helping show the new kindergarteners the process of getting on the bus, he said. One issue the district is dealing with is an unusually large number of unexpected students arriving to register on the rst day. Usually we have about ve, but so far weve had 20 this year across all grades, Dyal said. Were still waiting to see how many noshows we have who pulled out but didnt ofcially withdraw. Itll take seven to 10 days for that to shake out. One of the biggest changes this year is that all students, regardless of family income, can now partake of free breakfasts and lunches (not counting a la carte options at the higher grades). Dyal said he hasnt received any reports of Please see page 5 Please see page 5

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A-4 Taco Times August 21, 2013 Living Gardening with THE MASTERS August in the North Florida garden By WYNNE DRISCOLL After all the rainfall we received last month, the garden is so green and beautiful, especially the weeds. Bugs are thriving, too, as is fungus of all kinds. All the heat and humidity can make our gardening chores a lot more unpleasant, as we are blinded by our own perspiration, and maddened by ants and mosquitoes, as we attempt to pull weeds or add mulch and fertilizer. On the sunnier side, it is a great time to root cuttings of coleus and other plants that are now so vigorously growing. These will quickly root and grow to add color to the summer landscape. Another way to enhance a tired garden is to take advantage of sale items in your local garden center, where plants that are leggy and root-bound may be purchased at reduced prices to be rescued and planted in a good place where they can grow strong and healthy and beautiful. This month be sure to get outside early to enjoy your garden before it gets ridiculously hot. Be sure to drink plenty of uids, and pay attention to how you are feeling as you work. Flowers and vegetables need water, and so do you! And speaking of watering, this is a good thing to do in the early morning rather than in the middle of the day with the sun beating down on the leaves. Also, never water in the evening, as this will invite fungus and disease to visit your plants. Be sure to have fun as you do your yard work. Remember, this is the time to relax and learn from nature as you go about your garden. It is also a good time to be creative. Even as you delight in a new blossom on your rose bush, you may be planning what to plant where in your fall garden and its never too early to begin planning. There is no wrong way to do this because every mistake is also a good opportunity to learn more about gardening in North Florida, in August and beyond. September reception planned for Dees 90th birthday Mary W. Dees will be honored on the occasion of her 90th birthday with a reception at the First United Methodist Church on Sunday, Sept. 15, from 2-4 p.m. Her family, which is hosting the event, requests no gifts, please. A lifetime resident of Taylor County, Mrs. Dees was born to H.C. and Cora R. Walker on Sept. 19, 1923. She graduated from Taylor County High School in 1941 and from the Florida State College for Women in 1945. Mrs. Dees began her teaching career at Dixie County High School in 1945, teaching home economics there for ve years. She married Hoyt Dees (son of Veta H. Duffel and Hoyt Dees Sr.) on July 15, 1946, and returned to Perry in 1955 teaching at Taylor County High School and Taylor County Middle School for 32 years. She retired in 1986. She also sold real estate for Grady Moore Realty for 10 years. Her family includes a brother, H.C. Walker Jr., now deceased; a sister, Mildred L. Castleberry of Alabama; and a brother, John R. Walker of Tallahasee. She and her husband had four children: Ricky Dees (and wife Colleen) of Thomasville, Ga.; Veta Pinson, deceased; Chad Dees (wife Beth) of Atlanta, Ga.; and Kay Parker (and husband Ronnie) of Perry. Her grandchildren include: Brittany Sater (husband Josh) of Anderson, S.C.; Lee Pinson of Perry; Mike Pike of Texas; Randy Pike and wife Nina of Texas; Logan Parker of Tallahassee; and Grant Parker of Perry. Greatgrandchildren include Stephany and Kylie Sater, Quintenn and Hayden Pike. Mrs. Dees remains very active in the First United Methodist Church, serving on the Guild and with the Merry Makers. She is also a member of the Perry Womans Club, AARP, the Retired Teachers Association, the Pine Tree Quilters in Madison and the Red Hatters. The July Committee of Norma Collins and Cookie Workman are shown with Matthew French, who was on leave from the Marines and spontaneously joined in the fun, as well as Esther Ehle, who gifted members with mug rugs.Red Hats christen new Mexican restaurantCookie Workman and Norma Collins were in charge of planning the July 27 luncheon for the Roseheads of Perry, chapter 2207 of the Red Hat Society. The event was held at Casa Grande, the new Mexican restaurant in Perry. Door prizes were won by Marie Hill, Nancy Simons, and lona Walker. Tied together with a purple ribbon, a set of two red and two purple crocheted mug rugs, made by charter member Esther Ehle, marked each place setting.

