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Colyer will continue as advocate


305-248-0501. 86-399-3805
WWW. alilmotors.COIRI


BLACKS MusT CONT o TIll IR Ow'N ID Y


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ers have telegraphed for years.
"I am a proud Black man in
this country," Nutter said in
an interview with The Associ-
ated Press. "It was a message
that needed to be said. It need-
ed to be said at this time. ..
People have had enough of this
nonsense, Black and white.'
At a National Association
for the Advancement of Col-
ored People gathering in 2004,
Cosby chided the Black com-
munity in a.speech commemo-
rating the 50th anniversary of
Brown v. Board of Education,
the legal case that toppled~ seg-
regated education.
"These people marched and
were hit in the face with rocks
to get an education and now
we've got these knuckleheads
walking around," Cosby said
then. *
"`I can't even. talk the way
these people talk, 'Why you
ain't,' 'Where you is' ... and I
blamed the kid until I heard
the mother talk," the enter-
tainer said.
Nutter's words also .har-
kened back to a 2008 Father's
Day speech by then-presiden-
tial candidate Barack Obarna.
"If we are honest with our-
selves, we'll admit that what
too nriany fathers also are
is missing missing .from
too many lives and too many
homes," Obama told a church
in Chicago. "They have aban-
doned their responsibilities,
acting like boys instead of
m'en. -
Now, it's Nutter taking up
the mantra.
Some feel his message was
needed. Others say he's air-
ing private community matters
now that crime is sprouting
downtown, near businesses
and popular tourist attractions
in a sprawling city with many
other sections already plagued
by persistent gun violence.
: 0 il~l Ah~edersht;~ atalk show
host on the Black radio sta-


Ry Patrick Walters
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA The pain-
ful images and graphic stories
of repeated violent assaults
and vandalism by mobs of
Black teenagers had gotten to
be too much for Mayor Michael
Nutter.
As an elected official and a .
'proud Black man" in the na-
tion's fifth-largest city, Nutter
felt he had to go a step beyond
ordering a law enforcement
crackdown.
So he channeled the spirit of
another straight-talking Phila-
delphian: Bill Cosby. Nutter
took to the pulpit at his church
Sunday and gave an impas-
sioned, old-fashioned talking-
to directed at the swarms of
teens who have been using so-
cial networks to arrange violent
sprees downtown, injuring vic-
tims and damaging property.
Moreover, he called out parents
for not doing a better job rais-
ing their childi-en.
"You've damaged yourself,
you've. damaged another per-
son, you've damaged your
peers and, quite honestly,
you've damaged your own
race," Nutter said at Mount
Carmel Baptist Church.
The 54-year-old mayor, mar-
ried with a teenage daughter
and a grown son, called out
absentee fathers and neglec~t-
ful parents. He did not mince
words, saying they need to be
more than just a "sperm do-
nor" or a "human ATM."
"That's part of the problem
in our community," Nutter
told the congregation. "Let me
speak plainer: That's part of
the problem in the Black com-
munity. ... We have too many
men making too many babies
they don't.want to take care
of and then we end up dealing
with your children."
4t's el versienlhof ~e-the- tobigh
love message Cosby ands oth-


-AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File
In thiS May 6 file photo, Mayor Michael Nutter makes remarks
during an interview with The Associated Press in Philadelphia.


tion WURD-AM, estimated
that about 60 percent of call-
ers commenting on Nutter's
address supported him. But
quite a few, Anderson said,
believe Nutter simply doesn't
have the community standing
to make such strong remarks.
`"The perception is that he is
not necessarily a `community
guy. ... He has been perceived
as. Jare of a .bitsiness guy,"
Anderson said, noting that he


didn't have a problem with the
comments himself.
Anderson cited concerns
among the Black community,
such as Nutter's perceived fo-
cus on the city's downtown
over other neighborhoods, a
newly enforced curfew for teens
and Nutter's endorsement of
"stop-and-frisk" searches, a
tactic police credit with reduc-
ing crime but that ,some,feel
unfairly targets minorities.


versity of South Florida (51).
But Florida schools may start to
lose ground on this survey in the
future. The Legislature in 2009
authorized tuition at Florida's
public universities to increase by
15 percent a year, until tuition
reaches the national average.


Monday. The University of Florida
placed 11th, Florida State Univer-
sityj 13th, New College of Florida,
16th and the University of North
Florida, 19th. The schools charge
about $18,000 for four years of
tuition and fees.
The survey was compiled by
looking not only at price, but mea-
sures of quality, such as gradua-
tion rates, student debt load and


faculty pay.
"In these challenging economic
times, it is more important than
ever that we provide an affordable
education that doesn't sacrifice
academic excellence," said Mike
Michalson, president of New Col-
lege, a small public liberal arts


college in Sarasota.
The top three spots on the list
went to military service acad-
emies that don't charge tuition:
the U.S. Military Academy at West
Point, N.Y. placed first, followed
by the Air Force Academy in Colo-
rado Springs and the Naval Acad-


emy at Annapolis, Md. Fourth
place went to Cooper Union in
New York, which charges about
$17,000.
Other Florida schools in the
top 100 are the University of West
Florida (27), the University of
Central Florida (42) and the Uni-


BV Scott Travis

Tuition at Florida's universities
has been rising steeply in recent
years, but the state still has many
of the best bargains for a college
education, according to a new
survey from Forbes Magazine.
Four Florida schools placed in
the top 20 of the magazine's "Top
100 Best Buy Colleges," released
:. .~ d


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reprimanded, including Coly-
er. However, she was not rep-
rimanded for any specific ac-
tions but rather because the
mistakes made occurred un-
der her watch.
"That incident was a real
tragedy and while I do not
feel necessarily responsible,
I do feel badly because as an
agency we missed soine sig-
nificant points," she said. "I
don't think we will ever see

case ehv i mad nsi
nificant changes and improve-
ments in the system."
Will she miss the stress of
the job? Colyer says yes but
with a caveat.
"My entire career has been
based on prevention and the
preservation of families al
families. not just ~Black ones,
she said. "But those from the
Black community have always
been very supportive. They
felt I was a person who really
spoke on their behalf and that
I cared for them. I had to go to
my sister's barbershop on NW
62nd Street to assure them
that I was retiring and had not
been fired. It seems they were
pretty upset and were about to
take on the County. This is a
great place to work and live."


COLYER
continued from 1A

recent position, she was re-
sponsible for overseeing child
welfare, mental health and
elder abuse in Miami-Dade
and Monroe counties. .
"This decision was made
easier because I have a very
supportive husband who is
a vital part of who I am and
what I do," she said. "I am

pro te hgitona vbierec orv g
were able to keep hundreds
of children with their parents
and provided the adults with
the tools they needed in or-
der to retain custody of their
children.~ This area is rich in
programs, funding and ser-
vices including The Children's
Trust and the Early Learning
Coalition with whom we part-
ner. The goal for all of its is
and has always been keeping
children safe and with their
parents."
Colyer and her office were
heavily-criticized in their
handling of a case involving
10-year-old Nubia Barahona,
who was killed by her adop-
tive parents. ITwo DCF work-
ers were eventually fired, one
resigned and five others were


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S7A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


Philly mayor chides Black




parents over teen mobs


. :


UF, FSU among Forbes' list of top best college buys

























I


..n 3,,


A complete education? Not so


'~~f '0^ YrTll l



Are Miami-Dade CounttyPublic Schools preparing Black students for success?


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


BY QUEEN BROWN, COMMUNITY ACTIVIST, Queenb2020@bellsouth.net


children with medication and
other healthcare costs.
Floridians need to wake up.
and realize that many of the
people who are being elected
to run our government have
very little interest in helping
the people, especially Blacks.
They are out of touch with re-
ality and running for office to
"feather their nests." It would
not surprise me to see them
behind closed doors laughing

aitica 1 etri nf deici ierdu
,tion and jobs creation.
When Scott was on the cam-
paign trail, he continued to
proclaim that we would bring a
new economic era to Florida -
we just never knew he meant
economic turmoil. Of course
while we see the glass as com-
pletely empty, those who are
friends of Rick Scott continue
to toast their glasses, filled to
the brim at the expense of
the poor.


ate a $30 insurance health
insurance policy for yourself
and other high-ranking state
officials? Even low-income
parents whose children are en- -
rolled in a federal government
heavily-subsidized children's
health insurance program,
Florida Kid-Care, are pay-
ing up to $159 per child every


is worse than -a millionaire ap-
plying for and receiving welfare
benefits or food stamps. Some-
how he still has the audacity
to begrudge poor families who
are without jobs and who need
state assistance to survive.
That is, until he makes good
on his campaign promise and
creates those 700,000 jobs he


As the saying goes a leopard
doesn't change his spots and
Our own governor, Rick Scott,
continues to validate the ad-
age. Mother Jones Magazine
reported last week that Scott
has once again pulled off his
own health care reform. The
Magazine reported that Scott
has managed to secure for
himself and his family, premi-
um health insurance coverage
for only $30 per month. Mean-
" ile cle 100lstat workers

$180 per month. Even more
disturbing is the fact that some
retired, elderly Floridians are
paying over $1,200 per month
for health insurance. The wily
"leopard" Rick Scott, mean-
while, pays mere pennies.
Yes, this is the, same multi-
millionaire who has been ac-
cused of ripping off Medicare
to the tune of over $7 billion.
When you have that much
money why do you need to cre-


promised for Floridians. This
is the same "leopard" that re-
fused $2.4 billion in stimulus
dollars .to build a link to Flori-
da's high speed train and who
similarly turned down over
$40 million from the federal
government that would have
helped the elderly and poor


month for healthcare coverage.
Yet the Governor and his fam-
ily are entitled to pay only $30
and of course it comes at the
expense of Florida taxpayers.
If this level of hypocrisy wasn't
so sad, it would almost seem
like a joke.
This, action by the Governor


Jiki NRY Etisb SR., MIAMI TIMES COLUMNIST, hcrespos~grnail.cogn


: :
P


us to make gains? Where do
we want to go? And are we con-
tent with the status quo?
When we look at the con-
servative movement sweep-
ing across America we see a
group that, right or wrong,
understand the importance of
impacting institutional poli-


social, economic and political
lives? This blindness has been
to our extreme detriment.
To what extent are the Black
masses seeking to influence
. important policy decisions
that impact us? When I look
at the civil rights marches,
sit-ins, freedom riders, etc., it


If we could handle Jim Crow
and other weapons of mass de-
struction thrown at our race,
then certainly we can take on
the Tea Party and build our
house once more with real
grace and dignity. But to do
that will take sacrifice.
It's time to get back to the
task of building the house.
This is a different era and a
different country. The goal
of the Tea Party is to remove
our Black leader, regardless of
what happens to our country.
Blacks cannot afford to sit idly
by as more and more of our
community loses homes, re-
tirement funds and jobs while
seeing the dreams we once had
for our children destroyed. We
have many miles to go before
it can truthfully be said that
we are equal partners in this
thing .we call America. We
have grown weary of accept-
ing handouts. There is still a
whole lot of building to done.


The legacy of political eml-
powerment of Blacks in
America was a combina-
tion of protests, demonstra-
tions and lawsuits. Yes, lawrs
have changed, attitudes have
evolved and our people have
grown stronger. Some might
even say that we've reached a
state of equality in this Yland
of the free." After all, the lead-
er of the free world, where for-
mer slaves now live, work and
play, is a Black man. But oth-
ers would posit that real op-
portunity continues to allude
the vast majority of Blacks.
Only a handful of our people
have reached the pinnacle of
success while the majority
of Blacks continue to be held
back and refused access with
their efforts to move forward
thwarted by institutionalized
racism.
Where do we go from here?
How do we combat this sys-
tematicc exclusion in order for


cies. Somewhere between the
Voting Rights Act and today's
generation of Blacks we have
forgotten this. When did we
lose sight of why we fought so
hard to gain the right to vote?
Wasn't it to impact detriment-
tall policies that systematically
excluded our participation in
just about every aspect of our


was the Black masses that led
the charge -- everyday Black
folks. Where are vre today in
this continued fight for equity?
We can't still say we are too
broke, too ignorant, too ghetto,
too integrated or too afraid to
care -- we should be ashamed
to use these as excuses for our
own apathy.


.'


.BY DR. BOYCE WATKINS


erential treatment -- my mother
was one of those people.
As the father of three beauti-
ful dark-skinned young women,
the last thing I'd want is for any
of my kids to feel that they are
somehow less attractive because
of their complexion. I am glad to
say that not only do they seem
clearly unaffected, but I'd argue
that there is an entire generation
that doesn't put nearly. as much
of a premium on light skin as my
generation or that of my parents.
When it comes to understand-
ing the delicate issue of Black
women's hair, we've got a long
way to go, especially Black men.
I recall the true story of a 12-year


old girl who sat for hours on the
side of the pool, with her feet in
the water. When asked why she
wouldn't jump in, she responded
that she'd just gotten her hair
done and didn't want to "mess it
up." Her ability to enjoy the swim-
ming pool like the other kids had
been ripped away because she'd
been influenced to maintain a
Eurocentric standard of beauty.
Perhaps all of us should take
a step back and think carefully
about what it ineans to be beauti-
ful. While progress is certainly
being made against the backward
nature of stratifying ourselves


based on skin complexion, fur-
ther adjustment in our thinking
might be necessary. At ,the very
least, we can monitor our own
language when referring to those
who look different from ourselves.
Jokes about dark skin or nappy
hair need to go out the window,
along with the ignorant thinking
that accompanies them. Addi-
tionally, the standards of beauty
communicated to our children
must be carefully considered to
ensure that we don't lead our
daughters to believe that they are
nothing if they can't afford to get
their hair done.


Like most people, I grew up
hearing jokes about darker-
skimried Blacks. "Nappy" hair
was an even greater curse. The
further south you go, the more
light skin carries a premium, to
the point that it seems to mat-
ter more than anything else.
The little light-skinned girl with
long hair is (in the worst cases)
the family princess, the smartest
child in the group, the one who
can do no wrong. Unfortunately,
there are some light-skinned girls
who hate the pedestal as much as
everyone else and grow up fear-
ful of the resentment they might
receive from those who feel that
they're the beneficiaries of pref-


K-8 schools: Don't even men-
tion the fact that our' children
stomachs droop over their
pants and they can't walk at
a brisk pace. As a community
we sometimes focus on issues
which have nothing to do with
the future development of our
children and grandchildren.
Let's face it, we all become
frustrated with our political
leaders, even our church and
education leaders, but let us
not forget two principal ele-
ments which need to be ad-
dressed before any more time
lapses. If you have already for-
gotten them, they are physical
fitness gymnastics~) and mu-
sic. The two disciplines for the
mind and body.

Jan Whitney Goode
Miami


Dear Editor,


Plato and Aristotle agreed
that the way to produce the
"right" kind of person in public
education were the use of the
twJo principal elements, gym-
nastics and music. One for
the discipline of the body and
the other for that of the mind.
Leaving music and physical
fitness to our children's whims
will only promote the "wrong"
person. The "right" person has
moral qualities, gentleness,
courage, temperance, anger
and with them. a certain pas-
ston. We only miss live music
at a high school football game,
when either the band is very
small or non-existent. No one
ever complains when there's
an absence of music for mid-
die schools or short-staffed in


other than the real world.

YAPHEH PALMER, 20
Liberty City, Student:


dents. They fo-
cus too much
on the FCAT
and that's not
helping them
out.



MAXINE DELOACH, 69
Allapattahz, Retired

They are
only educat-
ing Black stu- :'l~li''. ~'i
dents if they
are in a school
where there is
a small num-
ber of Blacks.


MARTIN PAYNE, 52
Boca Raton, Bail Bondsman

The Black IL~~
kids in Mi-
ami Dade
County are
being short
changed. I be- '
lieve without a
doubt that the
kids in Miam~i- '
Dade County were getting bet-
ter education under Rudy Crew
as the superintendent,

PAULETTE, BRAVE, 20
Liberty City, Sales Associate

They are trying to at least.
But the way the world is todar,


the kids are
different from
the way they
use to be.


Yes, the peo-
ple that Iknow
that have
graduated
and now they
are working in
hospitals and
things like
that, so yes.


ANGELA WILLIAMS, 21
Little Haiti, Student


No, I don't
think that
they do a good
job at prepar-
ing students to
be in the real
world because
they focus on
other things


ER LINE IESTIBEN, 32
Miami Gardens, Medical Assistant

I don't think Miami-Dade Coun-
ty Public Schools are focusing
on the future of the Black stu-


5A THll MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


NOC E RR


Scott cares little for those most in need


caused of ripping off Medicare to the tune of over $7 bil.
lion. When you have that much money why do you need
10 create a $30 insurance health insurance policy for yourself and
Other high-ranking state officials? .


Political empowerment must head Black agenda


destruction thrown at our race, then certainly we can takO
On the Tea Party and build our house once more with real
grace and dignity.


~KilflPacerone


'


Do Blacks discriminate against dark skin and natural hair?


?I
I '
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__~~ _~_____~~__~_~~~~ __~_ ___~~~___ ~__~~ I ___


First Black Secret Service



.agent dies at age 82


Marine Corps seeks award for first Black Marines


structors and non-commis-
sioned officers at Montford
Point. The segregated camp
was closed down in 1949
and Black recruits were sent
to Parris Island and Camp

were the first Blacks that
were forcibly settled on this
" continent to work Involun-
tarily.
August 20, 1993: Dr.
David Satcher, genetic re-
searcher, was named as the
first Black Director of the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC).
*August 21, 1831: Nat
Turner, revolutionary free-
dom-fighter, began his fa-
mous slave revolt in South-
ampton County, VA. During
the three-day revolt, Turner
and other slaves killed around
60 whites.
aAugust 21, 1943: I-arriet
M. Waddy (West) became the


g .


By Cain Burdeau
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Carlton J.
Roy Sr., a Black businessman
who worked against segrega-
tion alongside influential New
Orleans civil rights leaders such
as the Rev. Avery Alexander and
Dorothy Mae Taylor, has died.
He was 94.
Roy died on Aug. 6 in the city
he did most of his work, accord-
ing to a funeral announcement.
Grandson Shedrick Roy said
that his grandfather was unable
to recover from a recent stroke.
Roy was a founding member of
the Black Businessman's Asso-
ciation of Louisiana. He owned
several businesses in Central
City, which was at the heart of
the Black civil rights movement
in the 1950s and '60s in New Or-
leans. They included a hauling
company, taxi cab fleet, laun-
dry, bar and restaurant. He let
early Black politicians use his


who didn't like inequality for
people and in particular for
Black people," his grandson
said. "If you told my grandfa-
ther you couldn't do it, he would
prove you wrong."
As a successful Black busi-
nessman, Roy had some re-
sources to help Black politi-
cians.
Ernest "Dutch" Morial, the
city's first Black mayor, and
Alexander and Taylor ran cam-
paigns out of his properties,
according to family members.
His wife, Ida Mae Kuluke Roy,
cooked food for Morial's cam-
paign, the grandson said.
"White people respected him
because he had a skill, a little
money and he could talk," his
grandson said. "He was very
smart."
Alexander was born on Feb:
27, 1917, in New Iberia, his
family said. .
He got his start with Martin
Luther King Jr. and in 1963


he famously went into the seg-
regated basement cafeteria
of City Hall in New Orleans
and refused to leave. He was
dragged up stairs by police,
which was caught on film.
Two police officers grabbed
Alexander by his heels and slid
him across the cafeteria floor
and up the steps. The rever-
end later organized boycotts to
force utility and transit compa-
nies to hire Black bus drivers.
Dorothy Mae Taylor was the
first woman on the New Or-
leans City Council and the
sponsor of a bitterly debated
1991 law banning racial dis-
crimination among Mardi Gras
parade clubs. She served as
a state representative in the
early 1970s and was one of the
first Blacks elected to the Loui-
siana Legislature and was the
first Black woman elected to
serve there.
Carlton Roy also helped Or-
etha Castle-Haley, the Rev. A.


L. Davis and the Rev. Sampson
"Skip" Alexander, other impor-
tant civil rights leaders, family
members said. Roy also served
as the master of ceremonies for
an event featuring King in New
Orleans, Shedrick Roy said. He
was uncertain of the event's
date.
Lance Hill, the executive di-
rector of the Southern Institute
for Education and Research, a
race relations center based at
Tulane Uriiversity, said Black
businessmen played an im-
portant role in the civil rights
movement because they were
able to help Black candidates
who found it hard to round up
money for campaigns.
"There were few African-
Americans who were able to
donate to political campaigns,"
Hill said. "The white conmmu-
nity, or elite, had difficulty
controlling independent Black
businessmen because they
weren't in their employ."


****IVI J* =VI en*
property for campaign offices.
Shedrick Roy said his grand-
father was known as a fear-
less Civil Rights activist. "He
would say: 'We know they're
going to sic the dogs on us, we
know there is a possibility that
we'll get beat, but we're going to
march,"' he recalled.
"He was driven. He was one


WASHINGTON (AP) -
Charles L. Gittens, who in
1956 became the first Black
Secret Service agent, has died.
He was 82.
The McGuire Funeral Home
in Washington confirmed that
Gittens died July 27 in Mary-
land. A spokesman for the Se-
cret Service confirmed that
Gittens was the first Black
agent but said no further de-
tails would be immediately
available.
According to an obituary
in The Herald-Sun of Dur-
ham, North Carolina, Gittens


joined the agency in 1956 and
was assigned to the Charlotte,
North Carolina, office. He also
worked in the New York City
office, investigating counter-
feiting and bank fraud.
Fluent in Spanish, Gittens
also worked in the San Juan,
Puerto Rico bureau and was
assigned to the D.C. office in
1969.
He retired in 1979. He then
worked for the Department of
Justice, where he investigated
war criminals who were living
in the U.S.
Danny Spriggs, vice presi-


dent of global security for The
Associated Press who had been
at Secret Service agent, called
Gittens "Ijust an outstanding
guy."
"He went oult of his way to
mentor and give counsel an'd
advice to young African-Amer-
icans who were coming up, es-
pecially those like myself who
were coming up through the
ranks.
"The guy was always physi-
cally fit. He looked like he
came out of the gym. His whole
persona was one of profession-
alism: no nonsense guy."


This undated. photo from a U.S. Department of Justice iden-
tification card shows Charles L. Gittens. Gittens, the first Black
Secret Service agent, died July 27. H~e was 82.


Associated Press

SAN DIEGO The top
leader of the Marine Corps
said recently that he wants
the first Black members of
the Marines to be awarded
the Congressional Gold Med-
al and hopes their story will
inspire more Black men and
women to join the Corps and
rise through its ranks.
Commandant Gen. James
Amos told hundreds of Ma-
rine Corps officers at the Na-
tional Naval Officers Associa-
tion meeting that it was time
for Congress to honor the
group known as the Montford
Point Marines.
About 20,000 Black Ma
rines underwent basic train-
mng in the 1940s after Presi-
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt
integrated the Marine Corps.
They were trained at the seg-
regated Camp Montford Point
in Jacksonville, North Caro-
lina, as racism continued in
the Marine Corps and society.
The Black troops were not


Pendleton like all new Ma-
rines. The Corps was fully
integrated during the Korean
War.
The Congressional Gold
Medal is awarded to a civilian
or group of civilians as the
highest expression of national
appreciation for distinguished
achievements and contribu-
tions.
Amos said his goal was to
cement the role of the Mont-
ford Point troops in the Corps'
235-year history. His efforts
are part of a broader goal in
diversifying the military's
smallest branch and sharing
the legacy of the Black Ma-
rines.
The story of the first Black
recruits will be part of the
instruction Marines receive
during basic training.
"`Spread the gospel that the
Marine Corps is a force that
has changed," Amos told the
officers. '"We're not in 1942
anymore."
Amos said only five percent
of Marine officers are Black

Women's ArtnY to ps' (WAC). .
first Black wv~oman Major.
August 22,..1979: Some
200 Black leaders met In New
York In support of ousted
UN Ambassador. AndreW 3.
Young, 3r., wiho was accused
of attending ain unauthorized
meeting with the PLO. The
Black leaders demanded that
Blacks have a volce in foreign
policy decision-making.
August 22, 1996: Presl-
dent BiII CI~nton ended the
federal' guarantee of funding
to families with dependent
children. This. so-'Falled wel-
fare refor W~ll gave "block-
grants" to stathr.to implement
their own programs, which are


and that needs to increase,
something he pledged to make
a priority.
The Marine Corps, like
all military branches, had
high recruitment and reten-
tion rates this year and will
be looking to downsize from
202,000 to 186,000.
Amos acknowledged stiff
competition to get into the Ma-
rine Corps but said that does
not take away from efforts to
boost minority numbers, es-
pecially among officers.
"I'm not out for quotas,"
Amos said. "I'm out to attract
the best young men and wom-
en of our nation."
Amos has invited Montford
Point Marine veterans; now in
their 80s, to stay at the Ma-
rine Corps barracks and par-
ticipate in a parade honoring
them in Washington, D.C., on
Aug. 26, which the Senate last
year designated as "Montford
Point Marines Day."
The date marks the first
day that Black recruits began
training at Montford Point.

not federally regulated,
*August 23, 1826: Ed-
ward A. Jones received an
A.B. degree from Amherst
College. Jones Is believed
to be the second Black to
graduate from a U.S. college.
Both he and John Russwurm
graduated and succeeded Al-
exander Luclus Tw~light, who
received a B.A. degree from
Middlebury College (Vermont)
in 1823.
S August 23, 1900: The
National Negro Business
League was founded. Booker
T. Washington was elected as
the group's first president as
he and 400 delegates from 34
states met in Boston, MA.


--AP Photo
Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos, right, accom-
panied by Joint Chiefs Vice Chairman Marine Corps Gen. James
Cartwright, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington Friday, Dec. 3,
2010.


allowed to enter the main
base of nearby Camp Lejeune
unless accompanied by a
white Marine. '
By 1945, many of the Black
recruits had become drill in-


*I Atagust 17, 1887: Marcus
'Garvely, Black Nationalist, Pan
Africhnis~t and founder of the
funited Negro Improvement
Association and the "Back to
iAfrica" movement, was born
in Jama~ca.
.*August 17, 1960: The Af-
frican nation of Gabon gained
;its independence.
August 18, 1963: 3ames
Meklredith, the.first Black per-
s$on admitted to the Univer-
Ssity of Mississippl, graduated.
'Meredith was the school's
,first Black graduate.
* August 18, 1976: Samu
i~el Le'e Gravely, 3r., Vice Admi-


ral, was made the Command-
er of the U.S. Third Fleet.
*August 19, 1791: Ben-
jamin Banneker, Inventor,
surveyor, mathematician, as-
tronomer and one of the plan-
ners of what is now Washing-
ton, D,C., published his first
Almanac.
*August 19, 1954: Dr.
Ralph ]ohnson Bunche, diplo-
mat and the first Black winner
of the "Nobel Peace Prize,"
was named Undersecretary
of the United Nations,
*August 20, 1619: The
Dutch brought 24 slaves to
the Jamestown colony. They


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


Civil rights activist Carlton Roy dies













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I..' "~YB~
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LOok for The Children's Trust After School Programs Guide
at any Miami-Dade Publix supermarket.















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R81\cKt s hlt'sr CONT~i'Roll fIRI1:I Ow~N 11Es n1NY


S9A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


achievement gap
dropout rates and college-en-
rollment and completion rates.
Research into the causes of gaps
in student achievement between
low-income minority students
and middle-income white stu-
dents have been ongoing since
the publication of the report,
Equality of Educational Op-
portunity, more widely known
L' as the Coleman Report, com-
missioned by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education in 1966. That
research suggests that both
in-school factors and home/
community factors impact the
academic achievement of stu-
dents and contribute to the gap.
Milton Parris Jr., president of
~ the Norland Vikings Alumni As-
sociation believes this conver-
sation is long overdue.
"I'm glad that we are doing it,
this is something that has been
a long time coming," he said. "It
Sis a good thing anytime you can
bring the community together
to try to form one common goal
in order to address the situa-
Concerned community mem- tions that are going on at this
ber K~evin Scott voices his opin- school."


BV Randy Grice
rgrice@miam,~itimlesonlile .com l
In an effort to help narrow the
achievement gap in depth, a com-
munity conversation was held
at Miami Norland Senior High
School on Wednesday, August
10. The event wras meant to bring
community- members from every
aspect of the community together
to engage in a conversation about
moving Norland forward as a
school and closing the achieve-
ment gap.
"We have partnered with Col-
lege Summit where we will
have students visiting colleges
throughout the school year,"
said Luis Solano, principal of
Miami Norland Senior High.
"We're helping them to fill out
more applications to go to col-
lege and helping students out
with more SAT and ACT prep."
The community conversation
took place as a result of a grant
the United Teachers of Dade
(UTD) received through the Na-
tional Education Association
and the Floridit Education As-
sociation.
"The grant is specifically to do
what we are doing right now it's
called a P.E.P. grant," said Ran-
di Biro, director of educational
policy for UTD. "That stands
for Public Engagement Project
and it is engaging the commu-
nity and the success of a school
and helping to turn that school


i; .



11











-Photo by/Armando Rodriguez/Miami-Dade County
GIVING BACK: Commissioner Audrey Edmonson, District 3,
poses with a child at her Fifth Annual Back to School Fun Day/
Health and Info Fair. The event was held at Jefferson Reaves
Park, 3090 NW 50th Street on Saturday, August 6. Commis-
sioner Edmonson gave away 2,200 backpacks filled with school
supplies to the children who attended.


Luis Solano, Norland's prin-
cipal addresses community
member during conversation.


ion during a break out session.

sures between the performance
of groups of students, especially
groups defined by gender, race/
ethnicity and socioeconomic
status. The achievement gap can
be observed on a variety of mea-
sures, including standardized
test scores, grade point average,


around."
Norland's administration has
narrowed its strategy to close the
achievement gap down to three
approaches: school accountabil-
ity, school resources and fam-
ily and engagement at an early
age. The achievement gap refers
to the observed disparity on a
number of educational mea-


-Photo by Gwen Apedo
Students pose for a picture in between karate training.

Y.E.S.! helps students succeed


BV Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com
When children are out of
school, many don't have the out-
lets to use.their time wisely, but
one program based in Liberty
City is offering that structure.
The Y.E.S.! (Youth Encourage-
ment Services) Program, locat-
ed at 5505 NW 7th Ave., offers
kids an opportunity to stimulate
their minds outside of school.
The program started in 2006
after Gwen Apedo, the creator of
the program, was laid off from
her job as a secretary at a men-
tal hospital.
"I was working at a men-
tal health hospital," she said.
"When they moved to the build-
ing in Florida City there was a
big cut back and they cut me
along with other people. So I de-
cided that I would invest in what
I really wanted to do."
Through Y.E.S.!, students can
learn karate and have other ex-
periences like fishing and swim-
ming. The program also has a
chess component that focuses
on fostering the students' overall
understanding about test tak-
ing. Through self-defense, the
goal is to develop self confidence
in each student.
"I realized that a lot of kids in
my neighborhood needed a little
extra tutoring and help with
their homework and I under-
stand that a lot of parents are
tired so I decided this would be
something good to get into," she
said.
Five years after opening
Y.E.S.1, Apedo feels that the pro-
gram is paying off for students.
"They are doing much better
in school after working with us,"
she said.
Currently, 25 students rang-
ing from four to six-year-olds
are in enrolled in Y.E.S.I.
While the after-school pro-
gram carries no charge for those
who have government-issued


vouchers for the program, the
average cost of enrollment is
'$35 a week for each child. The
program also receives funding
through the Early Learning Co-


alition of Miami-Dade County
and other private donations.
This past summer, six people
including Apedo worked for the
program.


Norland tackles


PII~tB OCalm I


:r I B F 13















_~_~__~~ _1_1__~ __~~ __ ______~___~1____11__I__~_~~__~~~~~_~_~_~ ~~____1_ __~_~___________~~_____~~_~I__~~~ I II~ _~__~_~~____~_1


Teens say they are optimistic about their future ~2


*IRVING
continued from. 1A

beyond 21 because of crime
and bad decisions that many of
us were making but I decided
that I wanted to do something
significant in my life before I
died," he said. "I flew around
the world at 23 but that wasn't
my goal at first. I just wanted to
become a pilot and I was willing
to do whatever it would take.
Of course there was one major
roadblock -- I was poor. But I
didn't let that stop me. When
I' left Opa-locka Airport, I had
$30 in mny pocket and remem-
ber thinking, 'Here I am about
to fly around the world and I
can't even swim.'=
He told the teens that they
cannot, afford to give up and
challenged them to remain fo-
cused on their dreams -- what-
ever they may be.
"During my flight I spent
some time with children in In-
dia in Calcutta -- one of the
poorest places in the world,"
he said. "Some of the kids have
an arm. or a leg that had been
amputated and I found out that
their parents often did it inten-
tionally so they could beg for
more food and money. The op
portunities here in the U.S. are


_ II I r


~ __~


School under NCAA~4 in


(JM
continued from 1A

coaches were not made avail-
able for interviews.
Golden addressed the team
about the matter during a
meeting before Tuesday morn-
ing's practice and was the first
one to come out onto the field
about 10 minutes before the
start of practice. *
"We're disappointed, but
we're- not discouraged," Golden
said.


.Bachmann win is a win for Obama


RLACKS MUST ( O)NTrOL. TiIIEI O)WN D)ESTINY


Black Caucus members put jobs at top of
lels the numbers here town hall meeting at Mt. Hermon Black unemployment at a stagger- the days of segregation," he said. emp
orida. In May, Miami- AME Church in Miami Gardens ing 16.2 percent the status quo is "They made it and we will too. We Blac
employment rate was (6 p.m.) as part a "'For the People" simply intolerable." have to provide incentives so that In n
, Broward was at-nine Jobs Initiative. Florida Congress- Wilson adds that she, and other employers will want to hire work- fell
nd when comparing woman Frederica Wilson has tak- members of the CBC have so far ers. We also have to shift our focus gove
0, the unemployment en the lead but will be joined by filed over 40 bills to address job for our children to careers related bers
ites actually declined many of her colleagues including creation. to science, technology, engineering perc
o 7.8 percent while for Emanuel Cleaver II (CBC chair), "I'm fed up with Republicans' re- 'and mathematics that's where emp
~se from 15.4 to 17.2 Alcee Hastings and Maxine Wa- fusal to bring up a single bill on the new job market is going. It's cent
ters. On Tuesday, Aug. 23rd, a job jobs this Congress," she remarked. really tough out here for Blacks. "II
fair will bring over 100 national Rick Beasley, executive director From November of last year to this have
ALL BRINGS CBC and local employers to the James South Florida Workforce, says that July we actually had people lose beca
IRS TO ADDRESS L. Knight Center downtown from 9 it is up to Blacks to find creative their unemployment benefits. A'nd just
IMPLOYMENT a.m. to 5 p.m. solutions for securing employment in our Black communities, Liberty he s
tfional attention to the "Unemployment in South .Flori- and in their efforts to rebuild their City, Overtown and Little Haiti, could
;n South Florida and da is no longer a crisis but an epi- communities, the unemployment rates are even lan@
immediate solutions demic," Wilson said. "It's time to "What Blacks are facing to- higher at 29, 27 and 26 percent." quir
ks, the Congressional take matters into our own hands day is no different than what our Miramar Commissioner Wayne will
Is (CBC) w~ill be in Mi- and provide real opportunities for grandparents experienced during M. Messam says he is particularly We
day, Aug. 22nd for a people to get back to work. With the Depression and throughout troubled by the impact that uln- thin


(B Autobody Repalr S High SchoolCompletior

O Aviahonl MechanicsO Medica Assrsting 1


,nal

which parall
in South Fle
Dade's unel
13.4 percent
percent. Ar
2009 to 201
rate for whi
from eight te
Blacks it ro
percent.

TOWN H
MEMBE
UNE
To draw na
enisis here i
to propose
to help Blacl
Black Caucu
ami on Mon


Congress
JOBLESS
continued from 1A

Many discouraged job seekers have
exited the labor force and have
simply given up in their search for
employment, according to the U.S.
Department of Labor. That fact is
significant because it tells us that
statistics related to current unem-
ployment are actually ~much worse.
In June, the national unemploy-
ment rate was 9.2 percent, the
highest it has been this year. And
with more government jobs being
cut to balance local and state bud-
gets, that number' will probably
get much worse before it gets bet-
ter. Joblessness for Blacks in the
U.S. now hovers at 16.2 percent


spite the cuts but you have to
be ambitious and go for it," said
Sisleyth Rodriguez, 16.
"Sure it's tough for young
Black men to find a job these
days but you have to keep get-
ting up every day so you can
make a way and find a way,"
said Andre Foster, 17.
"We have enough money to
fight wars all over the world
but we don't have enough to
help our own citizens. [Gover-
nor] Rick Scott cut funding for
a program at FIU that was re-
ally helping me to improve my
grades; I could see college in my
future for the first time. Now,
I'm not so sure but I can't give
up," said Joshua Kwia, 17.
Jon Durant from Homestead
said it best: "I try not to deal
with politics it adds too much
stress to my life."
"Success in life is not so much
about being happy as it achiev-
ing our goals," Irving said. "The
mind is a powerful tool, if we
just take the time to use it prop-
erly."
Irving was sponsored by
Mitsubishi Heavy Industry of
America, represented by Stan
Yokoi of Dallas, with additional
support by the South Florida
Workforce and Miami Dade Col-
lege.


--Miami~~~imes ~ pht/.KvnM~i
KIDS~~~~~~~~~~~. JS AN A FN -C hg co suet


tak: bra uigadyo erigadsaiga im aeC
lege~~~ wit Barngo Iuig Pcue r J Dan ev Yll
Johu Kwia Cahrn Nvs nr ot a Sleh dug.<.


"W~hat's happening in. Con-
gress effects us and it's sad to
see how adults in Miami don't
seem to want to take any action
or responsibility -- it's not the
government's job to take care of
us, we have to do that for our-
selves," said Devon Yeleell, 16.
"I am not an A student and
so I need extra help and tutors,
especially in math. What we re-
ally need are teachers who want
to teach -- not people who just
want a check," said Catherine
Navas, 16.
"I'm optimistic because the
future is really in my hands; we
have all the tools we need de-


O Computer Repair

8 Cosmoaldogy



Br GED


8 Heavy Equipment Operationrs


vestigation
taken the job had' he known
what he now knows, Golden
answered, "Absolutely. This is
the University of Miami, it's a
special place."
He added, "We're not: going to
let this knock us backwards.
We have great kids on this
team. They may have rpade a
mistake -- OK that's fine. But
that's also a part of growing
up and what we have to teach
them now is if something did
occur, let's be honest and move
forward."


Golden said he knew "abso-
lutely 'nothing" about the alle-
gations Shapiro first made last
August before he became coach
in December.
"l'm as surprised as all of you
and I'm learning and gathering
information as you are," Golden
said.
He said school president
Donna Shalala and athletic
director. Shawn Eichorst have
been in contact with the NCA'A,
but he has not had any contact.,
Asked if he would have still


even if there were more intact
Black families during slavery,
it takes a callous disregard for
the brutalities of that "peculiar
institution" to believe that life
for Blacks was somehow .better
then than it is now.
SWhile all this has made Bach-


WCIN
continued from lA

presidential election his ory.
A former Jimmy Carter Demo-
crat, Bachmann is an unwaver-
ing social conservative whose
faceoff with Obama would ener-
gize Black voters, whose support
for the president has waned.
This drop is probably spurred
by the nation's high Black un-
employment rate (nearly double
that of whites) and the failure
of the president's communica-
tions team to get the word oult
about the things he's doing to
better the lives of disadvantaged
Blacks for fear of a white back-
lash.

SHE ENERGIZES
... THE BLACK VOTE
Black rage over Bachmann's
assertion in January that the
Founding Fathers ended slay-
ery- which they didn't -- would
help get disillusioned Blacks
back into the Obama fold and to
the polls on Election Day.
So, too, would another Bach-
mann faux pas.
In a mindless attempt to win
over right-wingers in Iowa,
Bachmnann signed a "marriage,
vow" document that suggested
Black children were better off
when they were born into slay-
ery "and raised by (a) mother
and father in a two-parent
household" than are Black
children who were born after
Obamna took office.
Both the premise and accura-
cy of that claim were debunked
in Wilma Dunaway's 2003 book,
The African-American Family in
Slavery and Emancipation. But


mann a Tea Party favorite, it
won't win her.enough support
beyond the trench lines of that
right-wing clique surely not
enough to defeat Obamna. And
that has got to have Demo-
crats rooting for her to become
the GOP standard-bearer.


10A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


their list

loyment continues to have on
:k men and the Black family.
May, Black male employment
to the lowest level since the
,rnment began tracking num-
:in 1972. Nationwide, 56.1
:ent of Black men over 20 were
loyed, compared to 68.3 per-
for white men over 20.
n the private sector, Blacks
Sto push their way to the table
~use racism still exists it's
not as blatant and vicious,"
;aid. "We need the state and
nties to put more specific
:uage in their contract re-
'ements so that contractors
have to include minorities,
are all working for the same
:g and it's green."


amazing- but too many Black
kids are blo ng it and not tak-
ing full adv ~age of them."
OUT OF THE
MOUTH OF BABES .. .
Six students, all high school
juniors and seniors, after lis-
tening to Irving, shared their
concerns about the future and
what it may or may not have
in store for them. Their high
schools, mostly from the south-
ern part of Miami-Dade County
include County Wlalk, Robert
Morgan Educational Center,
Coral Reef, Miamni Southridge
and Homestead.


Q nee R
.;;i,
-"


I- ,









_ __ ~ ~~_~____ ~ ~_~__~~~_____~__~~___~__________________ ~ ____1_~1_1________1II__.__~______..__ ._.........~~- -1._~_. ..__ ._.. .


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I11A THE MIAMI TIMES, AU6IJST 17-25, 2011


Bours Mar awrent ne w onw ournNY


r. ~itic~''u
:


,y,~l
Bd~pnr~;--
2 ~r L


aif9,


ARLI LE


'7'"~BEACON

BROWrNSVILLE


r5























SECTION B MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST '17-23, 2011 MIAMI TIMES


Links youth attend

ARCHITECT


p.a~


'One of the seminar's speakers, Carolyn Mercury
Powery, the founder of The E'tiquette Touch Insti-
tute, has taught many youth the importance of re-
spect, poise and manners.


Conference sends


girls back to school

with confidence

By K~aila Heard
kheard @m iam itimesonline.com

As children and their parents prepare for the upcom-
ing school year, there are a plethora of events that offer
those essential back-to-school items for children from
kindergarten darlings to high school seniors hoping to
take on the world.
Most of the events offer the usual high-demand items
like free backpacks and immunizations. But one local
businesswoman, Rubie Mizell, says she's worried that
some children, especially teenage girls, would return to
their schools without being fully prepared to face their
future challenges.
So Mizell, the founder and president of the non-profit
organization Lovel3, Inc., decided to host a workshop
that would focus on teaching young girls to be more
self-confident.
The end result was an all-day seminar, "Building: _
Self-Esteem in Young W'omen." held at the African-
American Research Library and' Cultural Center on
Saturday, Aug. 13th.
"[Young girls] just don't know how beautiful they are,
Please turn to SCHOOL 14B


Are people faithful in good and hard times?


Overtown Youth Center (OYC), was developed and designed
to educate minority youth (grades two-12) with exceptional
artistic ability in the visual arts; increase their knowledge
of the visual arts; build gelf-confidence in drawing skills;
and provide career exposure in the field of visual arts.
The LETS Draw students, Aaron Ashe, Aesha Coleman,
Charlotte Graham, Keyana Joseph, Nathaniel Pedernera and
Kyndal Royal, joined more than 60 children from. through-
out Miami-Dade County at the University of Miami's
Please turn to ARCHITECT 14B


It's been an eventful summer for six talented students
who were able to attend a two-week summer camp designed
to introduce children to the field of architecture and per-
haps even inspire them to become tomorrow's architects.
They were sponsored by the Greater Miami Chapter of The
Links, Incorporated's Links Educating Talented Students
to Draw (LETS Draw) program and and were able to attend
the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Architects in the
Making (AIM) summer camp.
LETS Draw, in partnership with the Alonzo Mourning


Methodist Episcopal (CME) Church.
So Bonner is used to encoun-
tering both faiths and views that
do not jibe with his own. Still this
senior pastor for Bethany SDjA for
over two years believes denomina-
tional differences do not affect the
message of Jesus Christ.
"Generally when I go out in the
community and witness I don't tell
[people] what I am," he said. "I pres-
ent Christ to them, I don't present
religion. I allow Christ to open up
the door and then I reveal to them
SDA."
Seventh Day Adventism, which
was founded in mid-1800s, adheres
to many of the popular biblical
principles as do other mainstream
Please turn to BONNER 14B


By Kaila Heard
kheard@miamitimesonline.com


Fifty-one year-old Pastor Barry
Bonner of Bethany Seventh Day Ad-
ventist Church located in Browns-
trille, understands what it is like to
be a minority,
Although a 2010 survey found
that the Seventh Day Adventist
(SDA) Church is the fastest-growing
Christian denomination in both the
U.S. and the world, the denomina-
tion is only the 24th largest in the
U.S. with approximately one mil-
lion members.
Among Blacks, 59 percent belong
to historically-Black denominations
such as the Baptist, African Meth-
odist Episcopal (AME) or Christian


hardships, religious people are
' happier and outnumber the
non-religious in the same so-
cieties. However, the number
of religious tends to decrease
during peace times.
"In religious societies and in
difficult circumstances, reli-
gious people are happier than
non-religious people. But in
non-religious societies or more
benign societies where many
people's needs are met, reli
gious people aren't happier -
everyone's happier," said Ed
Diener, the study's leader in a
prepared statement.
The tendency for many peo


By Kaila Heard
kheard @miamitimesonline.com

It has become quite common
that churches fill to overflow-
ing capacities during times
of hardship and suffering.
Meanwhile, pastors leading
the same sanctuaries, find the
pews empty of most souls dur-
ing times of relative prosperity
for communities,
A study recently confirmed
this as well. The research, the
2005-2009 Gallup World Poll,
a survey of people in more
than 150 countries, found
that in countries experiencing


ple to turn to their falths dur-
Ing troubled times hale long
been lamented by leaders and
laypeople in the faith comzmu-
nity.
Pastor Oscar Chestnut of
New You Ministries of Life in
Hollywood finds the situation
understandable.
"Well, biblically it's just the
history of mankind. Even with
the children of Israel forgot


bouit God wvhen thingss were
gooid but w\hen~ jumesl wer-e
bad thleS turned to God," the
minister explained.
According to the study's
findings when societies tr~e
unable to provide food, jobs,
education, security and health
care, religious affiliation seem
to increase happiness and well
being. In the U.S., more people
Please turn to FAITHFUL 14B


The Miami Times


U erl% a''l


PASTOR OF TPHE WT~EER


Minister encourages


community to seek


faith-based education

















_C_~_ __~__ __~_ ~______~ _____~_~ _~~__ _=__1_ __


Veteran bandleader


George Saunders dies at 96
George L. Saun- Board and continued to
ders has beat down Iplay upuntil he retired five
the St. Agnes Com- IIyears ago.
Set Board at local A dlfy service will
funerals for more be helH~ Friday, 7 p.m.
than 60 years, has gI( at the Church of The
played his final Transfiguration. The
note. The popu- ~~funeral will take place
lar niusician died aj Saturday, 10:30 a.m. at
Monday at the vet- rt: the St. Agnes Episcopal
erans Hospital in Church with Gregg Mason
Pembroke.Pines. He was 96. in charge of arrangements.
Saunders grew up in Miami Survivors include: four sons,

Wbadhin tn Hgh Sc ooo. In th W ye andu Mi el larleptwo
early years he worked at the Tip daughters, Deborah Smith
Top Grocery Store on 5th Street and Adrienne Riles; a sister,
and Miami Ave. Anthwine Doone of New York
Saunders was one of the oldest City; and a nephew, Canon
members in the St. Agnes Comet Nelson Pinder of Orlando.


Myths about Jesus: What He never said


Pastors vent about credit down grade


Cascade UMC helps troubled HBCU IIrler LIK'1


Yolanda Adams launches fashion line


BLACKS MUIST C`ONTROL)I THEIR OW.N DEISTIN. I


megachurch
11 a.m. Saturday at
First Baptist Church
of Orlando. A wake -
and public viewing will .
be held from 3-7 p.m.
Friday at New Destiny
Christian Church in
Apopka.
Jamal Bryant, a pas-
tor at Empowerment TM
Temple AME in Bal- TIS


dies at 42

ministry was shaped for those
who had these kinds of prob-
lems," said Bracy, pastor of
New Covenant Baptist Church
in Orlando. "He filled a void
that was tremendously lacking
in the Central Florida area."
On a national level, Dallas
megachurch pastor T.D. Jakes
sent his condolences out on
Twitter: "DEEPLY saddened to
hear of the passing of Pastor
Tims @ztims ... praying for his
family and church"
Tims, whose Apopka-based
church has one of the largest
congregations in Central Flori-
da, was found dead at about 6
p.m. Friday. The housekeeping
staff at the W Hotel discovered
the pastor dead after attempt-
ing to clean the room. It's not
clear how long he was dead be-
fore he was discovered or why
he was in New York City.
The Office of Chief Medical
Examiner, city of New York is
working to determine how Tims
died. His body was claimed
from the Medical Examiner' by
a Brooklyn funeral home on
Monday, according to Ellen Bo-
rakove, a spokeswoman for the
ME's office there.
Please turn to TIMVS 14B


pastor
Friday night in a New
York hotel room had
not been determined.
Church member
Jacob Moby said the
cause of Tims' death
would not change his
mind about the pas-
tor who inspired and
encouraged his fam-
ily to become better


timore and a friend of Zachery
Tims' from there, told church
members that New Destiny will
continue without Tims.
"You are not a personality-
driven church. You are a pur-
pose-driven church," Bryant
said. "Pastor Zack's DNA is rmw
on you. You are infected with
excellence.
Although. much of the service
was joyous praise and singing,
Bryant told the congregation
that it was fitting to mourn the
passing of their spiritutd leader,
"Allow yourself the liberty to
grieve. Allow yourself the free-
dom to cry," he said.

CASUE OF DEATH
UNDETERMINED
New Destiny ~Minister Wanda
Robinson told the congregation
that the cause of Tims' death on


people.
"We celebrate the life he led
and the legacy he left," said
Moby, 45, of Orlando.
SEarlier in the day, Tims' fel-
low pastors said Central Florida
lost one of its most promising,
up-and-coming ministers.
The Rev. Randolph Bracy
Jr. said Tims was a charis-
matic preacher who appealed
to young people in a way that
few ministers could. He spoke
to them about the issues of
teen pregnancy, drugs, poverty
and crime from a background
of growing up troubled in Bal-
timore.

T.F. JAKES SENDS
CONDOLENCES
"That is where I think he
stood apart. That was the back-
ground he came out of, and his


BV Phillip CarV

There are lots of things Jesus
didn't say. But pastor Will Davis
Jr., author of 10 Things Jesus
Never Said: And Why You Should
Stop Believing Them (Revell), fo-
cuses on two main categories: ex-
pressions of disapproval and per-
mission to judge. The effect is to
counteract judgmentalism against
both oneself and others. So Davis


as well as challenge those who in-
dulge in self-righteousness.
The expressions of disapproval
we never hear from Jesus include,
for instance: "I'm so disappointed
Sin you," "This wouldn't be hap-
pening if you were a better Chris-
tian," and "I'e given up on you."
These have no place in the Bible
and, I would add, do not even bear
much resemblance to Jesus' many
words of warning and condemna-
dtin geus todcankbe secathng
sees), whereas Davis is concerned
with people who are not terrified
but suffer from low self-e~steem.
He wants to help them get rid of
the tapes they play in~their heads
that tell them, when they're disap-
pointed with themselves, that God
must be disappointed too. .
Then there are examples of the


permission to judge that Jesus
never gives us: "It's okay not to'
love certain people," "Everyone
should believe and act like you
do," and "You don't have to for-
give someone who really hurts
you." The overarching concern
here, and indeed throughout
the book, is to replace legalism
with a life of grace. If Davis gets
his way, the church would be a
kinder place, one not so ap't to
wo~unda popl mstkno
thing Jesus did say, Davis sug-
gests in his first chapter, is
"Come to me, all you who are
weary aird burdened, and I will
give you rest" (Matt. 11:28). He
goes on to quote several other
passages in which Jesus says, in
effect: "I am what you're looking
for." For my money, this is the'
best moment mn the book.
In his conclusion, which is the
second best ynoment mn.the book,
Dei does omv axsisom~etg
We are not left with a grace
that bears all our burdens while
we have no work to do. Rather,
Jesus gives us burdens of his
own when he says, "Take my
yoke upon you and learn from
me .... For my yoke is easy and
my burden is light" (Matt. 11:29-
30).


By Alex Murashka

U.S. pastors vented on Twitter
their- frustration as the nation
boiled under riews of the first-
ever credit rating downgrade in
its history Friday and the Dow
Jones Industrial Average's 600-
plus point plunge last Monday.
Pastor David Roberts of
Clarks Chapel Baptist Church
in North Carolina is prepping
his congregation for the hard
times ahead. The church will be
hosting Dave Ramsey's Finan-
cial Peace University classes
once per week beginning next
month. .
Ramsey's "The Great Recov-
ery" campaign to get the coun-
try back on its feet financially


"one family at a time" can't
seem to come soon enough for
Roberts.
"Watching the market speed
up its tumble while Obama
speaks...," Roberts tweeted
during the President's public
address about the downgrade
Monday. Later, Roberts tweet-
ed: "It's a good time to invest in
the stock market buy low; sell
high right?"
As news of the credit down-
grade by Standard and Poor's
broke, Bishop T.D. Jakes of the
Potter's House mn Dallas tweet-
ed, "Can u believe that this
political jockeying has lead ac-
cording to the S&6P has resulted
in the USA loosing it's credit
standing3??"


power over country!" And later,
"Changing leadership alone will
not change a systemic dysfunc-
tion so self serving that it has
lost it's mipsion. America de-
serves better!"
Pastor Rick Warren of Saddle-
back Church has been notice-
ably tweet-free on the trending
debt subject of late. Warren's
"tax tweet," which included
the observation that "HALF of
America pays NO taxes. Zero "'
created quite a stir, especially
among liberals.
Other pastors are trying to
infuse a bit of humor into the
crisis through their tweets. '
"So, if I raise my own debt ceil-
ing will it end my crisis?" asked
Please turn to JAKES 14B


Bishop T.D. Jakes
Jakes followed with another
tweet: "The whole system is.out
of control...esteeming party and


In a move that effectively
eliminates Morris Brown Col-
lege debt to the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education, the Rev. Dr.
Marvin Moss of Cascade Unit-
ed Methodist Church present-
ed a check of $22,000 to the
school's president on Sunday.
Reiterating the landmark
southwest Atlanta church's
commitment to outreach and
education--and the fact that
the church was celebrating
"United Methodist Student
Sunday"-Moss presented the
~church to Dr. Stanley Pritchett
at the 8 a.m. service.
" Pritchett confirmed Sunday~
that the funding means Morris
Brown now has the $500,000
due to the federal government
by Aug. 24 to settle what once
was a multi-million debt. He
told the congregants, some of
whom are Morris Brown gradu-
ates, that Morris Brown plans
to continue its 131-year-his-
tory of higher education and
leadership in the community.
."We are truly, truly blessed
that you have embraced us in
this campaign," Pritchett said
to a standing ovation. [The
check] helps us to insure that
the future is stable for Morris


Brown Colored College and all
of our BC U in st itut ions.
According to Pastor Moss, the
church campaign for Morris
]Brown began last month after
he received a letter from Pritch-
ett announcing .the U.S. De-
partment of Education's offer
to settle the college's multi-mil-
lion dollar debt with an amount
of $500,000.
On Sunday, July 3, Moss ex-
plained .the fundraising effort
during the 8 a.m. and 11 a.m.
services. In the weeks following,


several special offerings were
taken and members donated
money to the cause online.
"We recognize the historical
significance of MorFris Brown
College to our community
and the world," Moss said in
a statement last week. "We
are grateful that our Cascade
members have answered the
call during these tough eco-
nomic times. We are called to
be a light in the community so
Swe are pleased to participate in
this vital way."


great colors. We have gold, pur-
ples, greens; colors that make
you feel good."
And Adams says she didn't
just put her name on the line,
she designed it, too.
"I told them what kind of but-
tons I wanted. I wanted certain
embellishments because I think
that if you elongate the center
of the body it makes a woman
stand direct," she said.
You won't find Adams' de-
signs in retail or department
stores. The songstress wants
to focus on personal attention
by selling her clothes at private
trunk shows and on-line.
Also adding to the 'personal
attention' feel, Adams is offer-
ing free alterations for three
years.
Log onto Yolandaadmascol-
loection.com to view her entire
line.


She's wowed the world with
her collection of gospel music
and noiv Grammy-award win-
ning recording artist Yolanda
Adams is taking on a collection
of a different kind.
The Houston native is launch-
ing a clothing line that bears
her name. She says the Yolanda
Adams Collection has some-
thing for everyone.
"I thought the line should be
timeless, elegant, simple, but
just, 'I gotta have that,'" said
Adams. "This line can go any-
where. It can go to church, it
can go to brunch, it can go to
the boardroom, so there are
many places you can take this
line.",
With an 'anyone can wear it
approach, Adams, who has had
a hard time finding- clothes to
fit her six-foot frame, says her
pieces can fit anybody.


Yolanda Adams
"We range from sizes four all
the way to 26W, so there's a
wide range of sizes," said the
fashion designer. "We have such


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


Orlando


Zachery 77ms

wGS aStOT Of

New Destin

Christian Church

BV Bianca Prieto and
Jeff Kunerth

ORLANDO Members of
Pastor Zachery Tims' New Des-
tiny Christian Church packed
the sanctuary Monday night for
prayers, praise and testimoni-
als following the death of the
42-year-old minister.
Tim's ex-wife, Riva Tims, told
the capacity crowd of 2,000 that
Tims enjoyed a family vacation
in Puerto Rico a week before his
death. The Tims, who were di-
vorced in 2009, have four chil-
dren.
"He was able to have fellow-
ship with this daughters and
sons," said Riva Tims, pastor
of Majestic Life Church in Or-
lando.

WAKE 3-7 FRIDAY ,
Church officials announced
that Tims' funeral will be held
























Appeals court rejects health law component


Market volatility can depress consumers' moods


Revelation Christian Academy, Inc.

Re;velain o' rist ""Acad trich It sutpheesnwHl cbe dis
munity prayer vigil Friday, Au- nied by an adult, while supplies
gust 19, every 15 min. between last.
6 and 8 p.m., 17901 NW 37 Av- Open registration for grades
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WOmen's Day celebration at Metropolitan


Study: Depressed women have higher risk of stroke


JOIN OUR RELIGIOUS ELITE

IN OUR CHURCH DIRECTORY

CALL 305-694-6214


lB.Aics MusT~ CONTI`Iot IlilKI O)ix'N 1)ESflINY I


Circuit Court of Appeals wrote
in their 207-page majority
opmxion.
About 50 million Americans
lack basic health insurance.
As a result, hospitals and
taxpayers are forced to pay
about .$43 billion a year to
cover the costs of those who
are treated but cannot pay.
Many healthcare experts
believe an insurance
mandate is crucial not only to
controlling this cost shift but >
also to guaranteeing that all
Americans can get insurance,
a right provided by the law.
Without such a requirement, .
they argue, consumers would ~
be able to wait until they
were sick to buy insurance.
That in turn would push up
premiums.
The ruling was not a total
victory for the challengers.
The appeals court rejected the
states' claim that Cngress
went too far by expanding


By David G. Savage and
N~oam N. LeveV

A federal appeals court
struck down a pillar of Pres-
ident Obama's national
healthcare law, ruling Con-
gress does not have the power
to require all Americans to
buy insurance and setting the
stage for a Supreme Court de-
cision ahead of the 2012 elec-
tion.
The 2-1 decision is a victory
for Republican leaders in 26
states who challenged the law
last year, testing whether the
signature accomplishment of
Obama's presidericy would
stand.
The Atlanta-based judges
echoed the complaint that
the mandate represents an
"unprecedented" expansion of
federal power.
"The individual mandate is
breathtaking in its expansive
scope," two judges of the 11Ith


Ohio vote OK'd

COLUMBUS,0Ohio The
Ohio Supreme Court ruled
Friday that a proposed
amendment to the state
constitution designed to block
implementation of the health
care overhaul law clin appear
on the ballot in November.


the Medicaid program for
low-income Americans. The
judges also agreed the rest
of the healthcare law could
stand, even if the insurance
mandate is struck down.
The White House,
meanwhile, minimized the
opinion, citing the divided
rulings by multiple federal
courts around the country.
The administration can
appeal Friday's decision
directly to the Supreme Court.
If an appeal petition is filed in
the fall, the justices are likely
to hear the case early next
year and rule by late June.


esalshing an exchange rat

more than $38 million.
Federal funding also went to
three states with Republican
governors, including Indiaia
and Nevada, who are a part of
the multi-state lawsuit.
Mississippi led by Gov.
Haley Barbour, a former chair-
man of the Republican Nation-
al Committee will get more
than $20 million, making it
one of the largest recipients of
federal aid.
Barbour said Friday that his
state's exchange "will be very
different from the health ex-
change envisioned by Obam-

Other Republican-led states,
including Florida, have turned
their back on federal assis-
tance, even though the law re-
quires the federal government
to operate an exchange in any
state that does not establish
its own.
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal,
a Republican, has already an-
nounced that his state will not
run an exchange. And Okla-
homa Gov. Mary Fallin and
Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback,
also Republicans, recently re-
turned federal grant money to
help set up exchanges.


BV Noam N. Levey

The Obama administration

mailsliw indedanmts to 1stat s
and the District of Columbia
to help establish new state
based health insurance mar-
ketplaces where consumers
can shop for insurance start-
ing in 2014, a key benefit of
the new healthcare law.
These Internet-based ex-
changes, designed to help
America s who don't receive
health benefits through their
employer, are intended to
make bu ig health insurance
akin to comparison shopping
online for an airline ticket or a

By 2 m., the exchanges are
expected to provide insurance
for an estimated 24 million
Americans, most of whom will
receive subsidies to help them
buy a health plan because
they are expected to earn too
little to bear the full cost.
Employers with fewer than
100 workers will also be able
to use the exchanges, which
will have to offer plans with a
minimum level of coverage. No
plans will be able to deny cov-
erage to people with preexist-
ing conditions.


ory skills, Plus, kids who start
the day with healthful fare are
also likely to have consumed
important nutrients such as
calcium' and vitamins, nutri-
tionists say.
However, surveys show that
30 percent to 60 percent of kids
skip breakfast. Teens are more
likely to miss it than younger
children, Leidy says. And many
of those who eat breakfast are
consuming high-fat, high-sugar
processed foods that have rela-
t vely no effect on satiety, she

To get the full benefits of the
satiety from this kind of break-
fast, the meal needs to be 300
to 350 cator~ies, Leidy says.~J~ilst
grabbing a piece of fruit or gra-


By Nanci Hellmich

The ABCs of a nutritious
breakfast are now backed' by
science.
New research shows you'll feel
full longer and may get less hun-
gry throughout the day if your
first meal ha~s protein-rich foods,
such as eggs, Greek yogurt, low-
fat da~iry products or lean meat,
and fiber-filled fare, stich whole-
wheat bread, whole-grain cereal,
fruit and vegetables.
mThese aod apoea thao h ae
processed foods such as bagels,
muffins, doughnuts and sugary
cereals.
The findings are especially im-
portant for school-age children


The grants were announced
Friday just as a key compo-
nent in President Obama's
healthcare law, requiring all
Americans to buy insurance,
was ruled unconstitutional
by a federal appeals court in
Atlanta. The issue is likely
headed to the Supreme Court.
.Leaders in 26 states chal-
'lenged the law in court last
year.
Obama administration offi-
cials have been racing to get
states to set up exchanges
because they are central to


the coverage expansion envi-
siotted by the new law. That
effort has been embraced by
some state leaders and resist-
ed by others critical of the law.
The new grants went primar-
ily to states with Democratic
governors who have moved
most aggressively ~to imple-
ment the new law, including
California, Illinois, Maryland
and Connecticut. Three other
states have already received
these planning grants.
California, which was the
first state to pass legislation


nola bar is probably not enough
to keep hunger at bay, she says.
The Institute of Medicine rec-
ommends a diet containing a
range of 10 percent to 35 per-
cent of calories from protein.
The institute concluded that
te is ot ck ar ede ce that
the risk of kidney stones, osteo-
porosis, cancer, coronary artery
disea anddn be sisdents,. diet-
ers also get a boost from a pro-
tein-packed breakfast. Studies
show that protein helps diet-
ers feel full longer, which may
help them adhere to a program
better, says Karen Miller-Ko-
vach, chief scientific offcer for
Weight Watchers, who reviewed
research when developing the
company's PointsPlus System.
She says one of hey favorite
breakfasts is a poached egg on
whole-wheat toast and' fresh
fruit: "It leads to a productive,
hunger-free morning and helps
me feel in control of my appetite
for the rest of the day."


who may be ravenous by lunch-
time if they don't eat a good
breakfast.
"The evidence is pretty coti-
vincing that consuming more
protein at breakfast will provide
more appetite control for the
restof the sas t sys Hoe th r
of nutrition at the University of
Missouri.
wHer teec as wserthat
tein breakfast, they have re-
duced feelings of hunger and in-
creased fullness right away, and
that feeling of satiety continues
throughout the day.
Leidy and her research staff
performed functional MRIs on
the teens' brains and found that
a higher-protein breakfast re-
duced the teens' motivation and
drive to eat and made food look
less rewarding and appealing.
Other studies show that stu-
dents who eat breakfast do bjet-
ter on standardized tests and
have improved cognitive func-
tion, attention spans and mem-


Anxiety and even suicide rates rise when
stocks hit rough patch


creased muscle tension, el-
evated blood pressure and
worse. Suicide rates increase in
troubling economic times and
fall when the economy isi doing
well, says a Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention study
released in spring. .
Even in June, when markets
were more stable, 27 percent of
middle-class Americans were
"very" or "extremely" stressed
about economic conditions, ac-
cording to a First Command
Financial Services survey,
51 percentwere "somewhat
stressed.
To reduce angst, mental
health professionals advise
folks to limit exposure to eco-
nomic news. Checking once a
day should suffice, says Held.


"I don't think you should
stick your head in the sand,"
he says. "But you can have in-
formation overload.
Taking proactive steps -
such as discussing reallocation
possibilities with a financial
planner or stress-reduction
techniques with a psychologist
- can take the edge off. Even
exercise can help, says Klapow.
While meditating,, running
or making reallocation plans
won't create a more profitable
portfolio, it could have positive
results in the long run.
Anxiety "impedes your ability
to think clearly and decreases
reasoning," says Klapow. "If
you don't (take steps to reduce
it), the likelihood of making
smart decisions goes down."


"Money means more than just
dollars'and cents to people," he
says. "It's their ticket to secu-
rity. It's their ticket to survival."
Last week, the Dow had daily
triple-digit moves.
Given the volatility as well
as the Dow's nearly 10 percent
decline in the last month -
folks are ruminating over ques-
tions such as: "How am I going
to retire? Can I pay for my kids'
college? Will the market go low-
er?" says clinical psychologist
and certified financial planner
Mark Held.
The cognitive torment can
case fatigue, insomnia, in-


By Laura Petrecca

An economic depression isn't
the only thing this nation has to
worry about.
The uncertainty surround-
ing the stock market's volatil-
ity has penetrated our psyches,
causing many to feel antsy and
disheartened.
T~he market swiings already
raise anxiety levels. But mix
in the angst that comes with
financial loss, and it can cre-
ate a psychological maelstrom,
says Joshua Klapow, clinical
psychologist at the University
of Alabama-Birmingham.


Research at the University of
Illinois College of Medicine at
Chicago, who was not involved
in the research. "This relation-
ship has been suspected for a
long time, but has not received
the study and attention that it
might deserve.
Stroke is the third leading
cause of death in the USA, af-
ter heart disease and cancer,
and it hits 425,000 women a
year, 55,000 more than men,
the National Stroke Assocla-
tion says. To reduce risk of
stroke, Pan says, women can
make changes in behavior -
stop smoking, follow a health-
ier diet, exercise and work
with doctors to control diabe-
tes and blood pressure. If you
might be depressed, he says,
talk to a doctor to see whether
treatment is needed.


eral," says internist Kathryn
Rexrode, associate professor of
medicine at Harvard Medical
School, the study's senior au-
thor. But "these are modest el-
evations in risk," she says, and
should not lead women to stop
.taking antidepressants.
"Although we found women
who took antidepressants were
at higher risk, I don't have any-
thing to indicate it's because of
the medications," she says.
Use of antidepressants most
likely indicates more severe de-
pression, says lead researcher
An Pan of the Harvard School
of Public Health, and depres-
sion has been linked to stroke
risk factors such as high blood
pressure, diabetes, heart dis-
ease, smoking and physical in-
activity.
The study followed 80,574


women ages 54 .to 79 who
are part of the Nurses' Health
Study. Researchers examined
participants' symptoms of de-
pression, use of antidepres-
sants and diagnoses of depres-
sion by doctors from 2000 to
2006. At the outset, 22 percent
of the women reported ever
having depression, similar to
the national prevalence of 20
percent in women. Over the
course of the study, there were
1,033 stroke cases,
The findings might not apply
to men, Pan says. Depression
is twice as likely in women as
in men; reasons for the differ-
ence are unknown.
The study is important be-
cause it draws a link between
stroke risk and a history of de-
pression, says Philip Gorelick,
director of the Center for Stroke


By Anita Manning

Women who take antidepres-
sants have something new to
worry about: They could be
at increased risk of having a
stroke, Harvard researchers
say.
A study published recently in
Stroke: Journal of the Ameri-
can Heart Association reports
that women with a history of
depression have a 29 percent
greater risk of having a stroke
than non-depressed women,
and those who take antide-
pressants, particularly selec-
tive serotonin reuptake inhibi-
tors, or SSRIs (such as Prozac
or Zoloft), face a 39 percent
higher risk.
"Depression has now been
linked to stroke as well as car-
diovascular disease in gen-


Then, at 11 a.m. well go sail-
ing on a cloud with Prophet-
ess Sabrina James leading the
way.
Comell Be prepared for a day
of spiritual excitement.
The church is located at
1778 NW 69 St., Rev. Kyle Gib-
son is the pastor.


