• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Table of Contents
 Chapter I: Tom wants to build a...
 List of Illustrations
 Chapter II: Tom goes to London
 Chapter III: Tom goes to the...
 Chapter IV: Tom runs away
 Chapter V: Tom goes to the zoological...
 Chapter VI: Tom goes to look for...
 Chapter VII: Tom writes a letter...
 Chapter VIII: Tom buys presents...
 Chapter IX: Tom gives his...
 Chapter X: Tom hears about the...
 Chapter XI: Tom gives up the thing...
 Chapter XII: Tom goes to catch...
 Chapter XIII: Tom pays a visit
 Chapter XIV: Tom learns a...
 Chapter XV: Tom gets into...
 Chapter XVI: Tom goes to see Archie's...
 Chapter XVII: Tom makes an...
 Chapter XVIII: Tom gives his...
 Chapter XIX: Tom helps a poor bird...
 Chapter XX: Tom makes friends with...
 Chapter XXI: Tom makes enemies...
 Chapter XXII: Tom reads his...
 Chapter XXIII: Tom dances at Matty’s...
 Chapter XXIV: Tom reads Archie’s...
 Chapter XXV: Tom thinks he hears...
 Chapter XXVI: Tom goes blackberrying,...
 Chapter XXVII: Tom prepares a new...
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Tom seven years old
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028340/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tom seven years old
Alternate Title: Tom 7 years old
Physical Description: 245, 8 p., 6 leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Russell, H. Rutherfurd
Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901 ( Illustrator )
Marcus Ward & Co
Royal Ulster Works
Publisher: Marcus Ward & Co.
Royal Ulster Works
Place of Publication: London
Belfast
Publication Date: 1876
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Curiosity -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Patience -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Zoos -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- London (England)   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1876   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1876   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1876
Genre: Family stories.   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Northern Ireland -- Belfast
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by H. Rutherfurd Russell.
General Note: Added title page and frontispiece printed in colors; illustrated by Kate Greenaway.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028340
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236852
notis - ALH7330
oclc - 61164808

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Dedication
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Chapter I: Tom wants to build a ship
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    List of Illustrations
        Page 6
    Chapter II: Tom goes to London
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Chapter III: Tom goes to the pantomime
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Chapter IV: Tom runs away
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Chapter V: Tom goes to the zoological gardens
        Page 48
        Page 48a
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Chapter VI: Tom goes to look for cats
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Chapter VII: Tom writes a letter to the queen
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Chapter VIII: Tom buys presents and goes home
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Chapter IX: Tom gives his presents
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Chapter X: Tom hears about the martyrs
        Page 102
        Page 102a
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Chapter XI: Tom gives up the thing he likes best
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Chapter XII: Tom goes to catch tadpoles
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Chapter XIII: Tom pays a visit
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    Chapter XIV: Tom learns a new lesson
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Chapter XV: Tom gets into disgrace
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
    Chapter XVI: Tom goes to see Archie's grandpapa
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 160a
        Page 161
        Page 162
    Chapter XVII: Tom makes an acquaintance
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Chapter XVIII: Tom gives his earnings
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
    Chapter XIX: Tom helps a poor bird in distress
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
    Chapter XX: Tom makes friends with the bees
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
    Chapter XXI: Tom makes enemies of the wasps
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Chapter XXII: Tom reads his story
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
    Chapter XXIII: Tom dances at Matty’s wedding and makes a speech
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
    Chapter XXIV: Tom reads Archie’s story
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
    Chapter XXV: Tom thinks he hears robbers
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 228a
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
    Chapter XXVI: Tom goes blackberrying, and makes blackberry jam
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
    Chapter XXVII: Tom prepares a new surprise
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text





The Baldwin Library




















TOM


SEVEN


YEARS


OLD





























III



.T

4

111









Art,- A-
Sii
I
















THE PANT OMVIMVE.















BY


RUTHERFURD-RUSSELL


RCUS WARD & Co., LONDON,
fD ROYAL ULSTER WORKS, BELFAST.









T


SEVEN


O


M


YEAR


S


OLD


BY


H. RUTHERFURD RUSSELL
AUTHOR OF TOM"


Anttonn:


MARCUS


WARD & CO., 67, CHANDOS STREET


AND ROYAL ULSTER WORKS, BELFAST
1876


__


~





























TdiO
TO


MY LITTLE


FRIEND,


GEOFF.









CONTENTS.


CHAP.
1.--TOM


II.-TOM

III.-TOM

IV.-TOM

V.-ToM

VI.-TOM

VII.-TOM

VIII.-TOM

IX.-TOM

X.-TOM

XI.-TOM

XII.-TOM

XIII.-ToM

XIV.-TOM

XV. -TOM

XVI.-TOMi

XVII -TOM-

XVIII.-TOM

XIX.-TOM

XX.-TOM.

XXI. -TOM


WANTS TO


BUILD A SHIP


GOES TO LONDON

GOES TO THE PANTOMIME

RuNS AWAY

GOES TO THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS

GOES TO LOOK FOR CATS .

WRITES A LETTER TO THE QUEEN

BUYS PRESENTS AND GOES HOME

GIVES HIS PRESENTS .

HEARS ABOUT THE MARTYRS

GIVES UP THE THING HE LIKES BEST

GOES TO CATCH TADPOLES

PAYS A VISIT .

LEARNS A NEW LESSON

GETS INTO DISGRACE .

GOES TO SEE ARCHIE'S GRANDPAPA

MAKES AN ACQUAINTANCE

GIVES HIS EARNINGS

HELPS A POOR BIRD IN DISTRESS

MAKES FRIENDS WITH THE BEES

MAKES ENEMIES OF THE WASPS


PAGE
. 7

14

. 24

32

. 48

56

. 65

73

. 87

102

. 108

115

. 123

135

.145

155

. 163

175

S181

188

. 196














TOM SEVEN YEARS OLD.


CHAP.


I.-TOM WANTS TO BUILD A SHIP.


OM was growing
deed. He had


birthdays.


very old


had


seven


He had seen the


trees and bushes and plants in


the world round


Live again sev(
he was no Ion
0 the sight, an
tell when it was coming. He
to a hundred stars in the sky,


him die and


en times, so that


ger


surprised


d could


at


almost


Shad counted up
and had found


out that there were many, many, many more


than a hundred,


though there was only


moon, and that a big one.


one


He also knew that


this moon and these stars were not nearly as
small as they looked, and only appeared so be-


~C


in-





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


cause


they were a long way off,


far up above


the clouds, much higher than the lark could fly.
He had learnt a great many names besides his


own-names of animals and birds and


fishes,


trees and flowers, the names of all the letters,
and some of the notes on the piano, and even
the names of the countries which lay far away,


outside the garden, and


beyond the road.


Tom wanted to go everywhere, and to see


everything.


He was quite


astonished


when


his papa showed him, on a painted map, what


a very little corner of the


lived in.


Whenever he


big,


asked


big world


how


soon


he
he


might start, he was told-
As soon as you have a ship of your own."


So he seriously began to


pick up


pieces


wood


to take them to anybody who would


build him
he was gr
be a man.


Every


a ship,
rowing


autumn


away he longed


for time was passing,


very


old,


when


and would


the swallows


to go with them; but


and
soon


flew
then


had wings of their own to


take them


over the sea, and did not require ships to sail


of


they


_ _





Tom Wants to Build a Ship. 9

in. The two pieces of land he wished most
to go to, were freezing cold Iceland, and
burning hot India. He wished to see real live
white bears and roaring lions and tigers with
his own eyes, and not merely in pictures.
And after he had travelled all over Iceland
and India, he meant to go to Arabia, and
ride on the back of a camel across the sandy
desert, and sleep in a white tent at night.
In the drawing-room there were some tall
plants that had come from these hot countries.
They liked to stay indoors by the fire, how-
ever bright the sun might be shining outside,
and however much the flowers in the garden
might be enjoying it. They were different
from them altogether, and had different
names. Also, Tom knew that the oranges
he ate at dessert were picked off the trees in
these countries, where they grew like apples
on the apple-trees here; and in the drawers
of the cabinet in the study there were rows
of pretty shells which had been found on the
shores far away across the sea. But these
were not nearly all, for the house was full of





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


things


brought over in


ships.


The


tea he


drank hot every morning was made with the
dried leaves of a stranger plant, and his papa's


coffee,


though it looked like


nothing


brown powder when it was put into the coffee-
pot, was really ground from stranger berries


carried


over


on purpose.


Then


his dear


cockatoo,


which


had been


given him when


quite a little boy, and the yellow canary in the


next house, were both travellers,


their


and had left


brothers and sisters behind them to live


in England, where sparrows and thrushes and


robins


build their nests.


One evening, Tom had


slipped out to pick


up pieces of wood, when his papa met him.


" What are you doing?"


asked he.


" Don't you remember ?"


answered


Tom.


" I told you long


ship.


ago.


I'm collecting for my


Come and see what a lot I've got.


His papa followed him


to a


hole


the tool-house,


which


gardener knew of.
little heap.
I'm getting on,"


only


There, in

said Tom.


Tom


and the


a corner,

Am I


lay a

not ?


10


but


behind


_ __._ __





Tom Wants to Build a Slhi. I.

How much longer must I collect, do you
think ?"
What a hurry you are in!" exclaimed his
papa. What do yo-1 want to run away for ?"
"Oh, papa, think!" said Tom; "think of
all there is to see! White bears, and roaring
lions and tigers!"
Come along with me," said his papa.
He opened the gate into the field. Cows
and sheep were busily eating the grass. It
was nice watching them. The cows had
horns, but they never seemed to use them,
and they appeared so sleek and gentle. One
or two raised their heads as Tom passed, and
looked at him kindly out of their large mild
eyes; but the others went on quietly taking
their supper.
Papa," whispered Tom, not to disturb
them, I don't know if cows and sheep aren't
just as nice animals as lions and tigers, after
all."
In the farm-yard cocks and hens and tur-
keys and geese strutted about. They were
not so bright to look at as canaries and





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


parrots and


cockatoos,


but they were


very


pretty all the same.


And


to see each one going his
ing his own language.
When at last Tom and


it was delightful


own way, and talk-

his papa turned to


go home through the field, the sun was setting


same


great


sun that shines


countries, hot and cold, far and near.
of orange-trees or palm-trees bef(


on all
Instead


ore them,


there was a nice green hazel wood full of nuts,
and two oaks covered with dear little acorns


from head to foot.


And instead of tall, strange


plants, with


bright


faces and difficult


names,


there were daisies and buttercups and dande-
lions and red sorrel growing in the grass.
Tom jumped about in the sunlight. He did
not feel in such a dreadful hurry to have his


ship


built and sail away in


it.


