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Taco times ( July 10, 2013 )

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Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
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Newspaper
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English
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Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
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Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
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30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
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UF00028361:00445

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald

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Material Information

Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
System ID:
UF00028361:00445

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald


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By ANGELA M. CASTELUCCI Staff writer Less than 48 hours after receiving a life sentence for rst degree murder, Lloyd Phelps was in prison. The Florida Department of Corrections gave the 59-year-old Perry man the standard welcome all inmates receivea haircut, a shave and a new set of prison blues. While this is not Phelps rst stint in prison, it is slated to be his last under the mandatory sentencing guidelines set out for rst degree murder. Parole is not an option and a six-person jury was unanimous in the guilty verdict it handed down last Tuesday evening, July 23. The swift verdict, sentencing and transfer to state custody was a marked contrast to the six-year investigation that led to justice for Phelps victim, 39-year-old Patricia Niece Knight. Knight was rst reported missing in January 2006. While it would be another ve years before her case was ofcially upgraded to a murder investigation, her mother, Carol Dean Lockett, knew something had happened to her child long before the grim details of her death echoed across a courtroom. Her mother went out looking for her that very rst night, Perry Police Department (PPD) Det. Mike Anderson said. That night was Jan. 16, 2006Locketts birthday. She never missed her mothers birthday. Never. So when Carol Dean didnt hear from her all that day, she knew something was wrong. They had already spoken with ofcers well before they led a missing persons report just over a week later. Locketts birthday was on a Monday that year. Investigators now know that the last time anyone saw Knight alive was the preceding weekend (Saturday/Sunday). So we knew when she went missing. Basically we knew when she was killed, Anderson said. The rst investigator assigned to the case was Jim Wiggins. At that time, it was simply a missing persons investigation and he treated it as such. Wiggins even met toddlerA community yard sale benetting Little CJ Melton, the Taylor County toddler suffering from an inoperable brain tumor, will be held this Saturday, Aug. 3, inside the former Farmers Furniture store located at the Save-ALot shopping center. Donated items may be left at the Snow Ball Shack located in the front parking lot of the shopping center. Nothing is priced--we ask that you give a donation from your heart, organizers said. Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1961 TacoTimes 50 One Section52nd year, No. 31www.perrynewspapers.comWednesdayJuly 31, 2013 Index Editorial . .................. A-2 Living . ...................... A-4 Religion . ................... A-5 Community . ............. A-6 Sports . ..................... A-7 Classieds . .............. A-8Weather Wednesday 90 7250% Thursday88 72 50% News Forum School grades fall; rst F since 1999With school grades falling precipitously across the state this year, Taylor County was not immune, with Steinhatchee School earning the districts rst F grade since 1999. The Florida Department of Education (DOE) on Friday released school grades for elementary and middle schools, with Taylor County Middle School (TCMS) earning a C, Taylor County Elementary School (TCES) earning a D and Steinhatchee School earning an F. The latter two schools will have new principals when students return to classes in three weeks after Superintendent Paul Dyal did not recommend re-appointing the schools administrators to their positions in June. TCMS earned a B last year and missed repeating the grade by just ve points, earning a total score of 555, while the cut-off for a B is 560. TCES, the only school to maintain its grade from last year, scored 410 points, exactly in the middle of the range for a D, which runs from 395 to 434. Elementary and middle schools are graded on different scales, but since Steinhatchee School was a combination, including eighth grade, it was measured by the middle school standards. This was one of the reasons Dyal gave for his recommendation to eliminate middle school grades from the school and convert it to a K-5 school, which the Taylor County School Board approved earlier this summer. Steinhatchee School scored 385 points and needed at least 445 for a D. DOE will not release grades for high schools until late November or December. Since Perry Primary School is considered a feeder school to TCES, it receives the same grade, which in this case is a D. With the release of school grades on Friday, the results were just as we had anticipated, Dyal said in a statement Monday. It is obvious from our GRADING OUR SCHOOLS Taylor County