<%BANNER%>

Taco times ( July 10, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
System ID:
UF00028361:00443

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Taco times
Portion of title:
Taylor County times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perry Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1961.
General Note:
Published on Wednesday.
General Note:
Description based on: 22nd year, no. 27 (Apr. 11, 1984).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001977691
oclc - 10649452
notis - AKF4543
lccn - sn 84007718
issn - 0747-2358
System ID:
UF00028361:00443

Related Items

Related Items:
Perry news-herald


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Artist to speak at library July 29Artist Bill Holkham will be guest speaker at the Friends of the Taylor County Public Library meeting on Monday, July 29. Holkham will talk about his career and showcase a variety of his works.Drawings will be held for a free 20 x 16 matted print of his painting Ospreys at Wakulla. The rst drawing will be open to everyone who attends the meeting. The second drawing will be open to those who join or renew their membership to the Friends that evening. The program is free and open to the public.Need a business plan?Taylor Countys Small Business Development Center (SBDC) will host a free workshop on Business Plan Development Thursday, July 18, at the Chamber of Commerce. Complimentary lunch will be provided during the noon event. Gail Lee, a small business expert, will facilitate the workshop. Seating is limited and reservations are required. For more information, please call the chamber at 584-5366.Families invited to tee-off at Putt-Putt Golf July 20Families are invited to register now for the rst Chamber Family Putt-Putt Golf Tournament planned Saturday, July 20, at the KOA Campground. The event will be held from 9 a.m. to noon; breakfast and lunch will be provided. Prizes will be awarded to the top teams. Admission is $30 per twoperson team (one child under 12/one adult). Everyone will be invited to swim following the tournament. For additional information or to register your team, please call 584-5366. seeking donationsA community yard sale is planned for Saturday, Aug. 3, to raise money for C.J. Melton and organizers are seeking items to sell. The yard sale will be held at the former Farmers Furniture Store. Donations can be brought to the Snow Ball Shack. For more information, call 8380300 or 584-4433. Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1961 TacoTimes 50 One Section52nd year, No. 29www.perrynewspapers.comWednesdayJuly 17, 2013 Index Editorial . .................. A-2 Living . ...................... A-4 Community . ............. A-6 Religion . ................... A-7 Classieds . .............. A-8Weather Wednesday 93 7020% Thursday91 70 30% News Forum (Special to the Taco Times) Larry Hodges of Perry, and Wilbert Arrant Jr., of North Carolina, recently reunited for the rst time in more than 44 years, along with their families, at Dekle Beach. Hodges located his old buddy while researching Agent Orange on the Internet three years ago. This was the rst time they had seen each other since 1969. In January 1969, Sgt. Larry Hodges and Sgt. Wilbert (Junior) Arrant parted company at Tyndall AFB in Panama City, after spending three years together at seven different air bases. Heading off in different directions, Arrant returned to North Carolina and became a career highway patrolman. Hodges graduated from Florida State University and became a teacher, rst in Jefferson County, then in Taylor for a total of 27 years. During their recent reunion, they had the opportunity to rehash old times and their military service together. In the summer of 1965, they both volunteered for the U.S. Air Force. Arrant from North Carolina and Hodges from Alabama were shipped off to Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, for basic training. Facing two options--security police or cooks--it was an easy decision. No way were they going to cook, so wearing white hats, Air Force Blues, combat boots, badges and a Smith and Wesson on their sides, their military careers began. Their rst duty assignment was near the beautiful town of Columbus, Miss., home to the Strategic Air Command at Columbus AFB and the Mississippi State College for Women. With the B52s having been sent to Vietnam along with many of the airmen, the base was almost like a ghost town. You might say the duty was pretty good, patrolling base, working the main gate, riding on the Security Alert Team, wearing white hats and badges, and lets not forget the Mississippi State College for Women. Then the word volunteer came up. Minot AFB in Minot, N.D., needed some volunteers. Vietnam vets reunite aer 44 years Former 4-H Legislator Angel Ketring was recognized posthumously during the a banquet held to celebrate the 2013 4-H Legislature Program. committee in 2010. He encouraged teens to be involved in their community Remembering Legislator Angel The registered sexual predator, whose residence was marked in May by a sign outside his Judson Drive address, no longer resides in Taylor County. City Manager Bob Brown said he had been told by the Taylor County Sheriffs Ofce, which monitors those living in the county on the state sexual offender registry, that Charles Leon Tinsley, 59, had moved from the area. The Perry City Council approved an ordinance in May to post signs in front of the homes of registered sexual predators and at the time, Tinsley was the only registered predator in the city limits. Responding to the Taco Times following the placement of the sign, Tinsley said in early June he was getting ready to move out-of-state. With Tinsleys departure, there are currently no sexual predators living inside the city limits of Perry. There are eight predators registered at addresses in Taylor County out of a total of 60 offenders. Citys lone registered sexual predator moves The Florida Commission on Ethics has found no probable cause to believe former State Attorney Robert L. Skip Jarvis misused his position and resources to run records checks through restricted databases. Elise Perkins of Jacksonville led the ethics complaint in August against Jarvis over the record checks. In a release following the commissions June 7 meeting, the agency stated, No probable cause was found to believe that Robert J. Skip Jarvis, Jr., state attorney 3rd Circuit, misused his position and resources to run nonlaw enforcement records checks through restricted databases. The commission also found no probable cause to believe that Mr. Jarvis disclosed or used information not available Ethics complaint dismissed against former state attorney Please see page 3 Please see page 10Taylor Countys unemployment rate had a slight uptick in May, ending a downward trend which began in February. The countys unemployment rate was 7.6 percent compared to Aprils rate of 7.4 percent. After staying mostly level around 9.2 percent in the last several months of 2012 and into January, the countys unemployment rate dropped almost a full percentage point to 8.3 percent in February and then to 7.7 percent in March. Mays rate was still 1.5 percentage points below the May 2012 rate of 9.1 percent. Taylor had the 18th highest unemployment rate among Floridas 67 counties in April, with 728 people unemployed and 8,806 employed, according to gures released by the Florida Department of Unemployment rate breaks trend in May After six-foot rise in three daysOfcials monitoring Steinhatchee RiverLocal emergency management ofcials are asking residents along the Steinhatchee River to closely monitor the river after its waters rose six feet over the weekend due to the continued heavy rains in the region. According to Taylor County Emergency Management Coordinator Steve Spradley, the river was expected to crest at the Tennille gauge Tuesday after the area did not receive signicant rainfall Monday or Tuesday morning. Its just about to go over the bank in some areas, and in some low-lying areas it is over the banks, he said. It would need to rise another foot or two before people would need to start moving their vehicles in Steinhatchee. As long as it stays dry, it should crest and start dropping. The river is not affecting any roadways and the Emergency Management Department and its partners are closely monitoring the situation to ensure a quick and appropriate response should action be required, he added. The Taylor County Emergency Response Team would like to encourage Steinhatchee residents to closely monitor the river, report issues to the Emergency Operations Center at 850-838-3575 and take appropriate precautions. The Florida Forestry Services rain gauge at its Perry ofce and the National Weather Service (NWS) station at PerryFoley Airport both recorded about three and a half inches of rain during the weekend. The heaviest rain was recorded around 6 p.m. Sunday, with nearly two inches falling in an hour, sparking the NWS to issue a ash ood warning for central Taylor County, Please see page 10 Please see page 10

