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H~ow should we tackle violence m our own commumity .


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWVN DESTINY I


-IB REGINAU)J. CLYNE, ESQJ., MIAMI TIMES COLUMNIST, ric~clynelegal.com


of housing
gated to certain -areas of town.
It was in these "Negro" sections
of town wherC industrial plants
were similarly housed that
tvere considered too smelly, too
dangerous and just too nasty
to be placed in the more afflu-
ent white neighborhoods.


incinerators. The result is that
there are toxins in the water,
soil and air that collectively
cause all sorts of illnesses. I
have fought cases on behalf
of Blacks with arsenic in their
drinking well water from in-
dustrial run-off in Polk Coun-
ty and on behalf of Blacks suf-
fering from the impact of toxic
dust in Dania Beach. Now wre
are preparing for a new battle
-hsO tmeaover lead poison-
Some of you from the young-
er generation may be con-
vinced that racism is over but
as situations unfold at both
Olinda Park and now the An-
nie Coleman Public Housing
Development, it's clear that
Blacks still face subtle yet
deadly forms of discrimina-
tion.


nation. We won that battle
after eight years of litigation
during which time the City
spent over $10 million fighting
its own employees who simply
wanted a fair and impartial
work environment.
McCoy shared with me that


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First, organize a voting block
that consists of grassroots
community activists, labor
leaders and Bcademics as well
as a cadre of entrepreneurs,
lawyers, builders, bank-
ers and executives. Second,
identify a viable candidate
that espouses our values.
Third, raise money for their
campaign. Fourth, register
our folks to vote. Fifth, vote
Sixth, repeat -the process for
every election at every level of
government. Finally, we must
demand sincere representa-
tion to fight fire with fire. We
need to elect candidates that
will join forces with others
for our interest and stay the
course.
The Tea Party is a constant
reminder that it only takes a
determined handful to influ-
ence the big picture.


in many more aspects of the
social, educational and eco-
nomic opportunities available
in the U.S. what's! next?
I say the ingredients for the
next civil rights' movement
are now upon us and it is a
fight for our economic civil
rights that should be at the


ed indicators effecting Black
poverty is that Black fami-
lies are largely concentrated
in urban metropolitan areas,
where the cost of living is
much higher when compared
to rural areas. When one fac-
tors in family size, number
of children, age,. education,


Does anyone realize that
government is one of the last
vestiges of opportunity for ev-
eryday Blacks to gain full ac-
cess to the American dream
since the now-defunct poli-
cies of Affirmative Action? As
the Republicari Party and its
hyper-ego membership, aka
the Tea Party, seek to cut the
deficit by reducing govern-
ment spending, the result is
a decline in employment op-
portunities.
Lost job options will no
doubt disproportionately im-
pact Blacks, both nationally
and locally. This comes on
the heals of one of the worst
and most depressed econo-
mies in the last 30 years. But
for Blacks this state of affairs
is' nothing new. Blacks have
always been disproportion-
ately underemployed and un-
exhployed in this country. The
question remains, now that
we have achieved a level of
social integration. that on its
face allows us to participate


top~ of the Black agenda and
our list of priorities. Today,
the two-fold nemesis of pov-
erty and unemployment are
tearing at the very fabric of
the Black family.
In Miami-Dade _County
the unemployment rate for
Blacks, depending on wvho
you ask, stands between 16
and 18 percent -- in certain
Black enclaves it is noted to
be as high as 25 percent.
Moreover, one of the most-cit-


lower-than-average median
income and the dispropor-
tionate number of female-led
households, then we have
an all-out crisis in the Black
community.
What is the solution? We
need only look to the Tea
Party for a viable game plan,


son's hard work and diligence
is paying off. As a single moth-
er of two sons and grandmoth-
er of six, she has had to face
and overcome many obstacles
throughout her lifetime and
to see the result of h~er son's
dreams come to pass should
encourage many others to fol-
low their dreams. So thank you
again for your article and con-
tinued support.

Sylvia McCain
Miami


Dear Editor,

I just had the pleasure of
reading your article about
this wonderful movie, entitled
Baghdad. I wanted to let you
know that I totally concur and
am delighted that you took the
time to write such a positive
comment and endorsement. I
was in attendance at the mov-
ie, seated next to Mr. Ballards'
mom, Carolyn, and nothing
could express the delight and
pride she felt knowing that her


Dear Editor,


The University, along with the
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture and several grant sources
provide sixty percent of the
funding for the program. The
annual economic and social
benefit returns to Miami-Dade
County residents is approxi-
mately $47 million. The effec-
tive paid-in costs for Miami-
Dade residents is $0.29 per
resident/per year.
Some of the programs pro-
vided to the community ajre
nutrition education, financial
management, first-time home-
buyer education, youth detrel-
opment (4-H1) and agriculture
education and development.
To get a complete profile of the
programs and services offered,
go to miami-dade.ifas.ufl.edu.
Residents should write, fax,
or e-mail (www.miamidade.
gov/commissioners), a mem-
ber of the County Commission
and request that these valu-
able programs be restored to
the 2011-2012 Miami-Dade
County budget.

Gloria Humes
SMiami Gardens


The Miami-Dade Board of
County Commissioners will
have to make some hard de-
cisions as to which programs
will be- returned to the 2011-
2012 County budget, after
they were eliminated in the
Mayor's proposed budget.
One of the criteria the Com-
missioners should use to eval-
uate which program to return
to the budget is whether a pro-
gram provides maximum ben-
efits for the dollars expended.
Many of the programs slat-
ed to be cut or eliminated are
"under the *radar" programs.
They don't have the marquee
profile of the police or fire de-
partments. They simply get the
job done, day in and day out.
The Consumer Services/
Miami-Dade Cooperative Ex-
tension Service offers an array
"under the radar" programs
that hundreds of Miamni-Dade
residents partake of daily. The
program is a partnership be-
tween the University of Florida
and Miami-Dade County and
has been around for decades.


JERMAINE MOSES, 29
Entrepreneur, Hollywood


leadership in our communities.
I know that we say that they
are here, but they are not vis-
ible in our community.

JERMONE ROBERTS, 60
Carpenter, Liberty City


EDWARD TYLER, 52
Electrician, Pembroke Pines

We need to
have more ~' 1
communi -
ty7 projects
for -the kids
and youth, it
would really
help them out.

VIOLA WILLIAMS, 82
Retired, Liberty City

We have
to go back
to where we
came from.
People use to
send there
children to
church and
taught them
about God


and reverence for life, you don't
hear things like that anymore.

CRYSTAL THOMAS, 54
SUnemployed, Little Haiti

I feel the ,t
community
needs come
together and
be more uni-
fied like how it I ; a,
use to be back
in the day.
Neighbors use
to help look out for all the kids.
That is the type of community
wie need to be again,
" ... Ifor one believe that if you give
people a thorough understanding of
what confronts then and the basic
causes that produce it, they'll create
their own program, and when the peo-
ple create a program, you get action .. ."
Malcolm X


I ~




P-


ber one. If you
start working -
D, 53 towards the .
amti Beach youngsters .
quicker then
things will change. There are
the ones that need it, we all
Need it really, but if we give
them something to do after-
school and not just wait until
summer I think violence will
kind of slow down.


We need to
have more
community
gathering s,
like the Tea
Party. We just
need to have a
lot more com-
munity gath-
erings.

GOLLAR STEEI
Teacher, North Mi

I think one
issue we need
to possibly ad-
dress is the
education of
Our people. We
need to have
more Black


SThe best
thing to do is
get them jobs
that is num-


5 A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Lo CAL


CORNER


The le ac
We are all familiar with
some of the well-known lega-
cies of discrimination, such
as inadequate housing, weak
educational opportunities,
fewer jobs, barriers to ca-
reer advancement and higher
rates of and opportunities for
crime. What many do not real-
ize, however, is racism's legacy
towards issues of health. I am
not talking merely about the
lakofeacceisshto quality mlea 1
infant mortality ratios being
higher than some Third World
countries. Nor am I discussing
higher rates of hepatitis, dia-
betes and heart attacks.
What I am addressing is
an insidious foe that many of
know almost nothing about -
the legacy of housing discrimi-
nation when Blacks were rele-


discrimination


CCoy shared with me that Blacks were dying at higher
rates than any .other ethnic group, sometimes 200
PVtimes higher due to pollution. I subsequently learned
that many Black neighborhoods are home to trash dumps, sewer
plants, waste treatment' plants and incineratorS.

I learned of this discrimi- Blacks were dying at higher
natory practice from Leola rates than any other ethnic
McCoy, a Ft. Lauderdale civil group, sometimes 200 times
rights activist that helped me higher due to pollution. I sub-
when my firm represented 43 sequently learned that many
Black employees who were su- Black neighborhoods are home
ing the City of Ft. Lauderdale to trash dumps, sewer plants,
for race and gender discrimi- waste treatment plants and


Blacks should steal a page from Tea Part
y playbook


---- -um


determined handful to influence the big picture.


Great review on "CBaghdad' moviie


Residents should be

involved with County budget





__ __~~ _r_ _1_~___1__ ~___I_ I_


_ I __I ~ ^I I_ ~ __~___I_~ ~ ~I~ _____~~______~_~_~_I_ II


B

By Christina Rexrode
Associated Press

MAPLAT, Haiti I went to Hai-
ti last year after the earthquake,
driven by an excited but vague no-
tion of doing some good in a hurt-
ing country.
I went again this year with my
eyes open a little wider, not jaded
exactly but aware of why some peo-
ple view these volunteer trips with
justified skepticism.
Haiti is the poorest country in
the Western Hemisphere, a place
where sewage runs down the
streets of the capital and children
die because they don't have clean
water. It is in desperate need of
helpers. Still, I sometimes roll my
eyes when Americans visit for a
week and come home declaring
that their lives have been changed,
as if they were not going to happily
resettle into their comfy routines.
My editor asked me if these trips
are just a way for rich people to
lessen their collective guilt, and I
think that sometimes they are.
But I was impressed by the group
that I traveled with, a small non-
profit called Farsight Christian
Mission. Levern Halstead, who
runs Farsight from his home out-
side Chattanooga, Tennessee, says
again and again that his trips must
have an objectively measurable re-
sult a new building, a new bridge,
a new well.

MUST HAVE A PLAN
He grows frustrated by volunteer
groups that come with good inten-
tions but no plan. It's a sentiment
echoed by others I talk to in Haiti,
both Haitian community leaders
and long-term aid workers from
the U.S.
They don't want to discourage
people from helping. But they're
dismayed by the aid groups that
bring what they think Haiti needs
instead of asking what's needed,
which is how bags of donated high
heels end up in villages where
people trek through forests. Or'the
groups that want to play games


Nepalese Peacekeepers prepared a hot meal and provided
medical care for Haitians affected by quake .


he isn't sure how old he is, but he
thinks he's 61.
Louime cares for a congrega-
tion that mostly lives in cornstalk
huts and rarely has enough to eat.
But he doesn't particularly want
a truck to speed by throwing out
food and clothing, as happened af-
ter Hurricane Noel in 2007. Then,
a few people will grab as much as
they can and sell it later, and ev-
eryone else will get nothing, Loui-
me and others said.
His wish, he says through a
translator, is for an agronomist to
help his village learn how to better
use the clay-ridden land, and may-
be someone who will start a micro-
finance program so that people can
start businesses,
In other words, people who will
take the time to teach skills, not
just make themselves feel better by
giving away stuff they didn't want
anyway.
"We'll go into a new community
and the kids, all the English they
know is, 'Give me a dollar, give
me a cookie,'" said Clayton Bell, a
28-year-old doctor from El Paso,
Arkansas, who works at the Cloud
Forest Medical Clinic in Seg'uin.
"It's not their fault. But we have
to retrain them, `Okay, if you want
that, you can help me work, you
can help me clean the clinic."'"

TEACHERS PAY IN JEOPARDY
Next door, Chrisnet Excellus
walks through the school where
he is principal and worries that he
won't be able to pay his teachers.
He has more than 400 students at


Ecole Chretienne Emmanuel, who
sit five to a bench in a concrete
building without running water.
Tuition is about $15 a year, but a
third of the families can't afford
it. Excellus lets the children come
anyway.
Excellus, 40, is married and the
father of four girls. He has kind
eyes. On a chilly day, he wears a
Winn-Dixie windbreaker.
I ask him what he needs for his
school, and he needs everything,
even pens and paper. I ask him
what he wants for Haiti and he
says, "Complete change."
I am not naive. I know that a
couple of buildings in Maplat will
not fix Haiti's problems. I know
that radical changes are needed,
'like good roads, clean government,
renewed industry, replenished
topsoil, and I cannot bring them
about.
But that doesn't mean that we
can't work for small victories.
At the end of the week I come
home to New York, a city I love. I
walk my favorite streets, hug my
friends, enjoy hot showers.
But all I can think about are
the dusty, barefoot children who
grabbed my hands and grinned at
me. And Jocelin, a Seguin teenag-
er who wants to be a doctor "be-
cause that's what Haiti needs."
Tony, a student who dearly wishes
to buy some books for the children
in Maplat. Benitho, a debonair
20-year-old who gets serioils when
I ask him what he wants for his
country: "If I ca'n go anywhere to
find help," he says, "I will."


-Photo Marco Dormino
Daily workers employed by the Haitian Government remove rubble from the street in the area of
Delmas. UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti is working in cooperation'with international and national
agencies in order to clear roads that are been blocked by piles of rubble around Port au Prince.


with children but won't haul
around plywood, as if they could be
better teachers than someone who
actually speaks Creole. Or the vol-
unteers who won't bother to learn
and respect the local culture.
i'Some groups, you can tell, they
just want to make their Facebook
page really nice," says Nego Pierre
Louis, a 24-yeai--old Haitian who
founded a community service
group called the Bezalel Move-
ment. He saw a flood of donated
medical supplies come to one aid
group in Jacmel, the coastal town
where he lives, after the January
2010 earthquake. And, he says,
he saw much of it get thrown away
because it expired while the group
hoarded it, not sharing with other
relief organizations.
Still, there are good things to be
done in Haiti. I was with Halstead
last fall when he spoke to villagers
from Seguin, in the mountains,


about an idea where he'd buy 30
sheep for 30 families. The program
would be self-sustaining, with fam-
ilies giving back every other lamb
until everyone had a few animals.

LISTEN TO THE PEOPLE
The villagers told him they'd pre-
fer that 15 families get two sheep
each, because sheep get mopey
when they're alone. Halstead
changed his plans immediately.
After the earthquake, he raised
money for Pierre Louis to buy veg-
etable seeds to take to another
mountain village, Maplat, where
people were starving as food do-
nations got gridlocked in Port-au-
Prince. The villagers in Maplat
doubled their food supply.
"And it's not rice and beans with
an American flag on the side," adds
Halstead, 59. He's been coming to ~
Haiti for more than 14 years, ever
since he walked away from a car-eer


in computer programming.
My team spends the week in that
same village, Maplat, which is re-
ally just a handful of buildings on
the side of a treacherous dirt road.
We help the villagers build a couple
of one-room wooden houses with
tin roofs nothing fancy, but they'll
be useful for visiting doctors and
other aid workers.
I have no particular skills in
construction or any vocation that
would be especially~ useful to Hai-
ti, like medicine or agriculture.
But I can hammer a nail and lug
around lumber, and that's good
'enough when you've got a leader
who knows how to plug cogs like
me into a machine.
Maplat's village pastor, Louis-
saint Louime, is a smiling man
with whitening hair. Like most of
the men, he's up every morning be-
fore dawn waiting to help build the
houses. Like a lot of rural Haitians,


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4A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011 j


VOLUNTEERING IN HAITI?



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Gates explores Black culture in Latin America


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


trade in six Caribbean and
Latin Ame:-ican countries.
"Black in Latin America" is
the book companion to the
television Series of the same
title.
The reason for Gates' jour-
ney is a startling fact: Of the
roughly 11 million Africans
who survived the trans-Atlan-


tic slave trade, just 450,000
made it to the United States.
The rest were dispersed
throughout the region and
Gates, renowned for his Afri-
can-American studies, want-
ed to know how their descen-
dants live now. '
More than an outline of the
research featured in the se-


ries, Gates' book is a thought-
ful travelogue through Mexico,
Peru, Cuba, Haiti, the Domin-
ican Republic and Brazil.
It explores Black history in
these six countries, which
Gates visited in 2010, but
it doesn't linger in the past.
Through music, cuisine, art,
dance, politics, religion and


language, Gates finds living
links to Africa. He also finds
the other legacy of the slave
trade, a sometimes subtle
but persistent racism despite
pledges of multiculturalism.
Gates' academic questions
about race stem from conver-
sations in cafes, hotels, mu-
seums, street parties, night-


clubs, taxi cabs the casual
places where anyone goes on
vacation. "Black in- Latin
America" would be an in-
teresting companion to any
guidebook for the Caribbean
and Latin America, as it re-
veals not just a hidden history
but also an evolving sense of
identity.


By Jennifer KaV
Associated Press

~'Black in Latin America"
(NYU Press), by Henry Louis
Gates, Jr.: This spring, Hen-
ry Louis Gates, Jr. produced
a four-episode series for PBS
tracing the legacy of the slave


-AP Photo/NYU Press
In this book cover image re-
leased by NYU Press, "Black
in Latin America," by Henry
Louis Gates, Jr., is shown.



Reinventing

swVImweVar

for women
(NewsUSA) - Sunglasses:
Check.
Sunblock: Check.
Swimsuit: Uh-oh!
The sun is out, and the surf
is up, but women everywhere
can be found in front of full-
length mirrors facing an age-
old dilemma, thinking: "What.
swimsuit can I possibly pull
off with my body type?"
The bathing stixit hunt is
nothing less than discour-
aging. When met with most
store's racks crammed with
handkerchief-size designs
with bottoms that slip down
and tops that ride up, women
truly get the short end of the
stick when it comes to summer
swimwear.
That is, until now. Launched
in 2009, Ohio-based designer
Debbie Kuhn is bursting onto
the market with a new concept
that is a twist and a blend of
the tried and true: Girltrunks.
Kuhn designed the two-piece
suits because the traditional
swimsuit market offered noth-
ing that covered the legs.
After accepting an invita-
tioil for a summer holiday in
Montana that was to include
tubing down the Madison,
Kuhn found herself in a fu-
tile search in many a store for
an apprdpriate outfit for the
river excursion when she was
struck with the perfect solu-
tion: "Why don't I pair a tan-
kini top with swim trunks?"
She did just that. "It was a day
in time I remember vividly. I
felt so liberated, in swimwear
of all things, and I wanted to
share' that feeling with other
women."
The trunks fit like finely tai-
lored Bermuda shorts and are
available in two leg-covering
lengths. They are made of a
quick-drying polyamide fab-
ric with mesh lining that dries
almost instantly, unlike many
traditional women's bathing
suits. To complete the look,
two top styles are offered in
chic prints. All are available in
sizes four-24.
Like the slogan "Reinvent-
ing swimwear for women,"
Gilrtrunks delivers a sense of
confidence women so desper-
ately lack during bathing suit
season. But the suits don't
just flatter they're versatile,
too. Swimming, visiting water
parks, biking, hiking, jogging
or just simply strolling the
beach, Girltrunks lend them-
selves perfectly to any activity.
Short to tall, skinny to plus-
sized, apple to pear, teen-
ager to grandmother; women
no longer are forced to be
swathed in the excess of a
cover up. Comfortable, stylish
and taking in the joys of sum-


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S5A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011





~E~r~f~a~


New Or eans officers convicted in killings

Four could face hife sentences in -1 '

deaths of two after Katrina


MONITORING
continued from 1A

staff and community members
joined together in solidarity to
sho the ""uort of keeping
"Our schools belong to our
community," Bendross-Mind-
ingall said. "The school board
and district staff have used
our diverse experiences and
talents to improve community
participation in our schools."
The measure that was. ap-


CLYNE


Clyne & Associales, PA serves clients throughout South Florlda, Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties, as well as Central Florida The hiring of a lawyer is an Important decision
general information only. The information presented should not be construed to be formal legal advice or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship.


Buic s Musr CONTROL THEIR OWiN DESTINY


Teen charged in connection with deadly shooting
Miami Gardens Police have identified the teen taken into custody in connection.
with the shooting deaths of a young couple in a gas station robbery in Miami .
Gardens.
Eric Ellington, 16, was arrested last Tuesday at his aunt's house in Hollywood.
Ellington faces two counts of second degree murder in the deaths of Julian Soler,
23, and Kennia Duran, 24.
"We know he was one of the Shooters," said Miami Gardens Police Sgt. Bill
Bamford.
On Monday, July 25th, Soler and Duran were both shot to death while gassing.
up Soler's 1997 Ford Maistang Cobra at 16691 NW 57th Ave. It was around 12;38
a.m. when they were ambushed, forced out of the car and shot. The shooting was
captured on surveillance video from the gas station.
.Police said they are searching for three, possibly four, subjects.
Anyone with Information on tais crime is asked to contact Crime Stoppers at:
305-471-TIPS.

Miami Edison treasurer fraudulently wrote herself, police say
A treasurer at Miami Edlson Senior High Is behind bars after police say that for
the past five months, she fraudulently wrote herself checks and then tampered
those checks to make It seem as though the payments were made to legitimate
school vendors.
Police say Llsa Bradley, 41, wrote herself 14 checks each one more than $500
a piece totaling 514,332.44 from August 2010 to January 2011.
She would then take the checks to her own personal bank account and deposit
them there, police said.
Once the checks were returned to the school at 2521 NW 87th St. as part of the
bank's monthly statement, Bradley would allegedly use white-out to remove her
name from the check and replace It with a legitimate school vendor.
Police say she confessed to the crime saying she had financial hardship.
Last Wednesday, she appeared before a bond court judge and was ordered held
on $15,000 bond.

Bond set for accused FIU student stabber
The man accused of stabbing Florida International University football player
Kendall Berry to death will be released on bond and remain on house arrest while
he awaits trial, a Miaml-Dade judge ruled recently.
Quentin Wyche, 22, allegedly stabbed Berry to death on FIU's marn campus In
March 2010 with a pair of scissors.
Judge Mllton Hlrsch warned Wyche that he had to follow all the conditions and,
once he posts bond, will only be allowed to go to the doctor or church on Sunday. He
also warned him against contacting anyone on the witness Ilst
"Otherwise I will put you under the fail," Hlrsch told Wyche.
Defense attorney David Peckins said Wyche will i~ve with his mother and father
in Fort Lauderdale.

North Miami shooting turns into murder investigation
Police are Investigating the death of a South Florida man who climbed onto the
root of a North Miami home after he was shot.
According to North Miami police,.tne unidentified man In his 30s came was
visiting a home at 1210 Northwest 121st Street when he was chased by two men
and shot in the stomach. The man climbed onto the roof of the home to escape the
gunmen. When Miaml-Dade Fire Rescue arrived they rushed him to an air rescue
helicopter which took him to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center.
North Miami police spokesman Nreal Cuevas said police don't have much
information at this time.
"At this point, we don't know what led to the shooting. We do know that the two
individuals that are alleged to have shot the victim fled from this location In a grey
Ford Taurus," said Cuevas.
Neighbors are stunned about the shooting,
"I have no Idea," said Willie Knight. "I was in my house but I've been around'
. .h~netapi2ppTearrat we don'tftidtm'W an y prtdblems at~~~rcM~rF '1 w
90 krQPiatribbrling abolit this shooting, the victim or suspects, please chlH 7
Migiim bade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS.


Board helps troubled schools succeed


Applying plenty of resdnience to your life
BV Arthur Lee Hall, Jr. with his bare hands over my days spent here on 'sheer deter
gambling money. Like Earth. happiness
Resilience. What does that Malcolm, King did some- Paying close atten- that I regal
word mean to you? And how thing constructive with tion to other people who tion and re
could you apply it to your per- his time, honing his have gone through the see me be
sonal life? skills as a boxing pro- fire and have managed catch me (
When Malcolm Little was sent moter by arranging or- to emerge victoriously next time I
to prison for white slavei-y, he ganized boxing matches --in the end is a perfect her telling
spent the seven years of his while in prison. When he HALL source of inspiration to engaging


and continuing to attend exer-
cise class. But what I really re-
spect the most about my mother
is the fact that she has not al-
lowed herself to be defined by a
bleak period in time. Instead,
she has chosen to use that ex-
perience as a way to build char-
acter, ultimately becoming a
much stronger persori.
And that's what reaching
comeback kid status is all
about. Not so much in achieving
something enormously remark-
able subsequent to a tragedy,
setback or downfall -- but in
simply being able to find peace
and tranquility within your-
self and having the audacity to
move on gracefully.


rmination to attain
are things about her
rd with high admira-
:spect. If you want to
am with pride, just
on the telephone the
Scall home and hear
me about how she is
in church activities


incarceration reading books
and educating himself. After
embracing the teachings of
the Nation of Islam during his
time of reformity, Malcolm Little
changed his name to Malcolm
X and upon his release from
prison, he later became one of
the greatest civil rights activ-
ist of his era. Today, schools,
streets and recreational parks
are named after him and icon-
ic images of the Black Muslim
leader can be found almost ev-
erywhere, from a t-shirt wear-
ing young person to a mural on
the wall of an inner city build-
ing.
Don King also spent time in
the joint -- but for killing a man


was finally set free, he went on
to become the greatest boxing
promoter in the history of box-
ing and the first to ever promote
a fight that allowed both fight-
ers to earn one million dollars.
Successfully bouncing back
from a troubled past is some-
thing that I too certainly in-
tend on doing. After spending
a considerable amount of years
in prison, the story of my life
beyond criminal records must
somehow be written in a to-
tally different light. I do realize
that now is the time for me to
start setting into motion a rea-
son for a'positive account of my
life story to be added, yet divide
from other gloomy chapters of


draw from.
Strength can certainly be
drawn from the most adverse,
sometimes tragic circumstanc-
es of those who were able to
move forward and even achieve
greatness in spite of having
been faced with the adversi-
ties of life. Undoubtedly, there
is hope in knowing that if oth-
ers can find the drive to recover
from a set back -- so can you.
My dear mother, in my opin-
ion, is the epitome of what mak-
ing a comeback means with just
the simple smile she is able to
put on her face after being a
victim of domestic violence for
14 years. Her burning desire
to become a school teacher and


(Reuters) A federal jury
found four New Orleans police
officers guilty last Friday of
civil rights violations over the
shooting deaths of civilians in
the chaotic aftermath of Hurri-
cane Katrina and a subsequent
cover-up.
But the jury stopped short of
calling the shootings murder,
declining to classify them as
intentional. A fifth officer was
also convicted of helping the
Others cover up the incident.
The charges were linked to
the New Orleans police shoot-
ings on the Danziger Bridge in
2005 that killed two civilians,
17-year-old James Brissette
and 40-year-old Ronald Madi-
stit;"'iidd'u Strit~rhty'"wdattided
four others.
"Today's verdict sends a pow-
erful, unmistakable message,"
U.S. Attorney Jim Letten told
reporters outside the court-
house.
"The citizens of this country
will not, should not, and we in-
tend that they will ever have


to fear the individuals who are -"
called upon to protect them." ._
The officers had faced up to ; .
25 counts each for their role in.-,
the September 4, 2005, shoot-
ings that happened when much .
of New Orleans was still under-
water following the hurricane.
The decision means the jury
saw the deaths of Madison and
Brissette as resulting from po-
lice willfully violating their civil
rights, but that police did not
arrive at the scene with mur-
derous intent.
Officers Robert Faulcon, Ken-
neth Bowen, Robert Gisevius .
and Anthony Villavaso were -AP photo/Alex Brandon
found guilty of depriving citi- Sgt. Robert Gisevius, Jr., second from left, hugs a fellow officer
zens of their rights in relation
to-zltelhenFrisetater~iiste and ~ ~~seven o~thr Jiew Oricans top;.tumegddb~emse 1vegi n.
the shooting of four others, as' Jan. 2, 2007 in connection with, deadly shootings post-K~atrina.
well as using firearms in the
deprivation of those rights. a subsequent cover-up, includ- on 10 counts related to the
Faulcon was also found guilty ing conspiracy to obstruct jus- cover-up, including conspiracy,
of violating civil rights and use tice and violate civil rights, and obstruction of justice, fabricat-
of a firearm in the killing of false prosecution. ing witnesses, falsifying victim
Madison. The fifth officer, retired ho- statements, misleading federal
The men were also convicted micide detective Arthur "Ar- investigators and falsifyin-g evi-
of various charges connected to chie" Kaufman, was convicted dence.


proved is intended to create a
wider space of reviewing, mon-
itoring and regular reporting
of school progress. Spetifical-
ly, the measure ensures that

plns for mp erenm shools r
user-friendly, expands parent
and community awareness
of task force meetings and
provides for monthly report-
ing .to the school board on
the progress of improvement
plans for intervene schools.
--Compiled by Randy Grice,


of issues they are facing." said
Julia Daniel, Power U youth co-
ordinator.
Annie Thomas, 16, a student at
North Miami Senior High, says
some of her friends have been
suspended for being late, not
wearing the proper uniform and
talking back in class. She be-
lieves that restorative justice will
assist her peers when an incident
occurs so instead of them getting


M-DCPS finds alternative measures of


])HRIilHmelt illrOugh TestOYRtlVB Ue jutc
By Jimmie Davis, Jr. achieving by the Florida Depart- from just adults to incorporat- suspended or kicked out of school
Miami Times writer ment of Education. Students ing students as well," said Niko- they will have the chance to sit
and educators are assisted with lai P. Vitti, M-DCPS assistant down and iron out their prob-
It may be simple for adminis- specialized forms of intervention superintendent. "It will change lems. --gemjuledavis81l@yahoo.com
trators at Miami-Dade County and programs that promote aca-, the culture of how we think
Public Schools (M-DCPS) to demic ~enrichment]. through student behavior and
suspend and expel students for In particular, Black and La- discipline."
misconduct, buit the underlying tino students are being expelled "Restorative justice is impor-
issue of why pupils misbehave is at a higher rate than whites, tant because through the pro-
often more complex and not eas- leaving them more vulnerable to cess youth develop the skills
ily resolved. getting into trouble while on the they need to resolve their con-
Now instead of rushing to streets and away from the order flicts and look at the root causes a


ruin a child's academic career,
the Educational Transformation
Office (ETO) has embraced re-
storative justice at some of the
"Rising 19" schools to address
the root problems as to why stu-
dents misbehave.
[Rising 19 schools, totaling
six elementary, three middle
and 10 senior high schools, are
supported by the ETO and are
identified as persistently lowest-


of the classroom.
Restorative justice is the al-
ternative to zero-tolerance poli-
cies that constitute suspension
or expulsion and gives students
the opportunity to bring their is-
sues to the table for mediation.
"Restorative justice allows
students to take ownership of
positive behavior by shifting the
responsibility of creating a dif-
ferent culture in schools away


d car/Truck Accidents
d Catastrophic injuries
L.E Criminal

SEmployment Discrimination
dMedical Malpractice
SPremises Liability
a Probate
caToric tort
L.El Vacation Injuries
ca Wrongful Death


Ph No.: 305-446-3244
Fax No.: 305-446-3538


Email: firm@clynelegal.com
WJ(ebsite: www.clynelegal.com

Serving your legal needs since 1995
Reginald J. Clyne, Esq.


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


I~ RI SO3N


MP


ATTORNEYS AT LAW
814 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Suite 210
Coral Gables, Florida 33134



















Best time for Blacks and M~iami's moversr"


)cr 3~


ESTIMATED NEFI(H.I:.V INFE~iCTIQNS
'In Ihousandli, by:behavior and rape '
2000 -8 02 4: 6 8
r ',
- ep- go,3ppor
.gypr wh~p h~ave. plack
.sex with ien 'pynific
Men under 30
who have sex
with men

Homosexual
men .

Heterosexual
men ,

.Men


.Womarl White
injectirlg alack
drug@ Hl~plnic
Source Center for Didase and Prevention


in one subgroup: young gay Black
men. Black teenage boys who re-
alize they are attracted to men
are often too poor to move to gay-
friendly cities like San Francisco
or New York, researchers said, and
often must keep their homosexu-
ality hidden from relatives and
friends, making it more likely they
will have furtive, risky sex.
They often lack health insur-
ance, meaning they do not get
checkups' where a doctor might
suggest testing. And while new
surveys find that they use con-
doms at about the same rates as
young gay white and Hispanic
men, sex tends to stay within ra-
cial groups and more older Black
gay and bisexual men are in-
fected. Also, untreated syphilis,
whose sores open a path for H.I.V.,
is more common among Blacks.
The National Institutes of
Health is supporting studies in
the Bronx, Washington and other
heavily Black urban areas seeking
new ways to reach these men, Dr.
Fauci said. Results will be ready
in two or three years.
Prevention has worked for two
groups, Dr. Fenton said. The num-
ber of women infecting their chil-
dren at birth or through breast-
feeding has dropped to only 100
a year from about 1,300 two de-
cades ago. In that respect, the
United States is like Africa: scarce
public clinics focus on women and
children, and many poor ~women
see a doctor only when pregnant.

TARGET PREVENTION
Also, the number of infections
through drug use has dropped 80
percent, although that may be a
result of changing fashions among


HEATH CENTER
Jackson Health System

Tihe North Dade Healt Center, Inc., seeks volunteers from the residents of Miami-Dade County to serve on its
board of directors. The criteria for selection are professionals and patients who have an interest in serving
an ethnically diverse community.


For an application, a list of responsibilities and information ~about the process, connect with the
North Dade Health Center website at http://www.jhemismi.org/body.cfm?id=100 to download an application.
Applicants may also visit North Dade Health Center to request an application for the board of directors.
It is an opportunity for qualified individuals to serve and voice their opinions about the provision of
health care to their community.


Please return completed~applications to the North Dade Health Center, 16555 N.W. 25th Avenue, Miami Gardens,
Florida 33054. Deadline for submissions is Se tember 16, 2011, at 4:30 p. m. For more information, please
contact Kermit T. Wyche, executive director, or Annette Lopez, administrative secretary, NDHC, at 786-466-1710.








II~ "


BAD CR~E IT A.Ti FI~NANCING
.. '0VER 3 fO0 C iRS TR KS VANS SU V '


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THElR OWVN DESTINY


structure. For example, there
is no official leader and every
attendee gets equal access to
the guest speakers.
Since its inception in No-
vember 2010, the Roundtable
has hosted a who's who of
the influential people whose
hands, are either on the but-
ton for hiring in the county, or
who are in-the-know on what
upcoming federal, state or lo-
cal projects will affect entire
cities and neighborhoods in
the near future.
Past speakers have includ-
ed: Bill Talbert, C.E.O. of the
Greater Miami Convention
and Visitors Bureau; Modesto
Abety, C.E.O. of the Children's
Trust; Bill Johnson, executive
director of the Port of Miami;
and Jose Abreu, executive di-
rector of Miami International
Airport.
While individual partici-
pants in the Roundtable may
be involved, in political and
community affairs, Norwood
stresses the group as a whole


is nonpartisan.
"The goal is to have infor-
mal, nonpartisan discussions
on business and public policy
issues affecting the Greater
Miami and the Black commu-
nity in particular."
Johnson says he hopes the
gatherings will help the Black
community get a better under-
standing on how local govern-
ment departments function
and the jobs they can create.
To attend the breakfast,
Norwood said, "The Round-
tables are open to anyone who
is concerned about the future
of our community." The con-
versation and coffee are free.
But you do pay for your own
breakfast.
Future speakers include:'
Jacqui Colyer, southern re-
gional director of the Depart-
ment of Children and Families
(DCF) on Wednesday, August
17 and Carlos Migoya, chief
executive officer of Jackson
Health Systein on Wednesday,
September 21st.


BV GregorV Wright;,
Miami Times writer
g.w.wright@hotmail.com

If you have ever wondered
where Blacks can go to rub
shoulders with Miami's most
influential powerbrokers and
enjoy good food, the answer
is simple: Jackson's Restau-
rant in Overtown, every third
Wednesday from 8:30-10 a.m.
Miami's power elite come
from all across Miami-Dade
County hoping to speak di-
rectly to the County's Black'
citizens on important issues
that will affect their commu-
nities.
The influential come as
guests of T'he Breakfast
Roundtable, an informal group
of Black Miamians whose goal
is to provide a venue for infor-
mation exchange that is vital
for our community to grow.
"That is the only agenda,"
said Christopher Norwood,
a consultant with the Nor-
wood Consulting Group and


lead organizer of the monthly
roundtable.
Norwood along with co-or-
ganizers Minister Gary John-


son, Henry Crespo, Karen An-
dre, Esq. and the late Haneef
Hamudullah are responsible
for the coordination and se-


curing of guests and inform-
ing the community to par-
ticipate. However, the group
still maintains an informal


New HI


Critics fault poicies
BV Donald G. Mcneil Jr.

Despite years of great progress
in treating AIDS, the number
of new infections with the virus
that causes it has remained stub-
bornly around 50,000 a year in
the United States for a decade, ac-
cording to new figures released on
Wednesday by federal officials.
The American epidemic is still
concentrated primarily in gay
men, and is growing rapidly worse
among young Black gay men.
That realization is causing a rift
in the AIDS community. Activists
say the persistent H.I.V. infection
-rate proves that the government
prevention policy is a flop. Federal
officials are on the defensive even
as they concede that the epidemic
will grow if prevention does not
get better, which they know is un-
likely while their8~udgetes aeaibe-
ing cut. .
And some researchers believe it
is impossible to wipe 6ut a fatal,
incurable disease when it is trans-
mitted through sex and carries
so much stigma that people deny
having it and avoid being tested
for it. -

NO POLICY SEEN
Looking back, epidemiologists
at the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention believe that new
cases peaked at 130,000 a year
in the 1980s, sank slowly during
the '90s and reached a plateau at
50,000 around the year 2000.
Larry Kramer, a longtime AIDS
activist and the author of "The
'Normal Heart," a play about the
epidemic's early days, said: "It
means I don't see an AIDS policy,
and I don't see anyone in charge.
It's so dispiriting that it's hard
to find something to say about
it. How mahy times can you yell
'Helpl' without ever getting any-
where?"
Both Dr. Kevin Fenton, chief of
AIDS prevention for the C.D.C.,
and Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, chief of
AIDS research at the National In-
stitutes of Health, took issue with
Kramer's interpretation. While
both agreed that 50,000 new an-
nual infections was, in Dr. Fauci's
words, "a great concern," both
pointed to some areas where sub-
stantial progress had been made.
They said that new studies were
seeking ways to get more people
tested and treated early in the
course of the illness, which would
make them less infectious and
drive transmission rates down.
"The C.D.C. is absolutely not
resting," Dr. Fenton said. "It was a
major accomplishment to drop in-
fections from 130,000 to 50,000,
and we're dealing with an epidem-
ic that is dynamic."
But, he conceded, 50,000 is an
"unacceptably high level," and
without better prevention efforts
"we're likely to falee an era of rising
infection rates."
Philip Alcabes, a public health
epidemiologist at Hunter College in
Manhattan, noted that 50,000 is
close to the number of Americans
who die in road accidents each
year almost 40,000 "and in
some ways, we consider dying on
the road an ordinary thing."

MORE DIE OF HEART
DISEASE AND STROKE
By contrast, he said, nearly one
million Americans a year die of
heart disease and strokes.


:V cases stay

aimed at prevention
"So it's not clear that prevention
is a failure," he said. "The average
adult's chances of encountering
H.I.V. infection 0.02 percent a
year are rather low. It's not' rea-
sonable to expect that a sexually .
transmitted virus will disappear p
in America, or anywhere else. But
I agree with Larry Kramer that
there has been a dearth of new
policy ideas."
For most risk groups, infection
rates are stable, with 61 percerit
of cases contracted through gay or
bisexual sex, 27 percent through f
heterosexual sex and nine percent
through drug injections. -
But they are increasing rapidly agg ,


---Mary Altaffer/Associated Press
for AIDS treatment during a demonstration in New York in June.


Activists urged full financing


addicts: Fewer inject heroin and lic policy for amfAR, the Founda- munities that would bring down
more smoke or inhale heroin, tion for AIDS Research, said the community viral loads."
crack, crystal meth and cocaine or decade-long persistence of 50,000 A recent study has shown that
swallow prescription opiates like infections "shows that we've failed getting people on antiretroviral
OxyContin. Only needle-sharing to target prevention services ad- drugs early makes them 96 per-
passes virus-tainted blood. equately and have not. gotten cent less likely to infect others,
Chris ColliniS, director of pub- treatment coverage in many. com- so there is a growing outcry for


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S7A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


I -a ,. ~~'. ,.
IN THE MIX: Henry Crespo (1-r), Christopher Norwood, Bill Johnson (Director of the Port
of Miami), Debra Owens (Port of Miami) and Gary Johnson say The Breakfast Roundtable is: a
great networking opportunity for Blacks.


decade

a'eet a"d ereiYt shorthandafo
those injecting drugs and asking
them to get tested, and then help-
ing them find medical care if they
have the disease.
Dr. Fauci and Dr. Fenton said
there was no discussion' now of
making such tests mandatory
- as, for example, syphilis tests
once were for marriage licenses.

C.D.C. TESTS ACCURATE
San Francisco and Vancouver,
British Columbia, have lowered
new infection rates, Collins noted.
But how applicable those lessons
are to the United States as a whole
is debatable; both cities have very
small Black populations, and
Vancouver's success relies partly
on a government-approved cen-
ter where drug addicts can shoot
up under the eyes of a nurse add
without fear of arrest an ex-
peripapat~ un,1sierply.,tobe eepea~tepp
in the United States.
,The new. C.D.C. figures are
based partly on a new blood test
that can tell recent infections from
old one's, said Joseph Prejean,
who led the team that made the
new estimates. The test, invented
in 2005 and nicknamed the "BED
test," for the B, D and E viral sub-
types it uses, meaSures H.I.V. an-
tibodies in the blood relative' to
total antibodies. That ratio rises
rapidly fronri infection to about six
months, then levels off, he said.


305-248-0501 786-399-3805
WWW. allROtOrs.COM














_ ~


ed desegregating. Clemson
University and the University
of South Carolina; forcing
"auuur Davinia to leappoi r
tion .its legislative districts to
end discrimination against
Blacks; and winning the re-
lease of more than a dozen
men from death row.


as U.S. Solicitor General.
WAugust 11, 1965: The
Watts Rebellion, a six-day up-
rising that led to 34 deaths,
over 1,000 injuries, nearly
4,000 arrests, and over $35
million in property damage,
began on this date.
SAugust 12, 1890: The
Mississippi Constitutional
Convention started the trend
to systematically exclude
Black political participation
in the South. Literacy tests
were among the devices
states used to accomplish


I LAhCKS MUSTI C.ONT.ROL THIRl O)WN DESTINY


NAACP


LAWVY E R


SCHOOLS, COLLEGES,


GOLF


COU RSES


BV Douglas Martin

Matthew J. Perry, Jr., who
as a young lawyer had to wait
in the balcony of his segre-
gated local courthouse before
a judge would hear his case,
then went on to win hundreds
of civil rights legal battles
and to become the first Black
federal judge from the Deep
South, died on July 29 at his
home in Columbia, S.C. He
was 89.
His family confirmed the
death,
In the 1950s and '60s, Judge
Perry handled cases for the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored Peo-
ple that resulted in the deseg-
regation of schools, colleges,
hospitals, parks, golf courses,
restaurants and beaches. He
won rulings by the United
States Supreme Court that
overturned the convictions of
more than 7,000 people in-
volved in sit-ins.
The Harvard Law School
profElA f;"r dy ~d
said Judge Perry "helped cr~e-
ate federal law that enlarged
our liberty." The judge's cases,
he said, are taught "in every
law school across the United
States."


and home-baked pies as pay-
ment. In the mid-1950s, he
became chief counsel of the
South Carolina Conference of
Branches of the N.A.A.C.P.

SWORN IN BY THURGOOD
MARSHALL
Perry was sworn in as a fed-
eral judge by Justice Thur-
good Marshall of the Supreme
Court. Three decades earlier,
Mr. Perry had been inspired
to pursue a legal career after
watching Mr. Marshall argue
two civil rights cases in Co-
lumbia.
Perry's nomination to the
military appeals court was
pushed by Senator Strom
Thurmond, a South Caroli-
na Republican, even though
Perry was a -member of the
Democratic National Com-
mittee. Political analysts at
the time suggested that Thur-
mond, a staunch segreganlon-
ist, backed Perry to w~in votes
from a growing Black elector-
ate.
On ~t~he miilita~ry a~lj~ffs~
court, Judge Perry gained a
reputation as thoughtful and
"unflappable," said Eugene R.
Fidell, a lawyer who argued
before Judge Perry and now
teaches at Yale.

FEDERAL COURTHOUSE
NAMED
In~ 1974, Perry was defeated
as the Democratic, candidate
for a seat in the United States
House of Representatives;
Jimmy Carter, then governor
of Georgia, visited South Car-
olina to campaign for him.
When Carter became presi-
dent, he appointed him to the
lower federal district court.
Judge Perry never retired.
He continued as a senior
judge and was working on the
day he died. He is survived by
his wife, the former Hallie Ba-
cote; and their son, Michael.
In his hardscrabble years
as a young lawyer, Judge
Perry was rejected by poten-
tial Black clients -because
they feared he might irritate
a white judge. On out-of-town
cases, he was barred from mo-
tels and had to drive home to
sleep, no matter the distance.
And while awaiting his turn
to appear before a judge in
his hometown courthouse in
Spartanburg, he, along with
other Blacks, was restricted'
to the balcony.


Senate, was appointed Spe-
cila General Counsel of the
U.S, Post Office Department,.
the first Black female mem-
ber of their legal staffr4 -~~,
SAugust 16, 1963t Geo~rg
Olden's Emantipation stamp
went on sale on this date.
Olden, "an -internatlonally re-
nowned graphic artist, be-
came the first Black to.design
a U.S. posta'ge.stampj.
SAugust 18, 1972: 1-he
Rev, Ph~illip A. ~otter, a.M~eth-
odist minister from Dominica,
was named General Secre-
tary of the World Council of
Churches.


Judge Matthew J. Perry, Jr. at a dedication held in his honor.


Front segregation

in the Army to
courtroom Uktories

for integration.

jobs. He was drafted into the
Army and~ served in an all-
Black unit during World War


JUDGE APOLOGIZES
"I accepted our plight as
a fact of life," he said of the
segregation in an interview
with The Spartanburg Her-
ald-Journal in July, "and yet
I knew it wasn't right."
A pivotal moment in his ra-
cial thinking occurred when
he was home on furlough from
the Army. He was forced to or-
der his lunch from a restau-
rant window. Inside he could
see Italian prisoners of war
being served by waitresses.
He studied business admin-
istration at what is now South
Carolina State University, a
historically Black institution.
He then enrolled in its law
school, which had been cre-
ated after the University of
South Carolina's law school
resisted pressure to admit
Blacks.
One of five members of his
law school's second graduat-
ing class, Mr. Perry went on to
practice law in Spartanburg,
S.C., where he was the only
Black lawyer. If he believed in
a case, he might charge noth-
ing, or accept fresh vegetables


renowned biologist and pio-
neer of cell division, ,was born
in Charleston, S.C. ...
M August 14, 1942: Muolefl
Kete Asante, afrocentrist aind
professor of African Stud-
les at Temple University, was
born in Valdosta, G,A. .
a August 15, 1843: hn
Highland G~rnet, "a' .2jl7949>- y~~y~
old Presbyterian pastor,
called for a slave revolt and
general slave strike at the
National Black Convention in
Buffalo, NY.
a August 15, 1957: Cora
M. Brown, the first Black
woman elected to a state


'ation with oth-
awyers, includ-


ten in collabor
er N.A.A.C.P. l;


In the early 1960s, a judge
cited Perry for contempt be-
cause of his aggressive de-
fense of a Black teacher who
had been charged with tres-
-passinlg, a a- si'ttifiig in a hos-
pital waiting room designated
for whites. He was permitted
to return to the courtroom
after assuring the judge he
Meant no disrespect.

