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 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Content
 Back Cover






Title: Tom, Dick, and Harry made a scrap-book and here it is
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028354/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tom, Dick, and Harry made a scrap-book and here it is
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dodd, Mead & Company ( Publisher )
Rand, Avery & Co ( Printer )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher: Dodd, Mead & Company
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Rand, Avery, & Company
Publication Date: c1876
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1876   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1876   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1876
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Scope and Content: Books consists of a random pictures from other publications with a very short story under it.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by Dalziel.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028354
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238621
notis - ALH9141
oclc - 61164827

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
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    Content
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    Back Cover
        Page 97
        Page 98
Full Text



The Baldwin Library




























































































A PECK Ol-,TROUBLE.


u1










OM, ICK AND ARRY


MADE A SCRAP-BOOK;


AND HERE IT IS.


NEW YORK:
DODD, MEAD, AND COMPANY,
751 BROADWAY.








IU W--


COPYRIGHT, 1876,

By DODD, MEAD,& COMPANY.



























Franklin'Press:
Rand, Avery, & Company,
117 Franklin Street,
Boston.







TOM, DICK, AND IHARARY. 5







I 1 I-
I -.

























This is poor Tom's first day at school, and he is very home-
sick. He cannot even tell the letters in "Jack the Giant-Killer;"
and does not care for the red apple in his hand.
,- --------_------... .----,---.---------- ,,---,------,--->







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Here is a fishing-village. The sea is too rough for the boats

to go out; and so they are all drawn up on the beach, where

the waves cannot reach them, while the men set about mending

their nets, and waiting for the wind to go down.


I








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Once upon a time there was a boy whose name was Frank.

His father was captain of a ship, and often sailed to far-off

lands. Frank would sometimes stay on the ship till it was

ready to sail, and then he would go ashore in a small boat.


~-~-







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


But, when his father was not at home, Frank was not a good boy.
He did not obey his mother, and made friends with rude and bad
boys in the streets. At last he ran away to go to sea. Here he
is, trying to get the captain of a ship to take him as a cabin-boy.


,iT








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.




,. .


He did not have as good a time as he thought he should.
At first he was very seasick, and every one laughed at him.
After a while he grew to be quite a sailor, and could help reef
the sails with the oldest man in the ship.
IT







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


The ship on which he was sailed to the icy northern seas in
search of whales. Here we see a boat's crew trying to catch a
whale. It is hard work; and many a time poor Frank was wet
to the skin ; and many a night, when the wind was howling
overhead, he wished himself back in his own little bed.








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


They had now been away three years from home. At last

the ship's head was put to the south; and all were happy at

the thought that they should soon see their friends again. But

a great storm arose, and the wind tore the sails into pieces,
and the good ship sprung a leak.

S,------








12 TOM, DIC-K AND HARRY.
























M
*".. '". .', '"."*'

























The waves soon dashed over her, and she was a wreck. Oh,
how Frank wished that he had not run away to sea! But he
was not lost. Another ship came to his help, and he made his
way home safely; but he did not ever want to go to sea again.







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 13


What a cold scene this is! Snow is over every thing. The
little birds would starve, I fear, if it were not for the sheaves
of grain which some kind friend has tied on poles for them.
How merrily they fly about!







14 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Jack was down on his knees in the grass one morning,
cutting some fresh leaves for his birds; and Will was standing
near, watching every thing he did; when all at once they heard
some one call, "Willie !"






TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Willie ran around the house, and there was uncle Joe on
horseback. "Ask your mother if she will let you boys go
fishing this afternoon," said he. Willie ran to the window
where she was sitting, and soon had her consent.
111


U1





C!Y


TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


This is a cold country. The funny mound is a house, made

out of blocks of snow. If you look, you can see a man going in

at the door on his hands and knees. His friends who stand

around dressed in furs will follow him; but the dogs must stay

outside.







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 17


This is a warm country. Here the people hardly need a
house, except when it rains, and often sleep out of doors. You
will see in the picture that most of them wear almost no clothes
at all. What fun it must be for the little boys not to have to
be dressed every morning!







TOI, DICK, AND HARRY.


Harry and his little brother Jack were going into the country

for the summer: so they went to buy them each a fishing-pole.