T


very nice here-it could not be


where else-and the
that he knew so well


well,


and all


'he sun was
nicer any-


Daisies and buttercups
,and that knew him so


friendly cows and sheep, who let


him pat them as he passed, were very nice
also.


12


-the


C--------~- -I --





Tom IWants to Build a Shi.


13


"Papa!" cried he, "it's nice everywhere-
isn't it ?"
Yes, indeed," answered he. Tom, look
there! Where is the sun going ?"
He pointed to it. It was sinking like a
ball of fire. Tom knew quite well where it
was going, ever since he was a little boy, and
had thought it had fallen amongst the bushes
in the garden, and had run to pick it up.
Gone," answered he at once, to light up
other countries, and open the buds, and warm
other men and creatures, and shine on the
ships going backwards and forwards across
the sea."
"Good-bye, sun, till to-morrow morning,"
said his papa, going into the house. And
Ton i.ft off picking up pieces of wood to
build his ship for that evening, and went in
also.





Cozntents.


CHAP.
XXII.-TOM READS HIS STORY. .

XXIII.-TOM DANCES AT MATTY'S WEDDING AND MAKES A

SPEECH .

XXIV.-ToM READS ARCHIE'S STORY

XXV.-TOM THINKS HE HEARS ROBBERS .

XXVI.-TOM GOES BLACKBERRYING, AND MAKES BLACK-

BERRY JAM .
XXVII.-ToM PREPARES A NEW SURPRISE .


THE PANTOMIME (p. 24)

"HE WANTS TO GET OUT," SAID TOMI

TOM HAD A GREAT DEAL TO TELL HER .

"THERE TBEY ARE !" CRIED ARCHIE

A FALSE ALARM .


Frontispiece.

48

102

.160

228


PAGE
202


210

218

226


233
2-41


_ ----------~-


~tTaetssfiotrB,














CHAP. II.-TOM GOES TO LONDON.

ST last one morning Tom's papa said to
Shim-"I am going to London on
Thursday, and you may come with me, if you
like, to see your aunt and cousins."
Tom would have chosen Iceland or India
or Arabia, had he been asked; but he was
only too happy to go anywhere, and jumped
about clapping his hands. He had seen some
pictures of London, and knew that, though
white bears and roaring lions and tigers did
not generally live there, still there were some
visiting the Zoological Gardens, and he might
perhaps be taken to see them. Besides his
aunt and cousins, he also wanted to see the
Queen on her throne with her crown and
sceptre, and the Lord Mayor in his gold
coach. Just before his box was shut, his





Tom goes to


London.


mamma brought in a lot of paper, nicely
ruled, and a new red pencil.
"This, Tom," she said, "is for you to
write me a journal of the things you see and
hear and like best in London."
"Oh yes, mamma !" cried Tom; "all
about the roaring lions and tigers and
white bears, and the Queen, with her crown
on, and the Lord Mayor, and my aunt and
cousins."
"Everything that comes into your head,"
said she, as she packed the paper into a
corner.
Thursday morning came. Tom stood on
the steps with his hat on, and jumped into
the carriage. His mamma had promised to
take care of his hen and rabbits for him till
he came back, and he had run out early
before breakfast and kissed them, and said
good-bye to them.
The train was waiting at the station, just as
though it knew they were coming.
"Papa!" cried Tom, after sitting still a
minute, I want my journal. I've a great
B


15




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


deal in


my head


to write


down


for


mamma.


Where is


can't get it now,


" answered he;


" it's


in the
arrive.


luggage


van.


You


must


wait till


" But


runs out of
dear me!"


I shall forget it all!"


cried Tom;


my head as fast as it runs in.


There was no help


" it
Oh


for it, so he could do


nothing


but lean back


feel quite like a man.


opposite his
He felt still


papa,


and


more like


a man when his papa handed


look at,


after he


had


done with


him Punch
it himself.


It was nearly dark when the train ran slowly


the London station.


Tom began to look


about him, but he could see nothing except
a large place with a great number of people


who ran about shouting.


He held


his papa's


hand very


tight


as they crossed to the cab,


and did not talk much while they drove along.


At the front


door


of the house


a lady


them.


" And


this


down and kissing


Tom!"
him.


she


said,


She was so


bending
Z*>


like


his


16


it ? "


"You


we


into


to


met





Tom goes to London. 17

mamma, that he was quite glad to give her a
kiss in return.
Then they went into the drawing-room,
where the fire blazed brightly, and there were
a number of little boys and girls. Tom felt
very shy, for he had never seen so many little
boys and girls together at a time, except at a
party. But they not only looked at him, but
came up and said, How do you do, Tom ?"
Tom could only answer, Quite well, thank
you," without asking them how they were, as
he did not know any of their names. He was
very much surprised to hear them calling his
papa Uncle Henry," and was just going to
call out, "He isn't Uncle Henry; he's papa,"
when his aunt said to the biggest girl-
"Annie, take Tom upstairs and give him
his tea. I am sure he must be very hungry.
And you may go also, children."
Annie gave her hand to Tom, and led
him out of the room, while the others
followed. Tom looked at her as they went
upstairs.
You are my cousin," he said at last.




18 Tom Seven Years Old.

"You are all my cousins. What are your
names ?"
"You know mine," said Annie; "and that
is Bob, and Jack, and Henry, and May."
"Oh dear!" cried Tom, "what a number
of new names! And I've learnt so many
already. I wish you had only one among you
all, like Tom."
Little May looked as if she was going to
cry.
"I don't want to be called Tom," she said;
but nobody minded her, because she was the
baby.
Bob was a big boy, so was Jack. Tom
wanted to ask them a great many questions,
and they wanted to ask him a great many;
but Annie told them to wait till he had
finished his tea.
Very soon afterwards Tom went to bed.
His journal paper and new red pencil were
lying unpacked at the table, but he was too
sleepy to write. Only he settled in his own
mind, the first thing in the morning, to put,
"Cousins are nice creatures; nicer creatures





Tcm goes to


London.


to talk to or play with than he
However, when he did begin
after, he had forgotten this,
stead :-
Mamma, I'm in London.
big place, where the houses r
side of the streets like hedges,
who live in them are constantly


Mns
it,
and


or rabbits."
some days
I wrote in-


This is a big,
un along each
and the people
walking in and


out. I have not yet seen the Lord Mayor's
gold coach pass, or been to the Palace to visit
the Queen. Papa would not let me go in
at the Queen's front door, though we were
quite close to it yesterday. Annie has written
some of this, because I cannot write fast
enough to say all the things as they come into
my head, and you said I was to tell you
everything. I am going to the Zoological
Gardens on Saturday. I wish to-morrow
was Saturday. We cannot hear the lions or
tigers roaring from here. Aunt May is like
you, only, of course, not nearly so nice. Bob
is a big boy. He keeps his hands in his
pocket, and whistles like a man. May is


quite a


baby, and wears pinafores,


and says


I9




Tom Seven


Years


Old.


stupid things.


Jack has


bought


a canary-bird


in a cage with his own money. How is my
dear hen and all the rabbits ? I have a cousin
Henry too, but I can't think of anything to
say about him. Papa took me to his own
tailor to get an Ulster coat. He seems a
very rich man, for, besides having lots of coats
in the window, he had drawers full of stuff
inside to make more. The shop windows
are much bigger than our drawing-room and
dining-room windows. Anyone may stop
and see all that is inside, and if they wish to
take one of the things home with them, they
have only to push open the door, lay the
money on the table, and carry it away. Bob
has not got an Ulster. All his coats are made
at the tailor's. I wish mine were. I hope my
Ulster will be ready before I go to the Zoo-
logical Gardens, or the Queen's Palace. All
round the nursery walls are pictures of wild
beasts; but none of my cousins knew if they
were the same beasts who are now visiting
the Zoological Gardens. Isn't it very stupid
of them ? Jack showed me his treasure-box;


20





Tom goes to London. 21

it has no key, but is tied round with a piece
of red string; and outside he has printed,
'My Treasure-Box,' so that everybody may
know whose it is. He has five marbles-one
a blue one-and a top, and a penknife, and-I
forget the other things. I like Jack the best
-no, I think I like Bob the best. Mamma,
I've really settled now what I want to be when
I'm older. Before I came here I used to
think it would be nicest to be a sailor, and
wear a blue jacket and a round hat, and sail
in a ship all day and all night. But, now that
I've seen the dear shoe-blacks at the corners
of the streets, I've quite settled to be one of
them. I like their red jackets; and they have
a pot of blacking and two brushes of their
very own to do what they like with. I told
Aunt May so when we went in to dessert last
night. Bob wants to be a general, and Jack
a policeman. Papa often says I can never
begin work too soon. When may I really
wear a red jacket, and have a pot of blacking
and two brushes, and be a shoe-black ? Bob
thinks the country is a stupid place, and that




22 Tom Seven Years Old.

there is nothing to look at outside. I told
him there was the sky, and ground, and plants
always growing, and trees with birds' nests
hid in them. It isn't a stupid place, and
there's plenty to look at; isn't there, mamma ?
He wouldn't believe me.
I sleep in papa's dressing-room, and have
pink and white curtains to my bed. Aunt
May comes up every night to tuck me up. I
haven't forgotten to say my prayers once.
One day I was very cross--I don't remember
when. I am not cross now. We had batter-
pudding for dinner to-day. I hate batter-
pudding. All the others like it. I mean to
bring home a present for Richard and the
gardener when I come, and for somebody else
also, but you must not try to guess who. The
shops are so full of things, I never can settle
what to carry away. Bob has been on the
top of an omnibus. I want to go dreadfully.
There's a great deal more to tell. I haven't
nearly written down everything; but I don't
happen to have anything very particular in
my head to say at this minute. Oh yes, I





Tom goes to London. 23

remember. I wear my red tie on Sundays.
Jack has a blue one, which I think is much
prettier. I have begged papa to give me one
like it. We are going to the Baker Street
Bazaar. Annie says a bazaar is a large kind
of shop. I have just asked her. My head
is quite empty now; but there's as much
going on all round just the same. Kiss my
hen and rabbits, and give them plenty to eat.
Remember Annie has written part of this, but
it is what I told her to say. Now I'll stop."