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Back to school always brings new challenges for Paul Nawlin, as the Character Education Now program continues to maintain a presence in the Taylor County School District. The good news is that Nawlin and his organization have secured Adopt-AGrade commitments for K-12 grades, although a few more are needed. We need two more organizations in order to cover Taylor County High School and one more to extend the program to Taylor Technical Institute, Nawlin said. He also hopes for two more organizations for the transportation department and another for the administrative complex. We are grateful to Capital City Bank and Debbie Bassett for adopting kindergarten; to the Rotary Club and President Sondra Shaw for adopting rst grade and Lakeside Baptist Church (Darrell Jones) for taking second grade, he said. Nawlin expressed appreciation to the Kiwanis Club for signing up to adopt the third grade, to the Assembly of God for committing to the fourth grade and First Baptist Church (Rick Patrick) for adopting the fth grade. Grades 6-8 were adopted by Cornerstone Fellowship with Amy Sherrer and Libby Denmark handling the details. Grades 9-10 have been adopted by Faith Baptist Church (Merilyn Green) and Northside Church (Rodney McKinley). In addition to the Adopta-Grade program, Nawlin is very proud of the Character Under Construction program. Last year, every other week, we saw 905 students in grades 2-9; the student participation and cooperation was outstanding. We are very thankful for Jason Naes who completed his rst year with us last year teaching the ninth grade. Character Education Now also sponsors the Words of Wisdom program which covers topics such as citizenship, kindness, respect, patriotism and selfcontrol. Small-group mentoring has also been offered. This year we hope to add some anti-bullying lessons as well as programs encouraging school attendance and plerformance, Nawlin said. We need people who are willing to make a difference in our schools. If you can volunteer or contribute toward our expenses, please take a moment to contact me at 843-0646 or e-mail paul. nawlin@taylor.k12..us. A-5 Taco Times August 21, 2013 problems related to food service beyond the usual issues of students forgetting their numbers. Im going to give it a week and then compare the numbers to the rst week last year to see how much of an increase in participation we have. Motorists are reminded to be mindful of students walking to and from school as well as school buses now that classes have resumed. had previously received a call from Diane McNutt regarding a continuing disagreement over a road easement between their property and land owned by Lee and Connie Spees. These two families share an easement that provides travel to and from their residences. Paul McNutt told me that his wife made the call to the TCSO and I decided to make contact with her at her place of employment. I spoke briey to Diane concerning the continuing disagreement with the Spees family over the easement rights. I then traveled to David Spees residence, located at 3320 Johnson Stripling Road, and spoke with David and Lee Spees Jr., and Lee Spees III. I advised the Spees family to seek assistance with proper court authorities to solve their disagreements concerning the road easement. The Spees told me they had a court date concerning the easement on Jan. 19, 2012, Inv. Lee related in the arrest affadavit led on Paul McNutt. Deputy Eric Woods was called to the McNutt residence at 3:43 p.m. that afternoon concerning a civil disturbance. (Paul) McNutt reported that a temporary fence he had placed along the easement had been cut and that he suspected the Spees were responsible for the damage. Woods took the information and left the residence; approximately two hours later, Lee received a phone call from David Spees anc advising that Diane McNutt was causing a disturbance. Before the conversation could go further, the call was dropped. The caller called right back, but now Hazel Pridgeon was on the phone and I heard Pridgeon yelling that someone had been shot, Lee said. The phone was disconnected and ofcers were dispatched to the McNutt residence on Johnson Stripling