"They must be good and long, and supple and strong," said

Harry; and he chose them with great care, while Ponto looked

on very wisely.

~fli-------------------------


K4







7TOi,, DICK, AND HARRY. 19


Harry and Jack had each a pony. One day Jack got off
to let a little farmer-boy take a ride. Away went the boy at
full gallop, and Jack thought that he was going to steal the
pony; but he had only gone to chase a cow, and soon came
back.







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY


One day when they were out, and far from home, it began
to rain. But each had a waterproof cloak, and a hood to draw
over the head: so, though the rain came down in floods, they
did not get wet at all, but went merrily on.








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


This is a little boy named Peter, who often came to see

Harry and Jack. He does not come in this morning, because,

just as he climbed the hill, he saw them on their ponies, just

going out of sight. He is asking when they will be back.

------------------------------------------------- -- -f








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Poor little Jack is very cold and hungry. He has had nothing
to eat to-day, and hopes some one of these people will give him a
penny.

t <-------------------------------,-- _>








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 23


- ,4


Ii/v
/ r& j I


Sometimes Jack runs over to see his friend, lame Charley;
and they have long talks in the churchyard, where they lie on
the grass.
41-------------------- --









TOM, DICA, AND HARRY.


I --.~


Jack has a little baby-sister Polly at home, of whom he is very
fond. Often he holds her in his arms while she sleeps.

-T-


''
r


)"







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 25


Little Polly is very ill; and poor mamma is very sad, for she
fears her baby will not get well. But Jack comforts her.







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


____________ I


What are these women doing? and what funny clothes they

wear! This is a picture of a far-off land called Japan; and
these women are spreading out green tea-leaves to dry. When

they are all dry, they will be put in boxes, and sent across the
ocean to us.








TOM, DICI, AND HARRY.


Hurrah! How jolly this must be! The three horses are

on a full gallop. How the dust flies And see! the rider has
to hold on to the side of the car to keep his seat. The driver

is shouting strange words to his horses, for he is a Russian;

but they know what he means, and gallop away.


r* W







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Did you ever hear ot fishes that build nests ? Here are
some called sticklebacks. See that fellow in the corner, with
his mouth full of seaweed! His three friends have swum away
to bring him a fresh supply.


94 94







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 29


This man caught two leopards when they were young, and
has taught them to hunt for him. He is looking to see if
there is any game in sight. If there is, the leopards will soon
kill it for him.

1 t


j!








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


With his net this bold man gathers the eggs of the sea-birds
who have built their nest in the cliff. If he sl-ould let go the
rope, he would fall into the sea.


---c-J








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 31


What strange place is this, with half-dressed men and great
birds walking about its streets ? It is a city in India, many
thousand miles away.

---








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Ha, ha! This time, the shark has met his master. It is of
no use for him to struggle. He will soon be drawn up on the
beach, and be killed.


__ __







i.r


TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


On these tall trees, cocoanuts grow. See three men are climb-
ing up to gather them. Green cocoanuts are very good to eat, and
no doubt the men are hungry.







34 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


These men are saying their prayers. They do not pray as we
do. First they stand with their faces toward the east; then they
take off their shoes; then they make low bows; and at last they
kneel down, and strike their foreheads against the ground. They
are called Mohammedans.








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 35

















.---, ^ ^-^- *-- i






Is--w











The three men who are sitting down are blind beggars. You
will find that each is holding out his hand for money. They live in
the city that you see in the picture; and their friends bring them
out to sit by the roadside, in hopes that those who pass may help
them.

1 1 ----- -----------------------. ---







36 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.





















k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -_-----------------. ....------------------------------ ---------------------------.-
I-I-











This is an Arab chief. I fear that he is an old thief; and,
though he sits so quietly on his horse, I have no doubt that he is
laying a plan to rob some traveller as soon as he can get a chance.








TOM, DICK, AND HARR Y. 37


--- -----


In the country where this man lives, water is very scarce. So

every day he fills full the goatskin, puts it on his back, and goes

through the streets, calling loudly that he has it for sale.






TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


This must be a fisherman; for he has a rod and a basket: but
where is the water ?