TO THE PANTOMIME.


eT began at eight o'clock, and they
not be home till eleven. Tom had
once sat up so late before, and that was
party. They were all going-every
Bob and Annie had seen a pantomime
would not tell what it was like. Tom c
not imagine, though he had tried to d(
ever since he knew he was to go. He
never even seen the picture of a panton


rould
only
at a
one.
but
wouldd
o So,
. had
lime,


or read about it in any of his books. It was
something quite new.
Tom wore his Ulster. He could not talk
as they drove along, because he was too busy
thinking of it, and of all that was coming.
Outside the cab window the gas in the streets
was flaring much brighter than the stars.
There were even more people walking about
&


III. -TOM M GOES


CHAP,





Tom goes to tke Pantomime. 25

than in the day, as though they came out
at night like black beetles. At last they
stopped at a great door, where numbers were
already rushing in to see the pantomime.
Annie," said his aunt, take May's hand
and I'll take Tom's. Bob, look after the
others."
They pushed their way along the passage,
and opened the door into a little room, which
looked out on a large one filled with rows-and
rows of people. It seemed to belong to his
aunt, for she sat down at once without asking
anybody.
Now, children," she said, "go to the front,
where you can see best."
Tom saw before him a great painted picture,
that all the rows of people were staring at.
Is that the pantomime?" he whispered.
Bob shook his head.
"That's only the curtain. It will pull up,
and then you will see the pantomime."
Tom had never seen a curtain like it before.
It was not like a window-curtain or a bed-
curtain, and he would never have known it to




26 Tom Seven Years Old.

be a curtain at all. The ladies did not wear
bonnets as they did in church. There were
a great number of little boys and girls, who
looked as though they felt as happy as he did.
Tom wondered what their names were, and
how old they were. Suddenly a band struck
up with such a bang of music that it made
him jump, and then the gas blazed of itself,
without anyone touching it. Something very
great was going to happen.
Look!" whispered Jack, suddenly point-
ing.
The curtain had moved a little in one
corner. They waited a dreadfully long time,
staring as hard as they could. At last up it
went slowly. Tom forgot there was anyone
else near, and gave a great shout. He could
not help it. There, instead of the house-wall,
were rocks, and trees, and the sky, with the
moon shining in it. At first he thought that
they had really broken down the bricks to let
the moon and sky in; but Bob told him it
was not real, but only painted canvas. Sud-
denly whole troops of live, moving fairies-





Tom goes to the Pantomime. 27

just exactly what he knew fairies were like-
ran out and covered the ground. Tom
thought they could not possibly be painted
canvas also, and was very glad to hear they
were real. Some had wings, though they did
not fly with them, but they all danced about,
as only fairies could dance, not like little boys
and girls at parties. Tom thought he could
never be tired of looking. He did not care
to listen so much to what they said, though
the music had stopped playing, and their
voices were quite clear and like other people's.
There was a prince dressed in a silver coat,
with a gold crown on. Tom wondered
whither he lived in the Palace with the Queen,
and wished his papa had bought him a bright
silver coat like that, instead of his dark black
Ulster. Then came a clown and some other
queer people, with paint on their faces, but
real, and not made of canvas, like the moon
and sky. After making everybody laugh,
the curtain moved slowly down, and covered
them.
"Stop it, stop it !" cried Tom, in a great




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


hurry.
be hid


I want to see it longer-don't let it
I"


His aunt


would


bent forward, and


told him that


be pulled up in a minute or two,


he should


like


see them


all again.


He did


to wait even a minute or two for


thing ;
Henry,


but Annie, and Bob, and
and May, and even his a


Jack,


it


and
not
any-
and


unt, had to


do the very same.


When the


the fairies
was alone.


curtain went up in a little while,


had all run away, and the Prince
The sky was no longer painted


with a yellow moon shining in


it,


but was


all


black and dark.


green


coat


happy.


on this


Tom


The prince


had


time, yet he did


was surprised


that


a lovely
not look
a prince


could ever be unhappy, and


for him.


was very sorry


The prince turned to all the rows


of people in front of him,


but they did


not get


up or go to


help him.


"What's the


a fright.
run down


"Wh;


matter ?"
at is the


whispered
matter ?


t Tom, in
Can't you


and see ?"


Bob gave him a nudge.


28


_ C





Tom goes to the Panotomime. 29

Do be quiet. Listen to what he says.
Don't be a goose. It's not real-only acting."
"The prince zs real," said Tom; but Bob
was too busy listening and looking to answer.
Tom could not forget the unhappy prince,
even while he laughed with the others at the
clown. There was a great deal of rushing
about and jumping, and then the curtain came
down, and they had to wait again.
Tom was quite puzzled as to what was real
and what was not real, yet he did not like to
ask Bob any more questions. Besides, the
make-believe was just as pretty as the real,
if not prettier.
Never mind, Tom," said his aunt, in a low
voice. You need not be sorry for the prince.
You will see it will all come right in the end."
"Are they getting it right now behind the
curtain ?" whispered Tom; and he was more
content to wait, seeing nothing, when he
thought that was what they were doing.
This was the last time it went up at all.
The poor Prince had evidently been made
happier while it was down, for he spoke in




30 Tom Seven Years Old.

quite a different manner, and turned his face
to the rows of people, smiling. There was
a princess also, who was dressed far more
grandly than Tom's mamma or aunt. At the
end the clown and the little fairies ran in
again. Tom could not help asking if they
had been hiding all the time, and had seen all,
or had really been away, but Bob could not
tell him. They did not seem to be tired, for
they began to dance at once, and were still
dancing when the curtain moved down. The
prince and princess stood in the middle, smil-
ing, and appeared quite, quite happy.
"Good-bye, prince ; good-bye, princess.
I'm so glad it's all right! Good-bye, clown,
and you funny people!" called Tom, while
the boys and girls round were clapping their
hands loudly. Then he clapped his hands
also as loudly as he could, till they were quite
tired. The pantomime was done. It was
time to 'go home to bed. Everybody was
going home to bed, even the grown-up people.
They went out and back through a passage
into a cab. The gas was still blazing in the





Tom goes to I e Pantomime.


streets, but it did not seem nearly so
and the people did not look like fairies.


bright,
Tom


wished he might have pushed behind the cur-


tain, and stayed


with


them


a little


longer,


instead of going home.


" Poor fellow!"


said his


aunt,


sitting
is !"


" No,


opposite; "how


I'm not, really,"


dreadfully


sleepy


answered


he


Tom,


sitting up; but somehow, just as he said


it,


his head dropped down on Annie's shoulder,


and his eyes shut themselves, and he
everything, even about the fairies.


forgot


31


who


was


CI~ _~ II~_ _














IV.-TOM


SUST round the corner of the street were
Sthe Square Gardens. The railings and


trees looked quite


black, and


there was very


little


grass


growing.


Bob


had a new whip,


and wanted to drive a pair of horses along the


gravel walk; so he said to


Tom-


"You and


Jack will make a nice


couple,


and I will be coachman."


Tom; 'I


don't


want to


driven by anybody.
I'm the eldest,"


I shall be coachman."


answered Bob,


"and


the


biggest.
along."


You ought to give in to me.


Come


Tom did


not move,


or mean


to


move.


Jack ran up to him, and


whispered-


" Never


mind.


Come


along.


It's his


way.


said


be


CI-JAP#e


RUNS[C~


AWA-1173 TrT


" Nol"





Tom Runss A4wav. 33

Never mind," repeated little May. Don't
be cross, Tom."
"I am cross!" said Tom, loudly; "and I
will be cross. I don't like Bob. I wish he
would stop being my cousin."
Leave him alone, Jack and May," called
Bob. He's in a horrid temper. We'll run
along the other end of the walk without him."
They left Tom standing behind the bushes,
very angry indeed. Annie was sitting on the
seat far away, and had not heard. Tom
thought at first he would go at once and tell
her, and then he settled he would not, because
it would be like a sneak. A nursery-maid
was just opening the garden gate with a key.
I know what I'll do," said Tom to him-
self. If they run away from me, I'll run
away from them i" and, before it was shut, he
slipped out and crossed over.
Now," thought he, I'll go everywhere,
and see everything;" and he was very glad
that there were no gates with padlocks or
high stiles, as there were in the country, but
that all the streets were open, and he might




Tom


SevenC


Yea irs


O,/d.


walk wherever he chose outside the houses.
He did not stop till he came to the first shop-


window.


It was a china-shop, with all sorts


and shapes of


china


inside.


Tomn


saw one


jug and basin


which


had


beautiful pictures of


red roses and green leaves painted on
as large as real ones.


them,


" How mamma would like


" She's


that !"


so fond of flowers !


thought
Z!


must


cro
07!


in


and carry it away.


He pushed


open the door,


and


was just


going to pull out the beautiful jug and basin,


when a man


came up,


and asked


what


wanted.


I want these,
ing to them. "


shopman,


said Tom, point-


V[amma is so fond


of flowers.


I am sure she would like


them.


The man
the window.


lifted


the jug


and basin


out of


" How much money must


asked


Tbm.


" I've


I pay for it, shop-
got a purse full


of money in my jacket


pocket."


He did


not answer,


but


went


away


called another man, who was very tall indeed.


34


he.


he


man ?"


and





Tom


Away.


"Look what a lot
pouring out his money.


I've got,"


said Tom,


"There's two half-


crowns, and a sixpence, and three threepenny
pieces-I like threepenny pieces-and four


halfpennies, and


a farthing.


You mustn't


the farthing, but you may take any of


the others, if you want them, because
mamma, you know."


The tall man looked


it's for


at Tom, and then


at


the money, without touching any of it.


" Where


do you


live,


young


gentleman ?"


he asked.
"In the country, shopman," answered Tom.
But I mean, where do you come from ?"
said he.


" From


the Square


Gardens,"


answered


Tom.
The man looked at the other, and smiled.
Did anyone send you ?" he said.


"Send me ?"


repeated


Tom.


" No;


body


knows


about them


yet.


only saw


them this minute when I was standing


side.


out-


am sure mamma would like them.


May I carry them away ?"


35


touch


no-


Rullss




Tomr


Seven


Yea rs


Old.


" Don't you think, sir,"


said the man,


" they


would be very heavy to carry ?"


Tom bent down, and tried


to lift the


and basin in both his arms, but he could not.


"Suppose you


else,"


said


the


were to choose


man-


"just


something


as pretty,


but


lighter.


Here is a vase with flowers on it."


" It's


very nice,"


said


Tom; "but the roses


are not nearly so big, or like real ones."


The man


went away again, and


another vase with a bunch of


tulips


brought
painted


on the centre.
That will do !"


shopman.
member,


cried


T1


How much n
don't touch the


om.
honey


" Thank you,


is it?


farthing ;


Re-


and I'd


rather you didn't


take


any of the threepenny


pieces,
The
crown,


please."
shopman


only


took away


one half-


so that Tom poured the rest back into


his purse.