High School* *High school grades will be released by the state later this year **Taylor County Elementary Schools grade includes Perry Primary School 12-13 11-12 10-11 09-10 08-09 Taylor County Middle School Taylor County Elementary** Steinahatchee School Please see page 3 City attorneys abrupt resignation: I dont suffer fools well, Smith says Longtime City Attorney Mike Smith abruptly resigned during the middle of the Perry City Councils regular July 23 meeting. Smith scribbled out a one-line resignation on a sheet of notebook paper, folded it in half and tossed on the desk in front of Mayor Daryll Gunter before exiting through a side door Tuesday evening. I was just handed a letter a few seconds ago well need to agenda. It was a letter of resignation from Mike Smith that reads: Dear Mr. Mayor, Please accept this as my resignation as city attorney for the City of Perry, effective immediately. Signed Michael S. Smith. I gladly accept it and well need to go out and get advertising for a new attorney, Gunter said. Do I have a motion? he then asked. No action is required, is there? Councilman Don Cook said. If we have to vote to accept it, I will gladly pass the gavel and make the motion, Gunter said. I second, Councilwoman Shirlie Hamption said. Following the unanimous vote to accept Smiths resignation, Gunter asked City Manager Bob Brown to begin advertising for a new attorney right away preferably one who doesnt make me so mad. Councilman Cook intervened at that point, cautioning Gunter to consider what he was saying before he continued. Please see page 10 Shoppers ready for tax free days Floridas 2013 back-toschool sales tax holiday arrives this weekend, Aug. 2-4, and has expanded to include purchases of personal computers and accessories. With many parents heading to stores, the Taylor County School District recently announced that its dress code will be the same this coming year as it was during the 2012-13 school year. During the three-day tax holiday, sales of clothing, footwear and certain accessories selling for $75 or less as well as certain school supplies selling for $15 or less, will be exempt from the state and local sales tax. New this year, the tax holiday will also apply to personal computers and certain related accessories for personal use selling for $750 or less per item. According to the Florida Department of Revenue (DOR), clothing includes any article of wearing apparel, including footwear (excluding skis, swim ns, roller blades and skates). It does not include watches, watchbands, jewelry, umbrellas, handkerchiefs or sporting equipment. School supplies include pens, pencils, erasers, crayons, notebooks, notebook ller paper, legal pads, binders, lunch boxes, construction paper, markers, folders, poster board, composition books, poster paper, scissors, cellophane tape, glue, paste, ulers, computer disks, protractors, compasses and calculators. The personal computer tax exemption includes any electronic book reader, laptop, desktop, tablet or tower computer. It does not include cellular telephones, video game consoles or digital media receivers. Computer accessories include keyboards, mice, personal digital assistants, monitors, other peripheral devices, modems, routers and non-recreational software, regardless of whether the accessories are used in association with a personal computer base unit. Related computer accessories not included in the tax holiday are furniture or systems, devices, software or peripherals designed or intended primarily or intended for recreational use. A full list of the taxemempt items can be found online by visit the Department of Revenues website at http://dor. myorida.com. Long road to justice Lloyd Phelps was transferred to state custody Thursday, July 25. Timothy Monroe Joel Thomas Reynolds Man makes meth, again, at elderly dads home A Perry man was arrested last Thursday for operating a meth lab in his fathers mobile home on Vera Lanethe second time he has been charged with the same offense at the same location. Acting on information we received, Rusty Davis, Marty Nowlin and myself went to 3672 Vera Lane to investigate. While making rst contact with the homeowner, we noticed two marijuana plants growing behind the home. A search of the home revealed all the ingredientsincluding Shake & Bake bottlesfor making methamphetamine, Taylor County Sheriffs Ofce Capt. Ron Rice said. Three individuals were taken into custody at the home: Joel Thomas Reynolds, 32, charged with manufacture of methamphetamine and manufacture of cannabis; Timothy Jay Alex Monroe, 23, manufacture of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia; and Billy Allen Laird, 20, possession of drug paraphernalia. Please see page 3 were always in the forefront of our minds during No changes to districts dress code