PAGE 2

r rfrntrnb rt rnrrrrb ttftff f nffnrnf rrn bftfttfff fffnbf tbnb rf ntbt ff rtrtrtr tfffn nt bbtfrt rrrtf tftrnf rftffr

PAGE 3

A-3 Taco Times July 17, 2013 The two airmens hands shot skyward. World travel here they come. They didnt see that the senior airmen were rolling their eyes. Leaving Mississippi on a typical January day of 60 degrees, they headed north on their new adventure. The Minot temperature was hovering around zero, and when they stepped out of the C-47 onto the tarmac, those southern boys realized something was amiss. Their reward for volunteering was guarding armed B52 bombers in the dead of winter. Ninety days later, they returned to Columbus to the smell and sight of dogwood and azalea blossoms, crimson clover in the highway median, and the Mississippi State College for Womenparadise! The summer of 1966 is memorable because of Ofcers Lake (outside of Columbus) with a white sandy beach, Coppertone, a 1957 two-tone red and white Ford with a Thunderbird engine, When A Man Loves A Woman playing on the radio and no worries in the world. Then, they hear, We need volunteers. Who wants to go to Vietnam? Hands shot skyward again. Eyes rolled again. These two young airmen mused, What is wrong with these older airmen; dont they like to travel? Their fourth and fth bases were Camp Bullis and Lackland (again) for some combat training. Hodges remembers a former Special Forces instructor telling them they would learn just enough hand-to-hand combat to get their asses kicked. Camp Bullis (Army base) for weapons training was fun and was the rst time they had ever seen an armadillo. Their sixth base together was at Tan Son Nhut Air Base outside Saigon in South Vietnam. Less than a month after arrival, the base was attacked. The explosion of mortars and automatic weapons re broke the silence of the night on Dec. 4, 1966. The 377th Security Police Squadron provided security for Tan Son Nhut. Hodges recounts that particular attack of the base: Ill never forget that eerie feeling, the sounds, the explosions, the ares, the darkness, whistles blowing, sirens, grabbing M-16s, mortars and more mortars, loading up on trucks and jeeps heading to who knew where. During the attack, I ended up somewhere in a dark building with another Security Police guarding Air Force pilots. Junior, on the other hand, ended up on the perimeter of the ight line in a vicious reght. The Viet Cong had penetrated the base perimeter. Three Security Police lost their lives and 15 were wounded in the attack that night, and 28 Viet Cong were killed. Junior was wounded by a V.C. grenade. He received the Purple Heart and the Vietnam Gallantry Cross with a Bronze Star for valor. He was my hero, but I never told him. To this day I cant enjoy a reworks show, hearing the thud and waiting for that explosion. The 377th was awarded the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award. Tan Son Nhut was attacked again during the 1968 TET Offensive, two months after the pair had departed. After Vietnam, they both volunteered for duty at Tyndall AFB in Panama City. This was not a hard decision for them to make. They needed some time at the beach. This was a pretty good place to be stationed, though for some reason they never got along with the Panama City boys. A short while after arriving at Tyndall, their squadron commander called them to his ofce. He was bound for Vietnam, and they thought he wanted some advice from some seasoned troops. Want to go back to Nam with me? he asked. What? Larry said he thought he was through with the dumb and dumber team. Arrant had his hand up. This time, Hodges rolled his eyes. Junior and the colonel rst headed to Hawaii for some combat training and Ranger stuff before their Nam trip. Junior drove a Jeep for an ofcer for six months in Saigon and got to live in a downtown hotel, then returned to P.C. I wished Id volunteered. I also turned down a TDY in Key West while Junior was gone. Dumb decision. Revisiting their decisions to join the Air Force and their various volunteer assignments, they both proclaim, Would we do it all again? Damn right, raise that hand! Two months after leaving the Panama City base, Hodges, then a Troy State student, returned for Spring Break 1969 and met his future bride at the Old Dutch Tavern, 44 years ago. Would he do it again? Raise that hand! Hodges said he and Arrant plan on meeting at Dekle Beach this fall for some shing and maybe watching FSU beat up on one of those Carolina teams. Seven Taylor County youth recently took part in the 4-H Legislature in Tallahasee. Shown above are: back row (l to r) Haley Osteen, Jessica Welch, Rohan Patel, William Blue and Douglas Bethea; and front row (l to r) Catherine Weed and Bethany Snodgrass. Seven local youth take part in 4-H Legislature By ABBEY L. THARPE 4-H Extension Agent I When the 2013 Florida 4-H Legislature convened in Tallahassee, more than 200 teen members in the 4-H House and Senate were sworn in. Youth attendees representing Taylor County were: representatives Rohan Patel, Catherine Weed and Jessica Welch, and lobbyists Haley Osteen, Douglas Bethea and William Blue. With both a House and Senate in session, teen legislators lobbyists and reporters debated a variety of issues and learned how the government works. Florida 4-H Legislature conducts business with an acting governor, lieutenant governor and cabinet. Following Tuesdays opening session, 4-H legislators broke into committee meetings before debating the bills which made it past committees on Wednesday and Thursday. Bills successful in both chambers were to be signed or vetoed by the elected -H Governor. The co-ed, handson experience in how government works was organized by University of Florida, IFAS 4-H. A youth organizing committee has worked steadily on bills and logistics with UF advisors since last September. Youth played key roles throughout the event, helping with registration, running meetings, leading charges to kill or support bills and setting up an experimental party system. Partnering with young people to plan programs was very important to 4-H. Throughout the planning, bill writing and debates, teens were learning to be engaged citizens. Many -H legislators take their responsibilities seriously and some go on to careers in government. Adam Putnam, who participated in the 4-H Legislature program in his teens, now serves as the Commissioner of Agriculture for the State of Florida. Angel Ketring, a former 4-H Legislature participant, was recognized for her passion and commitment to the 4-H Legislature program at Thursday nights banquet held at Leon County Civic Center. Members of the Ketring family were recognized on her behalf. Angels father (Ward Ketring) spoke to the teens about Angels commitment Duo: Would we do it all again? Raise that hand! Wilbert Arrant Jr., of North Carolina, received the Purple Heart (shown above) and the Vietnam Gallantry Cross with a Bronze Star for valor for heroic actions in Vietnam. VIETNAM Continued from page 1 Ill never forget that eerie feeling, the sounds, the explosions, the ares, the darkness, whistles... Please see page 5