The vase was then


wrapped up


carefully in brown paper, and


tied with string,
0 /


and no one except


Tom could have


known11


what was inside.
" Good morning,


He


did not forget


shopman,


to


say,


" before lie went


36


jug





Tom Runs Away. 37

out. There were a great number of people
passing up and down. Tom did not care
which way he went, as he meant to walk all
over London. Just as he was going to start,
he heard a voice close beside him saying,
"Aren't you Master Tom ?" and, turning
round, he saw the postman-the dear post-
man who had brought him a letter from his
mamma that very morning. He wished he
could say he was not Master Tom, because
he did not want to stop again.
Isn't it Master Tom of No. 14? Are
you out by yourself ?" said the postman, sur-
prised. Is there no one with you ?"
Tom went quite near him, so that he could
whisper.
"Yes," he said, it's me. I'll tell you, but
you mustn't tell anyone else. I've run away.
They don't know where I am. They're all
in the Square Gardens."
That won't do, Master Tom," said the
postman. You must come back with me.
I'm going to No. 14 just now."
"Thank you, postman," said Tom; but




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


I'm going the other way.


go back yet.


don't mean


I'm not tired."


" Tired


come


or not,


sir,"


said


along with me.


he,


"you


They will all


must


be


wondering


and


fussing


to know


where


are.


"Will


thinking
at all.
Yes,"


they ?"


of


said


himself,


Tom.


and


He had


not about


been
them


postman.


" Come


along,


won't


bring you


any


more letters


don't."


"Oh, dear


postman !"


cried


Torm,


" don't


say that."
He did


so want to walk all


and to see everything,


and he (


over London,
did so dislike


going home.
Well, sir,"


said the postman, after waiting


a minute,


with


me,


"I


I'm


must go.


very


sorry;


If you won't


but I


can't


come
bring
c"5


you any more letters.


Tom


dashed


after


him


before


it


was too


late.


"I'll


go with


vou-wait
Of.


a minute-here


38


just


to


you


said


the


sir.
you


if





TomR Runs Away. 39

am," said he, running by his side. As soon
as they reached the steps, the front door
opened, and his aunt ran out.
"Oh, Tom!" she cried, "where have you
been ? We've had such a fright about you!
What made you run away ?"
I haven't been a long way off," answered
Tom; "not nearly so far as I wanted. I
wished to walk all over London, and see
everything."
Annie, and Henry, and Jack, and May now
came rushing down stairs to know where he
had been, and even Bob seemed eager to
hear.
Dear me !" cried Tom; "how happy you
all seem to see me! I'm glad of that."
No, Tom," said his papa; "you need not
be glad. See what a fright you have given
your aunt. Think how unkind it is to frighten
anybody. Promise that you will never run
away again."
Well," said Tom, after thinking a minute,
"as I am here now, I promise I won't run
away again. But I'm very sorry I ever came




Tomn


Seven.


Years


Old.


back.


did so want to walk all over London,


and see everything."


Tom


was still


very


angry


indeed


with


Bob.


He had begun


not stop.


being angry, and


He always paid


his


papa


c


could
a visit


in his room before breakfast.


"Papa," he


asked,


is a dreadfully horrid


" Have


"don't
boy ?"


you


you been quarrelling ?"


think Bob


asked


his


papa.
I haven't


seen


him this


morning,"


Tom.
But yesterday; can you remember ?"


" He quarrelled with


me.


I didn't quarrel


with him,


said


Tom.


" He wanted


be his horse, and to drive me, and


wouldn't, papa.


asked


you long


me
said
ago


you


didn't think Bob


a dreadfully horrid


boy, and you wouldn't tell me.


am sure


you


do-don't


much-as
pudding."


much


you ?


dislike


as I dislike


him


eatincr
6


very


batter-


" Tom,


" said his papa,


Sshut your eyes and


think a minute.


If your mamma were here,


40


said


to


if





Tom


Runs


A way.


and heard


you say that,


what would she


answer ?"
"I needn't shut my eyes and think,"


Tom;


"because


know quite well without


doing either.


She would be very sorry.


is always wanting me to love people, instead
of disliking them."


" Well,"


Your


said his papa,


"0 g


breakfast will be ready.


what she would like


you


upstairs


now.


Try and do


best to


do-the


thing that would


make


her happy, and


sorry.
But
know !"


she's
cried


a long
Tom, v


way off,


vho


was gl


and won't
ad at that


minute to think so.


" Never mind,"


answered his papa.


"You


can keep it a great secret all to yourself."


Tom walked


slowly upstairs.


he must try to stop being


reached the landing.


The


angry 1
children


He knew


before
were


in the nursery, excepting Bob.


Poor Bob !" said Annie;
his ankle, and can't get up.
lie still till the afternoon."


"he has sprained
He will have to


41


said


She


not


he
all


~~ _




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


Tom was getting


less


yet feel sorry enough


angry,


to


but could not


say anything


nice.


As soon


he slipped


" May


as breakfast


off his chair.
go and see


was finished,


him ?"


however,


he asked in


hurry.


" I want to see him."


"Certainly,


said


Annie.


He was


scarcely


angry at all now.


" Who's


there ?"


called Bob.


" Come


" Good morning,"


said


Tom.


" I wanted


to come


and


see you for a


very


particular


reason, that you would never guess.


"Isn't it horrid ?"


said


Bob.


" Dear


me!"


thought Tom;


" he's


heard


through the floor.
very morning."
Isn't it horrid ?"


his foot.
shelf to


"I
get


I called him horrid


repeated


was climbing


this


I Bob, looking at
up to that high


down my fishing-rod.


I don't


want it quite yet-not till summer, you know;


but I like


to take it


down every now


then, and look at it,


and clean


The press-door was open. Tom saw
fishing-rod high up on the shelf,


42


in."


it.


and


the





Tom Runs Away. 43

"Bob," he said, after a minute, "I've been
thinking. I'll tell you what I'll do. I'll push
the table in, and jump on it and fetch it down,
and we'll clean it together !"
Bob raised himself on his elbow. His eyes
brightened with pleasure.
Oh, Tom!" he said, eagerly, "do you
think you could? Take the things off the
table first-there, push it gently-more to
the side. Now don't fall and sprain your
ankle also."
Tom had climbed up, and stood quite close
to the shelf. Neither of them said a word
while he slowly climbed down again, and
landed safe and sound on the floor. Bob
stretched out his hands to receive it, then
looked at it carefully all over.
It's very dusty-just see," he said;
" dreadfully dusty. It would never have
done to have left it longer. You shall rub
one part while I do another. There, let's
begin at once."
Tom was quite ready. He was not at all
angry now. He pulled out his handkerchief,





44


i elvelz


and began to work with


liked


Years


OId.


all his might.


rubbing.


"Uncle Charlie
rubbing also. "Is
to have some good


gave


it


me," said


;n't it a beauty ?
fishing this year.


Bob,


I hope
Uncle


Charlie is going to ask me down to see him.
He promised."


said Tom,


stopping to


take breath,


" there must be a great many rivers in London


quite full of fish,


for I've


seen


shops


with


loads and loads of them."


" Haven't


Bob.
is built


you


" Don't you


on?


learnt


know


I learnt


geography
the river


it long


ago.
Z3~O


said


a1


London
I hate


geography.


" Stop


think.


a minute,"


said


It begins with a


Tom,


T.


It isn't


" while


Tartary


-that's a place; or turpentine-that's


know!


a stuff.


It's the Thames.


They rubbed


a minute


or two without


speaking.
Bob,"


said


Tom


at last, I


want


tell me something,


if it


isn't a secret.


Were


you dreadfully angry with me yesterday ?"


1-1e


you


to


Toln


,, But,")





Toml Runs Away. 45

Yesterday ?" repeated Bob, I can't
remember. What happened yesterday ?"
"In the morning we pasted pictures into
Jack's picture-book," said Tom; "and we had
an apple-pie for dinner, and I wouldn't be
your horse in the Square Gardens, and ran
away out of the gate-don't you remember ?"
Yes, of course," said Bob; "and we looked
for you behind every bush, and thought you
were hiding and Annie said she was afraid
you might be run over, and was frightened at
what mamma would say. But I forget about
being angry."
Well," said Tom, I didn't mean to tell
you, but I've changed my mind. I was very
angry with you yesterday, and I called you a
dreadfully horrid boy this very morning to
papa in his room. And I meant to write it
down in my journal before going to bed." He
stopped.
And why do you tell me all this ?" asked
Bob, working at his fishing-rod.
"You haven't waited for the end, or you
would understand," said Tom; "because I've




Tom


Seven


Years


Old


changed
wanted


my
you


mind


again
C)


to hear.


in this also,


don't


think


dreadfully horrid


boy


at all,


ever


since


began to rub.


And


I'll tell papa so the


next


time


I see him.


And


I'll not put


it in my


journal.


And I like you very much !"


"I like


you,"


said


Bob.


"I liked


pushing the table up to the press,


and stand-


ing on it.


And you've rubbed


beautifully.


wish
clean.
Tom.


Uncle


Charlie could see


It couldn't be


better.


it while
Thank


it is
you,


" Don't


thank


me,"


said


Tom.


"I did


for a
never


very
find


though."
He's
him say


particular reason,


out.


gone


wish


away,"


he had to go


wouldn't be back till ten
Ten or half-past ten, he


which


I could tell


said


Bob.


a long
o'clock


way
this


you will


papa,


" I heard


off, and
evening.


said."


"Oh


dear me !"


cried


Tom;


" and I wanted


to tell him something!"
Write a letter," said Bol
I do when I've anything


"that's the way


important


to


say.


46


and
you


you


it





Tom Runs


A4way.


Put
this
outs
goes

do."


it on his dressing-table, and write, 'Read
at once, please,' in large letters on the
ide, so as to catch his eye when he first
; into the room."
I will!" cried Tom; that's just what I'll


And before bed-time he had carried his
letter into his papa's room. On the outside
was printed-
Read this at once, please."
And in the inside was written-
"Papa, I did it. I am sure mamma would
have been happy, and not sorry, had she been
inside me, and known all. I like him now,
and lifted down his rod from the top shelf,
and we cleaned it together. And he is not a
dreadfully horrid boy, as I told you. And I
promised to let you know that he isn't, papa."


47


_ I ~














CHAP. V.-TOM GOES TO THE ZOOLOGICAL
GARDENS.

HE day came at last. It was very long
in coming. The sun shone on the streets
and squares. Tom was glad, not merely for
his own sake, but for the sake of all the strange
birds and beasts who had travelled a long
way from the hot countries. As soon as he
passed through the gate, he saw the houses
and gardens of the different creatures scattered
about, who either lived by themselves or in
large families together. They had men-
servants of their own kept on purpose to
attend to them, and clean out their houses, and
bring them their meals. Tom ran on in front
to the lion's den. He would have known him
anywhere to be the king of all the other
b

































'il/i


F ,*/'


g

~~

'I
1
I ii
ri


I1
I i'


k il


" HE WANTS TO


TOM."


L1 ii~i


(!/////


-.^
^


,-~
n~
------
~-=I:
==---


GET OUT, 9) SAIDJ





Zoological


Gardens.


animals.


He was


pacing


restlessly


up and


down.