Road. When Lee arrived at the location, she found Lee Spees Sr. and Lee Spees Jr. both lying on the ground; David Spees was located in the adjoining wooded area. All three men had been shot and were transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Lees Spees Jr. was pronounced dead at 7:05 that night; his father, Lee Spees Sr., died the next day (Dec. 6) at 10:03 p.m. David Spees remained in critical condition, but recovered. During interviews, Pridgeon stated she witnessed the confrontation between the McNutt and Spees families that occurred after Dep. Woods left. Pridgeon said she heard Diane McNutt tell her husband, Paul, that he better do something. She further stated that a few minutes later she saw (Paul) McNutt return to the area carrying what she was thought was either a rie or a shotgun. Pridgeon said she witnessed McNutt shoot Lee Jr., Lee Sr. and David Spees with the weapon. Lee Sr.s wife, Connie, was also interviewed and told investigators that she witnessed McNutt shoot all three victims and had also captured the incident on videotape. When Diane McNutt was interviewed, she stated she was taking photographs of the damage to the road when the Spees family began calling her names and threatening to kill her. She stated the altercation became threatening and that she told her husband, Paul, who was standing near her, to call the police because they (the Spees) were threatening to kill her. Diane (McNutt) said she did not see her husband go into their home, but she did see him a few minutes later and he had a shotgun. She further related she saw Paul shoot the three men, according to the arrest affadavit. When Paul McNutt was interviewed, he indicated the he only recalled his wife coming home from work around 4:30 p.m., but he could not recall a shooting incident at his house. A 12-gauge pump shotgun and a 9mm Glock handgun were found on the easement, about 15 feet from where Lee Sr.s bodywas found. Eight spent 9mm cartridge cases and one live 9mm cartridge were also found in the same area. In addition, three empty shotgun shells were found in a different location (on McNutts driveway), approximately 20 feet from Lee Sr.s body. Paul McNutt is facing two rst degree murder charges for shooting deaths of Lee Edward Spees Sr., 70, and his son, Lee Jr., 47. He has also been indicted on a charge of attempted rst degree murder while armed for the shooting of David Spees, as well as a fourth count of shooting at a building. He has been in custody at the Taylor County Jail since his arrest in 2011; his wife, Diane, died in March of this year. $3,000 in cash & prizes to be awarded in trout tournament The Taylor County Tourism Development Council (TDC) is hosting a Fall Trout Tournament Saturday, Sept. 7, with a guaranteed $3,000 payout in cash and prizes. The entry fee is $30 per person with weigh-in stations at Keaton Beach Marina and Fiddlers Restaurant in Steinhatchee. A captains meeting will be held Friday, Sept. 6, at the marina, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes will be awarded for the heaviest ve-trout stringer ($1,000 for rst place) as well as for the biggest trout and redsh, redsh with the most spots, heaviest mystery sh and the biggest shiner (for children 12 and under). Sponsors for the event include Duke Energy, Snyders Lance, Big Bend Marine and Marshall Health & Rehabilitation Center. For more information or to register, please contact Capt. Ashley Mock at (850) 843-0566 or the Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce at (850) 584-5513.Want to be a Distinguished Young Woman? Organizers of the 2013 Florida Forest Festival Distinguished Young Women program (formerly known as Junior Miss) invite all interested individuals to attend a registration meeting today (Wednesday), at the high school media center, at 3 p.m. The scholarship program is open to all high school senior girls living in Taylor County attending any school or being home-schooled. Participants may sign up online at www.distinguishedyw. com. For more information, contact Stacey Cruse (scruse1516@comcast.net) or Angie Gibson (agibson1@ fairpoint.net). begin Aug. 26 Fireghter (I) classes begin Monday, Aug. 26, at North Florida Community