PAGE 4

A-4 Taco Times July 17, 2013 Living After graduationTaylors Distinguished Young Woman eyes Flagler College nextBarry and Carla Wilson announce the graduation of their daughter, Molly Elisabeth, who has been homeschooled since rst grade. In addition to her academic studies, Molly has a true passion for acting and appeared as Juliet in Romeo and Juliet with the Capital City Shakespeare Company and as Elizabeth in Pride and Prejudice. This September she will be appearing as Ophelia in Hamlet, also presented by the Capital City Shakespeare Company. Beyond acting, Molly has also competed for three years with the National Christian Forensics and Communications Association speech and debate league, where she is a regionally recognized debater and a nationally recognized speaker. She is also a member of the Junior Classical League Latin Honor Society and the Eta Sigma Alpha National Homeschool Honor Society. Last October Molly was chosen the 2012/2013 Distinguished Young Woman of Taylor County. She plans to attend Flagler College, majoring in English and philosophy. Molly Wilson49 years of marriageLes and Donna Ansell will be honored on the occasion of their 49th wedding anniversary with a reception at the First United Methodist Church in Perry. Friends and family members are encouraged to gather at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 3 to celebrate with the couple. Family Reunions Page The third annual Page Reunion will be held this Sunday, July 21, at the Perry Garden Club. Friends and relatives are encouraged to gather at 12 noon. Cruce The annual Cruce Reunion will be held next Sunday, July 28, at the Perry Garden Club behind Forest Capital Hall. We will eat at 12:45 p.m., said Dub Cruce for the group, so please come and bring your family as well as a basket of food. If you know of family members whose address we may not have, please invite them to join us, Cruce said. Ice, cups, napkins, plates and silverware will be provided. If you have questions about the upcoming reunion or contact information to share, Cruce can be reached at 584-7718. 2 planned at Perry Garden Club The Alzheimers Project, Inc., reminds friends in the Perry community about the support group offered caregivers who have loved ones with life-limiting illnesses. No July meeting is planned, but in August and the months to follow, this group will meet on the fourth Thursday of each month from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the First Presbyterian Church, located at 310 Plantation Road. Our next meeting for caregivers will be on Aug. 22, said Angel Mendoza who serves as rural outreach coordinator. This support group provides information and education to caregivers. Please reserve in advance for respite care, she urges. If you have questions or comments, feel free to contact Mendoza at 850386-2778. Caregivers: no July meeting, come Aug. 22 Children are urged to come dressed as pirates for Thursdays summer reading program at the Taylor County Public Library. The Dig Into Reading program will begin at 10 a.m. with Pirate Mark Petty as the guest performer. Petty has toured the USA, Canada and the Caribbean for close to 40 years performing a unique blend of magic and puppets to delight young and old alike. His pirate character is based on the actual family history of his great, great, great uncle William Marsh--the English pirate-once a privateer, eventually a scallywag. Parents or caregivers are required to stay with the children. For more information, call the library at 838-3512. Blimey! Pirates needed