He wants to get out,"
lion's man-servant. It is


to walk in.


said Tom to


the


such a little place


Can't you open his door ?"


I daresay he does, sir,"
daresay they all do. But


said the man.


"I


what would become


of us if the wild beasts were allowed to run
about free ?"


"Oh!"
couldn't yo
run away ?


said Tom,
u open his


"if


you


are afraid,


door quickly, and then


It's a shame that a king


in his


own country should


be kept a prisoner here!


How sorry he must be that he ever visited
England, and how he must wish to go back !"
The man told him that the lion liked beef
and mutton for his dinner, just as he did, only


he preferred eating it
kitchens.


raw, and


not cooked in


Tom wondered


at his


den there was another lion


taste.


lying


In the next
fast asleep.


Tom was


glad to think he could sleep, and


was not too unhappy in such a miserable little


home.


Close beside him lived the tigers and


Th e


49


___




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


leopards.


They wore


beautiful


yellow


black skins, much grander than the lion


" They are not kings,


" cried Tom.


s.
" Any


one can see that, in spite of their


But they look like princes.


Our


the same faces, only not so fierce.


fine dress.
cats have


I am afraid


they're angry also with the


English


for keep-


ing them shut up.


Oh dear


me! I


wish


could go round and let them all out!"
He could not settle whether he admired the


tiger's


striped


skin


or the leopard's


spotted


one most. His own stockings were generally
striped, but he had a white neck-tie spotted
with purple.


The white bear was a great


soft


creature,


who seemed very fond of


bathing,


for he


splashing in and out of the water


the whole


time


they


stood


there,


and did not


notice


them at all.
and snow of


His


fur was as white as the


ice


the land he came from, but his


face looked rather stupid,


as though he


never


thought of anything.


Tom was glad to know


what he was like,


but did not care


to stay and


to him.


50


and


was


talk





The Zoological Gardens. 51

The next house belonged to the monkeys.
Tom had once or twice seen a funny little
brown monkey on the top of an organ; but
here were whole families of them making such
a noise, and tumbling about like children.
The air was quite warm, and they did not
seem to wish to go out of doors. As soon
as they saw Tom with his bag of nuts, they
stretched out their hands to get some.
"Stop!" cried Tom, "stop! Don't be in
such a hurry. I can't feed you all at once.
Oh, old monkey, how you do snatch at it!
Don't you know it's very rude to snatch ? I
am sure you are enough of a man to know
that. Your eyes are just like a man's. Now
don't look at me any longer. I'm going to
walk down the room. You'll make yourself
ill if you eat so much."
The monkeys watched him pass, and still
kept stretching out their funny, brown fingers,
so that Tom had often to stop and put a nut
in them. One or two sat quite quiet, and
without asking for anything; but still they
did not look unhappy like the lions, or cross




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


the tigers and leopards.


they did


not dislike


Tom felt almost


visiting


England,


and might


even perhaps come back


of their


accord.


Most of them had brown and


grey skins, but there was one in pure white,


with soft, pink hands, and


gentle manners.


" You've been well brought up," said Tom.


are a gentleman!


suppose


that's


why you have a house of your own to live in,


because


you find


the others too


rough
0O y


rude.


Can't you teach them


not to speak


loud, or snatch so rudely?"
He was quite glad to get out into the quiet,


open


air,


where he could


only


hear himself


talking, and the


cry


every now and then.


of


a strange creature


But the minute he went


into the parrots' house the noise began worse


than ever.
like other bi:


The parrots did not chirp or sing-
rds-they screamed, and they all


screamed together.


Tom was astonished


at


the beautiful


colours


they were dressed in;


some were as red as the scarlet geraniums


home, and some were as yellow as


the butter-


cups.


52


like
sure


own


"you


and


so


at


.. __





The Zoological Gardens. 53

"Oh, papa !" he cried, after looking at
them; "no one but God could have made
them! No one else could have thought of
such shapes and feathers! How beautiful
they must look flying about, as green as the
leaves and as blue as the sky!"
There were some very small, like little
round balls of down, who were even brighter
and more carefully made than the bigger ones.
But these were not nearly all the birds. There
were a number of others, who lived alone or
with their families in little houses of their own.
Tom noticed some tall ones walking quietly
in their gardens with necks like swans, only
much longer, and with difficult names that he
could not read. None of them had such
beautiful feathers or such ugly voices as the
parrots. He was very much astonished at
the number of different creatures that lived
in the world, for he had no idea that God had
made so many.
The poor elephants looked very shabby and
dusty, as though they had worn their skins too
long, and required new ones. Tom thought




54 Tom Seven Years O/l.

their shapes as ugly as the shapes of the
birds were beautiful. The ugliest of all was
the rhinoceros. He had a shape of his own,
like no other, which was absolutely hideous.
I hope," said Tom, as they left his house,
"that he doesn't guess how ugly he is, and
that nobody will ever tell him. I am glad he
isn't allowed to walk about, or go into the
birds' house, because I'm afraid he might then
find out, and be sorry. And even now he
looks very dull, poor beast!"
Tom saw a great many other creatures-
the camel, that he was going to ride upon
across the desert; and the serpents, who look
so gentle, and can be so cruel; and the smooth,
wet seals, who liked bathing even better than
the white bear, and whose skins, when dry,
were worn by so many people to keep them
warm in winter. Tom settled that he pre-
ferred looking at the birds, they were so beau-
tiful; and playing with the monkeys, they were
so funny; but he was too sorry for the lions
-such grand kings being shut up like
prisoners-even to bear to think o'f them.





Zoological


Gardens.


"Of course," ]
can do nothing.


he said,


"the men-servants


understand


that;


couldn't the


Queen let them out, papa ?"


He was very sorry to
become acquainted witl


go, after


having just


h so many new crea-


tures in


their


own homes;


but he had


return to his own.
When his aunt came up to see him at bed-
time, he had been thinking a great deal about
them.


" Aunt,"


he said,


"the God that made all


the live beasts and


birds


in the Zoological


Gardens must be a very great God.


I did


not know He was so great till this afternoon.


But I am sure He must be unhappy to


see


them shut up like that.
one up, and nobody can


a man, and


He never shuts any


like it.


go in my own ship to


Then I'm
Iceland,


and India,


and Arabia, I mean to take them


all back with me-that's what I mean to do!


Oh! I


wish some one would let them know I


was coming!"


The


55


but


to


_~0~


VI













GOES TO LOOK FOR CATS.


OB was soon quite well again,


to walk


and able


about.


" Tom," he whispered, one


day, as they sat


at dinner;


"come


upstairs


directly


afterwards


want you.


It was raining-for


it rained


in London


just as it did in the country-and the children


were not allowed to go out.


Bob's way of


whispering and


Tom saw
the nudge


gave him that it was a secret, so as soon as
he had swallowed his last mouthful he gave


him a nudge in return, and said


" I'm ready."
They waited


away, then


in a low voice,


till the others were moving


Bob took him upstairs to an empty


garret,


where


there


was a small


window


opening on to the


roof.


-I


by
he


CHIAP,


Vi.-TOM





Tom goes to look for Cats. 57

"Look," he said, pointing to it, and still
whispering, though there was nobody in the
room; "that's where they come, I'm certain-
just outside on the slates. Didn't you hear
them last night ?"
Hear what?" whispered Tom, half-
frightened. Do you mean robbers ?"
"No," answered Bob; "not robbers. Cats
-cats squalling. Didn't you hear them ?"
Tom could not say he did. He never
heard any noises at night after he was in bed.
Now," said Bob, look here. They've
a perfect right to squall, and I don't want
to interfere with them; but what I say is,
they've no right to join together to squall
there. It disturbs ever so many people. Do
you see that box ? I want you to push me
up. I must see what's outside."
They shoved the box close to the wall, and
Bob stood on it. Then Tom helped to push
him.
That'll do," said Bob, after looking out-
side carefully. "Just what I thought. There's
a deep gutter, and a railing along the top. I




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


expect they meet


round the chimney.


Tom,"


he whispered,


"( I


mean


to get


up in the


middle


of


the


send them away.


"Yes," wh
" To-night,


night, and come


Will you


ispered Tom;


said


Bob.


upstairs,


come with


and


me ?"


" I will."


" You


promise ?


It wouldn't do to change


last, you know.


your mind at the


And we must take our boots


off, that nobody may hear.


I begged Ann


light


to give it


it till we get


I've got a


me;


but we


into the room.


candle;
mustn't
In the


middle of the night-you promise ?"


"But if I don't wake ?"


said


Tom.


" Never mind," he answered;


" I'll


manage


that.
and
must


At the right


knock


three


hour I'll go


times


softly.


get out of bed and come


you'll find


me there.


to your door,


Then


you


outside, and


You mustn't keep me


waiting, or say a word-not even in a whisper


-or they'll hear, you know.


" I promise,


You promise ?"


said Tom, solemnly.


Fancy,"
it would be


away!


It


said


Bob, aloud,


" what


a


if we were really to send


would


be a public service.


thing
0
them
The


58


--


I





Tom goes to look for Cats. 59

sleep of the public is disturbed with their
squalling. I don't think I need go outside
myself, if I poke at them with a stick. I
won't hurt them, you know-only give them a
good fright, so that they mayn't collect round
that chimney again."
Have you got a stick ?" asked Tom.
Yes," said Bob; "a beauty. I found it
a year ago, in the Square Gardens, under a
bush. The gardener said I might take it,
and it's been the greatest comfort to me ever
since. Come down and I'll show it you."
They left the box standing by the window,
so as to be ready. Bob took Tom into his
room, and showed him the stick. It was
kept in a secret corner of the press.
"We'd better go back now," said he, "or
the others will be wondering where we are."
Night came, and at last bed-time. When-
ever Tom looked at Bob, he thought of the
cats; and whenever Bob looked at him, Tom
knew he was thinking of them also. After
they had said good-night, and were just going
upstairs, Bob whispered-




Tomn


Seven


Years


Old.


"Remember-in the middle


of the night-


three
don't


knocks.


make


any


Tom nodded.


Come


outside


at once;


noise, you know."
They went to bed.


always meant to lie awake a little to
but somehow he never could manage it.


was in the middle


of


but


Tom
think,
He


a funny dream, when he


suddenly jumped up with a great start.


Some-


body


was knocking at the


door.


The first


minute


he was frightened,


but the next


remembered it was
cold, and very dark.


only


Bob.


It was very


While he was huddling


on some


of his clothes,


he


began


to wish


had never promised.


After all,


what


matter


if


a thousand


chimney to squa
the meantime,
He whispered tl


cats met round the


11 ? They hurt
Bob was growing


rough


nobody. In
ig impatient.


the keyhole-


say, Tom, what a time


you are


Aren't


you coming ?"