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with the man who would quickly become the prime suspect, Phelps, at his home. However, he had no way of knowing that he was sitting down with Knights killer just feet from the bedroom where she was killed. That information developed in later investigations and interviews. When Det. Dwight Norris inherited the case in October 2008, it was undeniably classied as cold. By then it had been two years and she (Knight) had not had any contact with anybody. She also had not received any (government) services of any kind during that time, Norris said. Phelps remained on the investigators radar. The only suspect we ever had was the one being charged, Anderson said. We followed everythingevery call, every tip. We made every attempt to nd Patricia. We dug up whole city lots, called in cadaver dogs, ew over wooded areas searching for sinkholes, had fourwheelers on the ground anything and everything to nd her, Capt. Jamie Cruse said. When I got the case, I called in an Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) agent and worked with them going back over the case le. We saw there were some interviews and witnesses to follow up with, one of those being (Kimberly) Sierra Hockaday. She had been interviewed prior to this and gave just a little bit of information. When I approached her, she was able to give us a little bit more (information) each interview. Just more and more. She told us that Lloyd Phelps killed Patricia. Where he killed her and how, Norris said. Armed with this account, Norris was able track down the mobile home Phelps was living in at the time of the murder. By then it had been repossessed and was sitting on a sales lot in Panama City. The mortgage company was able to provide photos of the home at the time it was repossessed (exterior and living room shots only). However, the interior photos conrmed details of Hockadays storythe location of Phelps bedroom off the main living room and the color of the carpet. When detectives traveled to Panama City to see the mobile home, they were hoping, at best, to nd DNA from blood evidence. Given Sierras description of the crime, we knew the amount of blood loss was substantial and chances were good we might nd something, Norris said. Regardless of what they hoped to nd, what was revealed to them when the carpet in the master bedroom was peeled back rocked even these seasoned investigatorsa bloodstain so large it covered half a sheet of plywood. Even more shocking was the shape of the bloodstain, an outline easily identiable as a human body. Head, shoulders, torso. The plywood was removed and sent to the FDLE for processing. It took awhile. We had to get DNA from her mother, from her father (who was living in New York at that time), but nally we were able to say Yes, this is her, Norris said. But a bodiless homicide is one of the hardest to prove, Det. Sgt. Gene Franklin said. Even without Knights body, investigators had little doubt they were now dealing with a murder. It was a violent death. You have to consider the stain and consider the fact that the blood went through her clothes, the carpet, the padding and soaked into the plywood, Norris said. She laid there, knowing she was dying, Franklin said. While it may seem all these events happened in a rush, the reality is they did not. It took six months to get the DNA results back. We continued to do everything we could to nd her body, without any success, Norris said. So the case goes cold again. We knew who did it, so the question then became what is it going to take to prove it. To get it prosecuted, Anderson said. How do we prove shes dead? We had numerous experts look at the bloodstain, but due to the variables involved (unknown thickness of the carpet, padding, etc.), they were not able to say with a certainty that this kind of blood loss was enough to cause death. But, they did say the amount more than exceeded enough to cause death, especially if the victim did not receive treatment. We contacted every hospital and trauma center in the area to see if anyone tting Patricias description had received treatment. No one had. Then we looked at her nancial trail. There was no trail beyond December 2005. EBT activity (which was her sole means of support) ceased after she went missing. It was like she fell off the face of the earth January 2006. Once we established she ceased to exist after that time, we re-interviewed witnesses again. There had been no contact with anyone after the night she went missing, which was the weekend of Jan. 13-16. A witness had picked her up that Saturday night and she had talked about plans for a BBQ the next day. That was the last time this individual saw her alive. So our timeline was narrowed down even further, to something happening between Saturday night and early Sunday morning, Anderson said. We met with the state attorney again and were ready to take the case to the grand jury. We focused on the bloodstain in his homeat the foot of his bed. How could he not have noticed it? But he denied everything and that was his strategy. During this time lapse between the murder in 2006 and actual charges being brought against him in 2012Phelps had other run-ins with the law enforcement, chiey for battery charges involving violence against his wife (whom he had married during that time span). He was charged with strangling her. Also several years before he had been charged with attempted murder for cutting the throat of another woman he was involved with, Anderson said. In one instance, a state attorney witnessed him (Phelps) doing this toward a witness/victim while in court, Franklin said, drawing his thumb across his throat from ear-to-ear. Lloyd was violent toward women. We validated he was violent toward women, Cruse said. When we interviewed people, they said when he drank or was high, he became a demon. And everything we heard was validated by his previous history. We never received any information of another viable suspect. The community knew he did it. We knew he did it, Anderson said. But you only get one shot at a murder conviction, so you have to make sure it is the best it can be. Time was on our side in this casethere is no statute of