PAGE 5

A-5 Taco Times July 17, 2013 Fiddler on the roof? and love for the 4-H Legislature program. He attributed her knowledge of the 4-H Legislature program to her older brother John who served on the 4-H Legislature planning committee in 2010. In conclusion he encouraged youth to continue to be involved in their community and in the 4-H Legislature program. The 4-H Youth Development Program is part of IFAS and the Cooperative Extension Service at the University of Florida in Gainesville. 4-H LEGISLATURE Continued from page 3 Ketring recommends 4-H program to teens The Taylor County Public Librarys slate of adult workshops for July continues with two more programs this month. The remaining schedule includes: is a $5 materials fee); Space is limited so those interested in attending one or more of these workshops are advised to visit the Library to offer jewelry, couponing workshops over next two weeks At the Booking Desk Editors Note: It is the policy of this newspaper to run the names of all those arrested and booked at the Taylor County Jail. All those listed below have been charged with a crime, but are considered innocent until proven guilty. Feb. 12: Ronald Gordon Bilyou, 52, Madison, retail theft, Ptl. J Bass, PPD. Robert Chandler Wood, 23, 12975 Spring Warrior Rd., VOP, Deputy Blue, TCSO. Billy Carter, 22, 1480 N Reddick Dr., burglary, grand theft Deputy Blue, TCSO. Marcus Iacovino, 24, 9450 N. Hwy. 221, VOP, Deputy Woods, TCSO. Raymond William Maines, 40, Inverness, VOP, Deputy Woods, TCSO. Feb 13: Marc Allen Labrecque, 23, Greenville, poss-20 grams cannabis, Ptl. Dice, PPD. Austin Goit, 20, Greenville, poss-20 grams of cannabis, Ptl. Dice, PPD. Jessica Lynn Rocco, 26, 1627 S. Byron Butler Pkwy., warrant-VOP, Ptl. Shaw, PPD. Jonathon Hernandez, 32, 608 Sam Poppel Rd., VOP, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Thomas Cowart, 54, 4530 Fortner Cir., assault (domestic) resist w/o violence, Deputy Hooker, TCSO. Feb 14: Kenneth Porter, 36, 2492 Taylor Ln., FTA (felony battery), Deputy Hooker, TCSO. Raydon Jamal Parker, 19, 109 El Matador Dr., VOP-poss alcohol by person under 21, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Troy Eugene Padgett, 29, 1304 S. Center St., warrantVOP (criminal mischief), Deputy Cash, TCSO. Ashley Demetra Bailey, 29, 118 Joann St., fraud, cheating, grand theft, Ptl. Johnson, PPD. Amy Odom, 40, 608 Sam Poppell Rd., altered decal, theft from vehicle, poss RX w/o RX, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Feb 15: Kayla Robin Brinson, 24, 127 Walter Smith Rd., fraud, cheating, dealing in stolen prop, grand theft, intro of contraband, Deputy Johnson, TCSO. Emmanuel Oneal, 25, Blackville, S.C., VOP-grand theft, Deputy Cash, TCSO. Billy Carter, Jr., 22, 1480 N, Reddick Rd., VOP, Deputy Gunter, TCSO. Tracia Williams, 42, 131 Joann St., poss of cocaine, poss of cannabis with intent, Det. D. Norris, PPD. Robert Daniel Hilson, 27, 7210 US Hwy 19 S., DWLS habitual, dubal, attaching tag not assigned, Deputy Cash, TCSO. Feb 16: Rosanna Henderson, 24, Live Oak, VOP, Deputy Ricketson, TCSO. Rosie Latrail Ridings, 37, 3870 Oak Ln., FTA warrant, DWLS, Deputy Gulbrandsen, TCSO. Feb 17: Michael David Eady, 44, 108 Magnola Rd., agg. assault, VOP, Deputy Gunter, TCSO. Shanna Pittman, 18, 1752 Dulin Ln., petit theft, Deputy Blue, TCSO. Feb 18: Dawanda Gail Dixon, 43, 509 W. Church St., no valid DL, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Nathaniel Williams, 49, 1519 S. Campbell St., felony theft, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Courtney Lynn Doyle, 18, 5710 Hwy. 221 N., poss controlled sub, Deputy McKenzie, TCSO. Janie Angela Harris, 36, Mayo, frau/insuff checks, Deputy Hooker, TCSO. Brian A. Jones, 20, 813 E. Drew St., VOP, Deputy Owens, TCSO. Thomas Fischer, 24, Panama City, Fl., VOP, Deputy Upshaw, TCSO. Jamie Williams, 18, 1101 E. Main St., warrant, resisting without, Ptl. Johnson, PPD. Cynthia Luann Ward, 54, Steinhatchee, VOP-DWLS, Deputy Tompkins, TCSO. Feb 19: Lealer Sneed, 26, 607 W. Willow St., warrant DWLS, Ptl. C. Cannon, PPD. Cynthia Horton, 23, Greenville, warrant VOP, Deputy Burford, TCSO. John Allen Thomas, 46, 16629 W. Royal Oak Dr., VOPdealing in stolen property, poss-20 grams, Deputy Hooker, TCSO. Turner Pridgeon, 52, 308 Puckett Rd. VOP-felony battery, Deputy Shaw, TCSO. Robert Segrest, 31, Lamont, VOP, Deputy Hooker, TCSO. Dorothy Triestram, 39, 900 E. Main St., FTA unvaccinated AG rabies, Deputy Shaw, TCSO. James Jackson, 25, 250 Jenkins Rd., burglary, Agg battery, domestic battery, criminal mischief, Deputy Owens, TCSO. Dwayne Beasley, 24, 1221 E. Pinecrest, no