" Here


door softly,


am,"
and


whispered Tom, opening the
shivering all over.


It was quite black outside; the


quite black,


and so was


stairs
b


were


Bob.


6o


he


he


did


it


"I





Tom goes


to look


for Cats.


"We'll never be able to see,
" Hush !" answered Bob.


said Tom.


Of course not.


We must feel.


I've got the


candle,


but I'm


not going to light it till we get to the top."
Tom thought in his heart they would never


get there.


They crept along slowly.


clock in the passage ticked much louder than


it did in the day-time.


way up stairs,


When they were half-


it nearly frightened Tom out of


his senses by suddenly striking one.


" I say,"


that,


you'd


whispered Bob,
better go bac:


k


"if you jump like
to bed. You'll


wake everybody."
No, I won't," whispered Tom.
I just didn't know it was coming."


" Really,


They reached


the landing.


It was quite


as dark and quiet.
lit the candle. T,


Bob struck a match,


and


om looked round to see if


there was anybody hiding in the corners, but
there was not. The box had not been moved
from the window.


I don't
said Tom.
"Oh yes, 1


believe they're


there


" I don't hear anything.
they're there," said Bob.


to-night,"


" They


The


1~1~




Seven


Years


O/L


couldn't


know


we were


coming.


That's


impossible.
shade it wil
as soon as


Now
L your


hold


the


hand-so.


I've got on


candle,


and


Push me up


the window.


Tom stood ready,
fully, as he was told.


shading the candle care-
Suddenly a voice called


from outside the room-


" Who's
" Bob!"


there ?


Is anyone


whispered Tom,


there ?"


in a


great fright;


"did you hear that ?"


" I won't


come


me the stick.


down,"


said


I've just got at


Bob.
them.


" Hand
I think


see one sitting on the slates.


"Who's


there ?"


repeated the voice, louder.


" Is anyone there ?"
Bob!" whispered Tom, in a greater fright,


"get


down-do.


Somebody's


coming.


hear them!"


Bob turned round and listened.


There


were
room.


certainly footsteps


moving


in the


next


" It's Ann,"
was so near


he whispered.


them!


"What a pity !


Blow out the candle,


62


Tom


the box and


opened





Tom goes


to look for Cats.


Tom, or she'll see


us.


Don't


move


or say a


word."


Tom


blew out the


candle.


They stood


quite still and quiet.


It looked blacker than


ever all round.


The footsteps in


the next


room stopped moving,


call


and the voice did


again.


" She's


gone


back


to bed,"


whispered


joyfully.


" Hurrah!


I'llstrike another


match."


" Stop,"


said Tom.


" I've


settled


won't


hold the candle any longer.
there are any cats there.


I don't
Besides,


believe
if there


were, why should you poke at them ?
shouldn't they squall ?"


Why


" I tell you,"


said Bob,


" they've a right to


squall,
turbs


but no


the public


right to squall here.


sleep.


We are


It dis-


doing


public service."
I don't care a


bit about the public,


Tom,


"(and I'm going down.


You had


better


come also.


It's very cold and dark."


Bob stood a minute longer.


'"Well," he said at


last,


"I don't. think


63


Bob,


not


said


_ _~





Tom


Seven


Years


O7ld


there


strange,


can be


any


there


to-night.


It's


though-they couldn't possibly


very
have


known we were coming?"


" Come along,"


said


Tom.


" Never mind.


How very dark it is!"
He was shivering


all


over.


They


crept


downstairs again.


Ann did not hear them.


" If they


begin


to squall,"


whispered


Bob,


in the
again.


passage,


" I shall certainly go upstairs


Everything is so nice and ready,


could at least see


and


them all sitting round the


chimney."


"You


may go


if


you like,"


said


Tom.


won't."


He only wished to jump into


bed, and cover


himself up.


It was dreadfully


cold


outside.


"I


thought


don't


he,


care
when


a bit about


the public,


he was in; "but I'm very


sorrv for the cats.


I can't imagine how


can bear staying out on the slates all of
own accord, with only their day fur-skins


they
their
on-


nothing more than they wear in the day-time!
How they must freeze, poor things!"


64


" I


_~_















CHAP. VII.--TOM WRITES A LETTER TO THE
QUEEN.

>OM was very sorry indeed to hear that
the Lord Mayor scarcely ever drove out
in his gold coach, so that it was no use watch-
ing for it among the other carriages in the
street. He was also very sorry to hear that
he must not go in any day at the front door
of the Palace to visit the Queen, with her
crown and sceptre.
The Queen," said his papa, "is the
greatest lady in England, and nobody can
go to visit her unless she herself asks them
to go."
And will she ask me ?" said Tom. Now
that he had been to the Zoological Gardens,
and could not see the Lord Mayor in his
coach, he most wished to go to her.




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


" No,,"


answered


his papa; I


am afraid


not."
Tom went upstairs very much disappointed.


am sure, he


thought,


"if she only knew


how dreadfully I


wanted


to see her,


and that


was really


going


home on Saturday,


would


ask me to visit


her in


her palace at


once.


Then it suddenly struck him that he


write to


might


her, and tell her all, and perhaps she


would herself send for him; and then even his
papa said it would be no harm to go.


He ran into
were paper and


the schoolroom,


pens and


ink.


where there
Annie was


helping little May with her lesson at the other
end of the table.


am going to write a


letter,"


said


Tom.


" I won't make any noise.


He kept his word,


writing


quite


quietly.


The pen went smoothly over the paper,


and


the ink did not once run into a round blot.
When it was finished, Tom felt quite proud of
it, it looked so nice and neat-perfectly fit to


send to any queen in any palace.


He did


66


"I


she


"I


not


_I _I~__





Tom 's


Letter


to /h e


Queen.


say much, because


he did not wish to tire her


with reading too long a letter, or to tire him-
self with writing it.


"My


dear


Queen,"


he


wrote,


"I do


dreadfully want to see you with your crown


and sceptre.


Papa says I must not go


the Palace unless you ask me.


Will


please ask me before


Saturday, because I


going to travel home on that day. I live in
the country, and I go to bed at eight o'clock.
It is one of your own postmen who is bring-
ing you this letter.
I remain, my dear Queen,


" With


much love and kisses,


Your affectionate TOM."

He folded it as neatly as he had written it,


and put it into an envelope.
outside-
For the Queen,


" In her


own


Then he wrote


Palace,


"In London,
"The capital of her own country, England."


67


so


into
you


am


I _





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


When


he had done this, he


ran out of the


room,


hiding


it in his hand.


May had not seen it.
James, the footman,
scuttle.


Annie


On the stairs he


carrying


down


and
met


a coal-


give
next


"Oh,


this
time


James," said


to the


he


he. I


postman to


comes.


When


want


take


you


the


will he


to


very
come


again ?
James stopped.


touch


it-don't


touch


it !" cried


Tom,


in


a great


fright.


" Your fingers


black with the coals, and
for it to arrive dirty."


it would never do


" Master


Tom,"


said he,


"whatever have


you been doing ?


Does your papa know ?"


"Well, why do you ask ?"


said Tom.


"You go and


James,
an idea,


" before
writing


show it him first,


you


to


send


it.


sir,"


Why,


the Queen!


said
what


However


did it get into your head ?"


"Did
James ?"


you n
asked


ever
Tom


write


to the Queen,


"If you


can write,


and want her to do anything for you,


68


" Don't


are


why





Tom's


Letter


to the


Queen*.


shouldn't you ?


But perhaps you have


never


wanted her to do anything for you."
James listened, and looked very much


prised, as though
this before.
Suddenly there
front door.


s-


he had never thought


was a quick


knock


;ur-
of


" There he


is !"


said Tom;


" that's


knock,


I know.


I'll run


down


myself and


ask him.


He lost no time.


The


postman was


on the steps.


He had handed


in his letters,


and was just turning to go.


"Stop- stop !"


cried


Tom,


quite


out of


breath.


" Wait a minute.


want you


take this letter as fast as you can."
The postman took it, and read


written outside.


what was


Then he smiled.


No,
back.
"But


Master


Tom," he


" I couldn't take it.
," asked Tom, "ar


Queen's own postmen?


said,
NT 4-


handing
^ *1- "


I UN possi1iy.
en't you one of the
Mustn't you carry


all her
not?"


letters


to her, whether


/'


I 69


at the


his


still


to


you


like


or


*\I%
/'


I _


,


1_K


B
-~





Tom


70


Seven


Years


Old.


" Master Tom,"


this to


your papa


said he,
? Does


"have you
he know


shown
you're


sending it ?"
"How funny!"


what


James asked.


said Tom;
What can


" that's


just


that matter


to you, postman ?"
Just then his papa came
room, and saw him.
Hullo, Tom !" he cried,


out of the


surprised;


dining-


" what


are you doing at the front door ?


the postman ?"
"Show it him,


sir,"


Talking


to


said the postman.


"A letter ?"
got a letter ?


asked his papa.
Who is it from ?


" Have


you


Let me see."


Tom did not want to let him see.


he said, holding it tightly in


hand.


" I haven't got a letter.


wanted to


send one."


" To send one ?"


repeated his


papa, still


more surprised. "A
ing a letter to, Tom ?


.nd who were you send-
Is it a secret ?"


Not exactly,"
haven't sent it.


said Tom.


" No.


only wanted to


And


send it;


but he wouldn't take it."


his


" No,"





Tom's


Letter


to the Queen.


Tom's
and held


papa caught him round the waist,
him prisoner, laughing.


Now," he said,
you show it me. C


"I won't let you go
>ome, where is it ?"


till


"Well, here,"
pose I must. D


said


Tom, slowly.


)on't dirty it, please.


like to take it home, and show it to


" I sup-
I should
mamma.


She would be so pleased to see I could write


a whole


letter


all by myself without blotting


it."


papa


read


it through.
6n


He could


scarcely stand for laughing.
"Certainly," he said; by all means.


it home, and show it to mamma.


you think of such a thing, Tom ?"
I wanted to go, dreadfully,"


Take


What made


said


Tom,


"and you wouldn't let me, unless she asked


me.


And so


Mayn't


I wrote to ask her to ask me.


I send it, papa?"


"No," answered


he;


" certainly


would never do."
Tom did not understand what would never
do.


" Well,"


said he at last,


with a sigh,


71


His


not.


It


"I





Tom


Sevelz


Years


Old.


won't,


then.


I'll give it to mamma instead.


Now that I have written it all through


myself so nicely, I'd like to send


body to read.
Queen herself


it to some-


But I would much rather the


had got


it, for I


meant


it for


And


did so want to visit


palace, and see her sitting on
her crown and sceptre !"


her in her


her throne with


72


by


her.














CHAP. VIII.-TOM BUYS PRESENTS AND GOES
HOME.