limitations for murder, Franklin said. In all our interviews we asked about Patricia, about her character and the response was always the sameshe loved us and we loved her. They said she was the sweetest person and would give anything she had to help someone, Anderson said. Family members were fully cooperative with the investigation and friends were forthcoming. Everybody spoke for her because she couldnt speak for herself, Franklin said. Although some might question the caliber of witnesses who took the stand in Knights behalf (many were convicted felons, some--including Hockaday--currently serving prison sentences of their own), They are human beings too, they are not throw-aways. And their stories didnt change, Anderson said. Sierras (Hockaday) story didnt change. She told it for six years, Franklin said. Every statement, we were able to corroborate, so much so that the jury believed them, Cruse said. The bloodstain was right where she (Hockaday) said it was, Anderson said. Phelps attitude during exchanges with investigators was a far cry from the face he presented to the jury when he took that stand in his own defense. When we interviewed him, he always said I never hurt that woman. In the trial, he called her my niece. At the end of our interview, I asked him, You like cutting women, dont you? He just smiled. You cant use my past against me, he said, Cruse related. I think anybody in the audience during the trial saw that a person can do horrible things to another person without any kind of remorse. Evil is out there and evil hurts people. Evil will reach out and grab you. This was different than what we normally deal withwhen you get to evil people, you never forget, Anderson said. The investigative team praised Hockadays bravery in coming forward to testify. She was terried, scared for her family and friends, Norris said. Hopefully this will help her get rid of those demons that took over throughout the years. She did what a lot of people wouldnt do. It was a wonderful thing, Anderson said. She did what a lot of socalled upstanding citizens wouldnt do, Franklin said. There is always more to the story whenever someone is a drug user, Norris noted. But their lifestyle doesnt make them a lesser being, Anderson said. This prosecution was the result of many different people doing their job exceptionally well. Everyone working on it did the best job possible with the evidence and information they had. Without everyone being 100 percent on the job, we could not have gotten the investigation we had. They were extremely effective, committed and focused, Cruse said. While relived to see Phelps brought to justice, investigators know their job is not yet complete. Hockadays testimony put another man, Johnny Flowers, at the scene during the time of Knights murder and, under Florida law, he could be held just as liable as Phelps for her death. During the trial, Assistant State Attorney John Weed indicated his ofce would be looking at pursuing charges against Flowers. I can tell you that everyone was here at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday (the day after Phelps trial was over) discussing what we needed to do to move forward, Cruse said. For Norris and his fellow investigators, their mission is clear: Our ultimate goal is to bring her home if we can. school grades at our K-5 schools that we are not being successful at the requirements of increased rigor brought on by the raising of the cut scores and the movement toward high level of thinking skills that are required with the new standards and assessments in the states accountability program. I would like to speak to each of these. In looking at our scale scores for both individual students and grade levels, those have not dropped and in some areas have gone up, Dyal said. The difference is that the cut score of what now determines prociency has increased and this has lowered the percentage of our students that score at level 3 and above. It is these percentages that are used to calculate school grades. We still have students scoring at the same level as when our K-5 schools were As and Bs, but, those scores do not meet the increase required by the change in the school grading formula brought on by the increased accountability measurements. In other words, what would have been a procient score in reading for a student at level 3 two years ago is now a level two and lower. But, we must meet these challenges. Statewide, the number of A elementary schools fell by 44 percent compared to last year, the number of A middle schools fell by 30 percent and the number of A combination schools fell by 17 percent. Meanwhile, the number of F middle schools more than tripled, the number of F elementary schools doubled and the number of F combination schools rose from two last year to 17. This year also marked the lowest number of A in the past decade. Not only has the scoring requirements on determining prociency increased, what is needed to meet the rigor of the new standards has changed and will become even more rigorous with the Common Core State Standards, Dyal said. We have been transitioning from the Sunshine State Standards, where we were successful, to the Next Generation of Sunshine State Standards, which were more rigorous as well as requiring cognitive skills that go beyond knowledge/recall and simple comprehension to more application, to now the Common Core State Standards and assessments that move to the higher cognitive skills of the depth of knowledge that will be needed