The Metropolitan family in-
vites you to their annual Wom-
en's Day Celebration on Sun-
day, August 28th. At 7 a.m.
Minister Audrey Sears takes
us -to the mountain top from
the theme "Christian women
holding the whole armor of
God against spiritual warfare."


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


Supreme Court likely to settle issue
on insurance mandate


--Photo by Gerald Herbert / AP
President Barack Obama high-fives' Marcelas Owens of Seattle, after speaking about the
health care reform bill,Tuesday, March 23, 2010, at the Interior Department in Washington,
Behind them is Vicki Kennedy, widow of Sen.Ted Kennedy.


Stay fuller longer with


.2-DOtein and fiber


Health exchanges get startup money


Internet-based health insurance exchanges are a key bene
of the healthcare law batked by President Barack Obama.






















Y
a


L i.
LORRAINE F. STRACHAN
"Shug"
08/1 7/36 02/06/]1

It has been six months since
you've been gone.
The Farringtons, Strachan,
Kings, Daughters families re-
ally miss you.


Card of Thanks

As we the family of the late,


We think of you always, but
especially today.
You will never be forgotten,
although you are gone away.
Your memory is a keepsake
with which we never part.
God has you in His keeping;
we have you in our heart.
liIhe James and Peek fami-




Card of; Thanks

The family of the late,


^ ~CKS


M\UST CONTROL THEIR OW'N DESTINY


Hadley Davis
LAWRENCE SUMMER, 72, la-
borer, died Au-
gust 13. Service
1 p.m., Satur-
day at New St. .
James Mis- [
sionary Baptist
Church. '



JAMES SHELTON, 54, painter,
died on August
11. Memo-
rial Service 4-8
p.m., Thursday
in the chapel.


Range
MARIAN L. HARRIS SHAN-
NON, 91, edu- I
cator for Dade
County Public
Schools, died
August 9 at
home. Survivors
include adopted
son, Richard
Pasley, S.;
aunt, Mary Lou Carson; cousin,
Mae Blackford; dear friends, Al-
berta Godfrey, Irene Hargrove,
Irma Ingram, and David Robinson,
Esq.; a host of other relatives and
friends. Service was held 10 a.m.,
Tuesday in the chapel.

MATTIE H. WATERS, 86, re-
tired, died Au- I
gust 11 at Mt.
Sinai Hospital.
Survivors are
grandchildren,
Tiffany Moss :
(Clarence), Tina
Simmons-Spear ,
(Jerome) and d *
family. Viewing 3-8 p.m., Friday
at Range Funeral Home. Service
1 p.m., Saturday at St. Matthews
Free will Baptist Church.

OLLIE M. WILLIAMS, 64, man-
ager, Dade
County School
Board, VP AF-
SCME, died
August 15 at
Sylvester Can-
cer Center
Survivors are
Alissa, Albert,
Dashawn, Natosha, and Tony; nine
grandchildren, two great grandchil-
dren and a very very dear friend,
Eugene Rigby. Service Saturday at
Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church.


Royal
LAWRENCE L. PETERSON, 81,
supervisor, died August 14 at
home. Service
11:30 a.m., *-
Saturday arat

Holiness Church
of God, 21455
NW 32 Avenue,
Miami, Gardens,
FL 33056.

Richardson
LEE A. BEASLEY, 68, retired
cnsru ct ed

August 9 at Mt.
Sinai Hospital.
Surviv ors
include: mother,
Mollie Beasley;JL
brothers ,
Char les ,'
Vernard; sisters, Arlinda Jones,
Debra Beasley, Donnette Turner,
Delores Beasley, Donna Byrd'
one daughter, Tangela Beasley;
five sons, Darryel, Eric, Leonard.
Gary, and Troy; 17 grandchildren,
one great grandchild, a host of
nephews, nieces, family and
friends. Service 11 a.m., Saturday

Chu ch,C174m5 N. t Streeatist


Faith

diALBERT tNILSON, 78, laborer,
de ugust 1
at Kindred Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday
at Peaceful Zion
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.




Nakia Ingraham
JOYCE TENNANT, 71, domestic
worker, died August 8 at Memorial
Hospital. Service 11 a.m. at World
Harvest Church of God.

RAYMOND SANDS, 49, contrac-
tor, died August 9 at home. Service
3 p.m., Saturday at Ebenzer Bap-
tist Church.

VICTORIA MARTINEZI 72
housewife, died August 13 at Me-
morial Hospital. Graveside service
was held 1 p.m.,Tuesday.

NIMROD O'TTLEY, 85, shp-
keeper, died August 12 at Memorial
Hospital. Service 3 p.m., Saturday
at St James Episcopal Church.


Place your
OBITUfARY
today
305-694-6210


Gregg Mason
LOUISE LEWIS, 84, rt rd do-
mestic techni-
cian, died Au-
gust 11. Sur-
vivors are two
sons, Arthur
Lee Harris, and
Walter Lewis;
three daugh-
ters, Sylvia
Manuel, Paulette K. Rolle, and
Francine Lewis; a hosts of relative
and friends. Viewing 3 9 p.m.,
August 19 in the chapel. Service
1 p.m., Saturday at Miracle Valley
Praise and Worship Center, 1930
NW 70 Street.



New Serenity


The family of the late,


SHONQUANDA
RENEE WIMIBERLY
bka "Foxy"
08/20/88 -10/18/07

Remembrance is a golden
chain
Death tries to break, but all
in vain.
To have, to love, and then to
part
Is the greatest sorrow of
one's heart.
The years may wipe out
many things
But some they wipe out
never,
Like memories of those hap-
py times
When we were all together.

We miss you Foxy,
Your daddy, Rufus Wim-
berly, Jr. and wife, Rhonda;
mother, Vickie Torrence; sis-
ters and brother: Shawnie,
Quantia, Quanesha, and
Dale; step-sister: Malikah
Jefferson and nephew, Malik
Williams.
The Wimberly and Torrence
families.


|R MemOriam


JEROME CORNELL
PERKINS TRAPP


acknowledges with grateful
appreciation the many kind
expressions of sympathy dur-
ing our bereavement.
We extend special thanks to
The Rev. Eddie Lake and the
Greater Bethel AME Church
family for your unfailing sup-
port and to the Christ Jesus,
Jesus Christ Community
Choir, the brothers of Alpha
Phi Omega fraternity and the
brothers of Omega Psi Phi fra-
ternity for your moving trib-
utes. To Ike and Val Woods,
thank you for the stirring
rendition of "Fire and Rain."
To the many friends and col-
leagues from Miami-Dade Col-
lege and the Miami-Jackson
Class of 1968, we say thank
you for sharing your many
stories of his life.
Your acts of kindness are
truly uplifting to us. May God
continue to bless you.
Ryan, Katura and Tabatha
Trapp and The Koonce family.


In MemOriam


16 died


JOSEPH WILLIAMS
August 13. Memorial
a.m., Saturday in the ch


San Jose
PATRICIA WHITE, 51
operator I
died Aug ust 41
9. Service 11
a.m., Thursday
at Greater
Holy Coss M.B
Church. a


Service 10 DANIEL L. STEVENSON, 59,
lapel. died August 11.
Public viewing
4-7 p.m., Firday,
? August 19 at
Manker Funeral
, telephone Home ,2 07 5
NW 54th
Stree t, Miam i,
FL 33142. Pro-
fessional services are entrusted
to New Serenity Memorial Funeral
Home and Cremation Services,
Inc. Crystal River, FL 34429, (352)
563-1394.



itierManker

64, build- BELLE S. WILLIAMS, 82,
domestic, died August 14 at Select
Speciality Hospital. Services were
held.


Eric Wilson

LORINE DUGGINS, 72, home-
maker, died August 11 at Florida
Memorial Oakland Park. Service
1 p.m., Saturday at House of God
Miracle Revival Fellowship, Holly-


-'


Roberts Po
MARVIN CARSON,
ing inspector,
died August 4
at Cleveland
Clinic. Services
were held.


GLADYS P. BRAYNON


wood, FL.


gratefully acknowledges
your kindness and expres-
sions of sympathy.
telourovisitsc prayers, nards,
donation and covered dished
were appreciated.
Thanks to the Range Funer-
al Home staff, Pastor Eddie
Lake and the Greater Bethel
family, Delta Sigma Theta So-
rority, many friends, family
and neighbors.
May God bless each of you
is our pra e Fail



Happy Birthday


Grace


~~~In loving memory of,Inlv


ANNIE MAE NELSON, 64, re-
tired, died Au-
gust 12. Service
11 a.m., Friday
at Grace Funer-
alHome in the -
capl.





diWILLIE JAMES JACKSON, 52,
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.









Hall Ferguson Hewitt
CAROLYN BARBARY, 59,
retired postal
clerk, died
August Jaks

Me mo r ial
Hos p it al .
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday at
New Beginning
Missionary Baptist Church.



Wright and Young
WILLIE CECIL CHANEY, 82,
laborer, died Au-
gust 14 at Kin-
dred Hospital.
Service 11 a.m., Z-
Saturday at
New Providence
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.


In loving memory of,


JEROME SHARPE JR.
10/04/62 08/14/10

Our lives are so empty with-
out your love
Not a moment passes, when
you're not thought of.
takIeaLord giveth, the Lord
Our comfort cometh, know-
ing we will meet again some-
day
aL ving and missing you al-
ways, Mom and Family



|R MOmoriam


In loving memory of,


MAGGIE LEE MVOORE
KATHALEEN PEEK JAMES 12/16/1928 08/17/2010
05/06/47 08/06/10


Mother, you are always on
our minds and in our hearts.
Your loving family.




In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


CECIL LEON PINKNEY
"JOHN"
1961 -1991

Forever in our memories.
Mother, Inez Rowe; sisters,
Linda, Carolyn, Rhonda, Bob-
bie and Debra; brother, Eric
and Patrick; sons, C.J. and
Jahlil.

HONOR YOUR LOVED
ONE WITH AN
IN MEMORIAL
IN THE MIAMI TIMES


In loving memory of,


KAREN TARUSE
COVENTON-8UGG8
11/19/1958 8/17/08


Paradise
CARLTON H. BRYANT, 51, cor-
rection officer,
died August 9 at
home. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day at Sweet
Home Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


MAE BELL STRONG,93, for-
mer owner of Ray's Sweet Shop,
died August 12 at home. Service
10 a.m., Saturday at Hurst Chapel
A.M.E. Church of Perrine.


DIARRYL CRAIG
DRIESSEN, SR.


gratefully acknowledges your
kindness and expressions
of sympathy of your visits,
prayers, cards, telephone
calls, monetary donations
and covered dishes were ap-
preciated
Thanks the Pastor's of
Greater M.B. Church, Dea-
con WillieMMelvin and St. Ste-

May God continue bless you
is our prayer.
I.orene Melvin and Family


TARNORRIS
TYRELL GAYE
04/25/91 08/20/10


$3498.00 ******"'""'
*cammrenern tw


Its been one year since you
departed. Words can not ex-

msi ng ou, bnut, t i her m
of knowing that you are in
paradise.
Love grandma, Teundra,
Latisha and family.


20B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


Card of Thanks


in Memoriam


In MOmorlam





The Miami Times





li estle


Entertainment
FAsHION HIP HOP MUSIC FOOD DINING ARTs & CULTURE PEOPLE


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 17-23, 201`1


SECTION C


THE MIAM[ I DEj


ip=





















rPI~~~~~~~~ ~.."_~:5UlE(~~i

By~~ ~~ ELR~e~o~


Tamera~~~~~~~~~~ L.uyHuse ishvn h etya v








issue, ~~~ o tn ow

Tamera Msowry-Husly isa haing th bestan lyeaor u w ever :


able to catch up with her for a little chit-chat. "
She tells why she chose Adam to be her lawfully wedded hus- :
band, what married life has been like thus far, and why she'd much**
rather live in a world where people were color blind.
-See Page 2C


Spencer in mind.
Their longtime friend Tate Taylor
- who later wrote the screenplay
for "The Help" and directed the
niovie -- brought Spencer and the
rest of the cast and crew of his
2003 film "Chicken Party to New
Orleans to work on the sound
mix. Stockett came along.
.'She met me on a hot, hungry
day1," Spencer, 39, recalls with a
joyous laugh. "I was about 100
pounds heavier than I am now,
and I was dieting. I don't like to
be hot, and I was very, grumpy
because he was taking us on a
walking tour of the city.
.'So i can honestly say Minny's
physicality of course, her vo-
luptuousness is based on me,
and her sass and her strong wrill
are definitely based on me."
Taylor says Stockett, who wras
about a year into writing the book,

"w thi ng m n cti dg ingmtoe
to toe fighting about the heat, and
she said, 'My God, I've been writing
this character of Minny, and I think I
just spent an afternoon with her."'
That's where the similarities end and
Stockett comes into play, Spencer says.
"Minny is a complex ball of emotion. I
think she is a Greek chorus. She says
what everyone else is thinking."
In "The Help," recent college grad and
aspiring writer Skeeter Phelan (Emma
Stone) approaches Minny's friend,
Aibileen Clark (Viola Davis), to talk
honestly about cooking and
L Please turn to BPENCER 2C


/t-


BV Chris Wlsherspoon

American Idol winner
Fantasia Barrino announced
that she is pregnant during a
concert recently in Jackson-
ville, Florida.
The 27-year-old
R&6B singer wcas
performing at the
opening of the
Riverview Apart-
ments complex,
when she decided
to let fans in on
her big secret.
"You are the
faret persons
that I share this FANT
news with, and I
share this with y'ou because
I can relate to you,"* she said.
For a while I walked around
figuring out what will they
say and what will they think


about me. But now I tell you
I don't livle my life for folk.
This child that I carry, God
has given me this child. And
I don't have to hide it from
none of y'all."
Barrino has
a nine-year-old
daughter, Zion
Quari Barrino, from
a1 previous relation-
ship.
t ~She did not con-
firm who the father
of her second child
,is, although she
has been recently
linked to her ex-
SIA boyfriend Antwaun
Cook, with whom
she reportedly had an affair
with while he was still mar-
ried. In June, the twro were
spotted in Barbados on the
Please turn to PANTABIA 4C


By EURweb.com

Your favorite sing-along
drama series, "Glee," has un-
dergone quite a few changes
over the seasons. And there
might be another one soon.
Amber Riley, the show's lone
Black star, said she recently
that she may be graduating
from the crew of high school
singers this year.
'] may' not be coming back
for a fourth season," Riley
told El Online. "Who knows?
Whatever happens this third
season is what happens, and I
think everybody's okay with it
... I love my job to pieces, but
when it's time to go, it's time
to go, and hopefully, there are
greater things on the hori-
zon ."
"I mean, I don't want to be
a 30-year-old high school stu-


LOS ANGELES (AP) -
Oprah Winfrey, James Earl
Jones and makeup art-
ist Dick Smith have been
picked to receive honorary
Oscars.
The Academy of Motion
Picture Arts and Sciences
says the three will be hon-
ored with Oscar statuettes
at the Governors Awiards in
November. The academy's
Board of Governors voted
recently to recognize the
entertainment industry


veterans.
Winfrey will receive the
Jean Hersholt Humanitar-
ian Award, which honors
philanthropic and humani-
tarian contributions. The
57-year-old media mogul,
who was nominated for a
supporting actress Oscar for
1985's ''The Color Purple,"
supports various charitable
and educational causes, in-
cluding her own namesake
foundations and Academy
Please turn to OBCAR8 2C


dent either. 'Glee' was just a
great catapult for us," she said
of herself and fellow departing
cast members Lea Michele,
Cory Monteith and Chrie
Colfer. "Nobody knew who we
were, and we will always be
thankful for it. It's just been
an amazing blessing."


BV Nicole Sperling

When Roslyn Brock, chair-
woman of the NAACP, first
heard about "The Help," a new
film based on a novel about
the volatile relationships be-
tween Southern white women
and their Black maids at the
dawn of the civil rights move-
ment, she was skeptical,
"I didn't have any great
expectations for a movie based
in the '60s about domestics,"
Brock said. "I thought it would
be a heavy, dark movie that
would bring to mind segrega-
tion."
After seeing the film,
though, "I felt so proud," she
said. "My grandmother was
a domestic in Florida, and
when she passed, almost two
generations of families whom
she had taken care of sent


condolences saying what an
important part she was to
their family. And it never re-
ally connected with me until I
saw this movie."
Last week, during the an-
nual convention in Los Ange-
les of the National Assn. for
the Advancement of Colored
People, Brook took to the
stage after a screening of the
film with an impassioned plea:
"I ask each of you: Tell your
friends, your family, your co-
workers, your church. Orga-
nize screening parties. Go see
this movie."
As DreamWorks prepares to
open "The Help," starring Viola
Davis and Emma Stone, on
Wednesday, it faces the deli-
cate task of selling the film. to
moviegoers, Black and white,
who might be reluctant to
rekindle unpleasant memories


of segregation. Brock's shift
from doubter to evangelist for
the movie illustrates the criti-
cal role that word-of-mouth
is likely to play in determin-
ing whether the film flops or
scores as big as its source
material, the best-selling 2009
novel by Kathryn Stockett.
Yet "The Help" isn't univer-
sally beloved. Some critics
including the New York Times'
Janet Maslin derided the
book, which is told from three
narrators' perspectives (two
Black, one white), for allowing
its white characters to speak
in perfect English but giv-
ing its Black characters their
own dialect. Others carped
that the main white charac-
ter, Eugenia "Skeeter" Phelan
(played by Emma Stone in the
film), was viewed by the Black
maids as a savior.


-I


l--


--Dale Robinette, Dreamworks
Emma Stone, left, and Viola Davis work on a scene with director Tate Taylor while film-
ing the DreamWorks picture "The Help."


Octavia Spencer maxes


out Minny

Actress needs no help

BV Dennis- Moore

For readers of "The Help," M~inny is one
of the most memorable characters in
Kathtryn Stockett's best-selling novel.
For audiences of "The Help," Octav~ia
Spencer mayr be one of the most memo-
rable actresses in the film adaptation,
which opens today.
Spencer plays the feisty, de~ant and
determined Minny Jackson. She is one of
the Black domestic
persuaded by a
ls,asnd young white
-7 woman to
secretly work
-- a with her on
a book about
their lives in
service to white
fmli e in Jackson,

A ~1960s.


"lhe Help'


Idol winner Fantasia Barrino:


'God has given me this child'


. .. ?-~:~


Black star Amber Rile~y may


be graduating from 'Glee'


Onrah and James Earl Jones

tO TCeleVe honorary Oscars


'A


Black leaders give 'The Help' a hand in marketing


The chairwoman of the NAACP is among those spreading the word about the DreamWorks film, which

focuses on relationships between white Southern women and their maids during the civil rights era.





Newlywed Tamera Mowry speaks on married life


A Mother's Ni-htmare
Oh no your honor, that can't be, he Is Just a young man a son to me. How Is
a mother to endure such pain from the child she gave birth to who has brought
such shame.
This has to be a nightmare, this can't be true, resurrect my son this is noth-
Ing for you to do.
I taught him to say a prayer each night, he just made a mistake don't let him
take his life.
Resurrect my son this Is nothing for you to do he said he Is not guilty, he
won't lie to me and you.
I ask myself everyday did I spend enough time did I listen to my child, did I
respect his mind.
Is there anything, anything I can do,
Mama wakte uip are you having a bad dream too.


Actors added to Oscars hist


I I


RE 11El HEA


Irsrml~A1~CI~II~

L~rrm4h~A~mll. li~L1~


li~u~u~Ye!


TICKETS ) T.tsarisavorl.com
Lggy ntln~o

awnurmo mnsonasmassa


BLhc ;S MoST CONTROL THEIR OWNh DESTINY


2C THE MIAtMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


quiet to movements not used in
years. Leading the calypso line
were Strachan and Pinny,
followed by Clarke. The
honoree joined and the party
was at its highest level.
'Shelby Goodman took the
mic and open the party formally
while the Junkanoos marched
out of the room. Reflections
were given by Verna Goodman,
Edward M. Johnslon, while the
feast wpas served to the hugry
people. Brinna and MYorghan
Johnson passed out
leis and whistles to
the .guests during the
calypso dancing. Jevaris
Hodgesr and Dobe
Julins talked about the
good-ole-days at BTW
with Johnson. -
The honoree became
caught upl in theTH
festivities -as tears
streamed down~ her
cheeks and .her son comforted
her. The people clapped and.
recited "God is Good," while
Monique looked her four-
year-old daughter, N fevaeBi,
in the eyes and explained the
history taking place at that
time. Joining in were Lillian
Bridges, Hodges, Julius and
Delores H. Dean, daughter of
Cupid Dean.

The phrase "This is Ricky
Thomas" wras intimated on his
radio shows many a years, as
well as Friday when hundreds
of people crowded the edifice
of hount Hermon A.M.E, to
pay tribute. It was stated by
his son Rory, during his radio
show on AM 1490 WMBM that
his father was "great" and he
mingle with greatness. His
other children piggybhacked on
"greatness" and the audience
was education on the kind of
man RIcky was, GREAT.


Celebrating the Life of
Richard "URicky"~ Thomas was
handled with proficiency under
Rev. Henry E. Green, Jr.,
offciating. Sherwood DauBosle
addressed his presidency
with Metro Miam Action Plan
(MMAP) as a challenge for
Thomas to meet with him,
and smooth out the wrinkles
heap upon the organization's
progress.
Commissioner Barbara
Jordan further acquainted
the audience with the
plight of Thomas.
SOther resolutions
came from Mt. Her~mon
A.M.E., WMBM Clips,
Democratic Black.
Caucus and Monroe
County. It was an
Sevening that will
Remain in the hearts
of those in attendance.
Dx sting uished
speakers included Rev. Dr.
Gilbert 8. LSmith .(brother-
in-lawh), Arthur Floulkes,
Governor General Bahamais;
Samuel "Saumbo" Harrison,
Deacon Robert L. Thomas,
Commissioner. Richard P.
Dunn, Dr. Kevin Moyd and
Joey "JW"f Walker. Adding
to the service was the singing
by Joy Cooper and the Mt.
Hermon Mass Choir.
Ricky will be missed by
Miami-Dade County, his
loving wife, Patricia; children:
Rory and Bridgette Thomas,
Gregory and Helen Robinson,
Rodney Robinson,Lorl oullie,
Darlene Cordero, Richelle
and Ardonnis Lumpkin, seven
grandchildren and six great-
grandchildren, Dr. Jacquelyn
and Brodes Hartley, Capt.
Harry and Patricia Brown, Dr.
Edward and Pamela Scott,
Cheryl Thomasr-Tate, and a
host of other relatives.


Washington, moderator; and
Dale Robitnson, and family,
orchestrators.
Early next week, 12 young
people from North Dade will
board a bus and travel to
Orlando for the U.S. Junior
Olympics Tae Kwon Do
Championship.
Robinson taught autistic
children at Thomas Jefferson
Middle and is paying more
than $6,400 to take some of
the! students to qualify
for the event. Robinson
visited 15Andre D. Pierre,
Esq., Mayor of North
Miami; who assisted
financially with the~ trip
and other expenses.
Recipients of Master ~i
Tugen $mith's
outstandingachievement D1
included Justin Alford,
Joshua V. -Turner,' Rubinoff
E. Robinson, III, F~aith E.
Robinson, Isaiah T. Maxw~ell,
Jayvon A. Rickretts, Danrnel
Victor and Austyn Mimne.
Master Rubinioff Robinson
Memorial -Scholarships went
to Denissea Law, student at
Miamii Northwestern, who will
attend Clark University and
Michael Oliver, a graduate
from Turner Tech, who will
matriculate at Miami Dade
College and FIU.
*4 Dr. Lewis took
Sto the mic and
emphasize the
importance of them
considering FMU
as the place to
received the kind of
education that will
meet their needs.
NKNEY He motivated them,
challenged them,
gave them facts and a formula
for success. He received several
applause and a standing
ovation when he finished.


It was followed by a
demonstration from the Tae
Kwon Do group' with remarks
from Executive President of the
Board, Patrene Washington,
Dale Robinson, co-Founder,
a solo from Lightfoot, and
MUSYE DJ Spongebob, while
everyone line danced until
midnight.
***********^^
Edward Michael Johnson,
II not only loves his mother,
Mary Oliver Johnson,
but he demonstrated
his loving care mf her
during the time she
ir experience three heart
attacks, two strokes,
brain surgery, a
filter in her stomach,
going on the dialysis
UNN machine three times
a week, finally the life
support for a period of time.
Edward indicated that upon
his mother getting a second,
third, fourth, and fifth chance
at life prompted him. to take
her horseback riding in Sun
City, Disney World, the Casinos
in Broward -and a future trip
to Cat Island `and Nassau,
Bahamnas.
Church members, family
members, and friends from
Booker T. WVashington came
in for the celebration. Early
arrivals included Michele
Perry, Shanty Jones, Bernice
Carey, Percy Oliver, Lois
Oliver, Dr. Enid C. Pinkney,
Eugene Strachan, Franklin
Clarke,GOloria and Berman
Bannister, LShirley M. Bennett
and Delores Adderly.
The honoree walked in with
hugs and kisses from the
crowd, while the Junkanoos
with Nevaeh Mitchell,
Monique Mitchell, David
Waylor, Jeffery Williams,
and Wendell Lee brought the


Tom Joyner indicated on his
Hot 105 show that the Brothers
of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity~,
Inc. were planning the National
Conclave in Washington,
D.C., last weekend, and more
than 10,000 in attendance.
Unfortunately, former Basilei
Dr. Edward J. Braynon, Jr.
and Dr. Dorsey C. MHiller was
going to leave together, until
Braynon received a call that
his brother, Judge Harold
Brayn~on, died. Miller sadly
.left after a brotherly hug and
prayer.
As Dr. Miller arrived in
Washington, D.C., he -
felt the spirit of the
deceased founders, such
as Dr. Oscar J. Cooper,
Dr. Ernest E. Just,
Bishop Edgar A.' Love,
and Professor Frank
Coleman, who 'founded
th~e fraternity. with a
mission of manhood,
uplift, perseverance, andO
scholarship.
Different sessions occupied
the brothers during the day as
they discussed the economy,
job opportunities, President
Barack Obama issues and the
ground where the fraternity
was built.
The evenings were filled with
banquets, dancing, fraternizing
and impeccably dressed men
and women.
Shuttle buses were provided
for those who wanted to visit
Howard University campus,
such as Tory Cox and his
steppers. According to Oscar
Jessie, an aerial view of the
people moving in and out of


buildings w~as
overwhelming.
Some of the
brothers in
attendance
included Stan
Allen and wife Sarah, Earl
Daniels and wife Alie, Dr.
Hermnan Dorsett, Slamuel
Jackson, Oscar Jessie and
wife Mary, Richard Fisher,
Bill CoSby, Dr. Astrid Mack,
Henry Mingo, John ShawI,
Arthur Simma and wife Ruth,
Bagean Smith and wife Naomi,
S~teven Thompson, former
Basilei George Grace, Henry
Minugo, Rev. Jessie
Jackson, Audiey
Coakley, Steve
Thompson, Clyde
Dupree, Thomas
Sands, and Tim
Belcher, planner.
Kudos go out to the
brothers that took the
time to participate
BAMA in the phenomenal
event.
*H*********
A special salute goes out to
Quality United Education,
Inc. for paying tribute to
the late Master Rubinoff
Robinson, a benevolent
Tae Kwon Do trainer for
the Third Annual Awards
Gala, last Friday at Florida ,
Memorial University ( ~
Banquet Room before 100
members and parents.
It was an event that P
headlined Rochelle
Lightfoot, dynamic soloist;
Dr. Henry Lewis, III, Florida
Memorial Universityl president
and keynote speaker; Patriena


:li II~


deceased husband, Harris
Foster. Dr. Harris Foster, a
full professor of Urology at Yale
University was listed among the
"Best Doctors in the Northeast."
Nicole Foster graduated from
New York University in May
2011 with top honors in three
majors: Early Childhood General
Education, Special Education
and Histoory. While at NYU,
N~icole studied in Florence, Italy
for her sophomore year. She is
a member of Pi Lambda Theta
Honors Society and Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority, Inc. Nicole will
be entering Law School soon.
Mayor John Marks, Jr., son
of Mildred Marks and the late
John Marks, Sr. was in his
hometown of Miami to visit
his mother and aunts, Joan
Marks-Huff and Pannie Marks-


Lipecomb and their families last
weekend. Mayor M~arks resides
in Tallahassee. Welcome home
Mr. Mayor.
Easie 8tinson-Pace, .sister
of Dr. Solomon 8tinson said
goodbye to Region III as their
director on last Saturday,
August 6. Her family and friends
gathered at the InterContinental
Doral Country Club to bid
Essie goodbye and to enjoy her
retirement. She was the director
of 72 schools.
Anthony and Juanita
Armbrister are elated to have
their grandchildren William
and Zora Edwards visiting for
the summer. The children and
their grandparents have visited
Washington, D.C., New York,
Philadelphia, Maryland and Key
West.


of you: Nancy
Johnson, Ines
M. Johnson,
Winston
Scavella, Grace Heastle.
Patterson, Lessie Paige-8mith,
Julle Clarke, Pamela Walton,
Jaunita Jackson, Horace
Johnson and Hansel Higgs.
Wedding anniversary
greetings go out to the love birds
of the week: Harold and Paula
Meadows, their 41st on August
8; James B. and LSaundra
Nairn, their 34th on August 13.
Hearty congratulations go out
to the children of Dr. Rosebud
Lightbourn-Foster and her


Welcome to Miami Father
Denrick Rolle, who is expected
to replace our beloved Father
Richard L. Mtarquess-Barry
next year as our rector and
pastor of our beloved Saint
Agnes Episcopal Church. Fr.
Rolled will be with us for the
week.
Old time Miamians were once
again sadden by the death of
Glladys payne-Braynon, who
was the wife of the late John
Braynon. Gladys graduated
from Booker T. Washington in
1942 and her funeral was held
last Wednesda~y.
Get well wishes go out to all


coninAed from 10

for Girls in South Africa.
Jones and Smith will receive
honorary Oscars for their out-
standing careers.
Jones has appeared in more
than 50 films. The 80-year-
old actor voice of Darth Va-
der -waas nominated for an
Academy Award in 1971 for
"The Great White Hope." His
other credits include "Field of
Dreams," ''Patriot Games" and
,,The Hunt for Red October."
Smith was NBC's first make-
up man when he started his
career in 1945. He won an


Oscar iandl 194fr his work

nated again in 1989 for "Dad.''
Known as the "godfather of
makeup," he also worked on
.'The Godfather," "The Exor-
cist" and "Taxi Driver." Smith
also helped train many of to-
day''s top movie makeup art-
ists.
Smith, Jones and Winfrey
will receive their statuettes on
Nov. 12 at the 3rd annual Gov-
ernore Awards dinner at the
Grand Ballroom at Hollywood
&r Highland Center, just above
the Kodak Theatre, where the
Academy Awards are present-
ed.


go through a challenging situa-
tion then you overcome it you're
like "yes, we can do this." Adam
has to do most of the moving so
I: kind of feel sorry for him in
that sense. He's moving into
my place and one of the main
things that we're going through
right now is that I don't want
him to feel like a visitor. It's
our place. We're kind of going
through the transition where
you say "my place" and then
you're like, "no, wait, it's our
place." Plus, saying "my hus-
band", that feels amazing too.
SESSENCE: What made you
sure Adam was the one for you?


TAMIERA: I can be com-
pletely myself. I didn't have to
worry about that. I have natu-
rally curly hair, but a lot of my
ex-boyfriends always liked it
straight. It's a lot of work keep-
ing it straight all the time,
whereas Adam liked me as me.
Not only that, but when we were
going out on dates and eating,
and I found myself being able
to eat and do whatever I wanted
to do. I didn't feel like I had to
watch what I: say or watch what
I do. I could completely just be
raw and that's how I knew. I al-
ways wanted to be with him. I
never got tired of him. He made


me feel very comfortable.
ESSENCE: Will you share
one of the wedding moments
you keep replaying in your
head?
TAMrERA: Oh gosh that's
hard. There were so many.
When Adam and I did our first
dance, because we did a really
funny one. First we danced to
Journey's "Faithfully" then we
broke out into LL Cool J's "Go-
ing Back to Cali." LL Cool J fol-
lows us both on Twvitter, which
I have to mention because I
think that's amazing, and he
found out about it. He retweeted


E88ENPCE.COM: Congrats on
the big wedding What's married
life like?
TAMERA MOWRY: It's amaz-
ing I feel like I have a lot more
strength, and I have this per-
son who has my back, and no
matter what he's going to be
there for me. That just in itself
makes me feel a lot more con-
fldent and a lot more safe. It
feels amazing it really, really
does. Adam andl I, we haven't
lived together, so we're going
through that right now. Mov-
ing is challenging, but it's re-
warding. That's the best I can
,describe it. Because once you


Rising; star inspires, portrays character
SPENCER And Minny, who works for I'm going to have problems."'
continued from 10 Hilly's mother, is the kind of As she continued to read,
no-nonsense, sharp-tongued dipencer found that not all of
cleaning for white families and help that H~illy abhors. So she the characters talked in the
raising their children. Albileen sacks ~Minny and then spreads same dialect. "She! was writ-
and Skeeter, whio compiles a the lie that Minny stole her ing about characters who hap-
household hints column for mother's candelabra. opened to be from a certain so-
the local newspaper, could lose The only job Minny can get is cioeconomic group. They had
their jobs, their friends, even with Celia Foote (Jessica Chas- limited education, but' they
their lives if the segregationists' tain), an outcast herself who is were the most intelligent peo-
find out". shunned by the Jackson elite. ple in the book. I applaud her
Minny says they are irratio- Minny is suspicious when Celia because it gave an authenticity
nal. But after the indignities treats her with respect rather to those voices."
mount for the maids, sihe joins than the usual disdain, but When "The H~elp" was pub-
them and helps recruit others, they eventually become unlike- lished hi 2009, Stockett was
Skeeter's childhood friend ly confidantes. scheduled for a book tour. "I


didn't feel comfortable getting
up on stage and reading the
African-American voices,; so
I called up Octavia," she says.
"This was before we had thought
much about a film. So Octavia
went on tour with me and read
the voices of the Black charac-
ters, and I read the white."
Spencer calls it "Thelma and
Louise-ing."


'


and college roommate, the in-
fluential Junior League presi-
dent Hilly. Holbrook (Bryce
Dallas Howard), is appalled
that Blacks and whites use the
same toilets, so she proposes
the Home Help Sanitationl Ini-
tiative that would require white
households to have separate
bathrooms for Black house-
keepers. .


ACTRESS, AUTHOR
BONDED
Aibileen speaks first in the
book. "The first couple of lines
in, I realized (Stockett) had
written in this dialect," says
Spencer, who was raised .in
Alabama. "And quite honestly I
thought, 'Wow, if this is Mam-
mny firozil'Gone With the Wind,'


in 'The Help'
Tate had introduced us sev-
eral years earlier, but we didn't
have that much interaction with
each other. Now we were driving
across the South to 12 cities,-
We' weren't being lawless, but:
we bonded those three weeks."
Taylor had met Spencer in the
mid-'90s on the set of "A Time
to Kill." "I delivered time sheets
to the office she was working
in, and we hit it off and became
great friends," he says.
Spencer ma~ide her first screen
appearance in "A Time to Kill."
"I'f you blink, it is all of five sec-
onds. If you don't blink, six."-
Since then, she has appeared
in many big- and small-screen
productions. "For years I've
seen Octavia put in movies and
television, and when this show
or film, concludes, I think 'what
a waste,"' Taylor says. "They
had no idea who .they had in
their cast, and shame on them
for not wexloring that."





a1t Ac s ~la:ST coNTRol1 nmaI ows~ DESnINv


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


,Iy"Bs:


ing with Mlar\ Jl.
Blige. That led
her to Motowrn and
Bad Boy and Re-
cords, where she
ultimately became
director of c~ho-
reographi-.
Writer/
director
Billie W~ Mood -
ruff cF.F- has said
the the 2003 film
"Honey," starring Jessica
Alba as a dancer looking for her big
break, was based in part on Gibson's
life.
"My new show is truly an amazing


By Tonya Pendleton

If you saw her taking dancers to
task on Diddy's "Making the Band"
series, then you already have a good
sense of what dancer/choreographer
Laurieann Gibson can do. It was just
a matter of time before she got her
own reality show and that time has
come.
Gibson now hosts "Born To Dance:
Laurieann Gibson," which debuted
on BET on Tuesday, Aug. 2 at 10 p.m.
The show pits 20 aspiring dancers
against each other who'll have to
compete and make it past Gibson,
who, as you may remember on "Mak-
ing the Band," has little time for at-






"Lt I


titude or slouches.
And the stakes are high. The win-
ner will take home $50,000.
Throughout the eight-week compe-
tition, dancers will be challenged by
performing in a commercial and mu-
sic video, as well as with Lady Gaga
live during her "Monster Ball" tour.
The choreographer for all of Lady Ga-
ga's videos, Gibson directed the HBO
presentation of the Lady Gaga show
live from Madison Square Garden,
which garnered her an Emmy Award
nomination. .
Gibson was born in Toronto,
Canada, but came to the U.S. at age
17. She started out studying at Alvin
Ailey, then got her big break danc-


event." she told MlTV New s. "One
girl Is getting 550,000 and enter-
ing the professional world, and I'm
training her 0.err a period of eight
weeks with different competitive
elements, so it's a competition show.
No, there's no trophy, but there's ac-
tual real live information, money and
purpose. It's my baby. I'm so proud
of it."


Court Wedding' Whether he's
giving his Dad a pound or th row\-
ing a tantrum in the car, Kiy~an
still makes our uterus hurt and
yearn for children--at least dur-,
ing the hour he's on air.
3. Trina on a blind date? Kel-
ly Rowland gets a tattoo?
Lala has access to celebrities
most people only dream of and
calls m~any-of, them her friends.
In the super trailer, w~e see 50
Cent offering advice, Kielly Rowh-
land getting a tattoo and Trina
birn setr ep en r: bln ae
it s fun to see a down-to-earth
side of our favorite stars. away
from the paparazzi and press
conferences.
4. Lala's Got Her Own
Say what y;ou wrant about Lala
bu tshe had alegit mate ca reer as
a V'J before Carmelo came along
and is still just as determined to
build her name outside of being a
NBA player's w~ife. It's refreshing
to see her struggle wilth the bal-
ance between wrork and marriage
and family, which is a challenge
women face all over the world.
5. The Downside of Fame
Amid the grandiose wedding,
c~elebrity guest appearances and
photo shoots. Lala is very raw
and honest about the downside
to fame. We see her cope writh
rumors of Carmelo's love child,
tense Interview~s with the NYC
press and aggressive paparazzi'
and the impact It has on her
family.


BV Jessica C. AndreNs

I'll admit it: I wras initially ap-
prehensive about watching Lala's
Full Court Weddmng. After all,
wre had seen all the pictures on
gossip blogs months before and
a whole series around wedding
planning seemed excessive.
After tuning into the first epi-
sode, I w~as pleasantly surprised.
Lala seemed genuine, fun and
endearing, celebrity~ appearances
kept a fun flow of guests on the

ohr d~sa nrhoesoms. I n-o
earth quality to the showv despite
its star-filled roster that kept me
tuning in every Mlonday.
Nowv that we're mere weeks
awvay from the debut of Lala's
Full Court Life on VH I on A4u-
gust 22nd at 9 p.m., here are
five reasons wFe're excited for the
sho~.
1. A Real Basketball Wife
From handling familyl mem-
bers' ticket requests to dealing
with angry Denver fans that
blame her for Carmelo's trade,
Lala shows the true perks and
pitfalls of being an NBA wife. De-
spite rumors of infidelity which
Lala faces head-on. the pla?ful
and loving dynamic between her
and Carmelo seems less about
money and drama, and more
about love.
2. More Kiyant
Raise your hand if you're ex-
cited to see more of the ador-
able breakout star of Lala's Full


-By John Ricard
Rapper Royce Da 5'9" comes out swinging on Success is
Certain.
....;* l*

Ranner Royce rolls mto


'Success' on new album


that track and appears on
the next, single Writer's
Block. They claim to never
run out of punch lines and
poke fun at repetitive rap-
pers. Royce largely avoids that
trap, though he does devote
a couple of tracks (Merry Go
Round and My Own Planet)
to his ups and downs. The
DJ Premier-produced Second
Place finds him claiming, "I
should run a marathon back-
wards just to see what sec-
ond place looks like." In the
witty ER, with Kid Vishis, he
metaphorically breathes life
back into the rap game. His
harrowing narrative On the
Boulevard and the poignant
Security, which he dedicates
to slain Detroit rapper Proof,
add emotional depth. If mea-
sured in terms of doing things
his way, Royce already has
Success.


By Steve Jones

The Detroit rapper gets a
helping hand from Eminem
and others on Success is
Certain,
Success may not necessarily
be certain, but it is undeniable
that the Detroit rapper has a
boatload of momentum with
his fifth solo album. He and
Eminem put their near-de-
cade-10ng feud to rest a couple
of years ago, and in June,
reteamed as Bad Meets Evil
to top Billboard's album chart
with Hell: The Sequel. That al-
bum's second single, Lighters,
which features Bruno Mars, is
No. 2 in digital sales.
Royce takes advantage of
the spotlight on Success,
launching a barrage of boasts
on the metal-infu~sed opener
Legendary featuring Travis
Barker. Eminem co-produced


r


cide attempt after overdosing
on as irin and a sleep in he
Music, she later confirmed the
incident was a suicide attempt.
"At that moment I wanted out
I wanted it to be over with,
she said. In the interview she
also admitted to aborting pre-
vious a child with Cook.
Barrino currently stars in
the VH1 reality series, Fanta-
sia for Real.


FANTASIA
continued from 10

beach, with Barrino appearing
pregnant.
For Fantasia, life in the pub-
lic spotlight has been filled
with highs and lows, since
winning American Idol back
in 2004.
In August 2010 the "Bitter-
sweet" singer was hospitalized
in North Carolina from a sui-


meeting on tohe esy ta teHl their

scored veta'Ci SkaeterM ii

(Octavia Spencer) that flies in
the face of the era's societal
limitations. Their sisterhood
evolves slowly and naturally.
As long-suffering maids to
particularly loathsome wom-
en in Skeeter's circle, Davis
and Spencer give pitch-per-
fect performances.
c Iavissis remarkable as the
cating years of suffering and
fear with the most subtle ex-
pr maionhse Despie dh ehad

is wrml lovng o little
gri ianrml y lvh r pampered
mother.
Spencer; who is more often
seen in comic roles, brings
th -multifaceted character
C,1 Ial, to viv 1Id ine~. WLe un-
abashedly root for her as she
takes unusual revenge on the
Please turn to THE HELP 10D


Solid performances
boost drama set iri



By Claudi Puig

It would seem difficult,
even odd, to,make a sunny
and upbeat drama about ra-
cial prejudice.
But The Help, with its em-
phasis on an unlikely friend-
ship transcending segregat-
ed strictures, manages this
tricky feat. It also personal-
izes the broader issue of civil
rights by focusing on one shice
of the Black experience.

ing nove 1 a r es eb sy T
warml enggingb ok h s
weaernmade nt ng equally afs
fecting movie.
Powered by a strong cast,
The Help is a faithful adap-
tation of Kathryn Stockett's
novel. A trio of outstanding


.



Octavis Spencer and Viola Davis stars in The Help.
performances carry the film who endure all manner of dis-
on their strong shoulders. respect catering to white so-
The story is set in Jackson, city folks. At best, their em-
Miss., in 1963 and centers on Dloverrs take then for granted;
Skeeter (Emma Stone), a re- at wauias ii us~ .le acaed as it
cent college graduate deter- they are subhuman,
mined to document the life In the course of this project,
experiences of Black maids which involves the women


POetry Corner returns to The Miami Times
In a tradition that was once much-beloved and always anrtic-
ipated, February marked the return of "Poetry Corner" in The
Miami 77imes. Each week we will feature one poem from writers
who live in our community. Whether you are a seasoned scribe
or a novice poet, we want your work. Submissions should be
one page or less and typed. They may either be emailed to
Jasmine Johnson (jjohnson~miamitimesonline.com) or faxed
(305-757-5770). Poetry should also follow the example of our
best Black.poets and be positive in their message. Please in-
clude a photograph (high resolution), daytime phone number
and the city in which you currently reside. No phone inquiries
please. We hope to make this a weekly addition to our paper
but that will be up to y~ou. If you are "a poet and you know it,"
we invite you to send us your best work.


BACK O3N REALITY TV


1--


Fu


Court ife


~r~- ri


REASONS WHY WE ARE EXCITED


R&B singer announces pregnancy


'The Help': It s fine work all around






















A A T IA Y I g EN;~


OITCES N C


Monthly event

matures Jowee

Omicil

By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com

If it is the third Friday of the
month, then you can expect
the return of Big Night in Little
Haiti. The monthly event that
caters to packed crowds, will
be returning to the Little Haiti
Cultural Center, 212 NE 59th
Terrace, this Friday, August
19th from 6-10 p.m.
"It has been a completely
positive experience since the
beginning," said Laura Quin-
lan, director of The Rhythm
Foundation. "I think the com-
munity knows who we are and
do not need convincing to come
out and enjoy the festivities. We
have enjoyed working with local
artists. This is a great network
to experience Caribbean cul-

tT "s month, the Center is
featuring krevol jazz star Jowee
Omicil in the plaza, with an
opening set by world music
group Elastic Bond. Elastic
Bond is seven-member band
that has been hot on the Mi-
ami music scene for about two
years. The group, comprised of
vocalists and instrumentation
by saxophone, flute, congas and
guitar players was created from
the sound of Venezuelan pro-
ducer Andri~s Ponce to experi~
ment and create a unique sonic
cocktail.
CI can hardly wait to hear the
sweet sounds of Jowee," said
Jamila White. "My whole family
listens to him. I am an Amer"
,-nican-bornlaitian opi.Idonitu~ ,
really listen to a lot of Haitian
musicians-or musicians period,
but for some reason I really
enjoy the music of Jowee."
White is not the only one that
,is excited about Big Night's
return-
"It really doesn't get any bet-
ter than this," said Steven Mat-
thew. "Without fail I am here ev-
ery month to show myi support
to my community. Where else in
Miami can you go to hear good
music for free and enjoy fantas-
tic food? These Big Night events
are truly something that is good
for the community because of
how everyone is able td connect
with one another."


,p



Haitian girl walks through a Haitian tent city.















Relocation in the works






Thousands of Haitians living in one of the biggest tent
camps created after last year's earthquake could soon have
a new home, the mountains north of Port-au-Prince. City
officials plan to relocate the almost 20,000 people living
on the 42-acre Champs de Mars plaza across the street
from the crumbled National Palace if the central govern-
Sment approves, Port-au-Prince Mayor Jean Yves Jason said
recently.
Patrick Rouzier, a housing and reconstruction adviser
for the government, acknowledged the plan in a text mes-
sage:*+1#9aid Jason waritbto move-the~arrifies to 1Mone`
Cabrit, a mountain north of the capital, and house them in
tempodr~y shelters. The go\ er nrnent has reservation s about
the approach, Rouzier added, but he did not elaborate. He
said he was traveling with President Michel Martelly. Jason
cited an act of banditry in the public square as a reason for
officials wanting to clear away the camp, which has become
a shantytown complete with barber shops, boutiques and
restaurants and is a symbol of Haiti's post-quake misery.
"We are going to respond next week," Jason said.
Aboilt 20 students have been burning tires at the plaza
in recent days in a call for justice after a fellow student was
shot and wounded during a robbery for his laptop comput-
er. Jason said officials are figuring out a plan to compen-
sate the camp residents but didn't answer questions asking
how much they would get.
The planned closure comes as Haitian authorities havre
been criticized for not doing enough to provide housing
as they try to move the homeless out of public and private
spaces. Last week, about 60 to 80 demonstrators shut down
traffic on a busy thoroughfare to protest efforts to relocate
them from a private lot. They said the $125 stipend authori-
ties offered to families was insufficient to secure housing.



U.S. encourages


trRVel 10 Haiti

By Lawrence Peter

The U.S. State Department no longer urges American
citizens to avoid all travel to Haiti, but said citizens
should still carefully consider before traveling to the
island. The new travel warning issued last Monday
softens language from one released in January, when
the country was suffering election-related violence,
that strongly urged citizens to avoid all travel. The cur-
rent one cites crime, a renewed cholera outbreak and
an inadequate infrastructure as concerns.
The January 20 advisory noted that the number of
victims of violent crime, including murder and kidnap-
ping, continues to increase in Port-au-Prince. That lan-
guage w'as omitted from the new advisory. The earlier
warning also noted violent protests that surrounded
the November elections. References to the tire-burning,
rock-throwing demonstrations that gripped Port-au-
Prince have been dropped ~from the current advisory.
Port-au-Prince and the countryside have been relative-
ly quiet in recent months. The revised advisory comes
as Haiti's new president struggles to install a govern-
ment and take charge of rebuilding Haiti after last
year's earthquake.
President Michel Martelly has seen his first two
picks for prime minister rejected by lawmakers and he
hasn't yet picked a third nominee. The amended warn-
ing also takes into account a second surge in cholera,
which has killed more than 5,800 people and sickened
409,000 since an outbreak began in October, accord-
ing to the Health Ministry. The disease saw a second
spike in early summer as the rainy season began,
Health workers fear the waterborne disease could
spread again as the current hurricane season reaches
its peak. Haitian officials and business leaders have
long said the U.S. travel warnings are exaggerated and
unfairly discourage tourism and foreign investment.


Visual art continues to be a
leader in the cultural evolu-
tion of Miami. Local kids are
getting the opportunity to test
their talents through the Arts
for Learning program. The
program, held at the Little
Haiti Cultural Center, fosters
art skills in children.
"Wre concentrate on expos-
ing young people to portfo-
lio development skills," said
Christine Koenig, director of
community initiative for the
program. "We focus on draw-
ing, really being about to look
at value in line, shading, di-
mensions and perspective."
Through the program, chil-
dren are also exposed to dif-
ferent cultural art styles that
help to develop their talent.
"We use community cultural
resources to expose young
people to the Miami commu-
nity and the art community,"
Koeing said. "So we go to Viz-
caya Gardens and Museum,
we also go to the Bass Mu-
seum and we also go to some
of the local collections."
Koeing said the program
has a good turn out over the
summer.


support academic achieve-
rtent and child development.
All Art for Learning pro-
grams teach life and com-
munication skills, support
literacy and problem solving
skills, foster self-discovery,
and build self esteem. Their
comprehensive services
include teacher professional
development, multimedia
classroom resources, and
community arts instruction
and programming.


and seventh grade classes."
In order for a child to be
involved with the program,
there is an application pro-
cess. Students must summit
an application, a report card,
three drawing samples and a
teacher recommendation.
The group is one of Miami's
leading sources of arts-in-ed-
ucation services. They provide
quality arts-based programs
that connect the arts to other
core-curriculum subjects to


"This summer we had 26
young people," she said. "They
were divided between the
eighth grade class, because
they are the ones that will be
applying for magnet schools
and then we have the sixth


Elj~e Atiatni Iritnemr


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


Clks~r"G--~-. rl
I ~I;O~ 'L";11
L
-~


Art program aims for student success

Children learn art Student art

through culture ia from the Arts
f or Learning
By Randy Grice prga.e
rgrice @miam itimesonlin~e.com prga .rni~i





~a~s~p~a~


6C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUSLIST 17-23, 2011


Bu~cas blcst CONTROL. THEIR Oiv:N DESTINY


more information, visit www.jag-
uarwright.com or- www.thebohe-
miaroom.com.

I The Miami-Dade County
Health Department, Special
Immunizations Program will be
providing free Back-to-School im-
munizations to children between
the ages of two months through
18 years of age until August 31.
Parents need to bring their child's
immunization record and a pic-
ture ID. For more information and
location, call 786-845-0550.

SSummer BreakSpot, part
of the USDA Summer Food Nutri-
tion Program, will be open now
until August 2011 at hundreds of
sites across Miami-Dade County,
providing free nutritious meals -
breakfast, lunch and snack all
summer long for kids and teens,
18 and under. To find a Summer
BreakSpot site near you, visit
www.summerfoodflorida.org or
call 211.

The Miami-Dade Public Li-
brary System continues to cel-
ebrate its 40th anniversary with
a flashback to the books, movies
and music of the 1990s! This sum-
mer, the Library System kicked-
off its look back at the 1990s,
which will run through Septem-
ber. Special stories, classic board
games, crafts and more, as well
as '90s trivia contests, book clubs
and quilt making will be held
throughout the month of August.
All events are free and open to
the public. To find an event near
you, visit www.mdpls.org and
click on Calendar of Events or call
305-375-2665.

SThe Miami Jackson ('lass
of 1976' will celebrate their
35th Class Reunion on' Septemb-
berr 9-11. Activities will include:
Meet and greet at the Misty Lake
South Clubhouse, 625, NW 210th
Street; Picnic at Amelia Earhart
Park, 401 E. 65th Street, Pavil-
ion #8; Happy hour at Justin's
Bar and Lounge, 17813 Biscayne
Blvd.; Sunday morning worship
at ~El Bethel Pentecostal Church,
4792 NW 167th Street with lunch
immediately after at The Golden
Coiral in Pembroke Pines. T-shirts
are $10 and the fee for the com-
bined events are $20 per person.
For more information, ~call Keviin
Marshall at 305-319-8790 or Kar-
en at 786-267-4544.

SThe Beta~ Beta ,Lambda
Chapter---of Alpha' Phi Alpha
Fraternity, Inc., BBL- Educa-
tion Foundation KInights of
Gold Mentoring Program for
young males (grades' 8-12) will
be having its annual Informa-
tional Seminar/Parent Meeting
at Florida Memorial University,
15800 NW 42nd Avenue In Miami
Gardens in the FMU/FIU Audito-
riurm on Sunday, September 11
at 4 p.m. Interested student and
parents should contact ~kogpro-
grain~gmail.com to request an
application or to RSVP.

SEpsilon Alpha and Zeta Mu
Chapters of Alpha Pi Chi Na-
tional Sorority, Inc., of Miami
are completing a project of Red
Cross Readiness. The chapters
are collecting first-aid supplies
and emergency items for Emer-
gency Kits. These kits will be' dis-
tributed to the elderly community
of Miami for use during this hurri-
cane season. If you are- interested
in donating and contributing first-
aid supplies, call 305-992-3332
before September 17. If you'd like
more information about this orga-
nization, contact Lin~da Adderly at
addimh@aol~com.

SWomen Who 3am! is look-
ing for talented, groundbreaking
female singers, musicians an~d
entertainers to perform at the
'"Saveinthe Tivinz" Bme tc Csahno

Awareness Month. The deadline
of submission is September 19.
For more information, call` 901-
236-8439 or visit www.women-
whojam.com. The music show-
case will be held on October 1 at
7 pi.m. at the Broward Center for
the P rfo mingaA esrd el kW5th

are $30. To purchase tickets, visit
wwvw.browardeenter.org or call
954-462-0222.

M Mams~ Northwestern Class
of 1972 Scholarship Fundraiser
Bus Trip to Atlanta, GA for FAMU
Classic on September 23-25. For
additional information, contact
Clarateen Kirkland-Kent at 305-
323-5551 or Glenda Tyse at 954-
987-0689.

1) Women First Body Care
and Mama Senna Essence, a
natural beauty company based in
Dallas, Texas will present its first
South Florida "Saturday Pamper


Me Workshop" on Saturday, Sep-
tember 24 from 9:30 a.m.-12:30
p.m. at the African Heritage Cul-
tural Arts Center, 6161 NW 22nd
Ave. The workshop, including all
materials cost $40 and registra-
tion and payments can be made
for the workshop by visiting www.
wom anfi rstbod ycare. co m/a hca c-


aromatherapy-workshop.htmi.
For more information, call 817-
770-2029 or visit www.woman-
firstbodycare.com.

I Rainbow Ladies and Beta
Phi Omega Sorority are spon-
soring a Health Expo for lesbians,
bisexual and transgendered (LBT)
women of color on Saturday, Sep-
tember 24 at the Pride Center in
Wilton Manors. Free screenings
and health promotion education
will be provided by several local
agencies' and organizations. Ev-
eryone is invited. There will be
food, entertainment and raffles.
For more~ information, call 305-
772-4712, 305-892-0928 or visit
www.rainbowladiesourspaceinc.
org.

II Wingspan Seminars will
celebrate its 5th Anniversary and
presentation of the Pea'Ce Awards
celebrating women on Friday,
September 30 from 3-6 p.m. We
will also launch Wings on Women
(WOW). The theme is "She's Go-
ing Somewhere" For more infor-
mation, contact 305-253-2325 or
info@wingspanseminars.com .

$ The Habitat for Human-
ity of Greater Miami will be-
gin holding its second Saturday
of the month homeownership
application meetings at New
Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist
Church, 6700 NW 14th Avenue
on Saturday, October 8 at 9:30
a.m. There is no RSVP necessary
for the meetings and no applica-
tion deadline. For more informa-
tion, contact McKenzie Moore,
community outreach coordina-
tor, at 305-634-3628 or email
mckenzie.moore~miamihabitat.
org.

M The Inaugural .North-
east Florida Blue and White
Scholarship Golf Invitational
will be held on Saturday, Octo-
ber 15 at the Magnolla Point Golf
and Country Club in Green Cove
Springs, FL. Proceeds will go to-
wvards college 'scholarships for
Jacksonville-area students and
assist our organizations' commu-
nity service programs. For more
information, visit www.enefblue-
andwhitegolf.com.

SGreat Crowd Ministries
presents South Florida BB-Q/
Gospel Festival at Ame'lia Ear-
hart Park on Saturday, October
29 from 11 a.m-5:30 p.m, The
park fee is $6 per car. All artists


and vendors are encouraged to
call. For more information, con-
tact Constance K~oon-3ohnson at
786-290-3258.

II Coming this fall, a charter
bus leaving the Miami area go-
ing to FAMU campus for the stu-
dents. For more information, call
Phillip at 786-873-9498.

IICalling healthy ladies 50+ to
start a softball team for fun and
laughs. Be apart of this historical
adventure. Twventy-four start-up
players needed. For more Infor-
mation, call 3ean at 305-688-
~3322 or Coach Rozier at 305-
389-0288.

SKnoxville College, a
136-year-old Historic Black Col-
lege, is kicking off a three-year,
ten million dollar campaign to
revitalize the College under the
leadership of its new President
Dr. Horace 3udson. All alumni
and the public are asked to do-
nate to this campaign. To secure
donor. for-ms, g'o to www.knox-
villecollege.edu and scroll down
to K.C. Building Fund. Click on it
for the form or call Charlie Wil-
liams, 3lr., president of the local
alumni chapter at 305-915-7175
for more details.

I The Miami Northwestern
SClass of 1962 meets on the
second Saturday of each month
at 4 p.m. at the African Heri-
tage Cultural Arts Center, 6161
NW 22nd Avenue. We are begin-
ning to make plans for our 50th
Reunion. For more information,
contact Evelyn at 305-621-8431.

I Family and Children Faith
Coalition' is seeking youth ages
four-18 to connect with a caring
and dedicated mentor in Miami-
Dade or Broward County. Get
help with homework, attend fun
events and be a role knodel for
your community. For more infor-
rnation, contact Brandyss Hloward
at 786-388-3000 or brandyss@
fcfcfl.org.

.$ Work from home and earn
money. The CLICK Charity,
5530 NW 17th Avenue, is offering
free computer web design classes
for middle and high school stu-
dents.. Work at your own pace
and receive one-on-one instruc-
tion in learning a very valuable
trade. Registration and. classes
are free! Open Monday-Friday,
2-7 p.m. Don't wait call, email or


come by today: 305-691-8588 or
a nd re@th edickcha rity. com.

SThere will be a free first-
time homebuyer education class
held every second Saturday of
the month, at Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church, 21311 NW 34th
Avenue, from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
For more information, call 305-
652-7616 or email fgonzalez@
erechelp.org.

I)Free child care is available at
the Miami-Dade County Com-
munity Action Agency Head-
start/Early Head Start Pro-
gram for children ages three-five
for the upcoming school year. In-
come guidelines and Dade Coun-
ty residence apply only. We wel-
come children with special needs/
disability with an MDCPS IEP. For
more information, call 786-469-
4622, Monday-Friday from 8
a.m.-5 p.m.

I Looking for all former Mon-
tanari employees to get reac-
quainted. Meetings will be held
at Piccaddlly's (West 49th Street)
in Hialeah, on the last Saturday
of each month at 9 a~m. We look
forward to seeing each and every
one of you. For more information,
contact Loletta Forbes, at 786-
593-9687 or Elijah Lewis at 305-
469-7735.

Il The Cdmetery Beautifica-
tions Project, located at 3001
NW 46th Street is looking for vol-
unteers and donations towards
the upkeep and beautification of
the Lincoln Park Cemetery. For
more information, contact Dyrren
S. Barber at 786-290-7357.

Il Xcel Family Enrichment
Center,. Inc. will be celebrating
it's 2nd Annual Black Mlar~iage
Day Walk on March 24, 2012, Xcel
operates as a privately-owned
501(C)(3) not-for-profit com-
munity based organization that
provides social services to low/.
moderate income families. Its
main focus is to strengthen mar-
riage and families from a holistic
approach. Xcel is seeking dona-
tions for this event in the form of
monetary, talent, marriage counl-
selors (as a speaker), D3, etc.
Xcel is registered with the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services Solicitation of
Contributions Divislon. Your do-
nation is tax deductible. For more
information, call Ms. Gilbert at
186-267-4544.


SMiami-Dade County and
the Florida Division of Emer-
gency Management are part-
nering to help flood prone prop-
erty owners find relief. To learn
more about the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency's
(FEMA) grant assistance pro-
grams, there will be a workshop
held on Wednesday, August 17
from 6-8 p.m. at the Miami-Dade
Fire Rescue Auditorium, 9300 NW
41st Street in Doral. For more in-
formation, go to www.fema~gov/
business/nfip/.

SThe Miami-Dade Cham-
bjer of Commerce presents Mis-
sion Possible: Cracking the Code:
Business& Technology, a Business
Empowerment Network Series 2.0
on Wednesday, August 18 from 9
a.m.-1:30 p.m. at 3ungle Island's
Treetop Ballroom, 1111Parrot
Jungle Trail. The networking se-
ries is open to the public, $20 for
chamber members and $30 for
non-members. Attendants are re-
quired to bring a laptop with them
for interactive portions of the
event. For more information, call
The Chamber at 305-751-8648 or
visit www.m-dec.org.

SThe Miami-Dade County
Office of Community Advocacy
joins efforts with the Florida De-
partment of Highway Safety and
Motor Vehicles (DMV) to bring
residents "DMV to Go." It will offer
residents a location in Downtown
Miami with DMV services, such
as license renewals and identi-
fication cards. It will be held on
Thursday, August 18 from 9:30
a.m.-2:30 p.m. at the Stephen
P. Clark Center, Main Lobby 111
NW 1st Street. Future "DMV to
Go" events will be scheduled for
the 3rd Thursday of every month.
For more information, contact the
Office of Community Advocacy at
305-375-5730.

II loin the Ameriican Red
Cross South Florida Region for
a hurricane preparedness event
on Thursday, August 18 from
6-7 p.m. at Calder Casino & Race
Course. It will be held in the Win-
ner's Edge Room, Grandstand
Building, 2nd Floor, .21001 NW
27th Avenue in Miami Gardens,
Free self-parking on the South
Zraridstand L`iot. For Wlffi'eg infor-
mation, call 305-625-1311.

II Miami-Dade County Mayor
Carlos A. Gimenez is hosting a
series of Budget Town Hall Meet-
ings, where residents will be able
to asj< about the proposed Fiscal
Year 2011-2012 County budget.
It will be held on Thursday, Au-
gus't 18 at Coral Gables Country
Club, 998 North Greenway Drive
from 7-8 p.m. For more informa-
tion, visit www.miami-dade.gov/
budget.

SCHARLEE Homes for Chil-
dren ensures that children who
have been abused, abandoned or
neglected and are in foster care
are prepared to begin the school
year with the school supplies they
need. Donations can be dropped
off at any BankAtlantic branch
in Miami-Dade County or at the
CHAPLEE office until August 19th.
The CHARLEE office is located at
155 S. Miami Avenue, Suite 700.
Contact Hans Grunwaldt at 305-
779-9697 or hans.grunwaldt@
charlee.org for further informa-
tlon or to coordinate the drop off
of your donation. Donations are
fully tax deductible.

SThe City of Miami Gardens
will host a Lien Amnesty Blowout
event at City Hall, 1515 NW 167th

re sd on Sa ra20 Agus a
and Saturday, August 27 from 9
a.m.-2 p.m. This will be an oppor-
tunity for property owners with
liens on their property to satisfy
all liens for just $500.00 per lien
with all application fees waived.
For more information or to sched-
ueda Carp cimet is ntac t3
622-8000 ext. 2610 or ext. 2614
or contact Maggie Castor by email
at mcastor@miamigardens-fl.gov.

I The African-American Re-
search Library and Cultural
Center will be hosting free em-
powerment workshops on Satur-
day, August 20 from 11 a.m.-4:30
p.m. (pre-register by August 12
for "Starting your own nonprofit")
and Saturday, September 3 from
11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (pre-register
by August 26 for "Grant Writing").
For rnore information and/or to
register for these workshops,
contact Norman Powell at 954-
624-5213 or email posimo@aol.
com.

SThe Booker 't. Washington
Class of 1965, Inc.'s Class Mem-
ber's Picnic will be held on Satur-
day, August 20 at Amelia Earhart


Park. Class members are asked to
contact 305-625-6720 to advise
your food contributions.


II Congresswoman Frederi-
ca S. Wilson in partnership with
Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado and
Commissioner Richard P. Dunn
II is hosting a town hall meet-
ing discussing the Congressional
Black Caucus for the People 3obs
Initiative H. Res. 348 on Monday,
August 22 at 6 p.m. at Mt. Her-
mon AME Church, 17800 NW 25th
Avenue in Miami Gardens. For ad-
ditional information, visit www.
wilson.house.gov or call 305-690-
5905.

SCongresswoman Fred-
erica S. Wilson will host a job
fair on Tuesday, August 23 from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the 3ames L.
Knight Center, 400 SE 2nd Avenue
in Downtown Miami. Registration
begins at 8 a.m. For additional
information, visit www.wilson.
house.gov or call 305-690-5905.

SThere will be a meeting to
discuss the fate of the Memorial
Day Urban Weekend on August
24 at 5:30 p.m. at the Lowes
Hotel, 1601 Collins Avenue. For
more information, emall lih'da-
simmons43@~yahoo.com, African
American Foundation of Greater
Miami '

SThe Office of the State
Attorney is hosting a 'Second
Chance' Sealing and Expunge-
ment Program on Thursday, Au-
gust 25 from 4-7 p.m.. at the
Miami Beach Convention Center,
1901 Convention Center Drive,
Hall D. To avoid waiting a long pe-
riod of time in line you could pre-
register at www.miamisao.com
or fax a clear copy of your valid
picture ID and phone number to
305-547-0723, Attention: Kath-
erine Fernandez Rundle, State
Attorney. For more info, call. 305-
.547-0724.

SMilpmi-Dade County Park
and Recreation Department
and Miami-Dade County Com-
mission for Womnen celebrate
Women's Equality Day on Friday,
August 26 from 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
held at'the Roxcy O'Neal Bolton
Women's History Gallery at the
Women's Park, 10251 West Fla-
gler Street. For more information,
call 305-480-1717.

~'l'Top Ladies" of Distinc-
tion, Inc. are anxiously prepar-
ing for their first Annual Retreat
at the Doubletree Hotel & Resort
on August 26th-28th. This is a
time for planning the activlities
for the 2011-2012 year. There
will be business workshops, sis-
terhood breakout sessions and
many .fun-filled activities. We
are actively reclaiming an inac-
tive 'Top Lady Each One! Reach
One.' The weekend will culminate
with worship services at Mt. Tabor
Baptist Church (10:30 a.m.) with
our newly-elected President Lady
Crystal Pittman. Let's make this a
pretty in pink weekend! For more
information, call Lady Cleora
Brooks at 305-635-0504 or Lady
Daisy Williams at 305-651-8487.

SChai Community Services,
Inc. in collaboration with A-Be~tta
Bail Bonds, Inc. will host its an-
nual CCS Careei Expo (3ob Fair)
on Saturday, August 27 from 10
a.m.-6 p.m. at the DoubleTr~ee
Hotel & Exhibition Hall, 711 NW
72nd Ave. For more information,
call 786-273-0294.

SThe Miami Jackson Class
of 1976 twilat me o tShaBr a

mian Connection Restaurant Grill,
4490 NW 2nd Avenue. Please be
on time! For more information,

cntc eovi ato3 5-31 -8a9 On
Karen at 786-267-4544.

I Playing the Game of Life
(PGL), a turn-liey program for
teaching social skills through an
arts-based curriculum, invites
the community to a free back to
schooloevent fo nchikiren four- 2

frorn 11 a.m.-l` p.m. at the PGL
Enrichment Center, 7144 Byron
Avenue in Miami Beach. For more
information, call 305-864-5237 or
email info@ecqc.biz.

SP.H.I.R.S.T. Impressionz,
a dinner poetry event returns at
Oasis Cafe, 12905 NE 8th Avenue
in North Miami. It will be held on
Sunday, August 28, September
25, October 30, November 27 and
December 18 at 7 p.m. Admission
is $10, which includes perfor-
mance, dinner and drink. Anyone
interested in participating needs
to contact at least one week in
advance. For more information
call, 786-273-5115.

SThe Bohemia Room pres-
ents The Acoustics featuring Philly
Soul Diva and Indie Soul icon 3ag-
uar Wright on Wednesday, August


31. The doors open at 8 p.m. The
event will be held at V Midtown
Lounge, 3215 NE 2nd Avenue. For


WVe wrill be fSEPdiscusin and~ answering

ifaur questions oW following topics:


np Parental/COMMUnity InvOlVOmORI

r&S Student Safety

r IMinority, Women and Small Business

Opportunities


Pl8888 COntact 305-885-2311 for mtore bifiorlaloII./B























SECT ON D MIAMi, F'.0;L B UG;UST17 1


d PI~


By Daniel Wagner
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -- The num-
ber of people seeking unem-
ployment benefits fell last
week below 400,000 for the
first time in four months, a
sign that the job market is im-
proving slowly after a recent
slump.
Applications for unemploy-
ment aid dropped by 7,000
to a seasonally adjusted
395,000, the Labor Depart-
ment said recently. Applica-
tions had been above 400,000
for the previous 17 weeks.
The four-week average, a
less-volatile figure, fell to
405,000, its sixth straight
decline. That suggests appli-
cations are decreasing over
time. .
Applications fell in Febru-
ary to 375,000, a level that
reflects healthy job growth.
They soared to an eight-
month high of 478,000 in late
April, and have declined slow-
ly since then.
The economy added 117,000
net jobs in July, the govern-
ment said last week. That was
an improvement fr-om the pre-
vious two months. But it's far
below the average of 215,000
jobs per month that compa-


IT
. .:






A job seeker walks the floor at a large career fair at Rut-
gers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.


nies created from February
through April. .
Many employers pulled back
on hiring after signs emerged
that the economy had weak-
ened from last year. High gas
prices and scant wage gains
left consumers with less mon-
ey to spend on discretionary
purchases, such as applianc-
es, furniture and electron-
ics. Supply chain disruptions
caused by the Japan crisis
also dampened U.S. factory
production,
The economy expanded at
an annual rate of just 0.8 per-


cent in the first six months of
the year, the slowest growth
in the two years since the re-
cession officially ended.
It's not likely to get much
better in the second half of
the year. The Federal Reserve
said it expects growth will
stay weak for two more years.
The Fed also acknowledged
that the economy's problems
go beyond temporary factors,
such as high gas prices.
As a result, the Fed said it
would likely keep the short-
term interest rate near zero at
least through mid-2013.


I UUI EN S S

,BHI to aid entrepreneurs

BV Randy Grice


Graylyn Swilley Becoming an entrepreneur may sound exciting but it takes
WOODS .real planning, focus and determination to get a new busi-
8HI executive C ness off the ground, especially in toda) s tough econom!.
director LThat s w'hy organizations like the Black Hospitality Initiative
of' Greater M iaml (BHI) are so important to fledgling Black
businessmen and women.
"Helping Black businesses is important be-
cause they contribute to the economic fab-
sr rlc of this community," said Graylyn Swil-
ley, BHI executive director.
-'"- rqpThe group operates on three key prin-
ciples that are collectively aimed at help-
ing Black entrepreneurs: advocacy,
talent development and career connec-
tion. They recently sponsored a Hospi-
tality Student Leadership Summit that was held to help Black businesses obtain certification in
in conjunction with 15th Arinual International industry-related fields."
African American Hotel Owners & Investment Franklyn Perry, a recent graduate frorn FIU
Summit & Trade Show in Doral. said he gained a lot by attending the surrimit.
The conference hosted approximately 70 stu- "I met some real, shakers and movers," Petry
dents and more the 200 business professionals, said. "The program was very beneficial to me, es-
placing the youth and entrepreneurs together so pecially being that I am Black. We need things
that the former could network with those who like this to help us because no one will give you
have achieved success at the local, national or anything."
international levels. According to their mission statement, the BHI,
"Black business can seek help from us by ac- formally known as the Visitor Industry Human
cessing resources through our network meetings Resource Development Council (VIC), was estab-
and through our industry and educational part- lished in 1991 by the Greater Miami Convention
riers," Swilley said. "We have access to informa- & Visitors Bureau (GMCVB) to advance econom-
tion about market trend analysis that can as- ic participation and open doors of opportunity
.sist people with their business needs. We also for African Americans and Blacks of African de-
have educational and training resource referrals scent in the Greater Miami Visitor Industry.

r+~

Wal-Mlart to accept more kmnds of checks


Offers.com. You'll find ready-
made lists for grade school,
high school and college cat-
egorized into school supplies,
backpacks and accessories,
clothing and shoes,
Also, a great budgeting tool
and a way to avoid debt is the
layaway option. It's a monthly
payment Jilan for purchases,
but you don't pay interest be-
cause you don't receive your
item until it's paid for in full.
Check if your local retailers
offer layaway.
For online shopping, you
can make purchases using
layaway on eLayaway.com
and Lay-Away.com. This is a
great way to take advantage
of back-to-school sales on
things your child won't need
for months (like fall and win-
ter clothing), while still tak-
ing advantage of today's sale
prices.


By Mellody Hobson

Do you have any tips for
Anding 'the best back-to.
school deals?
The beginning of a new
school year is exciting for
kids, but for parents, it means
a lot of shopping, organiz-
ing and stress. Last year,
the average American family
with two children spent ap-
proximately $550 on back-to-
school gear. However, there
are a number of resources
available to help make life a
little easier during the annual
ritual of back-to-school shop-
ping.
Offers.com features all the
best coupons and deals from
top retailers. This year, the
web site introduced a Back-
to-School Savings Center to
make it easier when shopping
for school supplies and cloth-


ing. The coupons, coupon
codes and promotions on the
web site are verified by the
editorial team. to ensure qual-
ity.
You can also find good
back-to-school deals on The-
NewFrugalMom.com. where
you'll find weekly ~specials -
like where to buy two-pocket
folders for two cents each, a
box of Crayola crayons for $1,
a 10-pack of pencils for 19
cents and many other school
supply bargains.
What's the best way to
stay on budget?
I always say, whether you're
shopping for school supplies,
groceries or other staples,
don't leave your house without
making a list! Many schools
will provide a list of necessary
school supplies. If your school
does not, check the Back-to-
School 2011 checklists on


By Reuters


cashes payroll, government
and tax refund checks for cus-
tomers, will now also accept
student loan, insurance and
pension checks up to $5,000,
among other kinds of checks.
Wal-Mart does not cash per-
sonal checks.
Customers will be also able
to cash payroll cards and some
government benefit cards at
Wal-Mart's stores.


Wal-Mart, the world's largest
retailer, will also accept addi-
tional forms of identification,
including U.S. passports.
Wal-Mart cashes checks and
cards up to $1,000 for a $3 fee,
and up to $5,000 for $6.
Walmart Financial Services
head Daniel Eckert said in a
statement that "it's important
that they're (shoppers) able to
gain access to all their cash."


NEW YORK -- Wal-Mart
Stores Inc. said recently that
its check and card cashing ser-
vice would accept more types of
checks and take more forms of
identification from shoppers in
a move aimed at getting them
to spend more at the discount
chain's stores.
Wal-Mart, which already


By Jeams Clingman

"When you look at this final agree-
ment that we came to with the White
House, I got 98 percent of what I
wanted. I'm pretty happy," said John
Boehner, Speaker of the House.
If Boehner got 98 percent of what
he wanted from the debt ceiling deal,
what did the other side get? I haven't
heard the opposing side give its per-
centage yet. Of course, there was


Representative Emmanuel Cleaver,
who said the deal was a "Satan Sand-
wich." The quandary here is that if
98 percent of the deal was pleasing to
the Repubs, does that leave two per-
cent for the Dems? And if that's not
true, and the Dems say they got 98
percent of what they wanted, or even
50 percent, it means that both parties
wanted pretty much the same thing.
You can't have more than 100 percent
of anything.


I wonder how this debt
ceiling deal makes most
Black people feel. Are you
fired-up mad about it or do
you think it was pretty good?
Considering the latest sta-
tistics on the net worth gap
between Blacks and whites,
overall, we should under-
stand that we are in deeper
trouble than we were before
the deal. But, many of us


were asleep about 10 years
ago when the net worth gap
was reported to be about
10 to 1 in favor of White
households. Now that it's
20 to 1, with Black house-
holds having a median net
worth of $5,766.00, and
35 percent of our families
having a zero or negative
net worth, we are all riled
up.


Top off that news with the latest
debt ceiling deal and the highest un-
employment rate in the nation and
what we have is a real serious prob-
lem folks. But you already knew that
I'm sure. We will now see cuts in fed-
erally subsidized student loans, Head
Start, and food stamps, in addition to
the loss of more than 300,000 jobs.
Black folks won't be left out of that
equation.
Please turn to C=LINGMAN 10D


r,:
/i
.Ti"
c.

" r'
C, i`
~-


Uh ~irl nO~rtSS


f~BR~- :
~~ ~ -
if~ :::
:~u Si 1~5' ':sB1.
k~ ?' ;''
lo
1:
,I


I(:

.~:.
..,.r


II RHHS F~ OlS ~




.. sa at a four-month low


r-- b


.. ?


-Photo Credit: Graylyn Swilley
Black Hospitality Initiative at GMCVB Business Networking Mixer at the Crescendo JaZZ
and Blues Lounge. L-R: Jacqueline Abraham, volunteer staff; Petra Brennan, program
coordinator and Graylyn Swilley-Woods, executive director. -


~a~vU~~ ~nr~
i


Fmndmg good back-to-school deals


Black people continue to lose when it comes to debt ceiling


CLINGMAN

















'C! Arcola Lakes Park -. Senior Center and Pool
Contract Nlo. 311106-05-003 GOB ESP

4 J Miami-Dade County, hereinafter known as MADC, will receive bids for the Arcola Lakes Park Senior Center and Pool, Contract No.
..J 311106-05-003 GOB ESP. The project will be located in Miami-Dade County, State of Florida.
This project includes goals for th~e particioation of Community Small Business Enterprises based on a perceptage of the total contract
amount, as noted below and in the Bid Form, in accordance with the Project Manual. Goals for Community Small Business Enterprises
must be fulfilled usina construction contractorisubcontractor trades to comoly with goals reauirements oursuaant to this solicitation.
P ~ "- I he onracor ustacm t abde y te oovsions of the Project Manual regardin minimum participation goals, proposed below as a


Community Small Business Enterprise parfeipiation: 20.00%
Locally funded projects of $100,000 and above are also subject to the Equal Employment Opportunity requirements and Section 2-11.16
Sof the Code of Metropolitan Dade County (Responsible Wages).
Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code, as amended, a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon each RFP, RFQ
or bid after advertisement and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a written recommendation to the Board of County
Commissioners. THE CONE OF SILENCE PROHIBITS ANY COMMIUNICATION REGARDING RFPS, RFQS OR BIDS BETWEEN,
AMONG OTHERS:
potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants and the County's professional staff including, but not limited
to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff, the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs;
the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and the Counity's professional staff including, but not limited to, the
County Manager and the County Manager's staff;
potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants, any member of the County's professional staff, the Mayor,
County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member of the respective selection committee.
The provisions do not apply to, among other communications:
oral communications with the staff of the Vendor Information Center, the responsible Procurement Agent or Contracting Officer,
provided the communication is limited strictly to matters of process or procedure already contained in the solicitation document;
the provisions of the Cone of Silence do not apply to oral communications at pre-proposal or pre-bid conferences, oral presentations
before selection committees, contract negotiations during any duly noticed public meeting, public presentations made to the Board
of County Commissioners during any duly noticed public meeting; or
communications in writing at any time with any courity employee, official or member of the Board of County Commissioners unless
specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ or bid documents.
All Requests for Information (RFI) regarding this project shall be submitted in writing to JGX @qmiamidade.gov and a copy filed
with the Clerk of the Board at clerkbec~imiamidade.qo~v. The RFi may also be faxed to the attention of John Gutlerrez at (305)
961-2786 and copy the Clerk of the Board at (305) 375-2484. Only RFl's sent via email in MS Word format will show the entire question
and' answer on the Addendums issued. AII other RFl's will only show MDPR's response to the question. No verbal RFf's regarding
the project, via phone or In person, shall be permitted. MDC shall consider RFls received prior to the RFI submittal deadline. The RFI
submittal deadline is fourteen (14) calendar days prior to the Bid Opening Date. All responses to RFls are compiled then issued via an
Addendum to all the potential bidders / proposers that appear on the Bidder's List. This Biddler's List contains the contact information for
the bidder I proposer that obtained a bid package directly from MDC. A copy of the Bidder's List is sent via email or fax on Fridays at 4:00
PM to anyone that submits a written request for it.
In addition to any other penalhes provided by lawl, violation of the Cone of Silence by any proposer or bidder~shall render an~y RFP award,
RFQ award or bid award voidable. Any person having Mirsonal knowledge of a violation of these provisions shall report such violation to
the State Attomney andjlor may file a complaint with Ethics Commission. Proposers or bidders should reference Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code for further clarification,
This language is only a summary of the key provisions of the Cone of Silence. Please review Miami-Dade County Admninistrative Order
3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.
Miami-Dade County will receive bids for the construction of a one-story Senior Center Building which includes: lobby/reception area,
banquetlmeeting room, event services & delivery room, entertainment room, arts & crafts room, ceramics room, exercise room, restrooms,
locker rooms, staff offices, equipment room, and storage. Also includes: outdoor-therapeutic aquatic pool, and heated whirl pool, pool
deck space, pedestria i circulation, covered car drop-off area, parking lot and landscaping. The engineer's cost estimate for the base
bid is $54.786.161.72.
Included in the bid shall be tthe furnishing of all materials. Iabor, services, supervision, tools and equipment required or incidental to this
project. All work shall be performed as per the Contract Documents. Miami-Dade County, at its sole discretion may elect to negotiate with
the apparent low bidder,.if only one bidder bids.
The Counjei +lgty resvestergttwaiv anyinfrmalities oriregularities i any bid, or eject any o albids if deemedei~edners to bee in th bes

Apart of this Contract, the County may, at its sole discretion, issue miscellaneous changes covering all construction disciplines. The
"C~itnliti til E'tpable of expeditlbsly performiltf1hitf IdtPjh work either with IrS own foftes Of with subU)codtdcos Thh direct
and indlrect cost of these changes and hime extensions, if an will be negotiated at the time the changes are Issued and payment WII be
made in accordance wrilli Artcle 36 of tffe'GeneralBr~:~if~.ifon As the nature or extent of these changes can not be Ascertainetf)'por to
notice-to-proceedl the Contractor shall not include an amount in his bid in anticipation qf these changes.
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED IN: As required by Chapter 10 of the Miami-11ade County.
Other Certificates of Competency, if required, shall be provided by subcontractors prior to beginning of work.
Bid Documents will be available on or about Attoust 17, 2011. A list of bidders may also be obtained by mailing your request to
Eddlecsmiamidade.glov. MUDC has scheduled a Pre-Bid Conference at 10:00 AM. local time on August 25. 2011 at the Hickman Bldg.,
275 N. W. 2nd Street, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Miami, Florida 33128. The Pre-Bid Conference is being held to answer any questions
rfegarding th~is project.
MDC will receive SEAED 81ils at the Office of the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, at the Stephen P. Clark Center,
111 N. W. First Street, Suite 17202, Miami; Florida 33128 until 2:00 p.m. local time on Seotember 21. 2011. Bids received after that time
will not be accepted, nor will qualified; segregated andlor incomplete Bids be accepted. Bids may not be revoked nor withdrawn for 180
days after the bid opening date. The Contract, if awarded, will be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. Interested
parties are invited to attend.
All bids shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board in one (1) sealed envelope in the following manner:
AII bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope containing the required bid documents. On the outside of the envelope place the name
of the bidder, its address, the name of the contract for which the bid is submitted, the contract number and the date for opening of bids.
The Bid Security specified in Article 7 of the Instruction to Bidders shall be enclosed with the bid. Failure to include the Bid Security shall

hne dpni of bisnii se i s follows:
All SBD Form 400 Schedule of intent shall be forwarded to SBD on the bid opening date. If the SBD form 400 has correctable defectss,
the bidder will be given a checklist indicating the correctable defectss. The bidder must submit the corrected SBD form 400 to SBD
and the Clerk of The Board within forty-eight (48) hours of the bid opening date. If the bidder's SBD form 400 contains non-correctable
defectss, SBD will immediately inform the bidder that the submittal is not responsive and not approved.
Documents will be available electronically via E-mail in zip file format at:
The Park's Store htto://parkstorelmidamdeade~Lov/or go to: www.miamidade.oov/parks, then look for "Park Store" under the "Fun at
oParn ae o 2 c.aks" tab which can be located on top of the page. Bid documents can be sold at anytime from the 1st day of advertisement to the bid
Bid Security must accompany each bid and must be in an amount of not less than five percent of the highest Total Bid Price. MDC
reserves the right to waive irregularities, to reject bids and/or to extend the bidding period.
Each Contractor, and his subcontractors performing work at the Work site, will be required to pay Florida sales and use taxes and to pay
for licenses and fees required by the municipalities in which the Work will be located. Eacti Contractor will be required to furnish a Surety
Performance and Payment Bond in accordance with Article 1.03, Contract Security, of the Supplemental General Conditions and furnish
Certificates of Insurance in the amounts specified in the Contract Documents.
The Contractor is hereby advised of Resolution No R-1145-99, Clearinghouse for Posting Notices of Job Opportunities Resulting from
Construction Improvements on County Property. The procedures direct the Contractor to forward a notice of job vacancy(ies) created as
a result of this construction work to the director of the Employee Relations Department, located at Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW Ist
Street, suite 2110, Miami, Florida 33128. The job vacancy notices should be delivered within ten (10) working days following award of the
contractor. The Director of the Employee Relations Department will in turn distribute said job announcements to all Miami Dade County
facilities participating in the notification requirements of Resolution No. R-1145-99.
Any firm proposed for use as a CSBE on this contract, must have a valid certification from the Miami-Dade County Department of
Business Development (SBD), at the time of bid. It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to provide equal employment opportunity.
Those responding to this RFP/IT8/RFQ shall comply with the provisions of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and 49 U.S.C.
Section 1612 and other related laws and regulations.
Call (305) 755-7848, to request material in accessible format, information on access for persons with disabilities, or sign language
interpreter services (7 d ysin advance), 305-755-7980 (tdd).
SPANISH TRANSLATION:
Liamar al (305) 755-7848, para oblener informacion acerca del acceso para Leisure Access Services personas minusvalidas y para
obtener materials en formato accessible. Los interesados en el servicio de interpretes para el idioma de los sordomudos deben Ilamar
con siete dias de antelacion, 305-755-7980 (Servicio telefonico para sordos).
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI-DADE PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT
Harvey Ruvin, Clerk
Christopher Agrippa, Deputy Clerk


Miami-Dade County will hold a pubnc meeting in your area to discuss proposed adjustments to taxes
andlor'ees On each of the dates and locations listed below, the Office of Management and Budget
will make a presentation to discuss the FY 2011-12 Proposed Budget.


I


Mia~m~!~~i Arl~ts uemCrl Gpables outrCub


12 months, and com-
panies such as Star-
bucks Corp., Kraft
and J.M. Smucker Co.
already have raised
coffee prices this year.
But the coinpames
are taking a cautious
stance on hoir con-
sumers will respond
to higher prices.' Food
executives have found
it easier to raise pric~
es on items geared
toward high-end con-
sumers, who are less
price-sensitive than
lower-income shop-
pers.
Instead of rais
ing prices on Frost-
ed Flakes and oth-
er price-sensitive
brands, Kellogg is of-
fering smaller sizes
to avoid scaring off
shoppers.
"If you go over $4 a
box, you're going to
lose a lot more con-


L__


I


, a~Rvw~ac-~~i~l;ix


Doral Middle School
5005 NW 112 Avenue
Miami, FL
AII of these sessions are free and open to the public. For further information, please call
Anita Gibboney at 305-375-5414. For sign language interpreter services and for materials in
accessible format, call 305-375-5143 five days in advance of the meeting you plan to attend,


LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT
' REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR
BUILDING CODE CONSULTANTS ,


The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida (Board), intends to commission one or more firms or joint
ventures having full architectural and engineering services available within the entity, or with consultants,
to perform Building Code Consultant review and inspection services. These firms will be contracted for a
period of four (4) years with extension years at the option of the Board.

MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 at 9:30 a.m., local time,
at 1498 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida.

RESPONSES DUE: RFQ responses must be received no later than 4:00 p.m., local time, Wednes-
day, September 14, 2011 at:
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Department of A/E Selection & Negotiations
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, Executive Director
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132

REQUIRIEMENTS: This is an abbreviated ad; the complete legal ad with instructions for this solicitation
including Board-approved selection procedures and required U.S. General Services Administration modi-
fied SF330 form is available at the above address or at: http://ae-s~alicitations.dadeschoole.net.

In accordance with Board policies; a Cone of Silence, lobbyist requirements and protest procedures
are hereby activated. Failure to comply with requirements of this legal ad and Board policies shall be
grounds for disqualification. These, and all related, Board Policies can be accessed and downloaded at:
http://www.neola.com/miamidade-fil.


I '



1111!


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST17-25, 2011


BI.C);S X1CS cONTROL. THEIR OW'N DESTINY


e gatnecreD of the tota :


memm wom.ar ww-m;mus-n ar-om a r mul mumm a
A customer pushes a shopping cart past a display at a Safeway store in California in June.



Hige fOo pric o a


The rising cost of commodities this year

could hit store shelves in 2012


By Leslie Josephs
and Paul Ziobiro


the U.S. Department
of Agriculture said
grocery-store prices


this year is corn. Fu-
tures prices in Chica-
go have pulledl back


NEW YORK -- will likely rise three from their record
American consum- percent to four per- high but are still up
ers can expect bigger cent in 2012, on par seven percent since
grocery bills in 2012, with this year, even the start of the year.
even as commodity though ingredient High demand, par-
prices are forecast to costs may fall. ticularly from China,
fall. The biggest increas- is expected to support
The U.S. is expected es would, likely be in prices.
to churn out more sta- the first half of next The severe heat
ples like corn, wheat year, but prices would wave in the Ame rican
and soy, which would most likely ease later Midwest this summer
drive, comnmodityi in 2012, said USDA could hurt corn yields
prices lower in 2012. economist Richard in the fall, which
However, it takes Volpe. would further boost
several months for a "We're seeing that prices.
commodity such as retailers -really have Other commodii-
corn to make its way no choice but to start ties used widely by
down the production increasing prices in food companies have
line and into a box of order to restore their also skyrocketed, as
cereal, so consumers profit margins, so bad harvests in major
next year will be buy- we're expecting food growers and increased
ing food made from prices to continue ris- global demand pushed
raw materials bought .ing in ~2012," he said up prices. Benchmark
thidbaPfmbtmt~lme e.m~ -possimisill* tablsenffee fritu'reS
prices reached rlt- .At the center of the in Newr Y.ork hae
yea(8ighs." '" i'se in g~;-c~;"iiaral s~rg d close to 9i0
Weather problems commodities prices. ericent over the past
including frosts,
floods and droughts ,


summecrs J-e ~cmg ~rr
Execut i\e John Bry-
ant fald~fri a recent
interview,


have driven commod-
ity prices this year.
Corn futures in Chi-
cago reached a record
high near $8 a bushel
in June, while wheat
almost touched $9 a
buslhel in' February,
and arabica coffee
futures in New York
topped $3 a pound, a
14-year high, in May.
Major food compa-
nies like Kraft Foods

maker CKenlogg F'la
and General Mills,
producer of Yoplait
yogurt and Cheerios,
already have taken
steps such as rais-
ing prices or shrink-
ing products to offset
higher raw-material
costs and are likely
to continue doing so
next year.
In a recent report,


997 North Greenway Drive
roC al Gables FL 33f34


10 WstFlaglerStree t


Hialeah Senior High School
251 East 47th Street
I Hialeah, FL 33013


William F. "Bill" Dickinson Community Center
1601 iKrome Avenue
I Hometead, FL







I
~~~~