T OM went with his aunt to the Baker
Street Bazaar to buy his presents for
Richard and the gardener. He was very
sorry he had not asked them what they would
like best before he left home, for he found
it so difficult to settle what to carry away,
among all the things he saw. The bazaar
was like a large shop, just as Annie said, full
of shopmen and shopwomen, with a quantity
of paper and string ready to wrap up the
parcels.
Now," said his aunt, "you may walk
where you choose and look about you; but
take care and don't touch anything."
Tom put his hands behind his back, that
he might be sure not to do so. His aunt





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


went one way, and he


went another.


walked just where he liked, and stopped when
he liked, and looked at the things he liked.


It was very nice to feel that he


had a purse


of money in his pocket, and had only


to lay


some of it down, and carry away whatever he


wanted.
more he


But the longer he stayed, and the
saw, the less he could make up his


mind


what to take.


He remembered


it was


not himself he had to please, but Richard and


the gardener.


There were some dear little


penwipers, which had red woolly dogs
tb


on the


top of them, with


very
fond
pies


round


black


nice-and he kn
of dogs, because h


of his


glass


own.


Th(


letter-weights,


bead eyes-they were
.w the gardener was
e had three tiny pup-
en there were lovely


with


pictures


of


London inside them.


He fancied


Richard


might like one
be certain. A


"(Well, Tom,"
what you want?
time enough. At


of these,


but still he could not


t last his aunt came


said she,


I'm


sure


"have


up to him.


you


I've giver


found
I you


re you tired of waiting ?"
Z!


said Tom;


" I'm not tired of waiting,


74


He.


.01)y,





Tom


Presei nts.


but I'm tired of settling.


to take.


I can't settle what


don't know what Richard and the


gardener would think the nicest.


Buy something useful,"
thing that they can use."


said she-" some-


Very well,"
take anything.


said Tom.


He was ready to


" Here's a nice strong
Z>


pocket-knife,"


she. I think the gardener might
He is sure often to want a knife."


" Yes," said Tom, quite pleased.


that, shopwoman.


nicest.


like it.


" I'll take


I'm sure that would


be


Perhaps he has not got one, or per-


haps his old one is worn out, or he may have


lost it, you know.


it when I


I wonder I


passed this table


did not


a minute


Please wrap it in paper and tie it with string,
shopwoman."


She did so.


He put down the money, and


carried


it away.


Tom wanted next to buy


some perfume for Richard.


There were such


pretty little bottles, that looked full


of light-


green and yellow wine; but his aunt said she


did not think


Richard


would care for per-


75


said


take
ago.


_I~_


buys.





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


fume.


She advised


him to take


a white


pencil instead, that never required to be cut
as his did, and was made of smooth, shining
ivory.


" And it's


will
take


go


nice and short,"


said


into his waistcoat pocket.


that,


please.


Now


Tom.


Yes,


I've settled.


us go.


I don't care to look any more at


the things
buy."


that other


people


are going to


They
number


went


again


of people


into the


passed in and


street.
out of


shop-doors.
I hope,"


they


said Tom, looking at them,


find it easier to choose what to


away than I


" that
carry


do.


" You haven't asked me what


said his aunt.


"Wouldn't you like


I bought,"
to know ?"


" Is it a present ?"


said Tom.


" Yes," answered she.


"And


how


did you know what the person


would like


best ?"


said Tom.


"I guessed,"
"Oh!" cried


she answered.


Tom,


" that's what


I've had


76


let


" It
I'll
Do


A


the


_ _I~__ ~CII~





Tom buys Presents. 77

to do with Richard and the gardener. I do
hope I have guessed right !"
When you come into dessert this even-
ing," said his aunt, I'll show you what I
bought. You know you are going home to-
morrow.
So I am," said Tom. I always forget
about to-morrow. To be sure, I shan't be
here."
In the evening he dressed with the others,
and went into the dining-room to dessert.
Little May wore a white frock and a pink
sash, and looked like one of the fairies in the
pantomime. On the table lay the present his
aunt had bought at the Baker Street Bazaar
in the morning. It was a brown leather
writing-case, with a lock and key. Tom knew
exactly what was inside, for Bob had one, and
had shown it to him. There were paper and
envelopes, and pens and ink, and a blotting-
book and stamps, and even a long piece of
red sealing-wax.
"And who is it for ?" said Tom. "You
must have guessed the person can write."





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


"I know he can," said his
wrote a letter to the Queen not


aunt; "for
long ago."


cried


Tom,


looking


up,


" that's


what I did.


How funny !"


" Well,"


said


she;


" and


I bought it for


you.


"Did you ?"
ve guessed i


asked
right!


Tom, delighted.


When I


" You


saw Bobs,


wanted one at once exactly like


I do


it;


and it is,


believe.


Not quite," said Bob. I have examined.
The key is a little different in shape, and my
sealing-wax is black, and not red."


" But I think


mine


is the prettiest !"


cried


Tom.


"Oh! I do hope Richard


and the


gardener will like their presents as much as I
like mine."


" I am quite sure they will,"


said his aunt.


"Are you?"


" Then


I'll not


answered
be afraid.


Tom,


kissing


her.


You've guessed


right once, so it's not likely you
wrong a second time; is it ?"


would


guess


Tom wanted very much to see his


mamma,


and his hen, and his rabbits, and Richard,


78


he


ha


" Why"





Tom goes Home. 79

and the gardener, and the nest in the top
branch of the tree near the wall. He also
wanted very much to stay with his aunt and
cousins, and walk about all the streets of
London, and see everything-so he was both
glad and sorry at the same time. The
day he started was cold. He put on his
Ulster while the others stood looking at
him. He did not mind going half so much
while he had to wear his Ulster; and when
he put his hands into his great warm pockets,
he felt almost altogether glad, and not a
bit sorry.
"I like you very much," said he to his
cousins. I know all your names quite well,
and which belongs to which, and how old you
are.
And I like you," said little May. I
didn't at first. I thought you weren't a nice
Cousin Tom."
"That was because you were the baby,"
answered he, quickly. Never mind; I was
a baby once-I don't remember when-but it
was a long time ago."
.





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


said Bob,


in a whisper,


"you


collect my saying there were cats outside
the slates that night ?"


re-
on


Tom.


He


only


remembered


how horribly cold and


dark it was,


nice it felt getting back into bed.
But I did, though," said Bob, nodding his


head.


"And I was right;


there were.


Ann


heard them last night, and told me.


I mean


to go


up again.


The box


is still there, and


so is my stick.


It will be doing the public a


service to send them away."


Tom was glad


would


not be there to


the last minute


go


with him.


Jack ran up to him


little parcel wrapped in newspaper.


At


with a
It was


four marbles out of his treasure-box-one was
the blue one.


"Are you ready,
"Say good-bye. D


Tom?"


called


his papa.


)on't wait.


Tom


said good-bye to each one,


and


gave


his aunt a great hug.
Now that you know us," said she,


"(and we


know


you, you must come


back again


soon."


Tom ;


" certainly.


As


soon


8o


said


and


how


he


said


__ _


" Tom,"


(i No, 1


(C Yes)")





Tom goes Home. 81

as I've seen mamma, and my hen and rabbits,
and Richard and the gardener."
His aunt gave him a kiss to carry to his
mamma from her, and he promised to keep it
safely, and give it as soon as he arrived, and
had given all his own first.
The train went exactly the same way back
as it had come to London, for Tom perfectly
remembered some fields with ponds in them,
and a garden with a fountain, that he had
passed before. The grass had changed a
little since he had been away, and grown
greener, and the branches of the trees had
begun to live again and sprout into buds.
When they came near the station, Tom could
not sit still. He even forgot to put his
hands in his Ulster coat pockets. There


1 -


I


. 1


was lignt enough to see the
hedge.
It's grown greener too !" cr
can see-I can just see. Ai
carriage and the coachman. ]
me-he's looking at the train.
coachman !"


-ied
nd
He


ad and the

t Tom. I
there's the
doesn't see
Coachman!


fc~O;





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


" Wait


till the train


stops,


" said


his


papa.


"Tom, stand still.


" There's


Don't get out yet.


Richard-dear Richard!" called


Tom.


"He's coming !


Here,


Richard-here


we are-how


do


you


do ?


And


how


is


mamma, and my hen and rabbits ?"


"All well,


sir,"


said


Richard, helping them


out, and looking


as glad


to see them as they


were


to see him.


" Does


mamma


know


we re


coming ?"


asked


Tom,


running


" Does she know we're


across
here ?


the platform.


How


do


you


do, coachman?


How's my


hen and


rabbits,


and mamma ?"
They got into the carriage.


All well," said Tom.
coachman both say so.
what a long way it is!


" Richard and the


I'm
And


very glad.
I can't see


changes


since


I've been away.


I think the


hedge


is greener


almost sure it is.


all the


way


There's the


along.


gate


I'm


and the


lilac-bushes; and, papa,
house !"


look there's


sit still !"


cried


his papa; but it
'1


82


Oh,
the


" Sit


still,


the


~_





Tom


goes


Home.


was no use.


Tom did


not hear


him, and


could not sit still.
The house door was open, and the passage
was light. Tom's mamma had evidently


known they


were near, for she stood


ready


waiting.


She seemed


even


happier than


Richard was to see them.


Tom rushed up


the steps.
any longer.
These


His papa did


kisses


"and this one is Aunt


not keep


are mine !"


May's, that


him back


cried


Tom;


I promised


to give;


and these


are mine again!


mamma, how nice you look, and how nice


everything looks!


had forgotten


how nice


everything was.
His mamma gave him as many kisses in


return


as he gave


her.


Tom thought


never would be


tired


of kissing


her.


Then


he slipped off her knee, and ran about every-
where, looking at everything. It was too late
to go to his hen and rabbits; but she told
him also that they were quite well, and would
most likely be asleep.


" Wait a minute,


called


she,


as he


83


Oh,


he


was


____________I_________





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


running


along


the


passage.


" Don't


go up-


stairs till I come."


Tom


waited.


They walked


upstairs


gether.
"Where are you going?"
want to go to the nursery. ]


said


Tom.


" I


want to see if


my toys are all rightly arranged in the


and if


anybody has


rubbed


out the face


drew on the wall."
"This is your room,"


said


she,


opening


door.


" Look,


Tom.


Tom stood and looked.
new room with a bright


little new bed with


There was a little


fire


blazing,


and


white curtains, and white


curtains hanging at the window.


was his own press for


his toys,


and on


top a beautiful new book-shelf, that held


own books all in a row.