College. Orientation starts at 5 p.m. in building #13 on the Madison campus. For additional information, contact the college at (850) 973-9455. Florida Forest Festival pre-sale carnival tickets are now available at the festival ofce located inside the PerryTaylor County Chamber of Commerce on North Jefferson Street. The carnival will be held the week of Oct. 23-26 in conjunction with the 58th annual forestry celebration. News Forum Victims shot in front of wife, mother MCNUTT Continued from page 1 Backpack gifts Are you willing to make a difference? SCHOOL YEAR Continued from page 1Drivers: please watch for students The Taylor County School District has released the following lunch menu for students: Aug. 21-23 carrots with dip, applesauce and milk. noodles, buttered carrots, cucumber slices with dip, fruit, roll and milk. sauce, saltines, corn, baked tator tots, fresh fruit and milk. Aug. 26-30 baked sweet potato tots, mixed fruit cup and milk. black-eyed peas, fresh orange, carrots with dip, roll and milk. broccoli, celery sticks with dip, apple crisp and milk. loaf, buttered carrots, cucumber slices with dip, fruit, roll and milk. beans, tator tots, fruit and milk. Whats for lunch? Find us online at:www.perrynewspapers.com

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Wilma Lee WalkerWilma Lolly Walker, 83, of Perry, died Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013, at the Big Bend Hospice House in Tallahassee. Mrs. Walker was born July 30, 1930, in Douglas, Ga., to Riley and Eula (Carver) Cato. She was a member of The Church of God of Prophecy in Perry. Survivors include: her husband of 63 years, Lester Walker Sr., Perry; two sons, Lester C. Walker Jr. (JR) and Wayne Walker, both of Perry; two daughtersin-law, Margaret Walker and Jan Walker; three grandchildren, Leila Walker Smith and (Chip) Smith of Crawfordville; Jesika Walker Curry (Brad) Curry; Stephanie Walker; four great-grandchildren, one sister, Alice Johnson of Steinhatchee; and a host of nieces, nephews, friends and relatives. Services were held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17, at Joe P. Burns Funeral Home with Pastor Henry Lee Willis ofciating. Interment followed in Woodlawn Cemetery in Perry. The family received friends from 1-2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17, at Burns which was in charge of arrangements. In lieu of owers donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice.A-6 Taco Times August 21, 2013 Religion Sunday School welcomes all; Family, Friends Day set New classes at 1st Presbyterian Sunday was Rally Day at First Presbyterian Church, with a shared breakfast marking the occasion. After a summer recess, Sunday School classes begin Sunday at 9:45 a.m. with studies for all ages. Pastor Larry D. Neal and the congregation encourage members of the community to use this opportunity for spiritual growth and development. Everyone is welcome! Usher Anniversary at New Bethel New Bethel M.B. Church will observe its Ushers Anniversary on Sunday, Aug. 25, at 4 p.m. The speaker of the day will be the Rev. Lenny Brown. We do look forward to you coming out, said a spokesperson for the church.Awana kicks off Aug. 28First Baptist Church will hold its Awana kick-off and registration on Wednesday, Aug. 28, from 6-7 p.m. at the new splash pad in downtown Perry, located on Jefferson Street. The program is structured for age 3 through 5th grade. All children must be accompanied by an adult for the duration of the event.Revival begins today At St. Peter Primitive Baptist Church, revival services begin today, Aug. 21, and continue through Friday, Aug. 23, with worship at 7 p.m. Elder James Baker is the guest speaker. Pastor Cedric Spradley invites everyone to attend. On Sunday, the church will observe Family and Friends Day at 11 a.m., honoring the oldest mothers of the church: Dannie Lee Clayton, Virginia Holley and Pearlie Mae Smith. A community-wide invitation is extended. Obituary Cards of Thanks Wells To all the friends of Bonnie Jo Wells: We are truly thankful for all the cards, love, yarn club blanket, treats from Red Hats, visitations from pastors, friends and family, and donations to Blue Creek Baptist Church (for her stained glass