19D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


BLAhCKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR Ow\` DE5Tisy





Wachovia is now W~ells Fargo Small businesses are the backbone of our community.
That's why we're committed to helping you realize your vision for your business and community.
We offer business credit and cash management products to help you secure and grow your business.
You'll also find more online capabilities to connect you to your business accounts 24 hours a day.
Plus, we're the #1 small business lender in the country. We've lent more than $1 billion to African American
small businesses over the last to years and now our goal is to lend an additional $1 billion by 2018.
We support visions that move us all forward. Call 1-800-TO WELLS (1-8oo-869-3557) or stop by and
talk with a Wells Fargo banker today.


wellsfargo. corn/biz


@ 2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. AII rights reserved. Member FDIC. All lending applications are subject to credit approval.


With you w en vision


puts goals in motion


ii


Together we'll go far














I


Neck and neck
Apple is posted to paSS
Exxon Mobil as the world's
most valuable company.
Market cap in billions
Exxon/Mobil $348.3
Apple $346.7
,Microsoft $214.3
IBM .$203.8
Chevron $187.1

Wa -art $7.2
AT&T $171.0
Johnson & Johnson $170.5
General- Electric $169.2
Proctor & Gamble $168.1
Source: Capitall I
percent Tuesday to $374.01, a 16.0
percent rise this year.
While ExxonMobil was just
barely able to stay ahead of Apple
on Tuesday, it's "a matter of when"
Apple surpasses it given the fast
growth of markets for things such
as smartpflones and~ tablet comput-
ers, says Scott Sutherland of Wed-
bush Securities. "Apple is to the
point it can do no wrong," he says. ,
Investors are paying attention
to the market value race because


signla t?"io. Ma"'e'npanies thneds atuls of CEO Stev Jobs hekakh
their growth slow or stagnate. Inves- says Kim Caughey Forrest of Fort
tors have to wonder if its tremen- Pitt Capital. "As a value manager, I
dous growth can continue, given cannot buy this," she says.





































IN PARTNERSHIP WITH
MIAMI MA YOR TOMAS REFGALADO &G
COIMMIS'SIUNER RICILARD P. DUNN Il


(MDEAT) Mfiarni-Dade


1~14~n~irrfnlr~:n~nn~t~e&ni~:li~i~l~lnc~


LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT
I 4' ~REQUEST FOR QUAl.IFICATIONS
\ FOR
LAND SURVEYING SERVICES


The School Bdard of Miami-Dade Co~unty, Florida (Board), intends to select one (1) or more firm(s) to pro-
vide professional services to the Board for a continuing Agreement for Land Surveying. These firms will be
contracted for a period of four (4) years with extension years at the option of the Board.

RESPONsES DUE: RFQ responses must be received no later than 4:00 p.m., local time, Thursday,
September 8, 2011 at:
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Department of A/E Selection & Negotiations
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, Executive Director
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132

REQUIREMENTS: This is an abbreviated ad; the complete legal ad with instructions for this so-
licitation including selection procedures and required forms are available at the above address or at:
http://ae-solicitations.dadeschools.net.

In accordance with Board policies; a Cone of Silence, lobbyist requirements and protest procedures
are hereby activated. Failure to comply with requirements of this legal ad and Board policies shall be
grounds for disqualification. These, and all related, Board Policies can be accessed and downloaded at:
http://ww. neola. com/miamidade-fl/.



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BL.ICKS MIUST CONTROL THEIR OW~N DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


you


Most-val~uable

title u for grabs

By Matt Kranuz

Apple has gone from underdog to
overlord. The company that made
its mark in 1984 with its hammer"
thrower Super Bowl ad and defined
itself as the scrappy upstart is now
on track to surpass ExxonMobil to
be the most valuable company in

tThak in part to a powerful ral-
ly in the market recently, the value
of Apple (AAPL) surged to $346.7
billion, briefly surpassing the value
of oil company ExxonMobil (XOM).
ExxonMobil, which has held the
title of the most valuable company
throughout the recession, ended
the day worth $348.3 billion,
"Seems like anything Apple
makes, people will buy it," says
Howard Silverblatt of Standard 8a
Poor's. "You put the Apple logo on
something and it sells."
The horse race between Apple and
ExxonMobil is intensifying as Exxon..
Mobil's shares continue to fall along
with oil prices. Despite rising 2.1
percent recently to $71.64, shares
of ExxonMobil are down 2.0 percerit.
this year. Shares of Apple gained 5.9


able company in the U.S.
it is a:
*Way to see macro shifts in
the balance of power between
companies. If Apple manages to
pull ahead of ExxonMobil, it will
be just the 11th company to hold
the No.1 spot, Silverblatt says.
The others: AT&6T, Cisco, DuPont,
General Electric, General Motors,
IBM, Microsoft, Wal-Mart and
Philip Morris.
*Meteoric rise from battered
levels. Surging to No.1 is a re- .
markable reversal in fortune given
the shabby shape the company
was ini in the late 1990s, falling to
the No.456 spot in the SAP 500 in
1997.


And despite the company's mas-
sive size and scale, it is expected
to deliver 20 percent to 25 percent
earnings growth this year, says
Mark Lamkin, CEO of Lamkin
Wealth Management. "Growth is
absolutely phenomenal," he says.
*Way to buck the recession.
While consumers gripe about high
gas prices, they willingly shell out
hundreds of dollars for Apple prod-
ucts, Lamkin says. "When Ameri-
cans see a product they want, they
will buy it. They don't feel bad put-
ting the $500 on their credit card,"
he says.
Certainly, some wonder if Apple
hitting such extreme levels could


symbolism of politics
and its effect on your
emotions? Or will you
finally take appropriate
action to empower your-
selves economically and
free yourselves from the
yoke of economic op-
pression and exploita-
' tion?
Will you continue to
be more concerned with
catching the' latest epi-
sode of the Basketball
Wives, as they call one
another the b-word over
and over, or will you at
least make an attempt
to be informed on eco-
nomic solutions to our
problems?


income in the country.
These shares have risen
over the past 30 years.
They 'are being asked to
bear none of the burden
of closing the fiscal gap."
The report goes on to
say, "...the plan imposes
the full cost of deficit
reduction on low- and
middle-income house-
holds, gives the wealthy
a free pass, and bodes
poorly for future nego-
tiations, which, like it
or not, will require tax
increases or draconian
cuts in entitlements."
All right, Black folks,
you got stroked again.
The, deal went down
and you didn't get
jack from it. In fact,
you will have to bea
much of the financial
burden for the deal.
So now, what's it gjon-
na be? Will you con-
tinue to buy into the


Will you rest in the
refuge of now being
able to see a Black man
in the 6 o'clock slot on
television, making butt
prints in your easy
chair, or will you get
busy making footprints
on the path that leads to
economic freedom?
Will you continue to
subscribe to mantra,
"Jobsl Jobs! Jobs!" (`Why
must it be said three
times?), asking the guv-
rnent to create them,
you know, the same way
it created jobs with the
stimulus package, or
will you start making
your own jobs by grow-


ing Black businesses?
The folks in Washing-
ton are hardly concerned
about our moanin' and
groanin', our whinin'
and cryin', and our yell-
in' and screaming 'trhey
couldn't care less, and
they have shown us time
and time again. Why do
we keep asking them to
do what we know they
won't or can't do? Why
can't we see we've been
played again? Are i\ve
really that stupid? Do
we need to be hit upside
the head with a sledge-
hammer in order to take
care of business for our-
selves?


CLINGMAN .
continued from 7D

The Brookings Institute
issued a report written by
William G. Gale, Senior
Fellow, Economic Stud-
ies, pointing out: "It does
not seem, fair or reason-
able to impose virtually
the entire cost of this
part of the fiscal bur-
den on poor and mnid-
dle-class' households,,
but that is exactly what
this bipartisan act of
Congress and the White
House does. Without tax
increases in either part
of the current deal or in
the foreseeable future,
there is no way to ge~t
the well-off to pay any-
thing close to their fair
share of the fiscal bur-
den. The top one per-
cent own 33 percent of
the wealth and receive
about 15 percent of the

'The Help' gets
THE HELP
continued from 4C '

employer who' critelly
mistreated her. Spencer
visibly seethes and im
bues her character with
deadpan humor as she
endures the belittling
of her smug, racist em-
ployer Hilly (Bryce Dal-
las Howard).
The third.noteworthy
portrayal is by Jessica

ki t hartas Co si a
er who dresses like a
bombshell and is os-
tracized by the snob-
bish young women un-
der bossy Hilly's sway.
Chastain makes a pow-
erful impression as a
prai yosn tiehid-
The likable Stone -
so sharp in satirical
teen comedies li o Ea y


great reviews
teruporaryhinnthis ro

tre is iseway c. Th
less on Skeeter than on
the maids she chroni-
cles.
As she absorbs the
womett's personal sa-
gas, Skeeter's convic-
tion to become a writer
is strengthened, along
with her need to know
what happened to her
beloved maid, Const n

book gave that subplot
more heft. Here it feels
tacked on. Tyrson has
too little screen time,
though what she has is
memorable and moving.
The Help sidesteps
ahe Esentihmeentalityd
soul, Davis and Spen-
cer add vast reserves of
-et enda dgn a eto a


~t ~L.

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Debt ceiling has Black people at a downfall


Economic Advocacy Trust
New Board Aippoiptments
Miami-Dade Economic Advocacy Trust (MDEAT) is charting a
wn k ni ioinr bo rd miqes -to hep caryu ti
mission. The ideal candidates are seasoned experts in, banking,
bsins development, c iminai j stice economic devie rnaennd
or the law and legal professions) who are committed to help
stimulate socio-economic growth in underserved Miami-Dade
County neighborhoods*
IVDEAT is governqd by a fifteen member Trust Board and works

and th'e corporate community to ensure that all residents
have equal access to the necessities that maintain a healthy
community. MDEAT is a Miami-Dade County agency, meets
monthly and answers directly to the Miami-Dade Board of
County Commissioners.
MhDa ATTN minati g C ucil the ntit eres onsible f review n
vacancies and forward its recommendations to the Miami-Dade
Board of County Commissioners,
Interested individuals may download an application at
wiww.miamidade~qov/mmap or by picking one up Monday-
Friday between 8:30 am 5:00 pm at the following location:
Miami-Dade Economic Advocacy Trust
19 West Flagler Street, M-106
Miami, Florida 33130
A a pdicadiona an onTy be ed e n prson or d liverdda t
S ptome 2, 21by 4 at, For more inoe ato ryoau
305-372-7600.


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INSURANCE CORP.

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4A 4 TH MIAMV I TIMES, AU6USI 1rr, Ll------------ --------~I~ ~~~ ~-~'~---~~~


Dont cmpare a rights, civil rights 'gC2i


I


_ _I I I I_ ~I_ _XI ~I ~~I___ ~ I


I IAC:KS MUISTI CONTR.I OL THEJlliR OWVN DENT.IINY


ferent: struggles. One was for
tolerance and acceptance -
and an end to socially sanc-
tioned racial violence. That
battle has essentially been
won. The tougher battle, for
removing structural bqrri-
ers to opportunity, is far from
over.
When it comes to combat-
ing intolerance, the gay move-
ment has much in common
with the struggle for racial
equality. And it can certainly
draw hope from that struggle,
which taught us that bigotry
can be fought, that prejudice
can fade if not in one gen-
eration, in the next, provided
that a society works at it. And
clearly we are working at it.
New York's recent sanction-
ing 'of same-sex marriage
and Rhode Island's passage
of a civil union bill are mere-
ly the latest signs of that.


It has become fashion-
able to wrap the gay rights
movement in the mantle of
America's earlier struggle for
racial equality. As Sen. John
McCain's daughter, Meghan,
put it during one televised
interview, "Gay marriage and
everything having to do with
the gay rights movement (is)
generation's civHl riss s
tion is not only to claim moral
legitimacy but to invite com-
parison with the epic efforts
that ultimately forced Amer-
ica to end its homegrown ra-
cial caste system.
Certainly, there are simi-
larities between te move-
ment for racial equality and
the movement for gay ~rights.
Both movements share the
goals of ending discrimina-
tion and fostering decency.
But in many respects, they
are more different than they
are alike. To point that, out
does not diminish the impor-
tance of the battle for equal
treatment for gays. It merely
acknowledges that each bat-
tle must be understood on its
own terms.
Perhaps the most endur-
ing lesson of the civil rights
struggle is something that
has little applicability to the
fight for gay rights -- and
which also underscores its
fundamental difference from
it. And that has to do with
the weight of history with
the legacy of subjugation
that is not simply wiped away
with the passage of preju-
dice and time. Decades af-
ter the civil rights movement
proclaimed victory, Blacks
are still trapped in ghettos
and prisons out of all pro-
portion to their numbers.
Black youngsters are much
more likely than whites to be
stuck in second-rate schools
or in lower tracks in de-
cent schools and to face
a future of joblessness or


feed in the crisis.
Nancy Lindborg, an official with
the U.S. government aid arm,
told a congressional committee in
Washington recently that the U.S.
~estimates that more than 29,000
children under age five have died
in the last 90 days in southern So-
malia.


A U.S. official says the famine
in~ Somalia has killed more than
29,000 children under the age of
five.
The United Nations has said that
tens of thousands of people have
died in the Horn of Africa's drought
and famine, but the U.S. estimate
is the first precise death toll of-


marginal employment. The relentlessly oppressive, ~as
obstacles gays face are somne- entire communities were cor-
what different. doned off and disadvantage
was handed down through


RACIAL IDENTITY
CHANGES EVERYTHING
In some sense, the "don't
ask, don't tell" program
makes the difference clear.
The thoroughly discredited
policy (most recently repudi-
ated by the 9th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals) essentially
ordered gay soldiers to stay
closeted .- to "pass," in oth-
er words, for straight. That
would have been roughly
equivalent, in racially seg-
regated times, to demand-
ing that Black would-be sol-
diers "pass" for white. And
many Blacks did pass for
white. But most could not.
The racial markers were evi-
dent enough that, for most
people, there was no hiding
from the American system
of classification. One's racial
identity, for the most part,
was as clear as the nose on
one's face. That ability to in-
stantly and easily (albeit, im-
precisely) categorize was one
thing that made it possible
to organize an entire society
around the principle of racial
difference. It also allowed
the practice of racism to be


generations.
With gays, we are not look-
ing at roped-off communities
or at the intergenerational
transmission of disadvan-
tage. We are certainly look-
ing at the workings of preju-
dice, which, in all it~s guises,
ought to be condemned. But
because that prejudice is not
linked to a system of econom-
ic oppression that will leave
gay communities permanent-
ly incapacitated, the lack of
social acceptance faced by
gays -- and even the violence
visited upon those identified
as gay -- will not necessarily
haunt their descendants gen-
erations after attitudes begin
to change. So while the gay
struggle is about changing
attitudes, and laws that grew
out of bigoted thinking, it is
not about creating a pathway
to opportunity (though gay
marriage does confer certain
economic rights) where none
now exists.

STRUCTURAL
BARRIERS IN PLACE
The fight for racial equality
was really two altogether dif-


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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


BLArcKt h1S Mu CONTR'OL. Ti~llilR OW~N. 1910Sf N Y _




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,stylish
a Prada dress, but I like refer-
encing it."
While she's in New York, she'll
pop into luxury department
store Bergdorf Goodman, but
she's usually just shopping for
ideas and then takes those to
H&M.
Cost is a factor for Amurao,
too. She says, though, she puts
a lot of planning into her clothes
so they don't look cheap.


campus ci
field is fairly with a black-and-white st-riped
ng the summer shirt and a black vest," Tau-
ntern at the of- field, a soon-to-be-sophomore at
Tory Burch, and George Washington University,
Id-country style says. "I literally wore the exact
f her influences same thing. My suitemate said,
usually likes to 'I'm not sure if those things go
n on things, but together,' but I eventually told
utfit she copied her that it was straight from the
runway."
ad these camou- Anyway, she adds, mixing
they were styled seemingly mismatched prints is


,tes ge
one of her specialties. One of her
favorite recent outfits was a pea-
cock-print skirt with a striped
shirt. "I try to wear what I think
looks good. I'm tall ... and I can't
wear heels, and I wear looser
pieces. I'll wear tight jeans, but
I'm rarely seen in a tight shirt."
Other than Burch, Taufield
keeps tabs on what Proenza
Schouler and Prada are doing,
'~Obviously, I'm not purchasing


Elizabeth Tla~
dressed up duri
since she's an ii
fice of designer 1
Burch's town-an
serves as one o~
year-round. She
put her own spiI
there was one o
head to toe.
"Tory Burch h;
flage jeans, and


m


On this day in her hometown
of New York, for example, she ex-
plains her loosely crocheted top
and denim shorts: "I don't dress
very girlie, but I'll have those mo-
ments."
When she's back at SCAD,
she'll wear dresses or jumpsuits
most of the time. She says she'd
like to wear high heels "but I
can't really wear them to class
as an art student."


BV Samantha Critchell
Assoc~iatecd Press

NEW YORK It's not all jeans,
sneakers and sweatshirts packed
in those duffel bags headed to
college campuses in the com-
ing weeks. There might also be
a ripped-from-the-runway look
from Zara or H&6M that mimics
Celine or Chloe, and maybe -
just maybe a bona fide Diane
von Furstenberg dress or Alex-
ander Wang jacket.
Dr. Martens are a must-have.
It will all get worn, with the
possible exception of the sweat-
shirt, says Amy Levin, founder of
the blog site CollegeFashionista.
com. "College students love to
change up their look. ... They can
do it by translating the most up-
to-date looks for their lifestyles
and budgets."
For some students, Levin says,
going to class is a reason to get
dressed up.
CollegeFashionista has regular
contributors from more than 200
campuses chronicling clothes
worn by their peers. On this day,
for example, the site features a
student and her Michael Kors
bag and animal-print pumps at
the University of Texas, and a
Boston University student in a
strapless suridress.
The fact that today's students
are so plugged in certainly helps
in staying so stylish. They can
look at photos fromn designer col-
lections and red carpets around
the world in real time and
change their look in the time it


c-iI.
;I .J----i

~


.~. f~
1


New York University film stu-
dent Carolyn Amurao.

takes to.dig through their draw-
ers and dirty laundry piles.
A shift in style doesn't take
long for this crowd to digest. They
are hungry for the next big thing
and usually aren't married to a
,particular look. "`You'll see in the
U.S. that campuses in major cit-
ies are usually ahead of trends,"
observes Levin, and Londoners
and students in Australia are
even more fashion-forward.
(Levin says her alma matter,
Indiana University, is more tra-
ditional and casual, but -not by
much.)
That brings us back again to
the college sweatshirt students'
parents still buy when the accep-
tance letter first arrives. News
flash, according to Levin: They
are too generic. "They might put
their school name on a shirt, but
they've done it in some creative
way themselves. Everyone wants
to be individual no one wants
to dress alike," she says.
New York University film stu-
dent Carolyn Amurao, a Vancou-
ver native who just moved to hip
Williamsburg in Brooklyn, says
she doesn't pay much attention
to celebrity fashion anymore;
she'd rather be inspired by what
she sees on the street.
She has borrowed a few looks
from her fellow students like
wearing socks with platform
heels.
As a CollegeFashionista con-
tributor, she says she has trained
her eye to see it all. "There are
so many different styles on <&im-
pus. There's grungy and pol-
ished, more tailored, more sporty
or hip-hop. I think that inspires
me."
Madisen Matney, a fashion-de-
sign student at Savannah College
of Art and Design, leans toward
vintage looks, preferring not to
shop in mainstream stores. Her
outfit each day is influenced by
mood more than magazines, she
says.
"I see a lot of character in
clothes, it's not just clothes to
put clothes on mood is impor-
tant," she says.


oI


_






















__~___~___


_ I Rl~~~ntAKS MUST. :ON~~TROL. THEIR OWNVI DESTIN"Y


Woman killed, officer saved by vest, in police-involved shooting
A woman, armed with a handgun and making threats, opened fire on two Mlaml-
= := :::ie ffes early Frday, striking one of them, before she was fatally shot,
Catawaba Howard, 32, was an eight-year veteran of the Air Force and Army
Reserves who recently left the military.
Catawaba, police say, was making threats to herself and others around 3:30 a.m.
Someone called 911 and when police arrived at 1015 NW 109th Street, they were
confronted by Catawaba who began to fire at the cops.
Officers William Vazquez and Saul Rodriguez returned fire and she was struck
and killed on the scene.
Officer Vazquez, a 15-year veteran of the Mlami-Dade PD, was struck once In the
chest but his lIde was saved by his bullet proof vest. He was taken to Memorial West
Hospital In stable condition.

Police: Robber stole from wheelchair-bound man
Miami Police are looking for a robber they say ripped off a disabled man as the
Dair exited a county transit bus, and part of the crime was caught on camera.
The crime happened on July 22nd just before noon, when the wheelchair-bound
victim befriended a man while riding the bus.
When the victim exited the bus at NW 22nd Avenue and Flagler Street, the
victim's new friend followed.
Once outside, the man asked the victim for a cigarette. While pulling out the
pack, the victim mistakenly took out money, which the man snatched out of his
hand, along with the cigarettes and a cell phone. The robber fled on foot, running
westbound on Flagler Street.
The suspect was last seen running westbound on Flagler Street wearing a black
shirt, olive green shorts and white sneakers. He Is thought to be about 5'7", 145
pounds and about 20 years of age.
Anyone with information is urged to call Miami-Dade Crimestoopers at 305-471-
TIPs.

Bond set for suspect in Kendall shooting
One of three men charged in connection with a car theft which led to a police
involved shooting in Kendall was In bond court last Wednesday.
Marcos Antonio Acosta Quirch, 23, was ordered held on $39,500 bond julst one
day after the police involved shooting left two of his buddies hospitalized.
Acosta Qulrch is charged with Grand Theft Auto, Assault on a Law Enforcement
Officer and Resisting Arrest with Vliolence among other things.
The other two suspects, Michael Membrides, 22, and Ricardo Noa, 19, remain
hospitalized after being shot by officers In the parking lot of the Nob Hill West
Apartment complex last Tuesday morning.

Sketch released of man involved in North Miami killing
North Miami police have released a sketch of a man they believe was involved in
di deadly shooting earlier this month.
Accbrding to invrestigators, Siego Sergeo Brisson was visiting a home at 1210
Northwest 121st Street when he was chased by two men and shot In the stomach.
Brisson climbed onto the roof of the home to escape the gunman. Miami-Dade
'Fire Rescue airlifted Brisson to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center
where he~as later pronounced dead.
After the shooting, the two men were spotted speeding away from the home In a
.silver four door Ford Taurus with dark tinted windows.
Police have not released a motive for the shooting or a description of the second
'"8"
Anyone with information is asked to call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at305-471-
-PS


Another headache for,Strauss-

Kahn, accuser files civil suit


BTW grad murdered
weILoN' palrt~ment ~reljbrted 17 separate
continued from 1A shootins,s inclu ingitwo irivtel

Yelena Stewart-Revere, SLC co- Side. Their numbers, like Mi-
ordinator at BTW said. "He had ami's, continue to rise,, albeit at
a great personality and will be a much higher percentage. In
missed." 2009 there were 81 homicides
Stewart-Revere and other in Chicago; in 2010 the number
friends say Milton was a man rose to 97.
who loved to dance, who was In June, Rep. Frederica Wil-
always positive and enjoyed vol- son, (FL-17) addressed the ris-
unteering as a football coach ing number of police-involved
and as a cheerleader instruc- shootings in the Miami area in
tor. Milton's mother died before a letter to Thomas Perez, the as-
he graduated from high school. distant attorney general for the
And while Stewart-Revere be- U.S. Civil Rights Division. Her
lives he has an older brother, letter called for the investiga-
we were unable to verify if he tion of the City of Miami Police
had any remaining relatives. Department. In response to Wil-
Officials: place the blame of the son's query, Ronald Weich, as-
recent surge of murders on the distant attorney general, said
high temperatures this summer. the Civil Rights Division would
Others say that unemployment continue its investigation and to
and teens on summer vacation gather data.
may have also contributed to the`
increase in violence.
" Over the last few years, Mi-
ami's murder rate has contin-
ued to climb, reaching a rate of
nine/100,000 in 2010. But it has
been much worse in~ The Magic
City. For example, in 1981, the
murder rate in Miarni mirrored
those of other urban dwellings
like Chicago and New York City,
when the number peaked at
33.5/100,000 residents.
Last year was a troubling one
for other cities besides Miami. A
series of shootings in Chicago
in 2010 left eight dead and 16
wounded. Over a span of two
days, the Chicago Police De- IO CA g*


ICLYNE
CLYN


that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free wrltton information about our quallfloations and experience. This advertisement Is designed for
general information only. The Informatlon presented should not be construed to be formal legal advice or the formation of a lawyer/cilent relationship.


BV Kelli KennedV
Associacted Press

WEST PALM BEACH, Florida
- The day Eguel Geffrard was
supposed to testify in the trial of
the man accused of leading one
of South Florida's most violent
gangs, police found his bloodied
body in a parking lot, a targeted
hit authorities said was meant
to send a message about Top 6's
power.
Top 6 became the most violent
gang in Palm Beach County his-
tory, linked to 14 homicides and
more, tlC~n 150 shootings in the
past few y1Bgrs, including a fa-
tal Christmas Eve shooting at a
busy mall in 2006 all part of
a bloody gang war, authorities
said. Alleged leader Futo Charles,
30, has been arrested more than
a dozen times since 2003, but his
trial this week on various charg-
es could send the steely-gazed
Charles to prison for much of his
life if convicted.
Like many of Top 6's members,
Geffrard was a suspect in a previ-
ous crime, but ultimately became
a victim. Gang members have fre-
quently turned on each other. No
charges have been filed in Gef-
frard's death,
After Geffrard's slaying last
Monday, a judge ordered jurors
to be partially sequestered with
armed guards escortiI-g them to
and from the courthouse. A doz-
en armed deputies flanked the
tiny courtroom during Charles
trial and K-9 dogs swept the
courtroom hallways. He faces a
slew of charges, including drug
possession, aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon and at-
tempted murder for attacking a
lifelong acquaintance in a turf
war. Closing arguments were to
begin Friday.
Charles never hid his affilia-


-AP Photo/The Palm Beach Post, Lannis Waters
In an Aug. 9 photo, Futo Charles sits in court during his racketeering trial in West Palm Beach,
Charles, a man who authorities say led one of South Florida's most violent gangs was sentenced to
65 years in prison on racketeering charges Friday.


you gotta die one day," prosecu-
tors said.
Authorities say Top 6 did start
as a rap group, formed by six bul-
lied Haitian teens who bonded as
Outcasts and classmates learning
to speak English at Lake Worth
High School in the mid-1990s.
Picked on by Blacks and whites,
they started "Americanizing
themselves, embracing the thug,
gangsta lifestyle," showing up to
clubs and open mic nights that
ended in fight's, Wallace said.
Word of their violent reputa-
tion spread. It wasn't long before
white and Hispanic teens were
also claiming to be Top 6 and
"Top 6" became the routine mon-
iker shouted out before drive-by
shootings.


tion with Top 6, telling an offi-
cer in a 2006 traffic stop when
he was caught with a concealed
weapon that he belonged to the
group. But Charles says Top 6 is
a rap group.
Authorities first noticed
Charles in 1996 when someone
broke into his home, stole drugs
and tried to kill him. He's been in
and out of jail for years for drug
possession and car theft.
"He's an articulate, intelligent
guy who's even charismatic to a
point but he's not a nice guy. He's
been involved and has orches-
trated some bad things," said
Lt. Michael Wallace: who ran the
Palm Beach County gang task
until recently. "Whenever we had
a big incident, Futo was always
around."
Charles' motto was, "whateva,


Authorities estimate the group
grew to 400 to 450 members and
affiliates, offering protection in
the neighborhoods where they
sold drugs, mostly pot and crack
cocaine, and orchestrated rob-
beries to support the gang. AK-47
assault rifles were their weapon
of choice.
Shootings peaked -in 2007
when three Top 6 members were
killed after a car careened by a
daytime backyard party and
sprayed bullets. Tw~enty-three
year-old Edson Marcel one of
Top 6's original members was
'among the victims.
Charles was also at the party
and authorities believe he helped
clear the scene of guns and
drugs, Wallace said.


By AshbV Jones -

It isn't exactly surprising
news, but it is news nonethe-
less: The hotel maid who was
allegedly. assaulted by former
International Monetary Fund
chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn
on Monday filed a long-awaited
civil suit against "DSK," accus-
ing him of a "violent and sa-
distic" sexual attack that has
done her permanent damage.
The lawsuit by Nafissatou Di-
allo comes on the heels of her
decision to speak publicly in
media interviews and at a news
conference about the alleged
attack by St'rauss-Kahn after
she entered his suite on May
14. Prosecutors with the Man-


hattan District Attorney's office
are still investigating whether
to pursue or drop a seven-
count criminal indictment
against the man once seen as
French presidential contender.
"We have maintained from
the beginning that the motiva-
tion of Mr. Thompson and his
client was to make money,"
said William Taylor and Benja-
min Brafman, Strauss-Kahn's
lawyers, in a statement issued
Monday afternoon. "The filing
of this lawsuit ends any doubt
on that question. The civil suit
has no merit and Mr. Strauss-
Kahn will defend it vigorously."
Strauss-Kahn has plead-
ed not guilty to the criminal
charges.


SCar/Truck Accidents

d Catastrophic injuries
El Criminal

SEmployment Discrimination
dMedical Malpractice
~aPremises Liability


ATTORNEYS AT LAW
814 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Suite 210
Coral Gables, Florida 33134


Ph No.: 305-446-3244
Fax No.: 305-446-3538


----- C~3 ---~-- EProbate


Email: firm@clynelegal.com
Website: www.clynelegal.com


Serving youlr legal needs since 1995
Reginald J. Clyne, Esq.


C Toxic tort
L.El Vacation Injuries
C7Wrongful Death
ca Family


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011 1


FL gang trial turns deadly



with key witness' kilhng


Gang .leader. gets 65


years after conviction

The Assrociated Press

A man who authorities say led one of South Florida's most
violent gangs was sentenced to 65 years in prison on racketeer-
ing charges Friday. .
A Palm Beach County judge sentenced Fu'to Charles, 30.
shortly after a jury convicted him of racketeering, conspiracy
to commit racketeering and two other drug charges, according
to The Palm Beach Post. The conviction in the heavily guarded
courthouse came days after a witness who planned to testify .
was gunned dow~n in a parking lot.
Charles' Top 6 gang was linked to 14 homicides and more
than 150 shootings in the past few years, including a latalI
Christmas Eve shooting at a busy mall in 2006 all part of a
bloody gang war, authorities said. Estimates eventually put the
gang's membership at more than 400-
Charles' racketeering charge included multiple counts, in-
cluding two shootings. His attorney, Marianne Rantala, pointed
out that jurors found prosecutors had not linked Charles to
the shootings, yet the judge stiUl gave Charles the maximum
sentence. a
"It appeared that the sentence was going to be the maximum
no matter what," Rantala said in an email. "My opinion of the
sentence is that it was extremely overly harsh."
Rantala said she plans to appeal the case.
Witness Eguel Geffrard a member of the gang was sup-
posed to testify in the trial last Monday, but police found him
shot to death in a parking lot that same day.
Li ke many of Top 6's members. Geffrard was a suspect in a
previous crime, but ultimately became a victim. Authorities
say gang members have frequently turned on each other. No
charges have been filed in Geffrard's death-
Local authorities turned to racketeering laws after struggling
to bring anything other than minor drug charges against Top 6
members.
After Geffrard's slaying last Monday, the judge ordered jurors
to be partially sequestered with armed guards escorting them
to and from the courthouse.





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2119


Project MCC-R-088-A
MIA-Concourse "F" Painting & Stucco Repair &
Miscellaneous Repairs

Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for this project at Miami-Dade Avia-
tion Department.

This project consists of priming and' painting exterior of Conc. "F" to include
pressure cleaning and stucco repairs. Package bidding: Pkg. "A" Painting
(CSBE).

Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Tuesday, August 30, 2011 @ 10:30AM
Bids Due: Thursday, September 8, 2011 @g 2:00PM
Pre-Bid Location: 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor, Conf. Room "F".

For more information, call Ginny Mirabal or J. Caballero @ 305-876-8444.


PrOject MCC-P-018-A
MIA-Concourse "E" Painting & Stucco Repair &
Msc llneouls Repa rs

Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for this project at Miami-Dade Avia-
tion Department.

This project consists of priming and painting exterior of Conc. "E" to include
pressure cleaning and stucco repairs. Packages bidding are: Pkg. "A" General
Conditioning (bollards & h/m doors & frames) (CSBE), and Pkg. "B" Painting
(CSBE).

Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Tuesday, August 30, 2011 @ 10:00AM
Bids Due: Thursdiay, September 8, 2011 @ 2:00PM
Pre-Bid Location: 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor, Conf. Room "F".

For more information, call Ginny Mirabal or J. Caballero @B 305-876-8444.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOSAL

Sealed proposals will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office lo-
cated at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


PROOFREADER .
Retired English teacher
or a person that has the
skills necessary for cor-
recting spelling grammar.
Email kmeneir~miami-
timesonline.com or call


ROUTE DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to

Iult in So th Dd, r-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only
You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street


Houses

4915 NW 182 Street
Four bedrooms, three baths'
$1400 monthly. First and last.
Month to month lease. 305-
600-8603
ARCOLA GARDENS AREA

Large three bedrooms, two
baths, newly renovated-
$125,000. Owner/broker
305-793-0002
*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
*""WITH"'*
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP7???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty


NEED A CAR

Auut 0s wuooieaqi

305-652-1132

I .~;

ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Fu 1-time Administrative As-
ssat I fie vaM ae~o
and technical assistance
firm any years experience
wit c{ fl n~c001n Mre on' t

poereanu r mmunica a n
strong organizational/pro-
fessional skills. Competitive
salary with great benefits.
ISenderesum e ymy cove lt
gmall.com for more info. .


HAWKERS
WANTED
Looking for individuals to
sell newspapers at major
intersections.305-694-621 4.


MEDICAL BILLING
Trainees Needed!
Hspi als and Insurance
Companies now hiring. No
bxeriec needede PI."f
ment Assistance available
1-888-21 9-51 61


SECTION D


M IAMI, F. il~Da. AUGUST: 17-23, 2011


8092 NW 5 COURT
Two bedrooms, two baths'
central air, free water, and
fenced yard. $800 monthly
305-992-7503
928 NW 55 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath.
ss320ssFree water

ALLAPATTAH AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
tile, central air, $1,200. SEC.
TION 8tc)KI R86-355-5665

Large three bedrooms, two
baths, or two bedrooms, one
bath. 305-627-3735.
MIAMI SHORES AREA
505 NW 96th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, all
new, central air, $925, call
305-793-0002
NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedrooms, central air.
Section 8 OKI 786-269-5643
Efficiencies
100 NW 14 'Street




wkly, $650 mthly
305-751-6232
1490 NW 56 Street
Furnished, $450 monthly.
305-215-7891
1612 NW 51 Terrace
$550 moves you in. Utilities
in dNed786-389-1686
Section 8 Onlyl Extra large,
$500 monthly. 786-447-9457 ~
Fun 20 NW 1nA ENp ao

eson Uiliti~es included. $550
mothy 30-7-4
NORTHWEST AREA
Reducedl Private entrance'
cable, air. CalC 3 5- 58-6013

Move-in Speciall $375
monthly. Call 305-717-6084.
.Furnished Rooms
13387 NW 30 Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
30- 4-b186 05 r9sl- 486
1500 N.W. 183 Street
Water, cable and air, $140
wkly, $285 to move in. 786-
4527-98NW 100 Street

aRI~ncud d 35 31 63
16431 NW 17 Court
nj2A0r bely I24 ernove
305-310-5272
1775 NW 151 Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave', cable, air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996 -

Remlo~d~e3e 8titie ino ded.
$500 mthly. 702-448-0148.
2010 NW 55th Terrace
Ar ni d3 we ky, cable, utili-
2373 NW 95 Street
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-915-6276, 305-691-3486
3290 NW 45 Street
Clean room, $375 monthly.

5500 NW5A ue
'$85 wkly, free utilities, kitch-
en, bath, one person.
305-474*8186 305-691-3486
62 Street NW First Avenue
$450 monthly. $89008 mve in.
Ms 601 W 24 Court of /
Mirowave, re rgerator, co or
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Rooms, central air, applianc-
es. $100 and $110 wkly.


Cable TV, utilities included,
$550 monthly. 305-687-1110
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Furnished room,
.786-663-5641
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
786-277-3688.
NORTHWEST AREA
Clean Rooms, air included.
305-917-5367

N r HEST MAnp o E

$125 weekly. 305-696-2451.
OPA LOCKA AREA
270 Washingt~onOAveenue
$476 monthly.
786-277-3434,786-298-4383
Houses

10240 SW 171 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1345, appliances, central
air, fenced yard.
305-642-7080
13070 NW 16 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath*
tile, central air, carport. $1275
monthly. 305-662-5505
1490 NE 152 Street
Three bedrooms, one new
bath, tile, air, bars, $1150. No


Section 8! Terry Dellerson,
Realtor.305-891-6776
1510 NE 154 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, den, air
condition units, tile floor. $850
monthly. 786-489-4225


OPA LOCKA AREA
One bdrm, one bath. Special
$400. 305-722-4433
OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$70 Section 8 Ic5.we come.
305-722-4433

Io~ndosrfownhouses
2767 NW 198 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one and half
bath, $1200 monthly, Section
8 OKI 305-336-3133
TMIAMI GDENSoAeR th
close to stadium. $950
monthly. 954-663-3990
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
section 8 welcome.
786-234-5803

DupleXeS .
1202 N.W. 58 Street
Totrbealoo Sed no 8ba es.
come, 305-318-9760.
1228 NW 1 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath. $450.


1273N-642-S7TROEET
SECTION 8 OKI Two
bdrms, private drive-
way, large fenced yard,
bars, central air, tile, near
schools.786-277-1268
1510 NW 65 St #1
One bdrm., one bath, air and
wa e, $37005 mo 184ySection

1524 NW 1 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. $475,
free water. 305-642-7080

15614 NbW 2 Avenuoe, Unit 4
$500 deposit. $1200 mthly.
Section 8 only!
786-955-3071
172 NW 52 Street

$6505 Fe wat rel crt.
3`05-642-7080


Two b~d~rm on bah ec-
tion 8 welcome, central air,

17430N .0 Sr~eet
Two bdrms, one bath $750
Appliances. 305-642-7080
Tw 812 NW 580 Strm nthl
305-525-0619 305-331-3899.
2373 N.W. 61 Street Rear

305-69 -01 ,d 5298-0388
2452 and 2464 NW 44 St
Two bedrooms. one bath,
$975; Three bedrooms, two
baths, $1050 monthly. Cen.
tral air, low down payment,
786-877-5358.
251 NE 77 Street
One bedroorn, one bath, ap-
7lacs $6i0 6ron hy plus
2561 York Street
Ttiree bdrms, two baths, air,

S0 odneposinj 8 -95-3077
265 N.E. 58th Terrace
Huge three bedrooms, twjo
baths, all newl Central air,
Walk-in closets. $1275
monthly, 305-793-0002.
Set3047 NWn92 Streetbe-
room, one bath, $625 month-
ly. 786-447-9457.
3047 NW 92 Street
Section 8 Onlyl One bed-
room, one bath, $650 month-
ly. 786-447-9457.
3623 NW 194 Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1250 monthly, Section 8 .
Welcomel 305-761-5256
414 NW 53 Street
BEST VALUE, gorgeous
remodeled two bdrms, spa-
rius'avg i totally fneed
305-772-8257
5420 NW 7 Court
One bedroom, one bath, in-
cludes electric. and water,
$650 monthly, 305-267-9449.
5509 N.W. Miaml Court
One bdrm, one bath. Newly
renovated $650 mthly, first,
last, security. 305-751-6232
5511 NW 5 COURT

aTpep nds 2ronbthS Oa rn

$600 security. 305-979-3509
after 5 pm
5631 SW Fillmore Street

Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100 monthly, first, and se*
curity.7786-370- 82.ud

Move in Special $12001 Large
three bedrooms, two baths,
$895 monthly. 954-496-5530
7749 NW 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700 monthly, central air, all
appliances included. Free
19 LCD TV.:
Call Joel 786-355-7578

8001 NW 11 Court
Units 1 -4
Spacious one bedroom, walk-
in closet, $700 monthly, in-
cludes water, $1000 to move
in, tile floors, all new appli-


ances. 305-305-2311


1580 NW 64 STREET
SECTION 8 WELCOMEl
Large three bedrooms,
two baths, $1395 monthly,
central air, garage. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

15925 NW 22 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
tile, central air $1250 monthly
305-662-5505

Thr 2 bedrooms ,C baths
$1550 monthly Section 8 OK.
786-277-9378
1776 NW.53 STREET
One and two bedrooms, one
bath, $595 and $750 monthly.
Call 954-496-5530
1827 NW 43 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, air.
$850. mthly. 305-688-5002
1863 N.W. 91st Stret
Beraetf one bdbroom to a

$60 voenat tr tt an5 last to
1886 NW 85 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
8atie ror $10, oRSeea

20115 NW 9 Avenue
Three bdrms, two baths, cen-
tral air, Florida room, fenced.
Section 8 OK! $1600 mthly.
305-576-4025, 954-638-8842
2130 WIlmington Street
Four bedrooms, one bath'

CALSL 6ig 7 6 36-7 or

2140 NW 96 TERRACE
Three nbedr om$, 2nem ba h,

l. 30 58025Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath, in-
cludes water, $850 monthly.
305-267-9449

Two b~dr Wnle bath te, air
$900 mthly, 786-230-0257. '
2770 NW 194 Terrace
Section 8 OKI Three bdrms,
one and a half baths, cen-
nra oifehpaint. $1395 a
954-849-6793
2820 NW 1 Avenue .
Twombod Is, oneebatht,eS850
AII appliances included.
Free le n~ch L5CD7TV8Call


2950 NW 49 Street ~i-'
Three be roo6%- Section 8

305-298-0388
3501 NW 9 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$995, stove, refrigerator, free
water. 305-642-7080
3809 NW 213 Terrace
Lovely three bedrooms, two
baths. Fenced yard, tile floor-
Ing, central isir, close to shop-
pi de chu ches, at Broward/
Call 954-243-6606
3833 NW 209 Street
Three b rom s one bath,

305-642-7080
3879 NW 207 Street Rd.
Four bdrms, two baths, cen-
tral~alf and heat. Section 8
OK. Terry 305-965-1186.

One bdrm ole bth, apli-
ances, air, bars, fenced yard.
Call 305-625-8909.
55 NW 83rd Street
Four bedrooms, two baths.
fenced yard, and central air.
Section a preferred. Call Mr.
Coats at 305-345-7833.
901 NW 49th Street
Three bedrooms, two and
half baths, $1500 monthly,
first, last and $1,000 deposit.
Call 786-541-5234
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
t nciosinourrobdrmu, itwo
plasma TV Included. Section
8 Welcomed Others available.
305-834-4440
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath*
all appliances, tile through-
out, large fenced yard. $1,300
monthly. 305-620-4569
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath.

yado Selto 8 1$3d50
NORTHWEST
MIAMI DADE
Two orC Tre b~d~r6s lto~n
NORTHWEST 51 TERRACE
Completed renovated three
bd 4csSedtona8r hou e
floors. Everything new. Ready
to move in. 561-727-0974 or
305-905-2020
STOPtIl
Behind in Your Rent? 24
Hour notice. Behind in Your
Mortgage? 786-326-7916.


7000 NW 21 Avenue
Clean rooms, air, $395 a
month. Move in August 1st.
786-953-8935
755 NW 129 STREET


Three rooms available. Secu-
rity deposit required.
305-944-5542


RFP NO. 272271


CLOSING DATEITIME: 1:00 P.M., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011

Detailed specifications for this RFP are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1906.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271* ~


AD NO. 15543


Johnny Martinez, P.E.
'City Manager


j


BE A SECURITY OFFICER
24, 40 hours renew G. Con-
cealed $100. Traffic School
$35, first time driver.
786-333-2084
HOW TO PERFORM
AN EXORCISM
$100 per7S~eat3 August 29th,





Excellent Credit
Bu lde Wealth

Or0stvaert uop feer e4 a nth
Call for details
786-587-4332
GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14130 N.W.
22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.