motor vehicle registration, poss of less than 20-grams, Ptl. Johnson, PPD. Ronald Conrad Tucker, 34, 403 W. Ash St., battery, domestic, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Feb 20: Rita Lynn Edward, 35, 1645 Louzettie Ln., out of county warrant, Deputy Woods, TCSO. Lester Flowers Jr., 49, 610 W. Malloy Ave., FTA (resist w/o violence), Deputy Woods, TCSO. Christopher Fregapane, 28, 5193 US Hwy. 98, out of county warrant, Deputy Woods, TCSO. Feb21: Emmanuel Lee Bolden, 27, Tallahassee, writ of bodily attachment, Deputy Upshaw, TCSO. Daniel Michael McCune, 27, New Port Richie, trafck control substance, Deputy Blue, TCSO. Christopher Houck, 33, 1720 James Smith Rd., VOP, Deputy Curry, TCSO. Cacelia Mosley, 35, 500 Warner Ave., poss of cont substance, poss of analog substance., Ptl. Norris, PPD. Kenneth Porter, 36, 2492 Taylor Ln., poss of control sub., poss of analog substance., Ricketson, TCSO. Jacob Michael Redwood, 19, 916 J Tom Moore, VOP, Ptl. Grifn, PPD. Jeanne Arcularius, 34, 213 W. Cedar St., VOP, Ptl. Grifn, PPD. Johnny Futch, 49, 1315 S. Center St., grand theft, Deputy Gulbrandsen, TCSO. Feb 22: Brandi Marie Satterwhite, 33, 1005 E. Julia St., DUI-1st, offense, Ptl. Ricketson, PPD. Johnny Fudge, 33, Madison, dealing stolen property, retail theft., Deputy Basch, TCSO. Joseph Dixon, 41, 2196 Shelton Edwards Rd., VOP, battery, Deputy Hooker, TCSO. David Allen Parker, 65, 4620 Parker Hill Rd.., felony dom battery, Deputy Owens, TCSO. James W. Jackson Sr., 43, 4040 Grover Hunter Rd., burglary, assault. Deputy Shaw, TCSO. Joshua Omar Harris, 27, 1100 S. Wilder St., poss of cocaine, poss of meth, warrwant-FTA., Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Feb 23: Douglas Andrew Ross, 34, Panama City, domestic assault, Ptl. Murphy, PPD. Edward B. Watkins, 48, 2409 Golf Course Rd., DWLS knowingly, Deputy Burford, TCSO. Joshua James Jones, 19, 3762 Bohannan Cir., DWLS knowingly, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Joseph F. Roberts, 29, 2381 Sidney Blanton Rd., poss drug parapernalia, poss controlled susb meth, DUI, Bembry, FWC. Willie F. Calhoun, 52, 201 Alice St., FTA-traf in illegal drugs, Deputy Hooker, TCSO. Crystal N. Browning, 29, 5283 San Pedro Rd., DUI, domestic, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Sultan H. Ashi, 36, 111 Cypress Rd., poss of cocaine, domestic, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Lisa Turner, 36, Steinhatchee, poss of controlled sub w/o RX, poss of methamphetamine, SGT. Deeson, PPD. William Jordan Boyington, 32, Steinhatchee, DWLS, SGT. Deeson, PPD. Otto Rain Zavada, 36, 2647 Sidney Blanton Rd., DWLS, writ of bodily attachment, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Feb 24: Amanda M. Binkley, 38, 2819 Watts Ln., theft/of other, Deputy Cash, TCSO. Marcus Martin, 25, St. Petersburg, no valid DL, Deputy Owens, TCSO. Feb 25: Corey Michael Ussery, 44, Branson, Mo., poss controlled substance, poss RX w/o RX, DUI, DWLS, warrant (Missouri), Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Willie Alexander Williams, 27, 905 N. Veterans Dr., domestic battery, Ptl. Gray, PPD. Feb 26: Natasha Lazara VaughansWilliams, 40, 805 OSteen Rd., FTA DWLS/R, Deputy R. Ricketson, TCSO. Aida Kay Beach, 39, 1720 James Smith Rd., VOP, Ptl. Grifn, PPD. Donald Bass, 58, homeless, VOCC, Livingston, Probation. Don Helton Jr., 20, Springhill Nursery Rd., criminal mischief, deputy Blue, TCSO. Feb 27: Antonio Labron Yearby, 37, Orlando, DWMLS/R-knowingly, Ptl. Gray, PPD. Cedric Maurice Penn, 46, Jacksonville, FTA-disorderly intoxication, Burford, TCSO. Brinson D. Murphy, 27, 5260 Hwy. 19 S. lot E., battery, Deputy Hooker, TCSO. Travis L. Townsend, 20, 1474 Hampton Springs Ave., trespass after warning, disorderly conduct., Deputy Hooker, TCSO. Eric Landry, 38, 141 Al Suber Rd., writ of bodily attachment, Johnson, PPD. Feb 28: Ricky Robinson, 44, 1115 N. Faulkner St., misuse, Ptl. Campbell, PPD. Lakesha Danyell Walker, 29, 508 E. Morgan Ave., DWLS revoked, Ptl. Johnson, PPD. James R. Woods, 30, 1413 Quail St., AGG stalking, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Kendra Ahmalia Sheppard, 24, 1115 E. Julia St., DWLS, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Reginald Alan Sherrer, 33, 711 E. Bacon St., no valid DL, deputy Shaw, TCSO. Terry James Randall, 38, 3660 Bohannon Cir., DWLS, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Ritchie Lamont Davis, 40, 117 Warner Ave., lewd/ lasc batt on child, child abuse contrubting, uttering a counterfeit bill, VOP, Ptl. Murphy, PPD. March 1: Larry Davis, 48, 2795 Ward Rd., STC to weekends, county Judge, TCSO.