memorial window). We are grateful for the advice and professional help in handling her affairs. We have traveled the world and we will always feel that Perry is home, not because of the land, but because of its people. May God bless you each richly for loving Bonnie Jo and making our loss easier. We are certainly blessed to have called Bonnie Jo our: Mom, Mom-In-Law, and Nana. She is forever a part of all who knew her. Jim, Mandy, Jayce, Luke, Ian and Jamie Blume All caregivers invitedAlzheimers support group meets Thursday at 10:30 The Alzheimers Project, Inc., reminds the community of a support group for people who are caregivers for loved ones. This group meets on the fourth Thursday of each month from 10:30 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. at the First Presbyterian Church. The next meeting for caregivers is this Thursday, Aug. 22. While providing information and education to caregivers, the setting also gives them the opportunity to share their experiences and create new friendships. Participants are encouraged to please reserve respite care in advance. If you have questions or comments, you may call Angela Mendoza at 850-765-2900. This group is intended for all caregivers and is not restricted to those caring for loved ones with Alzheimers. Hendry Memorial invites all to Sunday worship, Bible study on third ThursdayThe Robert M. Hendry Memorial Methodist Church in Shady Grove welcomes everyone to regular Sunday services at 6 p.m., as well as Fifth Sunday worship at 11 a.m., followed by a covered dish meal. On the banks of the beautiful Econna River, the church is one of Floridas oldest pioneer churches, explained Morris Steen. Renovation of the old frame church, plus the addition of a glassed-in back wall with new stained glass windows in the brick church, combine the beauty of the churchs interior with natures beauty and the great outdoors. Established in 1872, the church is led by Pastor Wallace Holmes. He joins Steen in urging friends in the community to come to a monthly Bible study on the third Thursday at 9:30 a.m. Details of other special services (including soup and salad fellowships on the third Sunday) are available on the churchs Facebook page.

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A-8 Taco Times August 21, 2013 Community AARP: last Wed., 10 a.m. at Perry Shrine Club. Kiwanis Club: Wednesdays, noon, Perry Elks Lodge on Puckett Road. MainStreet Perry: fourth Tuesday, 5:30 p.m., Perry Historic Station. NAACP: rst Sunday, 5 p.m., at Jerkins Community Center. Optimist Club: Thursday, noon at Rosehead, downtown Perry. Perry Garden Club: third Wednesday, 10 a.m. Perry Elks Lodge: second and fourth Tuesday, 7 p.m. Perry Lodge #187: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m., Masonic Hall. Perry Masonic Lodge 123: meets rst and third Monday, 7:30 p.m. Perry Shrine Club: fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. (club house located on Courtney Road). Perry Womans Club: second Wed., noon (September to May). Rotary Club: Tues., noon at Rosehead Junction. Taylor County Leadership Council: second and fourth Friday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Vogue XIII: rst Mon., 7:30 p.m. Call 584-2404. Airport Advisory Committee: fourth Wednesday, 12 noon, Perry-Foley Airport. City Council: second and fourth Tues., at 5:30 p.m. County Commission: rst Mon. and third Tues. at 5:30 p.m., courthouse annex; workshop, fourth Tues., 5 p.m. Planning Board: rst Thurs., 6 p.m. Courthouse annex (old post ofce). Taylor County Construction License Board Meeting: third Fri., 2 p.m., courthouse annex. Taylor County School Board: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m. Taylor Coastal Water and Sewer: fourth Tuesday at 18820 Beach Road, 3 p.m. Taylor Soil & Water Conservation District Board: fourth Monday, 7 p.m., Foley Airport terminal conference room. Diabetes classes: every Tuesday, 3 p.m., Doctors Memorial Hospital. FAMU Alumni Chapter: second Monday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Friends of the Taylor County Public Library: last Monday of the month, 5:30 p.m., public library. Girl Scouts Service Unit: rst Tuesday, 7 p.m., Scout Hut. Habitat for Humanity: second Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Capital City Bank, Rm. #208. Helping Hands of the Shelter: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., Chamber of Commerce. Home Educators League of Perry: Forest Capital Hall. Call 584-6866 or visit on-line htt:taylor. ifas.u.edu. Muskogee Creek Indian Nation: second and fourth Sat., 7 p.m. Tribal grounds, Lyman Hendry Road. Muskogee Creek Indian Tribe: second Saturday, 3 p.m., Oak Hill Village on Woods Creek Road. National Wild Turkey Federation (Yellow Pine Drummers): holds open monthly meeting on rst Thursday, Golden Corral, 7 p.m. Call 584-9185. Parrot Heads in Perry-dise Club: meets the second and fourth Wednesday, 7 p.m. Call 843-1469 for location. Perry Alliance of Ministers & Pastors (P.A.M.P.): meets second Sunday, 2:30 p.m., Little St. John P.B. Church. Pet adoptions: Taylor County Animal Shelter, open Monday through Friday. Call 838-3525. Republican Party of Taylor County: second Thursday, 6 p.m., at Rigonis Cookhouse on Highway 19 North. Call 2232648. Search & Rescue Riders #1135 of Christian Motorcyclists Assoc.: 4th Saturday, 9 a.m. at Golden Corral Restaurant. Taylor Adult Program (TAP): Thursdays, 10 a.m., 502 N. Center Street. 223-0393. Taylor Coastal Communities Association: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., at the district building on Beach Road. Taylor County Brotherhood: meets on Mondays, 7 p.m., at New Brooklyn; every third Saturday, 9 a.m., at Stewart Memorial. Taylor County Brotherhood Choir: meets every Thursday, 6 p.m., at Stewart Memorial. Chamber of Commerce: second Thurs., 8 a.m., chamber board room. Taylor County Development Authority: second Mon., noon, at Historic Perry Station. Taylor County Historical Society: third Mon., 7 p.m. Historical Society building. Societys museum is open every Thursday, 1-5 p.m. Taylor County Horsemans Association Horse Show: practice roping every Friday, 7 p.m.; second Saturday, registration, 3 p.m.; ride, 4 p.m. Arena is located on Bishop Blvd. Free admission. Taylor County Quilters: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to noon, public library. Taylor County Reef Research Team: second Tuesday, 7 p.m., Forest Capital Hall. Taylor County Senior Center: Executive Board of Directors meeting, last Wednesday of the month, 10:30 a.m., Senior Center. Taylor County United: second Mon., 7 p.m., Evangel Christian Fellowship. Tourism Development Council: second Thurs., noon, Chamber of Commerce. Whole Child Taylor-Shared Service Network: fourth Mon., 9 a.m., Alton H. Wentworth Administrative Complex. Yarn Lovers Circle: rst and third Thursday, 9:30 a.m., Taylor County Public Library. AL-ANON: meets every Thursday at noon, St. James Episcopal Church. Alzheimers Support Group: meets every fourth Thursday, 10:30 a.m., First Presbyterian Church. Big Bend Hospice Advisory Council: fourth Tuesday at 1 p.m., Big Bend Hospice ofce. Celebrate Recovery: a nondenominational, Christ-centered recovery ministry meets Thursdays at 6 p.m., in the First Baptist Church Youth Center (old Citizens Bank building). Friends and Family of Sexual Assault Survivors Support Group: fourth Tuesday, 6-7 p.m., Glorious Rain Church. For information, call 843-0158. Narcotics Anonymous: Sun., Tues., Wed., Fri., 7 p.m.; Sat., 12 noon Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception (Parish Center), 2750 S. Byron Butler Pkwy. Call: (877) 340-5096. AMVETS Post 20: third Saturday, 10 a.m., at 107 East Green Street. American Legion Post #291 (Steinhatchee): second Thursday, 7 p.m. American Legion Post #96: rst Tues., 7 p.m., American Legion Hall, Center St. Sons of Confederate Veterans: fourth Thursday at North Orange Street. Call 5845725 or 838-2045. VFW Post #9225: second Tuesday, 7 p.m. (American Legion building). CIVIC GROUPS GOVERNMENT INTERESTS SUPPORT GROUPS VETERANSTo add your organization free of charge, please call 584-5513 or e-mail newsdesk@perrynewspapers.comCommunity CalendarPlease call 584-5513 to update your current calendar listing. Expanded Calendar of Events available at: www.perrynewspapers.com More than half a dozen art fans took part in a free workshop hosted by the Taylor County Public Library last week. Under the