Apartments
1 NORTHEAST AREA
Section 8 special. One and
two bedrooms. Furnished
units available. $199. Total
move in. 786-488-5225

One brNomi an bath
$450. Mr. Willie #6 '

1212 NW 1 Avenue
One bdroom, one bath*

305-642-7080

1215 NW 103 Lane
Two bdrms, gated security,
tile, $700 mthly, $1000 to
move in. 305-696-7667
1229 NW 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$500. Appliances, free
water.
305-642-7080 -

1231 NW 58 Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath.

I ee 19 inhLDN at
Joel
786-355-7578

12400 NE 11 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1,000. Appliances, free
water. 305-642-7080

1246 NW 58 Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath.
$495 ronthy I 50cm ve -
Free 19 Inch CCD TV. Call

786-355-7578


One2 bdroWm oe bth.
$550. Free Water.
306-642-7080

1317 NW 2 Avenue
Oe5 Serm, o n bt


M3 Nlj 18 L e
Two bedroom, one bath,
$450 month. $700 move
In. AII appliances included.
,..Free 19 Inch .DCTV.w..Cali

786-355-7578

140 NW 13 Street
Tw~o bedr oms oe bath
305-642-7080 .

1425 NW 60 Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath'
$570 mthly. Includes refriger-
ator, stove, central air, water.
$725 Move In. 786-290-5498
14350 NW 22 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $450

TMs.Jb km no 16 7-158654

1450 NW 1 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $425
Two bdrms, one bath $525
305-642-7080

M525 NN Sl laceL
One bdrm, one bath, $350
monthly. $575 move In. AiI
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1535 NW 1 Place
One bedroom $475, call
786-506-3067
1540 NW 1 Court
Studio $425, one bedroonf
$525, call 786-506-3067

One b~dim None b tu,$425.
Mr. Alter In #1

1721 NW 183 Drive
Two bedrooms, two baths, tlle
floors, near all facilltles, free
water. $800 monthly. Security
required. 305-493-9635
1744 NW 1 Cotirt
One bedroom, one bath
$495. Trwo bed'oms '
bath $595. m mincs a


1835 NW 2 Court
T bedrooms. F edewat r

$450 monthly. 786-454-5213
1943 NW 2 Court

Oenderoobs ro$ 0, moein o
day, quiet, 786-506-3067
1969 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$475 Appliances, free gas.
786-236-1144

200 NW 13 Street
One bdrm, one bath $425
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

210 NW 17 Street
One bdrmn, one bath $450,
appliances. 305-642-7080


2229 NW 82 Street #Y B

305-776-3857


2751 NW 46 Street
one bedroom, remote gate,
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849

4 11 NW 37 Street
Studio, $395 monthly.
Two bdrms., one bath, $650
mcnhy dAII Ca lia ces
786-355-7578

4470 N.W. 203 Terrace
Large two bedrooms apt.,
one bath, walk in closet $850

305-812-3773
458 NW 7 STREET
One bedroom, very nice $450
a month. Call 305-557-1750
467 NW 8 Street
Efficiency $425. Appliances
and free water.
305-642-7080

5200 NW 26 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath. Free

g d~e snt .87 fi
month, $975 moves you in.
Jenny 786-663-8862


One Oedroom, on ath,
$500. 305-642-7080

561 NW 6 Street
One bdrm, one bath $495.
S305-642-7080

One 60andto61b rms, $595
and $695. Call 954-482-5400
60 NW 76 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
S$500 and $600 Ap ians*

On 229 NW 2 Xvenue~e-
tion 8 OK. 55 and older pre-
ferred'

68305N3WO-7 ace
S dlio$1 0 wee ly- 8e6 t
2540.
7155 N.W. 17 Avenue
Onne bedr 3m one bath.$ Fi
deposit. 305-303-2383

One7 brNon ah Free
water. $550 monthly. -
Call 786-333-2448

7627 North Miami Avenue
One Dearoom, one batn.
Renovated new app OanP s

pOK. $95, plus security. Call
9 am. t~od .m.7N~o calls after

800 NW 67 Street
Large one bedroom, utilities
included. $675 moves you in.
786-389-1686
ALLAPATTAH AREA
One bdrm, tile, central at ,
water included. $750. section

ARENA GARDEN
Move in with first month rent

Re dle~d efclen~cy Ene,
two, three bdrms, air, appli-
ances, laundry, gate. From
$4030 1004NW 12 St'
BRAND NEW
LAKEFRONT APTS,
U~p toT oMonths Free aet
Restrictions Apply
305-757-4663
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080

Opap cka, B ownvle .
Apartments, Duplexes
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. Call for speoilas,
capitairentalagency.com


OnO b EdoR, Reta Sir,
water Included. Quiet neigh-
'borhood. 305-751-3498
GRAND OPENING '
NEW ARENA SQUARE
Walking distance to school
from $400. Remodeled
efficiencies one two three
bdrms; two baths Ce tral air,
laundry, gated. Office 1023
NW 3 Ave. 305-372-1383
HAMPTON HOUSE

Easy qualify. Move in spe-
cials. One bedroom, $495;
twow beroos 1. Free

LIBERTY CITY AREA

Se50 m tthy. 305 e22- bath
MIAMI LITTLE RIVER
Remodeled one bedroom.
$625 to $775. NE 78 Street
305-895-5480

CornMOE If PE A0Street
Beautiful two bedrooms, $700
monthly, $1000 to move in.
Gated, security, tiled floors,
central air. 786-402-0672
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Overtown Area,
One bdrm, $400
305-603-9592 305-375-0673
Call Mon-Fri 9 am 4 pm
NORTH MIAMI AREA


Two bdrms, one bath, $868,
one bedroom, $704, studio
$553, deposit. 305-297-0199


ADVERTISEMENT PROGRAM AND
ADVERTISEMENT SALES SUPPORT SERVICES
















BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OW(N DESTINY


12D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


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S3C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR Ow~N DESTINY


sale every day.


grocery tab. Go to publix.com/save right
now to makte plans to save th~is week.


How do ou save?

Let us count the wa s.


Begin with BOG COs-buy-on~e-get-one-free
deals you'll find throughout the store. Then
check out our Publix private label values.
Finally, figure in the hundreds of items on


They all add up to a lower


&TYto save


here.
































VOLUME 88 NUMBER 51 MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 17-23, 201 1 50 cents (55 cents in Blroward)


1111111111111111111 11111111111


Miami's Black jobless


rate nears 3o percent

Wizlson and other CBC members to tackle

minority unemployment zssue at Town Hall


MI cM T M ECLU IV E





retires ..

Colyer says she left position
under her 'own terms

By D. Kevin McNeir
kmeneir@miamitimeson line.com

The Miami regional director
for the Department of Chil-
dren and Families, Jacqui .4- ;S
Colyer, has stepped down after
two years on the job. Her re-
tirement culminates a 30-year
career in social service where
she has worked "for families
and children in a community JACGUI CO~LYER i
that I love."
For the record, Colyer emphasizes that her decision
was made without any pressure from state officials
and that she is anxious to move on to another phase


CC My entire career has been
based on prevention and the
preservation of families all families

not just Black ones -COLYER

of her life.
"My departure is totally on my own terms," she said.
"I am not leaving under any type of cloud, there is
no bad blood and there weren't any negative circum-
stances that forced me to retire. That is the farthest
thing from the truth. For the most part, DCF still
wants me to stay around and do some other things for
the Department."
Colyer was born in South Carolina but has lived in
Miami since she was six-months-old. She has been
married to Leroy Colyer for 25 years. In her most
Please turn to COLYER 7A



For mer BT W

cheerleader


gunned down
By Randy Grice 5.4 ~3
rgrice @miam itimesonline.com ?


. ... .. .. ... ... ... ,,, ,,, ,,, ,,, ,.,. ,.,,. .. ,.. ,, ... ...


aR~ringtOR tellS kids to stay focused

Local hero says "overcoming adversity"

iS a key ingredient of Black tradition


- . -
rv......lr..


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II i


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L BRARP10F FLA. HISTORY
25B 1M UIERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAINES VILLE FL 3 26 11-7 0 7


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


they expected. Tell that to Blacks in
South Florida who are experienc-
ing unemployment numbers that
hav~e not been seen since the Great
Depression of 1929 that extended
into the mid 1930s. At one point
one-fourth of all Floridians were on
public assistance, 12 million people
in the U.S. were unemployed and
over 90,000 Florida families faced
dire hardship.
Please turn to JOBLEISS 10A


By D. Kevin McNeir
kmeneir~'miamirimesonline.com


There's only one word that mat-
ters these days to Blacks in Miami
or in any of our nation's 50 states
- jobs. Economic analysts say that
even though the recent downgrade
of the U.S. credit rating and highly-
volatile financial markets have
walloped our economy, they believe
that things are actually better than


BV D. Kevin McNeir
kmeneir@miamitimesonline.com

Jamaican-born Barrington An-
tonio Irving, 27, grew up in Mi-
ami and graduated from North-
western where he starred on the
school's football team. But after
a chance meeting with a pilot, he
decided, much to the amazement
of his peers and family, to turn
down college scholarships based
on his gridiron prowess and went
after his dream of becoming


a pilot.
He shared his story that culmi-
nated in his successful solo voy-
age around the world, the first
Black person to ever achieve this
feat, with 195 high school stu-
dents from Miami-Dade County
last Thursday. He says his mes-
sage is simple: "No one can stop
you from pursuing your dreams
but you."
"A lot of my friends at North-
western could not see life
Please turn to IRVING 10A


Barrington Irving believes in following your dreams.



NCAA visit puts

UM in hot seat

.y "'""" ""r""
SThe University of Miami issued a statement Tues-
Lday morning about the NCAA investigation spurred
Sby allegations from former booster and convicted
SPonzi schemer Nevin Shapiro that he provided UM
Players with impermissible benefits during the past
Decade.
"When Nevin Shapiro made his allegations nearly
a year ago, he and his attorneys refused to provide
r any facts to the University of Miami," UM stated.
"The University notified the NCAA Enforcement of-
ficials of these allegations. We are fully cooperating
with the NCAA and are conducting a joint investiga-
tion. The University of Miami takes these matters
very seriously."
.The university's statement came a day after NCAA
investigators arrived on campus, and nearly an
hour and a half after Coach Al Golden spoke to
the media about the matter. Players and assistant
~WPlease turn to 11M 10A


County opens

doors for 4ooK

students
By Randy Grice
rgrice Qmiamitimesonline.com I


As students across
Miami-Dade County pre-
pare themselves for the
beginning of the 2011-
2012 school year,.
many school admmn-
istrators are plotting
new strategies to help
their students per-
form at the best level
possible. An estimated
380,006 students, 26
percent of those being Black,
are set to start school on
Please turn to SCHOOL 7A


Over the last five days, a total of
eight people have been murdered as
a result of gun violence. The sud-
den rash of violence has raised the
murder rate in Miami-Dade County,
which once claimed a 2005 low of P
171 -- a rate of seven murders for CLI ITN'
every 100,000 residents,
Former Booker T. Washington High School (BTW) student
and cheerleader captain, Calvin Milton, Jr., 27, was one of
the eight murdered last week. Milton was gunned down along
with another man in a drive-by shooting in Overtown on
Monday, August 15th.
"I knew him very well, he was a student of mine," said Dr.
Please turn to MIILTON 6A


3


Bachmann win would be a blessing for Obama
BVy DeWayne Wickham binding con- muscle flexing in this politi- during the debt debate has Bachmann will be soundly me) that we not raise the
test, which cal season. Bachmann is a pushed the movement onto defeated in the general elec- debt ceiling. ... The worsl
Michele Bachmann's win in `Efl i historically leader of that kamikaze wing the tundra of U.S. politics, tion and drag other Republi- thing that you can do is con-
the straw poll of the Republi- F aj has not been of House Republicans. a position from which Bach- cans down to defeat. In such tinue to borrow money and


spend money that we don't
have," Bachmnann said dur-
ing a televised debate. While
Bachmann endears herself
to the Tea Party crowd with
talk like that, she mortally
wounds her chances of ever
being more than a footnote of
Please turn to WIN 10A


t


can Party faithful in lowa -
the first voter test of the 2012
presidential campaign had
to be good news to a White
House battered by a down-
turn in the economy and an
uptick in war casualties.
The Minnesota congress-
woman's victory in the non-


a campaign, voters will be
constantly reminded that
Bachmann opposed rais-
ing the debt ceiling at a time
when many Democrats and
Republicans said doing so
would court economic catas-
trophe.
"It was very important (to


a major fac-
tor in pick-
ing the GOP
nomx nee ,
nonethe -


mann cannot mount a suc-
cessful assault on Obamna's
presidency.
If the Tea Party wing's
stranglehold on the GOP
propels Bachmann to the
party's presidential nomina-
tion, something many pun-
dits think is still a long shot,


THE WON'T-BUDGE PARTY
Although the Tea Party
movement's approval rat-
ing has been in a steady de-
cline, it still holds great swray
over the GOP. The no-comn-
promise stance it forced on
congressional Republicans


less helps
her chances of becoming the
party's standard-bearer, giv-
en the Tea Party movement's


-Cllr'L
!.J.i~
,.%~- Weekly


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BACHMANN


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BONNER
continued from 12B

religions including the Trin-
ity and the second coming of
Christ. However, the denomina
tion does have several beliefs
that distinguish it from other
faiths including the encourage-
ment of a vegetarian lifestyle
and worshipping on Saturday.

A FAITH-FILLED EDUCATION
Bonner strongly supports the
importance of receiving a for-
mal Christian education with
one caveat: the institution and
the prospective student should
share compatible values.
"I believe you should attend
an institution that will keep
you in the area of ministry that
teaches what you believe," ex-


Sermnar builds girls' self-esteem with survival skills


SUBSCRIBE TO

THE MIAMI TIMES

CALL 30-91;1


~BB~8~8B~6~ek ~


Senior year is full of special
moments. One of the year's
highlights is the prom that
formal dance near the end of
the year where all seniors step
out in high sty e. Some fret
about whether theyr will be able
to enjoy that special occasion
because of issues of affordabil-
ity.
To make sure that more se-
niors can enjoy their final for-
mal dance of high school, Be
U Productions, Inc., under the
leadership of Miami Northwest-
ern Senior High School's Brian-
na Trimmings, formed a local
chapter of Becca's Closet.
Becca's Closet is a national,
non-profit organization that
donates formal dresses to high
school girls who are unable to
purchase them.
"Prom night must go on. Fi-
nancial circumstances should
not stand in the way," Trim-
`mings said.
The young ladies of Be U Pro-
ductions', Inc., is a local organi-


party dresses, and matching
accessories to accentuate their
outfits for that special night.
Girls who had scheduled ap-
pointments were able to come
in to browse the selection of
dresses, which were available
in a variety of sizes, styles and
colors.
"It's heartwarming to see
smiles of satisfaction and grati-
tude on the faces of the young
ladies and their families, and to
know that we helped them to
step out in style on their special
night," said Bessie Campbell, a
board member of Be U Produc-
tions.
. Becca's Closet was created
to honor the work of Rebecca
Kirtman who passed away in
an automobile accident in Au-
gust 2003. In the spring of
2003, "Becca" single-handedly
collected and distributed over
250 prom dresses to needy girls
in South Florida so that they
could attend their high school
prom.

participate in their Gospel Back
to School Summer Jam Fest on
August 27 at 7:30 p.m. 954-
213-4332.

SThe Youth In Action
Group invites you to their "Sat-
urday Night Live Totally Radi-
cal Youth Experience" every
Saturday, 10 p.m.-midnight.
561-929-1518.

SRedemption Missionary
Baptist Church has moved but
still holds a Fish Dinner every
Friday and Saturday; a Noon
Day Prayer Service every Sat-
urday; and Introduction Com-
puter Classes every Tuesday
and Thursday at 11 a.m. and
4 p.m. Reverend Willie McCrae,
305-770-7064 or Mother Annie
Chapman, 786-312-4260.

A Mission with a New
Beginning Church mem-
bers invites the community to
their Sunday Worship service
at 11:15 a.m. on Thursdays,
Prayer Meetings at 6:30 p.m.
and Bible Class at 7 p.m.


hqm,
b ~


zation which provides mentor-
ing for girls, started collecting
dresses in the fall of last year
with the goal of bringing spe-
cial smiles at prom time this
year. Both the teen members


and their sponsors were excit-
ed that they could help young
ladies approaching prom time
rid themselves of worry about
being able to afford and find
the right outfit for such a mo-

SNew Life Family Worship
Center welcomes everyone to
their .Wednesday Bible Study
at 7 p.m. and their Let's Talk
Women Ministry discussing
'Sex and the Church' on August
20 at 1 p.m. 305-623-0054.

SThe Golden Bells are cel-
ebrating their 33rd Singing An-
niversary on August 20 at the
Word of Truth Church at 7: 30
p.m.; and August 21 at New
Covenant at 3 p.m. 786-251-
2878. *

SHoly Ghost Faith Deliv-
erance Ministries, Inc. cele-
brates their pastor's 13th anni-
versary with services on August
21.

SHoly Ghost Astsembly of
the Apostolic Faith is host-
ing a dinner sale on August 24,
12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

5 Little Rock Primitive
Baptist Church is hosting their
annual meeting,' August .19-21,
1 p.m. daily. 786-294-8179.


mentous occasion. The Be U
Productions chapter of Bec-
ca's Closet has collected over
200 dresses for distribution
to young ladies free of charge.
Over the past month three

SThe God is Love Church is
holding a reunion for all mem-
bers past and present on Sept.
10, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. at the New-
port Beach Resort. 786-406-
4240.

SEmmanuel Mission.
ary Baptist Church invites
the community to Family and
Friends Worship Services at
7:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. every
Sunday. 305-696-6545.

SChristian Cathedral
Chur~ch presents their Morn-
ing Glory service that includes
senior citizen activities and
brunch every Friday at 10 a.m.
to 12 p.m. 305-652-1132.

SPilgrim New Hope Bap-
tist Church's 'Convening of
the Evangelist' will be held at
the Palm Beach County Con-
vention Center, August 17-20.
561-863-9192.

SLighthouse Holy Ghost
Center, Inc. invites everyone to
their Intercession Prayer Ser-


dress distributions were held at
Mount Tabor Baptist Church,
located at 1701 NW 66 Street
in Miami.
So far, 54 young ladies were
matched with beautiful gowns,

vice on Saturdays at 10 a.m.
305-640-5837.

SMacedonia Missionary
Baptist Church's Usher Minis-
try is hosting a Fashion Show
and Musical Program on Au-
gust 21 at 4 p.m. and is cur-
rently seeking models. 305-
445-6459.

SAll That God is Interna-
tional Outreach Centers in-
vites everyone to their Chris-
tian Fellowship and Open Mic
Night every Friday at 7:30 p.m.
786-255-1509, 786-709-0656.

SThe. Faith Church, Inc.
invites you to their service on
Sunday at 11 a.m. and their
MIA outreach service that pro-
vides free hot meals, dry goods
and clothes. Visit wwwn.faith-
church4you.com or call 305-
688-8541.

SRunning for Jesus Out-
reach Youth Ministries is also
looking for additional praise
dancers, choirs, and soloists to


Wwactor Temple African
Methodist Episcopal is hosting
their annual Wonders of Wor-
ship Celebration on September
18 at 3:30 p.m. 305-636-3774.

SMt. Tabor MBC Health
Ministry is hosting a Back-to-
School Health and Resource
Fair on August 20, 9:30 a.m. -
1:30 p.m. Free back packs and
health information provided.
305-693-0820.

SThe Youth Department
Coordinators are sponsoring a
Back-to-School picnic for youth
on August 20th at 10 a.m.

SNew Mt. Sinal MVission-
ary Baptist Church welcomes
the community to Sunday Bible
School classes at 9:30 a.m. and
Worship Service at 11 a.m.;
Tuesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30
p.m. and Bible School at 8 p.m.
305-635-4100.


SMt. Hope Fellowship Bap-
tist Church invites all youth
to their Back-to-School Revival
August 18-19, 7 p.m. nightly.

SThe Church of the Open
Door will have a Community
Health Fair on August 20, 10
a.m.-1 p.m. Free screenings for
cholesterol, blood sugar, blood
pressure, body mass index,
HIV, substance abuse, pediat-
ric asthma and sickle cell. Free
body massage, breakfast and
lunch will be provided.

SThe South Florida Spiri-
tuals will journey to Waycross,
Ga., September 16-18 for an
'Evening of Song and Praise.' To
join them, call 786-838-1153.

SThe Heart of the City
Ministries invites everyone to
morning worship every Sunday
at 9 a.m. 305-754-1462.


things work together for good
for those who love and serve
God. You can decide to look for
those good things. This under-
'standing can give them hope,
meaning, and a sense of pur-
pose, which will enable them
to go through those events,"
Koenig said in a previous inter-
view.
When Pamela Burnett was
diagnosed with breast can-
cer in 2001, she found herself
leaning more than ever on her


faith in God.
"As a young girl I was al-
ways fascinated by the word
and when I got sick, I got like a
hunger for it," she said.
Yet 10 years later when she
is no longer facing imminent
danger -- Burnett is cancer
free and founded the popular
Beautiful. Gate, Inc. Cancer
Resource Center. She remains
passionately loyal to her reli-
gion.
"There is so much to learn


ARCHITECT
continued from 12B

School of Architecture for de
sign classes taught by practic-
ing architects who are mem-
bers of AIA Miami. The classes
focused on an introduction to
architecture, sketching and
designing, green building and
sustainable design and hands
on CADD instruction on creat-
ing computer designs.
The students also enjoyed
several field trips including a


walking tour of downtown Mi-
ami architecture and historic
landmarks, tours of several
architectural firms, the Lowe
Art Museum and a day at Hia-
leah's McDonald Aquatic Cen-
ter.
The summer camp culmi-
nated with an open house
which allowed the students to
showcase what they learned.
The students designed and
displayed futuristic town
homes to enhance the quality
of life for all communities.


FAITHFUL
continued from 12B

report being religious in poorer
states that offer less social sup-
ports. .
Dr. Harold Koenig, co-direc-
tor of the Center for Spiritu_
ality, Theology and Health at
Duke University Medical Cen-
ter, believes that faith provides
hope for people. regardless of
how dire their situations.
"Scripture promises that all


and I'm still growing and ap-
plying [the Word) as much as
possible."
According to Chestnut, the
best way that Christians can
maintain their faith in more
prosperous times is to by "stop-
ping taking ownership."
Everything "belongs to God.
You don't have. ownership of it.
See w~hen we take ownership of
God's stuff then that's when we
end with just the stuff and no
God," he said.


plained Bonner.
The minister himself is a
graduate of Oakwood Univer-
sity, an Alabama-based SDA
college, where he met his wife,
Tracy. His studies and campus
activities helped prepare him
for what has become a 27-year
career in the ministry. And
while he says he has found his
work to be greatly rewarding
and gratifying, Bonner admits
that he has found himself fac-
ing the danger of anyone else
who works a very demanding
job -burnout.
"I found myself a couple of
times needing a break because
you can wear yourself out if
you do not balance your sched-
ule," he recalled.
To ward off such occasions,
he takes several precautions


such as having designated
hours when he can be reached
concerning church business.
Married for 26 years, the father
of two also designates one day
a week as a time to spend with
family and also takes a vaca-
tion every year.

SUPPORTING ROLES
To Bonner, who married his
college sweetheart, healthy
marriages offer benefits for
both spouses.
"In every couple whether they.
want to realize it or not the
husband needs the wife and
the wife needs the husband,"
he said. "I need my wife beside
me in every situation; she helps
me to see things that I cannot
see."
The recognition of the impor-


tant gifts that every individual
can provide is why he also sup-
ports women in the ministry.
"It's more important than
ever to have a female associate
pastor because she can help
me as a male pastor to help un-
derstand others in ways that I
cannot," he said.
One of his goals since as-
suming the leadership at Beth-
any SDA has been to focus on
the specific needs of his con-
gregation and to help those in
the wider community. After
recently ending a month-long
revival in July, the church and
its community center are al-
ready gearing up to host their
second annual community
block party.
'Want to know more? Visit
www.bethanymiami.org.


JAKES
continued from 13B

Pastor Andy Stanley of North
Point Community Church in
Georgia.
"So glad we raised that debt
ceiling so that the U.S. credit
rating would not get lowered.
That worked well," tweeted Ed
Stetzer, president of LifeWay
Research.
Although not a pastor,
Ramsey is followed heavily by
the Christian community for
basing his financial advice on
biblical principles. Pastors on


Twitter found one of Ramsey's
micro-posts a re-tweet favorite.
"Only in DC can you cut
spending by 1 Trillion over TEN
years and raise the debt ceiling
almost 1 Trillion THIS year and
call that even," Ramsey tweeted
at the beginning of last week.
Some pastors were a bit more
encouraging.
"Jesus' love for us is not like
the stock market. His grace
never crashes even when we
make stupid decisions," tweet-
ed Greg Stier, founder and
president of Dare 2 Share Min-
istries.


TIMS
continued from 13B

"The cause of death is pend-
ing further study," Borakove
said. Toxicology testing is part
of the analysis done to deter,
mine cause of death, she said. A
determination will not likely be
available until later this month.

"PROSPERITY GOSPEL"
A New York City police official
told the Orlando Sentinel early
Monday that Tims' death did
not appear suspicious.
Later in the day, NYPD Detec-
tive Martin Speechley said, "It's


an ongoing investigation. I can-
not comment further."
Zachery Tims preached the
"prosperity gospel," which is
the belief that God answers
the prayers of those seeking
success. He was an example
of his own theology. Accord-
ing to divorce documents, Tims
erned about $3d3,400 a mon h

lion Windermere home, spent
$1,500 a month on clothing,
had $437,300 in the bank, and
drove both a 2004 Hummer
and a 2008 BMW. Giving back
to the church, he tithed $3,500
a month.


SCHOOL
continued from 12B

they don't know how smart
they are, [so} we'rejust going to
do a lot of activities to let them
converse with their peers and
when they leave they will learn
how to believe in themselves
and just start the school year
learning how to have more
faith in themselves Mizell
said.
Mizell, a member of the
prominent Mizell family whose
members were responsible for
establishing some of Black
South Florida's earliest busi-
nesses and schools, found that


her own self-esteem suffered a
severe blow once she reached
adolescence.
Now 28-years-old, Mizell
says she spent much of teen
years, continuing into her ear-
ly twenties, feeling insecure
about herself. That insecurity
led to her making poor deci-
sions that ended in her becom-
ing a teen mother. Her person-
al journey towards building a
positive self image was long
and arduous, but she said the
comfort of loved ones helped.
"It took many years and
what really help me over come
[my doubts] was my pastor
who always gave me words of


encouragement," said Mizell, a
member of The Purpose Center
Family Church in Hollywood.
The divorced mother of three
says she is determined to help
other young women do the
same. About a year ago, the
former: promotions and mar-
keting assistant for WEDR
99 Jamz, founded her non-
profit organization to focus on
mental and physical health of
young girls.
The Self-Esteem seminar,
which is Lovel3's first event,
touched on topics from nu-
trition and exercise to basic
savings and banking lessons
and even etiquette. Oneof the


highlights to the event was a
presentation by Ft. Lauder-
dale native Brian "Poem" Col-
lier.
Carolyn Mercury Powery,
president of The Etiquette
Touch Institute, taught atten-
dants about the importance of
poise and dining manners.
And while the etiquette
coach has tons of rules that
she could share, she said
one emphasizes following the
Golden Rule: Do unto others
as you would like others to do
unto you.
"It's a very simple rule be-
cause everyone wants to be re-
spected," she said.


i


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


Mentoring program gives prom dresses to students


'' rt. i:



,?- s / ,'4


Girls seeking free formal gowns had more than 200 dresses More than 200 dresses were collected by the local mentor-
to choose from at the local Becca's Closet chapter, ing' program, Be U. Productions, Inc.


Study: People become more religious during hardships


Future designers attend camp


Bethany SDA Church prepares for annual block party


Ministers worry about U.S. debt


Orlando megachurch pastor dies






















FOr profit hospice growth
2000 Government Total number
or other of hospices
*: 2 318


2000 Non-profit For-profit


~3,476
Source: Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC)


overhaul if they retake the
Senate and White House, ad
the law faijes a senes of court
challengers that are expected
to be settled by t~he Supreme
Court. Cuts to Medicare and
Medicaid spending also are
on the table in Washington's
negotiations to raise the
federal debt ceiling.
In the near term, the recent
recession and weak recovery
are expected to reduce the
rate .of growth in health
.spending as consumers
reduce out-of-pocket medical
spending, and job osses cut

The study predicts 49
percent of spending a four-
point rise, Will corne from
all leVelS Of government (0
2020. Businesses share will
;alitwo points to,18_lgEreent.

the number of people covered
by' employer-sponsored
insurance. In 2010, national
health spending grew 3.9
percent to a total of $2.6
trillion, according to the
report. It called that a historic
low, falling slightly below the
previous reason was that
the government paid private~
insurers less to run. Medicare
Advantage plans.

PRICES IN 2014
Health spending will see

aesh rph upc in kl c

in, including the Medicaid
expan sion and msurance
subsidies for lower earners.
"The report projects that
national health spending i~ll
grow 8.3 percent in 2014, up
fro a projected 5.5 percent
grow-th rate in 2013.
While spending growth will
Spike in 2014, it is expected
to taper off the following year
and growv. 6.2 percent on
average from 2015 to 2020,
the report found. It attributed
the slowdown to the excise
tax on high-cost insurance
plans that begins in 2018,
and the fact that some low-
wage workers will lose their
company insurance coverage.


Deaths plague even top hospitals


"'^as Mon comm Tunne owN ownm


patients lived in nursing facili-
ties when they entered hospice
care,
"Certain hospices seem to be
seeking out beneficiaries with
particular characteristics, and
these beneficiaries are often
found in nursing facilities,"
said Jodi Nudelman, a regional
inspector general for HHS in a

we at are pa h si es that
operated out of nursing facili-
ties in excess of $3,000 more
per beneficiary on average
than it paid other hospices,
she said.
Medicare pays a $143 daily
flat rate for hospice patients,
but they must be expected to
live less than six months.
They also must agree to shift
to palliative care, which is in-
tended only to relieve a dis-
ease's pain or symptoms not
to attempt to cure it.


hospices were pair, 29 percent
more per beneficiary than non-
profit hospices. Medicare pays
for 84 percent of all hospice
patients.
At the same time, some of
the nation's largest for-profit
hospice companies are pay-
ing multimillion-dollar settle-
ments for fraud claims and

frm stnteul2 f de tilaa en
forcement agencies. For exam-
ple:
*Vitas, the .nation's largest
for-profit hospice company, is
the subject of a fraud investi-
gation by the Justice Depart-
ment and the Texas attorney
general, according to federal
court filings .
*Gentiva, the nation's fast-
est-growing for-profit hospice
company, agreed last month
to pay $12.5 million .to settle
Medicare fraud claims, Justice


MedPAC found that amount
the hospices that exceeded
the spending cap, 44 percent
of patients transferred back
to traditional care from hos-
pices exceeded the six-month
spending cap. That suggests
"above-cap hospices may be
admitting patients before they
meet the hospice eligibility cri-
tria," it eaid in its 2011 report

The Center for Medicare and
Medicaid Services, which ad-
ministers Medicare, is consid-
ering reducing payments for
hospice in nursing facilities,
Nudelman said.
In a growing number of cas-
es, hospices are collecting the
same daily rate for visiting pa-
tients in nursing facilities as
other hospice programs that
also provide patients' room,
boad and medical care not re-
lated to their terminal illness.


Department records show.
Gentiva declined to com-
ment, and Vitas did not return
phone calls.
Critics say costs have also
increased because for-profit
organizations have cherry-
picked patients who live the
longest and require the least
amount of care such as
those with dementia or Al-


zheimer's, rather than those
with cancer.
From 1998 to 2008, Al-
zheimer's and dementia hos-
pice cases grew from 28,000 to
174,000, reports the Medicare
Payment Advisory Commit-
tee (MedPAC), an independent
commission that advises Con-
gress. The inspector general's
report said 90 percent of those


AN AVERAGE $30 A MONTH IN 2012. DOWN FROM $30.76 THIS YEAR.


By Janet; Adamy

.Almost half the nation's
health-care spending will
come from government cof
fers by 2020, up four percent-
age points from 2010. accord.
ing to new federal spending
.figures to be released Thurs-
Sday.
The data, published ~by the
trade journal Health Affairs,
shows how President Barack
Obama's 2010 health-over-
haul law will reshape who
foots the bill for the nation's
medical expenses by the end
of the decade.
Private employers will pay
for a slightly smaller portion
of the nation's health care
because some large employ-
erg wida low-wage workers
are expected to stop offering
10a'~lW 'if surance. thPregrt

Federal and state govern-
ments will take on a greater
portion because the health
overhaul will greatlt xpand
. the number of mericans on
the Medicaid insurance pro-
gram for the poor, and the
federal government will sub-
sidize insurance plans for mil-
lions of lower earners through
new insurance exchanges. In
addition, the growth of Medi-
care enrollment from an ag-
ing population will push up
federal health-care spending,



Spending by federal, state
Sand local governments is ex-
'pected to account for 49 per-
cent of all health spending
or $2.28 trillon. in 2020. up
from 45 percent in 2010. Pn-
vate businesses are expected
to account for 18 percent of
all health spending. or $820 5
billidin, down from 20 percent
in 20:10,
SThe reports authors-
economistss and actuaries
from the `federal Center
for Medicare Services` ---
cautioned that the figures
`could change If' lawmakers
rework federal health
programs. Republicans ha'e
pledged to repeal the health


By Noam N. LeveV

WASHINGTON Even as
health costs continue to rise,
Medicare beneficiaries will see
the average price of a Part D
drug plan decline slightly next
year, the Obama administra-
tion announced recently, offer-
ing some relief amid pressure
to cut benefits in the federal
health insurance program for
the elderly.
The Part D drug benefit, cre-
ated under the Bush adminis-
tration, allows seniors and oth-
ers on Medicare to sign up for a
privately administered, govern-
ment-subsidized health plan to
get their prescriptions.
Very popular with benefi-
ciaries, the program has also
proved far less costly than bud-
get analysts ori~ginally-expect-
ed, in part because of compe-
tition among private plans and
because of growing use of less-
expensive generic drugs.
In 2012, the average Part D
plan will charge seniors about
$30 a month, according to the
Department of Health and Hu-
man Services.
That's down from $30.76 in
2011 and would mark the sec-


more than 17 million Medicare
beneficiaries have taken advan-
tage of preventive services such
as cancer screenings that are
now available without co-pays,
another new benefit of the law.
And more than one million
people have seen a physician
for Medicare's annual wellness
vidit, which the new law also
makes available without re-
quiring a co-pay.
While celebrated by the
Obama administration, the
widely acknowledged success
of the Part D program is also
fueling calls from conservatives
to expand~ privatization of the
Medicare program.
Many House Republicans
pointed to.the drug program in
pushing their plan to replace
the current government health
-insweemrnceprogram with assys-
tem of vouchers that seniors
would use to purchase private
health coverage.
Dr. Don Berwick, who over-
sees the Medicare and Medicaid
program, cautioned Thursday
that the broader privatization
championed by House Bud-
get Committee chairman Paul
Ryan, R-Wis., would actually
mean higher costs for seniors.


ond time since the drug ben-
efit began in 2006 that average
premiums had declined.
By comparison, overall pri-
vate~ health-care spending in .
America is expected to grow by
nearly five percent a year be-
tween now and 2014, according
to the latest estimates by gov-
ernment actuaries. Premiums
on many private medical insur-
ance policies are rising even
more sharply.
The Obama administration
has been working to strengthen
the Medicare drug benefit with


the help of the new health care
law the president signed last
year. The law gradually phases
out the coverage gap known as
sthodoughnut hole, long viewed
as a weakness in the program.
'Last year some four million
seniors received $250 rebate
checks when they fell into the
gap in coverage, thanks to the
law. This year, the law will pro-
vide 50 percent discounts on
prescriptions for those who hit
the doughnut hole.
Administration officials also
announced last Thursday that


death and readmission rates.
"This is a very important
finding," says Donald Ber-
wick, director of the Centers
for Medicare 85 Medicaid Ser-
vices, adding that though pa-
tient-survey data offer critical
insights into how it feels to be
a patient at different hospitals,
patients' perceptions don't tell
the whole story.
Over the past decade, ris-
ing costs and a flood of com-
plex therapies have prompted
patients, employers, insurers
and the federal government to
demand public disclosure of
health care data. Armed with
this evidence, Berwick says,


Medical Center in Rock Hill,
S.C., and Southwest Missis-
sippi Regicinal Medical Center
in Macomb had high death
rates in all three categories.
Thirteen had low death rates
across the board-
Veterans Administration
hospitals performed well, ac-
cording to data released for the
first time this year. Ten hospi-
tals had lower death rates than
average for heart failure; two
were lower for heart attacks;
and five for pneumonia.
All VA hospitals were as good
as or better than the national
rate for heart attack and heart
failure.


By Steve Sternberg and
Christopher Schnaars

More than 120 hospitals giv-
en top marks by patients for
providing excellent care also
have a darker distinction: high
death rates for heart attack,
heart failure or pneumonia, a
USA TODAY analysis of new
Medicare data has found.
Experts say the newspa-
per's analysis of data released
recently by Medicare offers a
window into the relationship
between patients' perceptions
of the the quality of their hos-
pital care and more objective
measures, such as hospitals'


doctors, insurers and patients
themselves can make better
choices about where to obtain
medical care.
The challenge is to measure
hospitals accurately. Experts
still debate what measures
to use, says John Wennberg,
founding editor of the Dart-
mouth Atlas of Health Care
and author of Tracking Medi-
cine: A Researcher's Quest to
Understand Health Care.
Medicare's analysis of more
than 4,600 hospitals found
that 323, or one of every 14,
had above-average death rates
for heart attack, heart failure or
pneumonia. Two Piedmont


Medicare. This, in turn, raises
hard questions about public
policy, ethics and moral judg-
ments that Americans are go-
ing to have to face even as
elected officials in Washington
try to avoid them. It portends a
future, I believe, that includes
either systematic rationing -
even if we don't want to call it
that or some form of "death
panels," though hopefully we
won't call them that either.
Why? Because Medicare,
like the federal debt, is not re-
motely sustainable at the rate
it is growing. Fueled by Baby
Boomers turning 65, its rolls
will nearly double from 47 mil-
lion to 80 million in the next 20
years. (It's already projected to
go bust in 13 years.) A recent
study by the Urban Institute
found that a typical working
couple retiring this year will
get about three times as many


Medicare is enormously pop-
ular because it provides vir-
tually unlimited benefits for
hospital care and heavily sub-
sidizes benefits for doctor care
and prescription drugs. It's
essentially a single-payler sys-
tem of socialized medicine that
politicians like to condemn in
theory and embrace in practice.
But it's not going to last long
without some mix of unpopular
measures: large tax increases,
draconian benefit cuts, some
abstract rationing formula or
bureaucrats making God-like
decisions about patient care
that could penalize certain life-
styles.
When I ask doctors about
health care issues, especial-
ly rationing, their responses,
without exception, echo those
of Michael Ervin, a retired
Dayton, Ohio, physician who
founded and sold a highly suc-


cessful private health mainte-
nance organization and now
chairs a non-profit health
care group: "We already ration
health care; people just don't
understand it," he says. "It's a
subject that allows people to
take advantage of others' lack
of knowledgee"
Which invites the question,
why does talk of rationing health
care evokte such hostile reaction
when rationing is such a com-
mon practice in the rest of our
economy; when governments
routinely adopt regulations or
fund programs based on cost-
benefit analyses that calculate
the value of human life? The
British system of socialized
medicine which, notably, is
more popular there than our
system is here -puts a figure,
the equivalent of $49,000, on
what it will spend to extend a
hilman life for one yiear.


BV Don Campbell

Reports recently about three
new drugs for treating those
with advanced-stage prostate
cancer were of special interest
to me, not just because I was
fortunate enough to catch my
prostate cancer early, but be-
cause I know or knew sev-
eral people who didn't.
Life-extending drugs debut
frequently, and they usilally
seem exorbitantly expensive
when weighed against their
promise of adding a few weeks
or months of life to someone
with a terminal illness. In these
prostate-cancer cases, one new
drug costs $5,000 a month, an-
other $8,000 every three weeks
and a third $93,000 for a full
course of treatment.
The costs in this instance are
even more relevant because
most of them would be paid by


ib ~a~


dollars in Medicare services as
they paid in Medicare taxes.
What part of that upside-down
equation do people not under-
stand?


The next time you hear some-
One whining that "you can't cut
my Medicare I paid for it,"
just calmly tell them: "No, not
most of it, you didn't."


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


Medicare costs for hospice up 7o percent


For-profitfirms

see larger

market share

By Kelly KennedV

WASHINGTON Medicare
cot eo nhoosepcea car eahvet r
health care sector as for-profit
companies continue to gain a
larger share of the end-of-life
medical market, government
records show.
From 2005 through 2009,
Medicare spending on hospice
care rose 70 percent to $4.31 .
billion, according to Medicare
records.
A recent report by the in-
spector general for Health and
Human Services, which over-
sees Medicare, found for-profit


Medicare part D premiums to dip :Uncle Sam to pay more

THE GOVERNMENT-SUBSIDIZED PRESCRIPTION PLAN WILL COST SENIORS Of the tab for health


Ration care wIhen it comes to M~edicare credits





DON'T LET MENOPAUSE

GET YOU DOWN

Menopause is behavioral roller coaster for
some women, who experience a host of emo-
tions including mood swings, fear, depression
and irritability.
The womenshealth.gov website suggests how
to ease moodiness associated with menopause:
*Make sure you $'et enough sleep each night,
and stick to a regular sleep and wake schedule.
veExdertise fo at least 30 minutes almost
Limit how many activities you take on.
Find ways to help manage stress.'
Seek support from friends, a peer group or
get counseling.
*Talk to your doctor about medications and
therapy options to help you manage menopause
symptoms.
*Relax by reading a book, or treat yourself to
some quiet time.



HELP .PREVENT

ECZE~MA FLARE S

Eczema is a chronic condition that makes the
skin red, dry and itchy.
The American Academy of Family Physicians
suggests how to prevent flares of eczema:
*Stay away from irritants such as harsh
soaps, detergents, gasoline and cleaning

We:::clo thing made of cotton, and avoid
wool and synthetic fabrics that can irritate the
skin.
*Take short, lukewarm baths or showers and
wash with a mild cleanser. Avoid hot water.
S- i* Pat skin~dry after- a-bath-or shower and. -
immediately apply moisturizer.
*Make sure you moisturize your skin every
day. Avoid scratching your skin.
Avoid getting very sweaty or overheating.
*Find ways to control stress.


THAWr POULTRY

SAFELY

There are safe ways to thaw chicken, turkey
and other poultry and there are not so safe
ways to do so. Improper thawing can lead to
food-borne illness.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture offers
thes t giow sultry to thaw at room
temperature.
*Allow the pdbitry to thaw in the refrigerator,
for one-to-two days.
*You can thaw poultry in a sealed bag placed
in cold water for two-to-three hours, changing the
'water every 30 minutes to keep it cold.
*Thawed poultry can be stored in the
refrigerator for another one-to-two days.
*You can defrost poultry in the microwave, but
it should be cooked immediately afterward.
*Always allow poultry to thaw before using a
slow cooker.





iron to prevent anemia and reduce the
chances of preterm birth and a low-
birth weight baby. Your doctor may
prescribe prenatal vitamins during
your pregnancy.
Do get seven to nine hours of sleep
each night and reduce stress in your
life by setting limits and saying "no" to
requests for your tinie and erfergy.
Don't smoke, which can raise the
risk of miscarriage, preterm birth and
infant death, drink alcohol, which can
'1;- ?I cause irreversible birth defects, or use
illegal drugs, which are dangerous for
you and your baby. Avoid exposure to
Please turn to PREGNANCY 19B


BV KellV Hughson
Director of Wornen 's Services
North Shore Medical Center

If you just found out that you're
pregnant, .should you eat fish? What
about drinking a cup of coffee, soft
drink or glass of wine? Can you travel
by air? Should you get your hair
dyed? Can you stand in front of a
microwave? Artggghhhhi You probably
have a thousand questions, but only
a hundred answers about what you
should and shouldn't do or eat while
pregnant. So here are a few tips to help
you and your baby stay healthy for the


~RF OR Obesity focuses (ni ~failures of parents
~ila Heard of children, ages 10 to 17, are Craig and Weight Watchers,. the ing created to teach parents how
kh~eard~miamidimesonline .com considered overweight or obese, government has also issued the to cook more nutritious meals
according to the United Health youth-focused 'Let's Move' initia- as well as provide basic educa.
'I'he informal 'War on Obesity' Group. tive. There has been a growing tion on healthy foods, dietary
has beert escalating for years The growing number of obese awareness that parents play a requirements and how to remain
low. One of the newest fronts is Americans has been a popular large part in what their children, fit such as the ones offered at the
the 'focusing on childhood-obesi- discussion for a while. pre-teens and even teens put into Abundant Life Health and Fitness
ty. The theory is that by reaching With the growing concern of their mouths to a large extent. Center in Ft. Lauderdale.
kids wnith a message of healthy obesity, methods to win the 'War Recognizing the connection Yet already the focus on pa-
eating and exercise is good for on Fat' hav~e also seemingly in- between a well-informed parent rental responsibility has pro-
you early, will curb the num- creased. mayr produce healthier meals duced what some would say are
ber of obese adults. Currently, In addition to traditional weight and encourage their children to extreme methods. Instances of .
in Florida, about 33. 1 percent loss schools such as Jenny exercise, many programs are be- Please turn to OBEBSITY 198


PREGNANCY DOS AND DON'TS!-'


.' r ~ ~1B
;! ':-.


dience and favor structured envi-
ronments and schedules, and will
often use extreme forms of pun-
ishment to get what they want out
of their children. This type parent


pe icop er These parents are
responsive the point of hover-
ing over their children and are
extremely invested in every as-
pect of their lives. Nothing is too
much trouble or too much of a
sacrifice for their child. In the ex~
treme, they're hypervigilant about
their kid's health, safety, friends,
activities and grades, to the point
of choosing friends, completing
school assignments and fighting
their teens' battles. This style may
lead to blurring of parent-child
boundaries and lack of discipline
as these parents prize closeness
and support over all else.
Disengaged These parents gen-
erally, take a hands-off approach
possibly distracted by their own
Please turn to MENTAL 19B


BV Stacy Kaiser
Ideally, parenting styles are
customized and refined to suit
an individual child's personality,
skills, srntosu adm wan esses.

style and ways ofor~espondingmto
well ingrained, bitt I've seen over
and over again in my practice how
some simple adjustments can
make for a much happier and well-
adjusted child.
And the' research officially backs
this theory up. The results of a
three-year study showt that match-
ing your parenting style to your
child's personality can greatly re-
duce the youngster's risk of de-
Soltns takfra moment about
what kind of parent you are so that
you can work on adapting who you
are to what is in the best interest
emotionally- for your child. While
these categories are broad, they
represent four styles that I have
seeir over and over again, both in

... .. ... ..


my practice and real life:
Laisses-faire Highly respon-
sive parents, undemanding in
their approach to discipline, with a
non-confrontational manner. They
tend to be nontraditional, opt for
a lenient and democratic type of
household and are very invested in



W1HS the


their approach which favors few
rules, letting a child develop at his
or her own pace and "doing their
own thing." .
Authoritarian Parents believe
in and enforce firm discipline and
rules. They tend to be very invest-
ed in demanding respect and obe-


NO TOOLS NEEDED: Tourists come from hundreds of
miles around to eat the $15.75 lobster' rolls at Red's Eat
in Wiscasset, Maine, where customers happily stand in
line for an hour.


TAKIES THE CAKE: The lump crab cakes at The Nar-
rows on K~ent Island, near the Chespeake Bay Bridge,
have virutally no filler and have won many awards.


next nine months.
Do see your doctor for regular
prenatal checkups. A4sk about
stopping any medications you are
currently taking and starting any new
ones. Make sure health problems such
as diabetes or high blood pressure are
treated and kept under control. Ask
about getting a flu shot. Don't forget
to wear a seatbelt when you are in the
car.
Do eat plenty of fruits, vegetables,
grains, calcium-rich foods and lean
meats. It's okay to have up to 12
ounces of fish per week, but avoid fish
such as shark, swordfish, mackerel or


tilefish, that are high in mercury and
can cause serious nervous system
damage for your b~aby. Instead, opt for
canned light tuna, shrimp, salmon,
pollack or catfish. Also stay away from
unpasteurized milk and soft cheeses
because they may contain listeria,
a bacterium linked to miscarriage,
premature birth, stillbirth or fetal
illness. Remember to drink plenty of
water every day to prevent constipation.
Do get at least 400 mcg of folic
acid every day to lower the risk~ of
birth defects. It's al;o, a good ideal to
take folic acid before you become
pregnant. Also be sure to get enough


. 2

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rellness

Sponsored by North Shore Medical Center
"Once You Knoto, It's WhSere To Go"


~6~1'Fi~~ E~


Parenting skills that impact




your chidd s mental health


smack down?


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IRA 1 MUST CONTital. THElit OWN DESTINY


REST
CHIB[REN'
HOSPITALS


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


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With rankings like these,

Miami Children's Hospital


has much to be proud of.

Only one hospital in Florida has programers listed in all 10 subspecialty
categories nationally ranked by U.S.News & World Report in its 2011-12
"Best Children's Hospitals" rankings.


SCancer

dCardiology & Heart Surgery

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SGastroenterology

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Nephrology
Neurology & Neurosurgery

Orthopedics

Pulmonology

Urology


d

d

d


For a physician referral to a pediatric specialist,
please call 888.MCH.DOCS (888.624.3627).
3100 SW 62nd Ave., Miami, FL 33155 305.666.6511


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Based on the U.S.News & World Reports 2011-12
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BIEST
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OBESITY
continued from. 17B

children actually being removed
from their parents' care and
placed in foster care are not
unheard of now. In 2009, Jerri
Gray, then a 555-1b. teen was
placed into the South Carolina
Foster care system and in 2007,
Sa nine-year-old girl in New York
Swho was labeled morbidly obese
was also removed from her par-
ents' home.
According to a report by the
Child Welfare League of Ameri-
ca, other courts in states such
as New York, Indiana, New
Mexico, Pennsylvania and Cali-
fornia have debated whether


Tips to help you and your unborn child stay healthy during pregnancy


Mt. (alvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street


Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1410 N.W. 87th Street


Pembroke Park (hurch of Christ
3707 5.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a.m. Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Evnn Worship 6 pm
Wednesday Gnerall Sible Study7:30 p.m.
T918715100 pfogfam Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS/Comcosrt 3 Saturday- 7:30 a.m.
www.pembrokeporkthurchofthrlst.com pembrokeporkroc~Pbellsouth.net


i ~Friendship Missionary Baptist Church i
1 ~740 N.W. 58th Street E


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN~ DESTINY


Liberty lity Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street


IIIZ~IKI~IY~~


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Avenue


morbid childhood obesity is the
result of parental neglect.
Yet while the desire to pros-
ecute parents may continue
to grow, it remains diffcult to
prove abuse in such cases, ac-
cording to Richard Balnave, a
professor at the University of
Virginia School of Law.
"Obesity, although potentially
dangerous, does not generally
put a child in imminent danger,
Balnave said in a previously
published interview.
However, such cases will also
have to struggle to take into
consideration several additional
factors including environment,
genetics and even the free will
of the obese youth in question,


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue


Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Aeu


. a


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue


rvices
Iole ase


Order of Services
Hour of Prayer 6-30 am *n Early Mornmng Worshlp 1-30 a m
Sunday School 9 30 am *n Morning Worship 11 a.m
Youth Minlstry Study Wed 7 p m Prayer;Blble Study Wed 7 pm r
Noon day Allar Prayer (M-F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday 11 a m 1 p.m
wwu irarn~!h Cmbsmecl [':I frrendshlDPpover'Dbellouth ner


Bro. James Seymore


Bro. James Gibson


Greater Harvest Baptist Church under
the leadership of Rev. Kenneth McGee, pas-
tor will hold it's first Ordination Service at
4 p.m. on August 21. This honor is to be
bestowed upon these dutiful and God-fear-
ing Christian men who will serve along with
Dea. John Turner, Deacon Ministry Chair-
man. Bro. Willard Leon Barnes Jr., Bro.


Leroy Johnson, Bro. James Gibson and
Bro. James Seymore.
Rev. Charles Coleman, Pastor Emeritus
of Christian Fellowship M.B.C. will be in
charge of the service. Rev. McGee states
that it is truly a blessing that these fine
Christian men have shown their love for
Christ and accepted the challenge of being


ordained as a Servant Leader.
Great Harvest is a church that is "Walk-
ing in Purpose, Sowing in Expectation and
Believing in Jesus." The community at
large is invited to join us on this auspicious
occasion at El Palacio Hotel and Confer-
ence Center, 21485 NW 27 Ave., 9th Floor,
Miami Gardens, FL.


The Vesper Choir of A.M.
Cohen Temple COGIC will cel-
ebrate its 34th Anniversary
at 4 p.m. on Sunday, August
21, featuring local choirs and
groups.
The Appointed Gospel Sing-


ers, recording artists will be
special guests.
Refreshments served after the
program. The church is located
at 1747 N.WT. 3rd Avenue.
Bishop Jacob Cohen is the
pastor.


Little Rock celebrates annual meeting
Little Rock Primitive Bap- Guest speaker will be El-
tist Church, 1790 Ali Baba der James Grier of Dawson,
Avenue, Opa Locka, Elder GA. Dinner will be served af-
Richard Austin of Macon, ter Sunday services.
GA, pastor is having their Fior more information,
annual three day meeting please call 786-294-8179.
starting August 19-21 at 1 Come and have a Hallelu-


MENTAL
continued from 18B

troubles stress or addictions.
Neither warm nor responsive
toward their children on the
far end of the scale, they could
be termed neglectful or abusive,
Their children may experience a
great deal of freedom, but often


ultimately are missing critical
skills that will help them man-
age day-to-day and long-term
challenges.
As a therapist, I am always
trying to strike a balance be-
tween teaching parents to focus
on their child's self-esteem and
emotional well-being while still
being able to appeal to their par-


ticular style. In an ideal situa-
tion parents combine elements
of all of the above caregiving
styles appropriately. They are
assertive without being aggres-
sive or abusive; approach child-
rearing with firm rules and clear
boundaries; and reason with
and support their child rather
than take a punitive stance or


do everything for them. Children
raised with elements all of these
styles combined tend to be more
cooperative, self-regulating, so-
cially responsible and have the
least anxiety and highest level of
self esteem. Furthermore, they
tend to be the happiest... and
isn't that what we all want more
than anything else?


jah good time.


p~m


Minister Brother Job Israel
(Hebrew Israellites)
i 305-199-2920

i\-i i. ngele of Freedom
: Pas~on Mlnlstrles
P 0 Bos 2613
Joaslonaille 1L 37226
itlo peronaopparace


is normal weight should gain
about 25 pounds during her
pregnancy.
Don't change or clean out your
cat's litter box and avoid contact
with pet rodents such as guinea
pigs and hamsters.
Don't take very hot baths or
use a hot tub or sauna, which
can be harmful to the fetus,
Also avoid douching or using
scented feminine hygiene


Center also features the only
Level III Neonatal Intensive Care
Unit (NICU) in Northern Miami-
Dade County. Services include
24-hour coverage of certified
neonatologists, perinatologists
to treat high risk pregnancies,
and pediatric surgeons.
For more information on
maternity services or classes
at North Shore Medical Center,
please call 305-835-6000.


PREGNANCY
continued from 17B

toxic substances and chemicals,
such as cleaning solvents,
certain insecticides and paint.
Don't gain too much weight.
Excess body weight can increase
the chances of developing
gestational diabetes, pre-
eclampsia, stillbirth and preterm
birth. In general, a woman who


products, which can increase
the risk of infection.
You can get your hair dyed,
drink a cup of coffee or soda,
stand in front of a microwave, sit
in front of a computer monitor,
paint your nails, and travel by
air when you are pregnant. If
you have any more questions
about pregnancy dos and
don't, talk with your doctor
or call 1-800-984-3434 for a


free referral to an obstetrician/
gynecologist near you.
North Shore Medical Center
offers advanced medical care by
skilled professionals, who have
the experience to handle routine
deliveries and fully address any
complications that may occur.
NSMC has been delivering
babies for a half century,
and the services have earned
the highest quality ranking.


The facilities at North Shore
Medical Center are designed
for the comfort of you and your
family. Each member of our
staff is trained to enhance the
experience of giving birth. From
prenatal educational classes
to our Neonatal Intensive
Care, from our obstetricians to
nursing staff, all North Shore's
services are focused on you and
your baby.North Shore Medical


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 1 a.m.,
11 a.m., I p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m


I (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthboptistmiomi.org


Order of Services
!undsl I30aIlam
sundlr school Ilon=
Thursday Ipm ilble
Studr Praler Munlng B110
Bopnsm Thurs before
I's, un Ipm


~C Sunday loming IorshlSIp om
Su1Inday men Bibl Study 5 pm
nalk dor Lada Blble bdy 5 p ni
n pday [aning Worhip 6 pm


-- \


St. John Baptisl
1328 N.W. 3rd


Order of Services
Ior lyunday
Morenpwng wp 130am
Lndrsckhod 13om
onigworshlp lI am
ovrndlBible Iud
y [Tue)1pm


19B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


"P
;?,Z


'4P~ (~~


Parents to blame for obesity


I' 5


Bro. ILeroy Johnson


Deacon Ordination Service at El Palacio Hotel


Vesper Choir celebrates anniversary


Child s mental health may be affected by parenting skills


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue


New Birth Baptist (hurch, The (athedral of Faith international
2300 N.W. 135th Street


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
MMH~~lll~llnMF'rnrr~l~
Order of Ser


t Church
Ave r'ue























~___~~~~_~


~t~be blim Glttr
The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback
makes for a healthy dialogue among our readership and the community. Letters must, however, be 150 words or less, brief and to the point, and
may be edited For grammar, style and clarity. All letters must be signed and must include the name, address and telephone number of the writer
for purposes of confirming authorship. Send letters t~o: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fax
them to 305F 757-5770; Email: kmeneir~Pmiamitimesonline.com .


BL^CKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the
world from racial and national antagonism wnhen It accords to
every person, regardless of race, creed or color, his or her
human and legal rights Hating no person, fearing no person,
the Black PreSS Strives to help every person In the firm belief
that all persons are hurt as long as anyone Is held backe


M BY JAMES CLINGMAN, NNPA COLUMNIST


Debt deal leaves Blacks in a deeper hole
If Boehner got 98 percent of in deeper trouble than we were what we have is a real serious wealthy a free
what he wanted from the debt before the deal. But, many of problem folks. We will now see poorly for ful
ceiling deal, what did the other us were asleep about 10 years cuts in federally subsidized which, like it (
side get? I haven't heard the op- ago when the net worth gap was student loans, Head Start and tax increases
posmng side give its percentage reported to be about 10 to 1 in food stamps, in addition to the in entitlement
yet. Of course, there was Rep- favor of white households. Now loss of more than 300,000 jobs. All right,
resentative Emmanuel Cleaver, that it's 20 to 1, with Black Black folks won't be left out of the deal wen
who said the deal was a "Satan households having a Imedian that equation. didn't get jac:


you will have to bear much of
the financial burden for the
deal. The folks in Washington
are hardly concerned about
us they couldn't care less as
they've shown us time and time
again. Why do we keep asking
them to do what we know they
won't or can't do? Whry can't we
see we've been played again? Do
we need to be hit upside the
head with a sledgehammer in
order to take care of business
for ourselves?


pass n oe
ture negotiations,
or not, will require
or draconian cuts
ts."
Black folks, so
It down and you
k from it. In fact,


Sandwich." The quandary here
is that if 98 percent of the deal
was pleasing to the Repubs,
does that leave two percent for
the Dems? You can't have more
than 100 percent of anything.
I wonder how this debt ceiling
deal makes most Black people
feel. Are you fired-up mad about
it or do you think it was pretty
good? Considering the latest
statistics on the net worth gap
between Blacks and whites, we
should understand that we are


net worth of $5,766.00 and 35
percent of our families having a
zero or negative net worth, we
are all riled up.
Factor in the debt ceiling deal
and the highest unemploy-
ment rate in the nation and


A recently-released report by
the Brookings Institute says it
all in regards to the recent deal
made by Congress: "The plan
imposes the full cost of deficit
reduction on low- and middle-
income households, gives the


BY JULIANNE MALVEAUX, NNPA COLUMNIST


has signaled that economic
revitalization would have to
happen without government
stimulation. That ~ay be one
OTif~e reasons S&P decided
to downgrade the value of
Ur.S. bonds. Is this the begin-
ning of the end of U.S. hege-
mony? In some eyes, we are
just another struggling coun-
try, hampered by debt that is
poorly secured, bereft of so-
lutions because of partisan
bickering.
SNegative statistics need
not be the beginning of our
end. We can turn it around,
if wre make clear choices. Is
there a collective will to invest
in our young people, to pro-
tride jobs for our unemployed,
to salvage the middle class?
Can we get on the same
page? The SAP downgrade
makes it clear that political
brinkmanship weakens our
nation financially. Our fiscal
failure, if uncorrected, rep-
resents the beginning of our
nation's end.


When S&P downgraded the
U.S. bond rating from AAA
to AA+, they formalized the
financial buzz of months,
if not years. The U.S. is go-
ing to hell in a hand basket,
replicating the denouement
of England in the mid-21st
century. Our tax structure,
which rewards the rich and
punishes the middle class,
looks like something from a
developing country and our
economic distribution is go-
ing to look like that soon, as
well. The bottom line is that
our politicians were willing to
take us to the brink on the
debt ceiling and the move
does not bode well for fiscal
stability.
There are a number of other
trends that are troubling. The
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture reported that 45.8 mil-
lion Americans received food
stamps in May, a 12 percent
increase from a year ago. This
represents a record -- the
highest number of people


receiving food stamps since
the program started. Under-
stand that there are many
who qualify for food stamps
but don't receive them they
are too proud to participate


weeks. The official unemploy-
ment rate for Blacks at 15.9
percen~i has also a~n. How-
ever, the real unemployment
rate for Blacks approaches 30 8
percent,


Nationally, home ownership fell to 66 percent, the low-
est level in at least two decades. And of course, the
unemployment rate is of extreme concern, now at 9.1
pefCent.


in a "welfare program." Thus,
the reported numbers under-
states the magnitude of food
insecurity in our nation.
Nationally, home ownership
fell to 66 percent, the low-
est level in at least two de-
cades. And of course, the un-
employment rate is of extreme
concern, now at 9.1 per-
cent. It is still so high and so
ingrained that a third of those
officially without work haven't
worked for a full year. The
average unemployed person
has been out of work for 40


Last week, President Obama
urged the private sector to
hire more vets. Yet, find-
ing jobs will take more than
exhortation and veterans
aren't the only ones who need
jobs. Imagine the impact if
Obama rolled out a program. to
target those Blacks who expe-
rience unemployment. What
if there were also tax credits
available for those who hired
inner city workers, for those
who have been unemployed
for more than a year? In tying
Obama's hands, Congress


BY ROGER CALDWELL, MIAMI TIMES COLUMNIST


a plan that could eefihg
different authorities in the
state into one authority. It
has been predicted that this
merger could save the state
$24 million by eliminating
administrative overlapping.
Scott may be working
on his public image but
Florida citizens have more
pressing issues on their
minds. It appears that the
default problem has no
easy answer. When there
is not enough money in the
treasury, it is hard to pay
your bills. At this point,
Florida residents can only
hope that the other author-
ities around the state are
solvent.


It may be difficult for some
to believe but Florida Gov-
ernor Rick Scott has im-
proved his job performance
rating according to a poll by
Quinnipiac University. This
month's poll found that 52
percent of Florida voters
still disapproved of his job
performance, but 35 per-
cent approved. In May, his
numbers for job approval
was a dismal 29 percent.
Scott is still one of the
country's most unpopular
governors, but his extreme
makeover is winning over
more Floridians.
With the passage of Sun-
Rail, it is possible that Scott
will pick up more support-


ers. However, just last week
the Santa Rosa Bay Bridge
Authority in Pensacola Bay
failed to make its $5 million
bond payment to its credi-
tor. By missing this pay-


missed a payment. This de-
fault situation could have a
negative ripple effect in the
state, when Florida tries to
borrow money.
Scott and his cabinet need


ment, this public authority
is now in default on $116
million worth of bonds sold
to build the toll bridge.
This is the first time since
the depression that a trans-
portation authority that
represents the state has


to make a thorough study of
how the Authority got into
this mess. It is important
that no other toll author-
ity has a potential problem
and could get into a simi-
lar situation. The Governor
has indicated that there is


OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011 1


(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published We~ekly at 900 NuW 54th Street'
Miami, Flojrida 33127-1818
Post Offl ice Bo 270200
Buena Vista Station Miami. Flojrlda 33127
Phone 305-6i94-6210

H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Edltor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publlsher Emerltus
RACHEL J. REEVES. Publisher and Chairman


e IHHSt stand in sohidarity

for Over town's seniors


small pockets of urban cities and forced to fend for them-
selves. Facing incredible odds and hostile racist forces,
we moved forward with one primary goal: to make life better
for the next generation.
And while they may have come from the Bahamas, Haiti,
Bermuda or even Cuba, as distinctions based on culture, lan-
guage, religion and social mores soon blurred while their skin
color was used to define who they were here in Miami and
throughout the U.S. Black. In America, the "one drop of
Blacirblaocodevehm sp wrr notehn lersesm an amazing as they
formed a complete array of services and supportive institu-
tions from hotels, nightclubs, grocery stores and other busi-
nesses to doctors, dentists and lawyers. As the walls came
tumbling down and Blacks began to move freely and legally
beyond their more familiar environments some battle-worn
veterans chose to remain behind. They liked their old neigh-
borhoods, the familiar sights, sounds, smells and faces and
enjoyed walking to church.
Now, these senior citizens who were once the backbone of
our communities, our Black communities, face being pushed
out, relocated and forgotten all for the sake of development.
The Poinciana controversy and the decades of lawsuits over
who owns the highlyr-prized land in Overtown is but one ex-
ample of several instances where the voices of the powerless
are being ignored.
The challenge that our Black politicians face is making sure
those who helped build this City and their communities from
nothing are not treated like disposable commodities when
promises for community revitalization are waved in front of
them.
Those men and women who are barely holding on to their
homes are people, many of whom worked as maids, butlers
and drivers, paying for their modest homes one dollar at a
time. Surely they deserve to be fairly compensated for their
homes as well and should equally be given a piece of a very
large "pie" that white developers are eyeing like salivating
dogs.
We understand that gentrification and real estate develop-
ment are essential for any big city and facts of life here in
191iami`. But we also kno~ir that unless' we speak up for the
masses, they will continue to be treated like pawns. They may
not' live in spacious homes along the beach but their homes
matter to them. We are not talking about ghettoes. We are
talking about communities that face obliteration places with
rich histories, proud heritages and generations of survivors.
We cannot allow our own people to be mistreated for the
sake of economic gain. Let's hope someone will rise up to de-
fend their cause before it is too late.


Despite the cost we must

IllVeSt in our youth
As the Republicans play games with the U.S. economy
and seek ways to undermine the achievements of our
frtBlack president, those of us who don't live in a
"deluxe apartment in the sky," (a line from the theme song
to the old school rags-to-riches sitcom The Jeffersons), must
continue to find ways to survive in one of the toughest eco-
nomic periods in recent history. Pragmatism would suggest
that we reduce costs spending less and working harder to
make every dollar count. And while we must all be sure to
balance our budgets whether we're members of Congress
or single-parent momns in Liberty City one thing we can ill-
afford to do is to cut back on investing in our youth.
Young adults in Miami's Black communities wake up each
day to an environment where the field is not only uneven,
but dramatically tilted towards failure and disappointment.
They face the danger of sudden drive-by shootings, an ever-
increasing academic achievement gap in struggling public
schools and a digital divide that places them, at a distinct
disadvantage in relation to children from more affluent areas
and others from around the world.
Last week we chronicled the stories of a few young adults
from Overtown who were able to gain vital work experience
and mentorship through a CRA-financed summer jobs pro-
gram while making a decent wage at the same time. We wish
we could have shared more of their tales. Over half of these
teens were from Booker T. Washington Senior High and for
many of them, this summer marked their first time working
in a place where they were able to see the possibilities of a
career, the significance of higher education and the rewards
that come from having mentors.
Some might say that providing such. opportunities for only
135 young adults is not a big deal. However, we believe it
is. And just imagine the benefits if we were to multiply that
number and replicate similar programs throughout the City.
There are some services that we could do without and some
programs that we must either streamline or eliminate all to-
gether. But those like the CRA Summer Youth Employment
Program, that help young adults stay on a positive track,
should not be on the list. Because if we fail our youth dur-
ing their developmental years, it is certain that we will still
wind up paying the cost. Unfortunately, instead of wearing
starched white shirts, black slacks or navy blue skirts, they'll
be looking "sporty" in state-issued beige uniforms, answering
to numbers instead of names.
Maybe that's what some politicians and their supporters
would prefer in the first place.


Aualt Bureau of rCllulatronS

am


feel. Are you fired-up mad about it or do you think it waS
I odrhwti etciigda ae otBakpolpretty good?


U.S. faces avalanche of troubling trends


*
Times ma
y get tougher for Florida residents


I V V


citizens have more pressing issues on their minds. It ap-
pears that the default problem has no easy answer.