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Ho, ho, ho! Poor little Topsy is in a sad fright, and all about a

little white woolly dog.


1






TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


~-----U


Do you see the basket made fast to the ropes ? In that basket
is a man; and he is being pulled across the stream which is dashing
and roaring below him. This is the only way they can have to
cross; for the water rises in the spring, when the snow melts, and
would sweep away any bridge.







TOM, DICK, AND I/ARKY. 41


Are these chickens way out at sea ? Yes, but not the kind we
see on shore. The sailors call them Mother Carey's chickens."
They can float on the waves like a cork, and do not mind the
wildest storms. Sometimes they are seen in mid-ocean, more than
a thousand miles from land.







42


TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Do you see that light in the sky ? Neighbor Jones's barns are

on fire. Run to his help, or his house will burn too. Quick! lose

no time.

OR4


IFm









TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 43


'I


-'


u,
.Ji:
..
\

-" '

,! .~k 1161 i i


I : ~~


This old boat was left on the beach when the tide went out.

Tom and Dick have drawn it up out of reach of the waves, and

are trying to mend it.







-~


70M, DICK, AND HARRY.


v 1,u


Be careful, idle Jack. Squirrels have sharp teeth, and can bite

right through a boy's finger.






I~4


TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


If I could only drop some salt on that bird's tail, I could catch
him," said Tommy.






46 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


It is Christmas Eve, and a very frosty night. How cold the
moon looks as it rises behind the church-steeple! These poor boys
and girls have been singing carols at the doors of houses, and at
each they have had money given them. The kind lady in the door
will take them into her kitchen, and give them each something
good to eat.








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Jil
L, ~


-NJ --- ~


This is a scene in a hot country, as you may tell from the fact

that the man does not wear clothes. He is a water-carrier; and,

when he has filled his pots with water, he puts them all on his

bullock, and leads him away. He is a lazy fellow; and I fear, that,

when his master is not looking, he does not do any more work than

he can help.


i: ~L~ 'I
;; H~sL ~


r
ii7L;~ 1
/S

Li


r-







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


This great mass of leaping water is boiling hot. It comes out
of the ground, and shoots into the air to a great height. See the
great clouds of steam that rise about it!







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 49


Two great white polar bears lay on the ice. Said Mrs. Bear,
"I am hungry." So Mr. Bear got up, and looked all about, to see
if he could see a good fat seal anywhere.







50 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


What a horrid snake this is It is called a cobra; and its bite
is certain death. How would you like to live in a country where
the snakes crawl into the beds, and drop from the roofs, and lie
coiled up in the doorways ? In India, many thousand people die
every year from the bite of snakes.







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 51


F


/


In the Hooghly River, in India, the tide often comes in like a
wall of water, ten feet high. It does not sink the little boats, as
you would think; for they all ride over it in safety, as the one in the
picture is doing. What fun it must be to be in one of the boats
when the wave comes !
> <------------------------------------------------------------iA


M







52 TOf, DICA, AND HARY.


Tom and Dick went to coast with the other schoolboys at re-
cess. They had such a good time, that they did not hear the bell
ring; and their teacher has come out to see what the reason is.






TOM, DICA, AND HARRY.


Owl


Ten little birds came every day; for they knew that little Elsie
and her sister would not fail to throw them out crumbs, as long as
the ground was covered with snow.







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Little Ivan's father has asked his friends to take a sleigh-ride
on the frozen River Neva. It is a very cold night; but the stars
shine brightly, and all have warm rugs to wrap about them. The
drivers crack their long whips, the eight horses gallop away, and
the sleigh fairly flies over the ice.


W







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY 55


This is the camp of a troop of black soldiers. The bugle has
just blown; and each man has sprung on his horse, and is hurrying
to the parade-ground. They have pitched their tents in a cool
place, under the shade of these tall palm-trees; but they have to
work hard, and cannot sleep their time away.






TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


It N


In this still pool is where the dragon-flies are born. One is just
getting out of his old shell, while two above him are spreading
their wings to fly away.






TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Here are four bees sent out for honey. Two have loaded
themselves, and are flying back to the hive. The other two are
looking for a good sweet flower.