guidance of Tammy Mowrey, participants had a hands-on less in painting. When Addison Anne English, right, Miss Taylor County Forestry Queen and brought home the state title of Hospitality Queen in July, she carried on a family forestry tradition. On Aug. 6, Taylor County WIC celebrated World Breastfeeding Week 2013 at the Taylor County Health Department, providing prizes and refreshments along with information about nutrition and breastfeeding for WIC participants. This years World Breastfeeding Week theme, Breastfeeding Support: Close to Mothers, highlighted the importance of providing support to breastfeeding families. Infant feeding is one of the most important decisions that new families make. Evidence is clear that breastfeeding is the ideal way to feed an infant. Research shows that infants who are not exclusively breastfed for their rst six months of life are more likely to develop a wide range of chronic and acute diseases, including ear infections, diarrheal diseases, asthma, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, obesity and respiratory illnesses. Mothers also benet from breastfeeding with a decreased risk for breast and ovarian cancers, said J. Christell E. Walker, nutrition educator/breastfeeding peer counselor coordinator for Leon, Jefferson, Taylor and Madison counties. The WIC program plays a vital role in providing support to breastfeeding moms, offering a friendly environment with support from trained breastfeeding peer counselors. We are currently looking for a breastfeeding peer counselor for Jefferson, Taylor and Madison counties. If anyone one is interested please (850) 8387221, Walker said. World Breastfeeding Week is coordinated globally by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA). For more information, visit the WABA website at www.waba.org.my. Support available for local mothers By LORI WIGGINS Family & Consumer Sciences Extension Agent III Today more children snack on foods that contain sugar, fat and salt. This has led to some serious health problems in young children, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity. Since snacking is such an important part of a childs diet, it is important to make sure the snacks they eat are healthy ones. Healthy snacks will satisfy the appetite and give the child the needed nutrients in their diet for optimum growth Here are some snack ideas for at home and school to help ensure our children get the proper nutrition they need each day. Here are some suggestions for healthy homemade options: tangerines, bananas and pears are the perfect portable fresh fruit treat. great for hot days. a kick out of rabbit bags, which combine fresh fruit and vegetables in individual servings. and hummus is a great combination. are easy. Sweet and salty come together when you mix unavored popcorn with dry roasted peanuts and a handful of raisins. mini paper bag. with an assortment of sliced veggies and a avorful lowfat dip or salsa! fun to make and eat! great snack or mix it up with sweet potatoes. Healthy snacking fuels young scholars Many who have experienced the death of someone special have heard the words get over it or move on. They know rst-hand it is not that easy. and can affect all aspects of ones life. If you or someone you know has lost a loved one and would like to learn more, please join Big Bend Hospice for a free presentation on Living with Loss on Friday, Aug. 30, from 10 a.m. to noon at Rosehead Junction Restaurant (107 S. Jefferson St.). Light refreshments will be provided. We extend special thanks to Capital City Bank for making this event possible, Big Bend Hospice representatives said. For more information or to register please contact: Mindi Rojas at (850) 878-5310, ext. 774, or mindi@ bigbendhospice.org or visit www.bigbendhospice.org. Big Bend Hospice to host free grief workshop Aug. 30 Academics for Adult Education classes for both Taylor Classes will begin Monday, Aug. 26, from 4-7 p.m. at TTI and Tuesday, Sept. 3, 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the Center. For additional information, contact TTI at 838-2545.GED classes start Aug. 26A family traditionis week, at the library...

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