The Miami times.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00948
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times.
Uniform Title: Miami times
Physical Description: v.
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery,
The Magic Printery
Publication Date: 8/17/2011
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers. -- Florida
Newspapers. -- Miami (Fla.)
Newspapers. -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)
Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
General Note: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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notis - ABZ6315
oclc - 02264129
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*****************SCH 3-DIGIT 326
511 P1
LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
205 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


TempraMutanturEtNosMutamurInllis
Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


VOLUME 88 NUMBER 51 MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 17-23, 2011 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


MIAMI TIMES EXCLUSIVE


DCF chief



retires

Colyer says she left position

under her "own terms"
By D. Kevin McNeir
kmcneir@miamitimesonline.com
The Miami regional director
for the Department of Chil-
dren and Families, Jacqui
Colyer, has stepped down after
two years on the job. Her re-
tirement culminates a 30-year
career in social service where
she has worked "for families
and children in a community JACQUI COLYER
that I love."
For the record, Colyer emphasizes that her decision
was made without any pressure from state officials
and that she is anxious to move on to another phase

' My entire career has been
based on prevention and the
preservation of families all families
not just Black ones. j -COLYER


of her life.
"My departure is totally on my own terms," she said.
"I am not leaving under any type of cloud, there is
no bad blood and there weren't any negative circum-
stances that forced me to retire. That is the farthest
thing from the truth. For the most part, DCF still
wants me to stay around and do some other things for
the Department."
Colyer was born in South Carolina but has lived in
Miami since she was six-months-old. She has been
married to Leroy Colyer for 25 years. In her most
Please turn to COLYER 7A


Former BTW

cheerleader

gunned down
By Randy Grice .1
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com

Over the last five days, a total of
eight people have been murdered as
a result of gun violence. The sud-
den rash of violence has raised the
murder rate in Miami-Dade County,
which once claimed a 2005 low of I
171 a rate of seven murders for CALVIN MILTON
every 100,000 residents.
Former Booker T. Washington High School (BTW) student
and cheerleader captain, Calvin Milton, Jr., 27, was one of
the eight murdered last week. Milton was gunned down along
with another man in a drive-by shooting in Overtown on
Monday, August 15th.
"I knew him very well, he was a student of mine," said Dr.
Please turn to MILTON 6A


Aili -if All'rAl I Ild l I i ;


Miami's Black jobless KiT


rate nears 30 percent


LuJl


Wilson and other CBC members to tackle
minority unemployment issue at Town Hall


By D. Kevin McNeir
kmcneir'@miamirimiesonline.com

There's only one word that mat-
ters these days to Blacks in Miami
or in any of our nation's 50 states
-jobs. Economic analysts say that
even though the recent downgrade
of the U.S. credit rating and highly-
volatile financial markets have
walloped our economy, they believe
that things are actually better than


they expected. Tell that to Blacks in
South Florida who are experienc-
ing unemployment numbers that
have not been seen since the Great
Depression of 1929 that extended
into the mid 1930s. At one point
one-fourth of all Floridians were on
public assistance, 12 million people
in the U.S. were unemployed and
over 90,000 Florida families faced
dire hardship.


Jo Application
----. _


Please turn to JOBLESS 10A .


Barrington tells kids to stay focused

Local hero says "overcoming adversity" ---
is a key ingredient of Black tradition
By D. Kevin McNeir a pilot. ll fl" l 'Ih t l'l'l lll'l'i lll'f
kmcneir@miamitimesonline.com He shared his story that culmi-


Jamaican-born Barrington An-
tonio Irving, 27, grew up in Mi-
ami and graduated from North-
western where he starred on the
school's football team. But after
a chance meeting with a pilot, he
decided, much to the amazement
of his peers and family, to turn
down college scholarships based
on his gridiron prowess and went
after his dream of becoming


nated in his successful solo voy-
age around the world, the first
Black person to ever achieve this
feat, with 195 high school stu-
dents from Miami-Dade County
last Thursday. He says his mes-
sage is simple: "No one can stop
you from pursuing your dreams
but you."
"A lot of my friends at North-
western could not see life
Please turn to IRVING 10A


County opens

doors for 40oK

students
By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com

As students across
Miami-Dade County pre-
pare themselves for the
beginning of the 2011-
2012 school year,
many school admin-
istrators are plotting
new strategies to help
their students per-
form at the best level
possible. An estimated
380,006 students, 26
percent of those being Black,
are set to start school on
Please turn to SCHOOL 7A -


-Miami Times photo/D. Kevin McNeir
Barrington Irving believes in following your dreams.


NCAA visit puts

UM in hot seat
SBy Steve Gorten

S The University of Miami issued a statement Tues-
day morning about the NCAA investigation spurred
by allegations from former booster and convicted
SPonzi schemer Nevin Shapiro that he provided UM
Players with impermissible benefits during the past
decade.
"When Nevin Shapiro made his allegations nearly
a year ago, he and his attorneys refused to provide
S any facts to the University of Miami," UM stated.
"The University notified the NCAA Enforcement of-
ficials of these allegations. We are fully cooperating
with the NCAA and are conducting a joint investiga-
tion. The University of Miami takes these matters
very seriously."
The university's statement came a day after NCAA
investigators arrived on campus, and nearly an
hour and a half after Coach Al Golden spoke to
Sthe media about the matter. Players and assistant
WPlease turn to UM 10A


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Bachmann win would be a blessing for Obama


By DeWayne Wickham

Michele Bachmann's win in
the straw poll of the Republi-
can Party faithful in Iowa -
the first voter test of the 2012
presidential campaign had
to be good news to a White
House battered by a down-
turn in the economy and an
uptick in war casualties.
The Minnesota congress-
woman's victory in the non-


binding con-
test, which
historically
has not been
a major fac-
S tor in pick-
ing the GOP
nominee,
nonethe-
less helps
her chances of becoming the
party's standard-bearer, giv-
en the Tea Party movement's


muscle flexing in this politi-
cal season. Bachmann is a
leader of that kamikaze wing
of House Republicans.

THE WON'T-BUDGE PARTY
Although the Tea Party
movement's approval rat-
ing has been in a steady de-
cline, it still holds great sway
over the GOP. The no-com-
promise stance it forced on
congressional Republicans


during the debt debate has
pushed the movement onto
the tundra of U.S. politics,
a position from which Bach-
mann cannot mount a suc-
cessful assault on Obama's
presidency.
If the Tea Party wing's
stranglehold on the GOP
propels Bachmann to the
party's presidential nomina-
tion, something many pun-
dits think is still a long shot,


Bachmann will be soundly
defeated in the general elec-
tion and drag other Republi-
cans down to defeat. In such
a campaign, voters will be
constantly reminded that
Bachmann opposed rais-
ing the debt ceiling at a time
when many Democrats and
Republicans said doing so
would court economic catas-
trophe.
"It was very important (to


me) that we not raise the
debt ceiling. ... The worst
thing that you can do is con-
tinue to borrow money and
spend money that we don't
have," Bachmann said dur-
ing a televised debate. While
Bachmann endears herself
to the Tea Party crowd with
talk like that, she mortally
wounds her chances of ever
being more than a footnote of
Please turn to WIN 10A


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


We must stand in solidarity

for Overtown's seniors
In the days of segregation, Blacks were cordoned off in
small pockets of urban cities and forced to fend for them-
selves. Facing incredible odds and hostile racist forces,
we moved forward with one primary goal: to make life better
for the next generation.
And while they may have come from the Bahamas, Haiti,
Bermuda or even Cuba, as distinctions based on culture, lan-
guage, religion and social mores soon blurred while their skin
color was used to define who they were here in Miami and
throughout the U.S. Black. In America, the "one drop of
Black blood" philosophy reigned supreme.
Their achievements were nothing less than amazing as they
formed a complete array of services and supportive institu-
tions from hotels, nightclubs, grocery stores and other busi-
nesses to doctors, dentists and lawyers. As the walls came
tumbling down and Blacks began to move freely and legally
beyond their more familiar environments some battle-worn
veterans chose to remain behind. They liked their old neigh-
borhoods, the familiar sights, sounds, smells and faces and
enjoyed walking to church.
Now, these senior citizens who were once the backbone of
our communities, our Black communities, face being pushed
out, relocated and forgotten all for the sake of development.
The Poinciana controversy and the decades of lawsuits over
who owns the highly-prized land in Overtown is but one ex-
ample of several instances where the voices of the powerless
are being ignored.
The challenge that our Black politicians face is making sure
those who helped build this City and their communities from
nothing are not treated like disposable commodities when
promises for community revitalization are waved in front of
them.
Those men and women who are barely holding on to their
homes are people, many of whom worked as maids, butlers
and drivers, paying for their modest homes one dollar at a
time. Surely they deserve to be fairly compensated for their
homes as well and should equally be given a piece of a very
large "pie" that white developers are eyeing like salivating
dogs.
We understand that gentrification and real estate develop-
ment are essential for any big city and facts of life here in
Miami.'But we also kndo that unless we speak up for the
masses, they will continue to be treated like pawns. They may
not live in spacious homes along the beach but their homes
matter to them. We are not talking about ghettoes. We are
talking about communities that face obliteration places with
rich histories, proud heritages and generations of survivors.
We cannot allow our own people to be mistreated for the
sake of economic gain. Let's hope someone will rise up to de-
fend their cause before it is too late.


Despite the cost we must

invest in our youth
As the Republicans play games with the U.S. economy
and seek ways to undermine the achievements of our
first Black president, those of us who don't live in a
"deluxe apartment in the sky," (a line from the theme song
to the old school rags-to-riches sitcom The Jeffersons), must
continue to find ways to survive in one of the toughest eco-
nomic periods in recent history. Pragmatism would suggest
that we reduce costs spending less and working harder to
make every dollar count. And while we must all be sure to
balance our budgets whether we're members of Congress
or single-parent moms in Liberty City one thing we can ill-
afford to do is to cut back on investing in our youth.
Young adults in Miami's Black communities wake up each
day to an environment where the field is not only uneven,
but dramatically tilted towards failure and disappointment.
They face the danger of sudden drive-by shootings, an ever-
increasing academic achievement gap in struggling public
schools and a digital divide that places them at a distinct
disadvantage in relation to children from more affluent areas
and others from around the world.
Last week we chronicled the stories of a few young adults
from Overtown who were able to gain vital work experience
and mentorship through a CRA-financed summer jobs pro-
gram while making a decent wage at the same time. We wish
we could have shared more of their tales. Over half of these
teens were from Booker T. Washington Senior High and for
many of them, this summer marked their first time working
in a place where they were able to see the possibilities of a
career, the significance of higher education and the rewards
that come from having mentors.
Some might say that providing such opportunities for only
135 young adults is not a big deal. However, we believe it
is. And just imagine the benefits if we were to multiply that
number and replicate similar programs throughout the City.
There are some services that we could do without and some
programs that we must either streamline or eliminate all to-
gether. But those like the CRA Summer Youth Employment
Program, that help young adults stay on a positive track,
should not be on the list. Because if we fail our youth dur-
ing their developmental years, it is certain that we will still
wind up paying the cost. Unfortunately, instead of wearing
starched white shirts, black slacks or navy blue skirts, they'll
be looking "sporty" in state-issued beige uniforms, answering
to numbers instead of names.
Maybe that's what some politicians and their supporters
would prefer in the first place.


%bt 1liami timmf

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
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GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972.1982
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RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the
world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless of race. creed or color, his or her
human and legal rights Hating no person, tearing no person.
the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief
that all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back


Jlp
A.uOlt Bureau of Orculavons

Assonstim
(NKmF: S
i^.^j w^ Ba.,-..


M BY JAMES CLINGMAN, NNPA COLUMNIST


Debt deal leaves Blacks in a deeper hole
If Boehner got 98 percent of in deeper trouble than we were what we have is a real serious wealthy a free
what he wanted from the debt before the deal. But, many of problem folks. We will now see poorly for ful
ceiling deal, what did the other us were asleep about 10 years cuts in federally subsidized which, like it
side get? I haven't heard the op- ago when the net worth gap was student loans, Head Start and tax increases
posing side give its percentage reported to be about 10 to 1 in food stamps, in addition to the in entitlement
yet. Of course, there was Rep- favor of white households. Now loss of more than 300,000 jobs. All right,
resentative Emmanuel Cleaver, that it's 20 to 1, with Black Black folks won't be left out of the deal wen
who said the deal was a "Satan households having a median that equation. didn't get jacl


Sandwich." The quandary here
is that if 98 percent of the deal
was pleasing to the Repubs,
does that leave two percent for
the Dems? You can't have more
than 100 percent of anything.
I wonder how this debt ceiling
deal makes most Black people
feel. Are you fired-up mad about
it or do you think it was pretty
good? Considering the latest
statistics on the net worth gap
between Blacks and whites, we
should understand that we are


wonder how this debt ceiling deal makes most Black people
feel. Are you fired-up mad about it or do you think it was
pretty good?


net worth of $5,766.00 and 35
percent of our families having a
zero or negative net worth, we
are all riled up.
Factor in the debt ceiling deal
and the highest unemploy-
ment rate in the nation and


A recently-released report by
the Brookings Institute says it
all in regards to the recent deal
made by Congress: "The plan
imposes the full cost of deficit
reduction on low- and middle-
income households, gives the


e pass and boes
ture negotiations,
or not, will require
or draconian cuts
As."
Black folks, so
it down and you
k from it. In fact,


you will have to bear much of
the financial burden for the
deal. The folks in Washington
are hardly concerned about
us they couldn't care less as
they've shown us time and time
again. Why do we keep asking
them to do what we know they
won't or can't do? Why can't we
see we've been played again? Do
we need to be hit upside the
head with a sledgehammer in
order to take care of business
for ourselves?


BY JULIANNE MALVEAUX, NNPA COLUMNIST


U.S. faces avalanche of troubling trends


When S&P downgraded the
U.S. bond rating from AAA
to AA+, they formalized"the
financial buzz of months,
if not years. The U.S. is go-
ing to hell in a hand basket,
replicating the denouement
of England in the mid-21st
century. Our tax structure,
which rewards the rich and
punishes the middle class,
looks like something from a
developing country and our
economic distribution is go-
ing to look like that soon, as
well. The bottom line is that
our politicians were willing to
take us to the brink on the
debt ceiling and the move
does not bode well for fiscal
stability.
There are a number of other
trends that are troubling. The
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture reported that 45.8 mil-
lion Americans received food
stamps in May, a 12 percent
increase from a year ago. This
represents a record the
highest number of people


receiving food stamps since
the program started. Under-
stand that there are many
who qualify for food stamps
but don't receive them they
are too proud to participate


weeks. The official unemploy-
ment rate for Blacks at 15.9
percent, has also fallen. How-
ever, the real unemployment
rate for Blacks approaches 30
percent.


nationally, home ownership fell to 66 percent, the low-
est level in at least two decades. And of course, the
unemployment rate is of extreme concern, now at 9.1
percent.


in a "welfare program." Thus,
the reported numbers under-
states the magnitude of food
insecurity in our nation.
Nationally, home ownership
fell to 66 percent, the low-
est level in at least two de-
cades. And of course, the un-
employment rate is of extreme
concern, now at 9.1 per-
cent. It is still so high and so
ingrained that a third of those
officially without work haven't
worked for a full year. The
average unemployed person
has been out of work for 40


Last week, President Obama
urged the private sector to
hire more vets. Yet, find-
ing jobs will take more than
exhortation and veterans
aren't the only ones who need
jobs. Imagine the impact if
Obama rolled out a program to
target those Blacks who expe-
rience unemployment. What
if there were also tax credits
available for those who hired
inner city workers, for those
who have been unemployed
for more than a year? In tying
Obama's hands, Congress


has signaled that economic
revitalization would have to
happen without government
stimulation. That may be one
6of t:e reasons S&P decided
to downgrade the value of
U.S. bonds. Is this the begin-
ning of the end of U.S. hege-
mony? In some eyes, we are
just another struggling coun-
try, hampered by debt that is
poorly secured, bereft of so-
lutions because of partisan
bickering.
Negative statistics need
not be the beginning of our
end. We can turn it around,
if we make clear choices. Is
there a collective will to invest
in our young people, to pro-
vide jobs for our unemployed,
to salvage the middle class?
Can we get on the same
page? The S&P downgrade
makes it clear that political
brinkmanship weakens our
nation financially. Our fiscal
failure, if uncorrected, rep-
resents the beginning of our
nation's end.


BY ROGER CALDWELL, MIAMI TIMES COLUMNIST


Times may get tougher for Florida residents


It may be difficult for some
to believe but Florida Gov-
ernor Rick Scott has im-
proved his job performance
rating according to a poll by
Quinnipiac University. This
month's poll found that 52
percent of Florida voters
still disapproved of his job
performance, but 35 per-
cent approved. In May, his
numbers for job approval
was a dismal 29 percent.
Scott is still one of the
country's most unpopular
governors, but his extreme
makeover is winning over
more Floridians.
With the passage of Sun-
Rail, it is possible that Scott
will pick up more support-


ers. However, just last week
the Santa Rosa Bay Bridge
Authority in Pensacola Bay
failed to make its $5 million
bond payment to its credi-
tor. By missing this pay-


missed a payment. This de-
fault situation could have a
negative ripple effect in the
state, when Florida tries to
borrow money.
Scott and his cabinet need


cott may be working on his public image but Florida
citizens have more pressing issues on their minds. It ap-
pears that the default problem has no easy answer.


ment, this public authority
is now in default on $116
million worth of bonds sold
to build the toll bridge.
This is the first time since
the depression that a trans-
portation authority that
represents the state has


to make a thorough study of
how the Authority got into
this mess. It is important
that no other toll author-
ity has a potential problem
and could get into a simi-
lar situation. The Governor
has indicated that there is


a plan that could mergethe
different authorities in the
state into one authority. It
has been predicted that this
merger could save the state
$24 million by eliminating
administrative overlapping.
Scott may be working
on his public image but
Florida citizens have more
pressing issues on their
minds. It appears that the
default problem has no
easy answer. When there
is not enough money in the
treasury, it is hard to pay
your bills. At this point,
Florida residents can only
hope that the other author-
ities around the state are
solvent.


I(1t f;


The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its edicral commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback
makes for a healthy dialogue among our readership and the community. Letters must, however, be 150 words or less, brief and to the point, and
may be edited for grammar, style and clarity. All letters must be signed and must include the name, address and telephone number of the writer
for purposes of confirming authorship. Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fax
them to 305-757-5770; Email: kmcneir@miamitimesonline.com.


I I

















LOCAL

BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


OPINION


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


CORNER


-BY QUEEN BROWN, COMMUNITY ACTIVIST, Queenb2020@bellsouth.net


Scott cares little for those most in need


As the saying goes a leopard
doesn't change his spots and
our own governor, Rick Scott,
continues to validate the ad-
age. Mother Jones Magazine
reported last week that Scott
has once again pulled off his
own health care reform. The
Magazine reported that Scott
has managed to secure for
himself and his family, premi-
um health insurance coverage
for only $30 per month. Mean-
while, clerical state workers
making $32,000 annually pay
$180 per month. Even more
disturbing is the fact that some
retired, elderly Floridians are
paying over $1,200 per month
for health insurance. The wily
"leopard" Rick Scott, mean-
while, pays mere pennies.
Yes, this is the same multi-
millionaire who has been ac-
cused of ripping off Medicare
to the tune of over $7 billion.
When you have that much
money why do you need to cre-


ate a $30 insurance health
insurance policy for yourself
and other high-ranking state
officials? Even low-income
parents whose children are en-
rolled in a federal government
heavily-subsidized children's
health insurance program,
Florida Kid-Care, are pay-
ing up to $159 per child every


is worse than -a millionaire ap-
plying for and receiving welfare
benefits or food stamps. Some-
how he still has the audacity
to begrudge poor families who
are without jobs and who need
state assistance to survive.
That is, until he makes good
on his campaign promise and
creates those 700,000 jobs he


es, this is the same multi-millionaire who has been ac-
cused of ripping off Medicare to the tune of over $7 bil-
lion. When you have that much money why do you need
to create a $30 insurance health insurance policy for yourself and
other high-ranking state officials?


month for healthcare coverage.
Yet the Governor and his fam-
ily are entitled to pay only $30
and of course it comes at the
expense of Florida taxpayers.
If this level of hypocrisy wasn't
so sad, it would almost seem
like a joke.
This action by the Governor


promised for Floridians. This
is the same "leopard" that re-
fused $2.4 billion in stimulus
dollars to build a link to Flori-
da's high speed train and who
similarly turned down over
$40 million from the federal
government that would have
helped the elderly and poor


children with medication and
other healthcare costs.
Floridians need to wake up
and realize that many of the
people who are being elected
to run our government have
very little interest in helping
the people, especially Blacks.
They are out of touch with re-
ality and running for office to
"feather their nests." It would
not- surprise me to see them
behind closed doors laughing
at us for buying into their po-
litical rhetoric of deficit reduc-
tion and jobs creation.
When Scott was on the cam-
paign trail, he continued to
proclaim that we would bring a
new economic era to Florida -
we just never knew he meant
economic turmoil. Of course
while we see the glass as com-
pletely empty, those who are
friends of Rick Scott continue
to toast their glasses, filled to
the brim at the expense of
the poor.


BY HENRY CRESPO SR., MIAMI TIMES COLUMNIST, hcresposr@gmail.comn


Political empowerment must head Black

The legacy of political em- us to make gains? Where do social, economic and political
powerment of Blacks in we want to go? And are we con- lives? This blindness has been
America was a combina- tent with the status quo? to our extreme detriment.
tion of protests, demonstra- When we look at the con- To what extent are the Black
tions and lawsuits. Yes, laws servative movement sweep- masses seeking to influence
have changed, attitudes have ing across America we see a important policy decisions
evolved and our people have group that, right or wrong, that impact us? When I look
grown stronger. Some might understand the importance of at the civil rights marches,
even say that we've reached a impacting institutional poli- sit-ins, freedom riders, etc., it
state of equality in this "land
of the free." After all, the lead-
er of the free world, where for- we could handle Jim Crow and other weapons of mass
mer slaves now live, work and destruction thrown at our race, then certainly we can take
play, is a Black man. But oth- n the Tea Party and build our house once more with real
ers would posit that real op-
portunity continues to allude grace and dignity.
the vast majority of Blacks.
Only a handful of our people
have reached the pinnacle of cies. Somewhere between the was the Black masses that led
success while the majority Voting Rights Act and today's the charge everyday Black
of Blacks continue to be held generation of Blacks we have folks. Where are we today in
back and refused access with forgotten this. When did we this continued fight for equity?
their efforts to move forward lose sight of why we fought so We can't still say we are too
thwarted by institutionalized hard to gain the right to vote? broke, too ignorant, too ghetto,
racism. Wasn't it to impact detrimen- too integrated or too afraid to
Where do we go from here? tal policies that systematically care we should be ashamed
How do we combat this sys- excluded our participation in to use these as excuses for our
tematic exclusion in order for just about every aspect of our own apathy.


agenda

If we could handle Jim Crow
and other weapons of mass de-
struction thrown at our race,
then certainly we can take on
the Tea Party and build our
house once more with real
grace and dignity. But to do
that will take sacrifice.
It's time to get back to the
task of building the house.
This is a different era and a
different country. The goal
of the Tea Party is to remove
our Black leader, regardless of
what happens to our country.
Blacks cannot afford to sit idly
by as more and more of our
community loses homes, re-
tirement funds and jobs while
seeing the dreams we once had
for our children destroyed. We
have many miles to go before
it can truthfully be said that
we are equal partners in this
thing we call America. We
have grown weary of accept-
ing handouts. There is still a
whole lot of building to done.


M BY DR BOYCE WATKINS I

Do Blacks discriminate against dark skin and natural hair?


Like most people, I grew up
hearing jokes about darker-
skinned Blacks. "Nappy" hair
was an even greater curse. The
further south you go, the more
light skin carries a premium, to
the point that it seems to mat-
ter more than anything else.
The little light-skinned girl with
long hair is (in the worst cases)
the family princess, the smartest
child in the group, the one who
can do no wrong. Unfortunately,
there are some light-skinned girls
who hate the pedestal as much as
everyone else and grow up fear-
ful of the resentment they might
receive from those who feel that
they're the beneficiaries of pref-


erential treatment my mother
was one of those people.
As the father of three beauti-
ful dark-skinned young women,
the last thing I'd want is for any
of my kids to feel that they are
somehow less attractive because
of their complexion. I am glad to
say that not only do they seem
clearly unaffected, but I'd argue
that there is an entire generation
that doesn't put nearly as much
of a premium on light skin as my
generation or that of my parents.
When it comes to understand-
ing the delicate issue of Black
women's hair, we've got a long
way to go, especially Black men.
I recall the true story of a 12-year


Are Miami-Dade County Public Schools preparing Black students for success?


MARTIN PAYNE, 52
Boca Raton, Bail Bondsman

The Black
kids in Mi-
ami Dade
County are
being short
changed. I be-
lieve without a t t
doubt that the ,
kids in Miami-
Dade County were getting bet-
ter education under Rudy Crew
as the superintendent.

PAULETTE BRAVE, 20
Liberty City, Sales Associate

They are trying to at least.
But the way the world is today,


the kids are
different from
the way they
use to be.


ANGELA WILLIAMS, 21
Little Haiti, Student


No, I don't
think that
they do a good
job at prepar-
ing students to
be in the real
world because
they focus on
other things


other than the real world.

YAPHEH PALMER, 20
Liberty City, Student


Yes, the peo-
ple that I know
that have
graduated
and now they
are working in
hospitals and
things like
that, so yes.


ERLINE ESTIBEN, 32
Miami Gardens, Medical Assistant

I don't think Miami-Dade Coun-
ty Public Schools are focusing
on the future of the Black stu-


dents. They fo-
cus too much
on the FCAT
and that's not 4
helping them
out.

L-

MAXINE DELOACH, 69
Allapattah, Retired

They are
only educat-.
ing Black stu-
dents if they
are in a school
where there is
a small num-
ber of Blacks.


old girl who sat for hours on the
side of the pool, with her feet in
the water. When asked why she
wouldn't jump in, she responded
that she'd just gotten her hair
done and didn't want to "mess it
up." Her ability to enjoy the swim-
ming pool like the other kids had
been ripped away because she'd
been influenced to maintain a
Eurocentric standard of beauty.
Perhaps all of us should take
a step back and think carefully
about what it means to be beauti-
ful. While progress is certainly
being made against the backward
nature of stratifying ourselves


based on skin complexion, fur-
ther adjustment in our thinking
might be necessary. At the very
least, we can monitor our own
language when referring to those
who look different from ourselves.
Jokes about dark skin or nappy
hair need to go out the window,
along with the ignorant thinking
that accompanies them. Addi-
tionally, the standards of beauty
communicated to our children
must be carefully considered to
ensure that we don't lead our
daughters to believe that they are
nothing if they can't afford to get
their hair done.


I Ltmer to th Eduitor

A complete education? Not so


Dear Editor,

Plato and Aristotle agreed
that the way to produce the
"right" kind of person in public
education were the use of the
two principal elements, gym-
nastics and music. One for
the discipline of the body and
the other for that of the mind.
Leaving music and physical
fitness to our children's whims
will only promote the "wrong"
person. The "right" person has
moral qualities, gentleness,
courage, temperance, anger
and with them a certain pas-
sion. We only miss live music
at a high school football game,
when either the band is very
small or non-existent. No one
ever complains when there's
an absence of music for mid-
dle schools or short-staffed in


K-8 schools. Don't even men-
tion the fact that our children
stomachs droop over their
pants and they can't walk at
a brisk pace. As a community
we sometimes focus on issues
which have nothing to do with
the future development of our
children and grandchildren.
Let's face it, we all become
frustrated with our political
leaders, even our church and
education leaders, but let us
not forget two principal ele-
ments which need to be ad-
dressed before any more time
lapses. If you have already for-
gotten them, they are physical
fitness (gymnastics) and mu-
sic. The two disciplines for the
mind and body.