BORN IN COLUMBIA, S.C.
"The judge did a remark-
able thing," Judge Perry told
The New York Times in 1976.
"He apologized to me. He
said he had observed that if
he were of my race, he would
represent the causes I did
with even more vigor than
I did, and that he hoped I
would accept his apology."
In the book "Matthew J. Per-
ry: The Man, His Times, and
His Legacy," edited by William
Lewis Burke and Belinda
Gergel, Robert Carter, himself
an important civil rights law-
yer and later a federal judge,
wrote of Judge Perry in an es-
say, "He is the only militant
civil rights figure I know who
seems to be loved by both ra-
cial groups while still engaged
in the struggle."
Matthew James Perry, Jr.
was born Aug. 3, 1921, in Co-
lumbia, where he grew up.
His father, a tailor, died when
lie was 12, and his mother
went to work in New York City
as a seamstress. Matthew
lived with a grandfather and
helped support the family by
digging ditches and doing odd


~Judge Prty's cases taught in every l~auo school
aZcross the 7.Initid States." I
--Randall L. Kennedy
Harvard Law Professor


USED ROSA PERRY CASE
In 1955, Perry represented
a woman who had been el-
bowed by a bus driver for try-
ing to exit through the whites-
only front door. She lost her
suit against the bus company,
but Perry won an appeal in
a case that had echoes later
that~year when Rosa Parks re-
fused to give up her bus seat
in Montgomery, Ala. .
Perry's success as a civil
rights lawyer was owed in
part to his conscious effort
to avoid provoking confronta-
tions. When shepherding the
admission of Harvey Gantt
to Clemson, he "carefully
scripted" every step of the
admission process with law
enforcement officials, he said
in an interview in January in
The South Carolina Lawyers
Weekly.


FIRST BLACK FEDERAL
JUDGE IN SOUTH
Morris .Rosen, who years
earlier unsuccessfully de-
fended the city of Charleston,
S.C., in a lawsuit bi-ought by
Perry, put it more' simply: "He
beat the hell out of me."
In 1976, Perry became the
second Black and the first
from the Deep South to be ap-
pointed to the United States
Military Court of Appeals, a
three-member civilian body
that hears appeals of courts-
martial. He was appointed by
President Gerald R. Ford.
In 1979, President Jimmy
Carter named him to a new
seat on the Federal District
Court in South Carolina,
making him that state's first
Black federal judge.
The victories Perry won, of-


this plan.
MAugust 12, 1891: Mia-
dame Lillian Evanti, interna-
tionally famed opera singer,
was born in Washington, D.C.
Evanti founded the National
Negro Opera Company in
1941.
W August 1892: The Balti-
more Afro-American newspa-
per was founded.
SAugust 13, 1906: Black
soldiers raided Brownsville,
TX, in retaliation for racial
insults-killing one white man
and wounding two.
MAugust 14, 1883: Er-
nest E. Just, internationally


10,i 1981: up
"` $~4' million to as-
SIdek' bslsnesses
s'l,!k 'bthrmu nity at
edthe end
ttled.~by

i~P80s Army
L.owell was
Chitii~~~it;aira ijf.the Johnt
-'Chki~s of Staff; the highest
position In the ~country.
5 August .11, 1965: The
Senate cortfirmed the nomi-
nation of Thu geood Marshall


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


M/atthew J.


Perry, Jr. was the


fir st Black feder al judge in South


DESEGREGATED


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AND BEACHES





















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S9d THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011












I ~_


Prograrri takes mentoring to new heights


Schools praised for grade improvements


Affair with student lasted for almost one year


BLACKS MUST CONTROL. TH-EIR OW'N DESTINY


c justice
that question." Owners of the
condo say the discussion over
selling their units first began
in April but Henriques, when
asked if she had been brought
on board in April, replied, "I am
not in a position to answer that
question."
She further stated that she
could not reply to the question
of how she was selected as it is
a private issue. In addition, she
disputed the claim by some own-
ers that there had been a ten-
ant's association in place at the
Village at some point. Her claim:
"As far as I am aware there never
was a tenant's association."
Dunn says he understands
why some owners feel like they
are being pushed out of their
homes.
"In many ways this situation
mirrors what has happened at
the Transit Village and Greene
Dreams Shoes," he said. "People
feel like they are being pushed
out by larger entities. But this is
different because we aren't just
talking about businesses being
relocated we are talking about
where people live and have lived
for many years. We cannot take
their concerns lightly."


transparent process. The CRA in-
tends to follow the method used
by the State when we send out the
RFP (request for proposal]. One
thing is certain when the RFP
goes out it will be tight."

NO DEVELOPER
IS IN THE DRIVER'S SEAT
Dunn added that several
months ago when it appeared that
all of the disputes had been set-
tied, it looked like Carlisle Devel-
opment would get the nod and be
the developing company. However,
he says that is no longer the case.
"We were supposed to settle
things on the CRA's agenda at
least two times in July but the
County attorneys asked that the
vote be -postponed in order to
make sure this was a fair pro-
cess," he added. "I think that's the
best thing to make sure all of
the developers get a fair chance to
bid, build and participate."
County Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson says the County really
has no voice in the matter at this
point. At least not until all litiga-
tion has been settled. But she has
a clear opinion on what needs to
happen.
"Based on comments from the


undertaken to help try to solve
this longstanding problem and
have already engaged FIU Stem-
pel School of Public Policy to help
ensure third party accountability
in our effort to create a solution
for the financially-troubled Poin-
ciana Village which maximizes
each resident's opportunity to de-
termine the best solution for their
family."

ARE CONDO OWNERS BEING
SQUASHED BY GOLIATH?
As both Dunn and Edmon-
son admit, Poinciana Village is
privately-owned property and
thus neither of them has any au-
thority in terms of negotiations
or discussions relative to offers
that may have been made, ac-
cepted or rejected by the owners.
G.O.L. Henriques, owner of the
law firm The Henriques Group,
P.A., represents several of the
owners at Poinciana Village. She
says that there is no current
time table on when the remain-
ing unsold properties must be
sold. When asked if the cost for
renovations made by the owners
would be factored into the nego-
tiation of the sale price she said,
"I am not prepared to answer


POINCIANA
continued from 1A

County and the City (and its
CRA)? and 2) Housing developer
Carlisle Development, currently
in control of the long-delayed
Sawyer's Walk/Crosswinds resi-
dential project is suing the CRA
over whether they should be al-
lowed to develop the 3.5 blocks
that overlap some of the land in
question in the County/City suit
mentioned above.
But there's more to this confus-
ing puzzle. Questions continue
to be raised about the process
by which the City and its CRA
will award development rights to
builders.
City Commissioner Richard P.
Dunn, II heads the CRA located in
District 5, as its chairman.
"This is something that I in-
herited and unfortunately there
have been years of rumors and
unsettled attempts to settle lin-
gering lawsuits between the City,
County and CRA over the land in
Overtown," he said. "Some want
to think this is a done deal but
it isn't. The entire bidding pro-
cess is now wide open and we are
committed to making sure it is a


--'

AUDREY EDMONSON
County Commissioner
agreement is reached between the
city, County and CRA, then I can
legally discuss the project with my
constituency. Above all we want to
make sure no one gets preferential
treatment among those who want
to bid."
.Carlisle CEO Matt Greer says
his company is not the bad guy in
this process.
"Sawyer's Walk has .been va-
cant for 20 years due to litigation
and the result has been slower
growth and fewer jobs for the peo-
ple of Overtown' and higher taxes
for all' of us," he said. [We] have


RICliARD P. DUNN, II
City Commissioner
community, revitalization is sore-
ly needed in Overtown and I am
committed to that process," she
said. "We have the ability to re-
turn that community to the kind
of place it was many years ago.
What the residents are asking for
is a live-work-play type of develop-
ment that first brings in big box
retailers like Kmart, Lowes and
Sam's Club businesses that
can employ folks in the area. Then
you bring in housing and smaller
retailers so people can move into
low and medium income housing.
Once the RFP goes out and an


torm
University nearly $600,000 to
put a temporary cafeteria in
place.
About 600 students attended
summer school but could not
stay in the dorms.




















































nl



and families.-1?~;~




JDIZi li00S,

'o education. i


Shaw University continues srep air s after Apr il s-
SHAW 1~~II .'~~ another but on behalf of Shaw The tornado that touched
continued from 1A I I 19.;l:ifB University I am truly thankful down last spring tore the roof
for those who were able to give off of the Student Center which
which were built in the 1960s, a I1ab ~ ~ I~~ C and I would encourage them to won't be ready for at least sev-
endured a considerable amount bl BC6 IR ~ FILI IF-p~~continu~e to give until all of our eral more months. McClaurin
of damage. Officials decided to .work is done." added that FEMA awarded the
close the school early for the ,i~~ ..-' -^" L~ln~-~---C-- I
safety of the students, faculty "',............


and staff. But many wondered
if the University ivould survive,
particularly given the fact that
the devastation occurred just
one year after Shaw had been
approved for a $31 million loan
to refinance its debt and avoid a
financial catastrophe. But sur-
vive they have.
Irma McClaurin, university
president, said crews are con-
tinuing to put the finishing
touches on the residence halls
so students can live in them this
semester,
"We've added some new paint,
new ceiltrigs and there's going to


ru after the storm.
again," she said. "Even though
I know there is a lot that still
needs to be done, the majoorit!
of things left to do are more re-
lated to cosmetic improvements
as opposed to structural re-
pairs. I don't know how man!
people from the Miami-Dade
and Browrard commurt~ities
nriatet donatiotis~;. i` e .~k~~ag


The Student Cente
be new flooring put in," McClau-
rin said. "Some of the damage is
storm-related because of the wa-
ter soaking through ceilings and
then ending up on the floor."
Dolores Samms, is the presi-
dent of the Shaw University Mi-
ami Ahumni chapter.
"T am truly, truly happy to hear
1660 *saw~ s ~ cnor wl epned


JOBS
continued from 1A


- an achievable goal."
City Comitaissioner Richard P.
Dunn, II spoke to the 135 stu-
dents at their awards ceremony
at Booker T. Washington High
School. Eighty host agencies
applied for interns -- 50 were
eventually selected and because
of the program requirements,
50 percent of the interns were
Washington High students.
"Work experience, personal
growth and maturity are what
happened in the course of the
past six weeks for each of these
young adults," Dunn said. "It's
the kind of investment, both in
terms of dollars and manpower,
that we must make if we want
to change the cycle of unemploy-
ment that overcomes so many of
our young Black boys and girls."
Santana Tooks, 18, is on his
way to Morehouse College in the
fall. He was responsible for up-
grading and monitoring Wash-


ington's computer tech center
and received glowing reviews
from Dr. Yelena Stewart-Revere.
who heads the school's smaller
learning communities program.
"I always wanted to work with
computers and even set up my
own topnotch center at home
when I was little," he said. "But
this summer I got the chance to
install and upgrade systems and
to make my own recommenda-
tions for the school's networking
requirements. They let me show
what I can do."
The program was supported
by a $322,000 grant from the
CRA. Each site had a supervi-
sor/career mentor that helped
young people during the sum-
mer, guiding them in work ex-
perience and instructing them
with different portions of the job
and the workplace. Interns were
required to live in SE Overtown
Park West or in District 5.


formative years made all the dif-
ference. These kids need people
to get involved and to show they
care."
It's the first year that Urgent,
Inc. [Urban Renewal Greater
Enhancement National *Team]
has managed the program, now
in its second year. But they have
been making steady progress
since their founding in 1994, to
"empower young minds to help
transform their community."
"I started to believe in myself
because of Mr. [Henry] Crespo
[a founding member and vice
president of Urgent, Inc.] and my
mentor," Givens said. "I di-opped
out of high school to work and
never thought about going back.
I learned that I was good with
computers and see IT [informa-
tion technology] as a career goal


GRADE
continued from 1A

"I am very excited about our
improvement," she said. "We
know everyone put in the effort,
from the district, to the region,
to the students, teachers and
staff."
Catalina Flor, principal of
Wheatley was unavailable for
comment.
The districts were recognized
for either maintaining or im-
proving their district grade to an
"A" or having all "A" or "B" grad-
ed schools in 2011. Drew, rated
as a "D" school in 2010, jumped
to an "A" school in 2011. Phyllis


Wheatley went from being a "F"
school in 2010 to the top of the
class its an "A" school.
Williams said her school wras
able to improve because of the
specific teaching style they im-
plemented.
"We provided instruction that
targeted the specific needs of
each student," she said. "We
taught the standards that we
were required to bitt we also
made sure that we monitored
our students' progress on a
monthly basis. We had monthly
assessments of their progress
to determine the strengths and
weaknesses of each student."
She also added that she plans


to continue the same strategy
that helped the school improve.
"Our strategy of using differ-`
entiated instruction was what
helped us to get here and we will
continue that plan," she said.
"Through that process we in-
sured that the teachers and the
students were communicating
correctly. The constant data that
we received from those monthly
evaluations really helped us to
help our kids perform better."
The other schools recognized
in Miami-Dade included: Balere
Language Academy; Lincoln-
Marti Charter School; and Som-
erset Academy Charter Elemen-
tary School.


and in lingerie. The police re-
port further indicated that the
two engaged in 'safe sex' during
their year-long liaison.
The Honduras-born educa-
tor had sex with -the student
in several locations including
Jackson High and the parking
lot of Allapattah Middle School.
It is unclear whether the stu-
dent was in a special educa-
tion program but Velasquez was
hired because of her training in


teaching children with mental
handicaps and developmental
disabilities.
According to John Schuster,
chief communications officer for
M-DCPS, the District "will work
towards a swift termination."
"School district staff is regu-
larly reminded that personal
relationships with students
are unethical and forbidden by
School Board policy, and may
be illegal, as in this instance."


TEACHER
continued from 1A

Velasquez, who has since
bonded out of jail, admitted to
having sexual relations with
a 16-year-old student from
August 2009 and continuing
through 2010. She told police
that she gave the boy gifts in-
cluding cash, a cell phone and
sent him romantic texts and
photos of herself both nude


The Children's Trust is a dedicated source of revenue established by voter referendum to improve the
lives of children and families in Miami-Dade County by making strategic investments in their futures.


10A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Over town community waiting for economic


i .. . ,


IftpOrtant issues about children (



.. r - ----------- -- -- --- ----- ----------------- ----- ----









_____~___~
----~


--Photos by Rabsun Senat


The contingencies of a merit pay pro- pay! plan..
gram agreement signed by Miami-Dade s: When .you hav~e a 'Ohe size fits all'
County Public Schools (M-DCPS) super- approach like the merit pay plan, there
intendent and United Teachers of Dade becomes a problem," said Tony Jen-
(UTD) president in IVay, now haeIY some .nings, UTD steward and school advi-
educators concerned aboutthe agree- sory council chairperson at Booker T.
ment's impact on urban public schools. Washington Senior High School. "We
The Performance Pay Plan funded by have to deal with a slew of other issues
Federal "Race to the Top" grant money that teachers in affluent schools do not
was signed by Superintendent Alberto have to, because of that; it is going to be
Carvalho and UTD President Karen inherently inequitable."
Aronowitz. Sheryl Place, a teacher at Miami
Aronowi~tz, wvho says she .doesn't Killian Senior High School, empathized
"agree wvith the idea of the plan," wanted with teachers in the urban school.
to "get as much money in the pocket of PLace, who formerly taught .at Miami
teachers as possible until the funds ran ~ Northwestern Senior High School and
ou. kd at oh pa

is not enough to overshadow the' qualms "The urban a tlseed the best
of many urban school teachers and brightest teachers; I don't think
."Anyone can teach a student that that merit pay will bring them into a F
wants to learn," said Derrick Tate, a school."
reading teacher at South Dade Senior Carvalho combated these notions.
High School. "What about the t~each- "The w~ay that plan is structured for
ers who have to deal with students that 2011-12 is done evenly so students can
h av d s n yhoi ev rne nt3 ttke gme ta Floao eusbeoo R prse
a real special teacher to handle that.". tative Dwvight Bullard, District 118, says
The provisions of the Performance is flawed. "The argument is the stu-
Pay Plan, while admittedly still unclear r:dents are lowering performing, but you
and unknownI for many educators, will are able to., make more gains that will
provide bonuses to teachers whose stu-: be magnified [even though] the. State is
dents have met given criteria or num- setting a particular bar."
bers. According to the superintendent, While State law under Senate B'ill 736
"If 90 percent of a teacher's students does notriequire merit pay plans to com -
improve, ~then the teacher will get an mience until 2014, Carvalho wanted to :
additional share [of .bonus money]." get a jump start to w~ork out some of the
How much improvement needed is un- kinks. Ironically,' Aronowitz, believes
defined, and with such a large percent- merit, pay is the wrong model arid when
age needed, some urban school teach- asked if thiis would engender educators ,
ers feel like they are at a disadvantage. 'to migrate from1 urban schools, her an-
The struggles of students coming froni swer was simple, "yes."
underserved communities that are typi- .--- akilahlaster3@aol~com


j 1


H EL1,PLINE


BLACKS MUST CONTROL R OWN DESTINY


daterrenround
the sounds


cally prevalent in urban schools make
these teachers apprehensive that they
will even be eligible to benefit from the


By Akilalh Laster
Miami Times writer


two events 'our annual green fest
event and the back to school event,"
said Sherri Jones, one of the coordi-
nators for the program.. "We thought
this would be an excellent opportunity
for people in the neighborhood to not
only come and get school supplies and
backpacks so they can be ready for
the new school year, but this was also
a good opportunity for people to learn
more about the environment."
Students were also given plants to
take home anid free hair cuts. Jer-
nia.Lyman, eight-years-old, said she
learned a lot.
"I am having a great time," she said.
"I, learned how to put the dirt in the
plants right so I can make then grow.
Tim Broton, 31, who brought his
children to the event, said -the pro-
gram wa~s great.
"This type of event is exactly what


This past weekend, Liberty City stu-
dents were out and about getting pre-
pared for the new school year. To aid
them in getting ready -for the fall, the
first annual Back to School Greenfest:
Planting Seeds for Education event
was held at The Belafonte TACOLCY
Center. The event provided students
and parents information on the im-
portance of education and the envi-
ronment. The fun-filled day included
environmental displays, hands-on
plantirig activities, arts and crafts,
games, a reading corner for children,
music, food sampling and several
workshops that focused on topics like
growing healthy communities and
knowing parental rights in schools.
"Today what we have done is combine


we need in this neighborhood," he
said. "Today these kids got a lot more
than just backpacks and pencils I
think they really got some knowledge
for life."
TACOLCY is one of the largest youth
and family service non-profits in Mi-
ami. For over 44 years, the agency
has been offering diversified services
to youth, their families, schools, and
other agencies, particularly around
low income community issues and in
the under-served minority commu-
nity.


Fi':



t~~

B

i ,


Is Your Family Ready For School?

Adkcl A


I bCk~,-to-C;R0 nI-"
:~t2ecoo eP


SAcc \#sb



', L, fc\oo\'goroo\Fev^*


Pick up The Children's Trust
After-School Programs Guide
at Publix Super Markets
in Miarni-Dode County


The Cdens Trust is a dedicated source of revenue established by voter re
rhe lives ofhlrnand families in Miami-Dode County by making strategic inv


ferendum to improve
estments in their futures.


1 -!


I11A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


~G~i)


TEACHER MERIT PLANS:


Appropriate for


urban schools?


'Community center hosts

back to school dr xve


The Children's Trust encourages you to follow

this checklist to ensure that your kids get the

best possible start to their school year.
There's a lot to~do before school starts.
But the Children's Trust can help with convenient, free or
reduced cost options for your family's back-to-school checklist.


For more information visit

www.th ech ild re nstru st.org
or call






















SECTION B MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 10-1 6, 2011t MIAMI TIMES


BV Kaila Hseard
kheard@mniamarimesronhn~e.com


-PASTOIR OF~ THEI WUI~EER


:SRVillg SOHIS ill


: I e coIIII1111ty




Bly K~aila Heard
kheard@miamitimesonlinie.com

To commemorate a pastor's anniversary, the
congregation will often givre their minister a
special dinner, gift or even a financial love of-
fering.
But as hils eighth anniversary approaches
later this month, Reverend Ray~mond Carvil,


"I'm a team player .. If something
needs to be done at the church then I'rn


the senior pastor and founder of The Living
Word Baptist Church in Opa-Locka, says he
doesn't want any part of the traditional gifts.
"I don't want a pastor's appreciation celebra-
tion," Carvil said. "I'm not big on people el-
evating, me because the whole focus should be
on G~od."
And because he wants to make sure the fo-
cus remains on saving souls, Carvil plans to
hold a mass baptismal service at the Athalie
Range Park in Liberty. City on August 27th.
The service is open' to everyone during which
time he will baptize anyone who is willing ac-
cept Christ asi their personal savior.
"All this, other stuff that people make you go
Please turn to CARVIL 14B


forGo (Mur
anniversary
tended cou


sic for God) Production's first red carpet
yv showcase and dinner, anyone w~ho at-
lid be a celebrity and sashayl dowrn the red

he New~ Birth Enterprise Building in Little
festivities allowed Mufor~o, a Christian
hat offers lessons in the arts, to celebrate
year in business.
Please turn to MUFORGO 14B


The infamous i-ed carpet rolled out at various runner.
movie premieres and prestigious event openings Held at t
ise usually deemed necessary only for the rich and Haiti, the I
famous. company~ t
However, on Friday,. August 5th, the well-known their first ~
carpet became a bit more inclusive. During the Mlu-



CONGRlESS OF CHIRISTIAN EDUCATION


jects that are suitable for children up '
to senior citizens. Subjects include
topics such as "Teaching Baptist
Doctrine" ahid "Bible Basics" for the
Children's Division, "Christian Char-
acter and -How it Develops" for the
Youth Division and 'Defend ing Ch ris-
tian Morals in an Irnmoral World,"
and "Growing in Grace" in the Young
Adult Division. Meanwhile, the Con-
gress will offer more advanced sub-
jects i n m in ist ry i nclud ing "Theology
of the Early Church" and 'Founda-
tion of Christian Ethics."
Barber himself w~ill be teaching a
class on the doctrine of prayer which


focuses on "the necessary attitude
and disposition for the person who
is praying and wvho it is that we pray
to."
For Barber, the senior pastor of Mt.
Sinai Missionary' Baptist Church in
Mqiami, all Christians, regardless of
when they were saved, should strive
to continue their biblical education.
'[People] have more of an inclina-
tion to lean towards things that are
contrary to God, it's in our nature, so
there will always be a continual need
to study the word of God to learn of
the things that are in line with God,"
he explained.


In addition to study and medita-
tion, the Congress provides opportu-
nities for fun and fellowship. There's
still time to take advantage of some
of the fun things planned at the Con-
gress including a scholarship lun-
cheon on Thursday and a youth rally
on Friday~ night whose theme is "Fuel
Up, Don't Giv'e Upl"
.The convention which began on
Monday will continue through Fri-
day, Aug. 12th. Reverend Dr. Jimmie
L. Bryant of Miami is the president of
the Congress of Christian Education,
For more information, visit www.
fgbci.org.


By Kaila Heard
kheard@iniamitimesonline.com


Reverend Johnny Barber, the mod-
erator for the Florida East Coast
Baptist Association, led the opening
evening service for the Florida.Gen-
eral Baptist Convention's annual
Congress of Christian Education in
Orlando on Mlonday, August 8th
The Florida East Coast Baptist As-
sociation is this year's hosting chap-
ter for the Congress of Christian Ed-
ucation.
The wreek-long Congress offers
classes based upon a variety of sub-


Jumping for the future

...Local girl places sixth -

ill Junior Olympics

Nine-year-old Zatoria A.
IThompson ~recently placed
sixth in the nation for high
jump at the AAU Junior
Olympics 2011. To win her
position, she managed a
jump of 4'2". Zatoria also
placed 12th in the nation
with a 13'6" in the long jump.
In addition to excelling at
~ess ~-: athletics, Zatoria also works

I hard at her studies at a col-
lege prep school. The rising
Fourth grader makes straight
A's arid-plans to attend Har-
vard University in the future.
Meanwhile her immediate
goals for her sporting career
are to participate in a tri-
athlon as well as the high
and long jump in next
year's Junior Olympics.
The AAU Junior
Olympics 2011
j/ lwas held in
C New Orleans,
C~r L A from July 27 until
August 6.


on1 it."


--REVEREND RAYMOND CARVJIL


By Kaila Heard
kheard@mliam~itimlesonline .com

Nearly every week, you will
probably see Reverend Sabri-
na James and members of her
church out in the community.
Feeding the hungry, visiting
nursing homes or ministering
at various shelters are among
some of the regular activities
which they participate.
Compassion and a desire to
serve are common characteris-
tics if not actual requirements
for a ministry to be effective.
"In order to get someone's at-
tention you have to address the
needs of the person first," said
James, who founded her own
church, Tag Team Ministries


for Jesus Christ in April.
Although the 44-year-old is a
successful general manager for
McDonald's, in her youth she
faced a serious of hardships
that are similar to the crises
facing those she now tries to
help today.
"I've experienced some things
like being without food and
came to realize that there was
so much more in store for us,"
she said. "That's the message I
want to pass on."
One of six siblings who were
raised in Miami, James said
she was "reared in the church"
by her mother who recently
died.
"The thing [my mother] in-
stilled in us is that we should


However, by age 19, James
says she had strayed from some
of her earlier religious teach-
ings. No action reflected that
rift better than when she decid-
ed to move into an apartment
with her then-boyfriend.
According to James, "I was
an adventurous persona and I
was trying to establish myself
as an individual."
However, the relationship
didn't last long. Besides dealing
with a broken heart, James was
forced to leave their apartment
-- she was suddenly homeless.
Too proud to go back home,
she bounced from one friend's
couch to another at night and
worked during the day. Finally,
she swallowed her pride after


a few weeks on the street and
asked her mother if she could
come home, which she allowed.
While that brief taste of home-
le'ssness did weaken her pride,
James also credits her ordeal
with strengthening her faith.
"When you begin to have real
struggles in your life at some
point you begin to understand
that there's no one in your life
that can help except Christ,"
she explained. "Now I can hon-
.estly say that God is never late
--He is always on time."
An evangelist since 2003,.
James finally decided to be-
come an ordained minister in
2009.
Her maturation into the role
was unintentional, according


to James.
"It wasn't something that I
really wanted to do," she said.
"Becoming a pastor was never
on my list. It was just the spirit
of God that moved me with the
compassion for the people and
that's what kind of led me into
this realm."
Forty-nine-year-old Rhonda
Cox and her husband both left
their former church home to
join Tag Team Ministries when
it was first founded. Cox says
she was drawn to the ministry
because of its commitment to
outreach services.
"I liked her spirit and I liked
how she was always wanting
to help people because that's
Please turn to JAMVES 14B


REV. SABRINA JAMES


truly love God with all of our
hearts," she recalls.


The Miamni Times


": c;,:
L
J,


8~"s


Fa it


MUSIC: FOIR GOD



MluforGo celebrates with




'Red Carpet' anniversary


Rev. Johnny Barber leads opening service


Local minister discusses struggles of faith, outreach and sexism
















Manpower 2011 attracts star gospel singers


r ~:~h~ I~ ~ .-

'" ~ie:~S~P~


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwVN DESTINY


Gospel artists Fred Ham-
mond, Donald Lawrence, Wess
Morgan, Anthony Evans, and
the Soul Seekers have just been
added to the lineup for the 2011
ManPower Conference hosted
by T. D. Jakes at The Potters
House of Dallas.
ManPower will be held Thurs-
day, August 11 through Satur-
day, August 13, and will fea-
ture eminent speakers, such
as Bishop T.D. Jakes and other
renowned guests who will share
inspirational messages to men.
This year's theme is 'Breaking
New Ground'.
ManPower, created by Bishop


T.D. Jakes, is designed to ad-
dress the specific needs, hurts,
and struggles of all men from
a biblical perspective. The first
ManPower conference was held
in 1994 in Detroit. Years later,
ManPower continues to equip
and encourage men to build
strong marriages, increase
their confidence and take on
community responsibilities. To
date, ManPower has drawn over
150,000 men from around the
world. .
The ManPower conference
not only takes the needs of men
into account, but also the needs
of different cultures. In keeping


with our service to a culturally
diverse audience, this year's
ManPower will offer Spanish
audio translation,, in order to
better serve our Spanish speak-
ing brethren.
Featured musical artists in-
clude:
*Fred Hammond, multiple
Stellar and Dove Award~win-
ning singer/ songwriter/ pro-
ducer and highly influential
solo artist
*Donald Lawrence, Gram-
my~iwinning producer, compos-
er, and recording artist who has
collaborated with such artists
as, the Clark Sisters, Hezekiah


Walker, Mary J. Blige, Ramsey
Lewis, and more
*Wess Morgan, Dove AwardO
nominated, recording artist,
and founder of the Wess Mor-
gan Foundation
*Anthony Evans, composer,
recording artist, and former
Kirk Franklin prot~g~e who has
shared the stage with Yolanda
Adams, David Phelps, and Nat-
alie Grant
*Soul Seekers, up-and-com-
ing eight-member quartet con-
sisting of hit songwriters, pro-
ducers, and session musicians
touted as the new paradigm of
modern-day Quartet music.


Redistricting 2012:


Tell Us Your Story


Attend a Pubili Meeting


Coming Soon to a Town Near You!




Wednesday, August 17, 2011


MIAMI

~':10 a.m. 2 p.m.

Miami Dade College

Wolfson Campus Auditorium, Bldg. 1000
300 NE 2nd Avenue

Miami, FL 33132


SOUTH MIAMI

#*m 9, *$

FIU College. of Law
RafaeI DiaZ-Balart Hall

11200 SW 8th Street

Miami, FL 33199



Persons in need of special accommodations should contact the
Florida House of Representatives Redistricting Committee
at (850) 488-3928 or mydistrictbuilder@myfloridahouse.gov
at least 5 business days before the meeting,
in order that accommodations may be satisfied,


The Booker T. Washington Se-
nior High School Class of 1961
celebrated their 50th Anniver-
sary from June 8 12.
According to Charlie Mae
Smith Culpepper, "Nineteen-
sixty-one was a great year be-
cause it saw the graduation of
the~ Booker T. Washington Se-


nior High School Class of 1961.
But 2011 was even better be-
cause we were blessed to "Cel-
ebrate 50 years of God's Grace
and Mercy.'"
Some of the reunions activi-
ties included a 'Meet and Greet'
at the Church of the Incarna-
tion in Liberty City on Wednes-


day, June 8; a banquet at the
Hilton Miami Downtown Hotel
on Saturday, June 11;~ and a
worship service at Mt. Olivette
Baptist Church in Overtown
followed by farewell brunch at
the Rusty Pelican restaurant in
Key Biscayne on Sunday, June
12.


Gay Ferguson Outler, who
attended Saturday's banquet,
said, "The high point of the eve-
ning was [the picture presen-
tation] 'A Stroll Down Memory
Lane: The Way We Were.' This
nostalgic trip facilitated the re-
capturing of numerous joyous
.Please turn to BTW 14B


International jazz artist, Nicole Henry, who
provided entertainment, and local artist, Ba-
yunga Kialeuka who hosted an art exhibit
stand beside the Miami Gardens Mayor Shir-
ley Gibson and Miami Gardens Councilman


Melvin Bratton at 34th anniversary luncheon
and fashion show of the Center for Famnily &
Child Enrichment, Inc. (CFCE) on Saturday,
July 9 at the Country Club of Miami in Miami
Lakes.


By Mark BellV


Southern Baptists have invest-
ed more than $4.5 million in
assisting survivors of the earth-
quake. Besides building hous-
es, the disaster response effort
has included feeding programs,
medical clinics, school assis-
tance, beds for 2,200 orphans
and prosthetics fabrication, as
well as many other projects.
Baptist volunteers from Ecua-
dor, Dominican Republic, Dom-
inica and Grenada have worked
alongside U.S. and Haitian vol-
unteers.

FLORIDA IMPACT
More than 500 families are
living in new cement-block
homes across Port-au-Prince
and the surrounding areas
through the efforts of the Flori-
da Baptist Convention and the
Confraternite Missionaire Bap-
tiste d'Haiti, said Eddie Black-
mon, Rebuild Haiti coordinator
for Florida Baptist Disaster Re-
lief.
"These homes have not only
provided a safe haven for fami-


lies once living in destruction
and despair, but are also pro-
viding the local church an op-
portunity to share the love of
Christ and be a light in a dark
world," Blackmon said. "After
the completion of each home,
Rebuild Haiti pastors and case
workers accompany local pas-
tors to distribute Bibles to the
recipient families and to pray
with each family about their
specific prayer requests.
"Through this follow-up in-
dividuals are coming to Christ,
families are being restored,
churches are being planted and
lives are being changed," Black-
mon added. "Rebuild Haiti is
having an eternal impact for
the Kingdom on the communi-
ties within which it is working."
Blackmon shared examples
of the impact Florida Baptists
are seeing:
-- Pastor Pierre, a case work-
er in Tabarre, is training young
men in his Church to share the
Gospel.
Please turn to HAITI 14B


Rebuild Haiti, the joint
Southern Baptist disaster re-
lief initiative launched in the
aftermath of the massive. Jan,
12, 2010, earthquake, will have
built 1,982 houses by the end
of November and has 560 more
in the pipeline before the sched-
uled exit date in March 2012.
"Southern Baptists should
.heartily celebrate what has
been accomplished in Haiti,"
said Jeff Palmer, executive di-
rector of Baptist Global Re-
sponse, one of the key partners
in the Rebuild Haiti alliance. "It
is amazing what has happened
in such a short period of time,
but there are still thousands of
people living in tents and much
to be done."
"Rebuild Haiti" is a-coopera-
tive venture that also involves
Haitian Baptists, the Inter-
national Mission Board, the
Florida Baptist Convention
and Southern Baptist Disaster
Relief. In the past 18 months,


r


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Scheduling prayer-


during your day
There are many ways to' ~rduJtineal
prompt our forgetful souls 2. Let your schediale do
to find- quiet time with God. the. work. Use a date book
Here are five of my favorites. with- scripture and/or de-
I was in a friend's kitchen 'v~otionals (Guideposts Daily
the other 'day and nioticed PmI~riner 2012 is-a hice one},
a Bible propped open' in ai~ or enthr~ pray' as.an eventinn
stand on the counter. "Thlat 1 your daily C~lendar. ~
seems like a good idea," I - Tie a! strine around
commented, "Having the Bi ine~ou. finger techaolog.
ble there, open and itiiviting.". O.~s$.ui ~2 Posi~t-I Notes to -
"I never actually read whiler f quiet tima, or sign up for
I'm cooking," shl 'admittedc, ai ~ilic'pture phone aipp like,-
"though it` does remind me - Bible~is.
to pray." She went. on to de- 4..Taradf61the ~vacann~ot~
scribe liow she uses meal socil" media. .Tim. Challiees,
prep as a time to stir up her recektly po~tea ~ about ho(~.i
heart an'd remember those he 'uees: P progri called:.
she's cooked with or for. It got Lepchblotic'to restrict access
::," thnig about h maa ~ld'aelb ~r~~
souls to talk with' God. Here sodte of that: saved: ~time for
are some of my fav~orites: .prayer. .
1. Link prayer to a regii "- .' ScsConnect th~~~~k 4-taph-
lar nativoity.. Find a scrap: laoned wRay,.Link u~p *vhth~a
ture verse to get you started prayer pairtnier you c all oCr
while you get dressed (IISaiah tiria witlq; tegurlaidy; ir jdin':l
61:10), drive to work (Psalm i group. Having ot ets to
77:12) or do laundry (Psalm whom, .youte aecountabldl4
26:6). .God shoulid--pa;:d 's's great fhtnit~aiv _i tq
dan-be part of -our. dailj things doiibl '7,


Fifty years of %od's grace and mercy


CFCE, Inc. hosts annual luncheon


Florida Baptist Convention helps rebuild Haiti















I


Rev. Carvil preaches that sincerity key to baptisms


MiniS tires provide hope for Haiti


ClRSsmates grateful for reunion


Testifying the goodness of the Lord


BL^CKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


why they can't be like that.
So, let's review you had a
need, you prayed, and God an-
swered your prayer and your
need was provid-
ed. What about the
in-between time? Do
we leave out the part
where we doubted
and were not .alto-
gether confident that
the check for the
rent would come in '
time? Do we leave
out the sleepless nights, and
how we tried to borrow the
money just in case God did
not come through in time? I
mean, you knew that he would
come through, but would it


happen before the eviction
notice was posted? So many
sermons and lessons have
been based on Job, and the
patience of Job. Songs
have been sung about
how Job patiently wait-
ed for the Lord. But if
you have read the en-
tire book of Job, you
know that Job was not
this extraordinarily su-
per faithful man who
did not question any-
thing that happened to him,
and just went around praising
God for the loss of his home,
children, and possessions. He
questioned what happened. He
was confused. Even God rep-


rimanded him for his attitude
and his words. Yes, he was
faithful. Yes, he was a man
of God. This was why God al-
lowed him to be tested be-
cause of his love for God and
his faithfulness. But he had
some hard moments. It's all in
the book! King David was often
distressed about how his life
was going. Some of his Psalms
express his hurt and confu-
sion. But in all of this, Job and
David and others remained
steadfast until the end! They
didn't give up and throw in the
towel. Even when they did not
~understand God or his ways,
they never wavered in their
love for him.


Yes, testify of the goodness of
the Lord, but let people know
that there were times before
your breakthrough that you
were nervous or anxious or had
a moment of doubt. Let people
know that even through these
times, you still remained faith-
ful to God, and he remained
faithful to you. Tell them that
you are not a superhuman
man or woman just a man or
woman who loves God, knows
that he loves you, and you
trust him until the end. Al-
ways leave them with this seed
planted firmly in their spirit -
he did it for me, and he can do
it for you. I'm not super, but my
God ist


~-~B~B~8~daW wsB~I~Bc3~--


In my last column, I wrote
about not letting the enemy
stop your testimony. But I
must add a footnote to this
plea don't just tell people
you come through, but tell
them how! Sometimes we
stand before the church dur-
ing testimony night and are
exuberant with the news that
we did not know how we were


going to pay our rent, but we
prayed, and someone sent us
a check to pay our rent. That
is great news and worthy of
a praise report. But some-
times, those who are sitting
in the pews wonder why their
breakthrough has not hap-
pened. They look at you in awe
and think what a super prayer
warrior you are, and wonder


ing among women also has di-
minished. Two decades ago, half
of all women read the Bible in
a typical week other than at
religious events. Now 40 percent
do.
The survey also found a
marked stepping away from con-
gregations: a 17 percentage in-
crease in the number of women
who have become "unchurched."
"For years, many church lead-
ers have understood that 'as go
women, so goes the American
church,'" wrote Barna Group


founder George Barna, on his
website. "Looking at the trends
over the past 20 years, and es-
pecially those related to the be-
liefs and behavior of women, you
might conclude that things are
not going well for conventional
Christian churches."
The Ventura, Calif.-based re-
searchers compared surveys of
more than 1,000 people in 1991
and 2011.
They found that the percent-
age of women who strongly be-
lieve the Bible is accurate in


all it teaches declined by seven
percentage points to 42 percent.
And those who view God as "the
all-knowing, all-powerful and
perfect Creator of the universe
who still rules the world today"
dropped from 80 percent to 70
percent.
"Women used to put men to
shame in terms of their ortho-
doxy of belief and the breadth
and consistency of their reli-
gious behavior," wrote Barna.
"No more; the religious gender
gap has substantially closed."


BV Adelle M. Banks

Women, long; considered the
dominant pew dwellers in the
nation's churches, have shown a
dramatic drop in attendance in
the last two decades, a new sur-
vey shows.
Since 1991, the percentage of
women attending church during
a typical week has decreased by
11 percentage points to 44 per-
cent, the Barna Group reported
Monday (Aug. 1).
Sunday school and volunteer-


ship Services at 7:30 a.m. and
11 a.m. every Sunday. 305-696-
6545.

M Christian Cathedral
Church presents their Morning
G16ry service that includes senior
citizen activities and brunch ev-
ery Friday at 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
305-652-1132.

M Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist
Church invites the community
to celebrate their 30th Pastoral
Anniversary on August 14 at 11
a.m. 305-607-2015.

SGod Word God Way is back
open for service this week. 786-
326-3455.

SPilgrim New Hope Bap-
tist Church's 'Convening of the
Evangelist' will be held at the
Palm Beach County Convdiiffolf
Center, August 17-20. 561-863-
9192.

SLighthouse Holy Ghost
Center, Inc. invites everyone to
their Intercession Prayer Service
on Saturday at 10 a.m. 305-
640-5837.

5 Macedonia Missionary
Baptist Church's Usher Ministry
is hosting a Fashion Show and
Musical Program on August 21
at 4 p.m. and is currently seek-
ing models. 305-445-6459.

SAll That God is Interna-
tional Outreach Centers invites
everyone to their Christian Fel-
lowship and Open Mic Night ev-


ery Friday at 7:30 p.m. 786-255-
1509, 786-709-0656.

SThe International Prayer
Center is hosting their Pastord
Anniversary, Aug. 11-14. 954-
448-4634.

SThe Faith Church, Inc.
invites you to their service on
Sunday at 11 a.m. and their
MIA outreach service that pro-
vides free hot meals, dry goods
and clothes. Visit www.faith-
church4you.com or call 305-
688-8541.

SRunning for Jesus Out-
reach Youth Ministries is also
looking for additional praise
dancers, choirs, and soloists to
participate in their Gospel Back
to School Summer Jam Fest on
August ~27 at 7:30 p.m. 954-213-
412!t. jt i na so"

WRedemption Missionary
Baptist Church has moved but
still holds a Fish Dinner every
Friday and Saturday; a Noon
Day Prayer Service every Sat-
urday; and Introduction Com-
puter Classes every Tuesday and
Thursday at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Reverend Willie McCrae, 305-
770-7064 or Mother Annie Chap-
man, 786-312-4260.

A Mission with a New Be-
ginning Church members invites
the community to their Sunday
Worship service at 11:15 a.m.
on Thursday, Prayer Meetings
at 6:30 p.m. and Bible Class at
7 p.m.


SWomen in Transition of
South Florida is sponsoring the
"Pearls of Great Worth" Summer
Breakfast" on August 13 at 9
a.m. 786-477-8548.

SThe H~eart of the City Min.
istries invites everyone to morn-
ing worship every Sunday at 9
a.m. and to their first Girls of
Inspiration program at 3 p.m. on
August 14. 305-754-1462.

SFamily and Children Faith
Coalition is looking for caring
and compassionate adults to
serve as mentors for their Amachi .
Mentoring Project. Free training
will be held August 16, 6 p.m. to
9,p.m. re;lpagisfbtpg~gtioppgraired.
786-388-3000.

SNew Life Family Worship
Center welcomes everyone to
their Wednesday Bible Study at 7
p.m. and their Let's Talk Women
IVinistry discussing 'Sex and the
Church' on August 20 at 1 p.m.
305-623-0054.

SThe Golden Bells are cel
ebrating their 33rd Singing An-
niversary on August 13 at Tab- ~
ernacle Baptist Church at 7:30
p.m.; August 20th at the Word of
Truth Church at 7: 30 p.m.; and
August 21 at New Covenant at 3
p.m. 786-251-2878.

SHoly Ghost Faith Deliver,
ance MVinistries, Inc. celebrates


their pastor's 13th anniversary
with services on August 9 14th
and August 21.

SHoly Ghost Assembly of
the Apostolic Faith is hosting a
dinner sale on August 24, 12:30
p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

SGreater St. James Mis-
stonary Baptist International
Church invites you to their an-
nual Women's Day Celebration
on August 14 at' 11 a.m.

SJordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church welcomes the
community to celebrate their
55th Anniversary on August 14
at 7 a.m. and 11 a.m.

SLittle Rock Primitive Bap-
tist Church is hosting their an-
nual meeting, August 19-21, 1
p.m. daily. 786-294-8179.

SThe God is Love Church is
holding reunion for all members
past and present on Sept. 10,
11 a.m. 6 p.m. at the Newport
Beach Resort. 786-406-4240.

SGreater St. Luke Primitive
Baptist Church invites everyone
to their 50th Anniversary Concert
on August 12 at 7:30 p.m. 954-
391-8395,954-966-7656.

SEmmnanuel Missionary Bap-
tist Church invites the commu-
nity to Family and Friends Wor-


BV David Roach

Although the offerings in
most American churches
have met or exceeded bud-
get requirements in 2011,
the economy is still having
a negative impact on many
local congregations.
That's the finding of a
LifeWay Research survey of
1,000 Protestant pastors
that compared with simi-
lar surveys from November
2009 through January
2011.
According to the new sur-
vey released Aug. 11 71 per-
dLdhi of' abidris report 2# 1f'
offerings at or in excess of
their budget requirements.
That includes 25 percent
with offerings exceeding
budget requirements and
46 percent writh offerings
approximately at budget
level. When comparing
2011 offerings to 2010:
*22 percent of pastors
report lower offerings in
2011.


*36 percent say offerings
are at about the same level
as last year.
*39 percent report an
increase from 2010.
On average, churches re-
port a two percent increase
in 2011.
Churches with larger wlor-
ship attendance are more
likely to have increased of-
ferings. Nearly half (49 per-
cent) of congregations with
100-249 attendees report
increased offerings from
2010, as do 47 percent of
congregations with 250 or
more. In comparison, 34
gib~cehff f'c~~ifufhes With "~~
50-99 attendees and 23
percent of those with 0-49
report increased offerings
this year.
"Just as there are some
positive signs in the U.S.
economy, we are seeing
more churches with some
growth in offerings for
2011," said Scott McCon-
nell, director of LifeWay
Research.


ministry.
"I've been in quite a few
churches where I was not
welcomed in the pulpit," she
said. "It doesn't bother me be-

Bies whew ver rn, c tr
still expound upon the word
of God."


JAMES
continued from 12B

something that I always did
like help the homeless and
visitbr tered wmen in their
But not everyone has ac-
cepted James and her new


CARVIL
continued from 12B

through [to get baptized] is be-
cause of the tradition and is the
religious thing to do," he said.
"But what really matters is
accepting Jesus. Christ into
your heart. Wherever you go
to worship at that, it's up to
you," he said.
His message appears to be
appealing. The Living Word
Baptist Church currently
has an official membership
of 100 with an estimated 55


of them currently active.
The church also offers sev-
eral active ministries. It was
the original home for the now
community-based liturgical
dance ministry, D.C.L.A.R.E.
(Dancers Called, Led and
Anointed to Reach Everyone)
which was founded by Car-
vil's daughter, Genevieve.
While the church continues
to grow, Carvil finds him-
self filling a variety of roles,
from the traditional roles of
teacher and counselor to oth-
er ones including radio host


and maintenance man,
But he says he does not
mind the additional respon-
sibilities.
"I'm a team player," he
said. "If something needs to
be done at the church then
I'm on it." His can-do attitude
combined with pastoral roles
and a full time job as the
sergeant at arms for City of
Miami Mayor Tomas Regala-
do -means Carvil generally
works on a daily basis one
way or another.
When asked how he man-


ages his full schedule, the
married father of three
laughed and said, "I thank
God for a lovirig family and
I thank God that he has
blessed me with the energy
to do it."
And while his family re-
mains understanding, Carvil
still makes a conscious effort
to spend time with them.
"I believe if you want some-
thing to be successful then
you have to keep working at
it, so I make time to spend
with my family," he said.


After receiving a Bible, the man
was encouraged and expressed
a desire to read from Scripture
every night with his family.
The partnership with South-
ern Baptist volunteers has for-
tified the Haitian pastors' con-
fidence in facing an uncertain
future, Blackmon added. He
quoted one pastor as saying,
"All the buildings in Haiti could
collapse again, but the Word of
God will stand forever."


HAITI '
cotninued from 13B

*Several families in a re-
mote area of Gressier, where no
church exists, made decisions
to follow Jesus and asked for
help starting a church.
*Pastor Voltaire, working in
the badly damaged area of Bon
Repos, recently counseled a fa
their who was concerned he had
neglected his family spiritually.


"I just want to make sure that
they have the whole concept so
that they can move on to other
levels if they desire," he said.
Smith likens the program to
job placement assistance that
gets applicants ready for their
interview. However, they do not
guarantee that their former
students will be employed.
During the showcases, stu-
dents are often able to share
the same venue with more es-
tablished gospel groups like
The Heavenly Express Band
and Voices of Love.
For saxophone player Law-
rence McCoy, associating
with MuforGo Production has
brought welcomed opportuni-
ties for his 17-year-old group,


MUFORGO
continued from 12B

"Our vision is to perfect the
will of God in everything," said
co-founder Pamela Walker,
Walker, who leads the com-
pany's liturgical dance division
- God's Gift of Praise Dance
Ministry has trained pro-
fessionally and even traveled
throughout the world with com-
panies such as the Alvin Ailey
and Soweto Dance companies,
Pragmatically, MuforGo of-
fers students classes in their
desired artistry field.
"Whether they are coming
in for dance or are musically
inclined, we help them get to
where they need to be," said


Robert Smith, co-founder of
MuforGo and a former singer
with the gospel group Voice
of Love. "After three or four
months we showcase the new
artists to let people know who
they are and put them on the
map," he said.
One of the company's focuses
is to educate students about
their art and the entertainment
industry. Smith, a former Mi-
ami-Dade County elementary
teacher, also has over 20 years
experience as a gospel singer
and songwriter and is an ac-
complished guitarist.
Besides classes in the basics,
Smith offers advice about the
"full concept of the music in-
dustry."