58 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


See how wildly the sea-birds fly about! They know well that
these bold men have come to rob their nests, and take away all
their eggs ; and they do not like it at all.






IC.'


.TOM, DICAI; AND IYARRE.


Poor little Jack had a bad pain, and so his mamma sent for the

doctor. But, as soon as Jack saw the doctor, the pain went away;

and he does not want to take a pill.






TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


This fish is called an "angler." Do you see the fishing-line he
carries before him, with something like a bait at the end ? This
bait is red; and when any little fish thinks it is good to eat, and
swims up to see, the angler swallows him down in no time.






TOM, DICA, AND HARRY. 61


4'
.--~ 1^


This man is being shaved; but he does not look as if he were
having a good time at all. Instead of sitting in a chair at his ease,
his head is nearly pulled off; and I am very sure that the razor has
no edge at all, and hurts him very much.







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Here are four women at work, picking tea-leaves. They take
the leaves when fresh and green; and, when their basket is full,

they spread them out on a table to dry. After a time, when
they are all quite dry, they are put in boxes, and sent across
the ocean to us.


LI1







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 63


In India, people do not bury the bodies of their friends as we
do, but burn them, and keep their ashes. Here we see how it is
done. The great birds that stand around are found everywhere in
that country. It is not a pleasant picture: let us turn over the
leaf.







64 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


This young lad
and had to work.
work was done.


could not go to school, because he was poor,
So he tried to study at noon, and after his






TOa, DICK, AND HARRY.


Lazy Bill and idle Sam played truant. Bill fell into the stream
and all that you can see of him are his hands, as he tries to pull
himself out.
--I






TOM, DICK, AND IIHARY.


Here is Paul Jones. He was a great hero, and the first man
who raised the stars and stripes to the masthead of his ship. Now
it flies from the masthead of many thousand s'ips. Long may it
wave !


65







TOM, DICA, AND HARRY.


--7


This shark has swum after the ship for many days, to catch what
was thrown overboard. At last the sailors threw out a line, and
caught him ; and now, Master Jack, I fear your time has come.






68 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


The bears are hungry, and want to eat the men; and the men
are hungry, and want to eat the bears. Which do you think has
the better chance ?







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 69


It must be near Christmas; for it is snowing hard. So I
am sure that this is a Christmas-box, and that it is full of good
things.








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Here is a village in which every house is built out of blocks
of 'ice. There is no danger of the houses melting when the sun
shines; for, where these huts are, the sun shines a few hours only
each day. In fact, they have put the village under the side of a hill,
to keep off the cold winds.








701W, AVC D A zD HARRY.


These birds are for sale. See what a splendid long tail one of
them has! They do not keep so quiet from choice, but because
their feet are tied fast to the pole on which they sit. In the mean
time the young girl is calling loudly, so that some one may see
and buy them.












TOM, DICK, AND HA ARY.


The men in this boat came to these icy seas in search of


whales. The cold came all at once, and their good ship was


frozen fast. So they chose a dozen men, and sent them in this


small boat to see if they could find any open water through which


the ship might escape.


___= _~__ _____=


~=-2~-=-==----i;-=---~;=--~-~
-----~--
~--~- ----~-~--~--~ ~-~-~

--~-~-~--~;~-~~




_r__



~---















.i









LF_'~


--=--~---=-- -= ~~~---
---- -,

------------------








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


These good people are all hard at work, picking mulberry-
leaves. They take them home, and feed them to the young silk-
worms, of which they have a great many. How merry they all
seem over it! and how pleasant it must be to work in the shade
of the trees !








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


poor man's strength is almost gone.
boats reach him ?


Can he keep up till


The
the two








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 75











------------------- -- ).














S .I L'
57




















and the snake rises, and twines about him.









76 TOI, DICK, AND HARRY.


4


I.


This is the good dog Pepper. He is used, with other dogs, to

draw the sledge that lies near him. The big hogshead was put for

him to sleep in; but he always lies down in a heap in the snow,

for his fur is so thick that he does not feel the cold.


~-PI___

~F~Y ~ ~----------~i--~--
----
--~-
----







IT,


TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 7'


Pepper's master is the captain of this good ship, called the

"Little Fox." The captain is very anxious now; for the seas are

very high, and he fears lest one of the great blocks of ice may

dash against the side of his-ship, and sink her, when all would be

lost.