Jan Whitney Goode
Miami


CwKrlTsycuNyw


I I


I -


- v


~"l~t~'
~~~













Don't compare gay rights, civil rights '


By Ellis Cose

It has become fashion-
able to wrap the gay rights
movement in the mantle of
America's earlier struggle for
racial equality. As Sen. John
McCain's daughter, Meghan,
put it during one televised
interview, "Gay marriage and
everything having to do with
the gay rights movement (is)
my generation's civil rights
issue." To make that asser-
tion is not only to claim moral
legitimacy but to invite com-
parison with the epic efforts
that ultimately forced Amer-
ica to end its homegrown ra-
cial caste system.
Certainly, there are simi-
larities between the move-
ment for racial equality and
the movement for gay rights.
Both movements share the
goals of ending discrimina-
tion and fostering decency.
But in many respects, they
are more different than they
are alike. To point that, out
does not diminish the impor-
tance of the battle for equal
treatment for gays. It merely
acknowledges that each bat-
tle must be understood on its
own terms.
Perhaps the most endur-
ing lesson of the civil rights
struggle is something that
has little applicability to the
fight for gay rights and
which also underscores its
fundamental difference from
it. And that has to do with
the weight of history with
the legacy of subjugation
that is not simply wiped away
with the passage of preju-
dice and time. Decades af-
ter the civil rights movement
proclaimed victory, Blacks
are still trapped in ghettos
and prisons out of all pro-
portion to their numbers.
Black youngsters are much
more likely than whites to be
stuck in second-rate schools
- or in lower tracks in de-
cent schools and to face
a future of joblessness or


marginal employment. The
obstacles gays face are some-
what different.

RACIAL IDENTITY
CHANGES EVERYTHING
In some sense, the "don't
ask, don't tell" program
makes the difference clear.
The thoroughly discredited
policy (most recently repudi-
ated by the 9th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals) essentially
ordered gay soldiers to stay
closeted to "pass," in oth-
er words, for straight. That
would have been roughly
equivalent, in racially seg-
regated times, to demand-
ing that Black would-be sol-
diers "pass" for white. And
many Blacks did pass for
white. But most could rot.
The racial markers were evi-
dent enough that, for most
people, there was no hiding
from the American system
of classification. One's racial
identity, for the most part,
was as clear as the nose on
one's face. That ability to in-
stantly and easily (albeit, im-
precisely) categorize was one
thing that made it possible
to organize an entire society
around the principle of racial
difference. It also allowed
the practice of racism to be


relentlessly oppressive, as
entire communities were cor-
doned off and disadvantage
was handed down through
generations.
With gays, we are not look-
ing at roped-off communities
or at the intergenerational
transmission of disadvan-
tage. We are certainly look-
ing at the workings of preju-
dice, which, in all its guises,
ought to be condemned. But
because that prejudice is not
linked to a system of econom-
ic oppression that will leave
gay communities permanent-
ly incapacitated, the lack of
social acceptance faced by
gays and even the violence
visited upon those identified
as gay will not necessarily
haunt their descendants gen-
erations after attitudes begin
to change. So while the gay
struggle is about changing
attitudes, and laws that grew
out of bigoted thinking, it is
not about creating a pathway
to opportunity (though gay
marriage does confer certain
economic rights) where none
now exists.

STRUCTURAL
BARRIERS IN PLACE
The fight for racial equality
was really two altogether dif-


-; u
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------------



a w
1 .

NA l
. ,., .. ..



n2.-- -..
"' -:"- I I' /.1..1
( - ,_ - :.


-Ap Inolo


ferent struggles. One was for
tolerance and acceptance -
and an end to socially sanc-
tioned racial violence. That
battle has essentially been
won. The tougher battle, for
removing structural barri-
ers to opportunity, is far from
over.
When it comes to combat-
ing intolerance, the gay move-
ment has much in common
with the struggle for racial
equality. And it can certainly
draw hope from that struggle,
which taught us that bigotry
can be fought, that prejudice
can fade if not in one gen-
eration, in the next, provided
that a society works at it. And
clearly we are working at it.
New York's recent sanction-
ing of same-sex marriage
and Rhode Island's passage
of a civil union bill are mere-
ly the latest signs of that.


A U.S. official says the famine
in Somalia has killed more than
29,000 children under the age of
five.
The United Nations has said that
tens of thousands of people have
died in the Horn of Africa's drought
and famine, but the U.S. estimate
is the first precise death toll of-


fered in the crisis.
Nancy Lindborg, an official with
the U.S. government aid arm,
told a congressional committee in
Washington recently that the U.S.
estimates that more than 29,000
children under age five have died
in the last 90 days in southern So-
malia.


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- - --- ---- -- ----- --- -- ----- ---- --- ------- -


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 4 THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGIJST17-25, 2011











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR


OWN, DESTINY


I5A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


I I I


Hardly old school,


By Samantha Critchell
Associated Press

NEW YORK It's not all jeans,
sneakers and sweatshirts packed
in those duffel bags headed to
college campuses in the com-
ing weeks. There might also be
a ripped-from-the-runway look
from Zara or H&M that mimics
Celine or Chloe, and maybe -
just maybe a bona fide Diane
von Furstenberg dress or Alex-
ander Wang jacket.
Dr. Martens are a must-have.
It will all get worn, with the
possible exception of the sweat-
shirt, says Amy Levin, founder of
the blog site CollegeFashionista.
com. "College students love to
change up their look. ... They can
do it by translating the most up-
to-date looks for their lifestyles
and budgets."
For some students, Levin says,
going to class is a reason to get
dressed up.
CollegeFashionista has regular
contributors from more than 200
campuses chronicling clothes
worn by their peers. On this day,
for example, the site features a
student and her Michael Kors
bag and animal-print pumps at
the University of Texas, and a
Boston University student in a
strapless sundress.
The fact that today's students
are so plugged in certainly helps
in staying so stylish. They can
look at photos from designer col-
lections and red carpets around
the world in real time and
change their look in the time it



- -3--A ..


On this day in her hometown
of New York, for example, she ex-
plains her loosely crocheted top
and denim shorts: "I don't dress
very girlie, but I'll have those mo-
ments."
When she's back at SCAD,
she'll wear dresses or jumpsuits
most of the time. She says she'd
like to wear high heels "but I
can't really wear them to class
as an art student."


Elizabeth Tau
dressed up durir
since she's an in
fice of designer T
Burch's town-an
serves as one of
year-round. She
put her own spir
there was one o0
head to toe.
"Tory Burch hs
flage jeans, and t


campus cic
Field is fairly with a black-and-white striped
ng the summer shirt and a black vest," Tau-
ntern at the of- field, a soon-to-be-sophomore at
ory Burch, and George Washington University,
d-country style says. "I literally wore the exact
Sher influences same thing. My suitemate said,
usually likes to 'I'm not sure if those things go
Son things, but together,' but I eventually told
utfit she copied her that it was straight from the
runway."
ad these camou- Anyway, she adds, mixing
they were styled seemingly mismatched prints is


tnes gc
one of her specialties. One of her
favorite recent outfits was a pea-
cock-print skirt with a striped
shirt. "I try to wear what I think
looks good. I'm tall ... and I can't
wear heels, and I wear looser
pieces. I'll wear tight jeans, but
I'm rarely seen in a tight shirt."
Other than Burch, Taufield
keeps tabs on what Proenza
Schouler and Prada are doing.
"Obviously, I'm not purchasing


)stylish
a Prada dress, but I like refer-
encing it."
While she's in New York, she'll
pop into luxury department
store Bergdorf Goodman, but
she's usually just shopping for
ideas and then takes those to
H&M.
Cost is a factor for Amurao,
too. She says, though, she puts
a lot of planning into her clothes
so they don't look cheap.


New York University film stu-
dent Carolyn Amurao.

takes to dig through their draw-
ers and dirty laundry piles.
A shift in style doesn't take
long for this crowd to digest. They
are hungry for the next big thing
and usually aren't married to a
particular look. "You'll see in the
U.S. that campuses in major cit-
ies are usually ahead of trends,"
observes Levin, and Londoners
and students in Australia are
even more fashion-forward.
(Levin says her alma matter,
Indiana University, is more tra-
ditional and casual, but -not by
much.)
That brings us back again to
the college sweatshirt students'
parents still buy when the accep-
tance letter first arrives. News
flash, according to Levin: They
are too generic. "They might put
their school name on a shirt, but
they've done it in some creative
way themselves. Everyone wants
to be individual no one wants
to dress alike," she says.
New York University film stu-
dent Carolyn Amurao, a Vancou-
ver native who just moved to hip
Williamsburg in Brooklyn, says
she doesn't pay much attention
to celebrity fashion anymore;
she'd rather be inspired by what
she sees on the street.
She has borrowed a few looks
from her fellow students like
wearing socks with platform
heels.
As a CollegeFashionista con-
tributor, she says she has trained
her eye to see it all. "There are
so many different styles on cam-
pus. There's grungy and pol-
ished, more tailored, more sporty
or hip-hop. I think that inspires
me."
Madisen Matney, a fashion-de-
sign student at Savannah College
of Art and Design, leans toward
vintage looks, preferring not to
shop in mainstream stores. Her
outfit each day is influenced by
mood more than magazines, she
says.
"I see a lot of character in
clothes, it's not just clothes to
put clothes on mood is impor-
tant," she says.


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__.._._ I


I n I











6A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


FL gang trial turns deadly



with key witness' killing


By Kelli Kennedy
Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH, Florida
- The day Eguel Geffrard was
supposed to testify in the trial of
the man accused of leading one
of South Florida's most violent
gangs, police found his bloodied
body in a parking lot, a targeted
hit authorities said was meant
to send a message about Top 6's
power.
Top 6 became the most violent
gang in Palm Beach County his-
tory, linked to 14 homicides and
more, than 150 shootings in the
past few years, including a fa-
tal Christmas Eve shooting at a
busy mall in 2006 all part of
a bloody gang war, authorities
said. Alleged leader Futo Charles,
30, has been arrested more than
a dozen times since 2003, but his
trial this week on various charg-
es could send the steely-gazed
Charles to prison for much of his
life if convicted.
Like many of Top 6's members,
Geffrard was a suspect in a previ-
ous crime, but ultimately became
a victim. Gang members have fre-
quently turned on each other. No
charges have been filed in Gef-
frard's death.
After Geffrard's slaying last
Monday, a judge ordered jurors
to be partially sequestered with
armed guards escorting them to
and from the courthouse. A doz-
en armed deputies flanked the
tiny courtroom during Charles'
trial and K-9 dogs swept the
courtroom hallways. He faces a
slew of charges, including drug
possession, aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon and at-
tempted murder for attacking a
lifelong acquaintance in a turf
war. 'Closing arguments were to
begin Friday.
Charles never hid his affilia-


-AP Photo/The Palm Beach Post, Lannis Waters
In an Aug. 9 photo, Futo Charles sits in court during his racketeering trial in West Palm Beach,
Charles, a man who authorities say led one of South Florida's most violent gangs was sentenced to
65 years in prison on racketeering charges Friday.


tion with Top 6, telling an offi-
cer in a 2006 traffic stop when
he was caught with a concealed
weapon that he belonged to the
group. But Charles says Top 6 is
a rap group.
Authorities first noticed
Charles in 1996 when someone
broke into his home, stole drugs
and tried to kill him. He's been in
and out of jail for years for drug
possession and car theft.
"He's an articulate, intelligent
guy who's even charismatic to a
point but he's not a nice guy. He's
been involved and has orches-
trated some bad things," said
Lt. Michael Wallace; who ran the
Palm Beach County gang task
until recently. "Whenever we had
a big incident, Futo was always
around."
Charles' motto was, "whateva,


Gang leader, gets. 65


years after conviction

The Associated Press

A man who authorities say led one of South Florida's most
violent gangs was sentenced to 65 years in prison on racketeer-
ing charges Friday.
A Palm Beach County judge sentenced Futo Charles, 30,
shortly after a jury convicted him of racketeering, conspiracy
to commit racketeering and two other drug charges, according
to The Palm Beach Post. The conviction in the heavily guarded
courthouse came days after a witness who planned to testify
was gunned down in a parking lot.
Charles' Top 6 gang was linked to 14 homicides and more
than 150 shootings in the past few years, including a fatal
Christmas Eve shooting at a busy mall in 2006 all part of a
bloody gang war, authorities said. Estimates eventually put the
gang's membership at more than 400.
Charles racketeering charge included multiple counts, in-
cluding two shootings. His attorney, Marianne Rantala, pointed
out that jurors found prosecutors had not linked Charles to
the shootings, vet the judge still gave Charles the maximum
sentence e
"It appeared that the sentence was going to be the maximum
no matter what," Rantala said in an email. "My opinion of the
sentence is that it was extremely overly harsh."
Rantala said she plans to appeal the case.
Witness Eguel Geffrard a member of the gang was sup-
posed to testify in the trial last Monday, but police found him
shot to death in a parking lot that same day.
Like many of Top 6's members, Geffrard was a suspect in a
previous crime, but ultimately became a victim. Authorities
say gang members have frequently turned on each other. No
charges have been filed in Geffrard's death.
Local authorities turned to racketeering laws after struggling
to bring anything other than minor drug charges against Top 6
members.
After Geffrard's slaying last Monday, the judge ordered jurors
to be partially sequestered with armed guards escorting them
to and from the courthouse.


CLYNE


you gotta die one day," prosecu-
tors said.
Authorities say Top 6 did start
as a rap group, formed by six bul-
lied Haitian teens who bonded as
outcasts and classmates learning
to speak English at Lake Worth
High School in the mid-1990s.
Picked on by Blacks and whites,
they started "Americanizing
themselves, embracing the thug,
gangsta lifestyle," showing up to
clubs and open mic nights that
ended in fights, Wallace said.
Word of their violent reputa-
tion spread. It wasn't long before
white and Hispanic teens were
also claiming to be Top 6 and
"Top 6" became the routine mon-
iker shouted out before drive-by
shootings.


Authorities estimate the group
grew to 400 to 450 members and
affiliates, offering protection in
the neighborhoods where they
sold drugs, mostly pot and crack
cocaine, and orchestrated rob-
beries to support the gang. AK-47
assault rifles were their weapon
of choice.
Shootings peaked in 2007
when three Top 6 members were
killed after a car careened by a
daytime backyard party and
sprayed bullets. Twenty-three
year-old Edson Marcel one of
Top 6's original members was
among the victims.
Charles was also at the party
and authorities believe he helped
clear the scene of guns and
drugs, Wallace said.


BTW grad murdered


MILTON
continued from 1A

Yelena Stewart-Revere, SLC co-
ordinator at BTW said. "He had
a great personality and will be
missed."
Stewart-Revere and other
friends say Milton was a man
who loved to dance, who was
always positive and enjoyed vol-
unteering as a football coach
and as a cheerleader instruc-
tor. Milton's mother died before
he graduated from high school.
And while Stewart-Revere be-
lieves he has an older brother,
we were unable to verify if he
had any remaining relatives.
Officials place the blame of the
recent surge of murders on the
high temperatures this summer.
Others say that unemployment
and teens on summer vacation
may have also contributed to the'
increase in violence.
*" Over the last few years, Mi-
ami's murder rate has contin-
ued to climb, reaching a rate of
nine/100,000 in 2010. But it has
been much worse in The Magic
City. For example, in 1981, the
murder rate in Miami mirrored
those of other urban dwellings
like Chicago and New York City,
when the number peaked at
33.5/100,000 residents.
Last year was a troubling one
for other cities besides Miami. A
series of shootings in Chicago
in 2010 left eight dead and 16
wounded. Over a span of two
days, the Chicago Police De-


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apartment reported 17 separate
shootings, including two drive-
by attacks on the City's South
Side. Their numbers, like Mi-
ami's, continue to rise,, albeit at
a much higher percentage. In
2009 there were 81 homicides
in Chicago; in 2010 the number
rose to 97.
In June, Rep. Frederica Wil-
son, (FL-17) addressed the ris-
ing number of police-involved
shootings in the Miami area in
a letter to Thomas Perez, the as-
sistant attorney general for the
U.S. Civil Rights Division. Her
letter called for the investiga-
tion of the City of Miami Police
Department. In response to Wil-
son's query, Ronald Weich, as-
sistant attorney general, said
the Civil Rights Division would
continue its investigation and to
gather data.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Woman killed, officer saved by vest, in police-involved shooting
A woman, armed with a handgun and making threats, opened fire on two Miami-
Dade police officers early Friday, striking one of them, before she was fatally shot,
according to police.
Catawaba Howard, 32, was an eight-year veteran of the Air Force and Army
Reserves who recently left the military.
Catawaba, police say, was making threats to herself and others around 3:30 a.m.
Someone called 911 and when police arrived at 1015 NW 109th Street, they were
confronted by Catawaba who began to fire at the cops.
Officers William Vazquez and Saul Rodriguez returned fire and she was struck
and killed on the scene.
Officer Vazquez, a 15-year veteran of the Miami-Dade PD, was struck once in the
chest but his life was saved by his bullet proof vest. He was taken to Memorial West
Hospital in stable condition.

Police: Robber stole from wheelchair-bound man
Miami Police are looking for a robber they say ripped off a disabled man as the
pair exited a county transit bus, and part of the crime was caught on camera.
The crime happened on July 22nd just before noon, when the wheelchair-bound
victim befriended a man while riding the bus.
When the victim exited the bus at NW 22nd Avenue and Flagler Street, the
victim's new friend followed.
Once outside, the man asked the victim for a cigarette. While pulling out the
pack, Ihe victim mistakenly took out money, which the man snatched out of his
hand, along with the cigarettes and a cell phone. The robber fled on foot, running
westbound on Flagler Street.
The suspect was last seen running westbound on Flagler Street wearing a black
shirt, olive green shorts and white sneakers. He is thought to be about 5'7". 145
pounds and about 20 years of age.
Anyone with information is urged to call Miami-Dade Cnmestoppers at 305-471-
TIPS.

Bond set for suspect in Kendall shooting
One of three men charged in connection with a car thett which led to a police
involved shooting in Kendall was in bond court last Wednesday.
Marcos Antonio Acosta Quirch, 23, was ordered held on $39,500 bond lust one
day after the police involved shooting left two of his buddies hospitalized.
Acosta Quirch is charged with Grand Theft Auto, Assault on a Law Erilorcement
Officer and Resisting Arrest with Violence among other things.
The other two suspects, Michael Membrides, 22, and Ricardo Noa, 19, remain
hospitalized after being shot by officers in the parking lot of the Nob Hill West
Apartment complex last Tuesday morning.

Sketch released of man involved in North Miami killing
North Miami police have released a sketch of a man they believe was involved in
a deadly shooting earlier this month.
According to investigators, Siego Sergeo Brisson was visiting a home at 1210
Northwest 121st Street when he was chased by two men and shot in the stomach.
Brisson clirrbed onto the roof of the home to escape the gunman. Miami-Dade
Fire Rescue airlifted Brisson to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center
where he was later pronounced dead.
After the shooting, the two men were spotted speeding away from the home in a
silver four door Ford Taurus with dark tinted windows.
Police have not released a motive for the shooting or a description of the second
man.
Anyone with information is asked to call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-
nPS.


Another headache for Strauss-

Kahn, accuser files civil suit


By Ashby Jones '

It isn't exactly surprising
news, but it is news nonethe-
less: The hotel maid who was
allegedly assaulted by former
International Monetary Fund
chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn
on Monday filed a long-awaited
civil suit against "DSK," accus-
ing him of a "violent and sa-
distic" sexual attack that has
done her permanent damage.
The lawsuit by Nafissatou Di-
allo comes on the heels of her
decision to speak publicly in
media interviews and at a news
conference about the alleged
attack by Strauss-Kahn after
she entered his suite on May
14. Prosecutors with the Man-


hattan District Attorney's office
are still investigating whether
to pursue or drop a seven-
count criminal indictment
against the man once seen as
French presidential contender.
"We have maintained from
the beginning that the motiva-
tion of Mr. Thompson and his
client was to make money,"
said William Taylor and Benja-
min Brafman, Strauss-Kahn's
lawyers, in a statement issued
Monday afternoon. "The filing
of this lawsuit ends any doubt
on that question. The civil suit
has no merit and Mr. Strauss-
Kahn will defend it vigorously."
Strauss-Kahn has plead-
ed not guilty to the criminal
charges.


- ... ... .... .. I










I 7A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


B M T CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Philly mayor chides Black



parents over teen mobs


By Patrick Walters
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA The pain-
ful images and graphic stories
of repeated violent assaults
and vandalism by mobs of
Black teenagers had gotten to
be too much for Mayor Michael
Nutter.
As an elected official and a
"proud Black man" in the na-
tion's fifth-largest city, Nutter
felt he had to go a step beyond
ordering a law enforcement
crackdown.
So he channeled the spirit of
another straight-talking Phila-
delphian: Bill Cosby. Nutter
took to the pulpit at his church
Sunday and gave an impas-
sioned, old-fashioned talking-
to directed at the swarms of
teens who have been using so-
cial networks to arrange violent
sprees downtown, injuring vic-
tims and damaging property.
Moreover, he called out parents
for not doing a better job rais-
ing their children.
"You've damaged yourself,
you've. damaged another per-
son, you've damaged your
peers and, quite honestly,
you've damaged your own
race," Nutter said at Mount
Carmel Baptist Church.
The 54-year-old mayor, mar-
ried with a teenage daughter
and a grown son, called out
absentee fathers and neglect-
ful parents. He did not mince
words, saying they need to be
more than just a "sperm do-
nor" or a "human ATM.",
"That's part of the problem
in our community," Nutter
told the congregation. "Let me
speak plainer: That's part of
the problem in the Black com-
munity. ... We have too many
men making too many babies
they don't.want to take care
of and then we end up dealing
with your children."
"It's e version 'of the touigh-
love message Cosby and oth-


ers have telegraphed for years.
"I am a proud Black man in
this country," Nutter said in
an interview with The Associ-
ated Press. "It was a message
that needed to be said. It need-
ed to be said at this time ...
People have had enough of this
nonsense, Black and white."
At a National Association
for the Advancement of Col-
ored People gathering in 2004,
Cosby chided the Black com-
munity in a.speech commemo-
rating the 50th anniversary of
Brown v. Board of Education,
the legal case that toppled seg-
regated education.
"These people marched and
were hit in the face with rocks
to get an education and now
we've got these knuckleheads
walking around," Cosby said
then.
"I can't even. talk the way
these people talk, 'Why you
ain't,' 'Where you is' ... and I
blamed the kid until I heard
the mother talk," the enter-
tainer said.
Nutter's words also har-
kened back to a 2008 Father's
Day speech by then-presiden-
tial candidate Barack Obama.
"If we are honest with our-
selves, we'll admit that what
too nany fathers also are
is missing missing from
too many lives and too many
homes," Obama told a church
in Chicago. "They have aban-
doned their responsibilities,
acting like boys instead of
men."-
Now, it's Nutter taking up
the mantra.
Some feel his message was
needed. Others say he's air-
ing private community matters
now that crime is sprouting
downtown, near businesses
and popular tourist attractions
in a sprawling city with many
other sections already plagued
by persistent gun violence.
' Bill Alderson a: talk show
host on the Black radio sta-


-AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File
In this May 6 file photo, Mayor Michael Nutter makes remarks
during an interview with The Associated Press in Philadelphia.


tion WURD-AM, estimated
that about 60 percent of call-
ers commenting on Nutter's
address supported him. But
quite a few, Anderson said,
believe Nutter simply doesn't
have the community standing
to make such strong remarks.
"The perception is that he is
not necessarily a 'community
guy. ... He has been perceived
as more of a .business guy,"
Anderson said, noting that he


didn't have a problem with the
comments himself.
Anderson cited concerns
among the Black community,
such as Nutter's perceived fo-
cus on the city's downtown
over other neighborhoods, a
newly enforced curfew for teens
and Nutter's endorsement of
"stop-and-frisk" searches, a
tactic police credit with reduc-
ing crime but that ,some feel
unfairly targets minorities.


`.


UF, FSU among Forbes' list of top best college buys
By Scott Travis Monday. The University of Florida faculty pay. college in Sarasota. emy at Annapolis, Md. Fourth
placed llth, Florida State Univer- "In these challenging economic The top three spots on the list place went to Cooper Union in
Tuition at Florida's universities sity 13th, New College of Florida, times, it is more important than went to military service acad- New York, which charges about
has been rising steeply in recent 16th and the University of North ever that we provide an affordable emies that don't charge tuition: $17,000.
years, but the state still has many Florida, 19th. The schools charge education that doesn't sacrifice the U.S. Military Academy at West Other Florida schools in the
of the best bargains for a college about $18,000 for four years of academic excellence," said Mike Point, N.Y. placed first, followed top 100 are the University of West
education, according to a new tuition and fees. Michalson, president of New Col- by the Air Force Academy in Colo- Florida (27), the University of
survey from Forbes Magazine. The survey was compiled by lege, a small public liberal arts rado Springs and the Naval Acad- Central Florida (42) and the Uni-


Four Florida schools placed in
the top 20 of the magazine's "Top
100 Best Buy Colleges," released


COLYER
continued from 1A

recent position, she was re-
sponsible for overseeing child
welfare, mental health and
elder abuse in Miami-Dade
and Monroe counties.
"This decision was made
easier because I have a very
supportive husband who is
a vital part of who I am and
what I do," she said. "I am
proud that while serving
as the regional director, we
were able to keep hundreds
of children with their parents
and provided the adults with
the tools they needed in or-
der to retain custody of their
children. This area is rich in
programs, funding and ser-
vices including The Children's
Trust and the Early Learning
Coalition with whom we part-
ner. The goal for all of us is
and has always been keeping
children safe and with their
parents."
Colyer and her office were
heavily-criticized in their
handling of a case involving
10-year-old Nubia Barahona,
who was killed by her adop-
tive parents. Two DCF work-
ers were eventually fired, one
resigned and five others were


looking not only at price, but mea-
sures of quality, such as gradua-
tion rates, student debt load and


reprimanded, including Coly-
er. However, she was not rep-
rimanded for any specific ac-
tions but rather because the
mistakes made occurred un-
der her watch.
"That incident was a real
tragedy and while I do not
feel necessarily responsible,
I do feel badly because as an
agency we missed some sig-
nificant points," she said. "I
don't think we will ever see
that kind of tragedy again be-
cause we have since made sig-
nificant changes and improve-
ments in the system."
Will she miss the stress of
the job? Colyer says yes but
with a caveat.
"My entire career has been
based on prevention and the
preservation of families all
families, not just Black ones,"
she said. "But those from the
Black community have always
been very supportive. They
felt I was a person who really
spoke on their behalf and that
I cared for them. I had to go to
my sister's barbershop on NW
62nd Street to assure them
that I was retiring and had not
been fired. It seems they were
pretty upset and were about to
take on the County. This is a
great place to work and live."


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But Florida schools may start to
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Central and Northwestern principals

among those who feel "optimistic"

SCHOOL it is at Central or Edison, but
continued from 1A this is- the-job, that we signed
'..-up for.". '
Monday, August 22nd. Miami Central is one of four
Wallace Arstide, the new- -schools (Holmes Elementary,
ly-appointed principal at Mi- Lau-ra C. Saunders Elementary
ami. Northwestern Senior High and Miami Edison are the other
SSthool, is optimistic about the three) that have been labeled as
'new year and his goals for the "intervene schools" in Miami-
school. Dade County that is, schools
"I want our kids to begin in danger of being taken over
Sto think long-term," he said. by the State. Last month, a deal
"I want our students to think was reached with the State that
about graduating from college allowed all four schools to re-
,and that includes a partnership main open and under the con-
with. FlU and a signed pledge trol of M-DCPS. The deal came
e'bf commitment from our .ninth after the intervention of Florida
,.,grader s." Senator Marco Rubio who is
.Haitian-born Aristide came from Miami. The deal included
to. Miami at age four and grew three specific conditions that
up -in' Liberty City. His began must be met over the next year.
his tenure at Northwestern in The County must hire and
'D)ecember 2006 as a substitute work with'an independent, ef-
.teacher. He has his hands full fective management team or
Sa Northwestern, who received a firm to assist in improving the
school grade of "ID last year, is ,performance of the schools.
bel4g carefully watched by the .The schools must fully partici-
County's Educational..Transfor- pate in the Florida Department
nation Office. Still he' s confi- of Education's Race to the Top
dent that the grade will improve. initiative. Lastly, an event must
Rennina Turner, principal at be held at each school to show-
Miami Central, plans to carry case available school choice
the success of 2010-2011 into options to parents,
the new school year. Miami Norland has also put
"Considering what we have in place some proactive tools
faced these past few weeks and for the success of their stu-
understanding the success that dents this year..-
we have had over the past year, "We 'have some incredible
I hesitate to celebrate that suc- -programs that we are imple-
cess," she said. "I still express to mentiig," said Luis Solano,
my..staff, students and commu- principal of Norland. 'First we
ity, members that while we do will save City Year a pro-
have a lot to celebrate, we can't gram where we will provide
become complacent."- curricular and social interven-
She also plans to tackle one tions, tutoring and support."
of the bigger problems affecting Last week, Norland held a
Miami Central students, community conversation in
"We are really focusing on an effort to help narrow the
literacy and improving reading achievement gap. The achieve-
-for all grade levels," she said. meant gap refers to the dispar-
:.,"We are specifically focusing ity ia4 i number of educational
:,on different. programs -to as-- measiares between the. perfor-
,'sfst with 'our reading scores. mance of groups of students,
We, ae going, in the right di- .espelally.g~boups identified by
sectionn a'id have changed the 'genidei, .race/ethnioity and so-
cultire of Central. I am not cioeconomic status. The school
Doing this alone we have an has narrowed its strategy to
entire leadership team of com- reduce the achievement gap by
.mitted teachers who under- focusing on three areas: school
Stand where we are and where .accduntabijty, accessible re-
weved tsr>#Tcpra Glureetue-- -aomets .ai afty aeiin-en-
have is indescribable whether 'gagemeht at an early age.











.. TH MIAMI TIE. AUUS 2 2


Civil rights activist Carlton Roy dies


By Cain Burdeau
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Carlton J.
Roy Sr., a Black businessman
who worked against segrega-
tion alongside influential New
Orleans civil rights leaders such
as the Rev. Avery Alexander and
Dorothy Mae Taylor, has died.
He was 94.
Roy died on Aug. 6 in the city
he did most of his work, accord-
ing to a funeral announcement.
Grandson Shedrick Roy said
that his grandfather was unable
to recover from a recent stroke.
Roy was a founding member of
the Black Businessman's Asso-
ciation of Louisiana. He owned
several businesses in Central
City, which was at the heart of
the Black civil rights movement
in the 1950s and '60s in New Or-
leans. They included a hauling
company, taxi cab fleet, laun-
dry, bar and restaurant. He let
early Black politicians use his


property for campaign offices.
Shedrick Roy said his grand-
father was known as a fear-
less Civil Rights activist. "He
would say: 'We know they're
going to sic the dogs on us, we
know there is a possibility that
we'll get beat, but we're going to
march,"' he recalled.
"He was driven. He was one


who didn't like inequality for
people and in particular for
Black people," his grandson
said. "If you told my grandfa-
ther you couldn't do it, he would
prove you wrong."
As a successful Black busi-
nessman, Roy had some re-
sources to help Black politi-
cians.
Ernest "Dutch" Morial, the
city's first Black mayor, and
Alexander and Taylor ran cam-
paigns out of his properties,
according to family members.
His wife, Ida Mae Kuluke Roy,
cooked food for Morial's cam-
paign, the grandson said.
"White people respected him
because he had a skill, a little
money and he could talk," his
grandson said. "He was very
smart."
Alexander was born on Feb:
27, 1917, in New Iberia, his
family said.
He got his start with Martin
Luther King Jr. and in 1963


he famously went into the seg-
regated basement cafeteria
of City Hall in New Orleans
and refused to leave. He was
dragged up stairs by police,
which was caught on film.
Two police officers grabbed
Alexander by his heels and slid
him across the cafeteria floor
and up the steps. The rever-
end later organized boycotts to
force utility and transit compa-
nies to hire Black bus drivers.
Dorothy Mae Taylor was the
first woman on the New Or-
leans City Council and the
sponsor of a bitterly debated
1991 law banning racial dis-
crimination among Mardi Gras
parade clubs. She served as
a state representative in the
early 1970s and was one of the
first Blacks elected to the Loui-
siana Legislature and was the
first Black woman elected to
serve there.'
Carlton Roy also helped Or-
etha Castle-Haley, the Rev. A.


L. Davis and the Rev. Sampson
"Skip" Alexander, other impor-
tant civil rights leaders, family
members said. Roy also served
as the master of ceremonies for
an event featuring King in New
Orleans, Shedrick Roy said. He
was uncertain of the event's
date.
Lance Hill, the executive di-
rector of the Southern Institute
for Education and Research, a
race relations center based at
Tulane University, said Black
businessmen played an im-
portant role in the civil rights
movement because they were
able to help Black candidates
who found it hard to round up
money for campaigns.
"There were few African-
Americans who were able to
donate to political campaigns,"
Hill said. "The white commu-
nity, or elite, had difficulty
controlling independent Black
businessmen because they
weren't in their employ."


First Black Secret Service


agent dies at age 82


WASHINGTON (AP) -
Charles L. Gittens, who in
1956 became the first Black
Secret Service agent, has died.
He was 82.
The McGuire Funeral Home
in Washington confirmed that
Gittens died July 27 in Mary-
land. A spokesman for the Se-
cret Service confirmed that
Gittens was the first Black
agent but said no further de-
tails would be immediately
available.
According to an obituary
in The Herald-Sun of Dur-
ham, North Carolina, Gittens


joined the agency in 1956 and
was assigned to the Charlotte,
North Carolina, office. He also
worked in the New York City
office, investigating counter-
feiting and bank fraud.
Fluent in Spanish, Gittens
also worked in the San Juan,
Puerto Rico bureau and was
assigned to the D.C. office in
1969.
He retired in 1979. He then
worked for the Department of
Justice, where he investigated
war criminals who were living
in the U.S.
Danny Spriggs, vice presi-


dent of global security for The
Associated Press who had been
a Secret Service agent, called
Gittens "just an outstanding
guy."
"He went out of his way to
mentor and give counsel and
advice to young African-Amer-
icans who were coming up, es-
pecially those like myself who
were coming up through the
ranks.
"The guy was always physi-
cally fit. He looked like he
came out of the gym. His whole
persona was one of profession-
alism: no nonsense guy."


This undated, photo from a U.S. Department of Justice iden-
tification card shows Charles L. Gittens. Gittens, the first Black
Secret Service agent, died July 27. He was 82.


Marine Corps seeks award for first Black Marines


Associated Press

SAN DIEGO The top
leader of the Marine Corps
said recently that he wants
the first Black members of
the Marines to be awarded
the Congressional Gold Med-
al and hopes their story will
inspire more Black men and
women to join the Corps and
rise through its ranks.
Commandant Gen. James
Amos told hundreds of Ma-
rine Corps officers at the Na-
tional Naval Officers Associa-
tion meeting that it was time
for Congress to honor the
group known as the Montford
Point Marines.
About 20,000 Black Ma-
rines underwent basic train-
ing in the 1940s after Presi-
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt
integrated the Marine Corps.
They were trained at the seg-
regated Camp Montford Point
in Jacksonville, North Caro-
lina, as racism continued in
the Marine Corps and society.
The Black troops were not


-AP Photo
Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos, right, accom-
panied by Joint Chiefs Vice Chairman Marine Corps Gen. James
Cartwright, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington Friday, Dec. 3,
2010.


allowed to enter the main
base of nearby Camp Lejeune
unless accompanied by a
white Marine.
By 1945, many of the Black
recruits had become drill in-


ITH E EKIN A C-IT


August 17, 1887: Marcus
Garvey, Black Nationalist, Pan
Africanist and founder of the
United Negro Improvement
Association and the "Back to
Africa" movement, was born
in Jamaica.
August 17, 1960: The Af-
rican nation of Gabon gained
its independence.
August 18, 1963: James
Meredith, the first Black per-
son admitted to the Univer-
sity of Mississippi, graduated.
Meredith was the school's
first Black graduate.
August 18, 1976: Samu-
el Lee Gravely, 3r., Vice Admi-


ral, was made the Command-
er of the U.S. Third Fleet.
-* August 19, 1791: Ben-
jamin Banneker, inventor,
surveyor, mathematician, as-
tronomer and one of the plan-
ners of what is now Washing-
ton, D.C., published his first
Almanac.
August 19, 1954: Dr.
Ralph Johnson Bunche, diplo-
mat and the first Black winner
of the "Nobel Peace Prize,"
Was named Undersecretary
of the United Nations.
August 20, 1619: The
Dutch brought 24 slaves to
the Jamestown colony. They


structors and non-commis-
sioned officers at Montford
Point. The segregated camp
was closed down in 1949
and Black recruits were sent
to Parris Island and Camp

were the first Blacks that
were forcibly settled on this
continent to work involun-
tarily.
August 20, 1993: Dr.
David Satcher, genetic re-
searcher, was named as the
first Black Director of the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC).
August 21, 1831: Nat
Turner, revolutionary free-
dom-fighter, began his fa-
mous slave revolt in South-
ampton County, VA. During
the three-day revolt, Turner
and other slaves killed around
60 whites.
August 21, 1943: Harriet
M. Waddy (West) became the


Pendleton like all new Ma-
rines. The Corps was fully
integrated during the Korean
War.
The Congressional Gold
Medal is awarded to a civilian
or group of civilians as the
highest expression of national
appreciation for distinguished
achievements and contribu-
tions.
Amos said his goal was to
cement the role of the Mont-
ford Point troops in the Corps'
235-year history. His efforts
are part of a broader goal in
diversifying the military's
smallest branch and sharing
the legacy of the Black Ma-
rines.
The story of the first Black
recruits will be part of the
instruction Marines receive
during basic training.
"Spread the gospel that the
Marine Corps is a force that
has changed," Amos told the
officers. "We're not in 1942
anymore."
Amos said only five percent
of Marine officers are Black

Women's Army Corps' (WAC)
first Black woman Major.
August 22, 1979: Some
200 Black leaders met in New
York in support of ousted
UN Ambassador Andrew 3.
Young, Jr., who was accused
of attending an unauthorized
meeting with the PLO. The
Black leaders demanded that
Blacks have a voice in foreign
policy decision-making.
August 22, 1996: Presi-
dent Bill Clinton ended the
federal guarantee of funding
to families with dependent
children. This so-called wel-
fare reform bill gave "block-
grants" to states to implement
their own programs, which are


and that needs to increase,
something he pledged to make
a priority.
The Marine Corps, like
all military branches, had
high recruitment and reten-
tion rates this year and will
be looking to downsize from
202,000 to 186,000.
Amos acknowledged stiff
competition to get into the Ma-
rine Corps but said that does
not take away from efforts to
boost minority numbers, es-
pecially among officers.
"I'm not out for quotas,"
Amos said. "I'm out to attract
the best young men and'wom-
en of our nation."
Amos has invited Montford
Point Marine veterans, now in
their 80s, to stay at the Ma-
rine Corps barracks and par-
ticipate in a parade honoring
them in Washington, D.C., on
Aug. 26, which the Senate last
year designated as "Montford
Point Marines Day."
The date marks the first
day that Black recruits began
training at Montford Point.

not federally regulated.
August 23, 1826: Ed-
ward A. Jones received an
A.B. degree from Amherst.
College. Jones is believed
to be the second Black to
graduate from a U.S. college.
Both he and John Russwurm
graduated and succeeded Al-
exander Lucius Twilight, who
received a B.A. degree from
Middlebury College (Vermont)
in 1823.
August 23, 1900: The
National Negro Business
League was founded. Booker
T. Washington was elected as
the group's first president as
he and 400 delegates from 34
states met in Boston, MA.


BI.ACKS MUST (CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 8 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGU 2011









S9A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


BLACKS lMST CONTROL THEIR O\WN DESTINY


Norland


By Randy Grice
rgrice@mnianitimesonline.com
In an effort to help narrow the
achievement gap in depth, a com-
munity conversation was held
at Miami Norland Senior High
School on Wednesday, August
10. The event was meant to bring
community members from every
aspect of the community together
to engage in a conversation about
moving Norland forward as a
school and closing the achieve-
ment gap.
"We have partnered with Col-
lege Summit where we will
have students visiting colleges
throughout the school year,"
said Luis Solano, principal of
Miami Norland Senior High.
"We're helping them to fill out
more applications to go to col-
lege and helping students out
with more SAT and ACT prep."
The community conversation
took place as a result of a grant
the United Teachers of Dade
(UTD) received through the Na-
tional Education Association
and the Florida Education As-
sociation.
"The grant is specifically to do
what we are doing right now it's
called a P.E.P. grant," said Ran-
di Biro, director of educational
policy for UTD. "That stands
for Public Engagement Project
and it is engaging the commu-
nity and the success of a school
and helping to turn that school


tackles achievement gap
dropout rates and college-en-
rollment and completion rates.
Research into the causes of gaps
in student achievement between
low-income minority students
and middle-income white stu-
dents have been ongoing since
the publication of the report,
Equality of Educational Op-
portunity, more widely known
as the Coleman Report, com-
missioned by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education in 1966. That
research suggests that both
in-school factors and home/
community factors impact the
academic achievement of stu-
dents and contribute to the gap.
Milton Parris Jr., president of
the Norland Vikings Alumni As-
sociation believes this conver-
sation is long overdue.
"I'm glad that we are doing it,
this is something that has been
a long time coming," he said. "It
is a good thing anytime you can
bring the community together
Luis Solano, Norland's prin- to try to form one common goal
cipal addresses community in order to address the situa-
member during conversation. community me- ions that are going on at this
ber K(evin Scott voices his opin- school."


around."
Norland's administration has
narrowed its strategy to close the
achievement gap down to three
approaches: school accountabil-
ity, school resources and fam-
ily and engagement at an early
age. The achievement gap refers
to the observed disparity on a
number of educational mea-


ion during a break out session.
sures between the performance
of groups of students, especially
groups defined by gender, race/
ethnicity and socioeconomic
status. The achievement gap can
be observed on a variety of mea-
sures, including standardized
test scores, grade point average,


-Photo by Gwen Apedo
Students pose for a picture in between karate training.

Y.E.S.! helps students succeed


By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com


When children are out of
school, many don't have the out-
lets to use.their time wisely, but
one program based in Liberty
City is offering that structure.
The Y.E.S.! (Youth Encourage-
ment Services) Program, locat-
ed at 5505 NW 7th Ave., offers
kids an opportunity to stimulate
their minds outside of school.
The program started in 2006
after Gwen Apedo, the creator of
the program, was laid off from
her job as a secretary at a men-
tal hospital.
"I was working at a men-
tal health hospital," she said.
"When they moved to the build-
ing in Florida City there was a
big cut back and they cut me
along with other people. So I de-
cided that I would invest in what
I really wanted to do."
Through Y.E.S.!, students can
learn karate and have other ex-
periences like fishing and swim-
ming. The program also has a
chess component that focuses
on fostering the students' overall
understanding about test tak-
ing. Through self-defense, the
goal is to develop self confidence
in each student.
"I realized that a lot of kids in
my neighborhood needed a little
extra tutoring and help with
their homework and I under-
stand that a lot of parents are
tired so I decided this would be
something good to get into," she
said.
Five years after opening
Y.E.S.!, Apedo feels that the pro-
gram is paying off for students.
"They are doing much better
in school after working with us,"
she said.
Currently, 25 students rang-
ing from four to six-year-olds
are in enrolled in Y.E.S.!.
While the after-school pro-
gram carries no charge for those
who have government-issued


vouchers for the program, the
average cost of enrollment is
'$35 a week for each child. The
program also receives funding
through the Early Learning Co-


alition of Miami-Dade County
and other private donations.
This past summer, six people
including Apedo worked for the
program.


* Small Classroom Setting
* Qth in the nationfor number of
National Board Certfied Teachers -1,491
* Technology-Rich Classrooms
* Teacher-Student-Parent Partnership
* "th best school system in the nation"
SEd Week, 2011
SCollege Preparatory Curriculum available
* Sports & After-School Programs
* Free Breakfast
* Transportation available


PUBLIC SCHOOLS
he BEST choWce for our
children and our oonmunritis


ii1 Pi


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a -a




b -Photo by/Armando Rodriguez/Miami-Dade County
GIVING BACK: Commissioner Audrey Edmonson, District 3,
poses with a child at her Fifth Annual Back to School Fun Day/
Health and Info Fair. The event was held at Jefferson Reaves
Park, 3090 NW 50th Street on Saturday, August 6. Commis-
sioner Edmonson gave away 2,200 backpacks filled with school
supplies to the children who attended.


Whet IS





Your Child





Doing After





School?

Look for The Children's Trust After School Programs Guide
at any Miami-Dade Publix supermarket.















FREE
Available
Now









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The Children'sTrust



The Children's Trust is a dedicated source of revenue established by voter referendum
to improve the lives of children and families in Miami-Dade County..
Because All Children Are Our Children


I


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,m inLIMITIIII 21BA MTIITER-DIN


Congressional Black Caucus members put jobs at top of their list
-- ~~~- ------~--- ~------~---- .1 .


JOBLESS
continued from 1A


Many discouraged job seekers have
exited the labor force and have
simply given up in their search for
employment, according to the U.S.
Department of Labor. That fact is
significant because it tells us that
statistics related to current unem-
ployment are actually much worse.
In June, the national unemploy-
ment rate was 9.2 percent, the
highestit has been this year. And
with more government jobs being
cut to balance local and state bud-
gets, that number will probably
get much worse before it gets bet-
ter. Joblessness for Blacks in the
U.S. now hovers at 16.2 percent


which parallels the numbers here
in South Florida. In May, Miami-
Dade's unemployment rate was
13.4 percent, Broward was at nine
percent. And when comparing
2009 to 2010, the unemployment
rate for whites actually declined
from eight to 7.8 percent while for
Blacks it rose from 15.4 to 17.2
percent.

TOWN HALL BRINGS CBC
MEMBERS TO ADDRESS
UNEMPLOYMENT
To draw national attention to the
crisis here in South Florida and
to propose immediate solutions
to help Blacks, the Congressional
Black Caucus (CBC) will be in Mi-
ami on Monday, Aug. 22nd for a


town hall meeting at Mt. Hermon
AME Church in Miami Gardens
(6 p.m.) as part a "For the People"
Jobs Initiative. Florida Congress-
woman Frederica Wilson has tak-
en the lead but will be joined by
many of her colleagues including
Emanuel Cleaver II (CBC chair),
Alcee Hastings and Maxine Wa-
ters. On Tuesday, Aug. 23rd, a job
fair will bring over 100 national
and local employers to the James
L. Knight Center downtown from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.
"Unemployment in South Flori-
da is no longer a crisis but an epi-
demic," Wilson said. "It's time to
take matters into our own hands
and provide real opportunities for
people to get back to work. With


Black unemployment at a stagger-
ing 16.2 percent the status quo is
simply intolerable."
Wilson adds that she, and other
members of the CBC have so far
filed over 40 bills to address job
creation.
"I'm fed up with Republicans' re-
fusal to bring up a single bill on
jobs this Congress," she remarked.
Rick Beasley, executive director
South Florida Workforce, says that
it is up to Blacks to find creative
solutions for securing employment
and in their efforts to rebuild their
communities.
"What Blacks are facing to-
day is no different than what our
grandparents experienced during
the Depression and throughout


the days of segregation," he said.
"They made it and we will too. We
have to provide incentives so that
employers will want to hire work-
ers. We also have to shift our focus
for our children to careers related
to science, technology, engineering
and mathematics that's where
the new job market is going. It's
really tough out here for Blacks.
From November of last year to this
July we actually had people lose
their unemployment benefits. And
in our Black communities, Liberty
City, Overtown and Little Haiti,
the unemployment rates are even
higher at 29, 27 and 26 percent."
Miramar Commissioner Wayne
M. Messam says he is particularly
troubled by the impact that Un-


employment continues to have on
Black men and the Black family.
In May, Black male employment
fell to the lowest level since the
government began tracking num-
bers in 1972. Nationwide, 56.1
percent of Black men over 20 were
employed, compared to 68.3 per-
cent for white men over 20.
"In the private sector, Blacks
have to push their way to the table
because racism still exists it's
just not as blatant and vicious,"
he said. "We need the state and
counties to put more specific
language in their contract re-
quirements so that contractors
will have to include minorities.
We are all working for the same
thing and it's green."


Teens say they are optimistic about

-IRVING om 1
continued from 1A .,-- '-


beyond 21 because of crime
and bad decisions that many of
us were making but I decided
that I wanted to do something
significant in my life before I
died," he said. "I flew around
the world at 23 but that wasn't
my goal at first. I just wanted to
become a pilot and I was willing
to do whatever it would take.
Of course there was one major
roadblock I was poor. But I
didn't let that stop me. When
I left Opa-locka Airport, I had
$30 in my pocket and remem-
ber thinking, 'Here I am about
to fly around the world and I
can't even swim.'"
He told the teens that they
cannot, afford to give up and
challenged them to remain fo-
cused on their dreams what-
ever they may be.
"During my flight I spent
some time with children in In-
dia in Calcutta one of the
poorest places in the world,"
he said. "Some of the kids have
an arm or a leg that had been
amputated and I found out that
their parents often did it inten-
tionally so they could beg for
more food and money. The op-
portunities here in the U.S. are


\1~


-Miami Times photo/D. Kevin McNeir
KIDS JUST WANNA HAVE FUN: M-DCPS high school students
take a break during a day of learning and sharing at Miami Dade Col-
lege with Barrington Irving. Pictured are: Jon Durant, Devon Yeleell,
Joshua Kwia, Catherine Navas, Andre Foster and Sisleyth Rodriguez.


amazing but too many Black
kids are blowing it and not tak-
ing full adv age of them."

OUT OF THE
MOUTH OF BABES...
Six students, all high school
juniors and seniors, after lis-
tening to Irving, shared their
concerns about the future and
what it may or may not have
in store for them. Their high
schools, mostly from the south-
ern part of Miami-Dade County
include County Walk, Robert
Morgan Educational Center,
Coral Reef, Miami Southridge
and Homestead.


"What's happening in Con-
gress effects us and it's sad to
see how adults in Miami don't
seem to want to take any action
or responsibility it's not the
government's job to take care of
us, we have to do that for our-
selves," said Devon Yeleell, 16.
"I am not an A student and
so I need extra help and tutors,
especially in math. What we re-
ally need are teachers who want
to teach not people who just
want a check," said Catherine
Navas, 16.
"I'm optimistic because the
future is really in my hands; we
have all the tools we need de-


their future
spite the cuts but you have to
be ambitious and go for it," said
Sisleyth Rodriguez, 16.
"Sure it's tough for young
Black men to find a job these
days but you have to keep get-
ting up every day so you can
make a way and find a way,"
said Andre Foster, 17.
"We have enough money to
fight wars all over the world
but we don't have enough to
help our own citizens. [Gover-
nor] Rick Scott cut funding for
a program at FIU that was re-
ally helping me to improve my
grades; I could see college in my
future for the first time. Now,
I'm not so sure but I can't give
up," said Joshua Kwia, 17.
Jon Durant from Homestead
said it best: "I try not to deal
with politics it adds too much
stress to my life."
"Success in life is not so much
about being happy as it achiev-
ing our goals," Irving said. "The
mind is a powerful tool, if we
just take the time to use it prop-
erly."
Irving was sponsored by
Mitsubishi Heavy Industry of
America, represented by Stan
Yokoi of Dallas, with additional
support by the South Florida
Workforce and Miami Dade Col-
lege.


Autobody Repair D High School Compietio

Aviation Mechanics Medical Assisting

* Computer Repair MajorAppliance Repair


D Cosmorology

O Culinary Arts


1 Truck Drvik

...and many more'


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Heavy Equipment Operatons





J -in s ne t305558800I0
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School under NCAA investigation


UM
continued from 1A


coaches were not made avail-
able for interviews.
Golden addressed the team
about the matter during a
meeting before Tuesday morn-
ing's practice and was the first
one to come out onto the field
about 10 minutes before the
start of practice.
"We're disappointed, but
we're not discouraged," Golden
said.


Bachmann


WIN
continued from 1A

presidential election history.
A former Jimmy Carter Demo-
crat, Bachmann is an unwaver-
ing social conservative whose
faceoff with Obama would ener-
gize Black voters, whose support -
for the president has waned.
This drop is probably spurred
by the nation's high Black un-
employment rate (nearly double
that of whites) and the failure
of the president's communica-
tions team to get the word out
about the things he's doing to
better the lives of disadvantaged
Blacks for fear of a white back-
lash.

SHE ENERGIZES
... THE BLACK VOTE
Black rage over Bachmann's
assertion in January that the
Founding Fathers ended slav-
ery- which they didn't would
help get disillusioned Blacks
back into the Obama fold and to
the polls on Election Day.
So, too, would another Bach-
mann faux pas.
In a mindless attempt to win
over right-wingers in Iowa,
Bachmann signed a "marriage
vow" document that suggested
Black children were better off
when they were born into slav-
ery "and raised by (a) mother
and father in a two-parent
household" than are Black
children who were born after
Obama took office.
Both the premise and accura-
cy of that claim were debunked
in Wilma Dunaway's 2003 book,
The African-American Family in
Slavery and Emancipation. But


Golden said he knew "abso- taken thi
lutely'nothing" about the alle- what he
gations Shapiro first made last answered
August before he became coach the Unive
in December. special pl
"I'm as surprised as all of you He add(
-and I'm learning and gathering let this I
information as you are," Golden We have
said. team. Th
He said school president mistake -
Donna Shalala and athletic that's als
director Shawn Eichorst have up and v
been in contact with the NCAA, them nox
but he has not had any contact. occur, let
Asked if he would have still forward."


e job had he known
now knows, Golden
, "Absolutely. This is
ersity of Miami, it's a
ace."
ed, "We're not going to
nock us backwards.
great kids on this
ey may have made a
- OK that's fine. But
so a part of growing
that we have to teach
w is if something did
's be honest and move


win is a win for Obama


even if there were more intact
Black families during slavery,
it takes a callous disregard for
the brutalities of that "peculiar
institution" to believe that life
for Blacks was somehow better
then than it is now.
While all this has made Bach-


mann a Tea Party favorite, it
won't win her.enough support
beyond the trench lines of that
right-wing clique surely not
enough to defeat Obama. And
that has got to have Demo-
crats rooting for her to become
the GOP standard-bearer.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 01 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGUST 17-25 20 1







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111A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


autcKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY









The Miami Times





Fa ith


SECTION B MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 17-23, 2011 MIAMI TIMES


Links youth attend


ARCH ITECAMPT



SUMMER CAMP


It's been an eventful summer for six talented students
who were able to attend a two-week summer camp designed
to introduce children to the field of architecture and per-
haps even inspire them to become tomorrow's architects.
They were sponsored by the Greater Miami Chapter of The
Links, Incorporated's Links Educating Talented Students
to Draw (LETS Draw) program and and were able to attend
the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Architects in the
Making (AIM) summer camp.
LETS Draw, in partnership with the Alonzo Mourning


Overtown Youth Center (OYC), was developed and designed
to educate minority youth (grades two-12) with exceptional
artistic ability in the visual arts; increase their knowledge
of the visual arts; build self-confidence in drawing skills;
and provide career exposure in the field of visual arts.
The LETS Draw students, Aaron Ashe, Aesha Coleman,
Charlotte Graham, Keyana Joseph, Nathaniel Pedernera and
Kyndal Royal, joined more than 60 children from through-
out Miami-Dade County at the University of Miami's
Please turn to ARCHITECT 14B


'One of the seminar's speakers, Carolyn Mercury
Powery, the founder of The Etiquette Touch Insti-
tute, has taught many youth the importance of re-
spect, poise and manners.

Conference sends

girls back to school

with confidence
By Kaila Heard
kheard@miamitimesonline.com
As children and their parents prepare for the upcom-
ing school year, there are a plethora of events that offer
those essential back-to-school items for children from
kindergarten darlings to high school seniors hoping to
take on the world.
Most of the events offer the usual high-demand items
like free backpacks and immunizations. But one local
businesswoman, Rubie Mizell, says she's worried that
some children, especially teenage girls, would return to
their schools without being fully prepared to face their
future challenges.
So Mizell, the founder and president of the non-profit
organization Lovel3, Inc., decided to host a workshop
that would focus on teaching young girls to be more
self-confident.
The end result was an all-day seminar, "Building
Self-Esteem in Young Women," held at the African-
American Research Library and Cultural Center on' :'
Saturday, Aug. 13th.
"[Young girls] just don't know how beautiful they are,
Please turn to SCHOOL 14B


PASTOR OF THE WEEK


Minister encourages


community to seek


faith-based education


By Kaila Heard
kheard@miamitimesonline.comn


Fifty-one year-old Pastor Barry
Bonner of Bethany Seventh Day Ad-
ventist Church located in Browns-
ville. understands what it is like to
be a minority.
Although a 2010 survey found
that the Seventh Day Adventist
(SDA) Church is the fastest-growing
Christian denomination in both the
U.S. and the world, the denomina-
tion is only the 24th largest in the
U.S. with approximately one mil-
lion members.
Among Blacks, 59 percent belong
to historically-Black denominations
such as the Baptist, African Meth-
odist Episcopal (AME) or Christian


Methodist Episcopal (CME) Church.
So Bonner is used to encoun-
tering both faiths and views that
do not jibe with his own. Still this
senior pastor for Bethany SDA for
over two years believes denomina-
tional differences do not affect the
message of Jesus Christ.
"Generally when I go out in the
community and witness I don't tell
[people] what I am," he said. "I pres-
ent Christ to them, I don't present
religion. I allow Christ to open up
the door and then I reveal to them
SDA."
Seventh Day Adventism, which
was founded in mid-1800s, adheres
to many of the popular biblical
principles as do other mainstream
Please turn to BONNER 14B


Are people faithful in good and hard times?


By Kaila Heard
Il i rJ'ar ii liiin iicnn n '..'ililtl t *";
It has become quite common
that churches fill to overflow-
ing capacities during times
of hardship and suffering.
Meanwhile, pastors leading
the same sanctuaries, find the
pews empty of most souls dur-
ing times of relative prosperity
for communities.
A study recently confirmed
this as well. The research, the
2005-2009 Gallup World Poll,
a survey of people in more
than 150 countries, found
that in countries experiencing


hardships, religious people are
happier and outnumber the
non-religious in the same so-
cieties. However, the number
of religious tends to decrease
during peace times.
"In religious societies and in
difficult circumstances, reli-
gious people are happier than
non-religious people. But in
non-religious societies or more
benign societies where many
people's needs are met, reli-
gious people aren't happier -
everyone's happier," said Ed
Diener, the study's leader in a
prepared statement.
The tendency for many peo-


Pastor Oscar
Chestnut


'IAwl,"biblically.it's just the; history of mankindri E
th i.Aldrenof Israel forgot .,bout God whernith gVe
:buf Heh [times] were bad they turned to God." .:-'.
; ''-PASTOR OSCAR 1CHESTi f
pie to turn to their faiths dur- bout God when things were
ing troubled times have long good but when timesi were
been lamented by leaders and bad they turned to God," the
laypeople in the faith commu- minister explained.
nity. According to the study's
Pastor Oscar Chestnut of findings when societies are
New You Ministries of Life in unable to provide food, jobs,
Hollywood finds the situation education, security and health
understandable. care, religious affiliation seem
"Well, biblically it's just the to increase happiness and well
history of mankind. Even with being. In the U.S., more people
the children of Israel forgot Please turn to FAITHFUL 14B










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\\N DESIINY


13B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


Orlando

Zachery Tims

was pastor of

New Destiny

Christian Church
By Bianca Prieto and
Jeff Kunerth

ORLANDO Members of
Pastor Zachery Tims' New Des-
tiny Christian Church packed
the sanctuary Monday night for
prayers, praise and testimoni-
als following the death of the
42-year-old minister.
Tim's ex-wife, Riva Tims, told
the capacity crowd of 2,000 that
Tims enjoyed a family vacation
in Puerto Rico a week before his
death. The Tims, who were di-
vorced in 2009, have four chil-
dren.
"He was able to have fellow-
ship with this daughters and
sons," said Riva Tims, pastor
of Majestic Life Church in Or-
lando.

WAKE 3-7 FRIDAY
Church officials announced
that Tims' funeral will be held


megacd

11 a.m. Saturday at
First Baptist Church
of Orlando. A wake
and public viewing will
be held from 3-7 p.m.
Friday at New Destiny
Christian Church in
Apopka.
Jamal Bryant, a pas-
tor at Empowerment
Temple AME in Bal-


timore and a friend of Zachery
Tims' from there, told church
members that New Destiny will
continue without Tims.
"You are not a personality-
driven church. You are a pur-
pose-driven church," Bryant
said. "Pastor Zack's DNA is now
on you. You are infected with
excellence."
Although much of the service
was joyous praise and singing,
Bryant told the congregation
that it was fitting to mourn the
passing of their spiritual leader.
"Allow yourself the liberty to
grieve. Allow yourself the free-
dom to cry," he said.

CASUE OF DEATH
UNDETERMINED
New Destiny Minister Wanda
Robinson told the congregation
that the cause of Tims' death on


lurch pastor

'I-:--- Friday night in a New
York hotel room had
not been determined.
( Church member
Jacob Moby said the
cause of Tims' death
would not change his
mind about the pas-
tor who inspired and
TIMS encouraged his fam-
ily to become better


people.
"We celebrate the life he led
and the legacy he left," said
Moby, 45, of Orlando.
Earlier in the day, Tims' fel-
low pastors said Central Florida
lost one of its most promising,
up-and-coming ministers.
The Rev. Randolph Bracy
Jr. said Tims was a charis-
matic preacher who appealed
to young people in a way that
few ministers could. He spoke
to them about the issues of
teen pregnancy, drugs, poverty
and crime from a background
of growing up troubled in Bal-
timore.

T.F. JAKES SENDS
CONDOLENCES
"That is where I think he
stood apart. That was the back-
ground he came out of, and his


dies at 42

ministry was shaped for those
who had these kinds of prob-
lems," said Bracy, pastor of
New Covenant Baptist Church
in Orlando. "He filled a void
that was tremendously lacking
in the Central Florida area."
On a national level, Dallas
megachurch pastor T.D. Jakes
sent his condolences out on
Twitter: "DEEPLY saddened to
hear of the passing of Pastor
Tims @ztims ... praying for his
family and church"
Tims, whose Apopka-based
church has one of the largest
congregations in Central Flori-
da, was found dead at about 6
p.m. Friday. The housekeeping
staff at the W Hotel discovered
the pastor dead after attempt-
ing to clean the room. It's not
clear how long he was dead be-
fore he was discovered or why
he was in New York City.
The Office of Chief Medical
Examiner, city of New York is
working to determine how Tims
died. His body was claimed
from the Medical Examiner by
a Brooklyn funeral home on
Monday, according to Ellen Bo-
rakove, a spokeswoman for the
ME's office there.
Please turn to TIMS 14B


Pastors vent about credit down grade


By Alex Murashko

U.S. pastors vented on Twitter
their frustration as the nation
boiled under news of the first-
ever credit rating downgrade in
its history Friday and the Dow
Jones Industrial Average's 600-
plus point plunge last Monday.
Pastor David Roberts of
Clarks Chapel Baptist Church
in North Carolina is prepping
his congregation for the hard
times ahead. The church will be
hosting Dave Ramsey's Finan-
cial Peace University classes
once per week beginning next
month.
Ramsey's "The Great Recov-
ery" campaign to get the coun-
try back on its feet financially


"one family at a time" can't
seem to come soon enough for
Roberts.
"Watching the market speed
up its tumble while Obama
speaks...," Roberts tweeted
during the President's public
address about the downgrade
Monday. Later, Roberts tweet-
ed: "It's a good time to invest in
the stock market buy low; sell
high right?"
As news of the credit down-
grade by Standard and Poor's
broke, Bishop T.D. Jakes of the
Potter's House in Dallas tweet-
ed, "Can u believe that this
political jockeying has lead ac-
cording to the S&P has resulted
in the USA loosing it's credit
standing????"


Bishop T.D. Jakes
Jakes followed with another
tweet: "The whole system is out
of control... esteeming party and


power over country!" And later,
"Changing leadership alone will
not change a systemic dysfunc-
tion so self serving that it has
lost it's mission. America de-
serves better!"
Pastor Rick Warren of Saddle-
back Church has been notice-
ably tweet-free on the trending
debt subject of late. Warren's
"tax tweet," which included
the observation that "HALF of
America pays NO taxes. Zero,"
created quite a stir, especially
among liberals.
Other pastors are trying to
infuse a bit of humor into the
crisis through their tweets.
"So, if I raise my own debt ceil-
ing will it end my crisis?" asked
Please turn to JAKES 14B


Veteran bandleader


George Saunders dies at 96
George L. Saun- Board and continued to
ders has beat down play up until he retired five
the St. Agnes Com- years ago.
et Board at local A litany service will
funerals for more be held Friday, 7 p.m.
than 60 years, has at the Church of The
played his final i Transfiguration. The
note. The popu- l funeral will take place
lar musician died Saturday, 10:30 a.m. at
Monday at the vet- the St. Agnes Episcopal
erans Hospital in Church with Gregg Mason
Pembroke.Pines. He was 96. in charge of arrangements.
Saunders grew up in Miami Survivors include: four sons,
and attended Booker T. George Saunders, III, Gregory,
Washington High School. In the Wayne and Michael Clark; two
early years he worked at the Tip daughters, Deborah Smith
Top Grocery Store on 5th Street and Adrienne Riles; a sister,
and Miami Ave. Anthwine Doone of New York
Saunders was one of the oldest City; and a nephew, Canon
members in the St. Agnes Comet Nelson Pinder of Orlando.


Myths aboutJesus: What He never said


By Phillip Cary

There are lots of things Jesus
didn't say. But pastor Will Davis
Jr., author of 10 Things Jesus
Never Said: And Why You Should
Stop Believing Them (Revell), fo-
cuses on two main categories: ex-
pressions of disapproval and per-
mission to judge. The effect is to
counteract judgmentalism against
both oneself and others. So Davis
aims to comfort Christians who
suffer from performance anxiety
as well as challenge those who in-
dulge in self-righteousness.
The expressions of disapproval
we never hear from Jesus include,
for instance: "I'm so disappointed
in you," "This wouldn't be hap-
pening if you were a better Chris-
tian," and "I've given up on you."
These have no place in the Bible
and, I would add, do not even bear
much resemblance to Jesus' many
words of warning and condemna-
tion. Jesus' words can be scathing
and terrifying (ust ask the Phari-
sees), whereas Davis is concerned
with people who are not terrified
but suffer from low self-esteem.
He wants to help them get rid of
the tapes they play in their heads
that tell them, when they're disap-
pointed with themselves, that God
must be disappointed too.
Then there are examples of the


permission to judge that Jesus
never gives us: "It's okay not to
love certain people," "Everyone
should believe and act like you
do," and "You don't have to for-
give someone who really hurts
you." The overarching concern
here, and indeed throughout
the book, is to replace legalism
with a life of grace. If Davis gets
his way, the church would be a
kinder place, one not so apt to
wound people.
Perhaps the most important
thing Jesus did say, Davis sug-
gests in his first chapter, is
"Come to me, all you who are
weary and burdened, and I will
give you rest" (Matt. 11:28). He
goes on to quote several other
passages in which Jesus says, in
effect: "I am what you're looking
for." For my money, this is the
best moment in the book.
In his conclusion, which is the
second best moment in the book,
Davis does give us something
better than antinomianism.
We are not left with a grace
that bears all our burdens while
we have no work to do. Rather,
Jesus gives us burdens of his
own when he says, "Take my
yoke upon you and learn from
me .... For my yoke is easy and
my burden is light" (Matt. 11:29-
30).


Cascade UMC helps troubled HBCU


In a move that effectively
eliminates Morris Brown Col-
lege debt to the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education, the Rev. Dr.
Marvin Moss of Cascade Unit-
ed Methodist Church present-
ed a check of $22,000 to the
school's president on Sunday.
Reiterating the landmark
southwest Atlanta church's
commitment to outreach and
education-and the fact that
the church was celebrating
"United Methodist Student
Sunday"-Moss presented the
church to Dr. Stanley Pritchett
at the 8 a.m. service.
Pritchett confirmed Sunday
that the funding means Morris
Brown now has the $500,000
due to the federal government
by Aug. 24 to settle what once
was a multi-million debt. He
told the congregants, some of
whom are Morris Brown gradu-
ates, that Morris Brown plans
to continue its 131-year-his-
tory of higher education and
leadership in the community.
"We are truly, truly blessed
that you have embraced us in
this campaign," Pritchett said
to a standing. ovation. [The
check] helps us to insure that
the future is stable for Morris


Brown Colored College and all
of our IBCU institutions."
According to Pastor Moss, the
church campaign for Morris
Brown began last month after
he received a letter from Pritch-
ett announcing the U.S. De-
partment of Education's offer
to settle the college's multi-mil-
lion dollar debt with an amount
of $500,000.
On Sunday, July 3, Moss ex-
plained the fundraising effort
during the 8 a.m. and 11 a.m.
services. In the weeks following,


several special offerings were
taken and members donated
money to the cause online.
"We recognize the historical
significance of Morris Brown
College to our community
and the world," Moss said in
a statement last week. "We
are grateful that our Cascade
members have answered the
call during these tough eco-
nomic times. We are called to
be a light in the community so
we are pleased to participate in
this vital way."


Yolanda Adams launches fashion line


She's wowed the world with
her collection of gospel music
and now Grammy-award win-
ning recording artist Yolanda
Adams is taking on a collection
of a different kind.
The Houston native is launch-
ing a clothing line that bears
her name. She says the Yolanda
Adams Collection has some-
thing for everyone.
"I thought the line should be
timeless, elegant, simple, but
just, 'I gotta have that,'" said
Adams. "This line can go any-
where. It can go to church, it
can go to brunch, it can go to
the boardroom, so there are
many places you can take this
line."
With an 'anyone can wear it'
approach, Adams, who has had
a hard time finding clothes to
fit her six-foot frame, says her
pieces can fit anybody.


Yolanda Adams
"We range from sizes four all
the way to 26W, so there's a
wide range of sizes," said the
fashion designer. "We have such


great colors. We have gold, pur-
ples, greens; colors that make
you feel good."
And Adams says she didn't
just put her name on the line,
she designed it, too.
"I told them what kind of but-
tons I wanted. I wanted certain
embellishments because I think
that if you elongate the center
of the body it makes a woman
stand direct," she said.
You won't find Adams' de-
signs in retail or department
stores. The songstress wants
to focus on personal attention
by selling her clothes at private
trunk shows and on-line.
Also adding to the 'personal
attention' feel, Adams is offer-
ing free alterations for three
years.
Log onto Yolandaadmascol-
loection.com to view her entire
line.


C BRA.










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-25, 2011


Mentoring program gives prom dresses to students


Senior year is full of special
moments. One of the year's
highlights is the prom that
formal dance near the end of
the year where all seniors step
out in high style. Some fret
about whether they will be able
to enjoy that special occasion
because of issues of affordabil-
ity.
To make sure that more se-
niors can enjoy their final for-
mal dance of high school, Be
U Productions, Inc., under the
leadership of Miami Northwest-
ern Senior High School's Brian-
na Trimmings, formed a local
chapter of Becca's Closet.
Becca's Closet is a national,
non-profit organization that
donates formal dresses to high
school girls who are unable to
purchase them.
"Prom night must go on. Fi-
nancial circumstances should
not stand in the way," Trim-
mings said.
The young ladies of Be U Pro-
ductions, Inc., is a local organi-


:I.


Girls seeking free formal gowns had more than 200 dresses
to choose from at the local Becca's Closet chapter.


zation which provides mentor-
ing for girls, started collecting
dresses in the fall of last year
with the goal of bringing spe-
cial smiles at prom time this
year. Both the teen members


and their sponsors were excit-
ed that they could help young
ladies approaching prom time
rid themselves of worry about
being able to afford and find
the right outfit for such a mo-


. _*_.. ,,.. /
."' -...' .. -6




More than 200 dresses were collected by the
ing program, Be U. Productions, Inc.


mentous occasion. The Be U
Productions chapter of Bec-
ca's Closet has collected over
200 dresses for distribution
to young ladies free of charge.
Over the past month three


local mentor-


dress distributions were held at
Mount Tabor Baptist Church,
located at 1701 NW 66 Street
in Miami.
So far, 54 young ladies were
matched with beautiful gowns,


party dresses, and matching
accessories to accentuate their
outfits for that special night.
Girls who had scheduled ap-
pointments were able to come
in to browse the selection of
dresses, which were available
in a variety of sizes, styles and
colors.
"It's heartwarming to see
smiles of satisfaction and grati-
tude on the faces of the young
ladies and their families, and to
know that we helped them to
step out in style on their special
night," said Bessie Campbell, a
board member of Be U Produc-
tions.
. Becca's Closet was created
to honor the work of Rebecca
Kirtman who passed away in
an automobile accident in Au-
gust 2003. In the spring of
2003, "Becca" single-handedly
collected and distributed over
250 prom dresses to needy girls
in South Florida so that they
could attend their high school
prom.


01ON
0 0~


Wactor Temple African
Methodist Episcopal is hosting
their annual Wonders of Wor-
ship Celebration on September
18 at 3:30 p.m. 305-636-3774.

Mt. Tabor MBC Health
Ministry is hosting a Back-to-
School Health and Resource
Fair on August 20, 9:30 a.m. -
1:30 p.m. Free back packs and
health information provided.
305-693-0820.

The Youth Department
Coordinators are sponsoring a
Back-to-School picnic for youth
on August 20th at 10 a.m.

New Mt. Sinai Mission-
ary Baptist Church welcomes
the community to Sunday Bible
School classes at 9:30 a.m. and
Worship Service at 11 a.m.;
Tuesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30
p.m. and Bible School at 8 p.m.
305-635-4100.


Mt. Hope Fellowship Bap-
tist Church invites all youth
to their Back-to-School Revival
August 18-19, 7 p.m. nightly.

The Church of the Open
Door will have a Community
Health Fair on August 20, 10
a.m.-1 p.m. Free screenings for
cholesterol, blood sugar, blood
pressure, body mass index,
HIV, substance abuse, pediat-
ric asthma and sickle cell. Free
body massage, breakfast and
lunch will be provided.

The South Florida Spiri-
tuals will journey to Waycross,
Ga., September 16-18 for an
'Evening of Song and Praise.' To
join them, call 786-838-1153.

The Heart of the City
Ministries invites everyone to
morning worship every Sunday
at 9 a.m. 305-754-1462.


New Life Family Worship
Center welcomes everyone to
their Wednesday Bible Study
at 7 p.m. and their Let's Talk
Women Ministry discussing
'Sex and the Church' on August
20 at 1 p.m. 305-623-0054.

The Golden Bells are cel-
ebrating their 33rd Singing An-
niversary on August 20 at the
Word of Truth Church at 7: 30
p.m.; and August 21 at New
Covenant at 3 p.m. 786-251-
2878.

Holy Ghost Faith Deliv-
erance Ministries, Inc. cele-
brates their pastor's 13th anni-
versary with services on August
21.

Holy Ghost Assembly of
the Apostolic Faith is host-
ing a dinner sale on August 24,
12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

E Little Rock Primitive
Baptist Church is hosting their
annual meeting, August .19-21,
1 p.m. daily. 786-294-8179.


The God is Love Church is
holding a reunion for all mem-
bers past and present on Sept.
10, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. at the New-
port Beach Resort. 786-406-
4240.

Emmanuel Mission-
ary Baptist Church invites
the community to Family and
Friends Worship Services at
7:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. every
Sunday. 305-696-6545.

Christian Cathedral
Church presents their Morn-
ing Glory service that includes
senior citizen activities and
brunch every Friday at 10 a.m.
to 12 p.m. 305-652-1132.

Pilgrim New Hope Bap-
tist Church's 'Convening of
the Evangelist' will be held at
the Palm Beach County Con-
vention Center, August 17-20.
561-863-9192.

Lighthouse Holy Ghost
Center, Inc. invites everyone to
their Intercession Prayer Ser-


vice on Saturdays at 10 a.m.
305-640-5837.

0 Macedonia Missionary
Baptist Church's Usher Minis-
try is hosting a Fashion Show
and Musical Program on Au-
gust 21 at 4 p.m. and is cur-
rently seeking models. 305-
445-6459.

All That God is Interna-
tional Outreach Centers in-
vites everyone to their Chris-
tian Fellowship and Open Mic
Night every Friday at 7:30 p.m.
786-255-1509, 786-709-0656.

The Faith Church, Inc.
invites you to their service on
Sunday at 11 a.m. and their
MIA outreach service that pro-
vides free hot meals, dry goods
and clothes. Visit wivw.faith-
church4you.com or call 305-
688-8541.

E Running for Jesus Out-
reach Youth Ministries is also
looking for additional praise
dancers, choirs, and soloists to


participate in their Gospel Back
to School Summer Jam Fest on
August 27 at 7:30 p.m. 954-
213-4332.

The Youth In Action
Group invites you to their "Sat-
urday Night Live Totally Radi-
cal Youth Experience" every
Saturday, 10 p.m.-midnight.
561-929-1518.

0 Redemption Missionary
Baptist Church has moved but
still holds a Fish Dinner every
Friday and Saturday; a Noon
Day Prayer Service every Sat-
urday; and Introduction Com-
puter Classes every Tuesday
and Thursday at 11 a.m. and
4 p.m. Reverend Willie McCrae,
305-770-7064 or Mother Annie
Chapman, 786-312-4260.

A Mission with a New
Beginning Church mem-
bers invites the community to
their Sunday Worship service
at 11:15 a.m. on Thursdays,
Prayer Meetings at 6:30 p.m.
and Bible Class at 7 p.m.


Study: People become more religious during hardships


FAITHFUL
continued from 12B

report being religious in poorer
states that offer less social sup-
ports.
Dr. Harold Koenig, co-direc-
tor of the- Center for Spiritu-
ality, Theology and Health at
Duke University Medical Cen-
ter, believes that faith'provides
hope for people, regardless of
how dire their situations.
"Scripture promises that all


things work together for good
for those who love and serve
God. You can decide to look for
those good things. This under-
standing can give them hope,
meaning, and a sense of pur-
pose, which will enable them
to go through those events,"
Koenig said in a previous inter-
view.
When Pamela Burnett was
diagnosed with breast can-
cer in 2001, she found herself
leaning more than ever on her


faith in God.
"As a young girl I was al-
ways fascinated by the word
and when I got sick, I got like a
hunger for it," she said.
Yet 10 years later when she
is no longer facing imminent
danger -- Burnett is cancer
free and founded the popular
Beautiful, Gate, Inc. Cancer
Resource Center. She remains
passionately loyal to her reli-
gion.
"There is so much to learn


and I'm still growing and ap-
plying [the Word] as much as
possible."
According to Chestnut, the
best way that Christians can
maintain their faith in more
prosperous times is to by "stop-
ping taking ownership."
Everything "belongs to God.
You don't have-ownership of it.
See when we take ownership of
God's stuff then that's when we
end with just the stuff and no
God," he said.


Bethany SDA Church prepares for annual block party


BONNER
continued from 12B

religions including the Trin-
ity and the second coming of
Christ. However, the denomina-
tion does have several beliefs
that distinguish it from other
faiths including the encourage-
ment of a vegetarian lifestyle
and worshipping on Saturday.

A FAITH-FILLED EDUCATION
Bonner strongly supports the
importance of receiving a for-
mal Christian education with
one caveat: the institution and
the prospective student should
share compatible values.
"I believe you should attend
an institution that will keep
you in the area of ministry that
teaches what you believe," ex-


plained Bonner.
The minister himself is a
graduate of Oakwood Univer-
sity, an Alabama-based SDA
college, where he met his wife,
Tracy. His studies and campus
activities helped prepare him
for what has become a 27-year
career in the ministry. And
while he says he has found his
work to be greatly rewarding
and gratifying, Bonner admits
that he has found himself fac-
ing the danger of anyone else
who works a very demanding
job -burnout.
"I found myself a couple of
times needing a break because
you can wear yourself out if
you do not balance your sched-
ule," he recalled.
To ward off such occasions,
he takes several precautions


such as having designated
hours when he can be reached
concerning church business.
Married for 26 years, the father
of two also designates one day
a week as a time to spend with
family and also takes a vaca-
tion every year.

SUPPORTING ROLES
To Bonner, who married his
college sweetheart, healthy
marriages offer benefits for
both spouses.
"In every couple whether they
want to realize it or not the
husband needs the wife and
the wife needs the husband,"
he said. "I need my wife beside
me in every situation; she helps
me to see things that I cannot
see."
The recognition of the impor-


tant gifts that every individual
can provide is why he also sup-
ports women in the ministry.
"It's more important than
ever to have a female associate
pastor because she can help
me as a male pastor to help un-
derstand others in ways that I
cannot," he said.
One of his goals since as-
suming the leadership at Beth-
any SDA has been to focus on
the specific needs of his con-
gregation and to help those in
the wider community. After
recently ending a month-long
revival in July, the church and
its community center are al-
ready gearing up to host their
second annual community
block party.
'Want to know more? Visit
www.bethanymiami.org.


Seminar builds girls' self-esteem with survival skills


SCHOOL
continued from 12B

they don't know how smart
they are, [so] we're just going to
do a lot of activities to let them
converse with their peers and
when they leave they will learn
how to believe in themselves
and just start the school year
learning how to have more
faith in themselves," Mizell
said.
Mizell, a member of the
prominent Mizell family whose
members were responsible for
establishing some of Black
South Florida's earliest busi-
nesses and schools, found that