And the carpet was


bright red, and the jug and


basin


had a blue


ribbon painted round them ;


mantelpiece was hung


good cl
hard to
glass v


hild


Jesus, whon


and


over


a new picture of
i Tom was trying


the
the
so


be like; and there was a lovely green


ase


on the table; arid


everything


84


to-


press,


And there


the
his


_~_ __


I





Tom


goes


Home.


looked


new and shining,


and bright


snug.
Mamma!"


pantomime!


cried


Tom,


The curtain


and you see what is behind


"it's just like the
goes up suddenly,
! And you didn't


know at all what was coming-nobody could
ever guess what was coming!"
He had to go and kiss her again, she looked
so nice, and everything looked so nice.
Papa must come up and see all that is


behind the curtain,"


said Tom;


"only let him


till after


I'm in bed, and really behind


my own white curtains, and then there will
be me also to see, you know !"
His papa and mamma both came upstairs
after dinner.


" Papa !"


cried


Tom,


as he opened


door;


"you remember the prince in the silver


coat at the pantomime-you didn't see him,
but I told you all about it-well, I'm as happy
as him."


" You know what


happy ?"


I say when I


said his mamma.


hear you're


" You know what


I always say; don't you, Tom ?"


and


wait


the


I~ ___I_




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


Yes,"
already.


said I
I did it


Fom ;
before


"and


I've


got into


done it
my nice


new


bed, and


go to sleep."
Do what,


I mean to do it a ain


Tom ?"


before


asked his papa.


"Thank Him,"


answered


Tom,


quickly.


" I know that's what mamma means.


always thanking God.


She's


And there's so much,


you know.


Almost everything


in the


room


is new.


I'll have to


begin


to-night and finish


to-morrow.


I couldn't possibly go over each


thing


before


I go to


sleep."


86














CHAP. IX.-TOM GIVES HIS PRESENTS.

>T)OM'S presents were unpacked out of his
box, but still wrapped in paper and
tied with string. He knew at once which
was his mamma's, because it was much longer
and thicker than the other, and which was
Richard's, because it was rounder, and small
enough to go into his waistcoat pocket, so the
one left was of course the gardener's. Tom
carried them all carefully down, but did not
tell Richard anything about his, though he
passed close to him at the dining-room
door.
Good morning, mamma," he said. Then
he handed her her present. "That's yours.
I hope I've guessed right. It took me a long
time to settle what to take away. Do you
like it ?"





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


She unwrapped the paper, and drew


the vase.


It really did look beautiful.


Oh, Tom, how
it for me ?"


" Yes,"


said


pretty !"


Tom;


" I've


she cried.


"Is


bought it, and


now


I've given it


nobody else's.
much ?"


to


you.


So it's yours,


and


Do you like it a little, or very


Very
him; and


much indeed,"


Tom saw


by


said


she,


her face


kissing


that


she


did.


" Well,


near


then,


to her.


I'll tell


you,


said


he,


" I saw something else


going
that I


think you would have liked


better."


" I don't think you did, Tom,


" Yes,"


said


Tom;


"and


couldn't carry


it away, it was so heavy.


" What could


it have been ?"


"(You've got one


upstairs !"


cried


Tom;


uglier,


of


course,


because it wasn't


present.


with


And it's white all over,


a marble top.


guessed !"
Not in the


least,"


Now


said his


you


on a table
must have


mamma.


88


out


said


she.


"only


said


she.


_~ __ __





Tom gives


his


Present s.


"Well," said Tom, "if I tell you, do you
promise to like the vase the best ?"
"Yes," she answered, I promise."
It was a jug and basin," said Tom-
"that's what it was, with red roses painted


round it-so pretty and so heavy, I c
scarcely lift it. Are you sorry ? Do tell
Would you have liked it better than
vase ?"
No," answered she at once. I like
vase much the best."
Really and truly ?" said Tom.
Really and truly," repeated she.
"Well," said Tom, "I'll not think
more about it then, because, you see,
likely somebody has carried it away by
time. Oh, Richard's gone! I wanted to
him his present."
Wait till after breakfast," said his man
The vase was placed on a white woolly
on the table by the window. The light sl
on the red and yellow tulips. Tom began
think they looked almost as pretty as
roses round the jug and basin.


would
me.
the


Sthe


any
very
this
give


rma.
mat
hone
in to
the


89





Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


cried


over ;


" you're


STom,
going


Richard, aren't you ?
Richard came in.


when
to ring


breakfast
the bell


Where's his present ?"


" That's


for you,


" said


Tom,


handing


pencil.


" I wanted to buy a bottle of


perfume,


but Aunt May thought you would like
better. Do you like it ?"


"Thank you,


Master


Tom,"


said


Richard,


looking quite
pocket.


pleased.


Then


" I knew it would go


to his mamma.


size.


in,"


whispered


" I knew it was just the


Richard did not say


but then he never does.


much; did
I think he


Tom
right


he ?
really


likes it;


don't you ?"


His mamma nodded.


Tom felt satisfied.


" Now


"to give


I'm going


to


the


gardener,


him his present.


wish


cried
I had


a lot more for everybody-it's such fun giving
presents."


He ran away.


The air


in the garden was


much colder


nice to


than


breathe.


in the house, but still
Tom jumped down


very


two


90


was
for


the


that


he


put


it in


his


he,


cc Now,"





Toni


gives


his


Presents.


steps at a time.


beside the


The gardener was stooping


border.


" Gardener! gardener!"


round.


I t's


me.


called Torm,


How do you do ?
o


"turn
want


to see my hen and rabbits."
You'll find them quite well, Master Tom,"


said the gardener.


again.


" I'm glad to see you back


What did you think of London ?"


" It's a big place,"


must be very big,
than London. /


said Tom.
it goes on


knd on the m


it spreads ever so far
round."


lower d


" The world
much further
ap it does-
own, and all


" Bless


me, yes,


Master Tom,"


said the


gardener,


stooping down again.


" Didn't you


know that ?"
"Oh, don't begin to work for a minute!"


cried Tom.


" I've something to


show


Do you think this a nice knife ?"
The gardener took it in his hand and looked


at it.


Then he shook his head.


"Too big and too sharp for you, Master


Tom," he said at last; that's


( Well,"


what I think."


said Tom, dancing about; I


9i


you.




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


didn't


mean it for myself-there,


I bought it for you.


think it


too big


It's a present.
and too sharp


gardener


Do you


for


you,


gardener ?"


The
even


gardener seemed quite surprised, and


more


pleased


than his


mamma


and


Richard.
right.
Bless


Tom saw at once he had


me


a real beauty!


Master


And


Tom,


" he


I lost mine


said,


last


guessed


S it is
week.


I'm so glad of a new one.


Thank


you.


Tom danced about still more.


"I told


Aunt


May so!"


he


cried.


perhaps your old one was worn out,


" I said
or per-


haps you had


lost it.


And you


have-how


nice !


it.


I must run in and tell mamma about


I've guessed quite right every time !"


ran into


the house


and told her all.


Then


he ran out again


to


see his


rabbits.
one was


He had a great deal to do.


quite


well and happy.


Every-
Then he


went to the tree by the wall to look for
nest on the top branch, but it was gone.


One day, soon after,


Tom was


92


He


hen


and


the


in


his


own


~


I





Tom gives his Presents. 93

nice new room, arranging his toys in his own
press, when he was told there was a young
gentleman in the drawing-room waiting to see
him. It was the boy who lived in the nearest
white house. He met his mamma on the
stairs. She had her bonnet and shawl on.
"I'm going out," she said. You must
take care of your visitor, and make him
happy."
Tom knew quite well how to make himself
happy, because he could tell exactly what he
liked best to do; but he did not know how to
make anybody else happy, and was not sure
if he would be able. He told his mamma so.
"You can, if you try," she answered; and
Tom promised at least to try, before he ran
into the drawing-room.
His visitor was standing by the fire, with
his hat in his hand. His face was white, and
his eyes were blue, and his boots were very
black and glossy. He was not like Bob, or
Jack, or Henry, or any other boy Tom had
seen.
What's your name ?" asked Tom. It was




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


the first question he always


ing,


asked, after say-


" How do you do ?"


" Archibald


Graham,"


answered


he.


" I'm


called


Archie.


" How old


are you ?"


said


Tom.


This was


always his second question.


" I shall be eight in


May,"


he


answered.


suppose you want


to know what I'm


called, and how old I am,"


said Tom.


"Well,


I'm seven, and my name is


Tom.


,' Tom,"


coat ?
in the


said


Mamma


Archie,


said


"may
wasn't


take


C


to keep


)ff
it


house.


( Certainly,"


said


Tom, helping him to pull


it off.


" You may do anything


you like.


want you to
put it on ?


be happy.


Which


chair


shall I


You can choose.


"I'll put it out of sight,"


ing it to the ottoman;


" Now,


said Tom,


said Archie, carry-


"it's tidier."
" what would


you


to do next ?


What


do


you


think


would


happiest ?"
Archie walked to
lowed him.


the piano,


and .Tom fol-


94


"I


my
on


like


be





Tom


gives


Present s.


"Can you
on the stool.


"Of


course,


play ?"


said


Archie


Tom.


asked,


climbing


" Everyone


can


play.


You've only to


put


down your hands,


and the noise comes up at once from
its inside."


out of


" Why,


" cried


Archie,


"that's only


strum-


ming! I can play.
the Weasel' and '


I've learned 'Pop goes
'he Last Rose of Summer.'


Listen."
Tom
watched


stood


still and listened.


his fingers


carefully.


Archie


They moved


slowly


among the notes, and did


not always


seem to know where to go.
"Why don't you let your fingers go


they want ?"


easier,
same.


said Tom


and the


noise


at last.
comes


" It's


up just


where
much


the


" How stupid


you


are !"


cried


Archie.


" That would


be playing wrong


notes,


course-all out of tune.


Tom did not like to be called stupid.


He


liked, instead, to be called very clever indeed.


"Well," he said: -" show me.


Which are


95


of


_ __ _^__ _~~~~_ ___


his




Tom


Seven


Years


Old.


wrong


notes,


and which


are the


right


ones ?"


He could


see no difference.


All


the


white


looked the same white, and all


the black the


same black.


" I can't talk


in


the middle


of


my


tune


Archie.


" I'll


have


to finish


Now don't you hear the difference ?


ever there's a horrid


it after.
When-


noise, there's a wrong


note; and whenever there's a nice noise, it's
right one."


" I see!"


cried Tom, after a minute;


mustn't strike


how.


them


The notes want


11 down together,
to choose which


any-
they


will


go with.


and treacle.


It is like mixing


They're


potato-soup


delicious separate, but


would be very nasty eaten together.
know the notes were so particular."


I didn't


"Now
Archie.


again "
"Stop !"


I'm going


" Don't


cried


ing his promise;


back


talk, or


Tom,
"stop


to my tune,


I shall


suddenly


before you


said


have to begin


remember-


begin.


want to ask you a question.


Are you happy?"


96


the


said


" you


C ~I_________




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