---


-~ -=--~
:-w8~i~ ~-~BE1~B~B~Eslr.-r--rrl -~5--~








7OM, DICK, AND IARRY.


"I'veA

X.


One day, when a boat's crew from the ship were out, they saw

two walruses on the ice. They kept very still, and went so close to

them, that they could see their white tusks and their stiff whiskers.

All at once the walruses saw them, and sprang into the water.







TOM, DICA, AND HARRY. 79


ai t N/i


Another day, one of the men had caught a seal in a net. He
was taking him out of the net, when he heard a growl behind him,
and saw a big white bear close to him. He left the seal for the
bear to eat, and ran away as fast as his legs would take him.








So


TOM, DICK, AND HARRE.


One day, as idle Jim was playing in the road, he heard a voice
cry, Help!" He ran toward the sound, and found that old
Simon the cobbler had broken through the bridge. He ran and
found a long pole, and pulled him safely to the shore.


Ki4







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY. 81


Old Simon was so pleased at what Jim had done, that, when he
found he had no father nor mother, he took him home with him to
live. He taught him how to make and mend shoes; and Jim grew
up to be a famous cobbler and a very good man.







TOM, DICK, AND IARRY.


N. '
i;,


Bob and Dick were two little New-York boys, who went into the
country for the first time. Cousin Tom took them on old Dobbin
with him, and they rode over the whole farm. Often they came
back with their hands full of wild flowers, which they had stopped
to pick.


a.


82







TOM, DICA, ANLD I/A RR Y.


One winter's night, cousin Tom was going to drive in the sleigh
to the village. Bob and Dick had both made up their minds to go;
but, when the sleigh drove up to the door, grandma said that both
boys had fallen asleep, 'and were in bed: so cousin Tom went
alone.








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


lit


* ~Z 1-


A poor old man, driving a lame horse and a creaking wagon,
and shouting at the top of his voice, Fresh fish!" has just gone
down the street. These bad boys are calling him names; though
they take good care to keep out of the reach of his whip.


W I---- ---- 4


84







7o07,1 DICK, AND HARRY.



M'


Poor little Rob was one day playing by the roadside, when a
horse who had run away came on a gallop toward him, and, before
he could get out of the way, struck him with his hoof, and broke
his leg. He is just getting well now, and likes to walk out on his
crutches, and sit in the sun.







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Young Tom Jones's father and mother are in sad trouble; for

they have just learned that he has run away, and gone to be a

soldier.


1 K4








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


But idle Tom cares little about father or mother. Here he is,

trying to get Harry to run away and be a soldier with him. But

Harry will not go.


W






88 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY























think it fun to watch them.












think it f.u.-n ----- watc
;-4 'l
























think it fun to watch them.







TOM, DICU, AND HARRY.


Here is a steamship in mid-ocean.


And here is a whale-ship, frozen fast in the ice. It will be
many a day before she floats again in blue water.


m----~-----11


: ii; "r
~II

~- --







90 TOM, DICK, AND, HARRY.


.1 I ,;:IIjI/ i
II
;II


- *1-


Harry is going away from home, to be gone for a long time.
His father gives him a Bible, and asks him to read it every day.

<------------------------------- ---- T4








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


:1'
-1 -


It is my old friend !" cried Captain Buck as he rode home
from the wars at the head of his men. And he took off his hat
to greet him.


I








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


F,


=Zwi


Here is an Arab who has yoked his oxen, and set out to plough.

But his plough is not much better than an old stick, and it will do

no more than scratch the top of the ground. His crop will be

light, I think; for he is a poor farmer.


;
:








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


Elvie and his little sister were put in charge of the captain of a
sloop to sail to New York. They made friends with the carpen-
ter, who told them many a long story of his boy at home.


93







TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


"I am sure I heard a cry for help, father," said little Jane. "It
is some one lost in the snow. Quick Here is the lantern."


OZ-Ii- AM&A-41L.








TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.


95


* I*'.,


Bill had made up his mind to run away from school: so at
night he opened his window, and climbed out.








96 TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.

































Sge pi




sA /130C2










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