her own self-esteem suffered a
severe blow once she reached
adolescence.
Now 28-years-old, Mizell
says she spent much of teen
years, continuing into her ear-
ly twenties, feeling insecure
about herself. That insecurity
led to her making poor deci-
sions that ended in her becom-
ing a teen mother. Her person-
al journey towards building a
positive self image was long
and arduous, but she said the
comfort of loved ones helped.
"It took many years and
what really help me over come
[my doubts] was my pastor
who always gave me words of


encouragement," said Mizell, a
member of The Purpose Center
Family Church in Hollywood.
The divorced mother of three
says she is determined to help
other young women do the
same. About a year ago, the
former promotions and mar-
keting assistant for WEDR
99 Jamz, founded her non-
profit organization to focus on
mental and physical health of
young girls.
The Self-Esteem seminar,
which is Lovel3's first event,
touched on topics from nu-
trition and exercise to basic
savings and banking lessons
and even etiquette. Onedof the


highlights to the event was a
presentation by Ft. Lauder-
dale native Brian "Poem" Col-
lier.
Carolyn Mercury Powery,
president of The Etiquette
Touch Institute, taught atten-
dants about the importance of
poise and dining manners.
And while the etiquette
coach has tons of rules that
she could share, she said
one emphasizes following the
Golden Rule: Do unto others
as you would like others to do
unto you.
"It's a very simple rule be-
cause everyone wants to be re-
spected," she said.


Future designers attend camp


ARCHITECT
continued from 12B

School of Architecture for de-
sign classes taught by practic-
ing architects who are mem-
bers of AIA Miami. The classes
focused on an introduction to
architecture, sketching and
designing, green building and
sustainable design and hands-
on CADD instruction on creat-
ing computer designs.
The students also enjoyed
several field trips including a


walking tour of downtown Mi-
ami architecture and historic
landmarks, tours of several
architectural firms, the Lowe
Art Museum and a day at Hia-
leah's McDonald Aquatic Cen-
ter.
The summer camp culmi-
nated with an open house
which allowed the students to
showcase what they learned.
The students designed and
displayed futuristic town
homes to enhance the quality
of life for all communities.


Ministers worry about U.S. debt


JAKES
continued from 13B

Pastor Andy Stanley of North
Point Community Church in
Georgia.
"So glad we raised that debt
ceiling so that the U.S. credit
rating would not get lowered.
That worked well," tweeted Ed
Stetzer, president of LifeWay
Research.
Although not a pastor,
Ramsey is followed heavily by
the Christian community for
basing his financial advice on
biblical principles. Pastors on


Twitter found one of Ramsey's
micro-posts a re-tweet favorite.
"Only in DC can you cut
spending by 1 Trillion over TEN
years and raise the debt ceiling
almost 1 Trillion THIS year and
call that even," Ramsey tweeted
at the beginning of last week.
Some pastors were a bit more
encouraging.
"Jesus' love for us is not like
the stock market. His grace
never crashes even when we
make stupid decisions," tweet-
ed Greg Stier, founder and
president of Dare 2 Share Min-
istries.


Orlando megachurch pastor dies


TIMS
continued from 13B

"The cause of death is pend-
ing further study," Borakove
said. Toxicology testing is part
of the analysis done to deter-
mine cause of death, she said. A
determination will not likely be
available until later this month.

"PROSPERITY GOSPEL"
A New York City police official
told the Orlando Sentinel early
Monday that Tims' death did
not appear suspicious.
Later in the day, NYPD Detec-
.tive Martin Speechley said, "It's


an ongoing investigation. I can-.
not comment further."
Zachery Tims preached the
"prosperity gospel," which is
the belief that God answers
the prayers of those seeking
success. He was an example
of his own theology. Accord-
ing to divorce documents, Tims
earned about $33,400 a month
in 2009, owned a $2.2 mil-
lion Windermere home, spent
$1,500 a month on clothing,
had $437,300 in the bank, and
drove both a 2004 Hummer
and a 2008 BMW. Giving back
to the church, he tithed $3,500
a month.


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15B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


BLACKS MlusT CONTROl THEIR OWN DESTINY


Appeals court rejects health law component


Supreme Court likely to settle issue

on insurance mandate


By David G. Savage and
Noam N. Levey

A federal appeals court
struck down a pillar of Pres-
ident Obama's national
healthcare law, ruling Con-
gress does not have the power
to require all Americans to
buy insurance and setting the
stage for a Supreme Court de-
cision ahead of the 2012 elec-
tion.
The 2-1 decision is a victory
for Republican leaders in 26
states who challenged the law
last year, testing whether the
signature accomplishment of
Obama's presidency would
stand.
The Atlanta-based judges
echoed the complaint that
the mandate represents an
"unprecedented" expansion of
federal power.
"The individual mandate is
breathtaking in its expansive
scope," two judges of the 1 th


Circuit Court of Appeals wrote
in their 207-page majority
opinion.
About 50 million Americans
lack basic health insurance.
As a result, hospitals and
taxpayers are forced to pay
about .$43 billion a year to
cover the costs of those who
are treated but cannot pay.
Many healthcare experts
believe an insurance
mandate is crucial not only to
controlling this cost shift but
also to guaranteeing that all
Americans can get insurance,
a right provided by the law.
Without such a requirement,
they argue, consumers would
be able to wait until they
were sick to buy insurance.
That in turn would push up
premiums.
The ruling was not a total
victory for the challengers.
The appeals court rejected the
states' claim that Congress
went too far by expanding


-Photo by Gerald Herbert / AP
President Barack Obama high-fives' Marcelas Owens of Seattle, after speaking about the
health care reform bill,Tuesday, March 23,2010, at the Interior Department in Washington.
Behind them is Vicki Kennedy, widow of Sen.Ted Kennedy.


Ohio vote OK'd

COLUMBUS, Ohio The
Ohio Supreme Court ruled
Friday that a proposed
amendment to the state
constitution designed to block
implementation of the health
care overhaul law can appear
on the ballot in November.


the Medicaid program for
low-income Americans. The
judges also agreed the rest
of the healthcare law could
stand, even if the insurance
mandate is struck down.
The White House,
meanwhile, minimized the
opinion, citing the divided
rulings by multiple federal
courts around the country.
The administration can
appeal Friday's decision
directly to the Supreme Court.
If an appeal petition is filed in
the fall, the justices are likely
to hear the case early next
year and rule by late June.


Health exchanges get startup money


By Noam N. Levey

The Obama administration
has awarded more than $185
million in grants to 13 states
and the District of Columbia
to help establish new state-
based health insurance mar-
ketplaces where consumers
can shop for insurance start-
ing in 2014, a key benefit of
the new healthcare law.
These Internet-based ex-
changes, designed to help
Americans who don't receive
health benefits through their
employer, are intended to
make buying health insurance
akin to comparison shopping
online for an airline ticket or a
hotel room.
By 2019, the exchanges are
expected to provide insurance
for an estimated 24 million
Americans, most of whom will
receive subsidies to help them
buy a health plan because
they are expected to earn too
little to bear the full cost.
Employers with fewer than
100 workers will also be able
to use the exchanges, which
will have to offer plans with a
minimum level of coverage. No
plans will be able to deny cov-
erage to people with preexist-
ing conditions.


Internet-based health insurance exchanges are a key benefit
of the healthcare law backed by President Barack Obama.


The grants were announced
Friday just as a key compo-
nent in President Obama's
healthcare law, requiring all
Americans to buy insurance,
was ruled unconstitutional
by a federal appeals court in
Atlanta. The issue is likely
headed to the Supreme Court.
Leaders in 26 states chal-
lenged the law in court last
year.
Obama administration offi-
cials have been racing to get
states to set up exchanges
because they are central to


the coverage expansion envi-
sioned by the new law. That
effort has been embraced by
some state leaders and resist-
ed by others critical of the law.
The new grants went primar-
ily to states with Democratic
governors who have moved
most aggressively to imple-
ment the new law, including
California, Illinois, Maryland
and Connecticut. Three other
states have already received
these planning grants.
California, which was the
first state to pass legislation


establishing an exchange, re-
ceived the largest grant at
more than $38 million.
Federal funding also went to
three states with Republican
governors, including Indiana
and Nevada, who are a part of
the multi-state lawsuit.
Mississippi led by Gov.
Haley Barbour, a former chair-
man of the Republican Nation-
al Committee will get more
than $20 million, making it
one of the largest recipients of
federal aid.
Barbour said Friday that his
state's exchange "will be very
different from the health ex-
change envisioned by Obam-
acare."
Other Republican-led states,
including Florida, have turned
their back on federal assis-
tance, even though the law re-
quires the federal government
to operate an exchange in any
state that does not establish
its own.
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal,
a Republican, has already an-
nounced that his state will not
run an exchange. And Okla-
homa Gov. Mary Fallin and
Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback,
also Republicans, recently re-
turned federal grant money to
help set up exchanges.


Market volatility can depress consumers' moods


Anxiety and even suicide rates rise when

stocks hit rough patch


By Laura Petrecca

An economic depression isn't
the only thing this nation has to
worry about.
The uncertainty surround-
ing the stock market's volatil-
ity has penetrated our psyches,
causing many to feel antsy and
disheartened.
The market swings already
raise anxiety levels. But mix
in the angst that comes with
financial loss, and it can cre-
ate a psychological maelstrom,
says Joshua Klapow, clinical
psychologist at the University
of Alabama-Birmingham.


"Money means more than just
dollars'and cents to people," he
says. "It's their ticket to secu-
rity. It's their ticket to survival."
Last week, the Dow had daily
triple-digit moves.
Given the volatility as well
as the Dow's nearly 10 percent
decline in the last month -
folks are ruminating over ques-
tions such as: "How am I going
to retire? Can I pay for my kids'
college? Will the market go low-
er?" says clinical psychologist
and certified financial planner
Mark Held.
The cognitive torment can
case fatigue, insomnia, in-


creased muscle tension, el-
evated blood pressure and
worse. Suicide rates increase in
troubling economic times and
fall when the economy is doing
well, says a Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention study
released in spring.
Even in June, when markets
were more stable, 27 percent of
middle-class Americans were
"very" or "extremely" stressed
about economic conditions, ac-
cording to a First Command
Financial Services survey;
51 percentwere "somewhat"
stressed.
To reduce angst, mental
health professionals advise
folks to limit exposure to eco-
nomic news. Checking once a
day should suffice, says Held.


"I don't think you should
stick your head in the sand,"
he says. "But you can have in-
formation overload."
Taking proactive steps -
such as discussing reallocation
possibilities with a financial
planner or stress-reduction
techniques with a psychologist
- can take the edge off. Even
exercise can help, says Klapow.
While meditating, running
or making reallocation plans
won't create a more profitable
portfolio, it could have positive
results in the long run.
Anxiety "impedes your ability
to think clearly and decreases
reasoning," says Klapow. "If
you don't (take steps to reduce
it), the likelihood of making
smart decisions goes down."


Study: Depressed women have higher risk of stroke


By Anita Manning

Women who take antidepres-
sants have something new to
worry about: They could be
at increased risk of having a
stroke, Harvard researchers
say.
A study published recently in
Stroke: Journal of the Ameri-
can Heart Association reports
that women with a history of
depression have a 29 percent
greater risk of having a stroke
than non-depressed women,
and those who take antide-
pressants, particularly selec-
tive serotonin reuptake inhibi-
tors, or SSRIs (such as Prozac
or Zoloft), face a 39 percent
higher risk.
"Depression has now been
linked to stroke as well as car-
diovascular disease in gen-


eral," says internist Kathryn
Rexrode, associate professor of
medicine at Harvard Medical
School, the study's senior au-
thor. But "these are modest el-
evations in risk," she says, and
should not lead women to stop
taking antidepressants.
"Although we found women
who took antidepressants were
at higher risk, I don't have any-
thing to indicate it's because of
the medications," she says.
Use of antidepressants most
likely indicates more severe de-
pression, says lead researcher
An Pan of the Harvard School
of Public Health, and depres-
sion has been linked to stroke
risk factors such as high blood
pressure, diabetes, heart dis-
ease, smoking and physical in-
activity.
The study followed 80,574


women ages 54 to 79 who
are part of the Nurses' Health
Study. Researchers examined
participants' symptoms of de-
pression, use of antidepres-
sants and diagnoses of depres-
sion by doctors from 2000 to
2006. At the outset, 22 percent
of the women reported ever
having depression, similar to
the national prevalence of 20
percent in women. Over the
course of the study, there were
1,033 stroke cases.
The findings might not apply
to men, Pan says. Depression
is twice as likely in women as
in men; reasons for the differ-
ence are unknown.
The study is important be-
cause it draws a link between
stroke risk and a history of de-
pression, says Philip Gorelick,
director of the Center for Stroke


Research at the University of
Illinois College of Medicine at
Chicago, who was not involved
in the research. "This relation-
ship has been suspected for a
long time, but has not received
the study and attention that it
might deserve."
Stroke is the third leading
cause of death in the USA, af-
ter heart disease and cancer,
and it hits 425,000 women a
year, 55,000 more than men,
the National Stroke Associa-
tion says. To reduce risk of
stroke, Pan says, women can
make changes in behavior -
stop smoking, follow a health-
ier diet, exercise and work
with doctors to control diabe-
tes and blood pressure. If you
might be depressed, he says,
talk to a doctor to see whether
treatment is needed.


Stay fuller longer with


protein and fiber


By Nanci Hellmich

The ABCs of a nutritious
breakfast are now backed' by
science.
New research shows you'll feel
full longer and may get less hun-
gry throughout the day if your
first meal has protein-rich foods,
such as eggs, Greek yogurt, low-
fat dairy products or lean meat,
and fiber-filled fare, such whole-
wheat bread, whole-grain cereal,
fruit and vegetables.
These foods appear to have
more staying power than highly
processed foods such as bagels,
muffins, doughnuts and sugary
cereals.
The findings are especially im-
portant for school-age children


who may be ravenous by lunch-
time if they don't eat a good
breakfast.
"The evidence is pretty corn-
vincing that consuming more
protein at breakfast will provide
more appetite control for the
rest of the day," says Heather
Leidy, an assistant professor
of nutrition at the University of
Missouri.
Her research shows that
when teens eat a higher-pro-
tein breakfast, they have re-
duced feelings of hunger and in-
creased fullness right away, and
that feeling of satiety continues
throughout the day.
Leidy and her research staff
performed functional MRIs on
the teens' brains and found that
a higher-protein breakfast re-
duced the teens' motivation and
drive to eat and made food look
less rewarding and appealing.
Other studies show that stu-
dents who eat breakfast do bet-
ter on standardized tests and
have improved cognitive func-
tion, attention spans and mem-


ory skills, Plus, kids who start
the day with healthful fare are
also likely to have consumed
important nutrients such as
calcium and vitamins, nutri-
tionists say.
However, surveys show that
30 percent to 60 percent of kids
skip breakfast. Teens are more
likely to miss it than younger
children, Leidy says. And many
of those who eat breakfast are
consuming high-fat, high-sugar
processed foods that have rela-
tively no effect on satiety, she
says.
To get the full benefits of the
satiety from this kind of break-
fast, the meal needs to be 300
to 350 calories, Leidy says. Just
grabbing a piece of fruit or gra-


nola bar is probably not enough
to keep hunger at bay, she says.
The Institute of Medicine rec-
ommends a diet containing a
range of 10 percent to 35 per-
cent of calories from protein.
The institute concluded that
there is no clear evidence that
high-protein intake increases
the risk of kidney stones, osteo-
porosis, cancer, coronary artery
disease and obesity.
In addition to students, diet-
ers also get a boost from a pro-
tein-packed breakfast. Studies
show that protein helps diet-
ers feel full longer, which may
help them adhere to a program
better, says Karen Miller-Ko-
vach, chief scientific officer for
Weight Watchers, who reviewed
research when developing the
company's PointsPlus System.
She says one of her favorite
breakfasts is a poached egg on
whole-wheat toast and' fresh
fruit: "It leads to a productive,
hunger-free morning and helps
me feel in control of my appetite
for the rest of the day."


Revelation Christian Academy, Inc.
Revelation Christian Acad- School supplies will be dis-
emy, Inc. Back-to-School corn- tribute to students accompa-
munity prayer vigil Friday, Au- nied by an adult, while supplies
gust 19, every 15 min. between last.
6 and 8 p.m., 17901 NW 37 Av- Open registration for grades
enue, Miami, Gardens at Carol 6-8. Also tutoring. Call Mrs. J.
City United:Methodist Church. Reid at 786-281-8098.


Women's Day celebration at Metropolitan


The Metropolitan family in-
vites you to their annual Wom-
en's Day Celebration on Sun-
day, August 28th. At 7 a.m.
Minister Audrey Sears takes
us to the mountain top from
the theme "Christian women
holding the whole armor of
God against spiritual warfare."


Then, at 11 a.m. well go sail-
ing on a cloud with Prophet-
ess Sabrina James leading the
way.
Come!! Be prepared for a day
of spiritual excitement.
The church is located at
1778 NW 69 St., Rev. Kyle Gib-
son is the pastor.


JOIN OUR RELIGIOUS ELITE

IN OUR CHURCH DIRECTORY

CALL 305-694-6214


^^F D FTERI N SCHOO^^fLOR ON A

MET. DIDGETHOSE DOUIANUT-AN

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 61 THE MIAMI TIMES A 1


Medicare costs for hospice


For-profitfirms

see larger

market share

By Kelly Kennedy

WASHINGTON Medicare
costs for hospice care have in-
creased more than in any other
health care sector as for-profit
companies continue to gain a
larger share of the end-of-life
medical market, government
records show.
From 2005 through 2009,
Medicare spending on hospice
care rose 70 percent to $4.31
billion, according to Medicare
records.
A recent report by the in-
spector general for Health and
Human Services, which over-
sees Medicare, found for-profit


hospices were pair 29 percent
more per beneficiary than non-
profit hospices. Medicare pays
for 84 percent of all hospice
patients.
At the same time, some of
the nation's largest for-profit
hospice companies are pay-
ing multimillion-dollar settle-
ments for fraud claims and
facing multiple investigations
from state and federal law en-
forcement agencies. For exam-
ple:
Vitas, the nation's largest
for-profit hospice company, is
the subject of a fraud investi-
gation by the Justice Depart-
ment and the Texas attorney
general, according to federal
court filings .
Gentiva, the nation's fast-
est-growing for-profit hospice
company, agreed last month
to pay $12.5 million to settle
Medicare fraud claims, Justice


Department records show.
Gentiva declined to com-
ment, and Vitas did not return
phone calls.
Critics say costs have also
increased because for-profit
organizations have cherry-
picked patients who live the
longest and require the least
amount of care such as
those with dementia or Al-


zheimer's, rather than those
with cancer.
From 1998 to 2008, Al-
zheimer's and dementia hos-
pice cases grew from 28,000 to
174,000, reports the Medicare
Payment Advisory Commit-
tee (MedPAC), an independent
commission that advises Con-
gress. The inspector general's
report said 90 percent of those


up 70 percent
patients lived in nursing facili- MedPAC found that amount
ties when they entered hospice the hospices that exceeded
care, the spending cap, 44 percent
"Certain hospices seem to be of patients transferred back
seeking out beneficiaries with to traditional care from hos-
particular characteristics, and pices exceeded the six-month
these beneficiaries are often spending cap. That suggests
found in nursing facilities," "above-cap hospices may be
said Jodi Nudelman, a regional admitting patients before they
inspector general for HHS in a meet the hospice eligibility cri-
webcast about the report. teria," it said in its 2011 report
Medicare paid hospices that to Congress.
operated out of nursing facili- The Center for Medicare and
ties in excess of.$3,000 more Medicaid Services, which ad-
per beneficiary on average ministers Medicare, is consid-
than it paid other hospices, ering reducing payments for
she said. hospice in nursing facilities,
Medicare pays a $143 daily Nudelman said.
flat rate for hospice. patients, In a growing number of cas-
but they must be expected to es, hospices are collecting the
live less than six months, same daily rate for visiting pa-
They also must agree to shift tients in nursing facilities as
t to palliative care, which is in- other hospice programs that
tended only to relieve a dis- also provide patients' room,
ease's pain or symptoms not boad and medical care not re-
S to attempt to cure it. lated to their terminal illness.


Medicare part D premiums to dip Uncle Sam to pay more


THE GOVERNMENT-SUBSIDIZED PRESCRIPTION PLAN WILL COST SENIORS

AN AVERAGE $30 A MONTH IN 2012. DOWN FROM $30.76 THIS YEAR.


By Noam N. Levey

WASHINGTON Even as
health costs continue to rise,
Medicare beneficiaries will see
the average price of a Part D
drug plan decline slightly next
year, the Obama administra-
tion announced recently, offer-
ing some relief amid pressure
to cut benefits in the federal
health insurance program for
the elderly.
The Part D drug benefit, cre-
ated under the Bush adminis-
tration, allows seniors and oth-
ers on Medicare to sign up for a
privately administered, govern-
ment-subsidized health plan to
get their prescriptions.
Very popular with benefi-
ciaries, the program has also
proved far less costly than bud-
get analysts'originally' expect-
ed, in part because of compe-
tition among private plans and
because of growing use of less-
expensive generic drugs.
In 2012, the average Part D
plan will charge seniors about
$30 a month, according to the
Department of Health and Hu-
man Services.
That's down from $30.76 in
2011 and would mark the sec-


ond time since the drug ben-
efit began in 2006 that average
premiums had declined.
By comparison, overall pri-
vate' health-care spending in
America is expected to grow by
nearly five percent a year be-
tween now and 2014, according
to the latest estimates by gov-
ernment actuaries. Premiums
on many private medical insur-
ance policies are rising even
more sharply.
The Obama administration
has been working to strengthen'
the Medicare drug benefit with


the help of the new health care
law the president signed last
year. The law gradually phases
out the coverage gap known as
-theadoughnut hole, long viewed
as a weakness in the program.
Last year some four million
seniors received $250 rebate
checks when they fell into the
gap in coverage, thanks to the
law. This year, the law will pro-
vide 50 percent discounts on
prescriptions for those who hit
the doughnut hole.
Administration officials also
announced last Thursday that


more than 17 million Medicare
beneficiaries have taken advan-
tage of preventive services such
as cancer screenings that are
now available without co-pays,
another new benefit of the law.
And more than one million
people have seen a physician
for Medicare's annual wellness
visit, which the new law also
makes available without re-
quiring a co-pay.
While celebrated by the
Obama administration, the
widely acknowledged success
of the Part D program is also
fueling calls from conservatives
to expand privatization of the
Medicare program.
Many House Republicans
pointed to.the drug program in
pushing their plan to replace
the current government health
insurance program with a sys-
tem of vouchers that seniors
would use to purchase private
health coverage.
Dr. Don Berwick, who over-
sees the Medicare and Medicaid
program, cautioned Thursday
that the broader privatization
championed by House Bud-
get Committee chairman Paul
Ryan, R-Wis., would actually
mean higher costs for seniors.


Deaths plague even top hospitals


By Steve Sternberg and
Christopher Schnaars

More than 120 hospitals giv-
en top marks by patients for
providing excellent care also
have a darker distinction: high
death rates for heart attack,
heart failure or pneumonia, a
USA TODAY analysis of new
Medicare data has found.
Experts say the newspa-
per's analysis of data released
recently by Medicare offers a
window into the relationship
between patients' perceptions
of the the quality of their hos-
pital care and more objective
measures, such as hospitals'


death and readmission rates.
"This is a very important
finding," says Donald Ber-
wick, director of the Centers
for Medicare & Medicaid Ser-
vices, adding that though pa-
tient-survey data offer critical
insights into how it feels to be
a patient at different hospitals,
patients' perceptions don't tell
the whole story.
Over the past decade, ris-
ing costs and a flood of com-
plex therapies have prompted
patients, employers, insurers
and the federal government to
demand public disclosure of
health care data. Armed with
this evidence, Berwick says,


doctors, insurers and patients
themselves can make better
choices about where to obtain
medical care.
The challenge is to measure
hospitals accurately. Experts
still debate what measures
to use, says John Wennberg,
founding editor of the Dart-
mouth Atlas of Health Care
and author of Tracking Medi-
cine: A Researcher's Quest to
Understand Health Care.
Medicare's analysis of more
than 4,600 hospitals found
that 323, or one of every 14,
had above-average death rates
for heart attack, heart failure or
pneumonia. Two Piedmont


Medical Center in Rock Hill,
S.C., and Southwest Missis-
sippi Regional Medical Center
in Macomb had high death
rates in all three categories.
Thirteen had low death rates
across the board.
Veterans Administration
hospitals performed well, ac-
cording to data released for the
first time this year. Ten hospi-
tals had lower death rates than
average for heart failure; two
were lower for heart attacks;
and five for pneumonia.
All VA hospitals were as good
as or better than the national
rate for heart attack and heart
failure.


By Janet Adamy

Almost half the nation s
health-care spending will
come from government cof-
fers by 2020, up four percent-
age points from 2010, accord-
ing to new federal spending
figures to be released Thurs-
day.
The data, published by the
trade journal Health Affairs,
shows how President Barack
Obama's 2010 health-over-
haul law will reshape who
foots the bill for the nation's
medical expenses by the end
of the decade.
Private employers will pay
for a slightly smaller portion
of the nation's health care
becaus- some large employ-
ers with low-wage workers
are expected to stop offering
health insurance, th* report
found.
Federal and state govern-
ments will take on a greater
portion because the health
overhaul will greatht expand
the number of mericans on
the Medicaid insurance pro-
gram for the poor, and the
federal government will sub-
sidize insurance plans for mil-
lions of lower earners through
new insurance exchanges. In
addition, the growth of Medi-
care enrollment from an ag-
ing population will push up
federal health-care spending.

48 PERCENT OF ALL
HEALTH SPENDING
Spending by federal, state
and local governments is ex-
pected to account for 49 per-
cent of all health spending
or $2.28 trillion, in 2020, up
from 45 percent in 2010. Pri-
vate businesses are expected
to account for 18 percent of
all health spending, or $820.5
billion, down from 20 percent
in 2010.
The reports authors -
economists and actuaries
from the federal Center
for Medicare Services -
cautioned that the figures
could change if lawmakers
rework federal health
programs. Republicans have
pledged to repeal the health


overhaul if they retake the
Senate and White House, ad
the law faces a series of court
challengers that are expected
to be settled by the Supreme
Court. Cuts to Medicare and
Medicaid spending also are
on the table in Washington's
negotiations to raise the
federal debt ceiling
In the near term, the recent
recession and weak recovery
are expected to reduce the
rate of growth in health
spending as consumers
reduce out-of-pocket medical
spending, and job osses cut

The study predicts 49
percent of spending a four-
point rise, will come from
all levels of government to
2020. Businesses share will
fall twb points to 18 percent.
7'- .
the number of people covered
by employer-sponsored
insurance. In 2010, national
health spending grew 3.9
percent to a total of $2.6
trillion, according to the
report. It called that a historic
low. falling slightly below the
previous reason was that
the government paid private
insurers less to run. Medicare
Advantage plans.

PRICES IN 2014
Health spending will see
a sharp uptick in 2014,
when the bulk of the
health-overhaul law kicks
in, including the Medicaid
expansion and insurance
subsidies for lower earners.
The report projects that
national health spending will
grow 8.3 percent in 2014. up
fro a projected 5.5 percent
growth rate m 2013.
While spending growth will
spike in 2014, it is expected
to taper off the following year
and grow. 6.2 percent on
average from 2015 to 2020,
the report found. It attributed
the.slowdown to the excise
tax on high-cost insurance
plans that begins in 2018,
and the fact that some low-
wage workers will lose their
company insurance coverage.


Ration care when it comes to Medicare credits


By Don Campbell

Reports recently about three
new drugs for treating those
with advanced-stage prostate
cancer were of special interest
to me, not just because I was
fortunate enough to catch my
prostate cancer early, but be-
cause I know or knew sev-
eral people who didn't.
Life-extending drugs debut
frequently, and they usually
seem exorbitantly expensive
when weighed against their
promise of adding a few weeks
or months of life to someone
with a terminal illness. In these
prostate-cancer cases, one new
drug costs $5,000 a month, an-
other $8,000 every three weeks
and a third $93,000 for a full
course of treatment.
The costs in this instance are
even more relevant because
most of them would be paid by


Medicare. This, in turn, raises
hard questions about public
policy, ethics and moral judg-
ments that Americans are go-
ing to have to face even as
elected officials in Washington
try to avoid them. It portends a
future, I believe, that includes
either systematic rationing -
even if we don't want to call it
that or some form of "death
panels," though hopefully we
won't call them that either.
Why? Because Medicare,
like the federal debt, is not re-
motely sustainable at the rate
it is growing. Fueled by Baby
Boomers turning 65, its rolls
will nearly double from 47 mil-
lion to 80 million in the next 20
years. (It's already projected to
go bust in 13 years.) A recent
study by the Urban Institute
found that a typical working
couple retiring this year will
get about three times as many


it *

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dollars in Medicare services as
they paid in Medicare taxes.
What part of that upside-down
equation do people not under-
stand?


The next time you hear some-
one whining that "you can't cut
my Medicare I paid for it,"
just calmly tell them: "No, not
most of it, you didn't."


Medicare is enormously pop-
ular because it provides vir-
tually unlimited benefits for
hospital care and heavily sub-
sidizes benefits for doctor care
and prescription drugs. It's
essentially a single-payer sys-
tem of socialized medicine that
politicians like to condemn in
theory and embrace in practice.
But it's not going to last long
without some mix of unpopular
measures: large tax increases,
draconian benefit cuts, some
abstract rationing formula or
bureaucrats making God-like
decisions about patient care
that could penalize certain life-
styles.
When I ask doctors about
health care issues, especial-
ly rationing, their responses,
without exception, echo those
of Michael Ervin, a retired
Dayton, Ohio, physician who
founded and sold a highly suc-


cessful private health mainte-
nance organization and now
chairs a non-profit health
care group: "We already ration
health care; people just don't
understand it," he says. "It's a
subject that allows people to
take advantage of others' lack
of knowledge."
Which invites the question,
why does talk of rationing health
care evoke such hostile reaction
when rationing is such a com-
mon practice in the rest of our
economy; when governments
routinely adopt regulations or
fund programs based on cost-
benefit analyses that calculate
the value of human life? The
British system of socialized
medicine which, notably, is
more popular there than our
system is here -puts a figure,
the equivalent of $49,000, on
what it will spend to extend a
human life for one year.


For profit hospice growth

2000 Government Total number
or other of hospices

2,318


2000 Non-profit For-profit


So : : 3,476

Source: Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC)


of the tab for health


IUD I n i iviumvi I, ILO, RVUYV I/ LP, ul


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e ness
Sponsored by North Shore Medical Center
"Once You Know, It's Where To Go"


By Stacy Kaiser

Ideally, parenting styles are
customized and refined to suit
an individual child's personality,
skills, strengths and weaknesses.
As an adult your communication
style and ways of responding to
the world have probably become
well ingrained, but I've seen over
and over again in my practice how
some simple adjustments can
make for a much happier and well-
adjusted child.
And the research officially backs
this theory up. The results of a
three-year study show that match-
ing your parenting style to your
child's personality can greatly re-
duce the youngster's risk of de-
pression and anxiety.
So let's talk for a moment about
what kind of parent you are so that
you can work on adapting who you
are to what is in the best interest
emotionally. for your child. While
these categories are broad, they
represent four styles that I have
seen over and over again, both in


NO TOOLS NEEDED: Tourists come from hun
miles around to eat the $15.75 lobster rolls at
in Wiscasset, Maine, where customers happily
line for an hour.


my practice and real life:
Laissez-faire Highly respon-
sive parents, undemanding in
their approach to discipline, with a
non-confrontational manner. They
tend to be nontraditional, opt for
a lenient and democratic type of
household and are very invested in


p wBut wait!






dreds of


Red's Eat
stand in


their approach which favors few
rules, letting a child develop at his
or her own pace and "doing their
own thing."
Authoritarian Parents believe
in and enforce firm discipline and
rules. They tend to be very invest-
ed in demanding respect and obe-


dience and favor structured envi-
ronments and schedules, and will
often use extreme forms of pun-
ishment to get what they want out
of their children. This type parent
does not put much stock in their
child's feelings, emotional needs or
perspective.
Helicopter These parents are
responsive the point of hover-
ing over their children and are
extremely invested in every as-
pect of their lives. Nothing is too
much trouble or too much of a
sacrifice for their child. In the ex-
treme, they're hypervigilant about
their kid's health, safety, friends,
activities and grades, to the point
of choosing friends, completing
school assignments and fighting
their teens' battles. This style may
lead to blurring of parent-child
boundaries and lack of discipline
as these parents prize closeness
and support over all else.
Disengaged These parents gen-
erally, take a hands-off approach
- possibly distracted by their own
Please turn to MENTAL 19B


irU PAl/3r" I....--. k......L---------..t kL. hl-..


TAKES THE CAKE: The lump crab cakes at The Nar-
rows on Kent Island, near the Chespeake Bay Bridge,
have virtually no filler and have won many awards.


War on obesity focuses on failures of parents


By Kaila Heard
kheard'ii@mianirintesonliii.Lconl

The informal 'War on Obesity'
has been escalating for years
now. One of the newest fronts is
the focusing on childhood obesi-
ty. The theory is that by reaching
kids with a message of healthy
eating and exercise is good for
you early, will curb the num-
ber of obese adults. Currently,
in Florida, about 33 1 percent


of children, ages 10 to 17, are
considered overweight or obese,
according to the United Health
Group.
The growing number of obese
Americans has been a popular
discussion for a while.
With the growing concern of
obesity, methods to win the 'War
on Fat' have also seemingly in-
creased.
In addition to traditional weight
loss schools such as Jenny


Craig and Weight Watchers, the
government has also issued the
youth-focused 'Let's Move' initia-
tive. There has been a growing
awareness that parents play a
large part in what their children,
pre-teens and even teens put into
their mouths to a large extent.
Recognizing the connection
between a well-informed parent
may produce healthier meals
and encourage their children to
exercise, many programs are be-


ing created to teach parents how
to cook more nutritious meals
as well as provide basic educa-
non on healthy foods, dietary
requirements and how to remain
fit such as the ones offered at the
Abundant Life Health and Fitness
Center in Ft. Lauderdale.
Yet already the focus on pa-
rental responsibility has pro-
duced what some would say are
extreme methods. Instances of
Please turn to OBESITY 19B


PREGNANCY DOS AND DON'T


By Kelly Hughson
Director of Women's Services
North Shore Medical Center

If you just found out that you're
pregnant, .should you eat fish? What
about drinking a cup of coffee, soft
drink or glass of wine? Can you travel
by air? Should you get your hair
dyed? Can you stand in front of a
microwave? Arrggghhhh! You probably
have a thousand questions, but only
a hundred answers about what you
should and shouldn't do or eat while
pregnant. So here are a few tips to help
you and your baby stay healthy for the


next nine months.
Do see your doctor for regular
prenatal checkups. Ask about
stopping any medications you are
currently taking and starting any new
ones. Make sure health problems such
as diabetes or high blood pressure are
treated and kept under control. Ask
about getting a flu shot. Don't forget
to wear a seatbelt when you are in the
car.
Do eat plenty of fruits, vegetables,
grains, calcium-rich foods and lean
meats. It's okay to have up to 12
ounces of fish per week, but avoid fish
such as shark, swordfish, mackerel or


tilefish, that are high in mercury and
can cause serious nervous system
damage for your baby. Instead, opt for
canned light tuna, shrimp, salmon,
pollack or catfish. Also stay away from
unpasteurized milk and soft cheeses
because they may contain listeria,
a bacterium linked to miscarriage,
premature birth, stillbirth or fetal
illness. Remember to drink plenty of
water every day to prevent constipation.
Do get at least 400 mcg of folic
acid every day to lower the risk of
birth defects. It's al:;o a good idea to
take folic acid before you become
pregnant. Also be sure to get enough


A
Uap


Parenting skills that impact




your child's mental health


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iberie *aAfe~a * * ^ .IjJijik* Jjlhij

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^^|^*'Sii^^*A- llij


DON'T LET MENOPAUSE

GET YOU DOWN
Menopause is a behavioral roller coaster for
some women, who experience a host of emo-
tions including mood swings, fear, depression
and irritability.
The womenshealth.gov website suggests how
to ease moodiness associated with'menopause:
Make sure you get enough sleep each night,
and stick to a regular sleep and wake schedule.
Exercise for at least 30 minutes almost
every day of the week.
Limit how many activities you take on.
Find ways to help manage stress.
Seek support from friends, a peer group or
get counseling.
Talk to your doctor about medications and
therapy options to help you manage menopause
symptoms.
Relax by reading a book, or treat yourself to
some quiet time.



HELP PREVENT

ECZEMA FLARES

Eczema is a chronic condition that makes the
skin red, dry and itchy.
The American Academy of Family Physicians
suggests how to prevent flares of eczema:
Stay away from irritants such as harsh
soaps, detergents, gasoline and cleaning
solutions.
Wear clothing made of cotton, and avoid
wool and synthetic fabrics that can irritate the
skin.
Take short, lukewarm baths or showers and
wash with a mild cleanser. Avoid hot water.
Pat skin dry after a bath or shower and-..- .
immediately apply moisturizer.
Make sure you moisturize your skin every
day. Avoid scratching your skin.
Avoid getting very sweaty or overheating.
Find ways to control stress.


THAW POULTRY

SAFELY

There are safe ways to thaw chicken, turkey
and other poultry and there are not so safe
ways to do so. Improper thawing can lead to
food-borne illness.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture offers
these suggestions:
SDon't allow poultry to thaw at room
temperature.
Allow the poultry to thaw in the refrigerator
for one-to-two days.
You can thaw poultry in a sealed bag placed
in cold water for two-to-three hours, changing the
water every 30 minutes to keep it cold.
Thawed poultry can be stored in the
refrigerator for another one-to-two days.
You can defrost poultry in the microwave, but
it should be cooked immediately afterward.
Always allow poultry to thaw before using a
slow cooker.





iron to prevent anemia and reduce the
chances of preterm birth and a low-
birth weight baby. Your doctor may
prescribe prenatal vitamins during
your pregnancy.
Do get seven to nine hours of sleep
each night and reduce stress in your
life by setting limits and saying "no" to
requests for your time and energy.
Don't smoke, which can raise the
risk of miscarriage, preterm birth and
infant death, drink alcohol, which can
cause irreversible birth defects, or use
illegal drugs, which are dangerous for
you and your baby. Avoid exposure to
*.v: Please turn to PREGNANCY 19B


..........W ho wins the sm ackdown?.........................
Who wmns the smackdown?.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 81 THE MIAMI TIMES A 1


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Only one hospital in Florida has programs listed in all 10 subspecialty

categories nationally ranked by U.S.News & World Report in its 2011-12

"Best Children's Hospitals" rankings.

,f' !'
L Cancer Nephrology

[ Cardiology & Heart Surgery 1i Neurology & Neurosurgery

L Diabetes & Endocrinology Ei Orthopedics


SGastroenterology


.4.


JF
10


Neonatology


Pulmonology


Urology


BEST BEST BEST BEST BEST BEST BEST BEST BEST BEST
CHILOJR'S CHILDREN CHILDREN CHILDREN'S CHILDREN'S CHILDREN'S CHILDREN'S CHILDREN'S CHILDREN'S CHILDREN'S
HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS

-. ,a. ..i .- a k -- A.:' : .' --. .. '" -
jM k ss," l lll I"R.
7-v-77,'V- .


For a physician referral to a pediatric specialist,
please call 888.MCH.DOCS (888.624.3627).
3100 SW 62nd Ave., Miami, FL 33155 305.666.6511


Based on the U.S.News & World Reports 2011-12
"America's Best Children's Hospitals."


MIAMI X(J/




You Want The Best For Your Children.

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j*1


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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)t
Bro. Leroy Johnson


Bro. James Gibson


Bro. James Seymore


Deacon Ordination Service at El Palacio Hotel


Greater Harvest Baptist Church under
the leadership of Rev. Kenneth McGee, pas-
tor will hold it's first Ordination Service at
4 p.m. on August 21. This honor is to be
bestowed upon these dutiful and God-fear-
ing Christian men who will serve along with
Dea. John Turner, Deacon Ministry Chair-
man. Bro. Willard Leon Barnes Jr., Bro.


Leroy Johnson, Bro. James Gibson and
Bro. James Seymore.
Rev. Charles Coleman, Pastor Emeritus
of Christian Fellowship M.B.C. will be in
charge of the service. Rev. McGee states
that it is truly a blessing that these fine
Christian men have shown their love for
Christ and accepted the challenge of being


ordained as a Servant Leader.
Great Harvest is a church that is "Walk-
ing in Purpose, Sowing in Expectation and
Believing in Jesus." The community at
large is invited to join us on this auspicious
occasion at El Palacio Hotel and Confer-
ence Center, 21485 NW 27 Ave., 9th Floor,
Miami Gardens, FL.


Child's mental health may be affected by parenting skills


MENTAL
continued from 18B

troubles stress or addictions.
Neither warm nor responsive
toward their children on the
far end of the scale, they could
be termed neglectful or abusive.
Their children may experience a
great deal of freedom, but often


ultimately are missing critical
skills that will help them man-
age day-to-day and long-term
challenges.
As a therapist, I am always
trying to strike a balance be-
tween teaching parents to focus
on their child's self-esteem and
emotional well-being while still
being able to appeal to their par-


ticular style. In an ideal situa-
tion parents combine elements
of all of the above caregiving
styles appropriately. They are
assertive without being aggres-
sive or abusive; approach child-
rearing with firm rules and clear
boundaries; and reason with
and support their child rather
than take a punitive stance or


do everything for them. Children
raised with elements all of these
styles combined tend to be more
cooperative, self-regulating, so-
cially responsible and have the
least anxiety and highest level of
self esteem. Furthermore, they
tend to be the happiest... and
isn't that what we all want more
than anything else?


19B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


Parents to blame for obesity


OBESITY
continued from 17B
children actually being removed
from their parents' care and
placed in foster care are not
unheard of now. In 2009, Jerri
Gray, then a 555-lb. teen was
placed into the South Carolina
foster care system and in 2007,
a nine-year-old girl in New York
who was labeled morbidly obese
was also removed from her par-
ents' home.
According to a report by the
Child Welfare League of Ameri-
ca, other courts in states such
as New York, Indiana, New
Mexico, Pennsylvania and Cali-
fornia have debated whether


morbid childhood obesity is the
result of parental neglect.
Yet while the desire to pros-
ecute parents may continue
to grow, it remains difficult to
prove abuse in such cases, ac-
cording to Richard Balnave, a
professor at the University of
Virginia School of Law.
"Obesity, although potentially
dangerous, does not generally
put a child in imminent danger,
Balnave said in a previously
published interview.
However, such cases will also
have to struggle to take into
consideration several additional
factors including environment,
genetics and even the free will
of the obese youth in question.


Vesper Choir celebrates anniversary


The Vesper Choir of A.M.
Cohen Temple COGIC will cel-
ebrate its 34th Anniversary
at 4 p.m. on Sunday, August
21, featuring local choirs and
groups.
The Appointed Gospel Sing-


ers, recording artists will be
special guests.
Refreshments served after the
program. The church is located
at 1747 N.W. 3rd Avenue.
Bishop Jacob Cohen is the
pastor.


Little Rock celebrates annual meeting


Little Rock Primitive Bap-
tist Church, 1790 Ali Baba
Avenue, Opa Locka, Elder
Richard Austin of Macon,
GA, pastor is having their
annual three day meeting
starting August 19-21 at 1
p.m.


Guest speaker will be El-
der James Grier of Dawson,
GA. Dinner will be served af-
ter Sunday services.
For more information,
please call 786-294-8179.
Come and have a Hallelu-
jah good time.


Tips to help you and your unborn child stay healthy during pregnancy


PREGNANCY
continued from 17B
toxic substances and chemicals,
such as cleaning solvents,
certain insecticides and paint.
Don't gain too much weight.
Excess body weight can increase
the chances of developing
gestational diabetes, pre-
eclampsia, stillbirth and preterm
birth. In general, a woman who


is normal weight should gain
about 25 pounds during her
pregnancy.
Don't change or clean out your
cat's litter box and avoid contact
with pet rodents such as guinea
pigs and hamsters.
Don't take very hot baths or
use a hot tub or sauna, which
can be harmful to the fetus.
Also avoid douching or using
scented feminine hygiene


products, which can increase
the risk of infection.
You can get your hair dyed,
drink a cup of coffee or soda,
stand in front of a microwave, sit
in front of a computer monitor,
paint your nails, and travel by
air when you are pregnant. If
you have any more questions
about pregnancy dos and
don't, talk with your doctor
or call 1-800-984-3434 for a


free referral to an obstetrician/
gynecologist near you.
North Shore Medical Center
offers advanced medical care by
skilled professionals, who have
the experience to handle routine
deliveries and fully address any
complications that may occur.
NSMC has been delivering
babies for a half century,
and the services have earned
the highest quality ranking.


The facilities at North Shore
Medical Center are designed
for the comfort of you and your
family. Each member of our
staff is trained to enhance the
experience of giving birth. From
prenatal educational classes
to our Neonatal Intensive
Care, from our obstetricians to
nursing staff, all North Shore's
services are focused on you and
your baby.North Shore Medical


Center also features the only
Level III Neonatal Intensive Care
Unit (NICU) in Northern Miami-
Dade County. Services include
24-hour coverage of certified
neonatologists, perinatologists
to treat high risk pregnancies,
and pediatric surgeons.
For more information on
maternity services or classes
at North Shore Medical Center,
please call 305-835-6000.


The Miami Tim e-


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
IU] /' JVI I I' I T 'I IW!


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street

- Order of Services
Sunday School 945 a m
Worship 11 am
bible Slludy. hursday 7 30 p m
L ouh Minlslry
Man Wed 6 pm


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
!I'11. i


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue


I *:Il I III


Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue
Im mZ'L~IIclonl, l lr, rIowj, a:&


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
Iow i* :ra


Order of Services
Sunday I /J and 11 am
Worhip Sari.re
9 10 on i, ndor School
luridu l7m lible luiud
I p m Prlayr Meaing


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International
2300 N.W. 135th Street


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.,
11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a m. Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday General Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS/Com cast 3 Saturday- 7:30 a.m.
pembrokeparkchurchofthrsl ctm pembrokeparktoc@bellsouth.net
Avi


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
W IW IW o III|I


hi


Order of Services


Sunday 130 I11am
Sunday Schuir 1am
Tlur'day p Bible
Siudy Proer Mllnr,g B U
Bapillm Thurs before
Firs Sun 7pm


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court

Ii iOrder of Ser
Lord Doa Sunday Scho
Sunday Mornming Worsh


vices

Ip 4onm
ship 11 a m


Sunday Men s Bible Srudy 5p m
Sundry Ladlis Bible Sudy 5 pm
j Sunday Eening Worship 6p m


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street
378


Order of Services
Hour of Prayer 6:30 a.m. Early Morning Worship 1 30 a m
Sunday School 9-30 am Morning Worship 11 a.m
Youth Minisiry Study Wed 7 p.m Prayer, Bible Study Wed 7 p m
Noonday Altar Prayer (M F)
Feeding ihe Hungry every Wednesday 11 amn 1pm
.www Ir ,.,,d hih'nr ,.,u L' "* f rleni d:hippl~, er u 'bell;oulh nri l


Minister Brother Job Israel
(Hebrew Israellites)
305-799-2920
* BI TINm.lt iS'0 Ilia
Angels ol Freddom
Prnion Minr'lrnys
P 0 Be 26513
JaL onvIllu FL 31222


)


, il lI.uo pir.ll aoppearonce
Snd Biblieltudi Dan 244


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


--Order of Services
i ioarty Sunday
Morning worship 730am
SSunday School P9lum
I orrelngworshipllam
oaeroandBibleSiudy
seeing (Tues 1j7pm


i0lllKYY


t : I'~


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Avenue


Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street

- -- --E--- Order of Services
[hurh,'Sunrday School 830am
Sunday Worship Srice 10lOam
Mid dWeek er. re Wednesday I
Hour of P.oer Noon Day Prayer
12pml1pm
Evening Worship Ipm


IINmulaguarlI,: insuIilm


.0


II~IZ~I~Y~YYI _


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


20B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


I'
. S TYF S 0 iA I I, SANK


Range
MARIAN L. HARRIS SHAN-
NON, 91, edu-
cator for Dade
County Public f 4
Schools, died
August 9 at -
home. Survivors
include adopted i
son, Richard
Pasley, Sr.,;
aunt, Mary Lou Carson; cousin,
Mae Blackford; dear friends, Al-
berta Godfrey, Irene Hargrove,
Irma Ingram, and David Robinson,
Esq.; a host of other relatives and
friends. Service was held 10 a.m.,
Tuesday in the chapel.

MATTIE H. WATERS, 86, re-
tired, died Au-
gust 11 at Mt.
Sinai Hospital.
Survivors are
grandchildren,
Tiffany Moss .
(Clarence), Tina ,
Simmons-Spear
(Jerome) and -A .
family. Viewing 3-8 p.m., Friday
at Range Funeral Home. Service
1 p.m., Saturday at St. Matthews
Freewill Baptist Church.

OLLIE M. WILLIAMS, 64, man-
ager, Dade --.
County School a
Board, VP AF-
SCME, died
August 15 at
Sylvester Can-
cer Center.
Survivors are
Alissa, Albert,
Dashawn, Natosha, and Tony; nine
grandchildren, two great grandchil-
dren and a very very dear friend,
Eugene Rigby. Service Saturday at
Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church.

Royal
LAWRENCE L. PETERSON, 81,
supervisor, died August 14 at
home. Service
11:30 a.m.,
Saturday at
Calvary
Holiness Church
of God, 21455
NW 32 Avenue,
Miami, Gardens,
FL 33056.

Richardson
LEE A. BEASLEY, 68, retired
construction
foreman, died
August 9 at Mt.
Sinai Hospital.
Survivors
include: mother,
Mollie Beasley;
brothers,
Charles, -
Vernard; sisters, Arlinda Jones,
Debra Beasley, Donnette Turner,
Delores Beasley, Donna Byrd;
one daughter, Tangela Beasley;
five sons, Darryel, Eric, Leonard,
Gary, and Troy; 17 grandchildren,
one great grandchild, a host of
nephews, nieces, family and
friends. Service 11 a.m., Saturday
at Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church, 1745 N.W 79th Street.


Faith
ALBERT NELSON, 78, laborer,
died August 11
at Kindred Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday
at Peaceful Zion
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.



Nakia Ingraham
JOYCE TENNANT, 71, domestic
worker, died August 8 at Memorial
Hospital. Service 11 a.m. at World
Harvest Church of God.

RAYMOND SANDS, 49, contrac-
tor, died August 9 at home. Service
3 p.m., Saturday at Ebenzer Bap-
tist Church.

VICTORIA MARTINEZ, 72,
housewife, died August 13 at Me-
morial Hospital. Graveside service
was held 1 p.m.,Tuesday.

NIMROD OTTLEY, 85, shop-
keeper, died August 12 at Memorial
Hospital. Service 3 p.m., Saturday
at St James Episcopal Church.

Place your


OBITUARY
today
305-694-6210


Hadley Davis
LAWRENCE SUMMER, 72, la-
borer, died Au-
gust 13. Service
1 p.m., Satur-
day at New St.
James Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.



JAMES SHELTON, 54, painter,
died on August
11. Memo-
rial Service 4-8
p.m., Thursday
in the chapel.


JOSEPH WILLIAMS
August 13. Memorial
a.m., Saturday in the ch


, 61, died
Service 10
iapel.

e


San Jose


PATRICIA WHITE, 51, telephone
operator,
died August
9. Service 11
a.m., Thursday
at Greater
Holy Coss M.B
Church.




Roberts Poitier
MARVIN CARSON, 64, build-
ing inspector,
died August 4
at Cleveland
Clinic. Services
were held.


Gregg Mason
LOUISE LEWIS, 84, retired do-
mestic techni-
cian, died Au-
gust 11. Sur-
vivors are two
sons, Arthur
Lee Harris, and
Walter Lewis;
three daugh-
ters, Sylvia
Manuel, Paulette K. Rolle, and
Francine Lewis; a hosts of relative
and friends. Viewing 3 9 p.m.,
August 19 in the chapel. Service
1 p.m., Saturday at Miracle Valley
Praise and Worship Center, 1930
NW 70 Street.


New Serenity


DANIEL L. STEVENSON, 59,
died August 11.
Public viewing
4-7 p.m., Firday,
August 19 at
Manker Funeral
Home,2075
NW 54th
Street, Miami,
FL 33142. Pro-


fessional services are entrusted
to New Serenity Memorial Funeral
Home and Cremation Services,
Inc. Crystal River, FL 34429, (352)
563-1394.


Manker
BELLE S. WILLII
domestic, died August 1
Speciality Hospital. Ser
held.


Eric Wilso
LORINE DUGGINS,
maker, died August 11
Memorial Oakland Par
1 p.m., Saturday at HOL
Miracle Revival Fellows
NM A rp_ wood, FL.


Grace
ANNIE MAE NELSO
tired, died Au-
gust 12. Service
11 a.m., Friday
at Grace Funer-
al Home in the
chapel.


WILLIE JAMES JACKSON, 52,
died August 8.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.









Hall Ferguson Hewitt
CAROLYN BARBARY, 59,
retired postal
clerk, died
August 11
at Jackson
Memorial
Hospital .
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday at
New Beginning
Missionary Baptist Church.



Wright and Young
WILLIE CECIL CHANEY, 82,
laborer, died Au-
gust 14 at Kin-
dred Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday at
New Providence
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.



Paradise
CARLTON H. BRYANT, 51, cor-
rection officer,
died August 9 at
home. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day at Sweet
Home Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


MAE BELL STRONG,93, for-
mer owner of Ray's Sweet Shop,
died August 12 at home. Service
10 a.m., Saturday at Hurst Chapel
A.M.E. Church of Perrine.


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,
| --- i


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


SHONQUANDA JEROME CORNELL
RENEE WIMBERLY PERKINS TRAPP
bka "Foxy"


08/20/88 10/18/07

Remembrance is a golden
chain
Death tries to break, but all
in vain.
To have, to love, and then to
part
Is the greatest sorrow of
one's heart.
The years may wipe out
many things
But some they wipe out
never.
Like memories of those hap-
py times
When we were all together.


We miss you Foxy,
Your daddy, Rufus Wim-
AMS, 82, berly, Jr. and wife, Rhonda;
4 at Select mother, Vickie Torrence; sis-
vices were ters and brother: Shawnie,
Quantia, Quanesha, and
Dale; step-sister: Malikah
Jefferson and nephew, Malik
)n Williams.
The Wimberly and Torrence
72, home- families.
at Florida
rk. Service
use of God In Memoriam
ship, Holly-
In loving memory of,


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


JEROME SHARPE JR.
10/04/62 08/14/10


Our lives are so empty with-
out your love,
Not a moment passes, when
you're not thought of.
The Lord giveth, the Lord
taketh away.
Our comfort cometh, know-
ing we will meet again some-
day.
Loving and missing you al-
ways, Mom and Family



In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


TARNORRIS
TYRELL GAYE
04/25/91 08/20/10


Its been one year since you
departed. Words can not ex-
press the pain we feel from
missing you, but, it is the joy
of knowing that you are in
paradise.
Love grandma, Teundra,
Latisha and family.


KATHALEEN PEEK JAMES
05/06/47 08/06/10

We think of you always, but
especially today.
You will never be forgotten,
although you are gone away.
Your memory is a keepsake
with which we never part.
God has you in His keeping;
we have you in our heart.
The James and Peek fami-
lies.



Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


acknowledges with grateful
appreciation the many kind
expressions of sympathy dur-
ing our bereavement.
We extend special thanks to
The Rev. Eddie Lake and the
Greater Bethel AME Church
family for your unfailing sup-
port and to the Christ Jesus,
Jesus Christ Community
Choir, the brothers of Alpha
Phi Omega fraternity and the
brothers of Omega Psi Phi fra-
ternity for your moving trib-
utes. To Ike and Val Woods,
thank you for the stirring
rendition of "Fire and Rain."
To the many friends and col-
leagues from Miami-Dade Col-
lege and the Miami-Jackson
Class of 1968, we say thank
you for sharing your many
stories of his life.
Your acts of kindness are
truly uplifting to us. May God
continue to bless you.
Ryan, Katura and Tabatha
Trapp and The Koonce family.


In Memoriam


In Memoriam


LORRAINE F. STRACHAN
"Shug"
08/17/36 02/06/11

It has been six months since
you've been gone.
The Farringtons, Strachan,
Kings, Daughters families re-
ally miss you.


Card of Thanks

As we the family of the late,


GLADYS P. BRAYNON


gratefully acknowledges
your kindness and expres-
sions of sympathy.
Your visits, prayers, cards,
telephone calls, monetary
donation and covered dished
were appreciated.
Thanks to the Range Funer-
al Home staff, Pastor Eddie
Lake and the Greater Bethel
family, Delta Sigma Theta So-
rority, many friends, family
and neighbors.
May God bless each of you
is our prayer.
The Family


Happy Birthday


In loving memory of,


MAGGIE LEE MOORE
12/16/1928 08/17/2010


Mother, you are always on
our minds and in our hearts.
Your loving family.




In Memoriam

In loving memory of,
-7Or7


'
:r *
::
I '
'
""'


KAREN TARUSE
COVENTON-SUGGS
11/19/1958- 8/17/08


CECIL LEON PINKNEY
"JOHN"
1961 1991

Forever in our memories.
Mother, Inez Rowe; sisters,
Linda, Carolyn, Rhonda, Bob-
bie and Debra; brother, Eric
and Patrick; sons, C.J. and
Jahlil.

HONOR YOUR LOVED
ONE WITH AN
INMEMORPAMI
IN THE MIAMI TIMES


DARRYL CRAIG
DRIESSEN, SR.


gratefully acknowledges your
kindness and expressions
of sympathy of your visits,
prayers, cards, telephone
calls, monetary donations
and covered dishes were ap-
preciated.
Thanks the Pastor's of
Greater M.B. Church, Dea-
con Willie Melvin and St. Ste-
phens A.M.E. Church.
May God continue bless you
is our prayer.
Lorene Melvin and Family


I


N, v-,


;- ';:~;~
:
:;


iMJ -f











The Miami Times




Lifesty e


Entertainment
FASHION HIP HOP MusIc FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


Octavia Spencer maxes


out Minny


Actress needs no help

By Dennis Moore

For readers of "The Help," Minny is one
of the most memorable characters in
Kathryn Stockett's best-selling novel.
For audiences of "The Help," Octavia
Spencer may be one of the most memo-
rable actresses in the film adaptation,
which opens today.
Spencer plays the feisty, defiant and
determined Minny Jackson. She is one of
the Black domestics
persuaded by a
-, young white
. woman to
secretly work
with her on
S' a book about
their lives in
service to white
families in Jackson,
Miss., in the early
1960s.


By EURweb.com

Tamera Mowry-Housley is having the best year ever!
In May, the actress married her longtime love, FOX News cor-
respondent Adam Housley, in a beautiful vineyard ceremony, and
this month she's the cover star of Get Married magazine's fall
issue, on stands now.
Tamera is one busy woman right now, and lucky for us, we were
able to catch up with her for a little chit-chat.
She tells why she chose Adam to be her lawfully wedded hus-
band, what married life has been like thus far, and why she'd much
rather live in a world where people were color blind.
-See Page 2C



Idol winner Fantasia Barrino:

'God has given me this child'


By Chris Witherspoon

American Idol winner
Fantasia Barrino announced
that she is pregnant during a
concert recently in Jackson-
ville, Florida.
The 27-year-old
R&B singer was
performing at the
opening of the
Riverview Apart-
ments complex,
when she decided
to let fans in on
her big secret.
"You are the
first persons
that I share this FANT
news with, and I
share this with you because
I can relate to you," she said.
For a while I walked around
figuring out what will they
say and what will they think


about me. But now I tell you
I don't live my life for folk.
This child that I carry, God
has given me this child. And
I don't have to hide it from
none of y'all."
Barrino has
a nine-year-old
daughter, Zion
Quari Barrino, from
Sa previous relation-
ship.
She did not con-
firm who the father
of her second child
is, although she
has been recently
linked to her ex-
SIA boyfriend Antwaun
Cook, with whom
she reportedly had an affair
with while he was still mar-
ried. In June, the two were
spotted in Barbados on the
Please turn to FANTASIA 4C


"The Help'


Spencer in mind.
Their longtime friend Tate Taylor
- who later wrote the screenplay
for "The Help" and directed the
movie -- brought Spencer and the
rest of the cast and crew of his
2003 film "Chicken Party" to New
Orleans to work on the sound
mix. Stockett came along.
"She met me on a hot, hungry
day," Spencer, 39, recalls with a
joyous laugh. "I was about 100
pounds heavier than 1 am now,
and I was dieting. I don't like to
be hot, and I was very grumpy
because he was taking us on a
walking tour of the city.
"So I can honestly say Minny's
physicality of course, her vo-
luptuousness is based on me,
and her sass and her strong will
are definitely based on me."
Taylor says Stockett, who was
about a year into writing the book,
was quietly walking behind them,
"watching me and Octavia going toe
to toe fighting about the heat, and
she said, 'My God, I've been writing
this character of Minny, and I think I
just spent an afternoon with her."'
That's where the similarities end and
Stockett comes into play, Spencer says.
"Minny is a complex ball of emotion. I
think she is a Greek chorus. She says
what everyone else is thinking."
In "The Help," recent college grad and
aspiring writer Skeeter Phelan (Emma
Stone) approaches Minny's friend,
Aibileen Clark (Viola Davis), to talk
honestly about cooking and
Please turn to SPENCER 2C


SOPRAH
WINFREY
to receive the
IJean 'Hersholt
Humanitatian
Award.


Oprah and James Earl Jones

to receive honorary Oscars


LOS ANGELES (AP) -
Oprah Winfrey, James Earl
Jones and makeup art-
ist Dick Smith have been
picked to receive honorary
Oscars.
.The Academy of Motion
Picture Arts and Sciences
says the three will be hon-
ored with Oscar statuettes
at the Governors Awards in
November. The academy's
Board of Governors voted
recently to recognize the
entertainment industry


veterans.
Winfrey will receive the
Jean Hersholt Humanitar-
ian Award, which honors
philanthropic and humani-
tarian contributions. The
57-year-old media mogul,
who was nominated for a
supporting actress Oscar for
1985's "The Color Purple,"
supports various charitable
and educational causes, in-
cluding her own namesake
foundations and Academy
Please turn to OSCARS 2C


.- \


.A


By EURweb.com

Your favorite sing-along
drama series, "Glee," has un-
dergone quite a few changes
over the seasons. And there
might be another one soon.
Amber Riley, the show's lone
Black star, said she recently
that she may be graduating
from the crew of high school
singers this year.
"I may not be coming back
for a fourth season," Riley
told El Online. "Who knows?
Whatever happens this third
season is what happens, and I
think everybody's okay with it
... I love my job to pieces, but
when it's time to go, it's time
to go, and hopefully, there are
greater things on the hori-
zon."
"I mean, I don't want to be
a 30-year-old high school stu-


dent either. 'Glee' was just a
great catapult for us," she said
of herself and fellow departing
cast members Lea Michele,
Cory Monteith and Chris
Colfer. "Nobody knew who we
were, and we will always be
thankful for it. It's just been
an amazing blessing."


Black leaders give 'The Help' a hand in marketing


The chairwoman of the NAACP is among those spreading the word about the DreamWorks film, which

focuses on relationships between white Southern women and their maids during the civil rights era.


By Nicole Sperling

When Roslyn Brock, chair-
woman of the NAACP, first
heard about "The Help," a new
film based on a novel about
the volatile relationships be-
tween Southern white women
and their Black maids at the
dawn of the civil rights move-
ment, she was skeptical.
"I didn't have any great
expectations for a movie based
in the '60s about domestics,"
Brock said. "I thought it would
be a heavy, dark movie that
would bring to mind segrega-
tion."
After seeing the film,
though, "I felt so proud," she
said. "My grandmother was
a domestic in Florida, and
when she passed, almost two
generations of families whom
she had taken care of sent


condolences saying what an
important part she was to
their family. And it never re-
ally connected with me until I
saw this movie."
Last week, during the an-
nual convention in Los Ange-
les of the National Assn. for
the Advancement of Colored
People, Brook took to the
stage after a screening of the
film with an impassioned plea:
"I ask each of you: Tell your
friends, your family, your co-
workers, your church. Orga-
nize screening parties. Go see
this movie."
As DreamWorks prepares to
open "The Help," starring Viola
Davis and Emma Stone, on
Wednesday, it faces the deli-
cate task of selling the film to
moviegoers, Black and white,
who might be reluctant to
rekindle unpleasant memories


B
-~.


W aL,..- Y


-Dale Robinette, Dreamworks
Emma Stone, left, and Viola Davis work on a scene with director Tate Taylor while film-
ing the DreamWorks picture "The Help."


of segregation. Brock's shift
from doubter to evangelist for
the movie illustrates the criti-
cal role that word-of-mouth
is likely to play in determin-
ing whether the film flops or
scores as big as its source
material, the best-selling 2009
novel by Kathryn Stockett.
Yet "The Help" isn't univer-
sally beloved. Some critics
including the New York Times'
Janet Maslin derided the
book, which is told from three
narrators' perspectives (two
Black, one white), for allowing
its white characters to speak
in perfect English but giv-
ing its Black characters their
own dialect. Others carped
that the main white charac-
ter, Eugenia "Skeeter" Phelan
(played by Emma Stone in the
film), was viewed by the Black
maids as a savior.


CV~e "~;N


SECTION C


Black star Amber Riley may

be graduating from 'Glee'


AI
rA


JAMES E.
JONESto
receive How
orary Oscars
Award for
Outstanding
r.
Caree I


THE "'.'.r ,11 t, ,,


I ~


C'.
''


1. -










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


y Ri .


Tom Joyner indicated on his
Hot 105 show that the Brothers
of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity,
Inc were planning the National
Conclave in Washington,
D.C., last weekend, and more
than 10,000 in attendance.
Unfortunately, former Basilei
Dr. Edward J. Braynon, Jr.
and Dr. Dorsey C. Miller was
going to leave together, until
Braynon received a call that
his brother, Judge Harold
Braynon, died. Miller sadly
left after a brotherly hug and
prayer.
As Dr. Miller arrived in
Washington, D.C., he
felt the spirit of the
deceased founders, such
as Dr. Oscar J. Cooper,
Dr. Ernest E. Just,
Bishop Edgar A. Love,
and Professor Frank j
Coleman, who 'founded
the fraternity with a
mission of manhood, 1
uplift, perseverance, and
scholarship.
Different sessions occupied
the brothers during the day as
they discussed the economy,
job opportunities, President
Barack Obama issues and the
ground where the fraternity
was built.
The evenings were filled with
banquets, dancing, fraternizing
and impeccably dressed men
and women.
Shuttle buses were provided
for those who wanted to visit
Howard University campus,
such as Tory Cox and his
steppers. According to Oscar
Jessie, an aerial view of the
people moving in and out of


buildings was
overwhelming.
Some of the
brothers in
attendance
included Stan
Allen and wife Sarah, Earl
Daniels and wife Alice, Dr.
Herman Dorsett, Samuel
Jackson, Oscar Jessie and
wife Mary, Richard Fisher,
Bill Cosby, Dr. Astrid Mack,
Henry Mingo, John Shaw,
Arthur Simms and wife Ruth,
Baljean Smith and wife Naomi,
Steven Thompson, former
Basilei George Grace, Henry
Mingo, Rev. Jessie
Jackson, Audley
Coakley, Steve
S Thompson, Clyde
Dupree, Thomas
Sands, and Tim
Belcher, planner.
Kudos go out to the
brothers that took the
time to participate
BAMA in the phenomenal
event.

A special salute goes out to
Quality United Education,
Inc. for paying tribute to
the late Master Rubinoff
Robinson, a benevolent
Tae Kwon Do trainer for
the Third Annual Awards
Gala, last Friday at Florida
Memorial University
Banquet Room before 100
members and parents.
It was an event that PA
headlined Rochelle
Lightfoot, dynamic soloist;
Dr. Henry Lewis, III, Florida
Memorial University president
and keynote speaker; Patriena


I y mi .eeigI


Welcome to Miami Father
Denrick Rolle, who is expected
to replace our beloved Father
Richard L. Marquess-Barry
next year as our rector and
pastor of our beloved Saint
Agnes Episcopal Church. Fr.
Rolle will be with us for the
week.
Old time Miamians were once
again sadden by the death of
Gladys payne-Braynon, who
was the wife of the late John
Braynon. Gladys graduated
from Booker T. Washington in
1942 and her funeral was held
last Wednesday.
Get well wishes go out to all


of ybu: Nancy I
Johnson, Ines
M. Johnson,
Winsto n
Scavella, Grace Heastie-
Patterson, Lessie Paige-Smith,
Julie Clarke, Pamela Walton,
Jaunita Jackson, Horace
Johnson and Hansel Higgs.
Wedding anniversary
greetings go out to the love birds
of the week: Harold and Paula
Meadows, their 41st on August
8; James B. and Saundra
Nairn, their 34th on August 13.
Hearty congratulations go out
to the children of Dr. Rosebud
Lightbourn-Foster and her


Washington, moderator; and
Dale Robinson and family,
orchestrators.
Early next week, 12 young
people from North Dade will
board a bus and travel to
Orlando for the U.S. Junior
Olympics Tae Kwon Do
Championship.
Robinson taught autistic
Children at Thomas Jefferson
Middle and is paying more
than $6,400 to take some of
the students to qualify
for the event. Robinson
visited Andre D. Pierre,
Esq., Mayor of North
Miami; who assisted
financially with the trip
and other expenses.
Recipients of Master
Tugen Smith's
outstanding achievement DI
included Justin Alford,
Joshua V. Turner, Rubinoff
E. Robinson, III, Faith E.
Robinson, Isaiah T. Maxwell,
Jayvon A. Ricketts, Darnel
Victor and Austyn Mimns.
Master Rubinoff Robinson
Memorial Scholarships went
to Denissea Law, student at
Miami Northwestern, who will
attend Clark University and
Michael Oliver, a graduate
from Turner Tech, who will
matriculate at Miami Dade
College and FIU.
Dr. Lewis took
to the mic and
Emphasize the
importance of them
considering FMU
as the place to
received the kind of
education that will
meet their needs.
INKNEY He motivated them,
challenged them,
gave them facts and a formula
for success. He received several
applause and a standing
ovation when he finished.


deceased husband, Harris
Foster. Dr. 'Harris Foster, a
full professor of Urology at Yale
University was listed among the
"Best Doctors in the Northeast."
Nicole Foster graduated from
New York University in May
2011 with top honors in three
majors: Early Childhood General
Education, Special Education
and History. While at NYU,
Nicole studied in Florence, Italy
for her sophomore year. She is
a member of Pi Lambda Theta
Honors Society and Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority, Inc. Nicole will
be entering Law School soon.
Mayor John Marks, Jr., son
of Mildred Marks and the late
John Marks, Sr. was in his
hometown of Miami to visit
his mother and aunts, Joan
Marks-Huff and Pannie Marks-


Newlywed Tamera Mowry speaks on
ESSENCE.COM: Congrats on go through a challenging situa- TAMERA: I can be com-
the big wedding What's married tion then you overcome it you're pletely myself I didn't have to
life like? like "yes, we can do this." Adam worry about that. I have natu-
TAMERA MOWRY: It's amaz- has to do most of the moving so rally curly hair, but a lot of my
ingl I feel like I have a lot more I kind of feel sorry for him in ex-boyfriends always liked it
strength, and I have this per- that sense. He's moving into straight. It's a lot of work keep-
son who has my back, and no my place and one of the main ing it straight all the time,
matter what he's going to be things that we're going through whereas Adam liked me as me.
there for me. That just in itself right now is that I don't want Not only that, but when we were
makes me feel a lot more con- him to feel like a visitor. It's going out on dates and eating,
fident and a lot more safe. It our place. We're kind of going and I found myself being able
feels amazing it really, really through the transition where to eat and do whatever I wanted
does. Adam and I, we haven't you say "my place" and then to do. I didn't feel like I had to
lived together, so we're going you're like, "no, wait, it's our watch what I say or watch what
through that right now. Mov- place." Plus, saying "my hus- I do. I could completely just be
ing is challenging, but it's re- band", that feels amazing too. raw and that's how I knew. I al-
warding. That's the best I can ESSENCE: What made you ways wanted to be with him. I
describe it. Because once you sure Adam was the one for you? never got tired of him. He made


Rising star inspires, portrays character

SPENCER And Minny, who works for I'm going to have problems.'"
continued from 1C Hilly's mother, is the kind of As she continued to read,
no-nonsense, sharp-tongued Spencer found that not all of
cleaning for white families and help that Hilly abhors. So she the characters talked in the
raising their children. Aibileen sacks Minny and then spreads same dialect. "She was writ-
and Skeeter, who compiles a the lie that Minny stole her ing about characters who hap-
household hints column for mother's candelabra, opened to be from a certain so-
the local newspaper, could lose The only job Minny can get is cioeconomic group. They had
their jobs, their friends, even with Celia Foote (Jessica Chas- limited education, but they
their lives if the segregationists tain), an outcast herself who is were the most intelligent peo-
find out. shunned by the Jackson elite. ple in the book. I applaud her
Minny says they are irratio- Minny is suspicious when Celia because it gave an authenticity
nal. But after the indignities treats her with respect rather to those voices."
mount for the maids, she joins than the usual disdain, but When "The Help" was pub-
them and helps recruit others, they eventually become unlike- lished in 2009, Stockett was
Skeeter's childhood friend ly confidantes. scheduled for a book tour. "I


and college roommate, the in-
fluential Junior League presi-
dent Hilly Holbrook (Bryce
Dallas Howard), is appalled
that Blacks and whites use the
same toilets, so she proposes
the Home Help Sanitation Ini-
tiative that would require white
households to have separate
bathrooms for Black house-
keepers.


ACTRESS, AUTHOR
BONDED
Aibileen speaks first in the
book. "The first couple of lines
in, I realized (Stockett) had
written in this dialect," says
Spencer, who was raised in
Alabama. "And quite honestly I
thought, 'Wow, if this is Mam-
my from 'Gone With the Wind,'


didn't feel comfortable getting
up on stage and reading the
African-American voices, so
I called up Octavia," she says.
"This was before we had thought
much about a film. So Octavia
went on tour with me and read
the voices of the Black charac-
ters, and I read the white."
Spencer calls it "Thelma and
Louise-ing."


It was followed by a
demonstration from the Tae
Kwon Do group with remarks
from Executive President of the
Board, Patriene Washington,
Dale Robinson, co-Founder,
a solo from Lightfoot, and
MUSYE DJ Spongebob, while
everyone line danced until
midnight.

Edward Michael Johnson,
III not only loves his mother,
Mary Oliver Johnson,
but he demonstrated
S.' his loving care of her
1 during the time she
experience three heart
attacks, two strokes,
brain surgery, a
filter in her stomach,
going on the dialysis
UNN machine three times
a week, finally the life
support for a period of time.
Edward indicated that upon
his mother getting a second,
third, fourth, and fifth chance
at life prompted him to take
her horseback riding in Sun
City, Disney World, the Casinos
in Broward and a future trip
to Cat Island and Nassau,
Bahamas.
Church members, family
members, and friends from
Booker T. Washington came
in for the celebration. Early
arrivals included Michele
Perry, Shanty Jones, Bernice
Carey, Percy Oliver, Lois
Oliver, Dr. Enid C. Pinkney,
Eugene Strachan, Franklin
Clarke, Gloria and Herman
Bannister, Shirley M. Bennett
and Delores Adderly.
The honoree walked in with
hugs and kisses from the
crowd, while the Junkanoos
with Nevaeh Mitchell,
Monique Mitchell, David
Waylor, Jeffery Williams,
and Wendell Lee brought the

Lipscomb and their families last
weekend. Mayor Marks resides
in Tallahassee. Welcome home
Mr. Mayor.
Essie Stinson-Pace, sister
of Dr. Solomon Stinson said
goodbye to Region III as their
director on last Saturday,
August 6. Her family and friends
gathered at the InterContinental
Doral Country Club to bid
Estie goodbye and to enjoy her
retirement. She was the director
of 72 schools.
Anthony and Juanita
Armbrister are elated to have
their grandchildren William
and Zora Edwards visiting for
the summer. The children and
their grandparents have visited
Washington, D.C., New York,
Philadelphia, Maryland and Key
West.


married life
me feel very comfortable.
ESSENCE: Will you share
one of the wedding moments
you keep replaying in your
head?
TAMERA: Oh gosh that's
hard. There were so many.
When Adam and I did our first
dance, because we did a really
funny one. First we danced to
Journey's "Faithfully" then we
broke out into LL Cool J's "Go-
ing Back to Cali." LL Cool J fol-
lows us both on Twitter, which
I have to mention because I
think that's amazing, and he
found out about it. He retweeted
itl


in 'The Help'
Tate had introduced us sev-
eral years earlier, but we didn't
have that much interaction with
each other. Now we were driving
across the South to 12 cities.
We weren't being lawless, but
we bonded those three weeks."
Taylor had met Spencer in the
mid-'90s on the set of "A Time
to Kill." "I delivered time sheets
to the office she was working
in, and we hit it off and became
great friends," he says.
Spencer made her first screen
appearance in "A Time to Kill."
"If you blink, it is all of five sec-
onds. If you don't blink, six."-
Since then, she has appeared
in many big- and small-screen
productions. "For years I've
seen Octavia put in movies and
television, and when this show
or film concludes, I think 'what
a waste,'" Taylor says. "They
had no idea who they had in
their cast, and shame on them
for not exploring that."


quiet to movements not used in
years. Leading the calypso line
were Strachan and Pinkney,
followed by Clarke. The
honoree joined and the party
was at its highest level.
Shelby Goodman took the
mic and open the party formally
while the Junkanoos marched
out of the room. Reflections
were given by Verna Goodman,
Edward M. Johnson, while the
feast was served to the hungry
people. Brinna and Morghan
Johnson passed out
leis and whistles to
the guests during the
calypso dancing. Jevaris
Hodges and Dobe
Julius talked about the
good-ole-days at BTW
with Johnson.
The honoree became
caught up in the THC
festivities as tears
streamed down her
cheeks and her son comforted
her. The people clapped and.
recited "God is Good," while
Monique looked her four-
year-old daughter, Nevaeh,
in the eyes and explained the
history taking place at that
time. Joining in were Lillian
Bridges, Hodges, Julius and
Delores H. Dean, daughter of
Cupid Dean.
***********
The phrase "This is Ricky
Thomas" was intimated on his
radio shows many a years, as
well as Friday when hundreds
of people crowded the edifice
of Mount Hermon A.M.E. to
pay tribute. It was stated by
his son Rory, during his radio
show on AM 1490 WMBM that
his father was "great" and he
mingle with greatness. His
other children piggybacked on
"greatness" and the audience
was education on the kind of
man Ricky was, GREAT.


Celebrating the Life of
Richard "Ricky" Thomas was
handled with proficiency under
Rev. Henry E. Green, Jr.,
officiating. Sherwood DuBose
addressed his presidency
with Metro Miami Action Plan
(MMAP) as a challenge for
Thomas to meet with him
and smooth out the wrinkles
heap upon the organization's
progress.
Commissioner Barbara
Jordan further acquainted
the audience with the
plight of Thomas.
Other resolutions
came from Mt. Hermon
A.M.E., WMBM Clips,
Democratic Black
Caucus and Monroe
County. It was an
evening that will
JMAS remain in the hearts
of those in attendance.
Distinguished
speakers included Rev. Dr.
Gilbert S. Smith (brother-
in-law), Arthur Fioulkes,
Governor General Bahamas;
Samuel "Sambo" Harrison,
Deacon Robert L. Thomas,
Commissioner. Richard P.
Dunn, Dr. Kevin Moyd and
Joey "JW" Walker. Adding
to the service was the singing
by Joy Cooper and the Mt.
Hermon Mass Choir.
Ricky will be missed by
Miami-Dade County, his
loving wife, Patricia; children:
Rory and Bridgette Thomas,
Gregory and Helen Robinson,
Rodney Robinson, 4ori Gullie,
Darlene Cordero, Richelle
and Ardonnis Lumpkin, seven
grandchildren and six great-
grandchildren, Dr. Jacquelyn
and Brodes Hartley, Capt.
Harry and Patricia Brown, Dr.
Edward and Pamela Scott,
Cheryl Thomas-Tate, and a
host of other relatives.


By Lyndell Davis -Mlami, FL

A Mother's Nightmare
Oh no your honor, that can't be, he is just a young man a son to me. How is
a mother to endure such pain from the child she gave birth to who has brought
such shame.
This has to be a nightmare, this can't be true, resurrect my son this is noth-
ing for you to do.
I taught him to say a prayer each night, he just made a mistake don't let him
take his life.
Resurrect my son this is nothing for you to do he said he is not guilty, he
won't lie to me and you.
I ask myself everyday did I spend enough time did I listen to my child, did I
respect his mind.
Is there anything, anything I can do,
Mama wake up are you having a bad dream too.


Actors added to Oscars list


OSCARS
continued from 1C

for Girls in South Africa.
Jones and Smith will receive
honorary Oscars for their out-
standing careers,
Jones has appeared in more
than 50 films. The 80-year-
old actor voice of Darth Va-
der -was nominated for an
Academy Award in 1971 for
"The Great White Hbpe." His
other credits include "Field of
Dreams," "Patriot Games" and
"The Hunt for Red October."
Smith was NBC's first make-
up man when he started his
career in 1945. He won an


Oscar in 1984 for his work
on "Amadeus" and was nomi-
nated again in 1989 for "Dad."
Known as the "godfather of
makeup," he also worked on
"The Godfather," "The Exor-
cist" and "Taxi Driver." Smith
also helped -train many of to-
day's top movie makeup art-
ists.
Smith, Jones and Winfrey
will receive their statuettes on
Nov. 12 at the 3rd annual Gov-
ernors Awards dinner at the
Grand Ballroom at Hollywood
& Highland Center, just above
the Kodak Theatre, where the
Academy Awards are present-
ed.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


BACK N REALITY TV



BACK ON REALITY TV


By Tonya Pendleton

If you saw her taking dancers to
task on Diddy's "Making the Band"
series, then you already have a good
sense of what dancer/choreographer
Laurieann Gibson can do. It was just
a matter of time before she got her
own reality show and that time has
come.
Gibson now hosts "Born To Dance:
Laurieann Gibson," which debuted
on BET on Tuesday, Aug. 2 at 10 p.m.
The show pits 20 aspiring dancers
against each other who'll have to
compete and make it past Gibson,
who, as you may remember on "Mak-
ing the Band," has little time for at-





"LaLa '


titude or slouches.
And the stakes are high. The win-
ner will take home $50,000.
Throughout the eight-week compe-
tition, dancers will be challenged by
performing in a commercial and mu-
sic video, as well as with Lady Gaga
live during her "Monster Ball" tour.
The choreographer for all of Lady Ga-
ga's videos, Gibson directed the HBO
presentation of the Lady Gaga show
live from Madison Square Garden,
which garnered her an Emmy Award
nomination.
Gibson was born in Toronto,
Canada, but came to the U.S. at age
17. She started out studying at Alvin
Ailey, then got her big break danc-


Full


ing with Mar J.
Blige. That led
her to Motown and
Bad Boy and Re-
cords, where she
ultimately became
director of cho-
reography
Writer/
director
Billie H- Wood-
ruff has said
the the 2003 film
"Honey," starring Jessica
Alba as a dancer looking for her big
break, was based in part on Gibson's
life.
"My new show is truly an amazing


event." she told MTV News. "One
girl is getting $50.000 and enter-
ing the professional world, and I'm
training her over a period of eight
weeks with different competitive
elements, so it's a competition show.
No, there's no trophy, but there's ac-
tual real live information, money and
purpose. It's my baby. I'm so proud
of it."


Court Life


REASONS WHY WE ARE EXCITED


By Jessica C. Andrews

I'll admit it: I was initially ap-
prehensive about watching Lala's
Full Court Wedding. After all,
we had seen all the pictures on
gossip blogs months before and
a whole series around wedding
planning seemed excessive.
After tuning into the first epi-
sode, I was pleasantly surprised.
Lala seemed genuine, fun and
endearng, celebrity appearances
kept a fun flow of guests on the
show and Kiyan was adorable!
There was a wholesome, down-to-
earth quality to the show despite
its star-filled roster that kept me
tuning in every Monday. :
Now that we're mere weeks
away from the debut of Lala's
Full Court Life on VHI on Au-
gust 22nd at 9 p.m., here are
five reasons we're excited for the
show.
1. A Real Basketball Wife
From handling family mem-
bers' ticket requests to dealing
with angry Denver fans that
blame her for Carmelo's trade,
Lala shows the true perks and
pitfalls of being an NBA wife. De-
spite rumors of infidelity which
Lala faces head-on, the playful
and loving dynamic between her
and Carmelo seems less about
money and drama, and more
about love.
2. More Kiyanl
Raise your hand if you're.ex-
cited to see more of the ador-
able breakout star of Lala's Full


Court Wedding! Whether he's
giving his Dad a pound or throw-
ing a tantrum in the car, Kiyan
still makes our uterus hurt and
yearn for children-at least dur-
ing the hour he's on air.
3. Trina on a blind date? Kel-
ly Rowland gets a tattoo?
Lala has access to celebrities
most people only dream of and
calls many of them her friends.
In the super trailer, we see 50
Cent offering advice, Kelly Row-
land getting a tattoo and Trina
being set up on a blind date. In
our celebrity-obsessed culture,
it's fun to see a down-to-earth
side of our favorite stars, away
from the paparazzi and press
conferences.
4. Lala's Got Her Own
Say what you want about Lala
but she had a legitimate career as