PAGE 6

By SUSAN H. LINCOLN Managing Editor Sixty-three years ago, Charlie Willis cut the last log, and they let the whistle blow until the steam ran out. That, as Harry Hall recalls it, was a sad and mournful sound which signaled the beginning of the end for the thriving community of Foley which had surrounded the mill. But in his memoriesand in those of other neighbors, the community of Foley lives on. On Wednesday of last week, Hall walked members of the Perry Kiwanis Club through the town that J.S. Foley built. We had a drycleaners we called The Pressing Club, Hall said, beginning his list. A movie theatre, a barber shop, a ladies beauty salon, a library, a commissary and a large grocery store. At the grocery store, everybody had an open charge account. And free delivery, he added. Founded in the early 1920s, the mill paid day laborers about 22.5 cents per hour and managers earned about 45-50 cents an hour. Pay came in the form of Babbit which could be spent at the company store. Halls father was paymaster for the company. We had 24-hour medical service, Hall continued, remembering that Dr. Walter Baker made house calls day and night. He might be 10 oclock at night getting there, but hed just walk in the front doorbecause nobody locked their doors and ask, Wheres the patient? Hall remembered that Dr. Baker loved to sh and hunt, so he traveled with his shing rod and gun. If he saw a ditch full of water, he might just pull over and sh a bit. If you needed transportation to a hospital, then Dr. Baker hauled you to Archbold Hospital in Thomasville, Ga. It was said that if you survived the car ride with Dr. Baker, youd have no problems with the hospital stay. I dont believe the doctor slept all night in his 92 years of life, Hall stated. At Christmas, he said, a big, decorated tree was put in the center of town and each child had a wrapped gift from the company. There was only one church, and although nearly everybody was Baptist, you went to that church, no matter your denomination. He did note that the managers for Foley were predominantly Catholic from Minnesota. They were very family-oriented and made sure the community was too. No business was transacted on Sundays. No liquor was sold within the community. And another rule was, No rowdy behavior. If you assaulted your wife, youd be visited by a manager warning you that another offense could lead to your dismissal. If you didnt heed that warning, Hall said the managers were true to their word. You lost your job, they packed up your belongings and moved you out. And he emphasized, And nobody wanted to lose their job because this was during the Great Depression and the jobs at Foley were good jobs. The mill ran three, eighthour shifts, despite the nancial worries of the time, but Hall said very often the workers were only allowed to work ve or six hours of the eight-hour shift, to save money without letting workers go. After Foley survived the Depression, World War II became the dominant worryand the dominant customer. Every board foot of lumber was obligated to the federal government. People in Foley said you could hear the rejoicing all the way from Minnesota. The company made a lot of money during the war. The town continued to manufacture lumber until the 1950s when Procter and Gamble arrived. Thats when Lester Foley leased and moved the old mill A-6 Taco Times July 17, 2013 Community AARP: last Wed., 10 a.m. at Perry Shrine Club. Kiwanis Club: Wednesdays, noon, Perry Elks Lodge on Puckett Road. MainStreet Perry: fourth Tuesday, 5:30 p.m., Perry Historic Station. NAACP: rst Sunday, 5 p.m., at Jerkins Community Center. Optimist Club: Thursday, noon at Rosehead, downtown Perry. Perry Garden Club: third Wednesday, 10 a.m. Perry Elks Lodge: second and fourth Tuesday, 7 p.m. Perry Lodge #187: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m., Masonic Hall. Perry Masonic Lodge 123: meets rst and third Monday, 7:30 p.m. Perry Shrine Club: fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. (club house located on Courtney Road). Perry Womans Club: second Wed., noon (September to May). Rotary Club: Tues., noon at Rosehead Junction. Taylor County Leadership Council: second and fourth Friday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Vogue XIII: rst Mon., 7:30 p.m. Call 584-2404. Airport Advisory Committee: fourth Wednesday, 12 noon, Perry-Foley Airport. City Council: second and fourth Tues., at 5:30 p.m. County Commission: rst Mon. and third Tues. at 5:30 p.m., courthouse annex; workshop, fourth Tues., 5 p.m. Planning Board: rst Thurs., 6 p.m. Courthouse annex (old post ofce). Taylor County Construction License Board Meeting: third Fri., 2 p.m., courthouse annex. Taylor County School Board: rst and third Tues., 6 p.m. Taylor Coastal Water and Sewer: fourth Tuesday at 18820 Beach Road, 3 p.m. Taylor Soil & Water Conservation District Board: fourth Monday, 7 p.m., Foley Airport terminal conference room. Diabetes classes: every Tuesday, 3 p.m., Doctors Memorial Hospital. FAMU Alumni Chapter: second Monday, 7 p.m., Jerkins Community Center. Friends of the Taylor County Public Library: last Monday of the month, 5:30 p.m., public library. Girl Scouts Service Unit: rst Tuesday, 7 p.m., Scout Hut. Habitat for Humanity: second Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Capital City Bank, Rm. #208. Helping Hands of the Shelter: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., Chamber of Commerce. Home Educators League of Perry: Forest Capital Hall. Call 584-6866 or visit on-line htt:taylor. ifas.u.edu. Muskogee Creek Indian Nation: second and fourth Sat., 7 p.m. Tribal grounds, Lyman Hendry Road. Muskogee Creek Indian Tribe: second Saturday, 3 p.m., Oak Hill Village on Woods Creek Road. National Wild Turkey Federation (Yellow Pine Drummers): holds open monthly meeting on rst Thursday, Golden Corral, 7 p.m. Call 584-9185. Parrot Heads in Perry-dise Club: meets the second and fourth Wednesday, 7 p.m. Call 843-1469 for location. Perry Alliance of Ministers & Pastors (P.A.M.P.): meets second Sunday, 2:30 p.m., Little St. John P.B. Church. Pet adoptions: Taylor County Animal Shelter, open Monday through Friday. Call 838-3525. Republican Party of Taylor County: second Thursday, 6 p.m., at Rigonis Cookhouse on Highway 19 North. Call 2232648. Search & Rescue Riders #1135 of Christian Motorcyclists Assoc.: 4th Saturday, 9 a.m. at Golden Corral Restaurant. Taylor Adult Program (TAP): Thursdays, 10 a.m., 502 N. Center Street. 223-0393. Taylor Coastal Communities Association: second Tuesday, 6 p.m., at the district building on Beach Road. Taylor County Brotherhood: meets on Mondays, 7 p.m., at New Brooklyn; every third Saturday, 9 a.m., at Stewart Memorial. Taylor County Brotherhood Choir: meets every Thursday, 6 p.m., at Stewart Memorial. Chamber of Commerce: second Thurs., 8 a.m., chamber board room. Taylor County Development Authority: second Mon., noon, at Historic Perry Station. Taylor County Historical Society: third Mon., 7 p.m. Historical Society building. Societys museum is open every Thursday, 1-5 p.m. Taylor County Horsemans Association Horse Show: practice roping every Friday, 7 p.m.; second Saturday, registration, 3 p.m.; ride, 4 p.m. Arena is located on Bishop Blvd. Free admission. Taylor County Quilters: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to noon, public library. Taylor County Reef Research Team: second Tuesday, 7 p.m., Forest Capital Hall. Taylor County Senior Center: Executive Board of Directors meeting, every third Thursday. Taylor County United: second Mon., 7 p.m., Evangel Christian Fellowship. Tourism Development Council: second Thurs., 12 noon, Chamber of Commerce. Whole Child Taylor-Shared Service Network: fourth Mon., 9 a.m., Alton H. Wentworth Administrative Complex. Yarn Lovers Circle: rst and third Thursday, 9:30 a.m., Taylor County Public Library. AL-ANON: meets every Thursday at noon, St. James Episcopal Church. Alzheimers Support Group: meets every fourth Thursday, 10:30 a.m., First Presbyterian Church. Big Bend Hospice Advisory Council: fourth Tuesday at 1 p.m., Big Bend Hospice ofce. Celebrate Recovery: a nondenominational, Christ-centered recovery ministry meets Thursdays at 6 p.m., in the First Baptist Church Youth Center (old Citizens Bank building). Friends and Family of Sexual Assault Survivors Support Group: fourth Tuesday, 6-7 p.m., Glorious Rain Church. For information, call 843-0158. Narcotics Anonymous: Sun., Tues., Wed., Fri., 7 p.m.; Sat., 12 noon Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception (Parish Center), 2750 S. Byron Butler Pkwy. Call: (877) 340-5096. Perry Winners Group of Alcoholics Anonymous: Friday, 8 p.m.; Heritage House, 317 N. Orange St. AMVETS Post 20: third Saturday, 9 a.m., at Golden Corral Restaurant. American Legion Post #291 (Steinhatchee): second Thursday, 7 p.m. American Legion Post #96: rst Tues., 7 p.m., American Legion Hall, Center St. Sons of Confederate Veterans: fourth Thursday at North Orange Street. Call 5845725 or 838-2045. VFW Post #9225: second Tuesday, 7 p.m. (American Legion building). CIVIC GROUPS GOVERNMENT INTERESTS SUPPORT GROUPS VETERANSTo add your organization free of charge, please call 584-5513 or e-mail newsdesk@perrynewspapers.comCommunity CalendarPlease call 584-5513 to update your current calendar listing. Expanded Calendar of Events available at: www.perrynewspapers.com Extension WorkshopsLearning to can Canning classes were recently taught at the Taylor County Extension Service by Extension Agent Lori Wiggins who instructed participants on canning jams, pickles and tomatoes. Participants learned up-to-date methods on how to preserve the foods using the waterbath method as well as food safety issues related to canning. For more information on canning or future canning Harry Hall (left) took Kiwanians on a virtual tour is pictured with Club President Bobby Edwards.J.S. Foley was an exceptional entrepreneur, Harry Hall told Kiwanians last week. When the mill Foley founded at Eastport was hijacked by extraordinary freight charges, he found a way around it. He decided to take the mill to the forest. Thats how Foley became a mill community. It took almost two years to build the town, but the housing units which neared 200were constructed of rst run yellow pine from the mill. Arndt Larson, a Swede, designed all the buildings in Foley and J.P. Garver was in charge of construction. He once admitted that he laid every brick pier for all the houses in the community. Foley was his favorite place, Hall said. All houses were connected to a central water system, and to a central treated sewer system. It was modern for those times, he said. Monthly rent ranged from $2.50 to $6 depending on the size of the house and the number of bedrooms. There was also a boarding house and a hotel. When I think of J.S. Foley, I think of the graduation speech I heard at Florida State. I dont remember the name of the speaker but he emphasized the importance of a lamp-lighter. That stayed with me. And thats what J.S. Foley was. His inuence inspired so many other people. Hall talks to Kiwanians about communitys historyFoley lives on in residents memories J.S. Foley: He decided to take the mill to the forestPlease see page 10