The Heavenly Express Band.
"The one thing that I've
gained from working with them
is exposure," said 48-year-old
McCoy.
The gospel musician ex-
plained that he has not taken
lessons at the Christian pro-
duction company but his belief
in their purpose and message
led him to accept invitations to
perform at MuforGo's events in
order to expand the playing ter-
ritory for his group.
"When [Muforgo] call us to
perform in Miami, I jump at it
because we're trying to do more
programs here," he said.
For more information about
MuforGo Production, visit
www.muforgo.com.


McGill Terrell, Daisy Williams,
Johnnie Mae Buckles McCarty,
John Goodman, Nellie Green,
Jonnie Buckles McCarty, Al-
thea Ferguson McMillon, Peggy
Brown Hall (Lee), Oscar El-
lis (Thelma), Orville E. Saun-
ders (Zellene), Karetha Times,
George Williams, Mary Atwell,
Lillie Atwell Holloway (Gleason),
Robert Mapp, Fredricka Woods
Pol, and Barbara Scott Gaines.
In addition to the traditional
reunion held on June 9 -12,
the Booker T. Washington High
School Alumni Association
united all graduating classes
ending in "1" on Sunday, May
29.


BTW
continued from 13B

moments of our high school
days."
Among the Booker T. Wash-
ington Senior High School
Class of 1961 classmates who
attended were Velma Bouie Ar-
Snold, Barbara Carr Symonette,
Kelsey Dorsett, Rose Ann Henry
Franks, Lillie Herring Beneby,
Elois Hollingsworth Hayes,
Freddie Johnson, Gus Mar-
shall, Bloneva Morland Smith,
JoAnn Payne Dunn, Yvonne
Robinson Pickett, Annie Thom-
as Starkes, Erma Webster Sol-
omon, Arlester Young, Rose


B 41 THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST10-16, 2011


Rising number of women becoming unchurched


Poll: Economy still hits


many churches hard


ChuTCH IOcuses on outreach


MUFOrgo teaches students the arts, show business














,


'Food can act as medicine' -Americans know it


I TOp five functiondl foods:


SO Soon about yoxir departed

lOved one? Keep them in

yOur memory with an

In memorism or a

happy birthday remembrances

ill Our obituary section.



CR11 ClRSsified 305-694--6225

CRS Si fied@miam time sonline .com


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Marriage good for gay health?

Citing new research, psychology

group supports gay marriage E-a,


merous recent studies, includ-
ing findings that "many gay
men and lesbians, like their
heterosexual counterparts, de-
sire to form stable, long-lasting
and' committed intimate rela-
tionships and are successful in
doing so."
It adds that "emerging evi-
dence suggests that. statewide
campaigns to deny same-sex
couples legal access to civ-
il marriage are ,a significant
source of stress to the lesbian,
gay and bisexual residents of
tho e saes and may haveone -
ical ivell-being."
Six states (Connecticut, Iowa,
Massachusetts, New Hamp-
shire, New York and Vermont)
and the District of Columbia al-
low same-sex marriage.
"Psychologists have been
very important in helping to
keep the discussion at a fact-
based level and not let it steer
off into stereotypes," says M.V.
Lee Badgett, research director
at the non-profit Williams In-
stitute on Sexual Orientation
SLaw & Public Policy at the Uni-
versity of California-Los Ange-
les.
Sociologist W. Bradford Wil-
cox, director of the National
Marriage Project at the Univer-
sity of Virginiia-Charlottesville,
says his board is divided on
the issue and hasn't taken ~a.


By Sharon Jayson

WASHINGTON The world's
largest organization of psychol-
ogists took its strongest stand
to date supporting full marriage
equity, a move that observers
say will have a far-reaching im-
pact on the national debate.
The policymaking body of the
American Psychological ,Asso-
ciation (APA) unanimously ap-
proved the resolution 157-0 on
the eve of the group's annual
convention, which opens here
today group, with more than
154,000 members, has long
supported full equal rights for
gays, based on social science
research on sexual orientation.
Now the nation's psychologists
- citing an increasing body of
research about same-sex mar-
riage, as well as increased d~isa
cussion at the state andi fedbrao
levels took the support to a
new level.
"Now as the country has re-
ally begun to have experience
with gay marriage, our posi-
tion is much clearer and maore
straightforward that mar,-
riage equity is the policy that
the country should be moving
toward," says Clinton Ander-
son, director of APA's Office
on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and,
Transgender Concerns.
The resolution 150ints to nu-


By Jim Sellisch

So I'm pre~tty amped. I mean
I'tn hoppin'. I typbd those last
two sentences in less than a
second. I went out for a bike
ride earlier toi~fy and got
pulled over for speeding. I'm
on my sixth cup of coffee. It's
part of mycancer-fighting

canc r iste nmb one
cancer among nien over 50.
But thankfully, you can do
Something about it. Di-ink up.
M ~ore Frencl3.Rodst, please. .
Add another shot of espresso
to that.
J l~ove coffee. Thank Gdd
e~:'tudies like this one that
~Piuaed in.the Journal of .
the National Cancer institute,
The study of 48,000 men
found that those~who drank
. more than s~ix~ cups of coffee, ~
SPer day reduced their iirik '.
of developing lethal prdatate :
cancer by 60 percent when
compared with non-coffee -
"''drinkprs..And if you're'not big
.h on affine, the 'good Inews in
the study is that decaf also -
,works. .
I'm also.drinking 64 qunces.
of water a day. That sdeens
.to be~th~e oise thing everyZie
dari~arde air Drink loia of -:
w~ter. Your yoga instructor .


of-thoriedist. Wh~o doesn't
uIrjderstand th~e toxic-
. cleansing joint-lu bricating-
Ildn-bydrating benefits


of water?
There's on'e business
downside, though. i find that
clients don't appreciate it
when I excuse myself from
meetings every nine minutes:
Besides the water and the
coffee, I'n trying to drink
pure, unsweetened cranberry
juice. It's great for preventilieg.

stn sd yor urde, it'rettyr
bitter, so I have to mix it
with plenty of pomegranate
juice which,= thankfully,
helps reduce plaque-buidld !.
up on the arteries and may
help delay that onset of
Alzheimer's. And I always
try to drink several caxps of
green tea each day. I wouldn't
Want to deprive my body of its
powieiful antioxidants. Which
is why I also imbibe as much'
pure blueberry jliic~e as I~can -,.
afford. Ah, the wonderful
world of beverages. I salute
you.
In fact, I propose a toast
to you. Raise, high, your~
wine glasses, comrades-
in-preventive health. Just
make sure they're filled with
nice Cab or Merlot, even~a -
Z infandcel will glo. As long as,
it~sred. Studies have found
thaf. red wine can help lpwer u
bad cholesterol and blood


a couple of glasses take the
edge~off all that caffeine you
ingested in the battle against
prostate cancer.


-Steve Pfost, AP
LEGALLY WED: Kathy Kane, left, and Mary K~ane embrace
each other after saying their marriage vows in a mass wedding
ceremony for gay couples.


stance on same-sex marriage.
He says the APA resolution will
likely have a broad impact.
"I don't think it's very sig-
nificant for the population at
large, but I do think this move
is significant for the ongoing
public policy and legal battles
in Washington and around the
states," he says.
Clinical psychologist ~Mark
Hatzenbuehler, a Robert Wood
Johnson Foundation Health &
Society Scholar at Columbia
University in New York City,
whose new research is cited in
the resolution, says the courts
tend to look'.at these kinds of
policy statements because
"they're really looking to see


what social science research
says about the influerice on gay
marriage and marriage bans
on a whole host of outcomes."
Badgett's research of gay
marriage across cultures is
also cited in the resolution.
She says the Netherlands was
the first to allow gay couples
to marry, and it showed "very.
little change in the overall so-
ciety, but it was very important,
to gay couples themselves."
The last APA resolution on
sexual orientation and mar-
riage was approved in 2004.
The resolution notes that since
that time, APA has worked on
11 amicus briefs filed in same-
sex marriage cases since 2004.


By Alice Baghdjian

A sweet tooth might not be
the only reason why we reach
for ice cream and cake in times '
of stress.
Comfort from the consump-
tion of fatty foods is not derived ;
pueyfosensory experience of eating ,

but..asrteethg~rg-ouglanisgui-bomssig-us rm (
nal ng, according to a tudy by ,, ,
scien~tidts ';if~ Me Imversity of
Leuven, in Belgium.
The study, which was pub-
lished in the Journal of Clini-
cal Investigation, used MRI Alexis Colen
scans to investigate the effects
of fatty acids on emotion when potato fritter
directly injected into the stom- apartment in


The results showed that
those who were injected with
fatty acids were only half as
sad after watching the images
'and listening to the music as
the participants who were giv-
en the saline.solution.
"Eating fat seems to inake
us less vulnerable to sad etno- .
tions, even if we' don't know
we're eating fat," Lulgas v 94
Ou<@@T~rFe, wFA'o led the re-
search, told medical research
news website HealthDay.
"We bypassed sensory stim
ulation by infusing fatty ac-
ids directly into the stomach'
without the subjects knowing
whether they were getting fat
or saline," he said.
Although the study has impli-
cations for obesity, depression
and eating disorders, more re-
search is needed to determine
whether the findings may have
any value in treatment of the
illnesses, van Oudenhove said.


usually in p'e
providing adv
mate and perI
the rest.
Without kno
stance they r~


-Photo Credit Simon Newman
man spoons coriander creme fraiche onto sweet
s with fried halloumi during a brunch at her
London, March 5, 2011. Secret supper clubs,
ople's homes, have sprung up all over London
enturous foodies with the chanCe to eat in inti- .
sonal settings.
unteers rated their mood on a
wing which sub- scale of one to nine before arid
received, the vol- during scanning.


ach.
Scientists played mournful
music and showed sad images
to a group of 12 participants
before giving half the group
fatty acids through a feeding
tube and a saline solution to


entific studies coming
out, talking about
the benefits of a
food and its re-
lationship to good
health.
The IFIC defines
functional foods as
"foods or food compo-
nents that may pro-
vide benefits beyond
basic nutrition."
"People are 1,000 per-
cent more conscious of the
fact that food can act as medi-
cine and help prevent lots of
diseases," says Jean Carper,
author of several best-selling
books about functional food.
With such broad aware-
ness, are people actually eat-
ing heath foods? "Only about a
third of Americans say they're
making dietary changes be-
cause of a health condition,"
says Rahavi. More are "making
dietary changes because they
want to improve their overall
well-being, so they have ener-
gy to go about their day."


90 percent

can i'dentth

IHCtiOnal'far8

By GregorV Connolly

Say you eat yogurt for your
health, and most Americans
will know what you mean: You
are targeting that food's bone-
building calcium and gut-
friendly probiotics.
In fact, Americans are much
more aware of the health ben-
efits of specific functionala"
foods than they were a decade
ago, reports ~a survey released
today.
When the International Food
Information Council began its
survey in 1998, "only about
three-fourths of Americans
could name a food and its re-
lated -health benefits," says
the group's Elizabeth Rahavi.
"Now, almost nine out of 10
can. A lot has to do with sci-


1. Salmon: Heart, memory brain
2. Blueberries: Anti-aging, brain
3. Apples: Lung function (be sure to eat the
apple skin)
4. Nuts: Antioxidants, good fat
5. Legumes: Blood sugar, heart


Cost, taste and
availability were the
key reasons given for not eat-
ing health foods.
"Expense comes out on top,"
Rahavi says. "People have this
perception that functional
foods are more expensive, but
in reality, when you look at
something like a whole-grain
cereal or a yogurt, it's not." .
The survey was conducted
online by Cambridge, Mass.,
based Cogent Research. There
were 1,000 adults age 18 and
over in the survey with a mar-
gin of error of + or 3.1 per-


cent and a 95 percent confi-
dence level in the results.
Also noted in the survey:
*The nutrients and com-
ponents considered most im-
portant by Americans in the
survey include calcium (92
percent), vitamin D (90 per-
cent), protein (87 percent), B
vitamins (86 percent), ome-
ga-3 fatty acids (85 percent),
probiotics (81 percent) and fi-
ber (79 percent).
*95 percent of consum-
ers are confident they have a
"great" or "moderate amount"
of control over their health.


BV Parija Kadlaslns

NEW YORK --Doctors, hos-
pita~ls, nursing homes apd
pharmacies might not .get
paid for products and services
Sif the federal government de-
faults on its debt nexit week.
Some physician groups, an-
ticipating this scenario, have
started to warn their members
-that a possible default means


their 19[edicare paychecks may
tlot get -Ipailed. .
The AmPericB .Academy of
Family Physiks~; which hlas .
more thats:100,000 menibers, 1
alertedl. them this week that
a defau~lt' means the .~~i:'
ment will only have -~~~~i
money to pay about half lijt~: l
bills, resulting in alikely delay'
in Medicare payments to phy-
sicians.


la that scenario, the gov-
ernment would likely' halt.
Medicare reimbursements to
doctors until the debt ceiling
.insue is resolved, the g'rol1p
said.
. "We felt it was importarit
to tell our members for be
ready for this," said Dr.. Rq- ~
land Goertz, president of the
American Academy of Family
Physicians. "It is highly likely


that then* will be some impact
upon Medicare paymTerits."''
The American College/ ~i'.
Surgeons sent. out a l-ia
leilv iet enflailftoi jsPiif a
this 4weekl waF~rnm them tat
'"I Cdon~gressfand the pre~aerdet -
-edo not raise the.daeb$( ilingr
~by A~uag.,: there is4 De:
~that Medicare claimed wii not
be paid:'
Please turn to DOCTORS.A8B


16B 'THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


I'ntdrinking my


W'& Itoo health

' EVIrD E N C E- NOWV SHOW'S. .RIER S

A BE VERAGETO PRjEVENT J UST
ABOUT E VER Y DISEASE .


Fatty foods help curb sad emotions


S xx energy-boosting snacks

By Gregory Connolly in potato chips.
*Hummus and red bell P~p-
giftik pl .9B~I a 1b~2~~l g 11a r. i02kdb~hP!md fiberliYickf 2 ~;
the office do you know where pepper packed with vitamin C.
your energy is? Orange with nuts. Nut cal-
Joy Bauer, author of the new- ories add up fast: 1 1/2 ounces
ly revised "Food Cures" (Rodale, is all you need.
$21.99), has advice on eating to Grapes and part-skim string
help everything from your heart cheese. Full of high-quality
to your hair. "When it comes to carbs and protein.
energy, you really want things Apple with nut butter.
that help stabilize your blood- Dress a grab-and-go apple up
sugar levels," Bauer says. with a tablespoon of natural
"Some of the best foods will be nut butter peanut, almond
things that have a combination or cashew,
of protein, high-quality carbo- Homemade trail mix. Add
hydrates and fiber nuts and dried fruit to low-calo-
Her suggestions for snacks rie, high-fiber cereal.
that boost and sustain energy: Non-fat yogurt and ba-
*Soy crisps. Rich in protein nana. Choose a six-ounce- con-
and lacking the salt and grease tainer.


Doctors, hospials fear getting stiffed by U.S.





People with household incomes of
more than $75,000 live in neighbor- .
hoods with this share of household
making less than $40,000:
blon-Hispanic
White89%
Black 13.9%
Hispanic 13%
Asian ~Y ~~~~8.7% .
source: John Logan, Brown University sociologist
and director of the US2010 Project


WARD OFF
BAPD BREATHE)-
Whether you call it bad breath or halitosis,
it's an unpleasant condition that's cause for
embarrassment. Some people with bad breath
aren't even aware there's a problem.
If you're concerned about bad breath, see your
dentist. He or she can help identify the cause and,
if it's due to an oral condition, develop a treatment
plan. In the meantime, try these ~helpful hints,
courtesy of the American Dental Association:
*What you eat affects the air you exhale.
Avoid certain foods, such as garlic and onions,
that contribute to objectionable breath odor.
Brushing and mouthwash will only mask the odor
temporarily.
*Brush and floss daily so particles of food don't
re:in nthe mouth, collecting bacteria while

Prevent r mouth, hc~a be asdb
continuouslyy breathing throurgh~the mouth. Use an
.artificial saliva (prescribed by your dentist), chew
slugarless candy or gum, and increase your fluid
intake.
~Stop using tobacco products. Ask your dentist
for tips on kicking the habit.
*Bad breath may also be the sign of a medical
disorder, such as a local infection in the respiratory
tract, chronic sinusitis, post-nasal drip, chronic
bronclaitis, diabetes, gastrointestinal disturbance,
or a liver or kidney ailment.



SKIN FROM SUJNBURNS

BV Melissa Dahl

Important health tip for the summer: Drink more
wine! A better protection against .harmful sunburns
might be a healthy dose of SPF sauvignon blanc,
suggests a new Spanish study.
A compound found in grapes or grape derivatives
may protect skin Fells from skin-damaging ultravio-
let radiation, report researchers from the University
of Barcelona and the Spanish National Research
Council. The flavonoids found in grapes work to
halt the chemical reaction that kills skin cells and
causes suri damage. Here's what happens: When UV
rays hit your skin, they activate "reactive oxygen
species," or ROS, which then oxidize big molecules
like lipids and DNA.This activates particular en-
zymes that kill skin cells.
Brit grapes' flavonoids work to decrease the for-
mation of the ROS's in skin cells that were exposed
to UVA and UVB rays.The researchers, led by
Marta Cascante, a biochemist at the University of
Barcelona and director of the research project, note
that this finding may lead to better sun-shielding
drugs and cosmetics.
The study was published in the Journal of Agri-
cultural and Food Chemistry.
Previously, vino has also been' found to fight
Alzheimer's, ward off prostate cancer and even
prevent cavities. We'll drink to that.


Wltell-o~fjBla:cks,,Hispanincs likely to hkawe l:
relatively poor neighbors


384 es 1opoian aleas "Afri an
llive mn neighborhoods where people -
around them have not succeeded

tTh d sarte Tare strongest in
large metro areas in the Northeast
and Midwest where segregation
has always been high. It's lowest
in more recent booming parts of
the Sun Belt.
"White middle-class families
have the option to live in a com-
munity that matches their own
credentials," Logan'says. "If you're
African American and want to live
with people like you in social class,
Please turn to WEjALTH 18B


household t at makes less than
$40 000 a yar
"Separate translates to unequal
even for the most successful Black
and Hispanic minorities," said
sociologist John Logan, director of
UTS2010 Project at Brown Universi-
ty, which studies trends in Ameri-
can society.
"Blacks are segregated and even
affluent Blacks are pretty segre-
gated," said Logan, who analyzed
2005-2009 data for the 11ation's


By Haya El Nasser
The most successful Blacks and
Hispanics are more likely to have
poor neighbors than are whites,
according to new analysis of U.S.
Census Bureau data.
The average affluent Black and
Hispanic household defined in
Sthe study as earning more than
S$75,000 a year lives in a poorer
neighborhood than the average
lower-income non-Hispanic white .


. : - -- .


The Miami Times





Hea t


~em I n ess
Sponsored by North Shore Medical Center
"Once Yoiu Knoto, It's Wh~ere To Go "


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Wealth plays out differently by race


f V















Miami-Dade County places restrictions on pain clinics


Fish oil protects against colds


*Debt situation may have impact on healthcare system


Taking extra good care of your body while pregnant


Wealth depends on ethnicity


ASTHMA '
continued from 17B

among Blacks.
Carole Ober of the Univer-
sity of Chicago, who co-leads
. the EVE consortium, said the
findings confirm the signifi-
cance of four genes identified
in a large European asthma
genetics study published last
year called GABRIEL, offer-
ing strong evidence that these
genes are important across
ethnic groups.


Caring for a loved one with cancer


I B.^CKtS MlUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


an increase in prescription
drug abuse in Miami-Dade
County. Last August, the
South Florida Behavioral Net-
work gave a presentation to
the Florida Drug and Alcohol
Abuse Association; the find-
ings included ari increased
number of prescription drug-
related deaths due to oxyco-
done and benzodiazepines in
Miami-Dade County over the
past few years. The Miami-
Dade County Addiction Ser-
vices Board has reported that
nearly 1,000 infants born in
Florida hospitals were treated
for drug withdrawal in 2009,
priarily for writhdrawral from


oxycodone and other pre-
scription drugs. In addition,
the Florida Medical Examiner
Commission has released an-
nual and interim reports cit-
ing increases in opioid deaths.
While pain clinics are re-
quired to register with the
State of Florida, this ordi-
nance takes it a step further,
allowing for more local control,
the creation of a task force to
review the State's legislation
.on pain clinics and its effects
on Miami-Dade, and issuing a
moratorium on new pain clin-
ics for six months to allow any
additional ideas or recommen-
dations to be proffered to the


County Commission. Current-
ly, there are 109 pain clinics
in 1Miami-Dade County.
"There are many pain clinic
operators who adhere to the
requirements placed upon
them by the State of Florida
in order to run a legitimate
business. However, we cannot
ignore the prevalence of clin-
ics which knowingly prescribe
medication to addicts and
'doctor shoppers,"' said Com-
missioner Jordan. "This kind


On Tuesday, August 2, the
Miami-Dade Commission ap-
proved an ordinance spon-
sored by Commissioner Bar-
bara J. Jordan that requires
all owners of pain clinics
within the county to register
their clinic with the Depart-
ment of Consumer Services
(CSD). Clinics will not only be
required to display this regis-
tration for their patients, but
CSD will maintain a database
of registered clinics to ensure
none are involved in the ille-
gal distribution of prescription
medications.
Several South Florida or-
ganizations have reported


of unconscionable practice
can lead to crime in the sur-
rounding area, not to mention
death by the users who abuse
these powerful drugs. This or-
dinance makes it even more
difficult for those 'pill mills' to
operate within our borders."
The ordinance will be effec-
tive ten days after the passage
of the legislation. A detailed
copy of the ordinance can be
found online here: www.mi-
amidade.gov.


BARBARA J. JORDAN
Miami-Dade Commission


FISH OIL
continued from 17B

The new momns were inter-
viewed at one month, three
months and six months after
the babies were born. Each
hie eth wbme insere ask d
whethr thebabie hadexp ri
enced various respiratory symp.
toms, such as cough, phlegm,
nasal congestion and wheezing

wee eals aea if whdte rT ti
infants had caught a cold dur-
mng that time
At one month, babies whose
mothers took DHA experienced
shorter periods of respiratory
symptoms when they got sick.
As for the imnmune-boosting
effect, Ramakrishnan points to
earlier research showing that
the function of a host of differ-
ent kinds of cells can be im-
p 1 ed by olmteeIh fatty aci t/e
results will hold up. Earlier


research suggested that DHA
supplements might boost cog-
nitive development in babies,
but large study published last
year in the Journal of the Amer-
ican Medical Association found
no such impact. he ft
division ofuMate na-Fetal Medie
cieat the Uniest of Penn
sylvai in lt Sy tm, is wi-
ing for more research fore he
plemsn rcmm iendng s.e sup-
"'We don't think DHA causes
harm in pregnancy," he said.
"But we're skeptical that it re-
bll ps prevent co ds in ba-
bies."
tParry, member of the Cen-
ter fr Rse rhon Rpro uc-
tion and Women's Health, also
urged pregnant women to be
careful when choosing any nu-
tritional supplements, because

federal Food and Drug Admin-
istration.


Goertz said a halt in payments
is a serious issue to physicians,
esPecially since about a quar-
ter of all patients seen by his
group's members are Medicare
beneficiaries.
"Unfortunately that percent-
age has been dropping anyway
because of Medicare reimburse-
ment problems to doctors," Go-
ertz said.
He fears that a longer-term
ripple effect of a default could
worsen that trend.
A stoppage in payments be-
cause of default could threaten
to turn more physicians away
from Medicare patients, he said,
adding that doctors who aren't
getting paid may look to replace
Medicare patients with those
who do ensure that physicians


will be paid.
The American Medical Associ-
ation, whose more than 250,000
members include doctors, medi-
cal students and faculty mem-
bers, said it has contacted the
administration and "expressed
the importance of continuing
to process Medicare claims to
ensure physicians are paid in a
timely manner and protect se-
niors' access to health care.
The American Hospital Asso-
ciation said in a statement to
CNNMoney that it was unclear
what impact a default would
have on hospitals.
"When there was the possibil-
ity of a government shutdown,
[the government] did not issue
specific guidance about pay-
ments to hospitals until the


very last minute. We expect
that would be the same case
here as well," said Matt Fen-
wick, spokesman for the hospi-
tal group.
The Centers for Medicare
8& Medicaid Services declined
to say whether Medicare pay-
ments to health care providers
would be affected if a default
occurs.
In a statement to CNNMoney'
the agency said: "As the presi-
dent has said repeatedly over
the past six months, there is no
alternative to raising the debt
limit. The only way to prevent a
default crisis and protect Amer-
ica's creditworthiness is to en-
act a timely debt limit increase,
which we remain confident
Congress will do."


DOCTORS
continued from 16B

In 2010, the federal govern
ment paid out $515.8 billion in
total Medicare benefits to health
care providers, including doc-
tors, hospitals, nursing facili-
ties, home health care centers
and pharmacies
Here's a breakdown of Medi-
care payments to those provid-
ers last year:
$168 billion to hos itals
$64.5 billion to doctors
$26.9 >billion to nursing fa-
cilitiesng
*$19.1 billion to home health
centers
*$61.7 billion to. pharmacies
as part of Medicare's prescrip-
tion drug programs.


SPENCE
conusulrlr~ from 17B

with nausea, try eating five or
six small meals a day, rather
than three large ones.
Drink plenty of fluids, but
stay away from large amounts
of caffeine, which have been
associated with a higher .rate
of miscarriage. Becoming
dehydrated can cause
premature or early labor. Avoid
drinking alcohol while pregnant,
as this can damage a developing
baby's nervous system, as well
as cause growth retardation or
facial abnormalities. Also stop
smoking. Smoking is linked .
to stillbirth, prematurity, low
birth weight, sudden infant
death syndrome, asthma and
other respiratory problems
Check with your doctor or
certified nurse-midwife about
starting or continuing an
exercise program. The U.S.


Department of Health and
Human Services recommends
that healthy pregnant women
get at least two and a half hours'
of moderate-intensity aerobic
activity each wetek or about 30
minutes every da~y. Exercising
regularly can help improve sleep,
prevent excess weight gain,
lower the risk of developing
preeclampsia or gestational
diabetes, reduce recovery time
and ease pregnancy-related
problems, such as back pain,
constipation, varicose veins,
swelling and exhaustion.
Over-the-counter or
prescription medications may
not be safe for a developing
fetus. If you were taking a
medication before you became
pregnant, ask your health care
provider if it is safe to continue.
Have regular dental check-
ups because some pregnant
. women may experience red,
swollen~ gums that bleed.


easily. During `pregnancy,
women should avoid exposure
to environmental hazards
including lead, mercury,
arsenic, pesticides, solvents
and secondhand smoke that
could potentially lead to
miscarriage or birth defects.
Healthy pregnancy habits
should start early as early in
the pregnancy as possible, or
even before you get pregnant.
For more information about
staying healthy and safe
during your pregnancy, talk
with your doctor or visit the
March of Dimes Web site at
www. marchofdimes. com.
,North Shore Medical Center
offers advanced medical care
by skilled professionals, who
have the experience to handle
routine deliveries and fully
address any complications
that may occur. NSMC has
been delivering babies for a
half century, and their services


have earned the highest
quality ranking. The facilities
at North Shore Medical Center
are designed for the comfort
of you and your family. Each
member of our staff is trained
to enhance the experience of
giving birth. From prenatal
educational classes to our
Neonatal Intensive Care, from
our obstetricians to nursing
staff, all North Shore's services
are focused on' you and your
baby-
North Shore Medical Center
also features the only Level III
Neonatal Intensice Care Unit
(NICU) in Northeren Miami-
Dade county. Services include
24~-hour coverage of certified
neonatologists, perinatologists
to treat high risk pregnancies,
and pediatric surgeons.
For more information on
maternity services or classes
at North Shore Medical Center,
please call 305-835-6000.


WEALTH.
continued from 17B

you have to live irk a community
where you are in the minority."
Suburbs of Atlanta and Wash-
ington, D.C., are exceptions be-
cause they are home to large,
affluent Black populations in
established neighborhoods.
In Philadelphia, Hispanics.
live in neighborhoods that are
25.4 percent poor and affluent
Hispanics in areas that are 13.7
percent poor.
The average white household
lives in neighborhoods that
are 8.4 percent poor. But fast-
growing cities in Nevada, Flori-
da, Georgia and North Carolina
show a much narrower gap.
Affluent Blacks are more ex-
posed to poverty than the av-
erage non-Hispanic white in all
but two of the top 50 metro ar-
eas with the most Black house
holds: Las Vegas and Riverside,
Calif.
"Newer growth is less segre-
gatedlo sad RoderickdHarr~i n,
sity and at the Joint; Center for
Political and Economic Stud-


ies, a Washington, D.C., think
tank. "People are coming into
neighborhoods that have not
become characterized as Black
or white or Hispanic. They're
moving in, on a more equal
footing."
Except for the most affluent
Asians, minorities at every in-
come level live in poorer neigh-
borhoods than do whites with
comparable incomes. Affluent
Asians are 'actually less ex-
posed to poverty in their neigh-
borhoods than even affluent
whites and live in whitfer neigh-
borhoods than poor Asians.
Neighborhood poverty is
linked to lower-quality schools
and health care and to higher
crime rates.
"Even though they have in-
come comparable to whites,
they don't have access to
schools or other neighborhood
amenities that would be com-
parable to those available to
white families," Harrison said.
"Some better-off Black and
Hissph in families are never h-
lems poor Blacks and Hi'span-
ics are living with.


But because the study wras
so large and ethnically diverse
- including data on European
Americans, Blacks, African
Caribbeans and Latinos it
enabled the researchers to find
this new gene variant that ex-
ists only in Blacks and African
Caribbeans. -
This new variant, located in a
gene called PYHIN1i, is part of a
family of genes linked with the
body's response to viral infec-
tions, Ober said.
"We were very excited when


we realized it doesrtt exist in
Europe," she said.
The team stressed that each
gene variant on its own plays
~only a small role in increas-
ing asthma risk, but that risk
could be multiplied when com-
bined with other risk genes and
with environmental factors,
such as smoking, that also in-
cre'ase asthma risk.
"It's been extraordinarily
challenging to try to find varia-
tion in genes that are associ-
ated with risk for developing


asthma that can be replicated
among populations. It's a very
complex disease with a lot of
genes and a lot of environmen-
tal factors influencing risk,"
Ober said.
The findings now give re-
searchers new areas to explore
in understanding the interplay
of genetics and the environ-
ment in asthma risk, and may
lead to better treatments.
"What you see here in this
paper is only the beginning,"
Nicolae said.


Special to the NNPA


needs change during and af-
ter cancer treatment, your
role will also change aild the
entire experience can affect
your quality of life. There may
be physical and emotional de-
mands from cat~egiving, and,
for some, social and money
issues as well.
Cancer patients may need
help with mainy basic ac-
tivities during the day, such
as using the toilet, moving
arouncl the house and chang-
ing positions in bed. As you
try to meet the physical de-
mands of caregiving, you
need to take care of yourself.
In the beginning, there~may
be a lot of support from your
friends and you may be able
to continue working and keep
up your relationships. But
some caregivers note that as


they continue to care for their
loved one, the time demands
may increase and friends may
call or visit less often. If this
happens' to you, and if there
are problems in your relation-
ship with the patient, your
sense of isolation can become
a problem and you may want
to seek outside help. On the
other hand, the challenges of
caregiving can also bring you
closer to the patient as you
help them cope with the chal-
lenges cancer brings.
There are many financial
costs of cancer. Families
must pay insurance deduct-
ibles, co-payments, and the
cost of services that are not
covered by insurance, such
as transportation and home
care help. Some caregivers
give up, their jobs and in-


come so they can stay home
with the' patient, which can
make it harder to pay for ev-
erything. And financial stress
often causes additional emo-
tional stress.
All of these~ changing cir-
cumstances, new feelings and
major demands on your time
can be overwhelming. But
this is a crucial time to care
for your own mind, body, and
spirit. Giving care and sup-
port during cancer isn't easy,
yet many caregivers find that
it helps them look at life in'
new ways. Some caregivers
find it helpful to join a sup-
port group or to talk to a
counselor, psychologist, or
other mental health profes-
sional. For additional infor-
mation go to www.cancer.
gov.


Many cancer patients to-
day receive part of their care
at home. People with cancer
are living longer and many
patients want to be cared for
at home as much as possible.
This support is often given by
family caregivers, who may
be spouses, partners, chil-
dren, relatives, or friends
anyone who is helping a loved
one get through cancer treat-
ment. Today, family caregiv-
ers do many things that used
to be done in the hospital or
a doctor's office. In fact, they
play a large role in the health
care system in the U.S.
Your life will change in
many ways when you begin
to provide care for someone
with cancer. As the patient's


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Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St.* Miaml, FL 33127-1818 or
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i


'wwdveenobMa Mestax


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Asthma related gene mn most Blacks recently discovered











i ~19B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


BLACE;s MusT CONTROL. THEIR OWNr DESTISv


Joe Lee Wilson, a leader of '70s loft-jazz movement, dies at 75


WOmen's Day at Greater St. James
Greater St. James M.B. In-
ternational Church will host
their 54th Annual Women's
Day. Mrs. Jinnie Cooper, the
wife of J.W. Cooper, Emeritus
of St. Mark Missionary Baptist
Church, will be our speaker at
11 a.m. worship services.
The church is located at 4875
N.W. 2nd Avenue, 305-693- n~~~S
2726. Chairperson, Mrs. Jan-


Dr. William H. Washington,
Sr. is the pastor. Mrs. Jinnie Cooper


Actress, singer Jane W~hite dead at 88


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue

Order of Services
Wed lurarlr.\ory Plraer
Vom rn12pm
Morn~oJ lernlIold rr.

Slue, Playl~rlry Me 130 p a.
ir. I.bl irudy I 30 a


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
mcl~~~Y~ic~lmmLrmimiWW
Order of Services
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Doy Prayer
Billi Skluly, Thurs 7 p.m.
Sunday Worship l-ll e.m.
Sunday School 9:30 e.m.





St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sunday I 30 nd l 1 m
Wor*,Fup Irr le


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services

Sluodrl monday War h~p 10 on o
undlayno 5~l holu i 30 e m


93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist (hurch
2330 N.W. 93rd Street

SOrder of Services
1 30 em [ady MorningWorship
belm ~ nlng worshlp
ble &3rd Sunday b p
luasday lible !ludr I p m
wbsrre rmbs org




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Avenue

Order of Services
LS ulday Shool V 30om
i"" rn.ng Prese worthp 11


New Birth Baptist (burch, The (athedrol of Faith International
2300 N.W. 135th Street


Pembroke Park (hurch of Chr st
3707 5.W. 56th Avenue Hol ywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a.m. Morning Worship 10 a.m.

Wednesday Ge~neral Bible Study7:30 p.m
Television Program Sure Foundation
SMy33 WBFS/{omtast 3 Saturday 7:30 a m.


I


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street


Sunday 5thool 9 45 m
jlible Study Thusday 1 30 p mur IIo
roulh Ministry
SMon Wed 6 pm





Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Avenue

Order of Services
~ery Worship 7 a.m.
Suknday School 9 e.m.


The sisters appeared in Patti
LaBelle s 1990 television spe-
cial "Going Home to Gospel."
In 2008, they received the Am-
bassador Bobby Jones Legend
Award at the Stellar Awards'
the national gospel music
awards show.
Campbell' s husband, the
Rev. Frank Campbell, died
in 2000. The couple had four
children; two are deceased.
The surviving members of
the Barrett Sisters, Rodessa
Barrett Porter and Billie Bar-
rett GreenBey, sang with guest
vocalist Tina Brown in March
2011 to celebrate Campbell's
85th birthday at a gospel
concert in a Chicago church.
Campbell, her voice dimin-
ished to a whisper, watched
from a chair near the altar.
In a video clip from the con-
cert, Brown paid tribute to
Campbell. "She is my personal
queen of the gospel," Brown
said.


group was.
The trio shared a gospel lin-
eage with the greats. In the
girls' youth, Thomas A. Dorsey,
now considered the father of
gospel, was stirring up change
as music director of the city's
Pilgrim Baptist Church, where
he mixed the worldly and the
sacred during the Great De-
pression.
The Roberta Martin Sing-
ers, a touring gospel group,
emerged from. Pilgrim Bap-
tist's youth choir, and Camp-
bell joined it when she wras
in high school. The popular
music of the Andrews Sisters
also influenced Campbell and
her sisters. When they were
young, they practiced blending
their voices on both religious
and secular songs. The sisters
recorded their first album to-
gether, "Jesus Loves Me," in
the mid-1960s.
New generations discovered
the Barrett Sisters when they
appeared in the 1982 docu-
mentary "Say Amen, Some-


Liberty lity Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street


By Carla K. Jono

CHICAGO (AP) Delois Bar-
rett Campbell, a member of the
award-winning Barrett Sisters
trio who electrified audiences
worldwide with their power-
ful gospel harmonies, died last
Tuesday. She was 85.
Campbell died at a Chicago
hospital after a long illness,
her daughter, Mary Campbell
said
The Barrett Sisters, raised
on Chicago's South Side and
coached to sing by an aunt,
grew up to become what mu-
sic critic Howard Reich of the
Chicago Tribune has called
"the greatest female trio in gos-
pel history." Campbell was the
oldest of the three.
"I believe she was born to
sing," Mary Campbell said of
her mother in a July 2011 in-
terview with The Associated
Press. "Each time she sang it
was as if she were perform-
ing to a cathedral full of peo-
ple, no matter how small the


Order of Servits ices Su pm
SUNDAY: Worship Servte
Morning 10 0.m.
(hurch School 8:30 e.m.
WEONE50AY
feeding Ministry 12 noon


i"^


Father Denrick Rolle


body."
New Yorker film critic Pau-
line Kael described the trio as
"dramatic, physically striking
women with ample figures in
shiny, clinging blue gowns."
She wrote that they "sing so
exhilaratingly that they create
a problem." Kael wanted more
music, less talking, in the film.
The film opened doors for the
Barrett Sisters, Mary Campbell
said. "That's when they began
their European travels," she


Antioch Missionary Baptist
(hurch of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street

Order of Services
(burth Sunday 5thool 8 30 n m
lundy Wlorship \er...e 10 n m







First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsvi le
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
ggg~1~TZ~Zigygggigipyg IY
Order of Services

n..rinr I7cc I al

baers Ihur! belo 8


were not released,
and although he
went on to record for
various small labels,
and to enjoy criti-
cal praise and somne
success especially
in Europe, where he
spent the last three
decades of his life
-- he stayed largely


New York Musicians'
Jazz Festival, featur-
ing avant-gardists wrho
felt snubbed by the
Newport Jazz Festival,
which was presented
in New York for the
first time that sum-
mer. A year later, Wil-
son was on the New-
port-New York bill.


as jazz 10fts, which served as
valuable showcases and work-
shops for more experimental
types of jazz at a time when
musicians were finding emn-
ployment opportunities scarce
and nightclubs were going out
of business.
The Ladies' Fort wras a shoe-
string operation, generating
more enthusiasm than money,
"Since we were turned down for
a grant, we pay the musicians
by giving them two-thirds of
the receipts we take in at the
door," Wilson told The New
York Times in 1977. "The other
third goes for the rent. Which
is two months behind." The La-
dies' Fort closed in 1979.


By Peter Keepnews

Joe Lee Wilson, an acclaimed
singer who was also a leader of
the loft-jazz movement in the
1970s, died last Sunday at his
home in Brighton, England. He
was 75.
The cause was congestive
heart failure, his wife, Jill, said.
Wilson, a baritone with a res-
onant, seductive voice in the
tradition of Billy Eckstine and
a style rooted in the blues of
his native Southwest, seemed
destined for big things when he
signed with Columbia Records
in 1969. But for reasons that
remain unclear, most of the re-
cordings he made for Columbia


By Paul Vitello

Jane White, an actress who
made her reputation in the
1960s and '70s in Shakespear-
ean and classical Greek drama
in New York but who felt hamp-
peredd by the racial attitudes of
casting directors toward light-
skinned Black performers like
herself, died on July 24 at her
home in Greenwich Village. She
was 88.
The cause was cancer, said


Joan K. Harris, her friend and
executor.
White, who also employed a
rich mezzo-soprano voice as a
sometime cabaret singer, spoke
openly about the peculiar ra-
cial challenge she faced in the
1960s: though roles for Black
performers were increasing,
casting agents were continu-
ing to think mainly in terms of
"Black" parts and "white" parts.
"I've just always been too
whitet' to be 'Black' and too


under the radar for
most of his career.
In the early 1970s Wilson be-
came closely associated with
the jazz avant-garde, working
with the saxophonist Archie
Shepp and other exponents
of free jazz. In 1972 he was
among the organizers of the


At around the same
time, W;ilson opened the 100-
seat Ladies' Fort in a base-
ment on Bond Street in NoHo.
It quickly became one of the
most noteworthy of the do-it-
yourself musician-run perfor-
mance spaces in Lower Man-
hattan, known generically


: unrday 5hoal P hem
lun Mormul q S~i r II a

j lud~Bbrld


igEg
vices


rdr 5 pm
udy 5 pm
lp bpm


IVl~ Vlll1


St. John Baptist (hurch
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


Order of Services
larl, Jurds
LIemlngWorsh~p lQUrnm
\ Slunds,',hool 930am
\ omn~ng worse.,11. .
re nd B~blr Itudr
&Ing (rue:1p m


:*


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church Minister Brother Job Israel
740 N.W. 58th Street (Hbe Irelie)

\iOrder of Services aniaFedm
Hour of Prayer 6.30 o.m. Early Morning Wolrhip 1:30 e.m. Lr Pr~lon MlnI:lrly
Sunday School 9 30 a m Morning Worship 11 a m ,aP ( Jo !a 201

SYouth Mlnisryrl Studyr Wed 7 p.m Prayer..'8Ible study, Wed 7 p m Jsn.l L32
Noonday Allar Prayer (M-F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesda . 11 aml 1p m dt Bibrle I prsnudie Dpoln 244
=;; www.irlendshlpmbtmlo ora frrendshlnorover~lbe~llouth net irr t lp n D 4


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue


Order of Services
Sunday Mlirn~ng fl am
Sunday 5thrrl 1Uom
Sunday tening 6 pm
lue. Bible (Ints 6 30 pm
Ihur\ Fellowship 10 m r


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 1 a.m.,
11 o.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study


I (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiumi.org


Brownsville
Church of (hrist
4561 N.W. 33rd (ourt

Order of5er

s unday meri.nBl ware
Sunday L~dlIe Bible !Ir
S unday be.sngn Wonkh


,r:
,tlr


1 i


Gospel's Delois Campbell dead at 85 Father Rolle
"
t h t


said. It gave them the public-
"


On Sunday Au ust 14th,
the Reverend Fathe Denricl
Rolle, of the Anglican Diocese of
the Bahamnas, will be the guest
preacher and celebrant at the 9
a.m. worship.
Father Rolle is a deeply spiri-
tual person who is widely hailed
Throughout the Caribbean.
You are invited to worship
and fellowship with us on this
very special occasion.


rJ i

WILSON


-


Temple Missionary
Baptist (hurch
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue
I~iK~~,K~~TdO f Sb)L2~












208 THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011 1


~I~z=_ BLAiCKSi MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN\ DESTINY


WHITE
continued from 19B

'white' to be 'Black' and too
'Black' to be 'white,' which, you
know, gets to you after a while,
particularly when the roles keep
passing you by," she told an in-
terviewer in 1968.
She rebelled against such ra-
cial straitjacketing and es-
caped her limbo status by
choosing roles that transcend-
ed, or at least predated, the
American race problem.
She played the shrewish Kate


Happ Birthda

In loving memory of,


In loving memory of,


Complete Services
Starting From
$2695.,oo










11' ~11 *

-ust IOilow these three easy ,step

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3) In order to make sure your information is posted correctly,
you may hand deliver your obituary to one of our representa-
tives. Obituaries may also be sent to us by e-mail (classified@
miamitimesonline.com) or fax (305-694-6211).

For additional questions or concerns, please call us at 305-
694-6210 and we will be happy to provide you with quality
, 7.vice.


MOTHER BESSIE D.
PIERCE

your kind expression of
sympathy will always be held
in grateful remembrance.
May God bless each of you
is our prayer.
The Family


~HONOR YOUR :

LOVED ONE

WlITH-I AN

IN MEMORI~AM

IN THE


)r.


in "The Taming of the Shrew" at
the 1960 New York Shakespeare
Festival and Helen of Troy in a
1963 production of "The Trojan
Women," directed by Michael
Cacoyannis, who died on July
25. A pair of roles in the 1965
Shakespeare Festival Volum-
nia, the mother of the title char-
acter in "Coriolanus" and the
princess mn "Love's Labor's Lost"
- earned her an Obie.
Jane White was born in Har-
lem on Oct. 30, 1922, the first
child of Leah Gladys Powell,
whose heritage was Black, white
and Cherokee, and Walter Fran-
fisWh le,c uto i tified 1him-
that he was only 1/64 Black. A
yur er brother, Walter Jr., died

Paul Robeson, the legend-
ary actor and singer, who was
a friend of her father's, helped
White get her first stage role
the next year, as the lead in
Lillian Smith's "Strange ]Fruit,"
a short-lived Broadway play
about a doomed interracial love
affair. The play received mixed
reviews, but Eleanor Roosevelt,
in her nationally syndicated
n wspape h t ma tin foDays
"restraint and beauty.
She played many more stage
roles after that, had recurring
parts in soap operas, was cast
in the movie "Beloved," made
cameo appearances in spoken-
part roles at the Metropolitan
Opera and performed as a caba-
ret singer at Alfredo's Settebello,
the restaurant in the Village that
she and her husband opened in
1976. Viazzi died mn 1987.


ELLIS TYRONE JAMES RAY,
48, chef, died
August 3in Pom-
pano Beach, FL.
Wake 4-8 p.m.
Friday at Wright I' i
and Young Fu- b
neral Home,
15332 NW 7th
Avenue. Service
11 a.m., Saturday at Antioch Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, 21311 NW
34 Avenue, Carol City.

ELIZABETH D. DANIELS, 85,
retired, died Au-
gust 6 at Kin-
dred Hospital '
Service l ap' '


n ivry BMi -
Church.



Diane's Cremations
MARTHA PORTER, 63, bus
attendant .
died August
4. Survivors
include :
dau g hter ,
Crystal R.
Porter; and son,
Bural W. Porter.

Stpuray at 40 NW 48 Street.


Manker
JEROME P. TRAPP, 61, music
professor, died .
August 6 at -
J ac kson
Me mo r ial
Hos pi t al .
Service 10 a.m.,

SGdeahurBeth l



Premier
DEACON JOSEPH WILLIAMS,
94, retired, died ~
August 5 at
Miami Jewish 5
Home. Survi- j~
vors are wife,
Gladys Williams
of Panama City; .
daughter, Sha- .
ron R. Williams
of Miami; granddaughter, Sherri
Johnson-Campbell (Christopher) of
Miami. Visitation 2-5 p.m., Thurs-
day at Manker Funeral Home. Ser-
vice 11:30 a.m., Saturday at Mace-
donia Missionary Baptist Church,
Panama City, FL. Burial Hillside
Cemetery, Panama City, FL.


Grace
JAYKIA PITTS, 17, student,
died August 7
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospi-
tal. Service 1
p.m., Saturday
at Faith Com-
munity Baptist *
Church. F ;




Richardson
REV. DR. L. B. JOHNSON,
84, pastor of
New Hope
Baptist Church
of Goulds, FL
died August
6 in Miami.
Survivors are
wife, Frances
Johnson; two
daughters, two sons. Viewing 1-6

am Stutr aycaht N B rh ptis\
Church.