a VJ before Carmelo came along
and is still just as determined to
build her name outside of being a
NBA player's wife. It's refreshing
to see her struggle with the bal-
ance between work and marriage
and family, which is a challenge
women face all over the world.
5. The Downside of Fame
Amid the grandiose wedding,
celebrity guest appearances and
photo shoots, Lala is very raw
and honest about the downside
to fame. We see her cope with
rumors of Carmelo's love child,
tense interviews with the NYC
press and aggressive paparazzi,
and the impact it has on her
family.


-By John Ricard
Rapper Royce Da 5'9" comes out swinging on Success is
Certain.


Rapper Royce rolls into


'Success' on new album


By Steve Jones

The Detroit rapper gets a
helping hand from Eminem
and others on Success is
Certain.
Success may not necessarily
be certain, but it is undeniable
that the Detroit rapper has a
boatload of momentum with
his fifth solo album. He and
Eminem put their near-de-
cade-long feud to rest a couple
of years ago, and in June,
reteamed as Bad Meets Evil
to top Billboard's album chart
with Hell: The Sequel. That al-
bum's second single, Lighters,
which features Bruno Mars, is
No. 2 in digital sales.
Royce takes advantage of
the spotlight on Success,
launching a barrage of boasts
on the metal-infused opener
Legendary featuring Travis
Barker. Eminem co-produced


that track and appears on
the next, single Writer's
Block. They claim to never
run out of punch lines and.
poke fun at repetitive rap-
pers. Royce largely avoids that
trap, though he does devote
a couple of tracks (Merry Go
Round and My Own Planet)
to his ups and downs. The
DJ Premier-produced Second
Place finds him claiming, "I
should run a marathon back-
wards just to see what sec-
ond place looks like." In the
witty ER, with Kid Vishis, he
metaphorically breathes life
back into the rap game. His
harrowing narrative On the
Boulevard and the poignant
Security,.which he dedicates
to slain Detroit rapper Proof,
add emotional depth. If mea-
sured in terms of doing things
his way, Royce already has
Success.


R&B singer announces pregnancy


FANTASIA
continued from 1C

beach, with Barrino appearing
pregnant.
For Fantasia, life in the pub-
lic spotlight has been filled
with highs and lows, since
winning American Idol back
in 2004.
In August 2010 the "Bitter-
sweet" singer was hospitalized
in North Carolina from a sui-


cide attempt after overdosing
on aspirin and a sleep aid.
During a VH1 Behind The
Music, she later confirmed the
incident was a suicide attempt.
"At that moment I wanted out.
I wanted it to be over with,"
she said. In the interview she
also admitted to aborting pre-
vious a child with Cook.
Barrino currently stars in
the VH1 reality series, Fanta-
sia for Real.


Poetry Corner returns to The Miami Times
In a tradition that was once much-beloved and always antic-
ipated, February marked the return of "Poetry Corner" in The
Miami Times. Each week we will feature one poem from writers
who live in our community. Whether you are a seasoned scribe
or a novice poet, we want your work. Submissions should be
one page or less and typed. They may either be emailed to
Jasmine Johnson (jjohnson@miamitimesonline.coml or faxed
(305-757-5770). Poetry should also follow the example of our
best Black .poets and be positive in their message. Please in-
clude a photograph (high resolution), daytime phone number
and the city in which you currently reside. No phone inquiries
please. We hope to make this a weekly addition to our paper
but that will be up to you. If you are "a poet and you know it,"
we invite you to send us your best work.


'The Help': It's fine work all around


Solid performances
boost drama set in
the civil rights era

By Claudia Puig

It would seem difficult,
even odd, to,make a sunny
and upbeat drama about ra-
cial prejudice.
But The Help, with its em-
phasis on an unlikely friend-
ship transcending segregat-
ed strictures, manages this
tricky feat. It also personal-
izes the broader issue of civil
rights by focusing on one slice
of the Black experience.
And fans of the best-sell-
ing novel can rest easy: The
warmly engaging book has
been made into an equally af-
fecting movie.
Powered by a strong cast,
The Help is a faithful adap-
tation of Kathryn Stockett's
novel. A trio of outstanding


meeting on the sly to tell their
personal stories, a bond is
forged between Skeeter, Aibi-
leen (Viola Davis) and Minny
(Octavia Spencer) that flies in
the face of the era's societal
limitations. Their sisterhood
evolves slowly and naturally.
As long-suffering maids to
particularly loathsome wom-
en in Skeeter's circle, Davis
and Spencer give pitch-per-
fect performances.
Davis is remarkable as the
cautious Aibileen, communi-
cating years of suffering and
fear with the most subtle ex-
pressions. Despite the hard-
ships she has endured, she
is warmly loving to a little
girl ignored by her pampered
mother.
Spencer; who is more often
seen in comic roles, brings
the multifaceted character
Ui iiii ii Luo vivid Lic. We un-
abashedly root'for her as she
takes unusual revenge on the
Please turn to THE HELP 10D


performances carry the film
on their strong shoulders.
The story is set in Jackson,
Miss., in 1963 and centers on
Skeeter (Emma Stone), a re-
cent college graduate deter-
mined to document the life
experiences of Black maids


who endure all manner of dis-
respect catering to white so-
ciety folks. At best, their em-
plovers take them for granted:
at wVuiaL iii.j i .; Leated as ii
they are subhuman.
In the course of this project,
which involves the women


Octavis Spencer and Viola Davis stars in The Help.


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LAVI AYISYEN


HAITIAN


LIFE


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


Monthly event

features Jowee

Omicil

By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com

If it is the third Friday of the
month, then you can expect
the return of Big Night in Little
Haiti. The monthly event that
caters to packed crowds, will
be returning to the Little Haiti
Cultural Center, 212 NE 59th
Terrace, this Friday, August
19th from 6-10 p.m.
"It has been a completely
positive experience since the
beginning," said Laura Quin-
lan, director of The Rhythm
Foundation. "I think the com-
munity knows who we are and
do not need convincing to come
out and enjoy the festivities. We
have enjoyed working with local
artists. This is a great network
to experience Caribbean cul-
ture."
This month, the Center is
featuring kreyol jazz star Jowee
Omicil in the plaza, with an
opening set by world music
group Elastic Bond. Elastic
Bond is seven-member band
that has been hot on the Mi-
ami music scene for about two
years. The group, comprised of
vocalists and instrumentation
by saxophone, flute, congas and
guitar players was created from
the sound of Venezuelan pro-
ducer Andr6s Ponce to experi-
ment and create a unique sonic
cocktail.
I can hardly wait to hear the
sweet sounds of Jowee," said
Jamila White. "My whole family
listens to him. I am an Amer-
,,iican-born,Haitian So.I don't,
really listen to a lot of Haitian
musicians or musicians period,
but for some reason I really
enjoy the music of Jowee."
White is not the only one that
.is excited about Big Night's
return.
"It really doesn't get any bet-
ter than this," said Steven Mat-
thew. "Without fail I am here ev-
ery month to show my support
to my community. Where else in
Miami can you go to hear good
music for free and enjoy fantas-
tic food? These Big Night events
are truly something that is good
for the community because of
how everyone is able td connect
with one another."


Art program aims for student success


Children learn art

through culture

By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com

Visual art continues to be a
leader in the cultural evolu-
tion of Miami. Local kids are
getting the opportunity to test
their talents through the Arts
for Learning program. The
program, held at the Little
Haiti Cultural Center, fosters
art skills in children.
"We concentrate on expos-
ing young people to portfo-
lio development skills," said
Christine Koenig, director of
community initiative for the
program. "We focus on draw-
ing, really being about to look
at value in line, shading, di-
mensions and perspective."
Through the program, chil-
dren are also exposed to dif-
ferent cultural art styles that
help to develop their talent.
"We use community cultural
resources to expose young
people to the Miami commu-
nity and the art community,"
Koeing said. "So we go to Viz-
caya Gardens and Museum,
we also go to the Bass Mu-
seum and we also go to some
of the local collections."
Koeing said the program
has a good turn out over the
summer.


I---,.. .
P-i..l.. -r :r .ljr r.I, r i, Ei I.:, Ell. I |
"This summer we had 26
young people," she said. "They
were divided between the
eighth grade class, because
they are the ones that will be
applying for magnet schools
and then we have the sixth


Student art
from the Arts
for Learning
program.


iI
'V


IW*


-Photo credit: Marvin Elliot Ellis


and seventh grade classes."
In order for a child to be
involved with the program,
there is an application pro-
cess. Students must summit
an application, a report card,
three drawing samples and a
teacher recommendation.
The group is one of Miami's
leading sources of arts-in-ed-
ucation services. They provide
quality arts-based programs
that connect the arts to other
core-curriculum subjects to


support academic achieve-
ment and child development.
All Art for Learning pro-
grams teach life and com-
munication skills, support
literacy and problem solving
skills, foster self-discovery,
and build self esteem. Their
comprehensive services
include teacher professional
development, multimedia
classroom resources, and
community arts instruction
and programming.


'


". -.--Y- !
-. *



Haitian girl walks through a Haitian tent city.


Haitians



forced from



tent city

Relocation in the works

for evictees

By Trenton Daniel

Thousands of Haitians living in one of the biggest tent
camps created after last year's earthquake could soon have
a new home, the mountains north of Port-au-Prince. City
officials plan to relocate the almost 20,000 people living
on the 42-acre Champs de Mars plaza across the street
from the crumbled National Palace if the central govern-
ment approves, Port-au-Prince Mayor Jean Yves Jason said
recently.
Patrick Rouzier, a housing and reconstruction adviser
for the government, acknowledged the plan in a text mes-
sage *Weaid Jason wants to movethe'faftnites to Morne
Cabrit, a mountain north of the capital, and house them in
temporary shelters. The government has reservations about
the approach, Rouzier added, but he did not elaborate. He
said he was traveling with President Michel Martelly. Jason
cited an act of banditry in the public square as a reason for
officials wanting to clear away the camp, which has become
a shantytown complete with barber shops, boutiques and
restaurants and is a symbol of Haiti's post-quake misery.
"We are going to respond next week," Jason said.
About 20 students have been burning tires at the plaza
in recent days in a call for justice after a fellow student was
shot and wounded during a robbery for his laptop comput-
er. Jason said officials are figuring out a plan to compen-
sate the camp residents but didn't answer questions asking
how much they would get.
The planned closure comes as Haitian authorities have
been criticized for not doing enough to provide housing
as they try to move the homeless out of public and private
spaces. Last week, about 60 to 80 demonstrators shut down
traffic on a busy thoroughfare to protest efforts to relocate
them from a private lot. They said the $125 stipend authori-
ties offered to families was insufficient to secure housing.



U.S. encourages


travel to Haiti

By Lawrence Peter

The U.S. State Department no longer urges American
citizens to avoid all travel to Haiti, but said citizens
should still carefully consider before traveling to the
island. The new travel warning issued last Monday
softens language from one released in January, when
the country was suffering election-related violence,
that strongly urged citizens to avoid all travel. The cur-
rent one cites crime, a renewed cholera outbreak and
an inadequate infrastructure as concerns.
The January 20 advisory noted that the number of
victims of violent crime, including murder and kidnap-
ping, continues to increase in Port-au-Prince. That lan-
guage Was omitted from the new advisory. The earlier
warning also noted violent protests that surrounded
the November elections. References to the tire-burning,
rock-throwing demonstrations that gripped Port-au-
Prince have been dropped from the current advisory.
Port-au-Prince and the countryside have been relative-
ly quiet in recent months. The revised advisory comes
as Haiti's new president struggles to install a govern-
ment and take charge of rebuilding Haiti after last
year's earthquake.
President Michel Martelly has seen his first two
picks for prime minister rejected by lawmakers and he
hasn't yet picked a third nominee. The amended warn-
ing also takes into account a second surge in cholera,
which has killed more than 5,800 people and sickened
409,000 since an outbreak began in October, accord-
ing to the Health Ministry. The disease saw a second
spike in early summer as the rainy season began.
Health workers fear the waterborne disease could
spread again as the current hurricane season reaches
its peak. Haitian officials and business leaders have
long said the U.S. travel warnings are exaggerated and
unfairly discourage tourism and foreign investment.


SECTION C


~9L"*~4C~3W]E~Js~j~0,*91 ~ "ryi(A~a~i~:*4** L- : P











BLACKS MUST CONTROl. THEIR OWN DESTINY


6C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


Miami-Dade County and
the Florida Division of Emer-
gency Management are part-
nering to help flood prone prop-
erty owners find relief. To learn
more about the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency's
(FEMA) grant assistance pro-
grams, there will be a workshop
held on Wednesday, August 17
from 6-8 p.m. at the Miami-Dade
Fire Rescue Auditorium, 9300 NW
41st Street in Doral. For more in-
formation, go to www.fema.gov/
business/nfip/.

The Miami-Dade Cham-
ber of Commerce presents Mis-
sion Possible: Cracking the Code:
Business' Technology, a Business
Empowerment Network Series 2.0
on Wednesday, August 18 from 9
a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Jungle Island's
Treetop Ballroom, 1111Parrot
Jungle Trail. The networking se-
ries is open to the public, $20 for
chamber members and $30 for
non-members. Attendants are re-
quired to bring a laptop with them
for interactive portions of the
event. For more information, call
The Chamber at 305-751-8648 or
visit www.m-dcc.org.

The Miami-Dade County
Office of Community Advocacy
joins efforts with the Florida De-
partment of Highway Safety and
Motor Vehicles (DMV) to bring
residents "DMV to Go." It will offer
residents a location in Downtown
Miami with DMV services, such
as license renewals and identi-
fication cards. It will be held on
Thursday, August 18 from 9:30
a.m.-2:30 p.m. at the Stephen
P. Clark Center, Main Lobby 111
NW 1st Street. Future "DMV to
Go" events will be scheduled for
the 3rd Thursday.of every month.
For more information, contact the
Office of Community Advocacy at
305-375-5730.

Join the American Red
Cross South Florida Region for
a hurricane preparedness event
on Thursday, August 18 from
6-7 p.m. at Calder Casino & Race
Course. It will be held in the Win-
ner's Edge Room, Grandstand
Building, 2nd Floor, 21001 NW
27th Avenue in Miami Gardens.
Free self-parking on the South
grandstandd Lot. For more' infor-
mation, call 305-625-1311.

Miami-Dade County Mayor
Carlos A. Gimenez is hosting a
series of Budget Town Hall Meet-
ings, where residents will be able
to ask about the proposed Fiscal
Year 2011-2012 County budget.
It will be held on Thursday, Au-
gust 18 at Coral Gables Country
Club, 998 North Greenway Drive
from 7-8 p.m. For more informa-
tion, visit www.miami-dade.gov/
budget.

CHARLEE Homes for Chil-
dren ensures that children who
have been abused, abandoned or
neglected and are in foster care
are prepared to begin the school
year with the school supplies they
need. Donations can be dropped
off at any BankAtlantic branch
in Miami-Dade County or at the
CHAPRLEE office until August 19th.
The CHARLEE office is located at
155 S. Miami Avenue, Suite 700.
Contact Hans Grunwaldt at 305-
779-9697 or hans.grunwaldt@
charlee.org for further informa-
tion or to coordinate the drop off
of your donation. Donations are
fully tax deductible.

SThe City of Miami Gardens
will host a Lien Amnesty Blowout
event at City Hall, 1515 NW 167th
Ave., Bldg. 5, Suite 200 in Miami
Gardens on Saturday, August 20
and Saturday, August 27 from 9
a.m.-2 p.m. This will be an oppor-
tunity for property owners with
liens on their property to satisfy
all liens for just $500.00 per lien
with all application fees waived.
For more information or to sched-
ule an appointment, contact the
Code Compliance Division at 305-
622-8000 ext. 2610 or ext. 2614
or contact Maggie Castor by email
at mcastor@miamigardens-fl.gov.

The African-American Re-
search Library and Cultural
Center will be hosting free em-
powerment workshops on Satur-
day, August 20 from 11 a.m.-4:30
p.m. (pre-register by August 12
for "Starting your own nonprofit")
and Saturday, September 3 from
11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (pre-register
by August 26 for "Grant Writing").
For more information and/or to
register for these workshops,
contact Norman Powell at 954-
624-5213 or email posimo@aol.
com.

The Booker T. Washington
Class of 1965, Inc.'s Class Mem-
ber's Picnic will be held on Satur-
day, August 20 at Amelia Earhart
Park. Class members are asked to


contact 305-625-6720 to advise
your food contributions.


Congresswoman Frederi-
ca S. Wilson in partnership with
Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado and
Commissioner Richard P. Dunn
II is hosting a town hall meet-
ing discussing the Congressional
Black Caucus for the People Jobs
Initiative H. Res. 348 on Monday,
August 22 at 6 p.m. at Mt. Her-
mon AME Church, 17800 NW 25th
Avenue in Miami Gardens. For ad-
ditional information, visit www.
wilson.house.gov or call 305-690-
5905.

Congresswoman Fred-
erica S. Wilson will host a job
fair on Tuesday, August 23 from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the James L.
Knight Center, 400 SE 2nd Avenue
in Downtown Miami. Registration
begins at 8 a.m. For additional
information, visit www.wilson.
house.gov or call 305-690-5905.

There will be a meeting to
discuss the fate of the Memorial
Day Urban Weekend on August
24 at 5:30 p.m. at the Lowes.
Hotel, 1601 Collins Avenue. For
more information, email linda-
simmons43@yahoo.com, African
American Foundation of Greater
Miami.

The Office of the State
Attorney is hosting a 'Second
Chance' Sealing and Expunge-
ment Program on Thursday, Au-
gust 25 from 4-7 p.m. at the
Miami Beach Convention Center,
1901 Convention Center Drive,
Hall D. To avoid waiting a long pe-
riod of time in line you could pre-
register at www.miamisao.com
or fax a clear copy of your valid
picture ID and phone number to
305-547-0723, Attention: Kath-
erine Fernandez Rundle, State
Attorney. For more info, call 305-
547-0724.

M Miami-Dade County Park
and Recreation Department
and Miami-Dade County Com-
mission for Women celebrate
Women's Equality Day on Friday,
August 26 from 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
held at the Roxcy O'Neal Bolton
Women's History Gallery at the
Women's Park, 10251 West Fla-
gler Street. For more information,
call 305-480-1717.

A Top Ladies of Distinc-
tion, Inc. are anxiously prepar-
ing for their first Annual Retreat
at the Doubletree Hotel & Resort
on August 26th-28th. This is a
time for planning the activities
for the 2011-2012 year. There
will be business workshops, sis-
terhood breakout sessions and
many fun-filled activities. We
are actively reclaiming an inac-
tive 'Top Lady Each One! Reach
One.' The weekend will culminate
with worship services at Mt. Tabor
Baptist Church (10:30 a.m.) with
our newly-elected President Lady
Crystal Pittman. Let's make this a
pretty in pink weekend! For more
information, call Lady Cleora
Brooks at 305-635-0504 or Lady
Daisy Williams at 305-651-8487.

Chai Community Services,
Inc. in collaboration with A-Betta
Bail Bonds, Inc. will host its an-
nual CCS Career Expo (Job Fair)
on Saturday, August 27 from 10
a.m.-6 p.m. at the DoubleTree
Hotel & Exhibition Hall, 711 NW
72nd Ave. For more information,
call 786-273-0294.

The Miami Jackson Class
of 1976 will meet on Saturday,
August 27th at 1 p.m. at the Baha-
mian Connection Restaurant Grill,
4490 NW 2nd Avenue. Please be
on time! For more information,
or directions to the restaurant,
contact Kevin at 305-319-8790 or
Karen at 786-267-4544.

Playing the Game of Life
(PGL), a turn-key program for
teaching social skills through an
arts-based curriculum, invites
the community to a free back to
school event for children four-12
years old on Sunday, August 28
from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at the PGL
Enrichment Center, 7144 Byron
Avenue in Miami Beach. For more
information, call 305-864-5237 or
email info@ecqc.biz.

P.H.I.R.S.T. Impressionz,
a dinner poetry event returns at
Oasis Cafe, 12905 NE 8th Avenue
in North Miami. It will be held on
Sunday, August 28, September
25, October 30, November 27 and
December 18 at 7 p.m. Admission
is $10, which includes perfor-
mance, dinner and drink. Anyone
interested in participating needs
to contact at least one week in
advance. For more information
call, 786-273-5115.

H The Bohemia Room pres-
ents The Acoustics featuring Philly
Soul Diva and Indie Soul icon Jag-
uar Wright on Wednesday, August


31. The doors open at 8 p.m. The
event will be held at V Midtown
Lounge, 3215 NE 2nd Avenue. For


more information, visit www.jag-
uarwright.com or www.thebohe-
miaroom.com.

The Miami-Dade County
Health Department, Special
Immunizations Program will be
providing free Back-to-School im-
munizatiqns to children between
the ages of two months through
18 years of age until August 31.
Parents need to bring their child's
immunization record and a pic-
ture ID. For more information and
location, call 786-845-0550.

Summer BreakSpot, part
of the USDA Summer Food Nutri-
tion Program, will be open now
until August 2011 at hundreds of
sites across Miami-Dade County,
providing free nutritious meals -
breakfast, lunch and snack all
summer long for kids and teens,
18 and under. To find a Summer
BreakSpot site near you, visit
www.summerfoodflorida.org or
call 211.

The Miami-Dade Public Li-
brary System continues to cel-
ebrate its 40th anniversary with
a flashback to the books, movies
and music of the 1990s! This sum-
mer, the Library System kicked-
off its look back at the 1990s,
which will run through Septem-
ber. Special stories, classic board
games, crafts and more, as well'
as '90s trivia contests, book clubs'
and quilt making will be held
throughout the month of August.
All events are free and open to
the public. To find an event near
you, visit www.mdpls.org and
click on Calendar of Events or'call
305-375-2665.

The Miami Jackson Class
of 1976 will celebrate their
35th Class Reunion on Septem-
ber 9-11. Activities will include:
Meet and greet at the Misty Lake
South Clubhouse, 625 NW 210th
Street; Picnic at Amelia Earhart
Park, 401 E. 65th Street, Pavil-
ion #8; Happy hour at Justin's
Bar and Lounge, 17813 Biscayne
Blvd.; Sunday morning worship
at El Bethel Pentecostal Church,
4792 NW 167th Street with lunch
immediately after at The Golden
Corral in Pembroke Pines. T-shirts
are $10 and the fee for the com-
bined events are $20 per person.
For more information, call Kevin
Marshall at 305-319-8790 or Kar-
en at 786-267-4544.

The Beta Beta ,Lambda
Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity, Inc., BBL Educa-
tion Foundation Knights of
Gold Mentoring Program for
young males (grades 8-12) will
be having its annual Informa-
tional Seminar/Parent Meeting
at Florida Memorial University,
15800 NW 42nd Avenue in Miami
Gardens in the FMU/FIU Audito-
rium on Sunday, September 11
at 4 p.m. Interested student and
parents should contact kogpro-
gramn@gmail.com to request an
application or to RSVP.

Epsilon Alpha and Zeta Mu
Chapters of Alpha Pi Cli Na-
tional Sorority, Inc., of Miami
are completing a project of Red
Cross Readiness. The chapters
are collecting first-aid supplies
and emergency items for Emer-
gency Kits. These kits will be dis-
tributed to the elderly community
of Miami for use during this hurri-
cane season. If you are interested
in donating and contributing first-
aid supplies, call 305-992-3332
before September 17. If you'd like
more information about this orga-
nization, contact Linda Adderly at
addlmh@aol.com.

Women Who Jam! is look-
ing for talented, groundbreaking
female singers, musicians arid
entertainers to perform at the
"Save the Twinz" music show-

Awareness Month. The deadline
of submission is September 19.
For more information, call 901-
236-8439 or visit www.women-
whojam.com. The music show-
case will be held on October 1 at
7 l.m. at the Broward Center for
the Performing Arts, 201 SW 5th
Ave. in Ft. Lauderdale. Tickets
are $30. To purchase tickets, visit
www.browardcenter.org or call
954-462-0222.

Miami Northwestern Class
of 1972 Scholarship Fundraiser
Bus Trip to Atlanta, GA for FAMU
Classic on September 23-25. For
additional information, contact
Clarateen Kirkland-Kent at 305-
323-5551 or Glenda Tyse at 954-
987-0689.

Women First Body Care
and Mama Senna Essence, a
natural beauty company based in
Dallas, Texas will present its first
South Florida "Saturday Pamper
Me Workshop" on Saturday, Sep-


tember 24 from 9:30 a.m.-12:30
p.m. at the African Heritage Cul-
tural Arts Center, 6161 NW 22nd
Ave. The workshop, including all
materials cost $40 and registra-
tion and payments can be made
for the workshop by visiting www.
womanfirstbodycare.com/ahcac-


aromatherapy-workshop.html.
For more information, call 817-
770-2029 or visit www.woman-
firstbodycare.com.

Rainbow Ladies and Beta
Phi Omega Sorority are spon-
soring a Health Expo for lesbians,
bisexual and transgendered (LBT)
women of color on Saturday, Sep-
tember 24 at the Pride Center in
Wilton Manors. Free screenings
and health promotion education
will be provided by several local
agencies' and organizations. Ev-
eryone is invited. There will be
food, entertainment and raffles.
For more information, call 305-
772-4712, 305-892-0928 or visit
www.rainbowladiesourspaceinc.
org.

Wingspan Seminars will
celebrate its 5th Anniversary and
presentation of the Pea'Ce Awards
celebrating women on Friday,
September 30 from 3-6 p.m. We
will also launch Wings on Women
(WOW). The theme is "She's Go-
ing Somewhere" For more infor-
mation, contact 305-253-2325 or
info@wingspanseminars.com.

The Habitat for Human-
ity of Greater Miami will be-
gin holding its second Saturday
of the month homeownership
application meetings at New
Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist
Church, 6700 NW 14th Avenue
on Saturday, October 8 at 9:30
a.m. There is no RSVP necessary
for the meetings and no applica-
tion deadline. For more informa-
tion, contact McKenzie Moore,
community outreach coordina-
tor, at 305-634-3628 or email
mckenzie.moore@miamihabitat.
org.

The Inaugural North-
east Florida Blue and White
Scholarship Golf Invitational
will be held on Saturday; Octo-
ber 15 at the Magnolia Point Golf
and Country Club in Green Cove
Springs, FL. Proceeds will go to-
wards college scholarships for
Jacksonville-area students and
assist our organizations' commu-
nity service programs. For more
information, visit www.neflblue-
andwhitegolf.com.

Great Crowd Ministries
presents South Florida BB-Q/
Gospel Festival at Amelia Ear-
hart Park on Saturday, October
29 from 11 a.m-5:30 p.m. The
park fee is $6 per car. All artists


and vendors are encouraged to
call. For more information, con-
tact Constance Koon-Johnson at
786-290-3258.

0 Coming this fall, a charter
bus leaving the Miami area go-
ing to FAMU campus for the stu-
dents. For more information, call
Phillip at 786-873-9498.

ICalling healthy ladies 50+ to
start a softball team for fun and
laughs. Be apart of this historical
adventure. Twenty-four start-up
players needed. For more infor-
mation, call Jean at 305-688-
3322 or Coach Rozier at 305-
389-0288.

Knoxville College, a
136-year-old Historic Black Col-
lege, is kicking off a three-year,
ten million dollar campaign to
revitalize the College under the
leadership of its new President
Dr. Horace Judson. All alumni
and the public are asked to do-
nate to this campaign. To secure
donor forms, go to www.knox-
villecollege.edu and scroll down
to K.C. Building Fund. Click on it
for the form or call Charlie Wil-
liams, Jr., president of the local
alumni chapter at 305-915-7175
for more details.

*The Miami Northwestern
Class of 1962 meets on the
second Saturday of each month
at 4 p.m. at the African Heri-
tage Cultural Arts Center, 6161
NW 22nd Avenue. We are begin-
ning to make plans for our 50th
Reunion. For more information,
contact Evelyn at 305-621-8431.

Family and Children Faith
Coalition is seeking youth ages
four-18 to connect with a caring
and dedicated mentor in Miami-
Dade or Broward County. Get
help with homework, attend fun
events and be a role model for
your community. For more infor-
mation, contact Brandyss Howard
at 786-388-3000 or brandyss@
fcfcfl.org.

Work from home and earn
money. The CLICK Charity,
5530 NW 17th Avenue, is offering
free computer web design classes
for middle and high school stu-
dents. Work at your own pace
and receive one-on-one instruc-
tion in learning a very valuable
trade. Registration and classes
are free! Open Monday-Friday,
2-7 p.m. Don't wait call, email or


come by today: 305-691-8588 or
andre@theclickcharity.com.

There will be a free first-
time homebuyer education class
held every second Saturday of
the month, at Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church, 2131.1 NW 34th
Avenue, from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
For more information, call 305-
652-7616 or email fgonzalez@
ercchelp.org.

SFree child care is available at
the Miami-Dade County Com-
munity Action Agency Head-
start/Early Head Start Pro-
gram for children ages three-five
for the upcoming school year. In-
come guidelines and Dade Coun-
ty residence apply only. We wel-
come children with special needs/
disability with an MDCPS IEP. For
more information, call 786-469-
4622, Monday-Friday from 8
a.m.-5 p.m.

Looking for all former Mon-
tanari employees to get reac-
quainted. Meetings will be held
at Piccadilly's (West 49th Street)
in Hialeah, on the last Saturday
of each month at 9 a.ni. We look
forward to seeing each and every
one of you. For more information,
contact Loletta Forbes at 786-
593-9687 or Elijah Lewis at 305-
469-7735.

The Cemetery Beautifica-
tions Project, located at 3001
NW 46th Street is looking for vol-
unteers and donations towards
the upkeep and beautification of
the Lincoln Park Cemetery. For
more information, contact Dyrren
S. Barber at 786-290-7357.

Xcel Family Enrichment
Center, Inc. will be celebrating
it's 2nd Annual Black MarCiage
Day Walk on March 24, 2012. Xcel
operates as a privately-owned
501(C)(3) not-for-profit com-
munity based organization that
provides social services to low/
moderate income families. Its
main focus is to strengthen mar-
riage and families from a holistic
approach. Xcel is seeking dona-
tions for this event in the form of
monetary, talent, marriage coun-
selors (as a speaker), DJ, etc.
Xcel is registered with the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services Solicitation of
Contributions Division. Your do-
nation is tax deductible. For more
information, call Ms. Gilbert at
786-267-4544.
a :u. x e


A Parental/Community Involvement

c Student Safety

O Minority, Women and Small Business

Opportunities

uX And other important topics!




Please contact 305-995-2311 for more information.










cV


Business


ran -- r r I -r -


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in


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SL


M WEEI, .
-Photo Credit: Graylyn Swilley
Black Hospitality Initiative at GMCVB Business Networking Mixer at the Crescendo Jazz
and Blues Lounge. L-R: Jacqueline Abraham, volunteer staff; Petra Brennan, program
coordinator and Graylyn Swilley-Woods, executive director.








13L L


BUSINESS


Claims for jobless aid



at a four-month low


By Daniel Wagner
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The num-
ber of people seeking unem-
ployment benefits fell last
week below 400,000 for the
first time in four months, a
sign that the job market is im-
proving slowly after a recent
slump.
Applications for unemploy-
ment aid dropped by 7,000
to a seasonally adjusted
395,000, the Labor Depart-
ment said recently. Applica-
tions had been above 400,000
for the previous 17 weeks.
The four-week average, a
less-volatile figure, fell to
405,000, its sixth straight
decline. That suggests appli-
cations are decreasing over
time. .
Applications fell in Febru-
ary to 375,000, a level that
reflects healthy job growth.
They soared to an eight-
month high of 478,000 in late
April, and have declined slow-
ly since then.
The economy added 117,000
net jobs in July, the govern-
ment said last week. That was
an improvement from the pre-
vious two months. But it's far
below the average of 215,000
jobs per month that compa-


4





gers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.


nies created from February
through April.
Many employers pulled back
on hiring after signs emerged
that the economy had weak-
ened from last year. High gas
prices and scant wage gains
left consumers with less mon-
ey to spend on discretionary
purchases, such as applianc-
es, furniture and electron-
ics. Supply chain disruptions
caused by the Japan crisis
also dampened U.S. factory
production.
The economy expanded at
an annual rate of just 0.8 per-


cent in the first six months of
the year, the slowest growth
in the two years since the re-
cession officially ended.
It's not likely to get much
better in the second half of
the year. The Federal Reserve
said it expects growth will
stay weak for two more years.
The Fed also acknowledged
that the economy's problems
go beyond temporary factors,
such as high gas prices.
As a result, the Fed said it
would likely keep the short-
term interest rate near zero at
least through mid-2013.


*'1


l-":C.A


tality Student Leadership Summit tha
in conjunction with 15th Arinual Inti
African American Hotel Owners & I:
Summit & Trade Show in Doral.
The conference hosted approximate
dents and more the 200 business prof
placing the youth and entrepreneurs t
that the former could network with t
have achieved success at the local, n
international levels.
"Black business can seek help from
cessing resources through our network
and through our industry and educati
ners," Swilley said. "We have access t(
tion about market trend analysis tha
sist people with their business needs
have educational and training resource


Becoming an entrepreneur may sound exciting but it takes
real planning. focus and determination to get a new busi-
ness off the ground, especially in today's tough economy.
That s wh, organizations like the Black Hospitality Initiative
of Greater Miami (BHI) are so important to fledgling Black
businessmen and women.
''Helping Black businesses is important be-
cause they contribute to the economic fab-
ric of this community," said Graylyn Swil-
ley, BHI executive director.
The group operates on three key prin-
ciples that are collectively aimed at help-
ing Black entrepreneurs: advocacy,
talent development and career connec-
tion. They recently sponsored a Hospi-
t was held to help Black businesses obtain certification in
ernational industry-related fields."
investment Franklyn Perry, a recent graduate from FIU
said he gained a lot by attending the summit.
ly 70 stu- "I met some real shakers and movers," Perry
fessionals, said. "The program was very beneficial to me, es-
ogether so pecially being that I am Black. We need things
those who like this to help us because no one will give you
national or anything."
According to their mission statement, the BHI,
us by ac- formally known as the Visitor Industry Human
Meetings Resource Development Council (VIC), was estab-
onal part- lished in 1991 by the Greater Miami Convention
o informa- & Visitors Bureau (GMCVB) to advance econom-
at can as- ic participation and open doors of opportunity
s. We also for African Americans and Blacks of African de-
e referrals scent in the Greater Miami Visitor Industry.'
. .............................. .......!........


Wal-Mart to accept more kinds of checks


By Reuters


NEW YORK Wal-Mart
Stores Inc. said recently that
its check and card cashing ser-
vice would accept more types of
checks and take more forms of
identification from shoppers in
a move aimed at getting them
to spend more at the discount
chain's stores.
Wal-Mart, which already


cashes payroll, government
and tax refund checks for cus-
tomers, will now also accept
student loan, insurance and
pension checks up to $5,000,
among other kinds of checks.
Wal-Mart does not cash per-
sonal checks.
Customers will be also able
to cash payroll cards and some
government benefit cards at
Wal-Mart's stores.


Wal-Mart, the world's largest
retailer, will also accept addi-
tional forms of identification,
including U.S. passports.
Wal-Mart cashes checks and
cards up to $1,000 for a $3 fee,
and up to $5,000 for $6.
Walmart Financial Services
head Daniel Eckert said in a
statement that "it's important
that they're (shoppers) able to
gain access to all their cash."


By Mellody Hobson

Do you have any tips for
finding the best back-to-
school deals?
The beginning of a new
school year is exciting for
kids, but for parents, it means
a lot of shopping, organiz-
ing and stress. Last year,
the average American family
with two children spent ap-
proximately $550 on back-to-
school gear. However, there
are a number of resources
available to help make life a
little easier during the. annual
ritual of back-to-school shop-
ping.
Offers.com features all the
best coupons and deals from
top retailers. This year, the
web site introduced a Back-
to-School Savings Center to
make it easier when shopping
for school supplies and cloth-


ing. The coupons, coupon
codes and promotions on the
web site are verified by the
editorial team to ensure qual-
ity.
You can also find good
back-to-school deals on The-
NewFrugalMom.com where
you'll find weekly specials -
like where to buy two-pocket
folders for two cents each, a
box of Crayola crayons for $1,
a 10-pack of pencils for 19
cents and many other school
supply bargains.
What's the best way to
stay on budget?
I always say, whether you're
shopping for school supplies,
groceries or other staples,
don't leave your house without
making a list! Many schools
will provide a list of necessary
school supplies. If your school
does not, check the Back-to-
School 2011 checklists on


Offers.com. You'll find ready-
made lists for grade school,
high school and college cat-
egorized into school supplies,
backpacks and accessories,
clothing and shoes.
Also, a great budgeting tool
and a way to avoid debt is the
layaway option. It's a monthly
payment plan for purchases,
but you don't pay interest be-
cause you don't receive your
item until it's paid for in full.
Check if your local retailers
offer layaway.
For online shopping, you
can make purchases using
layaway on eLayaway.com
and Lay-Away.com. This is a
great way to take advantage
of back-to-school sales on
things your child won't need
for months (like fall and win-
ter clothing), while still tak-
ing advantage of today's sale
prices.


Black people continue to lose when it comes to debt ceiling


By James Clingman

"When you look at this final agree-
ment that we came to with the White
House, I got 98 percent of what I
wanted. I'm pretty happy," said John
Boehner, Speaker of the House.
If Boehner got 98 percent of what
he wanted from the debt ceiling deal,
what did the other side get? I haven't
heard the opposing side give its per-
centage yet. Of course, there was


Representative Emmanuel Cleaver,
who said the deal was a "Satan Sand-
wich." The quandary here is that if
98 percent of the deal was pleasing to
the Repubs, does that leave two per-
cent for the Dems? And if that's not
true, and the Dems say they got 98
percent of what they wanted, or even
50 percent, it means that both parties
wanted pretty much the same thing.
You can't have more than 100 percent
of anything.


I wonder how this debt
ceiling deal makes most
Black people feel. Are you
fired-up mad about it or do
you think it was pretty good?
Considering the latest sta-
tistics on the net worth gap
between Blacks and whites,
overall, we should under-
stand that we are in deeper
trouble than we were before
the deal. But, many of us


CLINGMAN


were asleep about 10 years
'ago when the net worth gap
was reported to be about
10 to 1 in favor of White
households. Now that it's
20 to 1, with Black house-
holds having a median net
worth of $5,766.00, and
35 percent of our families
having a zero or negative
net worth, we are all riled
up.


Top off that news with the latest
debt ceiling deal and the highest un-
employment rate in the nation and
what we have is a real serious prob-
lem folks. But you already knew that
I'm sure. We will now see cuts in fed-
erally subsidized student loans, Head
Start, and food stamps, in addition to
the loss of more than 300,000 jobs.
Black folks won't be left out of that
equation.
Please turn to bLINGMAN 10D


BHI to aid entrepreneurs


L


Finding good back-to-school deals










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


A customer pushes a shopping cart past a display at a Safeway store in California in June.


Higher food prices on way

The rising cost of commodities this year 12 months, and com-
panies such as Star-


the U.S. Department
of Agriculture said
grocery-store prices


NEW YORK will likely rise three
American consum- percent to four per-
ers can expect bigger cent in 2012, on par
grocery bills in 2012, with this year, even
even as commodity though ingredient
prices are forecast to costs may fall.
fall. The biggest increas-
The U.S. is expected es would likely be in
to churn out more sta- the first half of next
ples like corn, wheat year, but prices would
and soy, which would most likely ease later
drive commodity in 2012, said USDA
prices lower in 2012. economist Richard
However, it takes Volpe.
several months for a "We're seeing that
commodity such as retailers really have
corn to make its way no choice but to start
down the production increasing prices in
line and into a box of order to restore their
cereal, so consumers profit margins, so
next year will be buy- we're expecting food
ing food made from prices to continue ris-
raw materials bought ing in 2012," he said
thisF'r1'we.VPe'MenT S'"?WiPe *'^I**t* -
prices reached multi- At the center of the
yeatflighs. rise in agricultural
Weather problems commodities prices
including frosts,
floods and droughts
have driven commod-
ity prices this year.
Corn futures in Chi-


cago reached a record
high near $8 a bushel
in June, while wheat
almost touched $9 a
bushel in February,
and arabica coffee
futures in New York
topped $3 a pound, a
14-year high, in May.
Major food compa-
nies like Kraft Foods
Inc., Corn Flakes
maker Kellogg Co.
and General Mills,
producer of Yoplait
yogurt and Cheerios,
already have taken
steps such as rais-
ing prices or shrink-
ing products to offset
higher raw-material
costs and are likely
to continue doing so
next year.
In a recent report,


this year is corn. Fu-
tures prices in Chica-
go have pulled back
from their. record
high but are still up
seven percent since
the start of the year.
High demand, par-
ticularly from China,
is expected to support
prices.
The severe heat
wave in the American
Midwest this summer
could hurt corn yields
in the fall, which
would further boost
prices.
Other commodi-
ties used widely by
food companies have
also skyrocketed, as
bad harvests in major
growers and increased
global demand pushed
up prices. Benchmark
*arabita coffee futures
in New York have
'surged. close to O40
percent over the past


bucks Corp., Kraft
and J.M. Smucker Co.
already have raised
coffee prices this year.
But the companies
are taking a cautious
stance on how con-
sumers will respond
to higher prices. Food
executives have found
it easier to raise pric-
es on items geared
toward high-end con-
sumers, who are less
price-sensitive than
lower-income shop-
pers.
Instead of rais-
ing prices on Frost-
ed Flakes and oth-
er price-sensitive
brands, Kellogg is of-
fering smaller sizes
to avoid scaring off
shoppers.
"If you go over $4 a
box, you're going to
lose a lot more con-
sumers." KeHYogg-Cigf-"
Executive John Bry-
ant aid"'ri a recent
interview.


the F2 12


Miami-Dade County will hold a public meeting in your area to discuss proposed adjustments to taxes
and/or fees. On each of the dates and locations listed below, the Office of Management and Budget
will make a presentation to discuss the FY 2011-12 Proposed Budget.
Tu ed a, Agust16,201 700 m Tursay, ugut 1, 2 11 7:0 p


Miami Arts Museum
101 West Flagler Street
Miami. FL 33130


Coral Gables Country Club
997 North Greenway Drive
Coral Gables. FL 33134


urxpCnlnruI r'Iri!mnEII 'III


Hialeah Senior High School
251 East 47th Street
Hialeah, FL 33013


William F. "Bill" Dickinson Community Center
1601 Krome Avenue
Hometead, FL


Doral Middle School
5005 NW 112 Avenue
Miami, FL
All of these sessions are free and open to the public. For further information, please call
Anita Gibboney at 305-375-5414. For sign language interpreter services and for materials in
accessible format, call 305-375-5143 five days in advance of the meeting you plan to attend,
IForlealadsonin,1gthtp: ,egaldsmiamidademgv ,1


Arcola Lakes Park Senior Center and Pool

Contract No. 311106-05-003 GOB ESP
Miami-Dade County, hereinafter known as MDC, will receive bids for the Arcola Lakes Park Senior Center and Pool, Contract No.
311106-05-003 GOB ESP. The project will be located in Miami-Dade County, State of Florida.
This project includes goals for the participation of Community Small Business Enterprises based on a percentage of the total contract
amount. as noted below and in the Bid Form, in accordance with the Project Manual. Goals for Community Small Business Enterprises


must be fulfilled using construe this solicitation


Te h Contractor must agree to abide by the provisions of the Proiect Manual regarding minimum participation gas roedblwa-


Mrr of the total e ortisroject as follows:


Community Small Business Enterprise participation: 20.93%,
Locally funded projects of $100,000 and above are also subject to the Equal Employment Opportunity requirements and Section 2-11.16
of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County (Responsible Wages).
Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code, as amended, a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon each RFP, RFQ
or bid after advertisement and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a written recommendation to the Board of County
Commissioners. THE CONE OF SILENCE PROHIBITS ANY COMMUNICATION REGARDING RFPS, RFQS OR BIDS BETWEEN,
AMONG OTHERS:
potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants and the County's professional staff including, but not limited
to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff, the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs;
the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the
County Manager and the County Manager's staff;
potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants, any member of the County's professional staff, the Mayor,
County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member of the respective selection committee.
The provisions do not apply to, among other communications:
oral communications with the staff of the Vendor Information Center, the responsible Procurement Agent or Contracting Officer,
provided the communication is limited strictly to matters of process or procedure already contained in the solicitation document;
the provisions of the Cone of Silence do not apply to oral communications at pre-proposal or pre-bid conferences, oral presentations
before selection committees, contract negotiations during any duly noticed public meeting, public presentations made to the Board
of County Commissioners during any duly noticed public meeting; or
communications in writing at any time with'any county employee, official or member of the Board of County Commissioners unless
specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ or bid documents.
All Requests for Information (RFI) regarding this project shall be submitted in writing to JGX @miamidade.gov and a copy filed
with the Clerk of the Board at clerkbtccamiamidade.aov. The RFI may also be faxed to the attention of John Gutierrez at (305)
961-2786 and copy the Clerk of the Board at (305) 375-2484. Only RFI's sent via email in MS Word format will show the entire question
and answer on the Addendums issued. All other RFI's will only show MDPR's response to the question. No verbal RFI's regarding
the project, via phone or in person, shall be permitted. MDC shall consider RFIs received prior to the RFI submittal deadline. The RFI
submittal deadline is fourteen (14) calendar days prior to the Bid Opening Date. All responses to RFIs are compiled then issued via an
Addendum to all the potential bidders / proposers that appear on the Bidder's List. This Bidder's List contains the contact information for
the bidder I proposer that obtained a bid package directly from MDC. A copy of the Bidder's List is sent via email or fax on Fridays at 4:00
PM to anyone that submits a written request for it.
In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of the Cone of Silence by any proposer or bidder shall render any RFP award,
RFQ award or bid award voidable. Any person having personal knowledge of a violation of these provisions shall report such violation to
the State Attorney and/or may file a complaint with Ethics Commission. Proposers or bidders should reference Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code for further clarification.
This language is only a summary of the key provisions of the Cone of Silence. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order
3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.
Miami-Dade County will receive bids for the construction of a one-story Senior Center Building which includes: lobby/reception area,
banquet/meeting room, event services & delivery room, entertainment room, arts & crafts room, ceramics room, exercise room, restrooms,
locker rooms, staff offices, equipment room, and storage. Also includes: outdoor therapeutic aquatic pool, and heated whirl pool, pool
deck space, pedestrian circulation, covered car drop-off area, parking lot and landscaping. The engineer's cost estimate for the base
bid is $4.786.161.72.
Included in the bid shall be the furnishing of all materials, labor, services, supervision, tools and equipment required or incidental to this
project. All work shall be performed as per the Contract Documents. Miami-Dade County, at its sole discretion may elect to negotiate with
the apparent low bidder, if only one bidder bids.
The County reserves the right to waive any informalities or irregularities in any bid, or reject any or all bids if deemed to be in the best
interest of the County.
As part of this Contract, the County may, at its sole discretion, issue miscellaneous changes covering all construction disciplines. The
Contract? r snall betapable of expeditiessly :erformrigtlhis changed work either with its own forces or with subcorflftctors, The direct
and indirect cost of these changes and time extensions, if any, will be negotiated at the time the changes are issued and paymentwill be
made in accordance with Article 36 of the General Conditions As the nature or extent of these changes can not be ascertainef'br to
notice-to-proceed. the Contractor shall not include an amount in his bid in anticipation of these changes.
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED IN: As required by Chapter 10 of the Miami-Dade County.
Other Certificates of Competency, if required, shall be provided by subcontractors prior to beginning of work.
Bid Documents will be available on or about August 17. 2011. A list of bidders may also be obtained by mailing your request to
Eddie(mlamidade.gov. MDC has scheduled a Pre-Bid Conference at 10:00 A.M. local time on August 25. 2011 at the Hickman Bldg.,
275 N. W. 2nd Street, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Miami, Florida 33128. The Pre-Bid Conference is being held to answer any questions
regarding this project.
MDC will receive SEALED Bids at the Office of the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, at the Stephen P. Clark Center,
111 N. W. First Street, Suite 17-202, Miami; Florida 33128 until 2:00 p.m. local time on September 21.2011. Bids received after that time
will not be accepted, nor will qualified; segregated and/or incomplete Bids be accepted. Bids may not be revoked nor withdrawn for 180
days after the bid opening date. The Contract, if awarded, will be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. Interested
parties are invited to attend.
All bids shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board in one (1) sealed envelope in the following manner:
All bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope containing the required bid documents. On the outside of the envelope place the name
of the bidder, its address, the name of the contract for which the bid is submitted, the contract number and the date for opening of bids.
The Bid Security specified in Article 7 of the Instruction to Bidders shall be enclosed with the bid. Failure to include the Bid Security shall
render the bid non-responsive.
The opening of bids will be as follows:
All SBD Form 400 Schedule of Intent shall be forwarded to SBD on the bid opening date. If the SBD form 400 has correctable defectss,
the bidder will be given a checklist indicating the correctable defectss. The bidder must submit the corrected SBD form 400 to SBD
and the Clerk of The Board within forty-eight (48) hours of the bid opening date. If the bidder's SBD form 400 contains non-correctable
defectss, SBD will immediately inform the bidder that the submittal is not responsive and not approved.
Documents will be available electronically via E-mail in zip file format at:
The Park's Store htto://parkstore.miamidade.aov/, or go to: www.miamidade.gov/parks, then look for "Park Store" under the "Fun at
Parks" tab which can be located on top of the page. Bid documents can be sold at anytime from the 1st day of advertisement to the bid
opening date for $25 each.
Bid Security must accompany each bid and must be in an amount of not less than five percent of the highest Total Bid Price. MDC
reserves the right to waive irregularities, to reject bids and/or to extend the bidding period.
Each Contractor, and his subcontractors performing work at the Work site, will be required to pay Florida sales and use taxes and to pay
for licenses and fees required by the municipalities in which the Work will be located. Each Contractor will be required to furnish a Surety
Performance and Payment Bond in accordance with Article 1.03, Contract Security, of the Supplemental General Conditions and furnish
Certificates of Insurance in the amounts specified in the Contract Documents.
The Contractor is hereby advised of Resolution No R-1145-99, Clearinghouse for Posting Notices of Job Opportunities Resulting from
Construction Improvements on County Property. The procedures direct the Contractor to forward a notice of job vacancy(ies) created as
a result of this construction work to the director of the Employee Relations Department, located at Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW 1st
Street, suite 2110, Miami, Florida 33128. The job vacancy notices should be delivered within ten (10) working days following award of the
contractor. The Director of the Employee Relations Department will in turn distribute said job announcements to all Miami Dade County
facilities participating in the notification requirements of Resolution No. R-1145-99.
Any firm proposed for use as a CSBE on this contract, must have a valid certification from the Miami-Dade County Department of
Business Development (SBD), at the time of bid. It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to provide equal employment opportunity.
Those responding to this RFP/ITBIRFQ shall comply with the provisions of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and 49 U.S.C.
Section 1612 and other related laws and regulations.
Call (305) 755-7848, to request material in accessible format, information on access for persons with disabilities, or sign language
interpreter services (7 days, in advance), 305-755-7980 (tdd).
SPANISH TRANSLATION:
Llamar al (305) 755-7848, para obtener information acerca del acceso para Leisure Access Services personas minusvalidas y para
obtener materials en format accessible. Los interesados en el servicio de interpretes para el idioma de los sordomudos deben Ilamar
con siete dias de antelacion, 305-755-7980 (Servicio telefonico para sordos).
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI-DADE PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT
Harvey Ruvin, Clerk
Christopher Agrippa, Deputy Clerk


BBBBBI^nTff 1T1finf11lB^


"f A u


could hit store shelves in 2012


By Leslie Josephs
and Paul Ziobro


U ,.mm for 1


LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR
BUILDING CODE CONSULTANTS


The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida (Board), intends to commission one or more firms or joint
ventures having full architectural and engineering services available within the entity, or with consultants,
to perform Building Code Consultant review and inspection services. These firms will be contracted for a
period of four (4) years with extension years at the option of the Board.

MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 at 9:30 a.m., local time,
at 1498 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida.

RESPONSES DUE: RFQ responses must be received no later than 4:00 p.m., local time, Wednes-
day, September 14, 2011 at:

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Department of A/E Selection & Negotiations
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, Executive Director
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132

REQUIREMENTS: This is an abbreviated ad; the complete legal ad with instructions for this solicitation
including Board-approved selection procedures and required U.S. General Services Administration modi-
fied SF330 form is available at the above address or at: http://ae-selicitations.dadeschools.net.

In accordance with Board policies; a Cone of Silence, lobbyist requirements and protest procedures
are hereby activated. Failure to comply with requirements of this legal ad and Board policies shall be
grounds for disqualification. These, and all related, Board Policies can be accessed and downloaded at:
http://www.neola.com/miamidade-fl/.


I ~


.


I_


`J
.___k






9D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR ROWN DESTINY


V VELS


With you when vision


puts goals in motion


Wachovia is now Wells Fargo Small businesses are the backbone of our community.
That's why we're committed to helping you realize your vision for your business and community.
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Plus, we're the #1 small business lender in the country. We've lent more than $1 billion to African American
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/

ii


.-.-


~ ~____~ ~_~~~










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 17-23, 2011


Look out Exxon: Apple is right behind you
-d k ~ signal a peak. Many companies the status of CEO Steve Jobs' health
Most-valuable Neck and neck ----.. that have hit No.1 have since seen and challenges in overseas markets,
tite r grabs App ei .--.-. their growth slow or stagnate. Inves- says Kim Caughey Forrest of Fort
title up fr gras Apple is posted to pass wo's tors have to wonder if its tremen- Pitt Capital. "As a value manager, I
Exxon Mobil as the world's ------.~ dous growth can continue, given cannot buy this," she says.


By Matt Krantz


Apple has gone from underdog to
overlord. The company that made
its mark in 1984 with its hammer-
thrower Super Bowl ad and defined
itself as the scrappy upstart is now
on track to surpass ExxonMobil to
be the most valuable company in
the world.
Thanks in part to a powerful ral-
ly in the market recently, the value
of Apple (AAPL) surged to $346.7
billion, briefly surpassing the value
of oil company ExxonMobil (XOM).
ExxonMobil, which has held the
title of the most valuable company
throughout the recession, ended
the day worth $348.3 billion.
"Seems like anything Apple
makes, people will buy it," says
Howard Silverblatt of Standard &
Poor's. "You put the Apple logo on
something and it sells."
The horse race between Apple and
ExxonMobil is intensifying as Exxon-
Mobil's shares continue to fall along
with oil prices. Despite rising 2.1
percent recently to $71.64, shares
of ExxonMobil are down 2.0 percent
this year. Shares of Apple gained 5.9


most valuable company.
Market cap in billions
Exxon/Mobil $348.3
Apple $346.7
Microsoft $214.3
IBM $203.8
Chevron $187.1
Google' $185.2
Wal-Mart $176.4
AT&T $171.0
Johnson & Johnson $170.5
General Electric $169.2
Proctor & Gamble $168.1
Source: Capital IQ
percent Tuesday to $374.01, a 16.0
percent rise this year.
While ExxonMobil was just
barely able to stay ahead of Apple
on Tuesday, it's "a matter of when"
Apple surpasses it given the fast
growth of markets for things such
as smartphones and tablet comput-
ers, says Scott Sutherland of Wed-
bush Securities. "Apple is to the
point it can do no wrong," he says.
Investors are paying attention
to the market value race because


Apple on Tuesday briefly passed Exxon asthe most valu-
Apple on Tuesday briefly passed Exxon as the most valu-


able company in the U.S.
it is a:
Way to see macro shifts in
the balance of power between
companies. If Apple manages to
pull ahead of ExxonMobil, it will
be just the 11th company to hold
the No.1 spot, Silverblatt says.
The others: AT&T, Cisco, DuPont,
General Electric, General Motors,
IBM, Microsoft, Wal-Mart and
Philip Morris.
Meteoric rise from battered
levels. Surging to No.1 is a re-
markable reversal in fortune given
the shabby shape the company
was in in the late 1990s, falling to
the No.456 spot in the S&P 500 in
1997.


And despite the company's mas-
sive size and scale, it is expected
to deliver 20 percent to 25 percent
earnings growth this year, says
Mark Lamkin, CEO of Lamkin
Wealth Management. "Growth is
absolutely phenomenal," he says.
Way to buck the recession.
While consumers gripe about high
gas prices, they willingly shell out
hundreds of dollars for Apple prod-
ucts, Lamkin says. "When Ameri-
cans see a product they want, they
will buy it. They don't feel bad put-
ting the $500 on their credit card,"
he says.
Certainly, some wonder if Apple
hitting such extreme levels could


Debt ceiling has Black people at a downfall


CLINGMAN
continued from 7D

The Brookings Institute
issued a report written by
William G. Gale, Senior
Fellow, Economic Stud-
ies, pointing out: "It does
not seem fair or reason-
able to impose virtually
the entire cost of this
part of the fiscal bur-
den on poor and mid-
dle-class" households,
but that is exactly what
this bipartisan act of
Congress and the White
House does. Without tax
increases in either part
of the current deal or in
the foreseeable future,
there is no way to get
the well-off to pay any-
thing close to their fair
share of the fiscal bur-
den. The top one per-
cent own 33 percent of
the wealth and receive
about 15 percent of the

'The Help' gets

THE HELP
continued from 4C

employer who cruelly
mistreated her. Spencer
visibly seethes and im-
bues her character with
deadpan humor as she
endures the belittling
of her smug, racist em-
ployer Hilly (Bryce Dal-
las Howard).
The third noteworthy
portrayal is by Jessica
Chastain as Celia, a
kind-hearted outsid-
er who dresses like a
bombshell and is os-
tracized by the snob-
bish young women un-
der bossy Hilly's sway.
Chastain makes a pow-
erful impression as a
fragile young wife hid-
ing a painful secret.
The likable Stone -
so sharp in satirical
teen comedies like Easy
A- feels a bit too con-


income in the country.
These shares have risen
over the past 30 years.
They 'are being asked to
bear none of the burden
of closing the fiscal gap."
The report goes on to
say, "...the plan imposes
the full cost of deficit
reduction on low- and
middle-income house-
holds, gives the wealthy
a free pass, and bodes
poorly for future nego-
tiations, which, like it
or not, will require tax
increases or draconian
cuts in entitlements."
All right, Black folks,
you got stroked again.
The deal went down
and you didn't get
jack from it. In fact,
you will have to bear
much of the financial
burden for the deal.
So now, what's it gon-
na be? Will you con-
tinue to buy into the


great reviews
temporary in this role.
Her Southern accent
tends to waver. The
movie wisely focuses
less on Skeeter than on
the maids she chroni-
cles.
As she absorbs the
women's personal sa-
gas, Skeeter's convic-
tion to become a writer
is strengthened, along
with her need to know
what happened to her
beloved maid, Constan-
tine (Cicely Tyson). The
book gave that subplot
more heft. Here it feels
tacked on. Tyson has
too little screen time,
though what she has is
memorable and moving.
The Help sidesteps
easy sentimentality.
As the film's heart and
soul, Davis and Spen-
cer add vast reserves of
depth and dignity to a
crowd-pleasing tale.


symbolism of politics
and its effect on your
emotions? Or will you
finally take appropriate
action to empower your-
selves economically and
free yourselves from the
yoke of economic op-
pression and exploita-
'tion?
Will you continue to
be more concerned with
catching the latest epi-
sode of the Basketball
Wives, as they call one
another the b-word over
and over, or will you at
least make an attempt
to be informed on eco-
nomic solutions to our
problems?


Will you rest in the
refuge of now being
able to see a Black man
in the 6 o'clock slot on
television, making butt
prints in your easy
chair, or will you get
busy making footprints
on the path that leads to
economic freedom?
Will you continue to
subscribe to mantra,
"Jobsl Jobs! Jobs!" (Why
must it be said three
times?), asking the guv-
ment to create them,
you know, the same way
it created jobs with the
stimulus package, or
will you start making
your own jobs by grow-


. ... U I ."P ic t


(MDEAT) Miami-Dade
Economic Advocacy Trust
New Board Appointments
Miami-Dade Economic Advocacy Trust (MDEAT) is charting a
new direction in improving the quality-of-life for local residents
and seeks visionary board members to help carryout this
mission. The ideal candidates are seasoned experts in, banking,
business development, criminal justice, economic development,
education, finance, housing, health and human services, and/
or the law and legal professions) who are committed to help
stimulate socio-economic growth in underserved Miami-Dade
County neighborhoods.
MDEAT is governed by a fifteen member Trust Board and works
with local, state and federal officials; community organizations;
schools, colleges, and universities; foundations; municipalities;
and the corporate community to ensure that all residents
have equal access to the necessities that maintain a healthy
community. MDEAT is a Miami-Dade County agency, meets
monthly and answers directly to the Miami-Dade Board of
County Commissioners.
MDEAT Nominating Council, the entity responsible for reviewing
Board Trust applications will interview all candidates to fill
vacancies and forward its recommendations to the Miami-Dade
Board of County Commissioners.
Interested individuals may download an application at
www.miamidade.aov/mmap or by picking one up Monday-
Friday between 8:30 am 5:00 pm at the following location:
Miami-Dade Economic Advocacy Trust
19 West Flagler Street, M-106
Miami, Florida 33130
An application can only be filed in person or delivered to
the address above. The deadline for filing is Friday,
September 2, 2011 by 4 pm. For more information you
may contact Public Information Officer Joey Walker at
305-372-7600.


I I 1 I I I Fo ea dsolngot tp/ Iegld. miamidade go


ing Black businesses?
The folks in Washing-
ton are hardly concerned
about our moanin' and
groanin', our whinin'
and cryin', and our yell-
in' and screaming They
couldn't care less, and
they have shown us time
and time again. Why do
we keep asking them to
do what we know they
won't or can't do? Why
can't we see we've been
played again? Are we
really that stupid? Do
we need to be hit upside
the head with a sledge-
hammer in order to take
care of business for our-
selves?


IN PARTNERSHIP M IH
MIAMI MA YOR TOMAS REGALADO &
COMMISSIONER RICHARD P. DUNN Ii

JOBIITITIEH.RES.
Mt emo M hurch

17800 W 25",Avenu, Miam Gardns, FL 3305


LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR
LAND SURVEYING SERVICES


The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida (Board), intends to select one (1) or more firm(s) to pro-
vide professional services to the Board for a continuing Agreement for Land Surveying. These firms will be
contracted for a period of four (4) years with extension years at the option of the Board.

RESPONSES DUE: RFQ responses must be received no later than 4:00 p.m., local time, Thursday,
September 8, 2011 at:

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Department of A/E Selection & Negotiations
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, Executive Director
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132

REQUIREMENTS: This is an abbreviated ad; the complete legal ad with instructions for this so-
licitation including selection procedures and required forms are available at the above address or at:
http://ae-solicitations.dadeschools.net.

In accordance with Board policies; a Cone of Silence, lobbyist requirements and protest procedures
are hereby activated. Failure to comply with requirements of this legal ad and Board policies shall be
grounds for disqualification. These, and all related, Board Policies can be accessed and downloaded at:
http://www.neola.com/miamidade-fl/.



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SECTION D .'... AUGUT 7-... '.i !


Apartments
1 NORTHEAST AREA
Section 8 special. One and
two bedrooms. Furnished
units available. $199. Total
move in. 786-488-5225
1150 NW 1 Place
One bedroom, one bath,
$450. Mr. Willie #6

1212 NW 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$450. Appliances.
305-642-7080

1215 NW 103 Lane
Two bdrms, gated security,
tile, $700 mthly, $1000 to
move in. 305-696-7667
1229 NW 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$500. Appliances, free
water.
305-642-7080

1231 NW 58 Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath.
$450 monthly, $700 move
In. All appliances Included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV. Call
Joel
786-355-7578

12400 NE 11 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1,000. Appliances, free
water. 305-642-7080

1246 NW 58 Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
One bedroom, one bath.
$495 monthly, $750 move
In. All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV. Call
Joel
786-355-7578

1261 NW 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1317 NW 2 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$425. Ms. Shorty in #1.

135 NW 18 Street
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Two bedroom, one bath.
$450 month. $700 move
In. All appliances included.
.Free 19 Inch LDC TV.,.Cal
Joel
786-355-7578

140 NW 13 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$500. 786-236-1144 or
305-642-7080

1425 NW 60 Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath,
$570 mthly. Includes refriger-
ator, stove, central air, water.
$725 Move In. 786-290-5498
14350 NW 22 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $450
Two bdrms, one bath $550.
Ms. Jackson 786-267-1646

1450 NW 1 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $425
Two bdrms, one bath $525
305-642-7080

1525 NW 1 Place
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bdrm, one bath, $350
monthly. $575 move in. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1535 NW 1 Place
One bedroom $475, call
786-506-3067
1540 NW 1 Court
Studio $425, one bedroom
$525, call 786-506-3067
1718 NW 2 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $425.
Mr. Gaiter In #1

1721 NW 183 Drive
Two bedrooms, two baths, tile
floors, near all facilities, free
water. $800 monthly. Security
required. 305-493-9635
1744 NW 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$495. Two bedrooms, one
bath $595. Appliances,
Ms. Bell #9

1835 NW 2 Court
Two bedrooms. Free water.
$900 move in. $450 depositt.
$450 monthly. 786-454-5213
1943 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, $500, two
bedrooms, $650, move into-
day, quiet, 786-506-3067
1969 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$475 Appliances, free gas.
786-236-1144

200 NW 13 Street
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

210 NW 17 Street
One bdrm, one bath $450,
appliances. 305-642-7080

2229 NW 82 Street # B


One bdrm, one bath, central
air. $750 mthly. 305-685-9909
305-776-3857


2751 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, remote gate,
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849

411 NW 37 Street
Studio, $395 monthly.
Two bdrms., one bath, $650
monthly. All appliances
included. Call Joel
786-355-7578

4470 N.W. 203 Terrace
Large two bedrooms apt.,
one bath, walk in closet. $850
monthly. Call after 4 p.m.
,305-812-3773
458 NW 7 STREET
One bedroom, very nice $450
a month. Call 305-557-1750.
467 NW 8 Street
Efficiency $425. Appliances
and free water.
305-642-7080

5200 NW 26 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath. Free
gift for Section 8 tenants.
$300 deposit. $675 first
month, $975 moves you in.
Jenny 786-663-8862

540 NW 7 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$500. 305-642-7080

561 NW 6 Street
One bdrm, one bath $495.
305-642-7080
60 and 61 Street
One and two bdrms, $595
and $695. Call 954-482-5400
60 NW 76 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
S$500 and $600, Appliances,
free water. 305-642-7080
6229 NW 2 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 55 and older pre-
ferred.
305-310-7463
6832 NW 5 Place
Studio $110 weekly, every-
thing included. 786-286-
2540.
7155 N.W. 17 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath. First
and last. $500 monthly. $500
deposit. 305-303-2383
731 NW 56 Street
One bdrm, one bath. Free
water. $550 monthly.
Call 786-333-2448

7527 North Miami Avenue
One bedroom, one bath.
Renovated, new appliances,
parking. Section 8. HOPWA
OK. $695, plus security. Call
9a.m. to 7 p.m. No calls after
7 p.m. 305-754-7900.
800 NW 67 Street
Large one bedroom, utilities
included. $675 moves you in.
786-389-1686
ALLAPATTAH AREA
One bdrm, tile, central air,
water included. $750. Section
8 OKAY! 786-355-5665
ARENA GARDEN
Move in with first month rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, three bdrms, air, appli-
ances, laundry, gate. From
$400. 100 NW 11 St.
305-374-4412.
BRAND NEW
LAKEFRONT APTS.
Up to Two.Months Free Rent
One bdrm. starting at $720
Restrictions Apply
305-757-4663
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. Call for specials,
capitalrentalagency.com

CARVER RANCHES
One bedroom, central air,
water included. Quiet neigh-
borhood. 305-751-3498.
GRAND OPENING
NEW ARENA SQUARE
Walking distance to school
from $400. Remodeled
efficiencies, one, two, three
bdrms; two baths. Central air,
laundry, gated. Office 1023
NW 3 Ave. 305-372-1383
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in spe-
cials. One bedroom, $495;
two bedrooms, $595. Free
water! 786-236-1144

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450 monthly. 305-722-4433
MIAMI LITTLE RIVER
Remodeled one bedroom.
$625 to $775. NE 78 Street
305-895-5480
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Corner of NW 103 Street
Beautiful two bedrooms, $700
monthly, $1000 to move in.
Gated, security, tiled floors,
central air. 786-402-0672
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Overtown Area,
One bdrm, $400
305-603-9592 305-375-0673
Call Mon-Fri 9 am 4 pm
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms, one bath, $868,


one bedroom, $704, studio
$553, deposit. 305-297-0199


-- ~


ances. 305-305-2311


OPA LOCKA AREA
One bdrm, one bath. Special
$400. 305-722-4433
OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750. Section 8 welcome.
305-722-4433

Condos/Townhouses
2767 NW 198 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one and half
bath, $1200'monthly, Section
8 OKI 305-336-3133
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath
close to stadium. $950
monthly. 954-663-3990
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
section 8 welcome.
786-234-5803
Duplexes
1202 N.W. 58 Street
Two bedrooms, two baths.
Central air, Section 8 wel-
come, 305-318-9760.
1228 NW 1 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath. $450.
305-642-7080

127 NW 70 STREET
SECTION 8 OKI Two
bdrms, private drive-
way, large fenced yard,
bars, central air, tile, near
schools.786-277-1268
1510 NW 65 St #1
One bdrm., one bath, air and
water, $700 monthly, Section
8 okay, 305-490-9284.
1524 NW 1 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. $475,
free water. 305-642-7080
15614 NW 2 Avenue, Unit 4
Three bdrms, two baths.
$500 deposit. $1200 mthly.
Section 8 only
786-955-3071
172 NW 52 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Free water/electricity.
305-642-7080

1721 N.W. 48th Street
Two bdrms., one bath, Sec-
tion 8 welcome, central air,
305-318-9760
1747 NW.40 Street
Two bdrms, one bath $750
Appliances. 305-642-7080
1812 NW 50 Street
Two bdrms, $875 monthly.
305-525-0619 305-331-3899.
2373 N.W. 61 Street Rear
Two bedrooms.
305-693-1017, 305-298-0388
2452 and 2464 NW 44 St
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$975; Three bedrooms, two
baths, $1050 monthly. Cen-
tral air, low down payment,
786-877-5358.
251 NE 77 Street
One bedroom, one bath, ap-
pliances. $650 monthly plus
security. 786-216-7533
2561 York Street
Three bdrms, two baths, air,
Section 8 only $1200 mthly,
$500 deposit. 786-955-3071
265 N.E. 58th Terrace
Huge three bedrooms, two
baths, all newl Central air,
Walk-in closets. $1275
monthly, 305-793-0002.
3047 NW 92 Street
Section 8 Onlyl One bed-
room, one bath, $625 month-
ly. 786-447-9457.
3047 NW 92 Street
Section 8 Onlyl One bed-
room, one bath, $650 month-
ly. 786-447-9457.
3623 NW 194 Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1250 monthly, Section 8
Welcome 305-761-5256
'414 NW 53 Street
BEST VALUE, gorgeous
remodeled two bdrms, spa-
cious, large totally fenced
yard, available now, $875.
305-772-8257
5420 NW 7 Court
One bedroom, one bath, in-
cludes electric, and water,
$650 monthly, 305-267-9449.
5509 N.W. Miami Court
One bdrm, one bath. Newly
renovated $650 mthly, first,
last, security. 305-751-6232
5511 NW 5 COURT
Two bdrms, one bath, all
appliances, air, security bars.
Senior discount. $800 mthly.
$600 security. 305-979-3509
after 5 pm
5631 SW Flllmore Street
Hollywood
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1100 monthly, first, and se-
curity. 786-370-0832.
7633 NW 2 Court
Move In Special $12001 Large
three bedrooms, two baths,
$895 monthly. 954-496-5530
7749 NW 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700 monthly, central air, all
appliances Included. Free
19 LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

8001 NW 11 Court
Unite 1 4
Spacious one bedroom, walk-
in closet, $700 monthly, in-
cludes water, $1000 to move
in, tile floors, all new appli-


1510 NE 154 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, den, air
condition units, tile floor. $850
monthly. 786-489-4225


8092 NW 5 COURT
Two bedrooms, two baths,
central air, free water, and
fenced yard. $800 monthly.
305-992-7503
928 NW 55 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath.
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080

ALLAPATTAH AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
tile, central air, $1,200. SEC-
TION 8 OKI 786-355-5665
Little River Area
Large three bedrooms, two
baths, or two bedrooms, one
bath. 305-627-3735.
MIAMI SHORES AREA
505 NW 96th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, all
new, central air, $925, call
305-793-0002
NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedrooms, central air.
Section 8 OKI 786-269-5643
Efficiencies
100 NW 14 Street
Newly renovated, private
bath and kitchen, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN). 24
hour security camera, $185
wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232
1490 NW 56 Street
Furnished, $450 monthly.
305-215-7891
1612 NW 51 Terrace
$550 moves you in. Utilities
included 786-389-1686.
3047 NW 92 Street
Section 8 Onlyl Extra large,
$500 monthly. 786-447-9457
4020 NW 1 AVENUE
Furnished, air, new applianc-
es. Utilities included. $550
monthly. 305-573-2493.
NORTHWEST AREA
Reduced Private entrance,
cable, air. Call 305-758-6013
OPA-LOCKA AREA
Move-In Speciall $375
monthly. Call 305-717-6084.
Furnished Rooms
13387 NW 30 Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486
1500 N.W. 183 Street
Water, cable and air, $140
wkly, $285 to move in. 786-
457-2998.
1527 NW 100 Street
Rooms for rent. $125 weekly,
air Included. 305-310-7463
16431 NW 17 Court
$120 weekly, $240 to move
in. Air and cable included.
305-310-5272
1775 NW 151 Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable, air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996
1823 NW 68 Terrace
Remodeled, utilities Included.
$500 mthly. 702-448-0148.
2010 NW 55th Terrace
Air, $130 weekly, cable, utili-
ties included, 786-487-2286
2373 NW 95 Street
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-915-6276, 305-691-3486
3290 NW 45 Street
Clean room, $375 monthly.
305-479-3632
5500 NW 5 Avenue
$85 wkly, free utilities, kitch-
en, bath, one person.
305-474-8186 305-691-3486
62 Street NW First Avenue
$450 monthly. $900 move in.
Call 305-989-8824
6601 NW 24 Court
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Rooms, central air, applianc-
es. $100 and $110 wkly.
954-588-6656
MIAMI AREA
Cable TV, utilities included,
$550 monthly. 305-687-1110
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Furnished room,
786-663-5641
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
786-277-3688.
NORTHWEST AREA
Clean Rooms, air Included.
305-917-5367
NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Rooms, with home privileges.
Prices range from $90 to
$125 weekly. 305-696-2451.
OPA LOCKA AREA
2170 Washington Avenue
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly.
786-277-3434,786-298-4383



10240 SW 171 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1345, appliances, central
air, ,fenced yard.
305-642-7080
13070 NW 16 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
tile, central air, carport. $1275
monthly. 305-662-5505
1490 NE 152 Street
Three bedrooms, one new
bath, tile, air, bars, $1150. No
Section 81 Terry Dellerson,
Realtor. 305-891-6776


rity deposit required.
305-944-5542


1580 NW 64 STREET
SECTION 8 WELCOME
Large three bedrooms,
two baths, $1395 monthly,
central air, garage. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

15925 NW 22 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
tile, central air $1250 monthly
305-662-5505
17225 NW 12 COURT
Three bedrooms, two baths
$1550 monthly Section 8 OK.
786-277-9378
1776 NW,53 STREET
One and two bedrooms, one
bath, $595 and $750 monthly.
Call 954-496-5530
1827 NW 43 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, air.
$850. mthly. 305-688-5002
1863 N.W. 91st Street
Beautiful one bedroom, total-
ly remodeled, all appliances.
$650 monthly, first and last to
move in. 305-746-4551.
1886 NW 85 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, tile, air, $1200, No Sec-
tion 81 Terry Dellerson, Real-
tor. 305-891-6776
20115 NW 9 Avenue
Three bdrms, two baths, cen-
tral air, Florida room, fenced.
Section 8 OKI $1600 mthly.
305-576-4025, 954-638-8842
2130 Wilmington Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 Accepted.
CALL Gigi 786-356-0487 or
Lo 786-356-0486
2140 NW 96 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
tile, central air. $1275 month-
ly. 305-662-5505 ,
221 NW 82 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath, in-
cludes water, $850 monthly.
305-267-9449
2530 NW 162 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, tile, air,
$900 mthly, 786-230-0257.
2770 NW 194 Terrace
Section 8 OKI Three bdrms,
one and a half baths, cen-
tral air, fresh paint. $1395 a
month. Call Joe
954-849-6793
2820 NW 1 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath, $850
monthly. Free water.
All appliances Included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV Call
Joel 786-355-7578

2950 NW 49 Street '
Three bedrooms, Section 8
OK. 305-693-1017
305-298-0388
3501 NW 9 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$995, stove, refrigerator, free
water. 305-642-7080
3809 NW 213 Terrace
Lovely three bedrooms, two
baths. Fenced yard, tile floor-
ing, central air, close to shop-
ping, churches, at Broward/
Dade border.
Call 954-243-6606
3833 NW 209 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1150, appliances.
305-642-7080
3879 NW 207 Street Rd.
Four bdrms, two baths, cen-
tral ,air and heat. Section 8
OK. Terry 305-965-1186.
504 N.W. 58th Street
One bdrm, one bath, appli-
ances, air, bars, fenced yard.
Call 305-625-8909.
55 NW 83rd Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
fenced yard, and central air.
Section 8 preferred. Call Mr.
Coats at 305-345-7833.
901 NW 49th Street
Three bedrooms, two and
half baths, $1500 monthly,
first, last and $1,000 deposit.
Call 786-541-5234
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Spacious four bdrms, two
baths, living room furniture,
plasma TV included. Section
8 Welcome Others available.
305-834-4440
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
all appliances, tile through-
out, large fenced yard. $1,300
monthly. 305-620-4569
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tiled, fenced
yard. Section 8 OKI $1350
monthly. 786-360-1574
NORTHWEST
MIAMI DADE
Two or Three bdrms. Section
8 OK. Call Dre 786-303-5013.
NORTHWEST 51 TERRACE
Completed renovated three
bedrooms, Section 8 house.
Laundry, central air, wood
floors. Everything new. Ready
to move in. 561-727-0974 or
305-905-2020
STOPIII
Behind in Your Rent? 24
Hour notice. Behind in Your
Mortgage? 786-326-7916.


7000 NW 21 Avenue
Clean rooms, air, $395 a
month. Move in August 1st.
786-953-8935
755 NW 129 STREET
Three rooms available. Secu-


PROOFREADER
Retired English teacher
or a person that has the
skills necessary for cor-
recting spelling grammar.
Email kmcneir@miami-
timesonline.com or call
305-694-6216.

ROUTE DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only
You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street


BE A SECURITY OFFICER
24, 40 hours renew G. Con-
cealed $100. Traffic School
$35, first time driver.
786-333-2084
HOW TO PERFORM
AN EXORCISM
$100 per Seat. August 29th,
Call 786-306-4186



Excellent Credit
Builds Wealth
Improve your credit score for
$70 start up fee $49 a month.
Call for details
786-587-4332
GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14130 N.W.
22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.


HAWKERS Call or write 229-888-7144 Rev. Doc Brown
WANTED P.O. Box 50964 Albany GA, 31705
Looking for individuals to
sell newspapers at major Ad anlced Gyn Clilic
intersections.305-694-6214. -Prolessaonal, Sale & Confidential Services


-MEDICAL BIL Termination Up to 22 Weeks
MEDICAL BILLING, Individual Counseling 'Services
Trainees and nue Board Certified 0B GYN's
Hospitals and insurance mplete GYN Services
Companies now hiring. No Complete GYN Services


experience neeoeal Local
Job Training and Job Place-
ment Assistance available
1-888-219-5161


ABORTION START $180 AND UP

,a,,621-1399


Project MCC-R-088-A
MIA-Concourse "F" Painting & Stucco Repair &
Miscellaneous Repairs

Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for this project at Miami-Dade Avia-
tion Department.

This project consists of priming and painting exterior of Conc. "F" to include
pressure cleaning and stucco repairs. Package bidding: Pkg. "A" Painting
(CSBE).

Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Tuesday, August 30, 2011 @ 10:30AM
Bids Due: Thursday, September 8, 2011 @ 2:00PM
Pre-Bid Location: 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor, Conf. Room "F".

For more information, call Ginny Mirabal or J. Caballero @ 305-876-8444.


Project MCC-P-018-A
MIA-Concourse "E" Painting & Stucco Repair &
Miscellaneous Repairs

Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for this project at Miami-Dade Avia-
tion Department.

This project consists of priming and painting exterior of Conc. "E" to include
pressure cleaning and stucco repairs. Packages bidding are: Pkg. "A" General
Conditioning (bollards & h/m doors & frames) (CSBE), and Pkg. "B" Painting
(CSBE).

Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Tuesday, August 30, 2011 @ 10:00AM
Bids Due: Thursday, September 8, 2011 @ 2:00PM
Pre-Bid Location: 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor, Conf. Room "F".

For more information, call Ginny Mirabal or J. Caballero @ 305-876-8444.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOSAL

Sealed proposals will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office lo-
cated at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


RFP NO. 272271


ADVERTISEMENT PROGRAM AND
ADVERTISEMENT SALES SUPPORT SERVICES


CLOSING DATEITIME: 1:00 P.M., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011

Detailed specifications for this RFP are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1906.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271

AD NO. 15543 Johnny Martinez, P.E.
City Manager


Houses
4915 NW 182 Street
Four bedrooms, three baths,
$1400 monthly. First and last.
Month to month lease. 305-
600-8603
ARCOLA GARDENS AREA
810 NW 84th Terrace
Large three bedrooms, two
baths, newly renovated.
$125,000. Owner/broker
305-793-0002
*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
***WITH"**
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty


NEED A CAR
August is automobile acqui-
sition month, give away 50
people $100, $2 a person.
305-652-1132



ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Full-time Administrative As-
sistant / Office Managerfor
fast-paced private research
and technical assistance
firm any years experience
with proficiency in Microsoft
Office Suite 2007, excellent
phone and communication
skills required. Must have
strong organizational/pro-
fessional skills. Competitive
salary with great benefits.
Send resume and cover let-
ter e-mail ben.byers001 @
gmall.com for more info. .


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The Georgia

Witch Doctor

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"Powerful Magic"
I Remove evil spells, court and Jail cases return mate
Sex spirit & love spirit. Are you lonely? Order potion now.

















BACK, MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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