to be successful. Our teachers are working just as hard as they have always worked. Our students are as committed as ever. What is required is that we must change our delivery of instruction to meet these increased requirements. We are making changes in our core curriculum in reading, math and science. We are looking at our instructional strategies in the teaching of writing. Our teachers at K-5 have been busy all summer in developing curriculum maps that guide them in covering the strands, pacing guides to provide daily instruction, and lesson plans based on the new curriculum materials for our core programs. We will continue to be part of the support team provided by the FLDOE. We will have new leadership at our 3-5 schools as we take our schools in a direction that will bring us back to the success we expect and are used to. Public education in our state is going through lots of mandated changes. In this, we must understand that these changes are inevitable. Our schools, our students, our parents and our community must embrace the change instead of ghting it and work to return to our status as an Honor Roll School District. I know we can and I know A-3 Taco Times July 31, 2013 SCHOOL GRADES Continued from page 1 School grades tumble across the state Only one shot at charge s Investigators never gave up on cold case JUSTICE Continued from page 1 As certain as birthdays come every year, so too the call or visit from her daughter that Carol Dean Lockett would receive on her special day each year. Without fail. Until Jan. 16, 2006. Lockett waited and waited for the call that never came and she says she knew, in her heart, something was wrong. I was scared, I was nervous. When a week had passed and I still hadnt heard from her, I told my husband that something had happened to my child, Lockett said. It took seven long years, but Lockett can nally have some closure as to her daughter, Patricia Niece Knights fate. During court proceedings last week, Knights second cousin, Lloyd Phelps, 59, was found guilty of rst degree murder for her death. It was sad on both sides. Were still family and I hate that they have to go through what I have. But, they can still go see him in prison. I cant go see my daughter, Lockett said. In the end, Lockett said while the guilty verdict gives her some comfort, it is hollow at best. I just wish he would tell me what he did with the body. I think he still doesnt want to admit what he did to his family. I think he will take that to the grave with him, she said.A mothers sorrow The Taylor County RESTORE Act Committee has scheduled a series of public meetings over the next week to meet with people concerning potential projects and questions about the process of submitted proposals for consideration. Although the litigation involving the penalties is ongoing, Taylor County could receive between $3 million and $12 million depending on the eventual settlement with British Petroleum (BP). Pre-project proposals are due by Aug. 30. The meetings will be held Thursday, Aug. 1, at Steinhatchee Community Center at 6 p.m.; Tuesday, Aug. 6, at Blue Creek Baptist Church at 6 p.m.; and Thursday, Aug. 8, at the Econna Conference Center at 6 p.m. RESTORE committee seeks ideas at Thursday meeting

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A-4 Taco Times July 31, 2013 Living On May 1, Johnathan Derek Howell was deployed with his Ordnance Unit to Afghanistan from his current station in New River, N.C. Howell joined the U.S. Marines after graduating from Taylor County High School in 2009. He completed his basic training at Parris Island, S.C., in November of 2010 and the School of Infantry for Marine Combat Training at Camp LeJeune, N.C., after that. Howell is an aviation ordnance tech, tasked with maintaining rockets, bombs and missiles as well as armament equipment for COBRA helicopters. He is expected to return to the United States between November of this year and February, 2014. His parents are Eric and Vera Howell of Perry, and Amy (Fissell) and Ken Johns of Lake Butler. His grandparents include Dennis and Carol Howell, Susie and Carter Stanley, all of Perry, and John and Debbie Fissell of Haines City. Derek Howell is currently serving a tour of duty in Afghanistan with the U.S. Marines, serving as an aviation ordnance technician. He is pictured, above, second from left, with fellow Marines. Courtney Lynn Speas and David Gregory Gray will be married Saturday, Aug. 3, at 6 p.m. in the First Presbyterian Church. A nursery will be provided. The wedding will be followed by a reception in the church fellowship hall. Speas to wed Gray Saturday 49th anniversary reception honors Ansells SaturdayOn the occasion of their 49th wedding anniversary, Les and Donna Ansell will be honored Saturday, Aug. 3, with a reception at the First United Methodist Church at 1 p.m. All family members and friends are encouraged to attend. Howell, 2009 TCHS grad, deployed to Afghanistan Howell (right photo) is pictured (left) at military ball prior to deployment. Bargain shopping?Shady Grove yard sale Sat. The Shady Grove Citizens Council will have a big sale, rain or shine, on Saturday at Rockys old store, beginning at 7:30 a.m. Fishing and sporting goods, a hunting blind, lots of jeans and other clothes, many good hardback books by known authors, lots of nice household items and decorations (including Christmas and Easter) as well as a vacuum cleaner and furniture will be offered. Questions? Or need directions? Call 584-6343 or 838-6692.