Mlitchell
GLADYS MARIE BELL, retired
custodian supervisor, died August
1 at Memorial Pembroke Hospital.
Viewing 4 p.m. 8 p.m., August 11at
Mitchell Funeral Chapel. Service 11
a.m., August 12 at Love Tabernacle
of God, 1750 NW 1 Court.


WILLIAM S. D)UDLEY

approach his birthday, we
pause to say "thanks."
It is family and friends like
you who cared enough to
share your time, talents and
treasures that helped us en-
dure.
Special thanks to Rev. C.P.
Preston and Peaceful Zion;
Bishop Victor T. Curry and
New Birth Baptist Church;
hrCh tihof Yester-YearLSt.
raine King and Wright and
Young Mortuary.
May God continue to em-
power you to be a blessing to
others in their time of need.
Sallie Dudley and family.


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


JOHN VINCENT
COOPER
"J-LO"
08/16/79 03/15/08


We miss you and think of
you always,
Happy Birthday, from your
whole family.


in Memoriam


In loving memory of,


HENRY CHARLES SMALL
08/10/46 -05/16/05

You will forever live in our
hearts, but today we say,
Happy Birthday.
Your Family


-

WALTIER. FANNIN, JR.
"Ricky"
04/24/58 08/12/04

You heard God's call, you
slipped away and left us all.
We love you and we miss
you.
Love your mother, Ruby and
family.



In MOmoriam

In loving memory of,


MOTHER MARIE


gratefully acknowledges your
kindness and expressions of
sympathy,
Your visits, prayers, cards,
telephone calls, monetary do-
nations and covered dishes
were appreciated.
Thanks to Pastor Kenneth
Dukes and New Jerusa-
lem Baptist Church. Special
thanks to Martha Wells, Com-
missioners and Mayor of Opa-
Locka.
May God bless each of you
is our prayer.
The Family


Card oif Thanks


WILLIE RACHEL SR.
aka "Ray"
08/3 1/41-08/08/10


The family of the late,


I'll miss you forever, you will
always be in my heart, never
to be forgotten.
Love, Val


In M~emoriam

In loving memory of,


l


NANCY BOY]D SEWIARD
"Fancy Nancy"
11moiso-ostortoo9

It has been two years since
you left us and we miss you
dearly. But we hold onto the
memories which keep us alive
in our hearts always. God has
you in his arms. You are sadly
missed.
Love your husband, daugh-
ter, family and friends.


LASHAWN SIMMIONS,
housekeeper
died July 24th
at North Shore
Hospital .
Surviv ors
include: mother;
and daughter,
Ant walett
Simmons .
Services were held.


Emmanue


Happy Birthday Singer Jane White dies


Card of Thanks

As we the family of the late,


Range
GLADYS P. BRAYNON, re-
tired counselor
died August 1 ?(
in Rockledge, '
FL. Survived
by two daugh-
ters, Gwendo-
ly Childred
and Pamela
Braynon; son,
John Braynon, Jr.; one sister, Mary
Wright; one granddaughter, three
grandsons, three great-grand-
daughters, one great-great-grand-
son, numerous nieces and neph-
ews. Delta Sigma Theta Omega
service at Range Funeral Home 6
p.m.,Tuesday, August 9. In lieu of
flowers, please make checks to
Greater Bethel AME Church, YPD.
You may send the checks to Pame-
la at 872 Brookview Lane, Rock-
ledge, FL 32955. Service 11 a.m.,
Wednesday at Greater Bethel AME
Church.

JOHNNIE B. CHAPMAN, 72, re-
tired truck driv-
er, died August
4. Survivors
ir clude: wife,
Roberta Ch p
man; daughter ,
Joanne (Levi)
Mosley, Regina
Watkins; son,
David J. Chapman; sister, Gladys
Smathers. Service 11 a.m., Satur-
day at True Light Church of Jesus
Christ.


Hadley Davis
JANET POND WALLACE, 51,
housewife, died
August 3. Ser-
vice 1:30 p.m., _
Saturday at .
FriendshipaMti ..

Church.



NATHANIEL EBERHART, re-
tired bus driver, _
died August 3 at
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 10
a.m., Saturday
at .1u Saving




BRICE JACKSON, died August
3. Arrangements are incomplete.

BABY GIRL McMULLEN, died
July 31. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

Poitier
JESSE WALDEN, 90, contrac-
tor, died August
3 at home. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.

4



MARVIN CARSON, building in-
spector, died
August 4 at i
Cleveland Clin-
ic. Cherished
memories are
left with his lov-
ing mother, Jim- .
mie Carson; his
children, Mar-
vin, Jr. (Octavia), Mary, Kriston,
Tramayne, Navarre and Monte;
his adoring grandchildren, Montre,
Tionne, Maya, Tramayne, Jr., Kes-
hon and Yohance, Jr.; his siblings,
Edward, Patty (sister-in-law) and
Ardessa Carson; long-time com-
panion, Arlene Love and son, Yo-
hance; devoted friend, Sandra J.
Carson; aunts, Geneva "Tee" Wil-
son, Murdell Whitehead, and Eva
Olliff; and a host of nieces, neph-
ews, cousins and friends. View-
ing 5 to 9 p.m., Friday at Roberts
Poitier Funeral Home. Service 1
p.m., Saturday at Holy Redeemer
Catholic Church.


Wright and Young
LOUIS B. McDONALD, JR., 31,
student, died
August 6. Ser-
vice 11 a.m ,
Saturday at St'
James AME
Curch


Al I



















SF.S Tlr~lr C:
-- ~~r7; .. i i ~ ~*., . .; ..- nu~c~~d~scrrmnaF3rp


EARNEST PUGH

* CD battles Smallwood for #1


Hart's comedy tour

breaks all records

BV D. Kevin McNeir
kmeneir @miamitimesonline.com


Intertainment
~kQ4r~FAnr*ION HIP HOP MUSIC FOOD DINING ARTS Mr CULTURE PEOPLE


If f~ ei il-:;


'I '. ~
I
; b I
-: l~v


"I grewc up in a family) that was musically-
oriented and I haves beenz leading praise and
wtorship at a number of churches for over 20
years so I didn 't come out of nowhere."


He was recently dubbed as gospel music's "new leading man," but
Earnest Pugh, 45, is no stranger to the power of praise and wror-
ship or to the world of music. His fourth CD "Earnestly Yours"
debuted at #1 on the Billboard Top Gospel Albums Chart,
beating out the likes of Kirk Franklin and Richard Smallwood
for the coveted position.
The Memphis native now lives in Washington, D.C. and
says that much of his recent success is due to the support
and guidance of Kerry Douglas, a marketing and promotion
w~hiz that has previously helped artists like James Fortune and
FlYA make their leaps to stardom.
"He [Douglas] told me back in 2.008 that he could take my
single "Rain On Us" to number one and he did just that in less
than eight weeks," Pugh~ said. "Folks began calling into the
; tig r tl apnn.radio stations and things just started happening. And good
Pugh's latest single "I Need Your Glory" has become one of
the fastest-selling singles on itunes and has made him one
Sof the shining stars for Black Smioke Music, the label that
Produces his work. In fact, it's the first #1 CD in the 16-year
history of the company. Pugh says he isn't totally surprised by

/R his success. After all, music has always been part of his life.
Please turn to PUGH~ 2C


. '


There is an old adage that says "music soothes the say-
age beast." But there's something to be said about the
healing power of a good, hearty laugh as well. And that's
what North Philadelphia native Kevin Hart has been doing
ever since he can remember -- making people laugh.
In fact, H~art has become quite good doing what
apparently comes so naturally for him ~and has
recently made a meteoric leap in one of the tough-
est genres of entertainment coinedy. Old school
comedians say comedy is about getting one's
audience to laugh with you, not at you, and Hart,
32, says he has patterned himself after some of
the greatest Black comedians in history.
Now he's laughing all the way to the bank after
completing one of the most successful comedy
tours in U.S. history breaking attendance re-
cords previously set by industry icons like Richard
Pryor, Redd Foxx and ]Eddie Murphy.
The final leg of his tour in Los Angeles drew such
a huge crowd that the decision was made to film
Hart at his best. In September, in the tradition
Please turn to HART 2C


-- Photo by Lee Wexler
It Ain't Nothin' but the Blues The musicians Brett Pontecorvo, far left, and Jeffrey
Bolding (in hat) lead the cast members, from left, Darilyn Castillo, Dameka Hayes, Ta-
tiana Adams, Marvel Allen and Nathaly Lopez in this production at Aaron Davis Hall, City
College, in Ham~ilton Heights.



EX lO 11 the fat reac es


a11 TITIS Of th bl OS


dressed-up concert than play.
Costumes change, and there's
a bit of narrative patter ard
some dancing, but the songs
remain front and center. Here
are the blues in every per-
mutation: country, city and
church blues; happy blues
and sad blues; slow burns
and fast-talking come-ons.
The show, first seen in 1994
in Denver and at the New
Victory Theater in New York
in 1999, gives you a strong
sense of the elasticity and lon-
gevity of the form, but that's
about it. There is no overarch-
ing narrative idea; instead


the writers (five are credited)
present the music's story in a
roughly chronological way, be-
ginning with chants in Africa
and ending, more or less, with
postwar urban blues.
If the revue, directed by
Alfred Preisser (the found-
ing artistic director of the
Classical Theater of Harlem),
never gains much cumula-
tive power, it still has lots of
standout moments, thanks to
a strong, nicely varied cast of
eight performers. (A live,band
provides accompaniment.)
Somle highlights: Dameka
Please turn to BLUES 3C


BV Rachel Saltz
Watching "It Ain't Nothin'
but the Blues," a musical re-
vue at Aaron Davis Hall, feels
a bit like being on a sightsee-
ing tour with an uninspired
guide. The things you see may
be appealing or even thrilling,
but you're not going to learn
muh about them that you
didn't already know.
With more than 30 nun-
bers, this second production
of the New Haarlem' Arts
Theater, the recently formed
professional company of
City College, really is more


Riding a bus frorn
the Bronx to New
Cultural Horizons

A writer, Liz Welch,
speaking with students in
a summer program as the
Bronx Write Bus headed to
Manhattan recently.
---SEE STORY ON PAGE 3C


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HEP CATS
continued from 10

down to fingertip-length; the
pavem~ent-skimming watch
chain; and the wide-brimmed
hat with a long, angled feather,
The "sharpie" tries to lure Don-
ald into a saloon; but just in
time he sees that the zoot-suiter
has a shock of Hitler hair imd a
little square mustache. Donald
gives him what-for

ALLIGATOR AN THE
RIGHT SIDE
The "Tom and Jerry" anima
tors' at MGM took a rather more
lighthearted approach. Tom the
cat tries to woo a jitterbug kit-
ten, showing up at her door to
knock out a hot-cha tune on the
ukelele. "Boy, are you corny," she


Kevin Hart's comedy tour breaks all records


I a a ...


I


Ricks`h I1 sT CaONn[oI. manila X)~ I)ETnSY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Presiding Elder, Rev. Vincent
F. Mitchell delivered the words
of comfort, while his Booker T.
Washington, Class of 1949,
came in masses, including
Ret. Col. Albert Ferguson,
who spoke brilliantly about
Braynon and the fun, travel,
and fraternization they had
together.
Percy Oliver, president of
the Class, added to the positive
side during his lifetime,
followed by Lenora Braynon-
Smith, Father J.
Kenneth Major and
Wilhelmina M~innia,
soloist; and Rev.
Robert Jackson, III,
pastor, St. Paul A.M.E.
.;Reverend Mitchell
alluded to Judge
Braynon legacy
CHAN beginning when he
graduated from. BTW
and matriculated at
Morehouse and then Howard
University, where began
studying law and serving time
in the U.S. Army. With his
law degree, he became busy
with court cases involving
desegregation. He started in
Monroe County and ended up
in Miami with a popular "Talk
Show" and hooked up with
Matthew and Mapp to serve
the community.
Missing him are Glory
Braynon Watson, Harold,
Jr., Gia, Dedra, LaTaryn
Gay, Harland, Derrick, 10
grandchildren, Anthony
Simons, Johnny Stepherson,
Ms. Rolle and other relatives.
***************
Dr. Lorraine F. Sltrachan
would have celebrated 74
years on August 17. The King
Daughters of Bethany Seventh-
Day Adventist will pay tribute
to her on Saturday, August 20,
during the morning worship,
followed by fellowshipping and,
subsequently, blessing the
Museum set aside at her home.


during the four or five years from the honoree who shed


D~anielle, Amanda, Blake and
Jennife~r. Soror Bernice Carey
gave a dissertation of her life
to the delight of the family,
while Pernella Burke sang "To
God Be The Glory" and Hall,
Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
eased the family pain singing
"It Is Well With My Soul."

Samuel "Sambo" Harrison,
a cabinet maker and musician,
reported tasting death a
few years ago, as well as
experiencing the death of
his wife, Alice, the love
of his life. When asked
if he plans to marry, his
answer was a blatant
"no,". because he's set
in his ways arid being
single, his avocation
keeps him extremely


A


much tears during her remarks.
Others in attendance were
Bethenia Bullard, Tim
Strachan, Betty Bullard,
Rene MVay Green, Cynthia
Sweet, John Thomas, Walter
Johnson, Rev. Purnell M~oody
and wife Abrille, Edward and
Laurita Robinson, Maurice
Robinson, Helen Boneparte,
Marva Hill, Jean Albury
Perry, Corine Bradley, Vrera
Fenton, Willie Mae
Gibson, Flora Owens
and ~Karri Brookins.
***************
Isabelle Hopkins-
Brown, a pillar and
teacher at -Liberty City
Elementary, left this
earth July 22 and
YNON was laid to rest, last


preparing to- graduate. They
gave her a standing ovation,
as the DJ took over and the
grown folks gave the floor to
the youngsters.
************X***
"Departing is 'such sweet
Sorrow" stated Shakespeare.
It was evident Minister
Dr. Pamela Hall-Green
announced leaving Ebenezer
UMC to study for a Ph D. at
Emory Candler School C
of Theology. A special
program to tap tributes,
present gifts, and extolled
reflections was handle "
.by T. Eileen M~rartin ,
Major, orchestrator of
the event.
As "Order My Steps"
was played, Bruce BRA
Martin escorted the
honoree, wYhile the Mass
Choir provided "Praise &
Worship;" Rose Moorman
prayed; Priscilla White
read the scripture; Shirley
Jackson, occasion; reflections
from the church members,
beginning with Rev. Rich,
Minister Joanne Brookings,
Minister David Larmond,
Samuel "Chase" Williams,
Minister Wilcox, Minister
William Clark, Dr. Herman
Dorsett, Bertha Martin,
Shirey Jackso~n,
and Eboni Finley,
who videotaped her
reflections, with
kudos going out to
Charles Dunbar for
his videographing
the special event,
Pernella Burke
)ROWN~ filled up the edifice
singing "To God Be
the Glory." She was followed
by MI.A S.K. .performing
"Somnething About That Name"
and more reflections from the
audience including Rev. Dr.
Joreatha M. Capers, senior
pastor, offering, and remarks


An e-mail from Bethune-
Cookman University recruiter
Spider McCoy to Carol
We~atherington, president,
informed her that 173
freshmen will matriculate this
2011 year. Weatherington
collaborated with Martha Day,
Nancy Da~wkins, Anna Grace
Swreeting and other alumni
members to effect a "Wildcat
Bonvoyage" at the Omega
Activity Center, last Saturday.
Somne of the early arrivals from
Booker T. Washington included
Jose Deivilla, Robin Wilson
and Deborah Breedilove.
The program. began
with President-elect
Wayne Davis praying,
blessing the food, and
congratulating the
freshmen for selecting
B-CU. President
Weatherington (4
introduced John '" ~:
Willilams, former
president and NationalHA
Alumni President. He
began by stating the motto:
"Enter to Learn, Depart to
Serve." Other speakers that
gave remarks were Dawkins
and Day, .financial supporters
for 40-years.
Weatherington introduced
the speaker, former Judge
Shilyn McWhorter-Jones.
She began informing the
students she came from a
small town called Wac~ula,
where she had to pick oranges
to survive and it forced her to
attend B-CU, rather than pick
oranges.
She continued by informing
them of her clesire to graduate
and matriculate at the
University of Florida for a law
degree. She passed the bar


her first time
taking the test
and began her
law practice in
Miami. In a few I
years, she was
appointed to judge by Governor
Bush. She challenged the
students to study hard and
work toward achieving summa
cum laude as a top student
upon graduation. Her last
statement wras: "You're not
going to college to have a baby,
you're going to get a good
education without nicotine or
drugs."
She` received a
c standing ovation from
L Ashante Thurston,
Pace High; Janik
Hall, Coral Gables;
SXavier Campbell,
Norland; Sherrick
Lewis, Pace High;
-Aartene G rif~n,
Michael Fenderson,
-GENShemor Lewis, Pace
High; Carraway
Kiystal, Northwestern(
Sheldon Rock, Northwestern;
Austin Easterlilng,
Hialeah High; Danielle
Baily, Dr. Michael Krop;
Karanilta Cummings,
Miami Springs; Tarquise
James, Carol -City;
Henrietta Isaac, Turner
Tech.
Yours truly introduced
the "Fight Song." Then
Sweeting was called upon B
to motivate the freshmen.
She used her People Column
to break down leaving home
for the first time. She also
stressed focusing on their
studies 24-7 and stay away
from the influence of the
male. Set goals and meet them


By David~ F. Robinson ~ Flliaml, R.

Me, HmySelf and why
From my perspective, everything that revolves around me seems difficult
and in sin, because when something unfortunately happens, the earth stops it's
spin, the skies fall and my enemies win
I'm all alone, amongst millions throughout this vast and enormous globe,
Even when I'm happy, misery, sadness and pain are my humble abodes
Should I only be concerned with myself,
Pick up my heavy burdens, start moving forward and just forget about every-
body else
Does anybody even care about how I feel, what I think, what I want, what I've
accomplished or earned,
Why am I concerned? Because life is short and the hands that's inside the
clocks on the walls, continues to turn
Will my soul burn or will it be air conditioned, naturally, alongside milky
streams and under shadowy palm trees of bliss?
Will I be remembered? How will I be remembered? Will I even be missed?
l once was the life of the party, but now i'm appearing.to be as dead as funer-
als, my objectives are tasteless and my ambitions and aspirations are wasteless
Maybe, if I share my vision, my hopes, my dreams with the entire world, aban-
don my gluttony for power and success, by not trying to devour the entire Ameri-
can pie, and stop just focusing on ME, I probably won't be asking MYSELF WHY...


Saturday, at Ebenezer busy.ST
UMC by Rev. Dr. Joreatha However, he meets at
Capers, senior pastor. Gee Restaurant every
Isabella was born to Charles Thursday to fraternize with
and Laura Burside-Hopkins Elliot Flanders and Walter
in Miami. She also was a Johnson longtime buddies
Bahamian decent and the from Overtown. They sperid
youngest of seven children. their time reminiscing of the
She graduated from Booker T. good days, where Harrison
Washington High in 1952 and used his carpentry skills to
went on to Nova University to constructt a movie house in
obtain a Bachelor of Science in .his backyard and charged five
Education. She gave 25-years cents for the customers to
to the nMiami-Dade County come. .. "..
Public Schooi~ls. O:.:r: their groups that utilizing
Her legacy included being their time are Frank Pinkney,
"Who's Who Amnong Amenca's :."president,- Tree of Knowledge,
Teachers in 1996." She also and the Street Burners off of
made a significant impact and~ 64th Street. There are more and
difference in the lives of her as long as they congregate on
students. Her value was not the corners doing their thing; it
money, but students coming is therapy and long life.
back to her thanking her ***X********k****
for success in life. Along her The celebration of life for The
tenure in life, was Gamma Honorable Harold Leander
Delta Sigma Chapter of Sigma Braynon, Sr. was held last
.Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.. weekend. A memorial service
She will be missed by was held Friday night at Range
`Caroline, Sheryl, Debra, Big Funeral Home and the final
Charles, Lil Charles, Randy, rites on Saturday, with a crowd
Eric, Mlichael, Peaches, consisting of 50 brothers from
Donald, Donnello, Tasha, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, loc.,
Tabatha, Steven, Camneron, church members and family.


13 at 12 noon in Blackett
Hall. Little Miss Savaughn
Wright and Little -Miss Skyla
Carroll are the contestants.
Join them for a fun filled
afternoon.
Miamians were- saddened
once again to hear the death
.of Gladys Payne-Braynon,
who expired last week in
Rockledge, FL. Gladys was
the wife of John Braynon,
baby brother of the Braynon
clan. Gladys finished in
1942, her class was the
"Amphions," in thqse days
classes at BTW had jackets
and class names. Deepest
sympathy to the Braynon
family. Gladys is survived by
three children, one preceded
her in death.


Get ready for some football
On- September 12, our
Dolphins will kick-off their
season when theyi tackle the
New England Patriots and
end their regular season
when they play the Jets on
January 1st. Best of luck
Dolphins
May our teachers,
principals, assistant
principals, office staff,
cafeteria workers, security
guards, aides and all of our
students have a safe and
wonderful school year. Boys
and girls, remember what you
are there for. Be extremely
careful, study and ~make
yourself and your parents
proud. The streets offer you
nothing but trouble


by Shirlyon -McWhorter-
Jones, B-CU Miami Dade
Alumni and former judge
and now Delta's president
(Miami) chapter; After the
meet and greet, a delicious
meal iivas seared and the
students 'danced. Thanks
to our community partners.
Let's go Wildcats!
Wedding anniversary
greetings go out to the
following love birds: Samuel
and Helen 8. Bennett, their
31st on A'ugust 1; Antwran
and Dortresia J. Jones,
their 2nd on August 1; Lionel
A. and Lois F'erguson, their
51st on August 6.
John H. Jo~hnson, the late
founder and publisher of Jet
and Ebony, who used the


magazines -to celebrate the
achievement of Black people,
will be honored with the 2012
Black Heritage stamp.
Get well wishes to all of
you: Rachel Reeves, Edith
Jenkine-Coverson, Willie
Wlilliams, Ernestine Ross-
Collins, MVary Allen, Lillian
E. Davis, Dwight L. Jackrson,
Nabmi A. Adams, Sue
Francis, Nathaniel Gordon,
Fredricka Fisher, Ines
MVcKinney Dean-Johnson,
Hansel Higgs, Joyce Gibson
and Mildred "PI" Ashley.
Saint' Monica's Chapter of
Episcopal Church W~omen
presents their Summer
Extravaganza Luncheon
featuring fashions and
babies on Saturday, August


University held Bi~
a welcome
reception for ~-
the newly ,
committed
students who will attend
B-CU in the fall. John
Williams, brought
greetings from our National
Alumni Association, Carol
Weatherington, president
and Wayne D~avis, president
elect brought greetings to
the large group. Words of
wisdom/inspiration was
also given to the group


Agnes Rolle-lMoten and
her sister Naomi Rolle,
are in Fort Washington,
Maryland visiting their
brother, Dr. Albert Rolle
and his family. Dr. Rolle's
birthday was August 3rd
and his sisters were there
to celebrate with him and
extend get well wishes to him.
Your hometown buddies and
classmates also send a big
hello and get well wishes to
you, Doc.
Miami Dade Chapter
of Bethune-Cookman


sneers. "You act like a square at
the fair." Tom, humiliated, hears
a radio ad for zoot suits, and
soon he is cutting up an orange-
and-green hammock to make his
own drape-shaped, reet-pleated
threads. (He achieves the de-
sired shoulder width by leaving
a coat-hanger in the jacket while
he wears it.) "Jlacksoni," the kit-
ty cutie declares when she sees
the newly hep cat: "You're on the
right side, you alligator, you."
The "Tom and Jerry" cartoon
appeared in 1944, not long af-
ter the cultural conflict over the
zoot suit had taken an ugly turn.
On the pretext that zoot-suited
Mexican-American teens were
wearing seditious togs, sailors
on leave in Los Angeles went
on a rampage in 1943, chasing
pachucoss" and ripping the of-


fending jackets and trousers off
them. The police responded by
locking up the Mexican teens.

"DOWN TO THE BRICKS"
Peiss argues that the zoot-
suit riots, as the series of street
fights came to be called, were
actually old-fashioned race ri-
ots. In any case, a style that had
managed to overcome some ra-
cial barriers ended up as a pre-
text for racial violence. The dis-
tinctive clothes had originated
with urban Blacks, who looked
to dress "down to the bricks" by
exaggerating the drape of Eng-
lish bespoke tailoring (the sort
of suits favored by the Prince of
Wales and Cary Grant). But the
extreme drape-shape was em-
braced by swing-besotted white
teens as well as by Mexican-


American youth, making the
style a rather confused stand-in
for race.
As Peilss tells it, the zoot suit
became particularly problem-
atic in Los Angeles when ethnic
sensitivities prompted the adop-
tion of an unhelpful journalistic
shorthand. The California press
found itself chastised by the
Mexican government for telling
lurid stories of young Mexican-
American delinquents and their
gangs. Urged by U.S. officials
not to offend a wartime ally, the
papers stopped using the word
"Mexican" and, with a wink and
a nod, warned instead of "zoot
suiters." A style that in many
quarters had been regarded as
unpatriotic came to be synony-
mous with downright criminal-
ity.


across the country, leading re-
vivals in Mississippi, Orlando
and wherever his powerful
voice and God-given talents are
requested.
"We just got off a series of
12 listening parties that were
meant to undergird and guide
the direction of the CD," he
said. "I had a great tour with
Yolanda Adams and a few more
are in the works. You can imag-
ine that I haven't had much
sleep."
After years of service in the
gospel world, he has finally
made it big. And from where
we sit, it is definitely well-de-
served success.


what I love doing the most -
other than chilling with my
kids [he has a son and daugh-
ter, 3 and 6]. For me, making
people laugh comes naturally
and I take my work seriously.

TELLING JOKES IS A LOT
LIKE TELLING A
GOOD STORY
"Many of my jokes are family-
related but I'm not as clean as
someone like Cosby," he said.
"I use some profanity but it
fits my personality it works
for me I think because people
see that I am real and genuine
and they accept it. I tell folks
about my family, my kids, my


divorce, my relationships and
even some of the personal
problems I have faced."
Hart models himself after co-
medians like Murphy and Foxx
who he says had real "person-
ality." He's been at his craft for
over 14 years now and admits
thait in the early years there
were a lot of humps along the
road. .
"It's a challenging busi-
ness and yes, I have flopped
more than once," he said. "But
things are great these days.
Right now I'm going to take a
year off and revamp, put some
new material together and get
back to doing shows in 2012."


HART
continued from 1C

of Murphy, "Laugh at My Pain"
will hit theaters throughout
the U.S. It solidifies Hart's in-
auguration into an elite group
of kings of comedy -- a feat
that he describes as "huge."
"I go on stage and tell the
truth and let people into my
life," he said. "I'm a huge Bill
Cosby fan and Richard Pryor
too. But I idolize Chris Rock
and what he's done with his
career. I suppose I like taking
chances like him, in film and
television, but can't imagine
not doing standup comedy. It's


PUGH
continued from 1C

"I grew up in a family that
was musically-oriented and I
have been leading praise and
worship at a number of church-
es for over 20 years so I didn't
come out of nowhere," he added.
Pugh calls himself a fam-
ily guy, the father of a 24- and
22-year-old. He's a 15-year
veteran of the U.S. Army who
has .never taken his eye off of
his dream, performing in stage
plays whenever the opportunity
arose and working as a musical
Worship leader. Unable to per-
suade industry leaders that his


songs were marketable, he de-
cided to open his own company
and start his own label.
"My mother, believed in me
and what I could accomplish,".
he said. "Her death a few years
ago hit me hard but I used that
pain to inspire my writing on
my last two CDs. We are con-
fronted with good and bad situ-
ations throughout our lives and
somehow we have to face them.
Some write poems or books or
plays as these circumstances
arise -- for me the lyrics just
came off the paper and they be-
came the songs that people are
enjoying today."
Pugh is busy making his way


5







o


L


Unique trend of the zoot-suit redefined the 1940s


Pugh remains humble in midst of his success

















Riding a bus from the Bronx to new cultural horizons


su~cKS MusT CONTROL. THEIR OWIN DESTINY


I C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST130-16, 2011


gram sponsored by the Bronx
Council on the Arts called
Bronx Write Bus, which every
Tuesday in a program ending
next week has been providing
young people fr-om the Bronx
transportation and admission
to cultural events outside the
borough, with writers coming
along for the ride.
Bronx Write Bus's direc-
tor, Maria Romano, conceived
the program which also
includes classes Wednesdays
and Thursdays to keep
students academically stimu-
lated during the summer and
expose them to places out-
side the Bronx they otherwise
might not visit.
"In some ways, boroughs


like the Bronx feel like a small
town and you end up not leav-
ing very often," said Roma-
.no, who directs the council's
Bronx Wriiters Center.
Reggie Hester, 12, of Jessup
Avenue in the South Bronx,
had never visited SoHo before
- though he heard it resem-
bled 'a small China."
After spending the afternoon
on Crosby~ Street, he conclud-
ed differently. "Not really Chi-
na, just weird," he said.
Every Tuesday, Bronx Write
Bus students board a bus in
front of the Bronx Museum
of Arts and are handed a
notebook, pen and sandwich
before taking their seats. A
writer related to the genre of


the day's cultural event joins
them.
Last Tuesday, Liz Welch, co-
author of "The Kids Are All
Right," a 2009 meoi about
siblings who are sent. to dif-
ferent homes after their par-
ents die, stood at the front of
the bus speaking on the writ-
ing process and dishing out
quick wrriting assignments as
it drove along the Edward L.
Grant Highway north of Yan-
kee Stadium.
On hard turns, she gripped
the headrests while teetering
up and down the row of seats,
stopping every few minutes
to peer ovrer the shoulder of a
scribbling boy or girl and chat
about the child's sentences.


Along the West Side High-
stiay, the bus descended to-
ward Lower Manhattan, the
Midtown piers providing a
charming distraction from
writing for students like So-
len Washington, 13, who took
a break after sensing mo-
tion sickness coming on, and
Danyel Diarra, 13, who could
not resist his bacon, lettuce
and tomato sandwich any lon-

At the .Anne Frank Center
on Crosby Street, the students
listened to the personal ac-
count of Sally Frishberg, 77, a
Jewish woman who survived
the Holocaust as a child in Po-
land.
Frishberg recounted escap-


. ing into the farmlands with
her family the night before a
train headed to a concentra-
tion camp was set to depart,
and spending two.years hid-
ing in the attic of a farmer's
house, surviving with hay
furniture, a bucket for a bath-
room and a steady diet of
boiled beans and potatoes.
On the ride back to the
Bronx, students reflected on
Frank's and Frishberg's sto
ries, jotting down notes about
their own lives for personal
stories they would be working
on the following two days in
class.
Edgar was impressed with
Prishberg's story particu-
larly her hiding ability.


BV Andrewr Boryga

Edgar Doite, 12, lives on
College Avenue in the South
Bronx and likes baseball,
swimming and math not
reading or history. He cannot
* recall the last book he read,
and until recently, he was
unfamiliar with Anne Frank.
Asked about the Holocaust, he
responded, "the holo-what?"
Recently, he was one of 10
children who boarded a bus
on the Grand Concourse and
headed to the Anne Frank
Center in SoHo, where he re-
ceived an answer to his ques-
tion.
Edgar and company were
part of a new summer pro-


By Leslie Pitterson


martial arts guru who trains
the Joe commandoes.
RZA along with the rest of
the cast will be working with
director Jon Chu. G.I. Joe will
pick up where its first install-
ment, G.I Joe: The Rise of Co-
bra, left off.
While playing a martial arts
guru may seem like a stretch,
RZA has been steadily landing
small roles in several big films
im ihe apa a years indluging
Three Days and Repo Men.


have an easy life / Not like
Yeezy life / Just want 'em to
be someone people like / Don't
want 'em to be hated all the
time, judged." Jay-Z expresses
concern about the inevitable
media attention that would
be drawn to any child he and
Beyonc6: might have: "Sorry,
Junior, I already ruined ya /
'Cause you ain't even alive, pa-
parazzi pursuing' ya."
J Welcome to the Jungleers n
losses and overcoming his

s gr, ye onopopkonet) Mm -
der to Excellence delineates
the homicide rate in urban
communities, but is hopeful
that the senseless violence can
be stemmed by more achieve-
ment. On an. equally potent
Made in America, the two talk
about their rises to fame, while
acknowrledging those~ who
helped and inspired them.
They've also clearly inspired
each other. Star collaborations
don't always work out as well
in practice as they do on paper
(see: Jay-Z and R. Kelly). But
in this case, they've created an
artistic Throne that other rap-
pers can aspire to.


Jay-Z and Kanye
ascend 'Trone'

BV Steve Jones

As soon as Jay-Z and Kanye
West announced they were
naming their joint album proj-
ect Watch the Throne, it was
clear that the superstar rap-

cetiv brleafor te sele a
hip-hop in general. They've
reh eed to t am i ins on
tent set of tracks that finds
them stepping up their games
and stepping out of their com-
fort zones.
While both display their
characteristic swagger and
dabble in materialism, they
also ruminate on religion, pov-
erty, crime, loss and the price
of success. Their chemistry -
born of a decade-long associa-
tion allows each to carve o~ut
his own stylistic space, with
Jay-Z coolly delivering his in-
cisive lyrical darts, while the
more emotional West thrives
on adrenaline-fueled punch-
lines.


RZA made his name from his
Wu Tang days, but the rapper-
producer is cultivating his act-
ing skills. According to, reports,
the rapper has landed a role in
one of Hollywood's most antici-
pated sequels, G.I. Joe.
RZA will be joining the cast
of the nation movie, which
has already roped in Chan-

'Tc o nsand Hiwachnaeract
is named the Blind Master, a


Kanye West and Jay-Z's 'Watch the Throne' also features
other superstar contributors, including Beyonce.


Throne, which has been an-
ticipated for nearly a year, be-
came available exclusively on
iTunes Monday. (The ~CD will
be in stores Friday.)
West oversawr production of
the album, which has a broad
sonic palette thanks to the
contributions of RZA, Swizz
Beatz, Mike Dean, Jeff Bhask-
er, Q-Tip and others.
The percussive drive of al-
bum opener No Church in the
Wild underpins Jay-Z's con-
templation of the relevance of
the clergy and ancient philoso-
phers to someone who makes
his living on the streets, while


R&B star Frank Ocean ques-
tions, "What is a God to a non-
believer?" That song's edginess
gives way to a swirl of synthe-
sizers on the epic anthem Lift
Off, which features Beyonce.
Two songs later, the rappers
wallow in luxury on the hu-
morous Otis, built on soul
great Otis Redding's Try a Lit-
tle Tenderness.
They veer back to more seri-
ous themes with the introspec-
tive New Day. Both wonder how
they would raise the sons that
neither of them, have. Reflect-
ing on his own controversies,
West says, "I just want 'em to


can get. (Plenty.)
Too often, though, the the-
atrical- presentation works
~against the music, smoothing
its rough edges and making its
ache sound rehearsed. As my
friend said afterward, "They
gave you the songs, but where
were the blues?"
"lt Ain't Nothin' but the
Blues" continues through Aug.
21 at Aaron Davis Hall, City
College, West 135th Street
and Convent Avenue, Hamil-
ton Heights; (212) 868-4444,
newhaarlemartstheatre.org,
smarttix.com.


BLUES
'continued from 10

Hayes's "Fever," Marvel Allen's
"St. Louis Blues". and Shawn
Brown's sweet and shyly low-
down "Candy Man."
The most sustained section
- a "give the ladies the mike"
cluster of songs is, pet co-
incidentally, the most excit-
ing, and it contains the show's
high point: Nathaly Lopez's
vampy-funny "Come On in My
Kitchen." She understands how
to find the drama in the blues,
and milks the song for all she


Tw~o rap superstars are better than one


RZA lands role in upcoming film


R/3ixed reviews on blues musical


We've clone the math for you.






We've made sure: shopping at Publix can be as


economical as it is -pleasant. We~ put hundreds of


items on sale every week. Our easy-to-spot shelf


signs point out the deals and your register receipt


will tally up your saving's for you. Go to publix.com


/save right now to make plans to save this week.











BL \~cfs MusT~ CONTROl. THEIR OW'N DESTINY
4C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


4 ES


I1TH THE
.E PLAY

0 MNTMHONH
hO .2 MO 1H
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.. rcuraup C rrr~


*1 -r


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Group prepares for



I the worst in Haiti


By RandV Grice
rgrice @miamitimesonline .com

While Tropical Storm
Emily is holding steady
after brushing past Puerto
Rico, it now has Haiti
in it's sight. More than
630,000 people are still
without. shelter after last
year's earthquake in the
impoverished nation.
Locally, aid groups
and cities in Mliarm-Dade
SCounty are gearing up to
offer aid if the worst hap-
pens.
"North Miami is keeping
a close eye on what is hap-
pening over in Haiti with


BV Randy Grice
rgrice~3miamitimesonline.com

Last weekend, a local service
organization made the joilrney
to Haiti to provide some relief to
the nation. SMILE Haiti visited
Our Father's House, an orphan-
age located in Petion-Ville, Haiti
to put smiles on kids faces witch
toys and other essential items to
childhood.
"The kids were overly excited
they ate sweets all day long,"
said SunJa Leon, coordinator of
the group. "Wherr they are in the
orphanage there are only three
meals a day and there is no extra
juice and candy and cup cakes.
They' were really happy about
what we did for them."


Haiti rebuilds


hospitality industry


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


SECTION C


FOR STO R M

elf. zones ahead of the storm.
con- Haitian authorities urged
r blan- people to conserve food
," said and safeguard their be-
nator longings.
want Jeanie Cassius, a native
.ave of Haiti who survived the
pefully 2010 earthquake, said she
.as hopes her country doesn't
Ithe endure the same disaster.
have "Haiti is very, very frag-
,m- ile right now," she said. "A
e that lot of people didn't make
iill it out of the earthquake,
er the I was lucky. Haiti can
es." not have another natural
nse disaster it is just not pos-
.itary sible. I pray that if we do
mov- need help the world will
gh-risk open its arms to us again."


the need present itse
"We have already (
tacted companies fo
kets, food and water
SunJa Leon, coordil
of SMILE Haiti. "We
to make sure they h
these essentials. Ho
nothing goes as bad
what happened with
earthquake. But we
contacted several~co
panies to make sure
the people of Haiti w
be taken care of aftt
tropical storm passe
In Haiti, civil defel
officials and the mil
have already begun
.ing people out of hi~


Associated Press
A worker from a private company cleans a drain ip preparation for Tropical
Storm Emily in Port-au~-Prince, Haiti, Aug. 3, 2011.


Tropical Storm Emily,"
said Andre' Pierre, mayor
North Miami. "We are a
member of the world sister
city and and we do have
a sister city relationship
with a city in Haiti. So our
duties as a world sister
city is to help our city and
Other cities in that country
with aid during emergen-
cies.
The City of North Miami
lent their help in 2010 to
Haiti after the devastating
earthquake. North Mi-
ami's sister city is Delmar,
Haiti.
SMILE Haiti, a local
service group, has also
vowed to help Haiti out if


SMILE provided the children
with essentially a day off from be-
ing an orphan.
"We brought then to a national
park and we stayed the entire
day from 10 until 3," Leon said.
"We had a bounce house, cotton
candy, pop corn, face painting,
people singing and dancing. This
was just a day out of the orphan-
age just to try to give them some
normalcyy"
Our Father's House is home to
64 boys between the ages of fiie
and 16 years old.
Many of these kids were either
abandoned by their parents and
family members or found wan-
dering the streets. In June, the
service group organized a make-
over of the orphanage, where they


"f I






-- Associated Press
Haiti awaits tropical storm Emily, which will bring
further misery to the 634,000 earthquake survivors
living in di placement camps.


reimergence. As relief dollars
disapate we believe that peo-
ple desperately need to cre-
ate and persue opportunity
for themselves," said Johnson.
"This series of vocational train-
ing initiatives are all aimed at
sectors we believe the country
must grow in if it is to reemerge
from the catastrophic circum-
stances."
Yele Haiti, which was found-
ed in 2005 by Grammy-award
winning Imusician W~yclef Jean,
was set up a grassroots, non-
political, charitable organiza-
tion focusing on emergency
relief, employment, youth de-
velopment and education.
"Our region experienced the
greatest loss in hospitality
and leisure tourism demand
worldwide in 2009, and un-
fortunately Haiti stands at the
bottom of the list in terms of
tourism. dollars," Parris said.
"The program initiated by Y61e
Haiti combined with our exper-
tise in hospitality and training,
is needed to help the country
increase its share of tourism
revenue.


BV Melanie Nayer
Within minutes of the earth
shaking on January, 12, 2010,
one of the Caribbean's most be-
loved islands became the cen-
ter of international attention.
The 7.0-magnitude earthquake
that struck Haiti simply left the
..Caribbean nation in shambles.
Haiti has` historically been
one of the Caribbean's most
economically successful des-
tinations and the hospitality
industry is set on ensuring it
remains that way.
Derek Johnson, CEO of Y61e
Haiti Foundation and Parris
Jordan, managing director of
the hospitality consulting firm
HVS's office in the Caribbean,
created a partnership in which
both organizations will educate
Haiti residents in the hotel in-
dustry. The program is a voca-
tional training initiative taking
place in the port city of Jacmel,
one of Haiti's renowned resort
destinations, which suffered
severe damage after the earth-
quake.
"We're still in the bowel of


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IAN LIF E


HAITI BR AC`E-S


brought the boys out on a field
trip for an entire day. They also
had staff at the orphanage clean-
ing, repainting, and fixing the
facility. They also gave 64 beds to
the boys as a surprise.
This is the first time SMILE has
done something like this. ,
"This is first time we have had ~
sonriething like this," Leon said.
"We contacted an owner of a park
in Haiti and he told us that we
could have.the event there so we
could do it on a bigger scale. I
don't know if we will ahirays do
this the same way, but we are
trying to get a contract to have
things like this more often."
SMILE has been in existence
here in Miami for nearly a year,
since December 2010.


OR~ AAUZS O PZA EGOAN















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"THE FUNNIEST MOVIE


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Robert Fure, FILM SCHOOL REJECTS


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Stephen Rebello, PLAYBOY


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CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWT~IMES


RI.^CKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OwVN DESTINY


6C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


on Wednesday, August 18 from 9
a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Jungle Island's
Treetop Ballroom, 1111Parrot Jun-
gle Trail. The networking senes Is
open to the public, $20 for cham-
ber members and $30 for non-
members. Attendants are required
to bring a laptop with them f or
interactive portions of the event.
For more information, call The
Chamber at 305-751-8648 or visit
www.m-dec.org.

SCHARLEE Homes for Chil-
dren ensures that children who
have been abused, abandoned or
neglected and are in foster care
are prepared to begin the school
year with the school supplies they
need. Donations can be dropped
off at any BankAtlantic branch In
Mliami-Dade County or at the CHAR-
LEE office until August 19th. The
CHARLEE office is located at 155 5.
Miaml Avenue, Suite 700. Contact
yans Grunwaldt at 305-779-9697
or hans.grunwaldt@charlee.org for
further information or to coordinate
the drop off of your donation. Do-
nations are fully tax deductible.

SThe City of Miami Gardens
will host a Lien Amnesty Blowout
event at City Hall, 1515 NW 167th
Ave., Bldg. 5, Suite 200 in Miami
Gardens on Saturday, August 20
and Saturday, August 27 from 9
a.m.-2 p.m. This will be an op-
portunity for property owners with
liens on their property to satisfy
all Ilens for just 5500.00 per lien
with all application fees waived.
For more information or to sched-
ule an appointment, contact the
Code Compliance Division at 305-
622-8000 ext. 2610 or ext. 2614
or contact Maggie Castor by email
at meastor@miamigardens-Fl.gov.

SThe African-American Re-
search Library and Cultural
Center will be hosting free em-
powerment workshops on Satur-
day, August 20 from 11 a.m.-4:30
p.m. (pre-reglster by August 12
for "Starting your own nonprofit")
and Saturday, September 3 from
11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (pre-register by
August 26 for "Grant Writing"). For
more information and/or to regis-
ter for these workshops, contact
Norman Powell at 954-624-5213 or
email posimo@aol.com.

SThe Booker T. Washington
Class of 1965, Inc.'s Class Mem-
ber's Plcnic will be held on Satur-
day, August 20 at Amelia Earhart
Park. Class members are asked to
contedii4365-62;5-17 0 to advise
your fo d ~contrb~jiby


SCongresswoman Frederica
S. Wilson In partnership with Miami
Mayor Tomas Regalado and Com-
missioner Richard P. Dunn II is host.
Ing a town hall meeting discussing
the Congressional Black Caucus for
the People lobs Initiative H. Res.
348 on Monday, August 22 at 6 p.m.
at Mt. Hermon AME Church, 17800
NW 25th Avenue in Miami Gardens.
For additional information, visit
www.wilson.house.gov or call 305-
690-5905.

SCongresswoman Frederica
5. Wilson will host: a job fair on
Tuesday, August 23 from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. at the 3ames L. Knight Cen-
ter, 400 SE 2nd Avenue in Down-
town Miami. Registration begins at
8 a.m. For additional information,
visit www.wilson.house.gov or call
305-690-5905.

SThe Office of the State At-
torney is hosting a 'Second Chance*
Sealing and Expungement Program
on Thursday, August 25 from 4-7
p.m. at the Miami Beach Conven-
tion Center, 1901 Convention Cen.
ter Drive, Hall D. To avoid waiting a
long period of time in line youl could
pre-register at www.miamlsao.com
or fax a clear copy of your valid pic-
ture ID and phone number to 305- '
547-0723, Attention: Katherine Fer.
nandez Rundle, State Attorney. Fo~r
more info, call 305-547-0724.

SGreat Crowd Ministries
presents South Floricia BB-Q/Gospel
Festival at Amella Earhart Park on
Saturday August 27, September
24 and October 29 from 10 a.m.-
9 p.m. The park fee is $6 per car.
All artists and vendors are encour-
aged to call. For more information,
contact Constance Koon-lohnson at
786-290-3258 or Lee at 954-274-
7864.

SMiami-Dade County Park
and Recreation Department and
Miami-Dade County Commis-,
sion for Women celebrate Women's
Equality Day on Friday, August 26
from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. held at thy
Roxcy O'Neal Bolton Women's His.
tory Gallery at the Women's Park,
10251 West Flagler Street. For more
information, call 305-480-1717.

SChai Community Services,
Inc. in collaboration with A-Betta
Bail Bonds, Inc. will host its an-
nual CCS Career Expo (lob Fair) on
Saturday, August 27 from 10 a.m.-
6 p.m. at the DoubleTree Hotel &


Exhibition Hlall, 711 NW 72nd Ave.
For more Information, call 786-273-
0294.

SPlaying the Game of Life
(PGL), a turn-key program for
teaching social skills through an
arts-based curriculum, Invites the
community to a free back to school
event for children four-12 years
old on Sunday, August 28 from 11
a.m.-1 p.m. at the PGL Enrichment
Center, 7144 Byron Avenue In MI-
aml Beach. For more information,
call 305-864-5237 or email info@
ecqC.b~iz.

SP.H.I.R.S.T. Impressionz, a
dinner poetry event returns at Oasis
Cafe, 12905 NE 8th Avenue in North
Miami. It will be held on Sundays,
August 28, September 25, October
30, November 27 and December 18
at 7 p.m. Admission is $10, which
Includes performance, dinner and
drink. Anyone interested in partici-
pating needs to contact at least one
week In advance. 786-273-5115.

SThe Bohemia Room presents
The Acoustics featuring Philly Soul
Dlva and Indle Soul icon Jagrar
,Wright on Wednesday, August 31.
~The doors open at 8 p.m. Admis-
sion is $15. The event will be held
at V Midtown Lounge, 3215 NE 2nd
Avenue. For more Information, visit
www.jaguarwright.com or www.
thebohemlaroom.com.

SThe Miaml-Dade County
Health Department, Special
Immunizations Program will be
providing free Back-to-School im-
munizations to children between
the ages of two months through 18
years of age. Parents need to bnng
their child's immunization record
and a picture JD. For more informa-
tion, call 786-845-0550.

SThere will be a meeting about
the Memorial Day's Urban Week-
end In August by the City of Miami
Beach. Persons interested in attend-
ing should email lindaslmmons43@
yahoo.com, African-American Foun-
dation of Greater Miami.