PAGE 7

A-7 Taco Times July 17, 2013 Religion Obituaries Faye Peltier Faye Medlin Peltier of Perry died on July 12, 2013. Born on Feb. 1, 1922, Mrs. Peltier was 91 years old. Her parents were Buren Medlin and Lemmer Bennett Medlin in Fairmount, Ga. She was a faithful and devoted member of Southside Baptist Church. Mrs. Peltier was preceded in death by her husband, Gene Peltier; two brothers, Doyle Medlin and Loye Hayes Medlin; and two sisters, Lona Mae Thomas and Marie Underwood. She was the last surviving member of her immediate family. Memorial services will be held next Saturday, July 27, at 11 a.m. at Southside Baptist Church with Pastor Gary French ofciating. Joe P. Burns Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Milton A. Waddell Milton A. Waddell, 87, of Salem, died Saturday, July 13, 2013, at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Perry. Mr. Waddell was born Sept. 22, 1925, in Miami, to Paul and Lois Waddell. Mr. Waddell was of the Church of God faith. He was a veteran of the United States Army and served in World War II. Mr. Waddell was preceded in death by his parents; his wife of 51 years, Mary Imogene Waddell; and a son Steve Waddell. Survivors include: his wife, Renee Waddell of Salem; one son, Dewey Waddell of Leesburg; two brothers, Jimmy Waddell and Verle Waddell; a sister, Nelene; ve grandchildren; a host of great grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, July 27, at Joe P. Burns Funeral Home with the Rev. James Taylor ofciating. Interment will follow in Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell at a later date. The family will receive friends from 1 p.m. until time of service on July 27, at Joe P. Burns Funeral Home which is in charge of arrangements.Paul Allen KlopferPaul Allen Klopfer, 78, of Perry, died Monday, July 15, 2013, at his residence. Mr. Klopfer was born Aug. 11, 1934, in Piqua, Ohio, to Paul and Mary (Windland) Klopfer. He was preceded in death by a brother. Mr. Klopfer was a member of First Church of God in Perry. Survivors include: his wife of 20-plus years, Cennie Mae (Thomas) Klopfer of Perry; ve sons; three daughters; several grandchildren; one sister; and a host of nieces and nephews. Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, July 18, at Burns Funeral Home which is in charge of arrangements. Justin Webb will ofciate. The family will receive friends from 5-7 p.m. today, July 17, at their residence. 160th anniversary celebrated at Springhill Baptist Church present Armor of God Vacation Bible School The Pentecostals of Perry urge you to bring your children and let them fellowship with other children who are excited about our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. The churchs Armor of God Vacation Bible School begins Monday, July 22, and continues through Thursday, July 25, from 7-9 p.m. Food will be provided to children attending. Parents Night will highlight the nal evening with a presentation of what the students learned. Questions? Call David (843-4332) or Misty (8430050) Leggett. Springhill Missionary Baptist Church celebrates its 160th anniversary during worship Sunday, July 21, at 11 a.m. Guest speaker for the occasion will be Pastor Maevester Carter of Gainesville. Pastor Izell Montgomery Jr. and the congregation invite everyone in the community to attend.