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A-5 Taco Times July 31, 2013 Religion Thriving Together: Marriage is more than just living togetherits thriving together. With that one sentence, Charity Baptist Church is launching a Marriage Revival Aug. 1-3 with catered meals, power-lled preaching, biblical mens and ladies classes as well as door prizes. Sessions will be led by Stacey and Grace Shiett, Bill and Deborah South, Jack Holden and the following pastors: Jesse Bowen, Joey Harris, Todd Hill and David Young. Topics include: Biblical Submission, Communication Differences, Dealing with Criticism, Respect in a Marriage, Making Time for your Spouse and Knowing your Spouse. The revival begins Thursday, and organizers urge you to make plans to attend. The catered meal will be served at 5:30 p.m. at the church (580 Highway 27 South) with an evening service at 7. On Friday, an afternoon service is planned at 3 p.m., followed by a meal at 5:30 p.m. and evening worship at 7. Saturday welcomes guests at 9:30 a.m. for coffee and doughnuts followed by workshops at 10 and 11 a.m. Whether your marriage is on re or struggling, you dont want to miss this event, a church spokesman said. You may call 223-4673 or go online, www.cbcperry.org. Obituaries Nicholas Keith AndersonNicholas Keith Anderson, infant son of Keith and Jennifer (McGlocklin) Anderson of Sopchoppy, died in his mothers arms surrounded by his father, brother and grandparents on July 28, 2013. Nicholas was born July 23, 2013, and is survived by his parents; his siblings, Thomas and McKenzie; his maternal grandmother, Dalene McGlocklin of Perry; paternal grandparents, Randy and Nena Anderson of Sopchoppy; and greatgrandmother Eloise Strickland of Sopchoppy. Nicholas was preceded in death by his maternal grandfather, Tom McGlocklin. Family visitation will be held today, July 31, from 6-8 p.m., and a funeral to celebrate his life will be Thursday Aug. 1 at 4 p.m., both being held at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church, 117 Curtis Mill Rd., with internment to follow at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. In lieu of owers, memorial gifts may be made to Tallahassee Memorial Hospitals Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, in appreciation of their care. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville, is in charge of arrangements. Michael F. WilderMichael F. Sparky Wilder, 59, of Perry, died Monday, July 29, 2013, at his residence in Perry. Mr. Wilder was born Jan. 28, 1954, in Perry, to Willie James and Edith (Raulerson) Wilder who preceded him in death. He was a Baptist and a veteran of the United States Navy spanning a four-year enlistment as a gunners mate. Survivors include: two sisters, Teresa (Joe) Heartseld of Shady Grove and Kathy Wilder of Perry; three brothers, James (Robin) Wilder of Mexico Beach, Terry Wilder of Perry and Mitchell (JoAnn) Wilder of Mexico Beach; as well as a host of nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 3, in Southside Baptist Church with Pastor Gary French ofciating. All arrangements are under the care of Joe P. Burns Funeral Home.Brian Joe BeckerBrian Joe Becker, 44, of Perry, died Monday, July 29, 2013, at his residence. Mr. Becker was born July 30, 1968 in Stanford, N.Y., to Richard and Bonnie LaRue) Becker. Survivors include: his parents, Richard and Bonnie Becker; one sister, Barbara Jo Evans; one nephew, Josh Evans; one niece, Jessica Livingstone; and one aunt Wanda Klinger. A memorial service was held at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, July 30, at Joe P. Burns Funeral Home which is in charge of arrangements. The Rev. James Taylor ofciated. Sessions begin Thursday at Charity Baptist Church For many churches in this area, the Lighthouse Childrens Home in Tallahassee is a favorite charity. While expressing appreciation for all the loving gifts, the home admits that it has a needs list in case Sunday School classes or church groups are looking for a project to undertake. Lighthouse Childrens Home welcomes fresh fruits and vegetables (always!) but also expresses needs for: gallon containers of Veg-All, peas, peaches, pears and fruit cocktail; paper and foam or plastic items including freezer bags (gallon size) and trash bags, as well as divided dinner plates, small dessert plates, 16 oz. cups and paper towels; breakfast items such as dry cereals (pre-sweetened) and apple or grape juice; cooking items like dried lima beans, canola oil, sugar, cheeses, butter and hot sauce; condiments such as salad dressings, family-sized