SZoo Miami will show its appre-
ciation during August to those who
have served and are serving in the
military. Any active-duty member or
veteran presenting a valid military
ID will be able to take advantage Of
one of these offers: Enter the zoo
with a "buy one, get one free" ad-
mission, This offer Is valid for up to


six people and expires August 31.
Also, 15 percent off the Annual Pass
to Zoo Miami valid for 365 days of
admission. Zoo Miami provides a
25 percent off regular adult or child
admission for all military mem-
bers year-round. Identification is
required at time of admission pur-
chase.

SThe Miaml-Dade Public Li-
brary System continues to cel-
ebrate its 40th anniversary with a
flashback to the books, movies and
music of the 1990s! This summer,
the Library System kicked-off its
look back at the 1990s, which will
run through September. Special sto-
ries, classic board games, crafts and
more, as well as'90s trivia contests,
book clubs and quilt making will be
held throughout the month of Au-
gust. All events are free and open
to the public. To find an event near
you, visit www.mdpls.org and click
on Calendar of Events or call 305-
375-2665.

SThe City of Miami Gardens
Youth Sports (CMGYS) Football
and Cheerleading program is now
accepting registrations for the up-
coming 2011 season. The program
is available for youth ages four-15.
For more Information on registra-
tions and payment options, call
305-622-8080 or visit www.cmgys.
com.

SSummer BreakSpot, part of
the USDA Summer Food Nutrltion
Program, will be open. now until
August 2011 at hundreds of sites
across Miami-Dade County, provid-
ing free nutritious meals break-
fast, lunch and snack all summer
long for kids and teens, 18 And un-
der. To find a Summer BreakSpot
site near you, visit www.sumnmer-
foodflorlda.org or call 211.

SEpsilon Alpha and reta Mu
Chapters of Alpha Pi Chi Na-
tional Sorority, Inc., of Miami are
completing a project of Red Cross
Readiness. The chapters are collect-
ing first-aid supplies and emergen-
cy items for Emergency Kits. These
kits will be distributed to the elderly
community of Miami for use during
this hurricane season. If you are in-
terested in donating and contribut-
ing first-aid supplies, call 305-992-
3332 before September 17. If you'd
like more information about this or-
ganization, contact Linda Adderly at
addlmhaaol.com.
Please turn to LIFESTYLE 10D


Class of 1965 will meet on Satur-
day, August 13 at 4:30 p.m. at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts Cen-
ter. For more information, contact
Lebble Lee at 305-213-0188.

SThe Poemedy Project will
present Rubin Stacy: Seven
Moves at the Lion's Den, 6700
Biscayne Blvd on Saturday, August
13 from 6-10 p.m. For more infor-
mation, contact Raymond Akbar or
Lowell Williams at 213-537-5887,
email at poemedy@gmail.com or
visit www.poemedy.com.

SThe Seminole Hard Rock
Hotel &P Casino presents "Laughs
for Llteracy"' to benefit The Russell
Life Skills and Reading Founda-
tion on Saturday, August 13 start-
Ing with a reception at 5 p.m. and
dinner, drinks and comedy show
at 6:30 p.m. at the Seminole Hard
Rock Hotel & Casino/Seminole
Paradise, 1 Seminole Way In Hol-
lywood. To purchase tickets, visit
www.russellreadingroom.com, call
954-981-5653 or email events@
russellreading.com.

STooth Tales Pediatric Den-
tistry is hosting a back to school
dnve until Monday, August 15th to
collect supplies for the Broward Ed-
ucation Foundation. The drive will
take place at the Tooth Tales office,
12781 Miramar Parkway Suite 306.
Donations can be made at the of-
fice Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-5
p.m. For more information, visit
mytoothtales.com or contact Sara
Shake at 954-336-3275 or sara@
exposedprandevents.com.

SRepresentative Dwight M.
Bullard will be hosting "The Fu-
ture of Florida's Public Education
Forum" on Monday, August 15 at 6
p.m. at Southridge Senior High Au-
ditorium, 19355 SW 114th Avenue.
Thirty minutes prior to the forum,
parents and students are invited to
the "Empowerment Hour."' Organl-
zations will provide information to
students and parents, increasing
their level of preparedness for this
school year and graduation.

SThe Miami-Dade Cham-
ber of Commerce presents Mis-
sion Possible: Cracking the Code:
-Birsnesst*iTech~nology~ar a Business
Empowerment Network Series 2.0


SCity of Miami Gardens
Councilman Andre Williams will
be hosting "Closing the Achieve-
ment Gap," a community conversa-
tion on Wednesday, August 10 from
5-8 p.m. at Miami Norland Senior
High, 1050 NW 195th Street In the
Auditorium. There will be cash door
prizes available. RSVP with Latlsha
Lewis at 786-594-0227 or email at
latisha@utd.org.

SThe City of Miami Gardens
Code Compliance Division has
partnered with the Greater Miami
Gardens Chamber of Commerce
to host the 4th Annual Business
Expo on Thursday, August 11 from
9 a.m.-12 p.m. at the Betty T. Fer-
guson Recreational Complex, 3000
NW 199th Street. Are you a bust.
ness owner In the City of Miami Gar-
dens? Are you seeking an opportu-
nity to expand your business' Jorn
us and get the information that: will
get you organized and ready for the
next steps to success.

SThe Miami Jackson Class of
1976 will meet on Thursday, August
11 from 6-7:30 p.m. The meeting
willi take place at Range Park, 525
NW 62nd Street. Please be on time.
For more information or directions
to the Park, contact Kevin Marshall
at 305-519-8790 or Karen Gilbert at
786-267-4544. -

M Mami-Dade County Mayor
Carlos A. Gimenez is hosting a
series of Budget Town Hall Meet-
ings, where residents will be able to
ask about the proposed Fiscal Year
2011-2012 County budget. It will be
held at several locations from 7-8
p.m.: Thursday, August 11 at Miami
Gardens City Hall, 1515 NW 167th
Street; Miami Art Museum, 101
West Flagler Street; and Thursday,
August 18 at Coral Gables Country
Club, 998 North Greenway Drive.
For more information, visit www.
mlami-dade.gov/budget.

SChai Community Services,
Inc. In collaboration with' A Betta-
Dry Cleaning & Laundry, Inc. will
host its 7th Annual Back to School
Bash-School Supply giveaway on
Saturday, August 13 from 1-5 p.m.
at 2971 NW 62nd Street. For more
information, call 305-691-0233.
8-1 n ot <- r A~ar 1
8 Boker T. Washington

























VOLUME 88 NUMBER 50 MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 10-16, 2011 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Summer program


gives 135 teens jobs
~ Youth share tales of personal transformation


Jackson High

teacher admits to

sex with student
BV D. Kevin McNeir
kmenecir~miam times online.com
A science teacher at Miami Jackson
Senior High School, Waleska Velasquez,
29, has been charged with three counts
of having sex with a minor. After the
Florida Department of Children & Fami-
lies received an anonymous tip about the /'
affair, City of Miami Police conducted a -
full-scale investigation leading to the in-
structor's arrest at her NW 62nd Avrenue VELASOUEZ
home in Virginia Gardens late last week.
Please turn. to TECE 10A


I I I I I


I.. 1.. I. I, ....11 ...III...Ill...II...l...Ill...l...111111 1ll..I
assessessessexxxSCHH 3-DIGIT 326
510 P1
LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
265 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117097
CAINESVILLE FL 32611-7887


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur InIllis


By D. Kevin McNeir Brown Mackie College Miami. Now
kmen~eir@miamnitimesonlinze.com six weeks later with the summer
jobs program coming to an end,
When Temprens Givens, 25, a Givens has been identified for full-
single mother with three children, time employment with the College
first presented herself for an inter- once she earns her GED.
view for the CRA Summer Youth "These programs are so vital
Employment Program last spring, because young people like Temp-
she admits she did not bring her "A- rens get a chance to see another
game," showing up in an inappro- world, another wray of living and
priately-short dress, fiery-red hair have someone to talk to that guides
and a lot of attitude. But Project them and helps them change their
Director Saliha Nelson, 38, refused negative attitude and beliefs to
to give up on her -- neither did her more positive ones," Seymour-Lane
eventual mentor/job site supervi- said. "I grew up in Liberty City and
sor, Charlene Seymour-Lane, a know that having a mentor in my
project development coordinator at Please turn to JOBS 10A



. - Sivens and
Nientor
Charlene -
s~e~ymour- o~~


--Miami Times photo/D). Kevin McNeir


--Miami Times photo/Rlandy Grice
DEMOLITION BOUND?: Only a handful of the original 64 owners at Poinciana Village in Overtown remain, still
hoping for a fair settlement price as litigation continues over stalled development plans and property ownership rights.


PoSniCO co 7 vrs


"What the residents
are asking for is a
live-work-play type
of development that first
brings in big box retailers
... that can employ folks
in the area."
-EDMONSON


Are owners being pushed

out for sake of profit?
By D. Kevin McNeir
kmeneir@miamitimesonline.com
Attorneys representing the City,
County and private developers, continue
to place a stranglehold on plans for eco-
nomicc development and community revi-
talization in Overtown. Six blocks have


been identified as prime sites including
land on both sides of Northwest Second
Avenue, between Sixth and 10th Streets.
And while the City's CRA says it has big
plans in store, attorneys must first find
a way to settle several lawsuits between
public and private interests over who
has legal right to the land.
Here are the issues in summary: 1)
Who controls the three County-owrned
parcels between Sixth and Ninth Streets
that are being disputed between the
Please turn to POINCIANA 10A





Tornado-damaged University completes the
majority of its reconstruction efforts
BV RandV Grice South, is expected to open its doors in
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com time for the start of the fall semester.
"I am happy to see that my school
After months of reconstruction, will be open to provide educationI-
Shaw University [Raleigh, N.C.], the al opportunities again," said Rene
oldest historically-Black college in the Simms, a 27-year-old Shaw graduate.


"It is tr"lba bless ng that the tUnirver-
these students to get back to the regu-
lar schedule of college and get back to
the business of learning."
The tornado that struck the school
back in April left behind 26 buildings
with severe roof damage and toppled
massive trees in the area. The dorms,
Please turn to SHAW 10A


Speaking for the, a ~ ~i -sp

Congo s women --
Africa's Ambassador for Peace, Miss Congo Odi- It
ane Lokako, 30, (bottom, center), is traveling the ~""'"-**
U.S. in efforts to raise awareness about the daily
atrocities facing women in her county including
rape and HIV-infection. She toured facilities at .
Jackson Memorial Hospital and is joined by Ma-
mie Kabongolo (1-1*, and young Congolese-Ameri- BT C ~
cans from Miami: Sylva and Patrick K~abuanseya,
19 and 26; Terry Ellis, 24; Gracia K~abuanseya, 15;
Parfoit Nseya, 17; and Brendy K~amba, 11.


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~QCimers'


ShawT overcomes adversity


Voting Rights Act 1965

celebrates 46th anniversary
BLACK< EMPOWERMENT: Forty-six years ago, on August 6, 1965,
President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965, out-
lawing discriminatory practices that prohibited Blacks from voting. Pic-
tured are Johnson (I-r) along with Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy and Dr. Martin
Luther K~ing, Jr., both of whom were instrumental in the Act's passage.


$4hool Board adds

::w measures for
ttoxibled schools
' Recently, the' Miqupi-Dade .County n'P
' $61 B'oar~Id (10-1)UtPS) unanimousily
a f;~riiroved a nlicasure proposed by
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall, District
3 school board member, to provide
F:f U--jrqased support through community
ment"EE~S~m,, to:~elp achoole under the -
-9uevne categ ry continue their goal
(,bfimproving student achievement. Mi-
:anii Central and Miami Edison Senior BENDROSS. e
~ph ~jh~ ola a wrel~e,twointervene schools, :rIDNA
~Sf~~~edf;6y;,psimhdfr posblcosurclj.e. 1
.-t6;9cf afterthe school board, district
Please turn to MVONOITORING 6A


Drew and Phyllis

Wheatley cited for

earning "A" grade
By RandV Grice
rglrice C'miam7irimesonrline.co m
State Education Commissioner John L. Winn recently
recognized some of Florida's highest performing school dis-
tricts and Miami-Dade has scored with five schools noted
for improved performance from. among a total of 17 schools
statewide. Charles R. Drew and Phyllis Wheatley Elemen-
tary Schools, located in Liberty City and Overtowin, respec-
tively, were among those recognized for their significant
improvement and achievement.
Cathy Williams, principal at Drew, said she was satisfied
with the improvements the school has made.
Please turn to GRADE 10A


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- I


BL;\CKs .11CsT COsnTOL. THEIR OWNS DESTINY


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six IMonths $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210


CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the
world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless of race, creed or color, his or her
human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person,
the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief
that all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back.


-- on the table while taking
other matters, including tax in-
creases on the wealthy, off the
table. To swallow deep budget
cuts without also looking at
revenue increases seems mis-
guided, at best, and perhaps
even foolish.
The deal will require about $3
billion in deficit reductions, but
no increase in revenue. It gives
Republicans virtually every-
thing they asked for in the be-
gmnmig. Congressman Eman-
uel Cleaver (D-MO), Chairman
of the Congressional Black
Caucus, described the deal as


BY JULIANNE MALVEAUX, NNPA COLUMNIST



Will debt ceiling fix double dip recession?
Our country appears to have a "sugar-coated Satan sand- months-10ng debate has had ity of using stimu
avoided default on our debt, which But Cleaver's observa- on our investment climate. A ate employment i:
based on a deal that was cut tion still does not factor in the skittish stock market doesn't with the possibility
Sunday night. The Tea Party possibility that recession will exactly bode well for economic ling legislation t]
Republicans have been com- continue or become a double- recovery. Nor does a weakened flexibility for an
pletely unwilling to compro- dip recession. bond rating. Nor higher inter- downturn. Pass
mise. President Obama and Double dip reces- est rates, which appear to be a coated Satan san
some Democrats, on the other me wash it down v
hand, have been far willing to R M 80y 810 COnsidering walking away from those mort-i of that strychnine
compromise putting everything gageS, exacerbating the housing crisis. Mix in the ef- strychnine. Pois
sacred -Social Security, Medi- fect this months-lon debate has had on our investment this deal is poison
care, educational programs omy and for most


can people.
The debt-ceiling bill is bad
news. It is not even clear that it
is "better than nothing." What. it
actually shows is that Tea Party
Republicans are better at adhet*-
ing to their principles and exert-
ing their will than Democrats or
the White House are. They de-
serve no credit for their unwill-
ingness to compromise because
the legislative process is about
compromnise.But Obama and
some Democrats need to take
heed of Tea Party tactics or
drink that strychnine with the
sugar-coated Satan sandwich.


hIui~s o grir
s not possible
ty of debt cel-
hat offers no
employment
that sugar-
dwich and let
with a big dose
:. That's right,
on. Because
Sfor the ecori-
of the Ameri-


sion? How? Let's start with
high unemployment rates that
are likely to get higher when
money is taken out of the econ-
omy. Let's add the millions of
housing units that are empty
and the foreclosure crisis that
has not yet been resolved. More
than 28 percent of us have "un-
derwater" mortgages, or mort-
gages higher than the value of
a home. Many are considering
walking away from those mort-
gages, exacerbating the hous-
ing crisis. Mix in the effect this