PAGE 8

rfntbrnrbtf ntb f fntb tbtbrtf ttbfbrf ntbfbfb nbbt tb tbrttb btttb ftrrrfbb nbrffrfff rbrf tbttbtb bbrbntfr fbttbffrf tttfrrtf b ff b nf brfr bttttbt nttf rrt tbrfnnb tttt nf tftf ftbtntbt nrfrtfbtbftfb brtbftbtfr ttttfftn ft tfbbrb tftntb rbtb trfbtn ttbt br tbbfbtt ttfbrrfr rrtnntf brtr tbbfbfrnnrrf bfr brtr tb tbbfbttnbfr brbrrrfr rf f brtr tb rrtb rtfbtbbb tttrftbttntn rftfbnbfbrb tfbr tr tbbfbtt t rfrn tffrftrftf nbfbrbbr fbtf rtf t bb rfrrtfntb fftf rbf tbtfrb b bbr rfrrtfrfttbfr btrbftb nf t trfrrtfntb bttbf ftfrftfr fbtrrrrf tttrffbr bftrb rbftbrtfr rtfnntbrnr trf nf btrtbr rfrrtfntb trttrfb tftr bbfb rfrfbff bnbffttbrrtb brb nf bfrfbtt bfntbbft frbfrn fbfttfttbrb fftfrf rnftfb nf ttrbt brfrfntbtf brbtr tbrrf btfb nf ttrntb bfnbrbtbrbt bbrf rf rbtf rr tfrf btfb r nf bttnnbfr bfrrrrfft fttrftr ftt tftfr nf tbntbf fnbtf brftbr ntbftfbrnr t nf tntbbnntbbf btbtnnbr tfrbrfntb bttttf fbrfrfr ftfbft tbrftb tffbbbfntn rtfnrrff frfbrn btttntbrf rfrtfbr bttbrnfrf rfnfffbtb ff frtbttrbtt rftfbrt tnnbrtfrb tntbbtt brfrrfbttrfrf bttrnrbnrbtt rnrbrfbn btnnrbbbrtf bttrtttfb tbrrfbtbtb bnt btnn frtf tb bttnbr ttfbttrf rrtrffrtbtt frf tbt fntbtbf rtbfrbt bbbtr btfbnrffrfr tb nf rtbtf rbrrb tfttb nf tfttfb tfrbrf nf rrrtftft tbrfrr rrrftntbt tf nf trt nf tfntbf ttft tbrfr nf btttfttf rb rbrtt rf nf nbfrb rfrt tfttb nf tbtffrtrb fbbff rfbbffb bfbrbf bttrbfttr rf tbrfrf rbftfrrtf trbtrf tb tbttbb bfftfrrtft rf tb tb fttbrf nf bfbt rttbbfbtf rftfrrtf nf tbtbbr rtbbr bftbtbbrnf rbtbtb rrtr bntbtnn nf rrbtbtn tffbfnnrb fnntbr tfrb btfrtt rfttfrf btf nf b rttrttb rfrrtbf fbft tbbt ftrbrbt ftfrt rfrtntb rfbrftbb tnbrnrrfbtb brnrrtf tfrtfrftbrt tfrtbrrt nbrtfttrrtf rrtf nrbrrnrrrtf rfbtfrtn tbrtf rrnrrrtf rtrfttbfr tbtfttb rbrrfrtfrftf tfbbrrtf ttbfrtftbrrfrrr brrr bftbftbbbrr bt tbtftbtntf trrtfbbbft tfrf brrftnnr ffrrtfft brrtfbtftbr tbtftt tbtftt ttbrftbtnfrrtf bffrrtf nnrffn ntbr bbbf ttbfrrntbrnb fbtrrtfrftfrt tbrbbbf brfrbtfbnbb rnrfr ftbbrf tbrtfr nfrr tntbrfrfn frbtff nrn trtbrftr fbbtntb bbbtfrrrrf nnrtfrrtfr fnrrftrr bntbf rfbrfbtft bbrfb tfrttbr brfrf bbrrf bt brt b trf bbrf brf b t tb btff rfffb brnrrrr nf brfrftnnb btnrtfb brbfbr btft tbrtbrbrn bffrf tbffbr fbrfbbrrf btbbr bbtrfttrfb tbrbrfft fbr nf ffrfrftbb rfrrff rfbtntb trtftb brbrb ttt ttrf rfnbrrtffbrb trbrttf bbrtf trfffbrf bftrtb nb nf rfrntbtrf bnr rrbnr rbntbttrrntbtr rrbnrnrbtrrbt bnbrr nrtr ttbt bbtrntr brnnnntr rbr brnbbrnnrntr rnbrrnrtbtrbtr rnbrrnrtbtrn bttrbrnrttr rtntrrrrt btrrnnbbn rbnbbntrrrtn rntbtrbtn trbnrrnrrntr trbnttnt trrtntr rrrtbtrrnn bbnrbn bbntrrrtnrntbtrnt rtrbnttnt rbtrntbt tntrnf ttrrnb rrnrtbtr bb br rb rrrf bf rntbntbrt rnbrrnrtbtr r f rfn ftb

PAGE 10

A-10 Taco Times July 17, 2013 Economic Opportunity (DEO). Among Taylors neighbors, Dixie County had the highest unemployment rate at 8.7 percent, followed by Madison County at 8.5 percent. Below Taylor were Lafayette at 6.0 percent and Jefferson County at 5.4 percent. Like Taylor, all four counties saw slight increases in their rates in May. For the month, Hendry County had the highest rate in the state with 11.1 percent while Monroe County once again boasted the lowest with 4.0 percent. to the general public for the benet of himself or another person. Last August, Jarvis withdrew his bid for reelection as state attorney for the Third Judicial Circuit. At the time, he was the target of a Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) investigation spurred by allegations from a former state attorneys ofce employee stating that Jarvis had improperly accessed condential records regarding the employees wife. Days before a grand jury was to hear the matter, however, an agreement reached with State Attorney Brad King of the Fifth Judicial Circuit overseeing the case rendered the need for a grand jury hearing moot. In a letter to Gov. Rick Scott, King related that Jarvis agreed to withdraw his bid for re-election as state attorney, leave ofce at the end of his current term and have his certications for searching secure databases revoked by the FDLE. In return, King said he agreed not to present the matter to the grand jury or take any other action. He also agreed to recommend that no other action be taken against Jarvis. King--who was appointed by Scott to present the matter to a grand jury-issued a report detailing the investigation and the following conclusion: We have found no evidence that Mr. Jarvis used the information he obtained in any search in a way that harmed the person searched, or that beneted himself. However, it is clear that Mr. Jarvis made repeated searches of various persons in clear violation of the user agreements he signed. including Perry. City Manager Bob Brown said they had some mild washouts on Page Street and several low lying areas experienced some ooding, but there was no signicant damage to roadways. A ood warning remains in effect for the Aucilla River at Lamont, where the river was above its oodstage (9.0 feet) and was forecast to remain so through at least Saturday. According to the NWS, minor ooding is occurring in the area and is forecast to continue for the time being. The river level was 9.4 feet Tuesday and was expected to rise to 9.8 feet by this afternoon (Wednesday). The weather forecast for the rest of the week is calling for slight to moderate chances for thunderstorms, with a 20 percent chance today, rising to 50 percent by Friday. STEINHATCHEE Continued from page 1 At least through SaturdayAucilla at Lamont expected to remain above ood stage ETHICS Continued from page 1Jarvis withdrew his bid for re-election in August UNEMPLOYMENT Continued from page 1 Down on the farm First Presbyterian Church and First United Methodist Church combined forces for a 2013 Vacation Bible School with the theme, HayDayGrowing in Friendship with Jesus. Many friends from the community participated and enjoyed the petting zoo which added fur and fun to the week. Presbyterian Pastor Larry Neal and Methodist Pastor J.T. Taylor were down on the farm, too, and report a great week for the combined congregations. equipment to Shamrock (near Cross City), and many of the mill people went too, Hall said, adding that his father went as part of the accounting department. If you look at the grounds of Buckeye Cellulose now, little remains of the community of Foley. But the camphor trees and the old oaks, he said. However, the spirit of Foley lives on in those who called this community home. MEMORIES Continued from page 6 Little remains, but spirit lives on Jefferson boasts 5.4 percent