tea bags, coffee and creamer; cleaning items like dishwashing detergent, dryer sheets, Clorox, Pledge and Soft Scrub; miscellaneous items like Jell-O, AAA batteries, graham crackers; and personal hygiene items for girls including hair spray, facial cleaner, Venus or Daisy razors. For additional information on Lighthouse, you may call (850) 656-8249, or visit online at www. lighthousechildrenshome.com. The organization also has two thrift stores (7771 Mahan Drive and 2810 S. Adams) open Monday-Saturday. Jones to preach at Sirmans Pastor Thomas F. Jones, associate pastor of New Bethel Baptist Church in Perry, will be the guest preacher at New Hope Baptist Church in Sirmans this Sunday. He will speak at their annual Family and Friends Day which begins at 11 a.m. on Aug. 4. Everyone is invited. Loving gifts appreciated a marriage revival

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Eighteen local athletes traveled to Orlando to compete in the AAU National Championships June 12-16, joining more than 3,500 athletes from across the country who converged on Disneys Wide World of Sports complex to compete for this coveted title. Kiki Schubert, Jenny Jackson and Kinzi Mattingly left the gym oor with the ultimate prizethe titles of All-Around National Champion. Schubert had a rst place nish on vault and oor, along with an incredible 36.95 AA score for the win in Level 5. Jenny Jackson took gold on the vault and uneven bars in addition to her AA win for Level 8 with a score of 36.825. Mattingly scored a 36.10 to capture the title for Level 7. We could not have been more excited, said Coach Mike Romano. This was a great way to end the season for these girls that work so hard and put in so many hours at the gym. Level 8 gymnast Malayshia White won rst place on vault, second place on uneven bars and in the All-Around, and third place on oor. Level 7 gymnast Ayonna Carter took rst place on the uneven bars, second on vault and third in the A-6 Taco Times July 31, 2013 Community AARP: last Wed., 10 a.m. at Perry Shrine Club. Kiwanis Club: Wednesdays, noon, Perry Elks Lodge on Puckett Road. MainStreet Perry: fourth Tuesday, 5:30 p.m., Perry Historic Station. NAACP: rst Sunday, 5 p.m., at Jerkins Community Center. Optimist Club: Thursday, noon at Rosehead, downtown Perry. Perry Garden Club: third Wednesday, 10 a.m. Perry Elks Lodge: second and fourth Tuesday, 7 p.m. Perry Lodge #187: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m., Masonic Hall. Perry Masonic Lodge 123: meets rst and third Monday, 7:30 p.m. Perry Shrine Club: fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. (club house located on Courtney Road). Perry Womans Club: second Wed., noon (September to May). Rotary Club: Tues., noon at Rosehead Junction. Taylor County Leadership Council: second and fourth Friday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Vogue XIII: rst Mon., 7:30 p.m. Call 584-2404. Airport Advisory Committee: fourth Wednesday, 12 noon, Perry-Foley Airport. City Council: second and fourth Tues., at 5:30 p.m. County Commission: rst Mon. and third Tues. at 5:30 p.m., courthouse annex; workshop, fourth Tues., 5 p.m. Planning Board: rst Thurs., 6 p.m. Courthouse annex (old post ofce). Taylor County Construction License Board Meeting: third Fri., 2 p.m., courthouse annex. Taylor County School Board: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m. Taylor Coastal Water and Sewer: fourth Tuesday at 18820 Beach Road, 3 p.m. Taylor Soil & Water Conservation District Board: fourth Monday, 7 p.m., Foley Airport terminal conference room. Diabetes classes: every Tuesday, 3 p.m., Doctors Memorial Hospital. FAMU Alumni Chapter: second Monday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Friends of the Taylor County Public Library: last Monday of the month, 5:30 p.m., public library. Girl Scouts Service Unit: rst Tuesday, 7 p.m., Scout Hut. Habitat for Humanity: second Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Capital City Bank, Rm. #208. Helping Hands of the Shelter: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., Chamber of Commerce. Home Educators League of Perry: Forest Capital Hall. Call 584-6866 or visit on-line htt:taylor. ifas.u.edu. Muskogee Creek Indian Nation: second and fourth Sat., 7 p.m. Tribal grounds, Lyman Hendry Road. Muskogee Creek Indian Tribe: second Saturday, 3 p.m., Oak Hill Village on Woods Creek Road. National Wild Turkey Federation (Yellow Pine Drummers): holds open monthly meeting on rst Thursday, Golden Corral, 7 p.m. Call 584-9185. Parrot Heads in Perry-dise Club: meets the second and fourth Wednesday, 7 p.m. Call 843-1469 for location. Perry Alliance of Ministers & Pastors (P.A.M.P.): meets second Sunday, 2:30 p.m., Little St. John P.B. Church. Pet adoptions: Taylor County Animal Shelter, open Monday through Friday. Call 838-3525. Republican Party of Taylor County: second Thursday, 6 p.m., at Rigonis Cookhouse on Highway 19 North. Call 2232648. Search & Rescue Riders #1135 of Christian Motorcyclists Assoc.: 4th Saturday, 9 a.m. at Golden Corral Restaurant. Taylor Adult Program (TAP): Thursdays, 10 a.m., 502 N. Center Street. 