possibility.
The unemployment situation
is the most disturbing. Nearly *
a third of those who are out
of work have been out of work
for a full year. The average
length of unemployment is now
40 weeks, or 10 months. The
French philosopher Albert Ca-
mus once wrote, "Without work
all life is rotten." There are
at least 25 million Americans
leading "rotten" lives because
they have no work. Many, also,
have no hope. Yet the possibil-


~~~~BY DR. BENJAMIN F. CHAlVIS, JR. NNPAI COLUMNIST


President Obama s transcendent leadd~rshIp
Now that the U.S. debt ceiling of America on the night of his of North Carolina back in the ior of those whose only. mission
has finally been raised by the election just three years ago in 1960s as a youth organizer, I is to defeat the president next
U.S. Congress, there are many November 2008? wonder how King today would year in the 2012 national elec-
who are quick to cast judg- Obama has to be the leader view or respond to these sys- tions.
ment on the leadership per- of all the people, including tematic attacks on the lead- The election of Obama was
formance of President Barack even those wrho throw political ership of President Obama? I another indication that King
Obama. Somehow there is a stones at him no matter how believe King would speak out 'was right about the future
partisan loss of memory to the much he tries to represent and take a stand to warn all changes in American society
fact that the last seven presi- with respect to the oneness of
dents all supported the rais- humanity and the inclusive-
ing of the nation's debt ceilinguttecretcaenethtOaafcsaeraan nssoBlksiotecun
to avoid a national default. In the forces that are aligning~against him are gaining some try's political mainstream. But
fact. Reagan raised the U.S. 0800onal momentum. the current challenges that
debt ceiling 18 times during his Obama faces are real and the
eight years as president with- forces that are aligning against
out polarizing the nation. what isj best for all. Later this people not to allow the obvious him are gaining some national
What's really behind these month, we will all pause to racial and political prejudices momentum.
attacks? Is this really just an- celebrate the unveiling of the and undermining stereotypical The progressive transforma-
other example of the madness national monument in tribute attacks on Obama to trigger a tion of America will not be con-
of the current body politic in to the life, leadership, dream backward bigoted polarization tingent on the arrogance or ig-
the United States? Or is there and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther of our nation and society. At a norance of the past, but will be
something more fundamental King Jr. on the National Mall in time when the nation should accomplished by "optimistic"
going on today across America Washington, D.C. Yes, that will be focusing on rendering the leaders like Obama who know
that exposes the need for Presi- be another great historic day best high quality education for how to rise above and to tran-
dent Obama to keep pushing in the history of America. How- all children in America and to scend the backward tides of
forward to improve the qual- ever, as one who worked with be creating and providing mil- reactionary and negative pes-
ity for life in particular for the Dr. King and the Southern lions of needed jobs so that the simism of visionless politicians
millions of people who voted for Christian Leadership Confer- economy will rebound, it is sad that want to take the nation
him and danced in the streets ence (SCLC) in my home~ state to witness the ruthless behav- backward rather than forward.


Wealth gap
The report recently released
by the Pew Research Center
that showed that the wealth
gap between white families on
the one hand and Black and La-
tino families on the other was
greater than at any time in the
last 25 years, caught many peo-
ple by surprise. It should not
have. We have been witness-
ing an expansion of this gap for
some time. The so-called Great
Recession has exacerbated this
tendency.
Yet when I read this report,
actually the first thing that
came to mind was a discus-
sion I recently had with a white
friend of mine. They were telling
me about their son, a 20-some-
thing who has been looking for
work. He has gotten into the
frame of mind that goes like
this: white men have it rough
out there and, in fact, white
men face discrimination com-
pared with Black women.


In truth, what my friend's son
is confronting is the manner in
which the economy has been
changing over the last 30 years.
Not only has the economy re-
organized, leading to the intro-
ductions of new technologies;
downsizing; and off-shoring of


be there to soften the blow,
does not work the way that it
once did. Back during the Great
Depression, for instance, Black
workers were often fired from
their jobs and replaced by white
workers, though the white
workers would be paid at the


of U.S. society. But the second
piece is that the reorganization
of capitalism means that many
of the opportunities that whites
believed that they were entitled
to have dried up. In this situa-
tion many of these whites, like
my friend's son, focus on imag-
inary opponents --in this case
Black women rather than
understanding that the system
is actually crushing them. It is
anger like his that helps to fuel
Tea Party movements, white
nationalists and others who
desperately want to believe that
the American Dream can be re-
stored for whites.
Sorry. It won't work that way.
The system is saying loud and
clear: Do not pass go; do not
collect $200, go directly to the
unemployment line where you
stew and try to figure out how
did this happen because it was
not suppose to happen to white
folks right?


jobs, but white people can no
longer assume that they are im-
mune or cushioned against the
full impact of economic down-
turns any more. The challeng-
es to white racial privilege and
racist discrimination by people
of color and their allies over the
years has meant that the auto-
matic assumption that, when
all else fails people of color will


lower salaries than Black work-
ers were making. These days it
is more difficult to pull this off.
So, what does this all mean?
Racist discrimination is alive
and well but looks different
than it once did. Nevertheless,
the racial differential in treat-
ment, whether in employment,
wealth, education, etc., remains
very much a part of the fabric


OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011 i


(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street'
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210

H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


It s time for a primer in

Black history
For the record the history lessons that we believe
are essential for all Blacks to remember have noth-
ing to do with those boring reports your teachers
required you to prepare on such notable Black men and
women like Harriet Tubman, Crispus Attucks or George
Washington Carver. The history that too many of us have
forgotten and which is crucial for our economic survival
and the future of the next generation of Blacks, has to do
with an all but forgotten event that occurred on August 6,
1965.

It was on that day 46 years ago that then-President Lyn-
don Baines Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law
legislation that protected the democratic participation
of Blacks in the U.S. in the voting process. It wvas needed
to enforce the Fifteenth Amendment and to eliminate sub-
tle racial restrictions that denied Blacks from Alabama to
Alaska the right to vote.

Why should we pause and highlight this date? Because
without the Voting Rights Act, Blacks would still be subject
to such Jim Crow-like maneuvers as poll taxes, literacy
tests, intimidation and gerrymandering. Even more signif"
icant, however, are new and more creative laws signed by
leaders that include Governors Scott Walker (Wisconsin),
Rick Perry (Texas) and our very own Rick Scott (Florida),
tightening restrictions on third party voter registration
organizations and shortening the number of early voting
days

But Scott went even further, passing a ban on felon vot-
ing rights and forcing non-violent offenders to wait five
years after completing their sentences to apply for their
rights to be restored. While we do not profess to be legal
experts, the restrictions facing ex-felons sound a lot like
"double jeopardy.

What's more, many Blacks in the last presidential elec-
tion were persuaded to register to vote because of the ef-
forts of third party organizations and a large number of
uJ~s~votgd e.~a4-1 ~O. jSo at's the real im po rtance of the 196F
Voting Rights Act? It served to counter if not negate legis-
lative shenanigans like those now employed by Scott and
his cronies, making what wras once deemed as an "un-
alienable right" even more difficult to achieve.

But when Blacks act like we don't care about voting any-
way, as the numbers for Black voter turnout would sug-
gest, then maybe it doesn't really matter whether more
laws are changed at all. There once was a time that Blacks
were willing to die for the right to vote and many did just
that. But today more of us would prefer staying home and
letting those from, other ethnic groups determine our des-
tiny. It's enough to make a grown man cry!


Will new Northwestern


principal brmng calm or

more COllfHSIOl?
We are hoping, even praying, for positive results to
come from the most recent changing of the guard
at Miami Northwestern Senior High School. But
given what has transpired over the past six years, not only
will prayers be essential but a solid game plan will have to
be ready for operation and a lot of support from the school
district officials and parents will be needed when classes re-
sume .

Newly-appointed Principal Wallace Aristide has taken over
the hot seat once occupied by his two most recent predeces-
sors: the non-committal Charles Hankerson and before him
the much-beleaguered, but finally acquitted Dwight Bernard.
We e;""tedlywsh Anistd huk inhi nwspos dion but wo:;
made him stand out above other candidates.

Perhaps the proof, as the saying goes, will be in the pud-
ding. In the meantime, Northwestern must contend with its
being a "D" school and therefore subject to intense scrutiny
by the District's Educational Transformation Office. By the
way, if you wondering what the overall benefits are from be-
ing monitored by the recently-formed Education Transfor-
mation Office, wre must admit that you are not alone.

But whether it's downtown program coordinators or school
board officials that are keeping an eagle eye on academic de-
velopmnents at Northwestern, those who ultimately stand to
win, or lose are the 1,200-plus boys and girls who will return
to school in a few short da s.
Education is the only way to legally and effectively level the
playing field in the U.S. And without equal opportunities in
education, we have already destined these young Black boys
and girls to failure.

We will keep close watch on what transpires in the halls of
blue and gold at the "West." And we hope that each of you
will do the same. The future of our community's youth lies
in the balance.


Audit bureau of Circulatiohs

^ amprp


climate,


BY BILL FLETCHER, NNAP COLUMNIST


and souls of angry white folks


t is anger like his that helps to fuel ~Tea Party movementS,
White nationalists and others who desperately want to
Believe that the American Dream can be restored for
WhiteS.















I


o o a
~o


Public housing units get a fresh start


CARROLL -
cotninued from 7D

Julia Hurst.
"As a NLGA leader, Lt. Gov-
ernor Carroll will work with
her peers across the nation
to. find and foster multi-state
and regional solutions to
problems," said NLGA Chair
Nebraska Lt. Governor Rick
Sheehy. "Through NLGA, the
nation's lieutenant governors
discuss shared concerns and


MetroPCS slows down, asks customers to drop pre-paid service


~ :
i
i.

Tr' r


r~c~r I I I I fl ~ 1 ~ Yc~ ti I I i I 1 =II II I) II~ I I I I I I e~f 5R IE~I Q DYI


BU Y TH IS SP OT


RIL^CKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR Ow'N DESTINY


5530 NW 1 th v ndue s o srig
for middle and high school stu-
dents. Work at your own pace
and rce ve one-aon-one istarc

trade. Registration and classes
are free! Open Monday-Friday,
2-7 p.m. Don't wait call, email or
conrie by, today: 305-691-8588 or
andre@thedickcha rity~com.

SThere will be a free first-
time homebuyer education
class held every second Saturday
of the mo th, at Antioc 3Mission-

34th Avenue, from 8:30 a.m.-5
p.m. For more information, call
305-652-7616 or email fgonza-
lez@erechelp.org.

SFree child care is available at
the Miami-Dade County Com-
munitV Action Agency Head-
start/Early Head Start Pro-
gram for children ages three-five
for th ud omng nhoDl der
ty residence apply only. We wel-
come children with special needs/
disability with an MDCPS IEP.
For more information, call 786-
469-4622, Monday-Friday from 8
a.m.-5 p.m.

SLooking for all former Mon-
tanari employees to get reac-
quainted. Meetings will be held
at Piccadilly's (West 49th Street)
in Hialeah, on the last Saturday
of each month at 9 a.m. We look
forward to seeing each and every
on fyu Fotramore information
593-9687 or Elijah Lewis at 305-
469-7735.

Xcel Family Enrichment
Center, Inc. will be celebrating
it's 2nd Annual Black Marriage
Day Walk on Man-h 24, 2012.
::.:::: op s, <: at pr:::ate
community based organization
that provides social services to
low/moderate income families.
Its main focus is to strengthen
marriage and families from a ho-
listic approach. Xcel is seeking
dnationsmfonre his evet inmthe

riage counselors ls a speaker),
D3, etc. Xcel is registered with
the Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services
Solicitation of Contribultions Di-
vision. Your donation is-tax_.de-

dull Ms i ertma 7e8 -6r7m ,4


Muhammad Ali expressed his
sadness about the bombing and
massacre in Norway, saying he
is heartbroken by the senseless
deaths and the reasoning of the
man behind them.
In a letter to the people of
Norway written under his
name, the boxing great says his
"heart goes out to each of you
as you deal with the unimagi-
nable grief of your loss."
Ali wrote that the richness
of diversity is something that
makes the world a better place
and that no one should fear
multiculturalism. People, he
said, have the same ideals no
matter what religion or race
they are.
"I see the same wishes for our


children to
have hap-
py, healthy
hives; I see *,
the same -
concerns for -
others less
fo rtun at e
than our-
selves; I see ,
the same ALI
desire for
peace and dignity," Ali said.
The man who confessed to
carrying out the massacre, An-
ders Behring Breivik, has said
the attacks were part of a plan -
to start a cultural revolution
and purge Europe~ of Muslims
while also punishing politi-
cians who have embraced mul-


ticulturalism.
Ali, a Muslim, said those who
commit unspeakable acts in
the name of race and religion
"fail to understand that we
share far more with our fellow
beings than those aspects that
set us apart."
He went on to say that the
best way to honor the victims
in Norway is to reach out and
embrace others in a celebration
of common human values and
aspirations.
"The collective power of such
individual proactive acts can
have a tremendous aggregate
impact and provide a lasting
honor to those who are no lon-
ger able to. take such action
themselves," Ali wrote.


In 'll I II I I



CUSTOM PHOTOGRAPHY & SCREEN PRINTING
Professional Photography Services in Your Home


LIFESTYLE
continued from 6C

II The Miami lackson Class of
1976 will be celebrating their 35th
Class Reunion on September 9-11.
Activities will include: Meet and
greet at the Misty Lake South Club-
house, 625 NW 210th Street; Picnic
atArell~a Eial nr BP;r S 4d Em 6t

ing worship at El Bethel Ministry
4792 NW 167th Street. T-shirts are
$10 and the fee for the combined
events is $20. For more informa-
tion, call Kevin at 305-319-8790 or
Karen at 786-267-4544.

SMiami Northwestern Class
of 1972 Scholarship Fundraiser
Bus Trip to Atlanta, GA for FAMU


rateen Kirkland-Kent at 305-323-
5551 or Glenda Tyse at 954-987-
0689.

SWomen First Body Care and
Mama Senna Essence, a natural
bauty cmpn tbasedfi t DS t s

Florida "Saturday Pamper Me Work-
shop" on Saturday, September 24
from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts Cen-
ter, 6161 NW 22ndi Ave. The work-
shop, including all materials cost
$40 and registration and payments
can be made for the workshop by

o/he c- r aat eraywr -
shop.html. For more information,
call 817-770-2029 or visit www.
womanfirstbodycare.com.

SRainbow Ladies and Beta
Phi a ,a s:a -;ort are s,, :. ,
bisexual and transgendered (LBT)
women of color on Saturday, Sep-
tember 24 at the Pride Center in
Wliton Manors. Free screenings and
health promotion education will be
provided by several local agen-
cies and organizations. Everyone
*n nvte There wil ebe f~o d, en-
information, call 305-772-4712,
305-892-0928 or visit www.rain-
bowladiesourspaceinc.org.

SThe Inaugural Northeast
Florida Blue and White Schol.
arship Golf Invitational will be


held on Saturday, October 15 at
the Magnolia Point Golf and Coun-
try Club in Green Cove Springs, FL.
Proceeds WNill go towards college
scholarships for 3acksonville-area
students and assist our organiza-
tions' community service programs.
For more information, visit www.
nenblueandwhitegolfbcom.

SComing this fall, a charter
bus leaving the Miami area going
to FAMU campus for the students.
For more information, call Phillip at
786-873-9498.

SCalling healthy ladies 50+ to
start a softball team for fun and
laughs. Be apart of this historical
adventure. Twenty-four start-up
players needed. For more informa-
ti:"thcal ien at3 5- .832 or

SKnoxville College, a
136-year-old Historic Black Col-
lege, is kicking off a three-year, ten
million dollar campaign to revitalize
the College under the leadership of

sn Al almi and th p bic ar
asked to donate to this campaign.
To secure donor forms, go to www.
knoxvillecollege.edu and scroll
down to K.C. Building Fund. Click
on It for the form or call Charlie
Williams, 3r., president of the local
alumni chapter at 305-915-7175
for more deta l.

SThe Miami Northwestern
Class of 1962 meets on the sec-
ond Saturday of each month at 4
p.m. at the African Heritage Cul-
tural Arts Center, 6161 NW 22nd
Avenue. We are beginning to make


at 305-621-8431.

SFamily and Children Faith
Coalltlon is seeking youth ages
four-18 tq connect with a caring
and dedicated mentor in Miami,
Dade or Broward County. Get
Iep with homework lte o fuon

your community. For more infor-
mation, contact Brandyss Howard
at 786-388-3000 or brandyss@
rfdct.org.

SWork from home and earn
money. The CLICK Charity,


cal housing authorities across
the USA to partner with private
developers and lauild mixed-
income projects that are better
for the community but lower the
overall number of subsidized
units, he says.
"You have a choice," Gilmore
says. "Do you serve 800 fanxi-
lies in deplorable conditions or
300 in much better conditions?
I know what choice I would
make." '
Harmony Oaks once wnas the
site of the C.J. Peete public
housing complex, where crime
rates routinely exceeded the
city's.


HOUSING
continued from 7D

There's. bingo night at the
clubhouse, movie showings and
a van that pulls into the com
plex every other week carrying
job listings.
"It's a whole new world," says
Cowart, who pays $72 a month
for her apartment. "It's much
better living" but better only
for those who get in,
Public housing units account
for about one-third of the new,
developments, and many fami-
lies who once lived in the proj-
ects will be left out, housing offi


cials say. At 460-unit Harmony
Oaks, for example, there's a
4,000-person waiting list.

MIXED INCOIVE
Families who don't get into the
complexes can apply for a fed-
eral voucher and live in market-
priced apartments that accept
them, says David dilmore, a pri-
vate contractor hired by the U.S.
Department of Housing and Ur-
ban Development to oversee the
New Orleans Housing Authority.
But there's also a waiting list for
those: about 22,000 families.
Shrinking budgets and lack
of federal support have led lo-


seek to influence national dia-
logue."
"I am honored for the op-
portunity to serve the south-
ern region of the nation," said
Lt. Governor Jennifer Carroll.
"Next to Texas, Florida is the
largest state in the south, the
gateway to the international
business community, and the
national leaders in job cre-
ation. I look forward to sharing
Florida's enterprising ideas,' as
well as to learn best practices


from other states."
The committee meets about
three times a year and is re-
sponsible to chart the course of
issues and work to be pursued
by the nation's second-highest
state and territorial officehold-
ers. In addition to its' specific
-duties, the committee will also
address issues of mutual con-
cern to all members. The posi-
tion is a one-year term with Lt.
Governor Carroll serving until
July of 2012.


AR~LI~ANI
cotninued from 7D

a week for $80.00 a month arid
five classes a week for $160.00
a month. In the future, they
have their sights on adding a
recording studio to the facility
to allow kids to pursue their
musical' talerits. The opening
of school is right around the
corner and Byron believes that


will help to boost the studio's .
enrollment.
"As far as calls we have a bunch
of calls," Byron said. "Normally,
in this community, the regis-
' tration process is right before
school so we will give it at least
about another two weeks before
those people that have been
calling in and enquiring to pur-
sue enrollment. We are set to
register at least 80 kids with in


The first two weeks of school."
For Love, the studio goes be-
yond just being a business.
"For me personally dancing has
always been a lifesaver," Love
said. "Growing up I didn't have
it easy and this was my way to
release my anger or show that
I was happy or to tell my story.
I want the youth around me to'
do the same thing that is my
main goal in this studio."


GAS '
continued from 7D

Check prices online or on
your smart phones
Websites such as Automo-
tive.com, FuelMeUp.com,
GasBuddy.com and GasPrice-
Watch.com list gas prices re_
ported by drivers who have
recently purchased cheap
gas.


For drivers with smnart- Some gas stations; offer dif-
phones, several websites. and ferent prices for cash and
applications are available to credit, while other gas sta-
find gas prices as well as a tions take only cash. Often
map of the stations. Check the cash pr ice is cheaper
out MSN Autos' interactive than the stations that charge
gas center, the gas price fea- the same price for cash and
ture from MapQuest, Bing credit card customers. Take
Maps gas prices app, the app note if this is the case in your
from GasBuddy.com and the area, and you have cash in
Where app. your wallet reserved for filling
Pay cash up your tank. -


PHONE
continued from 8D

users get 250 free minutes and
discounted .offerings for addi-
tional minutes or texting capa
ability.

$40 A MONTH
DISCRETIONARY
A jump in customers seek-
ing out the~ Assurance brand
or dropping their traditional
prepaid service suggests cus
tomers in the lowest economic
tiers may be scraping bottom
to pay for more essential goods


anid services, said Michael Nel-
son, a Mizuho Securities ana-
lyst.
"There's an increased risk
that more of these lower-in-
come customers will discon-
nect their phones as economic
pressures mount on them," he
said. "For a certain segment
of the population, $40 or $50
a month is real money, and
phone service is discretion-
ary."
MetroPCS's rate of customer
losses rose to 3.9 percent last
quarter, from 3.3 percent a
year earlier.


MetroPCS acknowledged
that rising competition 'con-
tributed to its slowdown in
subscriber growth, pointing
to special offers at Sprint and
Deutsche Telekom AG's T-Mo-
bile USA. Last wueek;, Sprint
said it added 674,000 prepaid
subscribers. ,
'"There are more people en-
tering poverty so the market
is growing, unfortunately, for
these kiinds of products," John
Carney, Sprint's senior vice
president of consumer mar-
keting, said Tuesday. He added
that some of the growth in its


Assurance brand was due to
launches in new states, such
as Ohio and Kentucky in the
second quarter. Assuratice
has grown to 26 states and the
District of Columbia from four
states in 2009.
Carney/ said Sprint's fo-
cus on different demographic
segments among its prepaid
brands helped protect it from
big changes in churn from
quarter to quarter, noting that
the price sensitivity of prepaid
customers "is extremely high."
Shares of MetroPCS, up 81
percent over the past year


before Tuesday, fell $5.92 to
$10.26 on Tuesday. Shares of
Cricket-parent Leap Wireless,
which reports its earnings,
dropped 21 percent to $10.27.
Sprint, which also sells the
Boost and' Virgin Mobile pre-
paid service, lost 6.8 percent
to $4.
For the quarter, MetroPCS
reported a profit of $84.3 mil-
lion, or 23 cents a share, up
from $79.9 million, or 22 cents
a share, a year earlier. Revenue
jumped 19 percent to $1.21 bil-
lion. Analysts polled by Thom-
son Reuters hiad forecast earn-


ings of 28 cents a share on
revenue of $1.23 billion.
Average revenue per cus-
tomer rose' 1.6 percent, while
the cost per user increased 5.8
percent. Operating margin fell
to 17.4 percent from 19.6 per-
cent, reflecting' a 19 percent
increase in the cost of service
and a 46 percent jump in the
cost of equipment.
The company raised its esti-
mate of 2011 capital expendi-
tures to between $900O million
and $1 billion, up from its pri-
or forecast of $700 million to
$900 million.


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, AIJ6UST 10-16, 2011


Ali writes letter to people of Nor way


Carroll ser ying on NL GA committee


Cutting costs on purchasing cheaper gas


Young dancers open studio for children


C. BRIAN HART

I NSZ~URCANVC E CO R P.

We do Auto, Homeowners


"al: f o,.s

email: Inf
9 a.m.- 5:3

7954 NW 22ND AVE., MIAMI FL, 33147


















C ass fled


1Bru~ The Miami Children's Initiative has
g scheduled a meeting for its Educa-
~ T - tional Services Committee {Dr.
~tgJ Cathia Darling, Committee Chair}
on Wednesday, August 24, 2011
at 4:00 pm and the Youth Advisory Committee
{Thema Campbell, Committee Chair} on Tues-
day, August 30, 2011 at 12:30 pm. They will be
held in the 4th Floor Conference Room of the Jo-
seph Caleb Center, 5400 NW 22nd Avenue. All
are welcome to attend.





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Assistance available
1-888-219-5161


ROUTE DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deli rinewspprt r ti
wrd nd Miami Dads
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
ad 1 ip relvust have reli-
current Driver License.
Apply i erson at'
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street



Toro Z Master Lawn Mower
Low mileag~e.taiKawsk

einge ,end $7500.
954-744-6841



BE A SECURITY OFFICER
24, 40 hours renew G, and
Cnea ed5,fir 'edr affic

786-333-2084



GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
aff rdable pri e. 14130

Call 30 -685- 55
Super Cean CarpCl C et
Cleaning Service
Entire house $75. No appoint-
ment necessary. Miami-Dade
and Broward Counties Call
Mr. Charles. 786-372-1128.

Home, Autoand B snes
Free Quote 305-474-4639




NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
THIRD DAY HAVEN
TRANSIT SYSTEMS INC.'
inted nb eitr tt th
engaged in business under
the fictitious name of.
Chariots of the Gods
Third ~ay Transit System
114Gi NE 163rd Street
Suite 20-187
North Miami Beach,
FL 33162
in the city of North Miami
Beach, FL
Owners Rufus Pace,

intends to register the said
name with the Division of
Corporation of State, Talla-
hassee FL Dated this 10th
day of Aug ust, 2011.


PLACE YOUR
CLASSIFIED HERE
305-694-6225


SECTION D


1kdioNW$395 ron n if
One bdrm, one bath, $395
monthly. All appliances
included. Call Joet
786-355-7578

4470 N.W. 203 Terrace
Large two bedrooms apt., one
bath, walk in closet, fenced in .
yard. 305-401-7227 or 305-
812-3773.
-458 NW 7 STREET
One bedroom, very nice $450
a month. Call 305-557-1750
467 NW 8Street
Efficiency $425. Appliances
and free water.
305-642-7080

5200 NW 26 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath. Free
gift for Section 8 tenants
$300 deposit. 5675 tarst
month, $975 moves you In
Jenny 786-663-8862

540 NW 7 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
5500. 305-642-7080

561 NW 6 Street
One Ddrm, one bath $495.
305-642-7080
60 and 61 Street
One'nde 9w 4[rs $5

60 NW 76 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$500 and 5600 Appliances,
free water. 305-642-7080
6229 NW 2 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath. Sec-
ti n 8 OK. 55 and older pre-
frre .
S305-310-7463
6324 NW 1 Place
Two bdrms, one bath, cen-
tral air, rear, second floor apt.
$785 monthly. 305-206-1566
6832 NW 5 Place
Studio $110 weekly, $450 to
move In. 786-286-2540
731 NW 56 Street
One bdrm, one bath. Free
water. 5550 monthly
Call 786-333-2448


One otN Fre.A Lrg one
bedroom. Call786-9-290-3$3

OneAL Adm ieA cen~tr~aA air,
.water included. $750. Section
8 OKAYI 786-355-5665
ARENA GARDEN
Move in with first month rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, ore,

acso sandy a. Fro "

305 374-441 2.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville
Apartments, .Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Beavooms. Same day
approval. Call for specials.
capitairentalagency.com

GRAND OPENING
NEW ARENA SQUARE
Walking distance to school
from $400. Remodeled
efficiencies, one, two, three
bdrms; two baths. Central air'

NuWd3 tve 3503 113 3
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify Move In spe-
cials One bedroom, $495;
two bedrooms, 5595 Free
water 786-236-1144

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath, .
$450 monthly. 305-722-4433 '
LIBERTY CITY SPECIAL
One and two bdrms.
1250, 1231 NW 61 St
6820 NW 17 Avenue
305-600-7280
305-458-1791

MIAM 51 H3 5 IVER
Remodeled one bedroom.
$625 to $775. NE 78 Street
S305-895-5480
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Corner of NW 103 Street
Beautiful two bedrooms, $700
mont ly,s u10r to ttmofe a

central air. 786-402-0672
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Overtown Area,

305-600 959 0 30705-0673
~.Call Mon-Fri 9 am 4 pm.
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms, one bath, $868,
one bedroom, $704, studio
$553, deposit. 305-297-0199
OPA LOCKA AREA ,
One b~drm, o b~ath. Special


Two O dros Cn A~Ebath.
$750. Saction welcome.

OVERTOWN SPECIAL
APARTMENTS
One two, three bdrm,
1558, 1710, 1730 NW 1 PI
1130, 1132, NW 2 Ave
Please0Call 05-6 -9592

305-458-1791


5407 SW 41 Stret
Broward
Three bedrooms, two and
half baths, Section 8 okay,
$1600 a month, call:
786-277-4395
64 NW 166 Street
N. Miami Beach twnshe, new
four bedrooms, two baths.
$1600. Sect. 8 preferred.
305-528-9964
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath
close to stadium. $950
monthly. 954-663-3990


1097 NW 51 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath, wa-
ter and appliances included.
Section 8 OK! 786-444-1015
1228 NW 1 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath 5450
305-642-7080

1510 NW 65 St #3
Two bdrms., one bath, air
and water, $850, Section 8
okay, 305-490-9284. .
1524 NW 1 A venue
One bdrm, one bath 5475,
free water. 305-642-7080

Really ncNtwo brs, air
an'd some utilities, $850
monthly. 786-488-0599
1612 NW 55 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, appliances.
Section 8 OK! 305-720-7067
172 NW 52 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
5650 Free waterlelectrcity
305-642-7080

1747 NW 40 Street
Two bdrms, one bath $750
Appliances 305-642-7080
1751 NW 50 Stret
Two bedrooms, low deposit:
vr cenotiHlalea~heoroMami
Call 305-871-3280 ~
1826 NW 46 Street '
New remodeled two bed-
poms one b~at central ar'
come. 305-335-04i9
Lag2369 NWb50 Street oe
bath, very clean, quiet build-
ing, Section 8 welcome.
954-732-5319 ,
2373 N.W. 61 Street Rear
Two bedroorps.
305-693-1017, 305-298-0388

2452bando24m64 NW 44 St
$975; Three bedrooms, two
baths, 51050 monthly Cen-
tral air, low down payment.
786-877-5358.
2531 NW 79th Terrace
One bedroom, one bath
kitchen, dining, terrace,
fenced, Section 8,
305-21 9-2571 .
265 N.E. 58th Terrace .
Huge three bedrooms, two
baths, all `new! Central air,
Walk-in closets. $1 275
monthly, 305-793-0002. '
3047 NW 92 Street
Section 8 Only! One bed-
room, one bath, $625 month-
ly. 786-447-9457.
3047 NW 92 Street

Soom onebat, 65 emo t-
ly. 786-447-9457-
3105 NW 143 Street
Huge one bedroom, one bath,
newly remodeled, Section 8
welcome.786-797-7878
3359 NW 51 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, tile,
big back yard. $775 monthly
plus deposit. 786-210-7666
3849 NW 157 Street
Two bdrms., one bath,
$1,050 mthly. 305-751-3381 .
5509 N.W. Miami Court
One bdrm, one bath. Newly
renovated $650 mthly, first,
last,' security. 305-751-6232

Tw~o brms 5nc bthall
appliances, air, security bars.
Senior discount. $800 mthly.
$600 security. 305-979-3509
after 5 pm .
8001 NW 11 Court
Units 1 -4
Pnpaiu on Ob h m,a k
cludes water, $1000 to~move
in, tile floors, all new appli-
ances. 305-305-2311
To8092 NW 5 C hs
central air, free water, and
fenced yard. $850 monthly.
305-992-7503
8203 NW 6 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath, air.
$875 monthly. 954-687 2181
928 NW 55 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath:
$525. Free Water
305-642-7080 .

94 NE 59 Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, bars, $900 mthly. Section
8 OK. 305-490-9284
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Thr bedroo s, two bat s

and one bath, $1100, Section
8 welcome. 305-332-0072.


1150 NW 1 Place
One bedroom, one bath,
~$450. Mr. Willie #6

1212 NW 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$450. Appliances.
805-642-7080
1215 NW 103 Lane ~
Two bdrms, gated security,
tile, $700 mthly, $1000 to
move in. 305-696-7667
1229 NW 1 Court
One bedroom, one
bath, $500. Appliances,
free water.
305-642-7080 .

.1231 NW 58 Terra~e
One bedroom. one bath.
$450 monthly, $700 move
in. All appliances Included.
Free 19 Inch LCD TV. Call
Joel
786-355-7578

12400 NE 11 Court
Three Dedrooms, one bath.
51,000 Appliances, free
water 305-6412-7080

1261 NW 59 Street
One bdroom onae bath.

305-642-7080

1317 NW 2 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$425 Ms Shorty in #1
1326 NW 1 PLACE
Clean, one bedroom, one
bath. $430 monthly.
786-419-6613
140 NW 13 Street
Two bedrooms, one batn
$500. 786-236-1144 or
305-642-7080

14043 /L(E 2 AVENUE
Two bdims, two baths. $950.
305-254-6610
1425 NW 60 Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath'
$570 mthly. Includes refriger-
ator, stove, central air, water.
$725 Move In. 786-290-5498
14350 NW 22 Avenue

Two bdm, tn th 550.
Ms. Jackson 786-267-1646

.,1450 NW, 1 AvenBe
One bdrm. one bath $425
Two bdrms, one bath $525 ;
305-642-7080

1525 NW 1 Place
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bdrm, one bath. $350
monthly. 5575 move In. AII
appliances Included. Free
19 inch LCD TV Call Joel
786-355-7578

1535 NW 1 Place
One bedroom $475, call ,
786-506-3067
1540 NW 1 Court
Studio $425, one bedroom
$525, call 786-506-3067
1718 NW 2 Court
One barm, one bath, $425
Mr. Gaiter In #1

1721 NW 183 Drive
Tworbedroos, t baths ti e
water. $800~ monthly. Security
required. 305-493-9635
1744 NW 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$495 Two bedrooms, one
bath 5595 Appliances,
Ms Bell #9

1835 NW 2 Court
Two bedrooms. Free water.
$900 move in. $450 deposit.
$450 monthly. 786-454-5213
1943 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, $500, two
bedrooms, $650, move in to.
day, quiet, 786-506-3067
'1969 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath-
$475 Appliances, free gas
786-236-1144

200 NW 13 Street ~
One bdrm, one bath $425
Ms Shorty 786-290-1438


210 NW 17 Street
One bdrm, one bath $450,
appliances, 305-642-7080
2565; NW 92 Street
EXTRA CLEAN
One bedroom, .one bath.
stove, refrigerator, water and
lights included. Nice neigh-
rh od mov$ in0or $36 h
weekly, $1095 move in.
305-624-8820
2 804 NW 1 Avenue
Twoo bd ns, one bath, $95
AiI appliances included.
Fle 19 inch LCD TV Call
eJoel 786-355-7578

2940 NW 135 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bah, ve clear, quiet build-

954-732-5319


By Mary Bet~h Marklein

Colleges are tacking on
mandatory student fees at
a time when state funding
is dwindling and public
universities are trying to
hold the line on tuition.
Indiana University-
Bloomington is adding a
$180 "temporary repair and
maintenance fee" this fall;
next year it doubles. Fresh-
men and transfer students
this fall at Southern Illinois
University in Carbondale
will be charged a one-time
$150 "matriculation fee" for
orientation costs. Students
at Georgia's public univer-
sities will pay three percent
more in tuition, but with
fees the increase jumps to
. an average nine percent
more than last year. The
rise is driven primarily by
a "special institutional fee'
that will cost as much as
$1,088 next year for some
stiidents. For Georgia Tech
freshmen, all fees total
$2,370 about a quarter
of the total charge, $9,652.
SThe special.fee, a tem
make up for budget short-
falls, "keeps the lights on. It
pays the faculty. It pays for
all the things that tuition
pays," University System of
Georgia spokesman John
MillsaUs As DAY aais
A USA TDAY anlysi
last year of athletics fees
found that many NCAA
IDivision I schools don t
itemize what student fees
pay for. Lawmakers in sev-
eral states are demanding
transparency.
Colorado, where a 2010
audit of public universi-
ties found "some fees may
be higher than necessary,"
enacted a law this summer
making it easier for stu-
dents to question proposed
charges. Between 2006 and
2010, fees mn Colorado rose
142 ovs. 690d for tuition,
New Jersey state Sen.
Joe Kyrillos, -aa Republi-
can who was incensed this
sp~ring ~that Jersey Shore
star Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi
was ~pai v$3 ,000toin stuk

sen atii fe to pa

required to detailon tuition
bills ho fee 11e elated
Beginning next month,
North Dakota state uni-
versities must publish an
online breakdown of how
mandatory fees are spent-
Legislators also have or-
dered a study of how fees


are determined, identified
and justified.
"A big part of planning
for college (is) knowing how
much things are going to
cost," says Emily McLain,
executive director of the
Oregon Student Associa-
tion. As a student in 2007,
she and other students
worked with state legisla-
tors to force the state uni-
versity system to phase
out a laundry list of fels
by this fall. Many fees had
been added more than a
decade ago to get around
astate-imposed tuition
freeze and budget cuts,
says Jay Kenton, a system
vice chancellor.


Richard Falson













IReg 814 Yq Yd
r----------------,
5050 OFF SALE
unALDrrm p w AD
OoROBOUscARPET
tr o~e Y..
nIo as was suse~s no se


r -------------


IR iz mwou,~. 199



Ml~RpET S19
WAS NOW

ir2xiv' Oacoranveran sino $18:
:12'X11' SpanishRed $100 $10



~70% OFF

CARPET L;

LAMINATE
iTILE 699



DON BAILEY FLOORS
8300 Bisc. Blvd., Miami
14831 NW7th Ave., Miami
2208 South State Rd. 7, Miramar
3422 W. Broward Blv., Ft. Laud.
1283 NW 31 Ave., Ft. Laud.
PREE SHOP AT HOME
Toll Free 1-866-721-7171


14200 NW 3 Avenue
Three b drooms4 two baths,

1490 NE 152 Street
Three bedrooms, one new
bath, tile, air, bars, $1150. No
Section 81 Terry Dellerson,
Realtor. 305-891-6776
1510 NE 154 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, den, air
condition units, tile floor. $850
monthly. 786-489-4225
1580 NW 129 Street
Brand new three bedrooms,
one bath with big yard,
$1,450. Section 8 welcome!
305-300-5913
1580 NW 64 STREET
SECTION 8 WELCOMEl
Large three bedrooms
two baths, $1395 monthly,
central alr, garage All
appliances included Free ,
19 Inch LCD TV Call Joel
786-355-7578

15925 NW 22 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath
tile, central air $1250 monthly
305-662-5505
16415 NW 23 Court
Updated two bedrooms, one
bath, tile, central air $1100
monthly. 305-662-5505
17225 NW 12 COURT
Three bedrooms, two baths
$1550 monthly Section 8 OK.

175 N6W2 -9 8eet
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1250. 786-286-2540
1852 NW 85 STREET
Three bdrms, one bath,
$1000 monthly.

182 13W 8 RAD
Four bedrooms, two and one
half baths. Central air wash-
er and dryer. $1650 monthly.
Section 8 0.k. 786-797-7878
1886 NW 85 Street
Three bedrooms, two' baths
den, tile, air, $1200, No Sec-
tion 81 Terry Dellerson, Real-
tor. 305-891-6776
2130 Service Road
Two bdrm, one bath, air, tile,
Section 8 OK. 786-277-4395
2140 NW 96 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, one bath,.
tile, central air. $1275 month.
ly. 305-662-5505
221 NW 82 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath, in-
cl des` water $850 monthly.

2770 NW 194 Terrace
SSection 8- OK! Three bdrms,
one and a half bdaths, cen-
tral air, fresh~ yjaint. $1395 a
month. Call Joe

295 N 96 Steet
Three be ro~om Section 8

305-298-0388
3066 NW 94 STREET
Updated two, bdrms, new
kitchen, central air. $975 mth-
ly. 305-662-5505 `
3501 NW 9 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$995, stove, refrigerator free
water. 305-6342-7080
3833 NW 209 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1150, appliances.
305-642-7080
55 NW 83rd Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
fenced yard, and central air.
Section 8 preferred. Call Mr.
Coats at 305-345-7833.
901 NW 49th Street
Three btbedroom0; ntw a
first, last and $1,000 deposit.
Call 786-541-5234
9012 NW 22 Avenue
Small two bedrooms
305-693-9486 ,
BROWNSVILLE AREA
Three bdrms, one bath and
extras. Section 8 OKI Avail-
able Sept. 1st. 786-546-5290
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Spacious four bdrms, two
baths, living room furniture,
plasma TV included. Section
8 Welcomel Others available.
305-834-4440
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Trre betdrooms,doe sit .
quired. 954-435-2254
NORTHWEST 51 TERRACE
Completed renovated three
bedrooms, Section 8 house.
Laundry, central air, wood
floms Ev e gtgn~e7 R ad
305-905-2020
SOUTH MIAMI AREA
21425 SW 119 Avenue
SECTION 8, three bdrms,
one bath, central air, appli-
ances, laundry room and
Iarge back yard, quarter
acres. $1150 monthly, $1000
depo sit 305-628-3806


7000 NW 21 Avenue
Cla oyms,n ui,$395 a

786-953-8935


4915 NW 182 Street
Four bedrooms, three baths,
Mlo 0 moonthny. Firstaand I st.
600-8603


College fees fill


gaps in funding


NORTHWEST MIAMI
hw kbu m, ar r washered yen
8 ok. 954-260-6227
NORTHWEST AREA
~Three bedrooms, central air
Section 8 Ok! 786-269-5643


100 NW 14 Street
Newly renovated, private
bath and kitchen, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN). 24
hour, security camera, $185
wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232
1612 NW 51 Terrace
$550 moves you in. $140
weekly. 786-389-1686
2905 NW 57 Street
Small, furnished efficiency.
$550 monthly plus $100
security deposit, first and last

30 -8- 98,30-35m e 2
3047 NW 92 Street
Section 8 Only! Extra large'
$500 monthly. 786-447-9457
3150 NW 97 Street, Rear
Large bedroom cottage with
kitchen and bath. Nice, clean,
unfurnished. 305-691-6958
9000 NW 22 Avenue
Air, electric and water includ-
ed. Furnished, one person
only. 305-693-9486 ~


parig a5N. SCan bes e
Mon. Sat. 10 a.m. 2 p.m.
OPA-LOCKA AREA
Move-In Special! $375
monthly. Call 305-717-6084.


13387 NW 30 Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person-
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486
1527 NW 100 Street
Rooms for rent. $125 weekly,
air included. 305-310-7463
15341 NW 31 Avenue
Large room, full bath, private
entrance. 305-687-8187
15810 NW 38 Place
Private entrance $90 weekly.
Free utilities, bath, kitchen.
one person,
306-474-81 86, .305-691-3486
1722 NW 77 Street
$115 weekly, air,

177 N 5 St eet
Fully furnished, refrigerator.
microwave, cable, air and
heat. Two locations.
:iCall 954-678-8996
2373 NW 95Street
i8 he 9ea hofre utilities,
305-915-06276,5305-691e3486

$85 wkly, free utilities, kitch-
en, bath, one person.
305-691-3486
6835 NW 15 Avenue
Utilities included, air. $90
weekly. Move in special $200.
Call 786-558-8096
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Rooms, central air, applianc-
es. $100 and $110 wkly
954-588-6656
MIAMI AREA
Cable TV, utilities included,
$550 monthly. 305-687-1110
NORTHWEST AREA
Clean and nice, air. $100
weekly, $200 to move in.
786-426-6263
NORTHWEST AREA
Piv at de tr6-n8 utilities
OPA LOCKA AREA
2170 Washington Avenue
Clean ~rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly.
786-277-3434,786-298-4383


1014 N.W. 60 St
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, heat, all appli-
ances, alarm system, washer
and dryer. $1150 mthly. Sec-
tion 8 Welcome.
786-229-9488
10240 SW 171 Street
Four bedrooms. two baths
$35; app lances, centra
air, fenced yar
305-6412-7080

1042 NW 49 STREET
$w 5b droo one bath, air,
1110 NW 112 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Like Newl Tile, central air
$1300 monthly 305-662-5505
Two 0 r W105th St bt.
$2500 move-in and $1150
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
Contact Tonya at:
786-523-6045
12620 NW 15 AVENUE
betach ewntwo bedr 3m0
mthly. Call 954-357-3227.
12845 NW 17 Court
Three bedrooms, new bath,
bars, atr tile, $,1e0 ,oRSee

tor, 305-891-6776
13070 NW 16 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
tile, central air, carport. $1275
monthly. 305-662-5505
1417 NE 152 Street


T re bedrooms. ne bath

aplaces in udd Froe

786-355-7578















I I


Embrace Girls founder honored byM-D CPS


Family, friends and members of Christian Cathedral Church at-
tended one of the weekly Morning Glory Services held each Friday
at the Clover Leaf Park in Miami Gardens. The Morning Glory Ser-
vices draw approximately 25 to 30 people. In addition to a prayer
and worship session, attendants are always provided a brunch
and from week to week can enjoy a wide-variety of activities from
facials, manicures and pedicures to hosting garage sales. Chris-
tian Cathedral Church is lead by Pastor Thea Jones and Associate
Evangelist Birdie Freckelton.



Our deadlines have changed
We have made several changes in our deadlines due to a
newly-revised agreement between The Miami Times and our
printer. We value your patronage anid support and ask you
to adjust to these changes, accordingly. As always, we are
happy to provide you with excellent customer service.

Lifestyles Happenings (calendar):
Submit all events by Friday, 2 p.m.
Phone: 305-694-6216; fax: 305-757-5770;
e-mail: jjohnson~~miamitimesionline.com

shrc ,it a e. ( anith/aiycalp ndar):
Phone: 305-694-6216; fax: 305-757-5770;
e-mail: kheard@miamitimesonline.com

.Classified advertising:
Submit all ads by Tuesday, 4 p.m.

Family-posted obituariesi:
Submit all obituaries by Tuesday 4:30 p.m..

For classified and obituaries use the
following: Phone: 305-694-6225;
Pax:305-694-6211


St. John observes Hospitality Ministry Day


Ann Abraham Ministries appreciation program
Ann Abraham Ministries, Elder Abraham.
3415 Grand Ave, Coconut Also join us at 6225 NW 22
Grove appreciation program Ave, August 14 at 3 p.m. with
August 13th at 3 p.m. for Holy Faith Church.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWiN DESTINY


:rr~whri*



a~-,e~ -


Stud fnds

liberalized beliefs

and practices
By Cathy Lynn Grossman

The old wisdom: The more
educated you are, the less
likely you will be religious. But
a new study says education
doesn't drive people away from
God it gives them a more lib-
eral attitude about who's going
to heaven.
Each year of education ups
the odds by 15 percent that
people will say there's "truth in
more than one religion," says
University of Nebraska-Lincoln


professor Philip Schwadel in an
article for the Review of Reli-
gious Research. Schwadel, an
associate professor of sociolo-
gy, looked at 1,800 U.S. adults'
reported religious beliefs and
practices and their education.
People change their per-
spective because, as people
move through high school and
college, they acquire an ever-
wider range of friendships,
including people with different
beliefs than their own, Schw-
adel says. "People don't want
to say their friends are going to
hell," he says.
For each additional year
of education beyond seventh
grade, Americans are:
*15 percent Thore likely to


have attended religious ser-
vices in the past week.
*14 percent more likely to
say they believe in a "higher
power" than in a personal God.
"More than 90 percent believe
in some sort of divinity," Schw-
adel says.
*13 percent more likely to
switch to a mainline Protes-
tant denomination that is "less
strict, less likely to impose
rules of behavior on your daily
life". than their childhood reli-
gion.
*13 percent less likely to say
the Bible is the "actual word of
God." The educated, like most
folks in general, tend to say the
Bible is the "inspired word" of
God, Schwadel says.


*Hemant Mehta, the Friend-
ly Atheist blogger at Patheos.
com, is skeptical, saying this
"raises an eyebrow at every-
thing I've always heard that
the more educated you are,
the less religious you are. But
it must depend on how you
define religion."
Schwadel's findings dovetail
with findings by Barry Kosmin
of Trinity College in Hartford,
Conn., a co-author of the
on religious beliefs and the
behavior of people with higher
degrees. It turns out that on
Sunday mornings, "the educat-
ed elite look a lot like the rest
of America," Kosmin says just
as likely to believe in a person-
al God or higher power.


2 [


.The School Board of Miami-
Dade County, Florida present-
ed Velma R. Lawrence, founder
and executive director of The
Embrace Girls Foundation,
Inc., with a special recognition
for a decade of community ser-
vice. Lawrence's South Florida
based foundation is a men-
toring programs for girls that
provides academic tutoring,
mentoring, life and social skills
training.
"I am quite humbled to be
the recipient of this most pres-
tigious honor and recognition
and that it comes on the heals
of our 10th year anniversary
and excellent academic year
with great outcomes" said Law-
rence.
According~ to Tamara Gant,
local radio personality and a
founding Board Member for the
organization, "[Lawrence] is tru-
ly passionate about this organi-
zation. It's been a long journey
and she, more than anyone
I know deserves the .recogni-
tion. She walks the walk for
those girls and their families."
School Board Member, Dr.
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall
also believes that Embrace Girls
offers,q;pp-iceless ]8eclce to ~the
county. "It's simply I;istrict. 2
needs Embrace Girls Founda-
tion right here and I will do all in
my power to make sure this or-
ganization has what it needs to
serve every child that comes
through their doors."
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion's Embrace Girl Powerl Af-


-Photo credit: Marvin Ellis

Church of the Incarnation

host Torres-Planchat reunion


July 29-31, 2011 was a mar-
velous family reunion week-
end for the children of the late
Bruce Leroy Torres and Cari-
dad Planchat Torres -of Miami,
Florida and their Planchat fam-
ily cousins of Tampa, Florida
and Louisville, Kentucky. The
Torres Family .(George Torres,
Marie Torres Manrin Ellis, Bea-
trice Torres, Jacqueline Torres
Aranha and their cousin, Alexis
Edwards Virgin) were united
with their Planchat cousins
(Lazaro "Larry" Planchat, Sr.,
his wife, Edna, and their son,
Lazaro, Jr. of Louisville, Ken-
tucky) after Marvin did an in-
ternet search in 2007 for the
relatives of their late mother


who reside in Tampa, Florida.
Until that time the Planchat
cousins has been unknown to
them.
"Larry's" late grandfather,
Enrique Planchat, was the uncle
of Caridad Planchat Torres. His
late father was Henry V7aldez
Planchat and his mother, Dalia
Penalver Planchat, still resides
in Tampa.
Last weekend' s family reunion
was the third visit to Miami of
the Planchat's to be with their
Torres family cousins. Both
families greatly look forward
to many more visits with on
another and future family
reunions as they maintain their
family bond.


,, : -

(Back L-R) Gabrielle Michel-Johnson, Dahlia Miles, School Board Member, Dr. Dorothy
Bendross Mindingall, Embrace Girls Foundation Founder/Executive Director, Velma R.
Lawrence and Superintendent Alberto M. Carvalho. (Front L-R) Myla Smith, Destiny Johnson,
Alyssa Pelaez and Camelia Miles.


ter S'F~9hoolPrograms~~1 asamps,a
not for profit.501c(3) mentorling
program established in 2001,
where little girls learn to be
healthy, confident, ambitious
young ladies urho strive for aca-
demic excellence.
Where the lives of elementary
and middle school aged girls
are improved through academic


tutoring, leadership, life ,(ands
character educational training
- coupled with social and cul-
tural opportunities and expo--
sure they might not ordinarily
ever experience but, for their
involvement in our innovative
program that advocates and
serves young girls with a par-
ticular interest in those who are


The~ organization is currently
accepting Applications for its
All Girl All Powerl After School
Academy, Mentoring Program
and 2012 Summer Camps. For
details or additional informa-
tion about the organization,
visit www.embracegirlpower.org
or call305-270-4099.


By Donna Gehrke-White


It is occurring throughout the
country, including Florida with
many cases seeming to come
out of the central part of the
state, Dobzinski said.
He issued the age-old warn-
ing: "If it sounds too good to be
true, it probably is."
That includes offers of free
money "with no documentation


Some hucksters are hitting
church pews and other ven-
ues around the country, entic-
ing people .to send in false fed-
eral tax returns for cash back,
the Internal Revenue Service
warns.
People are led to believe they


He issued the age-old warning: "If it sounds too good


to be! true, it probably is."

should file a return with the
IRS for tax credits, refunds or
rebates for which they are not
really entitled, said IRS spokes-
man Michael Dobzinski.
The scam is still going on
even though the April tax dead-
line has long passed, Dobzinksi
said.
"We've seen fliers posted on
church boards," he said.
In some cases people are
charged a fee with the huck-
sters vanishing with the mon-
ey, the spokesman added.
Sometimes the scam artists try
to defraud Uncle Sam by seek-
ing money back from the false
filings: The tardy tax return re-
ports money withheld that re-
ally wasn't, Dobzinski said.


-- M~ichael Dobzinski

required," the spokesman said.
They "have been appearing in
community churches around
the country," he a~dded. "Pro-
moters are targeting church
congregations, exploiting their
good intentions and credibility.
These schemes are often spread
by word of mouth among un-
suspecting and well-inten-
tioned people tell their friends
and relatives."
He said he did not have the
names of specific churches tar-
geted.
Anyone with questions about
a tax credit or program should
visit www.IRS.gov, call the IRS
toll-free number at 800-829-
1040 or visit a local IRS Tax-
payer Assistance Center.


.& I
4.


The Hospitality Ministry Day
will be observed on Sunday, Au-
gust 14th at the 11 a.m. morn-
ing worship service. Our pastor,
Bishop James Adams will be


the morning speaker.
Please come out and support
this effort. Sis. Edwina Pace, is
the president. For more infor-
mation, call 305-372-3877.


F i


f


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Education sways views on religion


Friday M~orning Glory Service


#9


IRS warns scamn artists


prey on church faithful


COH 6Tence teaC eS


Trea WOrld spiritual

Pastor and First Lady Keith and Chanel Moore of New Mission
Worship Center hosted a Young Adults Conference, Thursday, Au-
gust 4 through Saturday, August 6. The theme for the conference
was "Real You, Real Jesus, Real Godly Decisions in a Real World.,,
Every evening featured different speakers including Apostle T.J.
Allen on Thursday, August 4; Elder Odane James on Friday, August
5; and Elder Damion 0. Archat on Saturday, August 6.
NeW Mission Worship Center is located at 3033 NW 7th Avenue
i Mai





















SECTION D MIAMI FLORIDS., AUGUST 10- 2011


r


By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com

A dancing duo has teamed up to bring their
talents to the heart of Liberty City. Studio
Director Genesis Love, 22, ahd Artistic Direc-
tor Kyle Byron, 25, have opened Ar~mani Danz
Studio, 5601 NWI 7th Ave. The two set up shop
close to a month ago.
"WJe are going to offer these kids a different
career besides being behind a desk or being a
truck driver, whatever may be the case," Love
said. "We want them to know that you can be
different, you can play an instrument, you can
draw a picture, you can do this and it can be a


ARMANI DANCE STUDIO


--Phojle ~:crdd Randy Grace
Dance instructor teach-
eS budding dancers to
stretch properly.


career and
something
`that you
love to do."
The stu-
dio focuses
on a broad
range of dance styles that include hip-hop,
jazz, ballet, contemporary and modern dance.
Currently, the two are pursuing grants through
the government to provide free classes and ad
to the programs they already provide at the
studio. To register at the studio there is a $25
non-refundable fee aind they offer three classes
Please turn to ARMLANI 10D


B IT ,


a ..
. ,w* *


A fresh model for housing the poor

New rlens radd al it prjecs I"People will be watching New leans. Neglect and the unsafe
New Orlens tradd all is pro~Orleans cl-'oselyo'" she says. environs steadily drove resi-
for ousng ime at vicingcrie -Residents an~d city leaders dents away. Hurricane Katrina
for ousng amedat victng ~ ** agree that the new .develop- in 2005 further scattered resi-
~i~E~ L~.- U" !ments are far more livable and dents.


II 1


draw less crime than the previ-
ous structures, some of which
were more than eight decades
old. But housing advocates
warn that the new plans will
steeply drop the number of
available public housing units,
-laaving Bhoggapocl$,of;looreda-
come families without afford-
able places to live.
Across the city, about 3,500
fewer units will be available,
says James Perry, head of
the Greater New Orleans Fair
,Housing Action Center.
"You're going to have a large
number of people without hous-
ing," Perry says.
Most of New Orleans' public
housing complexes were' built
after the Great Depression as
a way to create jobs, and the
structures deteriorated over
the decades, according to the
Housing Authority of New Or-


approach to' housing the cit? s
poor-
"I never thought I'd be able
to live like this," sa\s Harmon\
Oaks resident' Larry Berzat, 60,
who grew up in the former Mlag-
nolia Projects. "It's a whole lot
safer. A~nd a whole lot better.
Followin~g a national trend,
New Orleans' traditional mod-
el of corralling all subsidized
housing into one location is
being replaced by new~er devel-
opments that mix subsidized
and- market-priced -homes.
More than 900 such units have
opened in New Orleans already;
another 3,100 are on the way.

MORE LIABLE SEES CRIME
Public housing projects in
Chicago, Atlanta, Salt Lake
City and other cities have fol-
lowed a similar trend, says Lin-
da Couch of the Washington-


By Rick Jervis

14EW ORLEANS The decay-
ing brick buildings of what was
known a~sthe Magnolia Projects
are now rows of freshly painted
town homes with ornate bal-
conies and manicured lawgns.
Stocpi'il? M T~e~ rs~ once sold '
dope and shot at rivals have
been replaced by ea clubhouse
featuring a flat-screen TV and
a pool where neighborhood kids
splash.
The Magnolia Projects, once
one of the city's most notori-
ous public housing complex-
es, today is Harmony Oaks
Apartments, a 460-unit mix
of government-subsidized and
market-priced apartments. It
replaces one of six public hous-
ing projects across the city re-.
cently razed to make room for
new apartments and a fresh


MORE LIABLE LESS CRIME
After the storin, only 5,0'00
families lived within the city~rs
12,000 public housing units,
according to'ohousing authority
statistics. City leaders decided
to knock them dowhn and.part-
,:er writh private developers to
rebuild.
Tammy Cowart, 49, lived in
one of the old complexes, the
St. Bernard Housing Develop-
ment. Drug dealers prowled the
property and shootings were
rampant, she says.
Today, Cowart lives in a
roomy one-bedroom apartment
on the same land, redeveloped
and renamed Columbia Parc at
the 13ayou District. Crime has
all but vanished and some of
her neighbors are evert New Or-
leans police officers, she says.
Please turn to HOUSING 10D


-By Jonathan E. Bachman
I{ID SAFE: Jamie Jones and Mi~ssa Smith, right, supervise
Ashley Colemen as she explores a newly built playground at Har-
mony Oaks Apartments, standing on what was a notoriously risky
houSing project.

based National Low-Income. public housing projects at once,
Housing Cottlition. What makes choosing a swift overhaul to its
New Orleans unusual is how public housing over a phased
the city toppled all of its major redevelopment, Couch says.


~


Gas:= gai wit
creasinin 3 10f



~.i;iel tiot jtust Edmi~ Ije: ~gi6o t~,iK~~~~~~~~~~~iiti~ n

T. i6 somse tipd or fati .
: ''M~n~itor gass prices.-;. -"'
~-:Pviteatyan~~ttegs togas pright~j5~i~'r 'a

:: ui tiake oteT~ofh ithe ft ,s.]tibfiaj n~i ;ij






flo tiple ir
i, .


By D. Kevin MclNeir Minnelli. Hotel owner Brian
kmeneir~'miamitim~esonline.comn Gorman says he came up
with the idea after conduct-
It is probable that more ing a survey of 20,000 gay
members of the LGBT aI U.S. citizens who
community will begin' said they would
to flock to Miami to en- .prefer to stay in a
joy the tropical weath- Il~~ gay-oriented hotel,
er of southern Florida if one were avail-
with the recent open- 1 L/ able. Gorman has
ing of the Lords Hotel -Lr~~js plans to extend his
- America's first gay II BBP chain to cities that
hotel chain. include New York,
Located on Miarm's Los Angeles, Las Ve-


Florida's lieutenant gov-
ernor, Jennifer Carroll, is
-serving on the leadership
..committee: of the National
Lieutenant Governors Asso-
clation (NLOA). NLGA is the
professional ~association for
the. officeholders first in line
of succession to governor in
all 50 states and the U.S. ter-
ritor'es.
Lt. Governor Jennifer Car-
roll is serving as South Re-
gional chair of the NLOA
Executive Committee. "The
lieutenant governor was
elected to this position bi-
partisanly by her peers," said
NLOA Executive Director
Please turn to CARROLL 10D


-


- popular South Beach -
SOBE to the locals some
~call the move" a "quantum
-leap in gay travel," with ac-
coutrements that include
Cha Cha bars and posters
of the incomparable. Liza


-gas and San Fran-
cisco.
Of course, the hotel is open
to patrons of all sexual per-
suasions but is aimed at
those who are either gay
Please turn to HOTEL 8D


JENNIFER CARROLL
Florido's Lieutenant Governor


'"""""'"""'Y~ of Columbia College, Sm~ith
.said one reason why it has
taken her so long to find
new employment within
her indxistry is because of
outsourcing and downsiz-
ing that continues to take
place at companies big and
g ~small.
A "'Marketing is a tough in-
HUTSON dustry to stay in because a
lot of employers are farm-


ing out their marketing needs to
save money," explained Smith. "It is
cheaper to pay an outside- agency than
to pay an employee a salary, health
benefits and taxes." For now, Smith
said she plans to continue working
as a self-emnployed marketing consul-
tant. "I have had to re-invent myself
and sit down to evaluate if marketing
is still a feasible career. While I love
working in the marketing industry, I
Please turn to UNEMPLOYED 8D


By Wendell Hut~son
Special to the NNPA

Not since the Great: Depression
has the U.S. economy been so bad
that millions of people have been out
of work for two years or more. And
even though the economy is showing
some improvement, economists have
forecasted a long recovery and noted
that the Black middle-class remains
one of the core groups still unable


to find employment. Moleska Smith
is among the long-term unemployed.
Before she lost her $90,000 a year
marketing job at a Chicago bank in
2009 she said life was good for her.
She was able to pay her mortgage*
on time for her south suburban
home, monthly tuition payments to
her daughter's private high school
were paid on time and she was able
to travel and build up her emergency
fund for the unexpected. That has


all changed now that she
has exhausted her 99-weeks
of unemployment benefits.
"Never in a million years did
I think I would be unem-
ployed this long. I am deter-
mined to find new employ-
ment regardless of how long
it takes," Smith told the Cru-
sader. "God has been good
to me. He makes sure all my
needs are met." An alumns


.geeb"gj The Miami Times




Ec~ business


c


f


iI> UO


b/Ylng S & Ge tO the hOO


Nzu) SCHOOl opens in Liberty City 1


d I:
i,
fi
ic'
"'
-et' :- c
1~"
R
5


Lord hotel chain expected

to branch across the' U.S.


Jennifer Carroll named


to leadership of NLGA


The Black middle-class remains unable to find employment














1


Hialeah Senior High School
251 East 47th Street
Hialeah, FL 33013

AII of these sessions are free and open to the public. For further information, please call
Anita Gibboney at 305-375-5414. For sign language interpreter services and for materials
in accessible format, call 305-375-5143 five days in advance of the meeting you plan to
attend.


Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Resolution No. R-597-11, adopted on July 19, 2011,