223-0393. Taylor Coastal Communities Association: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., at the district building on Beach Road. Taylor County Brotherhood: meets on Mondays, 7 p.m., at New Brooklyn; every third Saturday, 9 a.m., at Stewart Memorial. Taylor County Brotherhood Choir: meets every Thursday, 6 p.m., at Stewart Memorial. Chamber of Commerce: second Thurs., 8 a.m., chamber board room. Taylor County Development Authority: second Mon., noon, at Historic Perry Station. Taylor County Historical Society: third Mon., 7 p.m. Historical Society building. Societys museum is open every Thursday, 1-5 p.m. Taylor County Horsemans Association Horse Show: practice roping every Friday, 7 p.m.; second Saturday, registration, 3 p.m.; ride, 4 p.m. Arena is located on Bishop Blvd. Free admission. Taylor County Quilters: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to noon, public library. Taylor County Reef Research Team: second Tuesday, 7 p.m., Forest Capital Hall. Taylor County Senior Center: Executive Board of Directors meeting, every third Thursday. Taylor County United: second Mon., 7 p.m., Evangel Christian Fellowship. Tourism Development Council: second Thurs., 12 noon, Chamber of Commerce. Whole Child Taylor-Shared Service Network: fourth Mon., 9 a.m., Alton H. Wentworth Administrative Complex. Yarn Lovers Circle: rst and third Thursday, 9:30 a.m., Taylor County Public Library. AL-ANON: meets every Thursday at noon, St. James Episcopal Church. Alzheimers Support Group: meets every fourth Thursday, 10:30 a.m., First Presbyterian Church. Big Bend Hospice Advisory Council: fourth Tuesday at 1 p.m., Big Bend Hospice ofce. Celebrate Recovery: a nondenominational, Christ-centered recovery ministry meets Thursdays at 6 p.m., in the First Baptist Church Youth Center (old Citizens Bank building). Friends and Family of Sexual Assault Survivors Support Group: fourth Tuesday, 6-7 p.m., Glorious Rain Church. For information, call 843-0158. Narcotics Anonymous: Sun., Tues., Wed., Fri., 7 p.m.; Sat., 12 noon Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception (Parish Center), 2750 S. Byron Butler Pkwy. Call: (877) 340-5096. Perry Winners Group of Alcoholics Anonymous: Friday, 8 p.m.; Heritage House, 317 N. Orange St. AMVETS Post 20: third Saturday, 10 a.m., at 107 East Green Street. American Legion Post #291 (Steinhatchee): second Thursday, 7 p.m. American Legion Post #96: rst Tues., 7 p.m., American Legion Hall, Center St. Sons of Confederate Veterans: fourth Thursday at North Orange Street. Call 5845725 or 838-2045. VFW Post #9225: second Tuesday, 7 p.m. (American Legion building). CIVIC GROUPS GOVERNMENT INTERESTS SUPPORT GROUPS VETERANSTo add your organization free of charge, please call 584-5513 or e-mail newsdesk@perrynewspapers.comCommunity CalendarPlease call 584-5513 to update your current calendar listing. Expanded Calendar of Events available at: www.perrynewspapers.com (Photo, left) All-Around Champions were Kiki Schubert, Jenny Jackson and Kinzi Matttingly. (Photo, above) Bringing home individual event medals were: (front row, left to right) Kiki Schubert and Ayonna Carter; (back row, left to right) Alexis Burkett, Malayshia White and Jenny Jackson. Overcast skies failed to dampen the spirits of the teams taking part in the rst Family Putt Putt Golf Tournament hosted by the Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce. Winning teams were: Brandon Fletcher, rst place; John Fuller, second place; and John Towles, third place. We would like to thank the following businesses and chamber volunteers who helped make this event as success: KOA Campground (the Swiegart family), Subway, Buckeye Community Federal Credit Union, Photos, Frames & Trophies, Cline Moore and LeAnne Powell, Chamber Director Dawn Taylor said. Please see page 103 bring home ultimate prize from national championships Taylor County Tax Collector Mark Wiggins, right, and son Denton Bailey Fletcher

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