by the Board of County Commissioners of Mliami-Dade County, Florida, notice is hereby
given of a Special Election on September 13, 2011, for the purpose of submitting to
the qualified electors residing in the proposed district, for their approval or disapproval,
the following proposal:
Shall Resolution No. 9165 relating to Carol City Street Lighting
Improvement District be amended to Annex the Venetian Gardens Area, .
as provided for in County Ordinance No. 11-50?
Ballots will be mailed to all registered voters residing within the proposed area who will
be eligible to vote YES or NO for the proposal. All marked ballots must be received by
the Miami-Dade County Supervisor of Elections by 7:00 p.m?. on the day of the election.
This special election will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Code of
Mliami-Dade County and other applicable provisions of general law relating to special
elections.
Lester Sola
Supervisor of Elections
Miami-Dade County, Florida












Miami-Dade County will hold a public meeting in your area to discuss proposed
adjustments to taxes and/or fees. On each of the dates and locations listed below, the
Office of Management and Budget will make a presentation to discuss the FY 2011-12
Proposed Budget.


Dl.ct so s tST CONTROL. THEIR O\\N DESTINY


A HialeadhGWo~m s Center Family Planning

All Motors
Blue Cross Blue Shield of FL
C. Brian Hart Insurance
Clyne & Associates, P.A.
Comcast
Don Bailey's Carpet
General Motors
Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau
J&K Roofing
Jackson Health Systems
Macy's
Miami Childrens Intiative
Miami-Dade Supervisor of Elections
Miami-Dade Office of Strategic Business Mgmt
North Shore Medical Center
Publix
St. Matthews Missionary Baptist Church
Suntrust
The Children's Trust
The Florida House of Representatives
Universal Pictures
Wachovia


Wireless carrier attributes fewer

subscribers to tough economy


from an all-time high of
725,945 in the first quarter
and kess than analysts had

MetroPCS, which has cut
some prices and begun to
offer speedier fourth-gen-
eration wireless service in
some markets to attract new
users, said the economy
was weighing on customers
who gravitate to the lowest-
end offers, such as Sprint's
government-subsidized As-
surance Wireless service.
Sprint's Assurance brand,
which offers a free cellphone .
and minutes in certain
states to some consumers
on food stamps or Medicaid,
was the "MVP" of the car-
rier's second-best prepaid
quarter in history, Sprint
Chief Executive Dan Hesse
said last week. Assurance
Please turn to PHONE 10D


wireless provider posted
results that missed Wall
Street's projections. Rex
Crum joins digits to discuss
Comments by MetroPCS
executives marked the con-
tinuing challenges to con-
sumer spending, especially
among the poorest, and
bode ill for wireless rivals
Leap Wireless Internation-
al Inc. and Sprint Nextel
Corp.
"We do see it being tough
out there currentlyy" Me-
troPCS Chief Operating
Officer Thomas Keys said.
"We see anecdotal evidence
in our stores, with our
subscribers, through con-
versations, through focus
groups."


BV Greg Bensinger

MetroPCS Communica-
tions Inc. said recently the
sputtering U.S. economy
is forcing more of its most-
vulnerable U.S. customers
to drop their prepaid wire-
less service or to seek even
cheaper options.
The trend, which cut into
the company's subscriber
growth, weighed on the
company's second-quarter
results and pointed to a
tough second half. At 4 p.m.
composite trading on the
New York Stock Exchange,
MetroPCS shares were off
37 percent.
Shares of MetroPCS tum-
bled last Tuesday after the


vice, which tends to attract
low-income users. The com-
pany added about 199,000
new prepaid customers in
the second quarter, down


PRICES CUT
Dallas-based MetroPCS
reported a sharp slowdown
in additions to its flat-rate,
no-contract wLireless ser-


first gay hotel opens
said to resemble a Mi- "It was supposed to
ami townhouse. be something spirited,
The hotel was de- happy, playful but def-
signed by Dan Maz- initely well-desigried
zarini along with his that a discerning gay
partner, .Brian Hum- audience would ap-
phrey. preciate and some-


.nable to find work

expire January 2012." transitioning into one
Unemployment com- of these jobs is not an
pensation is funded easy thing to do, said
by unemployment in- Antonio Wheeler, 46,
'surance, which is paid who knows first-hand.
for by employers and For 12 years he worked
not taxpayers, accord- as an office manager
ing to Rivara. And for a real estate com-
the maximum pay- pany. He was laid off
ment someone could in 2007 and has yet to
receive is $531 a week, find new employment.
depending on such "I was paid to man-
things as their marital age 10 employees and
status, earnings while perform clerical duties
employed and depen- in the office," he said.
dents, such as a child "Now I find most of the
or unemployed spouse. job leads I discover are
Another aspect :to for blue collar jobs."
the long-term un- Wheeler, who is single
employed especially with no children, still
for Blacks, w~ho hater maintains a one betd-
traditionally worked room apartment in the
white-collar .Iobs, such North Late~ndale com-
as secretaries or of- mulnity- on the WVest
fice managers, is the Side and still drives
ability to transition his 2008 Ford Explor-
into new Industries. er despite not making
Manufacturi ng and any monthl- payments
construction, which since last year.
are considered blue- -"You don't w;ant to
collar jobs, hav;e domi- know\ how~ I am mak-
nated the~ job 9~1~-g19f Ri :"T&'iU
in Illinois the past just say that i am do-
two years, according ing what is required to
to IDES records. And survive."


UNEMPLOYED
continued from 7D

love it more when I can
pay my bills on time."
Age is what Charles
Porter cited as his
reason for being un-
employed for over two
years. "While employ
ers are not saying it,
age also works against
the unemployed and
contributes to why so
many people have ex-
hausted their unem
ployment benefits and
still remain jobless,"
Porter, 56, a former
electrical engineer,
said.
Porter now works for
temporary agencies
to support his family.
"One temp agency told
me I should consider
dying my hair to im-
prove my chances of
getting hired," he said.
"LI guess no one wants
to hire a grandfather."
Illinois' unemployment
rate for June matched
the national rate of 9.2
percent and has been
equal to or below the



linois Department of
Employment Security.
And Illinois has also
reported declines in 15
of the past 17 months
but has added thou~
sands of manufac-
turing and construc-
tion jobs. "Illinois
has added more than
10,000 manufacturing
jobs and nearly 9,000
jobs in the conktruc-
tion sector over this
time last year, includ-
ing strong growth over
the past month," said
Jay Rowell, director of
the IDES. "While un-
even movements are
an expected part of an
economic recovery, Illi-
nois is building on the
steady progress that
has been made." Edu-
cation is often seen as
a plus for anyone look-
ing for a job but De-
shawna Olgesby, 36,
said it could also serve
as a deterrent when
applying for entry-level
jobs.
"I have a bachelor's
in communications
and a master's in
counseling and when
e 1oto apply for entry-
ment stores and fast-
food restaurants I am
always turned down,"
she said. "Managers
have told me when ap-
plying that I was over
qualified and they
feared I would leave
within a year." For
the past seven years,
Olgesby had worked
as a family counselor
for a West Side non-
profit organization but
due to a dip in state
funding she was laid
off and has not found
a new job. Greg Ri-
vara, a spokesman for
IDES, said candidates
should improve their


interviewing skills so
they can better explain
to employers why they
should take a chance
on hiring them.
"This has to also be
conveyed in cover let-
ters too. I don't want
to tell a person to
take off their educa-
tion on their resume
but that's also a pos-
sibility if they thinly
it is hindering their
searchi" he said. And
unlike. Smith and Por-
ter, who collected un-
employment benefits
for nearly two years,
thanks to Congress
extending benefits, Ri-
vara said that cush-
ion is no longer avail-
able. "If someone had
applied for benefits in
>June they would not
be eligible to receive an
extension after their
standard 26 weeks of
state benefits expire.
They would have had
to apply for benefits
in May or before to be
eligible," Rivara said,
"All federal extensions


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Poorest customers hit by MetroPCS slowdown


/ -'

p .-Q


Jl ,
MetroPCS, which offers flat-rate, no-contract ser-
vice, reported a profit of $84.3 million for the quar-
q e "


Black midd~le-class u


America's

HOTEL
contimaed from 7D

or at least gay-friendly.
The 54-room hotel is
decked out in bright,
playful colors and is


in Miami

thing different than
they've seen before. If
you stop by the hotel,
pay special attention
to the glittery bar and
giant polar bear in the
lobby.


~Palmetto Bay Village Hall
9705 East Hibiscus Street
Miami, FL 33157


M~iami Gardens City Hall
1515 NW 167 Street
Miami, FL 33169


Mliami Arts Mluseum
101 West Flagler Street
Miami, FL 33130


Coral Gables Country Club
997 North Greenway Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33134







I ~ ~--_--~- --~- -~ --- _i


BLACK~s \ILAT CON)TROL. THEIR OW\~ DI)\ I~


19D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


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With you when growth

he gins in the com munity


Together wye'H go far





'Prime Time' high steps right into Hall of Fame


LaMarr Woodley signs $61.5M deal


Reggie Bush: Trade to Miami Dolphins is 'surreal'


RL\(K ^c~ST COuRr I cortHEIK OWN DESTINY


12D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUJ6IST 10-16, 2011


of highly-impressive
statistics: 153 touch-
downs, 14,858 total
yards and a single-
season record of 23
touchdown passes,
Impressive numbers
yes, however, they
don't tell the whole
story of Moss at his
game-breaking best.
He changed the game
every time he made
one of his "how-the
heck-did-he do-that"
touchdown recep-
tions.
Nobody could stop
Randy Moss except,
well, Moss himself.
With his gifted abili-


ties, he made his he-
roics seem effortless.
So much so that peo-
ple would notice when
he appeared to be dis-
tracted even turn-
ing it off as he desired.
We may never know
just how good Moss
could have been.
Despite his tal-
ent, he clearly had
his share of detrac-
tors. Nonetheless, he
earned the respect of
some of the greatest in
the league including
Jerry Rice, Michael
Irvin and Terrell Ow-
ens guys who were
perceived as hard


workers at the same
position. He frustrat-
ed his early mentor
Cris Carter who saw
what everyone else
did but struggled to
keep Moss motivated.
Perhaps it all came
too easy for him -- he
was so much .better
than those wvho tried
to stop him that he
sometimes toyed with
the opposition.
Moss could be dif-
ficult to like because
like several of his
peers, he gained the
reputation of being
a "diva" especially
when he got cocky -


"straight cash, hom-
ey," he once famously
uttered. It was hard
for us to focus on his
game given his over-
the-top antics. We
tend to be more com-
fortable with athletes
like Barry Sanders
who hand the ball
over to the referee af-
ter every play and re-
main humble.
Moss was clearly
a different breed. He
played with a physi-
cal intelligence that
was easy to ignore or
take for granted. He
displayed exceptional
speed and covered


the field with long,
graceful strides. De-
fensive coordinators
lost sleep at night
trying to come up
with a plan to slow
Moss down but noth-
ing seemed to work.
Never have we seen
a wide receiver that
was so dominant.
He dared you to stop
him, he taunted help-
less defenders and
once mooned Packer
fans 'at legendary
Lambeau field. Talent
like his only comes
around once in a life-
time. Moss was truly
one of the greatest.


Ll rlIl ~I b~l~


before an enthusias-
tic crowd. And while
each of these men are
deserving of the hon-
or, there is one other
NFL star who retired
last week and will un-
doubtedly make his
way to the Hall as well
- Randy Moss.


Moss will forever be
remembered as one
of most talented wide
receivers the NFL has
ever seen. The num-
bers speak for them-
selves. No one can
refute the fact that
Moss terrorized de-
fenses with an array


Deion Sand-
ers joined Marshall
Faulk in entering the
Hall of Famne in their
first year of eligibil-
ity. Shannon Sharpe,
Richard Dent, Chris
Hanburger, Les Rich-
ter and Ed Sabol
also were enshrined


views were shaped as they
climbed from challenging so-
cioeconomic conditions.
Sanders talked about be-
mng ridiculed by a classmate
for his mother's work as a
hospital aide and how it moti-
vated him to ensure that Con-
mie would never have to work
again after he turned pro and
fueled creation of his "Neon
Deion" image.
"If your dream isn't bigger
than you," he preached, "then
there's a problem with your
dream."
With seven inductees, in-
cluding NFL Films founder Ed
Sabol, Richard Dent, Chris
Hanburger and the late Les
Richter, the enshrinement ex-
tended nearly four hours.
"You can't prepare for the
emotion and excitement of all
this," Sanders said. A nd to
be on stage, performing w~ith
Snoop? That s icing on the
cake."
The concert ended with
Snoop helping on Sanders'
1995 rap song, IVust Ele The
Money.
Persona intact.
Said Sanders, "I guarantee
'there will never be another
Hall of Tame weekend like
this."


By Jarrett Bell


,


CANTON, Ohio Near the
end of a swaggering Pro Foot-
ball Hall of Fame weekend
entry that was distinctively
"Prime Time," Deion Sanders
basked on stage with one of
the high-profile participants
at his not-so-typical post-
induction bash. Snoop Dogg
flew in from overseas for this.
Wearing a faux Hall of Fame
gold blazer, the rapper per-
formed for an hour in a huge
tent on the grounds of the
Hall of Fame that housed the
celebration for Sanpders and
fellow first-ballot inductee
Marshall Faulk;
Just before 2 a.m, as Sat-
urday night faded to Sunday
morning, Snoop who fol-
lowed' hip-hop artist Nelly -
6~ffered analysis.
"I like the way you put the
do-rag on the bust," he told
Sanders, who added that
crowning feature after his
induction speech. "That was
so gangsta ... so hood. When
I come to the Hall of Fame, I
want to see it. They'd better
not take it off."
Sanders doesn't expect the
do-rag will stay. He wanted
a bandana bronzed into, his


,
* .


.
UNCOMMON FACE: Yankees center fielder Curtis Grander-
son is one of the top players in the majors. But aspiring Black
players, he says, are without clear role models today.


Graderon ondrs

ThrOG TSe Onc WOHCS?


bust, requesting as much to
the Hall. -
"That's how a lot of fans re-
member me, from way back,"
he said. "So I asked. They told
me that Walter Payton's bust
doesn't have a headband. But
did he request it?
"The least I could,do wis to
put it on after the speech. So
we got that moment."
A signature snapshot from
Sanders, a phenomenal ath-
lete who also made a prolific
mark as a high-stepping en-


tertainer.
"I had to go in being me," he
said.
Sanders realizes that
not everyone embraces his
style and, as reflected in his
25-minute speech, doesn't
aim to please the masses.
There was a striking thread
that connected Sanders'
speech to messages deliv-
ered by Faulk and Shannon
Sharpe. Each shed light on
their version of the American
journey and how their world


myriad for baseball's drop in
Black players. The Star-Tele-
gram cites costs for equipment
and league participation as
possible reasons for baseball's
lack of appeal, to say nothing
of admission prices. -
"I knowr it's expensive, but
I've gone to places and there
are fields," Granderson said.
"You can easily get equipment~
donated. I don't know how you
fight this one. I've heard a lot
of kids just say, 'I don't want
to.' That's not a Black/white
thing, that's a kid thing. So
they play on their computer,
and they say, 'I want to just
Stay right where I am. I'm not
getting into any trouble so you
can't force me.
"If you poll a lot of African-
American guys that are be-
tween 20 and' 40 years old
(and ask) what NBA player
did you watch and want to be,
they're all going to say '(Mi-
chael) Jordan.' He was the best
player and he looked like us.
(In) baseball, you have a group
playing right now who could
syloKgn rGiffey Jr.,a but he's
there hasn't been anybody to
replace him.
Although MLB has made ef-
forts to promote the game, in
part through its RBI (Reviving
Baseball in the Inner Cities)
program, which boasts nearly.
200,000 participants across
the country, the fruits have
been difficult to decipher at


By Seth Livingstone

New York Yankees outfielder
Curtis Granderson Isn't telling
Major League Baseball any-
thing it doesn't already know.
Baseball appears to lack
appeal and access to some
Blacks, whether they are par-
ticipants or fans. And Grand-
erson wasn't necessarily try-
ing to stir the pot when he told
the Fort Worth Star-Te~legram:
"Count the nuinber of African-
American fans."
On a recent trip to Texas,
Granderson said it was diffi-
cult to push the count to dou-
Sble digits.
"At first, it starts off as a joke
(with teammates)," Grander-
son said. "As the game moves
on, you'll get to 10, or maybe
15. Depends on where you are,
too. Places like Chiicago or New
York, other places it's easy. (In
Texas), it's hard. So after a
while it becomes, 'Told you so.
"As it was reported in April,
the percentage of Black pvlay-
ers dropped to 8.5 percent on
or ming da cehis yer,e ron
of last season and its lowest
level since 2007, according to
the University of Central Flori-
Sda's Institute for Diversity and
Ethics in Sports. More than
80 percent of NBA players are
Black and the percentage of
Black players in the NFL is
inore than 60 percent,
Possible reasons appear


so fi t"
sery res. It's Woodley's way

tTbe idaal makes the .Pro
Bowl linebacker one of the
highest-paid players at his
position in the league while
also providing the team with
salary cap relief..
The Steelers were $10 mil-
lion over the $120.4-million
salary cap when camp be-
gan, -a figure that included
, the 'one-year, $10-million
contract tendered to Woodley
in February when the' Steel-
ers' designated him with the
franchise tag-
SThe new deal is front-load-
ed with bonus money, helping
Pittsburgh to get breathing
roon't under the cap.
The 26-year-old gras only
too happy to move the num-
bers around to make the
contract cap-friendly. All
that really mattered was the
opportunity to stay in Pitts-
burgh,
"That's something I wanted


--r'elh Sral:rji0 associatedr Press
Steelers linebacker La~larr Woodley runs a drill during
~practice last wee in Latro e, qa.


to happen when I first came
in the door and saw the great
linebackers wlho had come
through here," Woodley said.
"I wanted to be a part of that
great tradition and history
around here, but to do thiit I
had to be around here."
Woodley has developed into


one of the NFL's top young
linebackers since the former
Michigan star' was chosen
by the Steelers in the sec-
ond round of the 2007 draft.
He has recorded at least
10 sacks in each of the last
three years, including 131/2
in 2009.


Bush was due about $11.8
million this season, the final
year of his contract with the
Saints, who face salary-cap
constraints.
He helped the Saints win the
Super Bowl in February 2010
-- on the Dolphins' home field.
But he has never been. to a
Pro Bowl or even rushed for as
much as 600 yards in a season,
though the sort of speed he has
is something Miami desperate-
ly coveted.


amazing ~cit~y to play in Irl the ball 524 times,
and I'm just looking for- 'actually gaining more
ward to being able to yards as a receiver
come in here and con- I*P~ L than runner.
tribute right away and be ~i~"It's an opportunity
a difference-maker and P~~~~~I've wanted and envi-
help this team win." sioned as long as I've
Bush said he and the played football," Bush
Dolphins are still figur- BUSH said. "I've always
ing out how he'll be used, wanted to be a fea-
but noted that he'll be a run- tured back and the main guy
ning back first -- clearly his and I feel like there's an oppor-
top priority. In five years with tunity here for that. And there's
the Saints, Bush only carried also an opportunity for me to


be a leader and a .contributor
and help some of the young
guys come along too. I've been
in the league five years and I
can't believe it, but I'm kind of
one of the older vet guys now."
Bush is a dynamic kick re-
turner and receiver out of the
backfield when he is healthy.
And although plagued by a se-
ries of injuries in his career, he
gained 4,982 all-purpose yards
for the Saints and scored 33
touchdowns.


By Tim Reynolds

DAVIE (AP) -- Reggie Bush
watched part of his first prac-
tice with the Miami Dolphins
from an end zone, arms across
his chest, nodding and smiling
as he studied what was hap-
pening on the field.
He can't wait for a different
view.
Bush's next chapter formally
began last Friday, one day af-
ter he was acquired by the Dol-


phins in a trade with the New
Orleans Saints and agreed to a
two-year contract worth nearly
$10 million. He couldn't prac-
tice with the club until Aug. 4
because of NFL; rules, but is in
camp and already knee-deep
into the process of learning ev-
erything about his new team.
"It's still pretty surreal for
me," Bush said after practice.
"This whole experience is great.
I'm looking forward to this op-
portunity. I think this is an


~r


-~c~


*Rate quoted for a 26-year-old male non-smoker in Hemnando County. Rates may vary by gender, age. county and tobacco usage. Limitations and exclusions may apply. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida. Inc., is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 71364-S11


Randy Moss: One of the greatest


.rll I
Fhf
C
<-.. 2


..1
'1
.1"
-Y ~r~l~PP


SIGNATURE MOMENT: Former cornerback Delon Sand-
ers added his trademark bandana to his Hall of Fame bust af-
tev his sppech.


Steelers lock LB

fOT Six yBOTS
Associated Press

LaMarr Woodle~y didn't
groan when the Pittsburgh
Steelers slapped him with
their franchise tag.
He. didn't panic either. His
goal was always to remain
with the defending AFC
champions, and the news of
the contract that will keep
him in Pittsburgh was so
good he couldn't keep it to
himself. -
Rather than' get extra rest
entering the second week of
training camp, Woodley took
to Twitter around 6 a.m. Fri-
day to break the news about
his six-year, $61.5-million
deal.
"I set my alarm and I decid-
ed I was going to tweet this
first thing in the morning,"
Woodley said. "That was the
whole thing breaking the




The Miami times.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00947
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times.
Uniform Title: Miami times
Physical Description: v.
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery,
The Magic Printery
Publication Date: 8/10/2011
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers. -- Florida
Newspapers. -- Miami (Fla.)
Newspapers. -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)
Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
General Note: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358015
notis - ABZ6315
oclc - 02264129
isbn - 0739-0319
System ID: UF00028321:00947

Full Text














,i ,, I, ..II.1I I l.....II.ll. ,. ll.. III 111 1 .11 ll ...I.I .l l.
*****************SCH 3-DIGIT 326
510 P1
LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
205 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
CAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


VOLUME 88 NUMBER 50 MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 10-16, 2011 50.cents (55 cents in Broward)


Summer program


gives 135 teens jobs

Youth share tales of personal transformation


By D. Kevin McNeir
kmcneir@miamitimesonline.com


-Miami Times photo/Randy Grice
DEMOLITION BOUND?: Only a handful of the original 64 owners at Poinciana Village in Overtown remain, still
hoping for a fair settlement price as litigation continues over stalled development plans and property ownership rights.


Poinciana controversy


Are owners being pushed

out for sake of profit?

By D. Kevin McNeir
kmcneir@miamitimesonline.com
Attorneys representing the City,
County and private developers, continue
to place a stranglehold on plans for eco-
nomic development and community revi-
talization in Overtown. Six blocks have


been identified as prime sites including
land on both sides of Northwest Second
Avenue, between Sixth and 10th Streets.
And while the City's CRA says it has big
plans in store, attorneys must first find
a way to settle several lawsuits between
public and private interests over who
has legal right to the land.
Here are the issues in summary: 1)
Who controls the three County-owned
parcels between Sixth and Ninth Streets
that are being disputed between the
Please turn to POINCIANA 10A


"What the residents
are asking for is a
live-work-play type
of development that first
brings in big box retailers
... that can employ folks
in the area."
-EDMONSON


When Temprens Givens, 25, a
single mother with three children,
first presented herself for an inter-
view for the CRA Summer Youth
Employment Program last spring,
she admits she did not bring her "A-
game," showing up in an inappro-
priately-short dress, fiery-red hair
and a lot of attitude. But Project
Director Saliha Nelson, 38, refused
to give up on her neither did her
eventual mentor/job site supervi-
sor, Charlene Seymour-Lane, a
project development coordinator at


Brown Mackie College Miami. Now
six weeks later with the summer
jobs program coming to an end,
Givens has been identified for full-
time employment with the College
- once she earns her GED.
"These programs are so vital
because young people like Temp-
rens get a chance to see another
world, another way of living and
have someone to talk to that guides
them and helps them change their
negative attitude and beliefs to
more positive ones," Seymour-Lane
said. "I grew up in Liberty City and
know that having a mentor in my
Please turn to JOBS 10A


Intern
Temprens
Givens and
Mentor
Charlene
Seymour-
Lane


-MiamiTimes photo/D. Kevin McNeir
.o .. ..oo..o ..o ..oe...o ..oooo.oo.e.o .ooo .. o...oo ..o e .. o .oo ... o. oooo..oo...oo..o o.eo... ..ooo .. o ...e .. oo.. o


Shaw overcomes adversity


Tornado-damaged University completes the
majority of its reconstruction efforts
By Randy Grice South, is expected to open its doors in
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com time for the start of the fall semester.
"I am happy to see that my school
After months of reconstruction, will be open to provide education-
Shaw University [Raleigh, N.C.], the al opportunities again," said Rene
oldest historically-Black college in the Simms, a 27-year-old Shaw graduate.


Voting Rights Act 1965

celebrates 46th anniversary

BLACK EMPOWERMENT: Forty-six years ago, on August 6, 1965,
President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965, out-
lawing discriminatory practices that prohibited Blacks from voting. Pic-
tured are Johnson (1-r) along with Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy and Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr., both of whom were instrumental in the Act's passage.


"It is truly a blessing that the Univer-
sity was able to get things together for
these students to get back to the regu-
lar schedule of college and get back to
the business of learning."
The tornado that struck the school
back in April left behind 26 buildings
with severe roof damage and toppled
massive trees in the area. The dorms,
Please turn to SHAW 10A


Speaking for the

Congo's women
Africa's Ambassador for Peace, Miss Congo Odi- -
ane Lokako, 30, (bottom, center), is traveling the --
U.S. in efforts to raise awareness about the daily
atrocities facing women in her county including
rape and HIV-infection. She toured facilities at
Jackson Memorial Hospital and is joined by Ma-
mie Kabongolo (I-r), and young Congolese-Ameri- M
cans from Miami: Sylva and Patrick l(abuanseya,
19 and 26;Terry Ellis, 24; Gracia Kabuanseya, 15;
Parfoit Nseya, 17; and Brendy Kamba, 11.
Miami Times photo/D. Kevin McNeir


School Board adds

new measures for

troubled schools
Recently, the Miami-Dade County r '
School Board (M-DCPS) unanimously I
approved a measure proposed by
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall, District
2 school board member, to provide
increased support through community
engagement, to help schools under the
intervene category continue their goal
of improving student achievement. Mi- N,
ami Central and Miami Edison Senior BENDROSS-
High Schools are two intervene schools MINDINGALL
that were saved from possible closure by
the State after the school board, district
Please turn to MONITORING 6A


Drew and Phyllis

Wheatley cited for

earning "A" grade
By Randy Grice
rgrice@'mniamirnilie online.c oin
State Education Commissioner John L. Winn recently
recognized some of Florida's highest performing school dis-
tricts and Miami-Dade has scored with five schools noted
for improved performance from among a total of 17 schools
statewide. Charles R. Drew and Phyllis Wheatley Elemen-
tary Schools, located in Liberty City and Overtown, respec-
tively, were among those recognized for their significant
improvement and achievement.
Cathy Williams, principal at Drew, said she was satisfied
with the improvements the school has made.
Please turn to GRADE 10A


Jackson High

teacher admits to

sex with student
By D. Kevin McNeir
kmcnetr@mniamitinesionline.com
A science teacher at Miami Jackson
Senior High School. Waleska Velasquez,
29, has been charged with three counts
of having sex with a minor. After the
Florida Department of Children & Fami-
lies received an anonymous tip about the
affair. City of Miami Police conducted a
full-scale investigation leading to the in-
structor's arrest at her NW 62nd Avenue VELASQUEZ
home in Virginia Gardens late last week.
Please turn to TEACHER 10A


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2A THE MIAMITIM ade

2A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


It's time for a primer in

Black history

For the record the history lessons that we believe
are essential for all Blacks to remember have noth-
ing to do with those boring reports your teachers
required you to prepare on such notable Black men and
women like Harriet Tubman, Crispus Attucks or George
Washington Carver. The history that too many of us have
forgotten and which is crucial for our economic survival
and the future of the next generation of Blacks, has to do
with an all but forgotten event that occurred on August 6,
1965.

It was on that day 46 years ago that then-President Lyn-
don Baines Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law
legislation that protected the democratic participation
of Blacks in the U.S. in the voting process. It was needed
to enforce the Fifteenth Amendment and to eliminate sub-
tle racial restrictions that denied Blacks from Alabama to
Alaska the right to vote.

Why should we pause and highlight this date? Because
without the Voting Rights Act, Blacks would still be subject
to such Jim Crow-like maneuvers as poll taxes, literacy
tests, intimidation and gerrymandering. Even more signif-
icant, however, are new and more creative laws signed by
leaders that include Governors Scott Walker (Wisconsin),
Rick Perry (Texas) and our very own Rick Scott (Florida),
tightening restrictions on third party voter registration
organizations and shortening the number of early voting
days.

But Scott went even further, passing a ban on felon vot-
ing rights and forcing non-violent offenders to wait five
years after completing their sentences to apply for their
rights to be restored. While we do not profess to be legal
experts, the restrictions facing ex-felons sound a lot like
"double jeopardy."

What's more, many Blacks in the last presidential elec-
tion were persuaded to register to vote because of the ef-
forts of third party organizations and a large number of
usw,vtptdel.S,,al s ~hat's the relg;portf ce of th 1965
Voting Rights Act? It served to counter if not negate legis-
lative shenanigans like those now employed by Scott and
his cronies, making what was once deemed as an "un-
alienable right" even more difficult to achieve.

But when Blacks act like we don't care about voting any-
way, as the numbers for Black voter turnout would sug-
gest, then maybe it doesn't really matter whether more
laws are changed at all. There once was a time that Blacks
were willing to die for the right to vote and many did just
that. But today more of us would prefer staying home arid
letting those from other ethnic groups determine our des-
tiny. It's enough to make a grown man cry!


Will new Northwestern

principal bring calm or

more confusion?
We are hoping, even praying, for positive results to
come from the most recent changing of the guard
at Miami Northwestern Senior High School. But
given what has transpired over the past six years, not only
will prayers be essential but a solid game plan will have to
be ready for operation and a lot of support from the school
district officials and parents will be needed when classes re-
sume.

Newly-appointed Principal Wallace Aristide has taken over
the hot seat once occupied by his two most recent predeces-
sors: the non-committal Charles Hankerson and before him
the much-beleaguered, but finally acquitted Dwight Bernard.
We certainly wish Aristide luck in his new position but won-
der what the former vice-principal brings to the table that
made him stand out above other candidates.

Perhaps the proof, as the saying goes, will be in the pud-
ding. In the meantime, Northwestern must contend with its
being a "D" school and therefore subject to intense scrutiny
by the District's Educational Transformation Office. By the
way, if you wondering what the overall benefits are from be-
ing monitored by the recently-formed Education Transfor-
mation Office, we must admit that you are not alone.

But whether it's downtown program coordinators or school
board officials that are keeping an eagle eye on academic de-
velopments at Northwestern, those who ultimately stand to
win or lose are the 1,200-plus boys and girls who will return
to school in a few short days.
Education is the only way to legally and effectively level the
playing field in the U.S. And without equal opportunities in
education, we have already destined these young Black boys
and girls to failure.

We will keep close watch on what transpires in the halls of
blue and gold at the "West." And we hope that each of you
will do the same. The future of our community's youth lies
in the balance.


(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder. 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
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7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster- Send address changes to The Miami Times, PO Box 270200
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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the
world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless of race, creed or color, his or her
human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person,
the Black Press strives to help every person In the firm belief
that all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back.


Auodi Bureau of Circulatons

I Mi


-. .; q -
BY JULIANNE MALVEAUX, NNPA COLUMNIST


Will debt ceiling fix double dip recession?


Our country appears to have
avoided default on our debt,
based on a deal that was cut
Sunday night. The Tea Party
Republicans have been com-
pletely unwilling to compro-
mise. President Obama and
some Democrats, on the other
hand, have been far willing to
compromise putting everything
sacred Social Security, Medi-
care, educational programs
- on the table while taking
other matters, including tax in-
creases on the wealthy, off the
table. To swallow deep budget
cuts without also looking at
revenue increases seems mis-
guided, at best, and perhaps
even foolish.
The deal will require about $3
billion in deficit reductions, but
no increase in revenue. It gives
Republicans virtually every-
thing they asked for in the be-
ginning. Congressman Eman-
uel Cleaver (D-MO), Chairman
of the Congressional Black
Caucus, described the deal as


a "sugar-coated Satan sand-
wich." But Cleaver's observa-
tion still does not factor in the
possibility that recession will
continue or become a double-
dip recession.
Double dip reces-

SMany are considering
gages, exacerbating t
f ect this months-long c
climate.

sion? How? Let's start with
high unemployment rates that
are likely to get higher when
money is taken out of the econ-
omy. Let's add the millions of
housing units that are empty
and the foreclosure crisis that
has not yet been resolved. More
than 28 percent of us have "un-
derwater" mortgages, or mort-
gages higher than the value of
a home. Many are considering
walking away from those mort-
gages, exacerbating the hous-
ing crisis. Mix in the effect this


months-long debate has had
on our investment climate. A
skittish stock market doesn't
exactly bode well for economic
recovery. Nor does a weakened
bond rating. Nor higher inter-
est rates, which appear to be a

walking away from those mort-
he housing crisis. Mix in the ef-
debate has had on our investment


possibility.
The unemployment situation
is the most disturbing. Nearly
a third of those who are out
of work have been out of work
for a full year. The average
length of unemployment is now
40 weeks, or 10 months. The
French philosopher Albert Ca-.i
mus once wrote, "Without work
all life is rotten." There are
at least 25 million Americans
leading "rotten" lives because
they have no work. Many, also,
have no hope. Yet the possibil-


ity of using stimulus togener-
ate employment is not possible
with the possibility of debt cel-
ling legislation that offers no
flexibility for an employment
downturn. Pass that sugar-
coated Satan sandwich and let
me wash it down with a big dose
of that strychnine. That's right,
strychnine. Poison. Because
this deal is poison for the ecoi-
omy and for most of the Ameri-
can people.
The debt-ceiling bill is bad
news. It is not even clear that it
is "better than nothing." What it
actually shows is that Tea Party
Republicans are better at adher-
ing to their principles and exert-
ing their will than Democrats or
the White House are. They de-
serve no credit for their unwill-
ingness to compromise because
the legislative process is about
compromise.But Obama and
some Democrats need to take
heed of Tea Party tactics or
drink that strychnine with the
sugar-coated Satan sandwich.


BY DR. BENJAMIN F. CHAVIS, J I NNPACOLI
.1 0 I, ,' Y1 .!1_. . ..


President Obama's transcendent leadership
Now that the U.S. debt ceiling of America on the night of his of North Carolina back in the ior of those whose o y mission
has finally been raised by the election just three years ago in 1960s as a youth organizer, I is to defeat the president next
U.S. Congress, there are many November 2008? wonder how King today would year in the 2012 national elec-
who are quick to cast judg- Obama has to be the leader view or respond to these sys- tions.
ment on the leadership per- of all the people, including tematic attacks on the lead- The election of Obama was
formance of President Barack even those who throw political ership of President Obama? I another indication that King
Obama. Somehow there is a stones at him no matter how believe King would speak out was right about the future
partisan loss of memory to the much he tries to represent and take a stand to warn all changes in American society
fact that the last seven presi- with respect to the oneness of
dents all supported the rais- humanity and the inclusive-
ing of the nation's debt ceiling ut the current challenges that Obama faces are real and ness of Blacks into the coun-
to avoid a national default. In the forces that are aligning-against him are gaining some try's political mainstream. But
fact, Reagan raised the U.S. national momentum. the current challenges that
debt ceiling 18 times during his Obama faces are real and the
eight years as president with- forces that are aligning against
out polarizing the nation. what is best for all. Later this people not to allow the obvious him are gaining some national
What's really behind these month, we will all pause to racial and political prejudices momentum.
attacks? Is this really just an- celebrate the unveiling of the and undermining stereotypical The progressive transforma-
dther example of the madness national monument in tribute attacks on Obama to trigger a tion of America will not be con-
of the current body politic in to the life, leadership, dream backward bigoted polarization tingent on the arrogance or ig-
the United States? Or is there and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther of our nation and society. At a norance of the past, but will be
something more fundamental King Jr. on the National Mall in time when the nation should accomplished by "optimistic"
going on today across America Washington, D.C. Yes, that will be focusing on rendering the leaders like Obama who know
that exposes the need for Presi- be another great historic day best high quality education for how to rise above and to tran-
dent Obama to keep pushing in the history of America. How- all children in America and to scend the backward tides of
forward to improve the qual- ever, as one who worked with be creating and providing mil- reactionary and negative pes-
ity ,for life in particular for the Dr. King and the Southern lions of needed jobs so that the simism of visionless politicians
millions of people who voted for Christian Leadership Confer- economy will rebound, it is sad that want to take the nation
him and danced in the streets ence (SCLC) in my home, state to witness the ruthless behav- backward rather than forward.


BY BILL FLETCHER, NNAP COLUMNIST


Wealth gap
The report recently released
by the Pew Research Center
that showed that the wealth
gap between white families on
the one hand and Black and La-
tino families on the other was
greater than at any time in the
last 25 years, caught many peo-
ple by surprise. It should not
have. We have been witness-
ing an expansion of this gap for
some time. The so-called Great
Recession has exacerbated this
tendency.
Yet when I read this report,
actually the first thing that
came to mind was a discus-
sion I recently had with a white
friend of mine. They were telling
me about their son, a 20-some-
thing who has been looking for
work. He has gotten into the
frame of mind that goes like
this: white men have it rough
out there and, in fact, white
men face discrimination com-
pared with Black women.


and souls of angry white folks


In truth, what my friend's son
is confronting is the manner in
which the economy has been
changing over the last 30 years.
Not only has the economy re-
organized, leading to the intro-
ductions of new technologies;
downsizing; and off-shoring of


be there to soften the blow,
does not work the way that it
once did. Back during the Great
Depression, for instance, Black
workers were often fired from
their jobs and replaced by white
workers, though the white
workers would be paid at the


t is anger like his that helps to fuel Tea Party movements,
white nationalists and others who desperately want to
believe that the American Dream can be restored for
whites.


jobs, but white people can no
longer assume that they are im-
mune or cushioned against the
full impact of economic down-
turns any more. The challeng-
es to white racial privilege and
racist discrimination by people
of color and their allies over the
years has meant that the auto-
matic assumption that, when
all else fails people of color will


lower salaries than Black work-
ers were making. These days it
is more difficult to pull this off.
So, what does this all mean?
Racist discrimination is alive
and well but looks different
than it once did. Nevertheless,
the racial differential in treat-
ment, whether in employment,
wealth, education, etc., remains
very much a part of the fabric


of U.S. society. Bu: the second
piece is that the reorganization
of capitalism means that many
of the opportunities that whites
believed that they were entitled
to have dried up. In this situa-
tion many of these whites, like
my friend's son, focus on imag-
inary opponents -in this case
Black women rather than
understanding that the system
is actually crushing them. It is
anger like his that helps to fuel
Tea Party movements, white
nationalists and others who
desperately want to believe that
the American Dream can be re-
stored for whites.
Sorry. It won't work that way.
The system is saying loud and
clear: Do not pass go; do not
collect $200, go directly to the
unemployment line where you
stew and try to figure out how
did this happen because it was
not suppose to happen to white
folks right?


~


I t _


- S~d:


-i
















LOCAL


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


OPINION

3A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


BY REGINALD J. CLYNE, ESQ., MIAMI TIMES COLUMNIST, rjc@clynelegal.com


The legacy
We are all familiar with
some of the well-known lega-
cies of discrimination, such
as inadequate housing, weak
educational opportunities,
fewer jobs, barriers to ca-
reer advancement and higher
rates of and opportunities for
crime. What many do not real-
ize, however, is racism's legacy
towards issues of health. I am
not talking merely about the
lack of access to quality medi-
cal care which results in Black
infant mortality ratios being
higher than some Third World
countries. Nor am I discussing
higher rates of hepatitis, dia-
betes and heart attacks.
What I am addressing is
an insidious foe that many of
know almost nothing about -
the legacy of housing discrimi-
nation when Blacks were rele-


of housing discrimination
gated to certain areas of town. nation. We won that battle incinerato:
It was in these "Negro" sections after eight years of litigation there are
of town where industrial plants during which time the City soil and
were similarly housed that spent over $10 million fighting cause all
Were considered too smelly, too its own employees who simply have foug
dangerous and just too nasty wanted a fair and impartial of Blacks
to be placed in the more afflu- work environment, drinking
ent white neighborhoods. McCoy shared with me that dustrial ru
ty and on
M cCoy shared with me that Blacks were dying at higher fearing front
rates than any other ethnic group, sometimes 200 dust in Da
times higher due to pollution. I subsequently learned are prepare
this tin
that many Black neighborhoods are home to trash dumps, sewer ing in Olin
plants, waste treatment plants and incinerators. Some of


I learned of this discrimi-
natory practice from Leola
McCoy, a Ft. Lauderdale civil
rights activist that helped me
when my firm represented 43
Black employees who were su-
ing the City of Ft. Lauderdale
for race and gender discrimi-


Blacks were dying at higher
rates than any other ethnic
group, sometimes 200 times
higher due to pollution. I sub-
sequently learned that many
Black neighborhoods are home
to trash dumps, sewer plants,
waste treatment plants and


er genera
vinced tha
as situatii
Olinda Pa:
nie Colem
Developme
Blacks st
deadly foi
tion.


rs. The result is that
toxins in the water,
air that collectively
sorts of illnesses. I
ht cases on behalf
with arsenic in their
well water from in-
in-off in Polk Coun-
behalf of Blacks suf-
n the impact of toxic
ania Beach. Now we
ring for a new battle
ie over lead poison-
ida Park.
you from the young-
tion may be con-
it racism is over but
ons unfold at both
rk and now the An-
ian Public Housing
ent, it's clear that
ill face subtle yet
rms of discrimina-


Does anyone realize that
government is one of the last
vestiges of opportunity for ev-
eryday Blacks to gain full ac-
cess to the American dream
since the now-defunct poli-
cies of Affirmative Action? As
the Republican Party and its
hyper-ego membership, aka
the Tea Party, seek to cut the
deficit by reducing govern-
ment spending, the result is
a decline in employment op-
portunities.
Lost job options will no
doubt disproportionately im-
pact Blacks, both nationally
and locally. This comes on
the heals of one of the worst
and most depressed econo-
mies in the last 30 years. But
for Blacks this state of affairs
is nothing new. Blacks have
always been disproportion-
ately underemployed and un-
employed in this country. The
question remains, now that
we have achieved a level of
social integration that on its
face allows us to participate


in many more aspects of the
social, educational and eco-
nomic opportunities available
in the U.S. what's next?
I say the ingredients for the
next civil rights movement
are now upon us and it is a
fight for our economic civil
rights that should be at the


ed indicators effecting Black
poverty is that Black fami-
lies are largely concentrated
in urban metropolitan areas,
where the cost of living is
much higher when compared
to rural areas. When one fac-
tors in family size, number
of children, age, education,


he Tea Party is a constant reminder that it only takes a
d determined handful to influence the big picture.


top of the Black agenda and
our list of priorities. Today,
the two-fold nemesis of pov-
erty and unemployment are
tearing at the very fabric of
the Black family.
In Miami-Dade County
the unemployment rate for
Blacks, depending on who
you ask, stands between 16
and 18 percent in certain
Black enclaves it is noted to
be as high as 25 percent.
Moreover, one of the most-cit-


How should we tackle violence in our own community?


JERMAINE MOSES, 29
Entrepreneur, Hollywood


We need to
have more
community
gatherings, .
like the Tea
Party. We just
need to have a
lot more com- '
munity gath-
erings.

GOLLAR STEED, 53
Teacher, North Miami Beach

I think one
issue we need
to possibly ad-
dress is the f
education of
our people. We
need to have
more Black


leadership in our communities.
I know that we say that they
are here, but they are not vis-
ible in our community.

JERMONE ROBERTS, 60
Carpenter, Liberty City

The best
thing to do is
get them jobs
that is num-
ber one. If you
start working .
towards the
youngsters
quicker then
things will change. There are
the ones that need it, we all
need it really, but if we give
them something to do after-
school and not just wait until
summer I think violence will
kind of slow down.


EDWARD TYLER, 52
Electrician, Pembroke Pines

We need to
have more
communi- ..
ty7 projects
for the kids
and youth, it
would really
help them out.

VIOLA WILLIAMS, 82
Retired, Liberty City


We have
to go back
to where we
came from.
People use to
send there
children to
church and
taught them
about God


and reverence for life, you don't
hear things like that anymore.

CRYSTAL THOMAS, 54
Unemployed, Little Haiti

I feel the
community
needs come
together and
be more uni- ,
fied like how it
use to be back
in the day. '
Neighbors use
to help look out for all the kids.
That is the type of community
we need to be again.
"... I for one believe that if you give
people a thorough understanding of
what confronts them and the basic
causes that produce it, they'll create
their own program, and when the peo-
ple create a program, you get action ..."
Malcolm X


lower-than-average median
income and the dispropor-
tionate number of female-led
households, then we have
an all-out crisis in the Black
community.
What is the solution? We
need only look to the Tea
Party for a viable game plan.


First, organize a voting block
that consists of grassroots
community activists, labor
leaders and academics as well
as a cadre of entrepreneurs,
lawyers, 'builders, bank-
ers and executives. Second,
identify a viable candidate
that espouses our values.
Third, raise money for their
campaign. Fourth, register
our folks to vote. Fifth, vote!
Sixth, repeat the process for
every election at every level of
government. Finally, we must
demand sincere representa-
tion to fight fire with fire. We
need to elect candidates that
will join forces with others
for our interest and stay the
course.
The Tea Party is a constant
reminder that it only takes a
determined handful to influ-
ence the big picture.


Great review on "Baghdad" mo ie
Great review on "Baghdad" movie


Dear Editor,

I just had the pleasure of
reading your article about
this wonderful movie, entitled
Baghdad. I wanted to let you
know that I totally concur and
am delighted that you took the
time to write such a positive
comment and endorsement. I
was in attendance at the mov-
ie, seated next to Mr. Ballards'
mom, Carolyn, and nothing
could express the delight and
pride she felt knowing that her


son's hard work and diligence
is paying off. As a single moth-
er of two sons and grandmoth-
er of six, she has had to face
and overcome many obstacles
throughout her lifetime and
to see the result of her son's
dream come to pass should
encourage many others to fol-
low their dreams. So thank you
again for your article and con-
tinued support.

Sylvia McCain
Miami


Residents should be

involved with County budget


Dear Editor,


The Miami-Dade Board of
County Commissioners will
have to make some hard de-
cisions as to which programs
will be returned to the 2011-
2012 County budget, after,
they were eliminated in the
Mayor's proposed budget.
One of the criteria the Com-
missioners should use to eval-
uate which program to return
to the budget is whether a pro-
gram provides maximum ben-
efits for the dollars expended.
Many of the programs slat-
ed to be cut or eliminated are
"under the -radar" programs.
They don't have the marquee
profile of the police or fire de-
partments. They simply get the
job done, day in and day out.
The Consumer Services/
Miami-Dade Cooperative Ex-
tension Service offers an array
"under the radar" programs
that hundreds of Miami-Dade
residents partake of daily. The
program is a partnership be-
tween the University of Florida
and Miami-Dade County and
has been around for decades.


The University, along with the
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture and several grant sources
provide sixty percent of the
funding for the program. The
annual economic and social
benefit returns to Miami-Dade
County residents is approxi-
mately $47 million. The effec-
tive paid-in costs for Miami-
Dade residents is $0.29 per
resident/per year.
Some of the programs pro-
vided to the community are
nutrition education, financial
management, first-time home-
buyer education, youth devel-
opment (4-H) and agriculture
education and development.
To get a complete profile of the
programs and services offered,
go to miami-dade.ifas.ufl.edu.
Residents should write, fax,
or email (www.miamidade.
gov/commissioners), a mem-
ber of the County Commission
and request that these valu-
able programs be restored to
the 2011-2012 Miami-Dade
County budget.

Gloria Humes
Miami Gardens


CORNER


BY HENRY CRESPO SR., MIAMI TIMES COLUMNIST, hcresposr@gmail.com


Blacks should steal a page from Tea Party playbook


TO fff- iam [ "i .C









IT IM I IL M MITIMFS MAPfUSTIV 1-6 201 B K MS


VOLUNTEERING IN HAITI?


Good intentions not enough


By Christina Rexrode
Associated Press

MAPLAT, Haiti I went to Hai-
ti last year after the earthquake,
driven by an excited but vague no-
tion of doing some good in a hurt-
ing country.
I went again this year with my
eyes open a little wider, not jaded
exactly but aware of why some peo-
ple view these volunteer trips with
justified skepticism.
Haiti is the poorest country in
the Western Hemisphere, a place
where sewage runs down the
streets of the capital and children
die because they don't have clean
water. It is in desperate need of
helpers. Still, I sometimes roll my
eyes when Americans visit for a
week and come home declaring
that their lives have been changed,
as if they were not going to happily
resettle into their comfy routines.
My editor asked me if these trips
are just a way for rich people to
lessen their collective guilt, and I
think that sometimes they are.
But I was impressed by the group
that I traveled with, a small non-
profit called Farsight Christian
Mission. Levern Halstead, who
runs Farsight from his home out-
side Chattanooga, Tennessee, says
again and again that his trips must
have an objectively measurable re-
sult a new building, a new bridge,
a new well.

MUST HAVE A PLAN
He grows frustrated by volunteer
groups that come with good inten-
tions but no plan. It's a sentiment
echoed by others I talk to in Haiti,
both Haitian community leaders
and long-term aid workers from
the U.S.
They don't want to discourage
people from helping. But they're
dismayed by the aid groups that
bring what they think Haiti needs
instead of asking what's needed,
which is how bags of donated high
heels end up in villages where
people trek through forests. Or'the
groups that want to play games


Nepalese Peacekeepers prepared a hot meal and provided
medical care for Haitians affected by quake .


-Photo Marco Dormino
Daily workers employed by the Haitian Government remove rubble from the street in the area of
Delmas. UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti is working in cooperation'with international and national
agencies in order to clear roads that are been blocked by piles of rubble around Port au Prince.


with children but won't haul
around plywood, as if they could be
better teachers than someone who
actually speaks Creole. Or the vol-
unteers who won't bother to learn
and respect the local culture.
'Some groups, you can tell, they
just want to make their Facebook
page really nice," says Nego Pierre
Louis, a 24-yeai-old Haitian who
founded a community service
group called the Bezalel Move-
ment. He saw a flood of donated
medical supplies come to one aid
group in Jacmel, the coastal town
where he lives, after the January
2010 earthquake. And, he says,
he saw much of it get thrown away
because it expired while the group
hoarded it, not sharing with other
relief organizations.
Still, there are good things to be
done in Haiti. I was with Halstead
last fall when he spoke to villagers
from Seguin, in the mountains,


about an idea where he'd buy 30
sheep for 30 families. The program
would be self-sustaining, with fam-
ilies giving back every other lamb
until everyone had a few animals.


in computer programmr
My team spends the
same village, Maplat,
ally just a handful of 1
the side of a treacherol
We help the villagers bi


LISTEN TO THE PEOPLE of one-room wooden i
The villagers told him they'd pre- tin roofs nothing fanc
fer that 15 families get two sheep be useful for visiting
each, because sheep get mopey other aid workers.
when they're alone. Halstead I have no particul.
changed his plans immediately. construction or any v
After the earthquake, he raised would be especially us
money for Pierre Louis to buy veg- ti, like medicine or
etable seeds to take to another But I can hammer a
mountain village, Maplat, where around lumber, and
people were starving as food do- enough when you've g
nations got gridlocked in Port-au- who knows how to pl
Prince. The villagers in Maplat me into a machine.
doubled their food supply. Maplat's village pa
"And it's not rice and beans with saint Louime, is a s
an American flag on the side," adds with whitening hair. I
Halstead, 59. He's been coming to the men, he's up every
Haiti for more than 14 years, ever fore dawn waiting to he
since he walked away from a career houses. Like a lot of ru:
,-. , ..^ i. .i; n^.wt'- ; -, .(i^ ,ftp ""* cn ^irr* W ^ ^ WW W W*^^a( -v^ ^.


ling.
week in that
which is re-
buildings on
us dirt road.
build a couple
houses with
;y, but they'll
doctors and

ar skills in.
location that
useful to Hai-
agriculture.
nail and lug
that's good
got a leader
ug cogs like

stor, Louis-
miling man
Like most of
morning be-
elp build the
ral Haitians,


he isn't sure how old he is, but he
thinks he's 61.
Louime cares for a congrega-
tion that mostly lives in cornstalk
huts and rarely has enough to eat.
But he doesn't particularly want
a truck to speed by throwing out
food and clothing, as happened af-
ter Hurricane Noel in 2007. Then,
a few people will grab as much as
they can and sell it later, and ev-
eryone else will get nothing, Loui-
me and others said.
His wish, he says through a
translator, is for an agronomist to
help his village learn how to better
use the clay-ridden land, and may-
be someone who will start a micro-
finance program so that people can
start businesses.
In other words, people who will
take the time to teach skills, not
just make themselves feel better by
giving away stuff they didn't want
anyway.
"We'll go into a new community
and the kids, all the English they
know is, 'Give me a dollar, give
me a cookie,'" said Clayton Bell, a
28-year-old doctor from El Paso,
Arkansas, who works at the Cloud
Forest Medical Clinic in Seguin.
"It's not their fault. But we have
to retrain them, 'Okay, if you want
that, you can help me work, you
can help me clean the clinic."'

TEACHERS PAY IN JEOPARDY
Next door, Chrisnet Excellus
walks through the school where
he is principal and worries that he
won't be able to pay his teachers.
He has more than 400 students at


Ecole Chretienne Emmanuel, who
sit five to a bench in a concrete
building without running water.
Tuition is about $15 a year, but a
third of the families can't afford
it. Excellus lets the children come
anyway.
Excellus, 40, is married and the
father of four girls. He has kind
eyes. On a chilly day, he wears a
Winn-Dixie windbreaker.
I ask him what he needs for his
school, and he needs everything,
even pens and paper. I ask him
what he wants for Haiti and he
says, "Complete change."
I am not naive. I know that a
couple of buildings in Maplat will
not fix Haiti's problems. I know
that radical changes are needed,
'like good roads, clean government,
renewed industry, replenished
topsoil, and I cannot bring them
about.
But that doesn't mean that we
can't work for small victories.
At the end of the week I come
home to New York, a city I love. I
walk my favorite streets, hug my
friends, enjoy hot showers.
But all I can think about are
the dusty, barefoot children who
grabbed my hands and grinned at
me. And Jocelin, a Seguin teenag-
er who wants to be a doctor "be-
cause that's what Haiti needs."
Tony, a student who dearly wishes
to buy some books for the children
in Maplat. Benitho, a debonair
20-year-old who gets serious when
I ask him what he wants for his
country: "If I can go anywhere to
find help," he says, "I will."


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


i''









D


I


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A 4 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGUST10-16 2011


ii-eT\ ~ icai. col-rl









I 5A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\N DESTINY


Gates explores Black culture in Latin America


By Jennifer Kay
Associated Press

"Black in Latin America"
(NYU Press), by Henry Louis
Gates, Jr.: This spring, Hen-
ry Louis Gates, Jr. produced
a four-episode series for PBS
tracing the legacy of the slave


trade in six Caribbean and
Latin Ame.ican countries.
"Black in Latin America" is
the book companion to the
television 'series of the same
title.
The reason for Gates' jour-
ney is a startling fact: Of the
roughly 11 million Africans
who survived the trans-Atlan-


tic slave trade, just 450,000
made it to the United States.
The rest were dispersed
throughout the region and
Gates, renowned for his Afri-
can-American studies, want-
ed to know how their descen-
dants live now.
More than an outline of the
research featured in the se-


ries, Gates' book is a thought-
ful travelogue through Mexico,
Peru, Cuba, Haiti, the Domin-
ican Republic and Brazil.
It explores Black history in
these six countries, which
Gates visited in 2010, but
it doesn't linger in the past.
Through music, cuisine, art,
dance, politics, religion and


language, Gates finds living
links to Africa. He also finds
the other legacy of the slave
trade, a sometimes subtle
but persistent racism despite
pledges of multiculturalism.
Gates' academic questions
about race stem from conver-
sations in cafes, hotels, mu-
seums, street parties, night-


clubs, taxi cabs the casual
places where anyone goes on
vacation. "Black in Latin
America" would be an in-
teresting companion to any
guidebook for the Caribbean
and Latin America, as it re-
veals not just a hidden history
but also an evolving sense of
identity.


-AP Photo/NYU Press
In this book cover image re-
leased by NYU Press, "Black
in Latin America," by Henry
Louis Gates, Jr., is shown.



Reinventing

swimwear

for women
(NewsUSA) Sunglasses:
Check.
Sunblock: Check.
Swimsuit: Uh-oh!
The sun is out, and the surf
is up, but women everywhere
can be found in front of full-
length mirrors facing an age-
old dilemma, thinking: "What
swimsuit can I possibly pull
off with my body type?"
The bathing suit hunt is
nothing less than discour-
aging. When met with most
store's racks crammed with
handkerchief-size designs
with bottoms that slip down
and tops that ride up, women
truly get the short end of the
stick when it comes to summer
swimwear.
That is, until now. Launched
in 2009, Ohio-based designer
Debbie Kuhn is bursting onto
the market with a new concept
that is a twist and a blend of
the tried and true: Girltrunks.
Kuhn designed the two-piece
suits because the traditional
swimsuit market offered noth-
ing that covered the legs.
After accepting an invita-
tion for a summer holiday in
Montana that was to include
tubing down the Madison,
Kuhn found herself in a fu-
tile search in many a store for
an appropriate outfit for the
river excursion when she was
struck with the perfect solu-
tion: "Why don't I pair a tan-
kini top with swim trunks?"
She did just that. "It was a day
in time I remember vividly. I
felt so liberated, in swimwear
of all things, and I wanted to
share that feeling with other
women."
The trunks fit like finely tai-
lored Bermuda shorts and are
available in two leg-covering
lengths. They are made of a
quick-drying polyamide fab-
ric with mesh lining that dries
almost instantly, unlike many
traditional women's bathing
suits. To complete the look,
two top styles are offered in
chic prints. All are available in
sizes four-24.
Like the slogan "Reinvent-
ing swimwear for women,"
Gilrtrunks delivers a sense of
confidence women so desper-
ately lack during bathing suit
season. But the suits don't
just flatter they're versatile,
too. Swimming, visiting water
parks, biking, hiking, jogging
or just simply strolling the
beach, Girltrunks lend them-
selves perfectly to any activity.
Short to tall, skinny to plus-
sized, apple to pear, teen-
ager to grandmother; women
no longer are forced to be
swathed in the excess of a
cover up. Comfortable, stylish
and taking in the joys of sum-
mer that's you, girlfriend, in
Girltrunks.


k tr, Ilhr 'lii4J r '.t ,rch a : a M .(.COM to urcr. FIND MACY'S EVI RYWHERE! '%n.- SIap, harry, and [IE(nnacl an ytTme.
S ,, OPEN A MACY" S ACCOUNT COR, JXTRA 15 SAVINGS HE FIRST iDAYS, UPp TO $100 WITH MORE REWARDS TO COME. M;.,:'< ci 1i,d i; ii i aviLUc4 :,'i: hc .'i^l:r,, f, AW, rwtllof iingt, ,il-. th, rly yO l ix,,un:
** wf"-^* 1l;lil1 (*:lm fi,'fl,^l.:ille









UA I-IFM 1IAMIV TIMII IVILJIA11VVB CSM IV- I 1i IT RRI


PRISON


RAP


Applying plenty of resilience to your life
By Arthur Lee Hall, Jr. with his bare hands over my days spent here on sheer dete
gambling money. Like Earth. happiness
Resilience. What does that Malcolm, King did some- Paying close atten- that I rega:
word mean to you? And how thing constructive with tion to other people who tion and re
could you apply it to your per- his time, honing his have gone through the see me be
sonal life? skills as a boxing pro- fire and have managed catch me (
When Malcolm Little was sent mother by arranging or- I to emerge victoriously next time I
to prison for white slavery, he ganized boxing matches in the end is a perfect her telling
sent the seven years of his while in prison. When he HALL source of inspiration to engaging


incarceration reading books
and educating himself. After
embracing the teachings of
the Nation of Islam during his
time of reformity, Malcolm Little
changed his name to Malcolm
X and upon his release from
prison, he later became one of
the greatest civil rights activ-
ist of his era. Today, schools,
streets and recreational parks
are named after him and icon-
ic images of the Black Muslim
leader can be found almost ev-
erywhere, from a t-shirt wear-
ing young person to a mural on
the wall of an inner city build-
ing.
Don King also spent time in
the joint -- but for killing a man


was finally set free, he went on
to become the greatest boxing
promoter in the history of box-
ing and the first to ever promote
a fight that allowed both fight-
ers to earn one million dollars.
Successfully bouncing back
from a troubled past is some-
thing that I too certainly in-
tend on doing. After spending
a considerable amount of years
in prison, the story of my life
beyond criminal records must
somehow be written in a to-
tally different light. I do realize
that now is the time for me to
start setting into motion a rea-
son for a positive account of my
life story to be added, yet divide
from other gloomy chapters of


draw from.
Strength can certainly be
drawn from the most adverse;
sometimes tragic circumstanc-
es of those who were able to
move forward and even achieve
greatness in spite of having
been faced with the adversi-
ties of life. Undoubtedly, there
is hope in knowing that if oth-
ers can find the drive to recover
from a set back -- so can you.
My dear mother, in my opin-
ion, is the epitome of what mak-
ing a comeback means with just
the simple smile she is able to
put on her face after being a
victim of domestic violence for
14 years. Her burning desire
to become a school teacher and


;rmination to attain
are things about her
rd with high admira-
aspect. If you want to
-am with pride, just
on the telephone the
I call home and hear
me about how she is
in church activities


and continuing to attend exer-
cise class. But what I really re-
spect the most about my mother
is the fact that she has not al-
lowed herself to be defined by a
bleak period in time. Instead,
she has chosen to use that ex-
perience as a way to build char-
acter, ultimately becoming a
much stronger person.
And that's what reaching
comeback kid status is all
about. Not so much in achieving
something enormously remark-
able subsequent to a tragedy,
setback or downfall -- but in
simply being able to find peace
and tranquility within your-
self and having the audacity to
move on gracefully.


New Orleans officers convicted in killings

Four could face life sentences in

deaths of two after Katrina


(Reuters) A federal jury
found four New Orleans police
officers guilty fast Friday of
civil rights violations over the
shooting deaths of civilians in
the chaotic aftermath of Hurri-
cane Katrina and a subsequent
cover-up.
But the jury stopped short of
calling the shootings murder,
declining to classify them as
intentional. A fifth officer was
also convicted of helping the
others cover up the incident.
The charges were linked to
the New Orleans police shoot-
ings on the Danziger Bridge in
2005 that killed two civilians,
17-year-old James Brissette
and 40-year-old Ronald Madi-
S fft"d'u serit y"Jwdtt'ided
four others.
"Today's verdict sends a pow-
erful, unmistakable message,"
U.S. Attorney Jim Letten told
reporters outside the court-
house.
"The citizens of this country
will not, should not, and we in-
tend that they will never have


to fear the individuals who are
called upon to protect them."
The officers had faced up to
25 counts each for their role in
the September 4, 2005, shoot-
ings that happened when much
of New Orleans was still under-
water following the hurricane.
The decision means the jury
saw the deaths of Madison and
Brissette as resulting from po-
lice willfully violating their civil
rights, but that police did not
arrive at the scene with mur-
derous intent.
Officers Robert Faulcon, Ken-
neth Bowen, Robert Gisevius
and Anthony Villavaso were
found guilty of depriving citi-
zens of their rights in relation
ttPrlt"de'sgat Brissette-.and
the shooting of four others, as
well as using firearms in the
deprivation of those rights.
Faulcon was also found guilty
of violating civil rights and use
of a firearm in the killing of
Madison.
The men were also convicted
of various charges connected to


-AP photo/Alex Brandon
Sgt. Robert Gisevius Jr., second from left, hugs a fellow officer
.,.-.he and seven other.Ne.aw.-Oreanscops turo4k4hemselves in.
Jan. 2, 2007 in connection with deadly shootings post-Katrina.


a subsequent cover-up, includ-
ing conspiracy to obstruct jus-
tice and violate civil rights, and
false prosecution.
The fifth officer, retired ho-
micide detective Arthur "Ar-
chie" Kaufman, was convicted


on 10 counts related to the
cover-up, including conspiracy,
obstruction of justice, fabricat-
ing witnesses, falsifying victim
statements, misleading federal
investigators and falsifying evi-
dence.


M-DCPS finds alternative measures of


punishment through restorative justice


By Jimmie Davis, Jr.
Miami Times writer

It may be simple for adminis-
trators at Miami-Dade County
Public Schools (M-DCPS) to
suspend and expel students for
misconduct, but the underlying
issue of why pupils misbehave is
often more complex and not eas-
ily resolved.
Now instead of rushing to
ruin a child's academic career,
the Educational Transformation
Office (ETO) has embraced re-
storative justice at some of the
"Rising 19" schools to address
the root problems as to why stu-
dents misbehave.
[Rising 19 schools, totaling
six elementary, three middle
and 10 senior high schools, are
supported by the ETO and are
identified as persistently lowest-


achieving by the Florida Depart-
ment of Education. Students
and educators are assisted with
specialized forms of intervention
and programs that promote aca-,
demic enrichment].
In particular, Black and La-
tino students are being expelled
at a higher rate than whites,
leaving them more vulnerable to
getting into trouble while on the
streets and away from the order
of the classroom.
Restorative justice is the al-
ternative to zero-tolerance poli-
cies that constitute suspension
or expulsion and gives students
the opportunity to bring their is-
sues to the table for mediation.
"Restorative justice allows
students to take ownership of
positive behavior by shifting the
responsibility of creating a dif-
ferent culture in schools away


from just adults to incorporat-
ing students as well," said Niko-
lai P. Vitti, M-DCPS assistant
superintendent. "It will change
the culture of how we think
through student behavior and
discipline."
"Restorative justice is impor-
tant because through the pro-
cess youth develop the skills
they need to resolve their con-
flicts and look at the root causes
of issues they are facing." said
Julia Daniel, Power U youth co-
ordinator.
Annie Thomas, 16, a student at
North Miami Senior High, says
some of her friends have been
suspended for being late, not
wearing the proper uniform and
talking back in class. She be-
lieves that restorative justice will
assist her peers when an incident
occurs so instead of them getting


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Teen charged in connection with deadly shooting
Miami Gardens Police have identified the teen taken into custody in connection,.
with the shooting deaths of a young couple in a gas station robbery in Miami
Gardens.
Eric Ellington, 16, was arrested last Tuesday at his aunt's house in Hollywood.
Ellington faces two counts of second degree murder in the deaths of Julian Soler,
23, and Kennia Duran, 24.
"We know he was one of the shooters," said Miami Gardens Police Sgt. Bill
Bamford.
On Monday, July 25th, Soler and Duran were both shot to death while gassing
up Soler's 1997 Ford Mustang Cobra at 16691 NW 57th Ave. It was around 12:38
a.m. when they were ambushed, forced out of the car ard shot. The shooting was
captured on surveillance video from the gas station.
Police said they are searching for three, possibly four, subjects.
Anyone with information on this crime is asked to contact Crime Stoppers at
305-471-TIPS.

Miami Edison treasurer fraudulently wrote herself, police say
A treasurer at Miami Edison Senior High is behind bars after police say that for
the past five months, she fraudulently wrote herself checks and then tampered
those checks to make it seem as though the payments were made to legitimate
school vendors.
Police say Lisa Bradley, 41, wrote herself 14 checks each one more than $500
a piece totaling $14,332.44 from August 2010 to January 2011.
She would then take the checks to her own personal bank account and deposit
them there, police said.
Once the checks were returned to the school at 2521 NW 87th St. as part of the
bank's monthly statement, Bradley would allegedly use white-out to remove her
name from the check and replace it with a legitimate school vendor.
Police say she confessed to the crime saying she had financial hardship.
Last Wednesday, she appeared before a bond court judge and was ordered held
on $15,000 bond.

Bond set for accused FIU student stabber
The man accused of stabbing Florida International University football player
Kendall Berry to death will be released on bond and remain on house arrest while
he awaits trial, a Miami-Dade judge ruled recently.
Quentin Wyche, 22, allegedly stabbed Berry to death on FIU'S main campus in
March 2010 with a pair of scissors.
Judge Milton Hirsch warned Wyche that he had to follow all the conditions and,
once he posts bond, will only be allowed to go to the doctor or church on Sunday. He
also warned him against contacting anyone on the witness list.
"Otherwise I will put you under the jail," Hirsch told Wyche.
Defense attorney David Peckins said Wyche will live with his mother and father
in Fort Lauderdale.

North Miami shooting turns into murder investigation
Police are investigating the death of a South Florida man who climbed onto the
roof of a North Miami home after he was shot.
According to North Miami police, the unidentified man in his 30s came was
visiting a home at 1210 Northwest 121st Street when he was chased by two men
and shot in the stomach. The man climbed onto the roof of the home to escape the
gunman. When Miami-Dade Fire Rescue arrived they rushed him to an air rescue
helicopter which took him to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center.
North Miami police spokesman Neal Cuevas said police don't have much
information at this time.
"At this point, we don't know what led to the shooting. We do know that the two
individuals that are alleged to have shot the victim fled from this location in a grey
Ford Taurus," said Cuevas.
Neighbors are stunned about the shooting.
"I have no idea," said Willie Knight. "I was in my house but I've been around
.Mtl t2r a r e s'ntwe ~tfn'tmwermnany problems aronatl1re1.r' 1' I [II
If you knbW Ahything about this shooting, the victim or suspects, please call.
Miami- iade Crime Stoppers atf309-471-TIPS.


Board helps troubled schools succeed


MONITORING
continued from 1A
staff and community members
joined together in solidarity to
show their support of keeping
the schools open.
"Our schools belong to our
community," Bendross-Mind-
ingall said. "The school board
and district staff have used
our diverse experiences and
talents to improve community
participation in our schools."
The measure that was. ap-


proved is intended to create a
wider space of reviewing, mon-
itoring and regular reporting
of school progress. Specifical-
ly, the measure ensures that
school improvement grant
plans for intervene schools are
user-friendly, expands parent
and community awareness
of task force meetings and
provides for monthly report-
ing to the school board on
the progress of improvement
plans for intervene schools.
-Compiled by Randy Grice.


CLYNE
CLYN^-i


BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 6 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGUST 10-16 2 1














Best time for Blacks and Miami's "movers"


By Gregory Wright
Miami Times writer
g.w.wright@hotmail.com

If you have ever wondered
where Blacks can go to rub
shoulders with Miami's most
influential powerbrokers and
enjoy good food, the answer
is simple: Jackson's Restau-
rant in Overtown, every third
Wednesday from 8:30-10 a.m.
Miami's power elite come
from all across Miami-Dade
County hoping to speak di-
rectly to the County's Black
citizens on important issues
that will affect their commu-
nities.
The influential come as
guests of The Breakfast
Roundtable, an informal group
of Black Miamians whose goal
is to provide a venue for infor-
mation exchange that is vital
for our community to grow.
"That is the only agenda,"
said Christopher Norwood,
a consultant with the Nor-
wood Consulting Group and


IN THE MIX: Henry Crespo (I-r), Christopher Norwood, Bill Johnson (Director of the Port
of Miami), Debra Owens (Port of Miami) and Gary Johnson say The Breakfast Roundtable is a
great networking opportunity for Blacks.


lead organizer of the monthly
roundtable.
Norwood along with co-or-
ganizers Minister Gary John-


son, Henry Crespo, Karen An-
dre, Esq. and the late Haneef
Hamudullah are responsible
for the coordination and se-


curing of guests and inform-
ing the community to par-
ticipate. However, the group
still maintains an informal


structure. For example, there
is no official leader and every
attendee gets equal access to
the guest speakers.
Since its inception in No-
vember 2010, the Roundtable
has hosted a who's who of
the influential people whose
hands are either on the but-
ton for hiring in the county, or
who are in-the-know on what
upcoming federal, state or lo-
cal projects will affect entire
cities and neighborhoods in
the near future.
Past speakers have includ-
ed: Bill Talbert, C.E.O. of the
Greater Miami Convention
and Visitors Bureau; Modesto
Abety, C.E.O. of the Children's
Trust; Bill Johnson, executive
director of the Port of Miami;
and Jose Abreu, executive di-
rector of Miami International
Airport.
While individual partici-
pants in the Roundtable may
be involved in political and
community affairs, Norwood
stresses the group as a whole


is nonpartisan.
"The goal is to have infor-
mal, nonpartisan discussions
on business and public policy
issues affecting the Greater
Miami and the Black commu-
nity in particular."
Johnson says he hopes the
gatherings will help the Black
community get a better under-
standing on how local govern-
ment departments function
and the jobs they can create.
To attend the breakfast,
Norwood said, "The Round-
tables are open to anyone who
is concerned about the future
of our community." The con-
versation and coffee are free.
But you do pay for your own
breakfast.
Future speakers include:
Jacqui Colyer, southern re-
gional director of the Depart-
ment of Children and Families
(DCF) on Wednesday, August
17 and Carlos Migoya, chief
executive officer of Jackson
Health System on Wednesday,
September 21st.


New HI

Critics fault policies
By Donald G. Mcneil Jr.


Despite years of great progress
in treating AIDS, the number
of new infections with the virus
that causes it has remained stub-
bornly around 50,000 a year in
the United States for a decade, ac-
cording to new figures released on
Wednesday by federal officials.
The American epidemic is still
concentrated primarily in gay
men, and is growing rapidly worse
among young Black gay men.
That realization is causing a rift
in the AIDS community. Activists
say the persistent H.I.V. infection
rate proves that the government
prevention policy is a flop. Federal
officials are on the defensive even
as they concede that the epidemic
will grow if prevention does not
get better, which they know is un-
likely while their budgets are be-
ing cut.
And some researchers believe it
is impossible to wipe out a fatal,
incurable disease when it is trans-
mitted through sex and carries
so much stigma that people deny
having it and avoid being tested
for it.

NO POLICY SEEN
Looking back, epidemiologists
at the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention believe that new
cases peaked at 130,000 a year
in the 1980s, sank slowly during
the '90s and reached a plateau at
50,000 around the year 2000.
Larry Kramer, a longtime AIDS
activist and the author of "The
Normal Heart," a play about the
epidemic's early days, said: "It
means I don't see an AIDS policy,
and I don't see anyone in charge.
It's so dispiriting that it's hard
to find something to say about
it. How many times can you yell
'Helpl' without ever getting any-
where?"
Both Dr. Kevin Fenton, chief of
AIDS prevention for the C.D.C.,
and Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, chief of
AIDS research at the National In-
stitutes of Health, took issue with
Kramer's interpretation. While
both agreed that 50,000 new an-
nual infections was, in Dr. Fauci's
words, "a great concern," both
pointed to some areas where sub-
stantial progress had been made.
They said that new studies were
seeking ways to get more people
tested and treated early in the
course of the illness, which would
make them less infectious and
drive transmission rates down.
"The C.D.C. is absolutely not
resting," Dr. Fenton said. "It was a
major accomplishment to drop in-
fections from 130,000 to 50,000,
and we're dealing with an epidem-
ic that is dynamic."
But, he conceded, 50,000 is an
"unacceptably high level," and
without better prevention efforts
"we're likely to face an era of rising
infection rates."
Philip Alcabes, a public health
epidemiologist at Hunter College in
Manhattan, noted that 50,000 is
close to the number of Americans
who die in road accidents each
year almost 40,000 "and in
some ways, we consider dying on
the road an ordinary thing."

MORE DIE OF HEART
DISEASE AND STROKE
By contrast, he said, nearly one
million Americans a year die of
heart disease and strokes.


IV cases stay steady in U.S. over decade
S"' "test and treat" shorthand for
aimed at prevention actively seeking out gay men and
"So it's not clear that prevention those injecting drugs and asking
is a failure," he said. "The average them to get tested, and then help-
is a failure, he said. "he aeraing :' e ing them find medical care if they
adult's chances of encountering have the disease.
H.I.V. infection 0.02 percent a , have the disease.
"I.mco -00pre aDr. Fauci and Dr. Fenton said
year are rather low. It's not rea- Dr. Fauci and Dr. Fenton said
sonable to expect that a sexually there was no discussion now of
Idnch i ...; ii wil li urnaPq? making such tests mandatory


rUansmlttLLe VLrus Will UCisappear
in America, or anywhere else. But
I agree with Larry Kramer that
there has been a dearth of new
policy ideas."
For most risk groups, infection
rates are stable, with 61 percent
of cases contracted through gay or
bisexual sex, 27 percent through
heterosexual sex and nine percent
through drug injections.
But they are increasing rapidly

ESTIMATED NEW H.I.V. INFECTIONS
In thousands, by behavior and race
2009 0 2 4 6 8


Men age 30 or
over who have
sex with men
Men under 30
who have sex
with men

Homosexual
men

Heterosexual
men

Men
injecting
drugs
Woman
injecting
drugs


- Black
Hispanic

H 4


I









I White
SBlack
Hispanic


SSource Center lor Disease and PreBenlion


in one subgroup: young gay Black
men. Black teenage boys who re-
alize they are attracted to men
are often too poor to move to gay-
friendly cities like San Francisco
or New York, researchers said, and
often must keep their homosexu-
ality hidden from relatives and
friends, making it more likely they
will have furtive, risky sex.
They often lack health insur-
ance, meaning they do not get
checkups' where a doctor might
suggest testing. And while new
surveys find that they use con-
doms at about the same rates as
young gay white and Hispanic
men, sex tends to stay within ra-
cial groups and more older Black
gay and bisexual men are in-
fected. Also, untreated syphilis,
whose sores open a path for H.I.V.,
is more common among Blacks.
The National Institutes of
Health is supporting studies in
the Bronx, Washington and other
heavily Black urban areas seeking
new ways to reach these men, Dr.
Fauci said. Results will be ready
in two or three years.
Prevention has worked for two
groups, Dr. Fenton said. The num-
ber of women infecting their chil-
dren at birth or through breast-
feeding has dropped to only 100
a year from about 1,300 two de-
cades ago. In that respect, the
United States is like Africa: scarce
public clinics focus on women and
children, and many poor women
see a doctor only when pregnant.

TARGET PREVENTION
Also, the number of infections
through drug use has dropped 80
percent, although that may be a
result of changing fashions among


-Mary Altaffer/Associated Press
Activists urged full financing for AIDS treatment during a demonstration in New York in June.


addicts: Fewer inject heroin and
more smoke or inhale heroin,
crack, crystal meth and cocaine or
swallow prescription opiates like
OxyContin. Only needle-sharing
passes virus-tainted blood.
Chris Collins, director of pub-


lic policy for amfAR, the Founda-
tion for AIDS Research, said the
decade-long persistence of 50,000
infections "shows that we've failed
to target prevention services ad-
equately and have not gotten
treatment coverage in many com-


munities that would bring down
community viral loads."
A recent study has shown that
getting people on antiretroviral
drugs early makes them 96 per-
cent less likely to infect others,
so there is a growing outcry for


- as, for example, syphilis tests
once were for marriage licenses.

C.D.C. TESTS ACCURATE
San Francisco and Vancouver,
British Columbia, have lowered
new infection rates, Collins noted.
But how applicable those lessons
are to the United States as a whole
is debatable; both cities have very
small Black populations, and
Vancouver's success relies partly
on a government-approved cen-
ter where drug addicts can shoot
up under the eyes of a nurse and
without fear of arrest an ex-
periment.unlikely-.to be. repeated
in the United States.
.The new C.D.C. figures are
based partly on a new blood test
that can tell recent infections from
old ones, said Joseph Prejean,
who led the team that made the
new estimates. The test, invented
in 2005 and nicknamed the "BED
test," for the B, D and E viral sub-
types it uses, measures H.I.V. an-
tibodies in the blood relative to
total antibodies. That ratio rises
rapidly from infection to about six
months, then levels off, he said.


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NorthDade <
HEALTH CENTER
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The North Dade Health Center, Inc., seeks volunteers from the residents of Miami-Dade County to serve on its
board of directors. The criteria for selection are professionals and patients who have an interest in serving
an ethnically diverse community.


For an application, a list of responsibilities and information about the process, connect with the
North Dade Health Center website at http://www.jhsmiami.org/body.cfm?id=100 to download an application.
Applicants may also visit North Dade Health Center to request an application for the board of directors.
It is an opportunity for qualified individuals to serve and voice their opinions about the provision of
health care to their community.


Please return completed applications to the North Dade Health Center, 16555 N.W. 25th Avenue, Miami Gardens,
Florida 33054. Deadline for submissions is September 16, 2011, at 4:30 p. m. For more information, please
contact Kermit T. Wyche, executive director, or Annette Lopez, administrative secretary, NDHC, at 786-466-1710.


I


BLACKS MUST CONTROL TIN1


ci r
pu hs


I 7A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011









OR I M MIATMIVI IITIL,10 91B C IK Musi, CHN


Matthew J


Perry, Jr. was the


first Black federal judge in South


NAACP


LAWYER


DESEGREGATED


SCHOOLS,


COLLEGES,


HOSPITALS, RESTAURANTS,


GOLF


COURSES


AND BEACHES


By Douglas Martin

Matthew J. Perry, Jr., who
as a young lawyer had to wait
in the balcony of his segre-
gated local courthouse before
a judge would hear his case,
then went on to win hundreds
of civil rights legal battles
and to become the first Black
federal judge from the Deep
South, died on July 29 at his
home in Columbia, S.C. He
was 89.
His family confirmed the
death.
In the 1950s and '60s, Judge
Perry handled cases for the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored Peo-
ple that resulted in the deseg-
regation of schools, colleges,
hospitals, parks, golf courses,
restaurants and beaches. He
won rulings by the United
States Supreme Court that
overturned the convictions of
more than 7,000 people in-
volved in sit-ins.
The Harvard Law School
profeso'r'alnil"Tl'",e e' edy
said Judge Perry "helped cre-
ate federal law that enlarged
our liberty." The judge's cases,
he said, are taught "in every
law school across the United
States."


Judge Matthew J. Perry, Jr. at a dedication held in his honor.


ten in collaboration with oth- In the early 1960s, a judge
er N.A.A.C.P. lawyers, includ- cited Perry for contempt be-


ed desegregating. Clemson
University and the University
of South Carolina; forcing
*"S-IOtITn fira'i'OTegppor- -
tion its legislative districts to
end discrimination against
Blacks; and winning the re-
lease of more than a dozen
men from death row.


"Judge Perry's cases taught in every law school
across the United States."
-Randall L. Kennedy
Harvard Law Professor


FIRST BLACK FEDERAL
JUDGE IN SOUTH
Morris Rosen, who years
earlier unsuccessfully de-
fended the city of Charleston,
S.C., in a lawsuit brought by
Perry, put it more simply: "He
beat the hell out of me."
In 1976, Perry became the
second Black and the first
from the Deep South to be ap-
pointed to the United States
Military Court of Appeals, a
three-member civilian body
that hears appeals of courts-
martial. He was appointed by
President Gerald R. Ford.
In 1979, President Jimmy
Carter named him to a new
seat on the Federal District
Court in South Carolina,
making him that state's first
Black federal judge.
The victories Perry won, of-


USED ROSA PERRY CASE
In 1955, Perry represented
a woman who had been el-
bowed by a bus driver for try-
ing to exit through the whites-
only front door. She lost her
suit against the bus company,
but Perry won an appeal in
a case that had echoes later
that year when Rosa Parks re-
fused to give up her bus seat
in Montgomery, Ala.
Perry's success as a civil
rights lawyer was owed in
part to his conscious effort,
to avoid provoking confronta-
tions. When shepherding the
admission of Harvey Gantt
to Clemson, he "carefully
scripted" every step of the
admission process with law
enforcement officials, he said
in an interview in January in
The South Carolina Lawyers
Weekly.


I HI WE I BAC ISORm


. August 10, 1981:
Coca-Cola agreed to sup-
ply some $34 million to as-
sist both Black businesses
and the Black community at
large. This prompted the end
of a fatlonwid bodycott led by
PUSH ': ".
Augusti-O, 1989: Army
General Colin L. Powell was
named Chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, the highest
position In the country.
M August 11,.1965: The
Senate confirmed the nomi-
nation of Thurgood Marshall


as U.S. Solicitor General.
August 11, 1965: The
Watts Rebellion, a six-day up-
rising that led to 34 deaths,
over 1,000 injuries, nearly
4,000 arrests, and over $35
million in property damage,
began on this date.
August 12, 1890: The
Mississippi Constitutional
Convention started the trend
to systematically exclude
Black political participation
in the South. Literacy tests
were among the devices
states used to accomplish


cause of his aggressive de-
fense of a Black teacher who
had been charged with tres-
--passing after sitting in a hos-
pital waiting room designated
for whites.. He was permitted
to return to the courtroom
after assuring the judge he
meant no disrespect.

BORN IN COLUMBIA, S.C.
"The judge did a remark-
able thing," Judge Perry told
The New York Times in 1976.
"He apologized to me. He
said he had observed that if
he were of my race, he would
represent the causes I did
with even more vigor than
I did, and that he hoped I
would accept his apology."
In the book "Matthew J. Per-
ry: The Man, His Times, and
His Legacy," edited by William
Lewis Burke and Belinda
Gergel, Robert Carter, himself
an important civil rights law-
yer and later a federal judge,
wrote of Judge Perry in an es-
say, "He is the only militant
civil rights figure I know who
seems to be loved by both ra-
cial groups while still engaged
in the struggle."
Matthew James Perry, Jr.
was born Aug. 3, 1921, in Co-
lumbia, where he grew up.
His father, a tailor, died when
he was 12, and his mother
went to work in New York City
as a seamstress. Matthew
lived with a grandfather and
helped support the family by
digging ditches and doing odd


this plan.
August 12, 1891: Ma-
dame Lillian Evanti, interna-
tionally famed opera singer,
was born in Washington, D.C.
Evanti founded the National
Negro Opera Company in
1941.
August 1892: The Balti-
more Afro-American newspa-
per was founded.
August 13, 1906: Black
soldiers raided Brownsville,
TX, in retaliation for racial
insults-killing one white man
and wounding two.
August 14, 1883: Er-
nest E. Just, internationally


From segregation

in the Army to

courtroom victories

for integration.


jobs. He was drafted into the
Army and served in an all-
Black unit during World War
II.

JUDGE APOLOGIZES
"I accepted our plight as
a fact of life," he said of the
segregation in an interview
with The Spartanburg Her-
ald-Journal in July, "and yet
I knew it wasn't right."
A pivotal moment in his ra-
cial thinking occurred when
he was home on furlough from
the Army. He was forced to or-
der his lunch from a restau-
rant window. Inside he could
see Italian prisoners of war
being served by waitresses.
He studied business admin-
istration at what is now South
Carolina State University, a
historically Black institution.
He then enrolled in its law
school, which had been cre-
ated after the University of
South Carolina's law school
resisted pressure to admit
Blacks.
One of five members of his
law school's second graduat-
ing class, Mr. Perry went on to
practice law in Spartanburg,
S.C., where he was the only
Black lawyer. If he believed in
a case, he might charge noth-
ing, or accept fresh vegetables


renowned biologist and pio-
neer of cell division, was born
in Charleston, S.C.
August 14, 1942: Molefi
Kete Asante, afrocentrist and
professor of African Stud-
ies at Temple University, was
born in Valdosta, G.A.
August 15, 1843: Henry
Highland Garnet, a 27-year-
old Presbyterian pastor,
called for a slave revolt and
general slave strike at the
National Black Convention in
Buffalo, NY.
August 15, 1957: Cora
M. Brown, the first Black
woman elected to a state


and home-baked pies as pay-
ment. In the mid-1950s, he
became chief counsel of the
South Carolina Conference of
Branches of the N.A.A.C.P.

SWORN IN BY THURGOOD
MARSHALL
Perry was sworn in as a fed-
eral judge by Justice Thur-
good Marshall of the Supreme
Court. Three decades earlier,
Mr. Perry had been inspired
to pursue a legal career after
watching Mr. Marshall argue
two civil rights cases in Co-
lumbia.
Perry's nomination to the
military appeals court was
pushed by Senator Strom
Thurmond, a South Caroli-
na Republican, even though
Perry was a member of the
Democratic National Com-
mittee. Political analysts at
the time suggested that Thur-
mond, a staunch segregation-
ist, backed Perry to win votes
from a growing Black elector-
ate.
On the military "ap~jFiafs
court, Judge Perry gained a
reputation as thoughtful and
"unflappable," said Eugene R.
Fidell, a lawyer who argued
before Judge Perry and now
teaches at Yale.

FEDERAL COURTHOUSE
NAMED
In 1974, Perry was defeated
as the Democratic candidate
for a seat in the United States
House of Representatives;
Jimmy Carter, then governor
of Georgia, visited South Car-
olina to campaign for him.
When Carter became presi-
dent, he appointed him to the
lower federal district court.
Judge Perry never retired.
He continued as a senior
judge and was working on the
day he died. He is survived by
his wife, the former Hallie Ba-
cote; and their son, Michael.
In his hardscrabble years
as a young lawyer, Judge
Perry was rejected by poten-
tial Black clients because
they feared he might irritate
a white judge. On out-of-town
cases, he was barred from mo-
tels and had to drive home to
sleep, no matter the distance.
And while awaiting his turn
to appear before a judge in
his hometown courthouse in
Spartanburg, he, along with
other Blacks, was restricted
to the balcony.


Senate, was appointed Spe-
cial General Counsel of the
U.S. Post Office Department,
the first Black female mem-
ber of their legal staff,
August 16, 1963: Georg
Olden's Emancipation stamp
went on sale on this date.
Olden, an Internationally re-
nowned graphic artist, be-
came the first Black to design
a U.S. postage stamp.
* August 16, 1972: The
Rev. Phillip A. Potter, a Meth-
odist minister from Dominica,
was named General Secre-
tary of the World Council of
Churches.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 8 THE MIAMI TIMES AU 1











S9A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


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10A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Overtown community waiting for economic


POINCIANA
continued from 1A

County and the City (and its
CRA)? and 2) Housing developer
Carlisle Development, currently
in control of the long-delayed
Sawyer's Walk/Crosswinds resi-
dential project is suing the CRA
over whether they should be al-
lowed to develop the 3.5 blocks
that overlap some of the land in
question in the County/City suit
mentioned above.
But there's more to this confus-
ing puzzle. Questions continue
to be raised about the process
by which the City and its CRA
will award development rights to
builders.
City Commissioner Richard P.
Dunn, II heads the CRA located in
District 5, as its chairman.
"This is something that I in-
herited and unfortunately there
have been years of rumors and
unsettled attempts to settle lin-
gering lawsuits between the City,
County and CRA over the land in
Overtown," he said. "Some want
to think this is a done deal but
it isn't. The entire bidding pro-
cess is now wide open and we are
committed to making sure it is a


transparent process. The CRA in-
tends to follow the method used
by the State when we send out the
RFP [request for proposal]. One
thing is certain when the RFP
goes out it will be tight."

NO DEVELOPER
IS IN THE DRIVER'S SEAT
Dunn added that several
months ago when it appeared that
all of the disputes had been set-
tled, it looked like Carlisle Devel-
opment would get the nod and be
the developing company. However,
he says that is no longer the case.
"We were supposed to settle
things on the CRA's agenda at
least two times in July but the
County attorneys asked that the
vote be postponed in order to
make sure this was a fair pro-
cess," he added. "I think that's the
best thing to make sure all of
the developers get a fair chance to
bid, build and participate."
County Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson says the County really
has no voice in the matter at this
point. At least not until all litiga-
tion has been settled. But she has
a clear opinion on what needs to
happen.
"Based on comments from the


RICHARD P. DUNN, II
City Commissioner
community, revitalization is sore-
ly needed in Overtown and I am
committed to that process," she
said. "We have the ability to re-
turn that community to the kind
of place it was many years ago.
What the residents are asking for
is a live-work-play type of develop-
ment that first brings in big box
retailers like Kmart, Lowes and
Sam's Club businesses that
can employ folks in the area. Then
you bring in housing and smaller
retailers so people can move into
low and medium income housing.
Once the RFP goes out and an


agreement is reached between the
City, County and CRA, then I can
legally discuss the project with my
constituency. Above all we want to
make sure no one gets preferential
treatment among those who want
to bid."
,Carlisle CEO Matt Greer says
his company is not the bad guy in
this process:
"Sawyer's Walk has been va-
cant for 20 years due to litigation
and the result has been slower
growth and fewer jobs for the peo-
ple of Overtowri and higher taxes
for all of us," he said. [We] have


undertaken to help try to solve
this longstanding problem and
have already engaged FIU Stem-
pel School of Public Policy to help
ensure third party accountability
in our effort to create a solution
for the financially-troubled Poin-
ciana Village which maximizes
each resident's opportunity to de-
termine the best solution for their
family."

ARE CONDO OWNERS BEING
SQUASHED BY GOLIATH?
As both Dunn and Edmon-
son admit, Poinciana Village is
privately-owned property and
thus neither of them has any au-
thority in terms of negotiations
or discussions relative to offers
that may have been made, ac-
cepted or rejected by the owners.
G.O.L. Henriques, owner of the
law firm The Henriques Group,
P.A., represents several of the
owners at Poinciana Village. She
says that there is no current
time table on when the remain-
ing unsold properties must be
sold. When asked if the cost for
renovations made by the owners
would be factored into the nego-
tiation of the sale price she said,
"I am not prepared to answer


c justice
that question." Owners of the
condo say the discussion over
selling their units first began
in April but Henriques, when
asked if she had been brought
on board in April, replied, "I am
not in a position to answer that
question."
She further stated that she
could not reply to the question
of how she was selected as it is
a private issue. In addition, she
disputed the claim by some own-
ers that there had been a ten-
ant's association in place at the
Village at some point. Her claim:
"As far as I am aware there never
was a tenant's association."
Dunn says he understands
why some owners feel like they
are being pushed out of their
homes.
"In many ways this situation
mirrors what has happened at
the Transit Village and Greene
Dreams Shoes," he said. "People
feel like they are being pushed
out by larger entities. But this is
different because we aren't just
talking about businesses being
relocated we are talking about
where people live and have lived
for many years. We cannot take
their concerns lightly."


Shaw University continues repairs after April storm

SHAW another but on behalf of Shaw The tornado that touched University nearly,
continued from 1A University I am truly thankful down last spring tore the roof put a temporaryi
for those who were able to give off of the Student Center which place.
which were built in the 1960s, and I would encourage them to won't be ready for at least sev- About 600 stuck
endured a considerable amount continue to give until all of our eral more months. McClaurin summer school
of damage Officials decided to work is done." added that FEMA awarded the stay in the dorm


close the school early for the
safety of the students, faculty
and staff. But many wondered
if the University would survive,
particularly given the fact that
the devastation occurred just
one year after Shaw had been
approved for a $31 million loan
to refinance its debt and avoid a
financial catastrophe. But sur-
vive they have.
Irma McClaurin, university
president, said crews are con-
tinuing to put the finishing
touches on the residence halls
so students can live in them this
semester.
"We've added some new paint,
new ceil's and there's going to


The Student Center after the storm.


be new flooring put in;" McClau-
rin said. "Some of the damage is
storm-related because of the wa-
ter soaking through ceilings and
then ending up on the floor."
Dolores Samms, is the presi-
dent of the Shaw University Mi-
ami Alumni chapter.
"I am trul,. truly happy to hear
'"tit'a r ?x7e opened


again," she said. "Even though
I know there is a lot that still
needs to be done, the majority
of things left to do are more re-
lated to cosmetic improvements
as opposed to structural re-
pairs. I don't know how many
people from the Miami-Dade
and Broward communities
made donations in one rmor


Program takes mentoring to new heights
JOBS an achievable goal." ington's computer tech center
continued from 1A City Commissioner Richard P. and received glowing reviews
Dunn, II spoke to the 135 stu- from Dr. Yelena Stewart-Revere,
formative years made all the dif- dents at their awards ceremony who heads the school's smaller
ference. These kids need people at Booker T. Washington High learning communities program.
to get involved and to show they School. Eighty host agencies "I always wanted to work with
care." applied for interns 50 were computers and even set up my
It's the first year that Urgent, eventually selected and because own topnotch center at home
Inc. [Urban Renewal Greater of the program requirements, when I was little," he said. "But
Enhancement National Team] 50 percent of the interns were this summer I got the chance to
has managed the program, now Washington High students. install and upgrade systems and


in its second year. But they have
been making steady progress
since their founding in 1994, to
"empower young minds to help
transform their community."
"I started to believe in myself
because of Mr. [Henry] Crespo
[a founding member and vice
president of Urgent, Inc.] and my
mentor," Givens said. "I dropped
out of high school to work and
never thought about going back.
I learned that I was good with
computers and see IT [informa-
tion technology] as a career goal


GRADE
continued from 1A

"I am very excited about our
improvement," she said. "We
know everyone put in the effort,
from the district, to the region,
to the students, teachers and
staff."
Catalina Flor, principal of
Wheatley was unavailable for
comment.
The districts were recognized
for either maintaining or im-
proving their district grade to an
"A" or having all "A" or "B" grad-
ed schools in 2011. Drew, rated
as a "D" school in 2010, jumped
to an "A" school in 2011. Phyllis


TEACHER
continued from 1A


Velasquez, who has since
bonded out of jail, admitted to
having sexual relations with
a 16-year-old student from
August 2009 and continuing
through 2010. She told police
that she gave the boy gifts in-
cluding cash, a cell phone and
sent him romantic texts and
photos of herself both nude


"Work experience, personal
growth and maturity are what
happened in the course of the
past six weeks for each of these
young adults," Dunn said. "It's
the kind of investment, both in
terms of dollars and manpower,
that we must make if we want
to change the cycle of unemploy-
ment that overcomes so many of
our young Black boys and girls."
Santana Tooks, 18, is on his
way to Morehouse College in the
fall. He was responsible for up-
grading and monitoring Wash-


Wheatley went from being a "F"
school in 2010 to the top of the
class as an "A" school.
Williams said her school was
able to improve because of the
specific teaching style they im-
plemented.
"We provided instruction that
targeted the specific needs of
each student," she said. "We
taught the standards that we
were required to but we also
made sure that we monitored
our students' progress on a
monthly basis. We had monthly
assessments of their progress
to determine the strengths and
weaknesses of each student."
She also added that she plans


and in lingerie. The police re-
port further indicated that the
two engaged in 'safe sex' during
their year-long liaison.
The Honduras-born educa-
tor had sex with the student
in several locations including
Jackson High and the parking
lot of Allapattah Middle School.
It is unclear whether the stu-
dent was in a special educa-
tion program but Velasquez was
hired because of her training in


to make my own recommenda-
tions for the school's networking
requirements. They let me show
what I can do."
The program was supported
by a $322,000 grant from the
CRA. Each site had a supervi-
sor/career mentor that helped
young people during the sum-
mer, guiding them in work ex-
perience and instructing them
with different portions of the job
and the workplace. Interns were
required to live in SE Overtown
Park West or in District 5.


to continue the same strategy
that helped the school improve.
"Our strategy of using differ-
entiated instruction was what
helped us to get here and we will
continue that plan," she said.
"Through that process we in-
sured that the teachers and the
students were communicating
correctly. The constant data that
we received from those monthly
evaluations really helped us to
help our kids perform better."
The other schools recognized
in Miami-Dade included: Balere
Language Academy; Lincoln-
Marti Charter School; and Som-
erset Academy Charter Elemen-
tary School.


teaching children with mental
handicaps and developmental
disabilities.
According to John Schuster,
chief communications officer for
M-DCPS, the District "will work
towards a swift termination."
"School district staff is regu-
larly reminded that personal
relationships with students
are unethical and forbidden by
School Board policy, and may
be illegal, as in this instance."


The Children'sTrust


Because all children are...

.' '' * .






Saturday at 10 a.m. on
wsvn


Important issues about children and families


Topics include after-school programs, immunizations,
parental involvement, and the impact of cuts to education.


After-School Alberto Carvalho


Programs


Superintendent
MDCPS


The Children's Trust is a dedicated source of revenue established by voter referendum to Improve the
lives of children and families in Miami-Dade County by making strategic investments in their futures.


y $600,000 to
y cafeteria in

dents attended
but could not
s.


Schools praised for grade improvements


Affair with student lasted for almost one year


I __


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f
f
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1) 1,21 Alk-N 1Ii 3F C kI :N I F OD11A-I TM U S 06 1


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F" ,


TEACHER MERIT PLANS:


Appropriate for


urban schools?
By Akilah Laster cally prevalent in urban schools make
Miami Times writer these teachers apprehensive that they
will even be eligible to benefit from the
The contingencies of a merit pay pro- pay plan.
gram agreement signed by Miami-Dade "When .you have a 'One size fits all'
County Public Schools (M-DCPS) super- approach like the merit pay plan, there
intendent and United Teachers of Dade becomes a problem," said Tony Jen-
(UTD) president in May, now have some nings, UTD steward and school advi-
educators concerned about the agree- sory council chairperson at Booker T.
ment's impact on urban public schools. Washington Senior High School. "We
The Performance Pay Plan funded by have to deal with a slew of other issues
Federal "Race to the Top" grant money that teachers in affluent schools do not
was signed by Superintendent Alberto have to, because of that; it is going to be
Carvalho and UTD President Karen inherently inequitable."
Aronowitz. Sheryl Place, a teacher at Miami
Aronowitz, who says she doesn't Killian Senior High School. empathized
"agree with the idea of the plan," wanted with teachers in the urban school
to "get as much money in the pocket of Place, who formerly taught at Miami
teachers as possible until the funds ran Northwestern Senior High School and
out." ia Edisol b.'lt's that the plan
The gratrtt.-,t's to- ro lPOW."
tially make UpV"t $ l 9"'a f.W.f.:,aalso hindi -ispec-
year. However, the six figure pot df gold tioe educators.
is not enough to overshadow the qualms "The urban schools need the best
of many urban school teachers. and brightest teachers: I don't think
."Anyone can teach a student that that merit pay will bring them into a F
wants to learn." said Derrick Tate, a school."
reading teacher at South Dade Senior Carvalho combated these notions.
High School. "What about the teach- "The way that plan is structured for
ers who have to deal with students that 2011-12 is done evenly so students can
have so many other things going on at be achievers across the board." An ar-
home and in their environment? It takes gument that Florida House of Represen-
a real special teacher to handle that." tative Dwight Bullard, District 118, says
The provisions of the Performance is flawed. "The argument is the stu-
Pay Plan, while admittedly still unclear dents are lowering performing, but you
and unknown for many educators, will are able to make more gains that will
provide bonuses to teachers whose stu- be magnified [even though] the State is
dents have met given criteria or num- setting a particular bar."
bers. According to the superintendent, While State law under Senate Bill 736
"If 90 percent of a teacher's students does not require merit pay plans to com-
improve, then the teacher will get an mence until 2014, Carvalho wanted to
additional share [of bonus money]." get a jump start to work out some of the
How much improvement needed is un- kinks. Ironically, Aronowitz, believes
defined, and with such a large percent- merit pay is the wrong model and when
age needed, some urban school teach- asked if this would engender educators
ers feel like they are at a disadvantage, to migrate from urban schools, her an-
The struggles of students coming from swer was simple, "yes."
underserved communities that are typi- akilahlaster3@aol.com


-Photos by Rabsun Senat
Children
gather around
the sounds
of African
drums.


Community center hosts

back to school drive


This past weekend, Liberty City stu-
dents were out and about getting pre-
pared for the new school year. To aid
them in getting ready for the fall, the
first annual Back to School Greenfest:
Planting Seeds for Education event
was held at The Belafonte TACOLCY
Center. The event provided students
and parents information on the im-
portance of education and the envi-
ronment. The fun-filled day included
environmental displays, hands-on
planting activities, arts and crafts,
games, a reading corner for children,
music, food sampling and several
workshops that focused on topics like
growing healthy communities and
knowing parental rights in schools.
"Today what we have done is combine


two events our annual green fest
event and the back to school event,"
said Sherri Jones, one of the coordi-
nators for the program. "We thought
this would be an excellent opportunity
for people in the neighborhood to not
only come and get school supplies and
backpacks so they can be ready for
the new school year, but this was also
a good opportunity for people to learn
more about the environment."
Students were also given plants to
take home and free hair cuts. Jer-
nia Lyman, eight-years-old, said she
learned a lot.
"I am having a great time," she said.
"I learned how to put the dirt in the
plants right so I can make then grow.
Tim Broton, 31, who brought his
children to the event, said the pro-
gram was great.
"This type of event is exactly what


we need in this neighborhood," he
said. "Today these kids got a lot more
than just backpacks and pencils I
think they really got some knowledge
for life."
TACOLCY is one of the largest youth
and family service non-profits in Mi-
ami. For over 44 years, the agency
has been offering diversified services
to youth, their families, schools, and
other agencies, particularly around
low income community issues and in
the under-served minority commu-
nity.


Is, Your Family Ready For School?


Back -c-soo C, The Childre

'i \c.\ ck,, this check
best


Bt
i reduced







Pick up The Children's Trust
After-School Programs Guide
at Publix Super Mrlwr t
in Miami-Dade County


The Children s Trust is a dedicated source of revenue established by voter referendum to improve
the lives of children and families in Miami-Dade Counly by making strategic investments in Iheir futures


'n's Trust encourages you to follow

list to ensure that your kids get the

possible start to their school year.

There's a lot todo before school starts.
ut the Children's Trust can help with convenient, free or
I cost options for your family's back-to-school checklist.


For more information visit
www.thechildrenstrust.org

or call





211 The ChildrendsTrust


HELPLINE


BLACKS MusT CONTR Y


I 11A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011









The Miami Times


Fait


1


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


MIAMI TIMES


MUSIC FOR GOD



MuforGo celebrates with



'Red Carpet anniversary


By Kaila Heard
kheard@miamitimesonline.com


The infamous red carpet rolled out at various
movie premieres and prestigious event openings
is usually deemed necessary only for the rich and
famous.
However, on Friday, August 5th, the well-known
carpet became a bit more inclusive. During the Mu-


forGo (Music for God) Production's first red carpet
anniversary showcase and dinner, anyone who at-
tended could be a celebrity and sashay down the red
runner.
Held at the New Birth Enterprise Building in Little
Haiti, the festivities allowed MuforGo, a Christian
company that offers lessons in the arts, to celebrate
their first year in business.
Please turn to MUFORGO 14B


CONGRESS OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION


Rev. Johnny Barber leads opening service


By Kaila Heard
kheard@miamitimesonline.com


Reverend Johnny Barber, the mod -
erator for the Florida East Coast
Baptist Association, led the opening
evening service for the Florida Gen-
eral Baptist Convention's annual
Congress of Christian Education in
Orlando on Monday, August 8th.
The Florida East Coast Baptist As-
sociation is this year's hosting chap-
ter for the Congress of Christian Ed-
ucation.
The week-long Congress offers
classes based upon a variety of sub-


jects that are suitable for children up
to senior citizens. Subjects include
topics such as "Teaching Baptist
Doctrine" and "Bible Basics" for the
Children's Division, "Christian Char-
acter and How it Develops" for the
Youth Division and "Defending Chris-
tian Morals in an Immoral World,"
and "Growihg in Grace" in the Young
Adult Division. Meanwhile, the Con-
gress will offer more advanced sub-
jects in ministry including "Theology
of the Early Church" and 'Founda-
tion of Christian Ethics."
Barber himself will be teaching a
class on the doctrine of prayer which


focuses on -the necessary attitude
and disposition for the person who
is praying and who it is that we pray
to."
For Barber, the senior pastor of Mt.
Sinai Missionary Baptist Church in
Miami, all Christians, regardless of
when they were saved, should strive
to continue their biblical education.
"[People] have more of an inclina-
tion to lean towards things that are
contrary to God, it's in our nature, so
there will always be a continual need
to study the word of God to learn of
the things that are in line with God,"
he explained.


In addition to study and medita-
tion, the Congress provides opportu-
nities for fun and fellowship. There's
still time to take advantage of some
of the fun things planned at the Con-
gress including a scholarship lun-
cheon on Thursday and a youth rally
on Friday night whose theme is "Fuel
Up, Don't Give Upl"
The convention which began on
Monday will continue through Fri-
day, Aug. 12th. Reverend Dr. Jimmie
L. Bryant of Miami is the president of
the Congress of Christian Education.
For more information, visit www.
fgbci.org.


PASTOR OF THE WEEK


Saving souls in


the community


'en masse'


By Kaila Heard
kheard@miamitimesonline.com


To commemorate a pastor's anniversary, the
congregation will often give their minister a
special dinner, gift or even a financial love of-
fering.
But as his eighth anniversary approaches
later this month. Re\erend Raymond Carvil,

"I'm a team player . If something
needs to be done at the church then I'm
on it." -REVEREND RAYMOND CARVIL


Jumping for the future

Local girl places sixth

I N in Junior Olympics


Nine-year-old Zatoria A.
Thompson 'recently placed
sixth in the nation for high
jump at the AAU Junior
Olympics 2011. To win her
position, she managed a
jump of 4'2". Zatoria also
placed 12th in the nation
with a 13'6" in the long jump.
In addition to excelling at
athletics, Zatoria also works
hard at her studies at a col-
lege prep school. The rising
fourth grader makes straight
A's and plans to attend Har-
vard University in the future.
Meanwhile her immediate
goals for her sporting career
are to participate in a tri-
athlon as well as the high
and long jump in next
year's Junior Olympics.
The AAU Junior
Olympics 2011
S was held in
SNew Orleans,
L A from July 27 until
August 6.


the senior pastor and founder of The Living
Word Baptist Church in Opa-Locka, says he
doesn't want any part of the traditional gifts.
"I don't want a pastor's appreciation celebra-
tion," Carvil said. "I'm not big on people el-
evating me because the whole focus should be
on God."
And because he wants to make sure the fo-
cus remains on saving souls, Carvil plans to
hold a mass baptismal service at the Athalie
Range Park in Liberty City on August 27th.
The service is open to everyone during which
time he will baptize anyone who is willing ac-
cept Christ as their personal savior.
"All this other stuff that people make you go
Please turn to CARVIL 14B


Local minister discusses struggles of faith, outreach and sexism


By Kaila Heard
kheard@miamitimesonline.com

Nearly every week, you will
probably see Reverend Sabri-
na James and members of her
church out in the community.
Feeding the hungry, visiting
nursing homes or ministering
at various shelters are among
some of the regular activities in
which they participate.
Compassion and a desire to
serve are common characteris-
tics if not actual requirements
for a ministry to be effective.
"In order to get someone's at-
tention you have to address the
needs of the person first," said
James, who founded her own
church, Tag Team Ministries


for Jesus Christ in April.
Although the 44-year-old is a
successful general manager for
McDonald's, in her youth she
faced a serious of hardships
that are similar to the crises
facing those she now tries to
help today.
"I've experienced some things
like being without food and
came to realize that there was
so much more in store for us,"
she said. "That's the message I
want to pass on."
One of six siblings who were
raised in Miami, James said
she was "reared in the church"
by her mother who recently
died.
"The thing [my mother] in-
stilled in us is that we should


REV. SABRINA JAMES


truly love God with all of our
hearts," she recalls.


However, by age 19, James
says she had strayed from some
of her earlier religious teach-
ings. No action reflected that
rift better than when she decid-
ed to move into an apartment
with her then-boyfriend.
According to James, "I was
an adventurous persona and I
was trying to establish myself
as an individual."
However, the relationship
didn't last long. Besides dealing
with a broken heart, James was
forced to leave their apartment
- she was suddenly homeless.
Too proud to go back home,
she bounced from one friend's
couch to another at night and
worked during the day. Finally,
she swallowed her pride after


a few weeks on the street and
asked her mother if she could
come home, which she allowed.
While that brief taste of home-
lessness did weaken her pride,
James also credits her ordeal
with strengthening her faith.
"When you begin to have real
struggles in your life at some
point you begin to understand
that there's no one in your life
that can help except Christ,"
she explained. "Now I can hon-
estly say that God is never late
-He is always on time."
An evangelist since 2003,.
James finally decided to be-
come an ordained minister in
2009.
Her maturation into the role
was unintentional, according


to James.
"It wasn't something that I
really wanted to do," she said.
"Becoming a pastor was never
on my list. It was just the spirit
of God that moved me with the
compassion for the people and
that's what kind of led me into
this realm."
Forty-nine-year-old Rhonda
Cox and her husband both left
their former church home to
join Tag Team Ministries when
it was first founded. Cox says
she was drawn to the ministry
because of its commitment to
outreach services.
"I liked her spirit and I liked
how she was always wanting
to help people because that's
Please turn to JAMES 14B


ji>









13B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Manpower 2011 attracts star gospel singers


Gospel artists Fred Ham-
mond, Donald Lawrence, Wess
Morgan, Anthony Evans, and
the Soul Seekers have just been
added to the lineup for the 2011
ManPower Conference hosted
by T. D. Jakes at The Potters
House of Dallas.
ManPower will be held Thurs-
day, August 11 through Satur-
day, August 13, and will fea-
ture eminent speakers, such
as Bishop T.D. Jakes and other
renowned guests who will share
inspirational messages to men.
This year's theme is 'Breaking
New Ground'.
ManPower, created by Bishop


T.D. Jakes, is designed to ad-
dress the specific needs, hurts,
and struggles of all men from
a biblical perspective. The first
ManPower conference was held
in 1994 in Detroit. Years later,
ManPower continues to equip
and encourage men to build
strong marriages, increase
their confidence and take on
community responsibilities. To
date, ManPower has drawn over
150,000 men from around the
world.
The ManPower conference
not only takes the needs of men
into account, but also the needs
of different cultures. In keeping


with our service to a culturally
diverse audience, this year's
ManPower will offer Spanish
audio translation, in order to
better serve our Spanish speak-
ing brethren.
Featured musical artists in-
clude:
Fred Hammond, multiple
Stellar and Dove AwardOwin-
ning singer/ songwriter/pro-
ducer and highly influential
solo artist
Donald Lawrence, Gram-
myrwinning producer, compos-
er, and recording artist who has
collaborated with such artists
as, the Clark Sisters, Hezekiah


Walker, Mary J. Blige, Ramsey
Lewis, and more
SWess Morgan, Dove AwardO
nominated, recording artist,
and founder of the Wess Mor-
gan Foundation
Anthony Evans, composer,
recording artist, and former
Kirk Franklin protegee who has
shared the stage with Yolanda
Adams, David Phelps, and Nat-
alie Grant
Soul Seekers, up-and-com-
ing eight-member quartet con-
sisting of hit songwriters, pro-
ducers, and session musicians
touted as the new paradigm of
modern-day Quartet music.


Scheduling prayer


during your day


Fifty years of God's grace and mercy


SThe Booker T. Washington Se-
nior High School Class of 1961
celebrated their 50th Anniver-
sary from June 8 12.
According to Charlie Mae
Smith Culpepper, "Nineteen-
sixty-one was a great year be-
cause it saw the graduation of
the Booker T. Washington Se-


nior High School Class of 1961.
But 2011 was even better be-
cause we were blessed to "Cel-
ebrate 50 years of God's Grace
and Mercy."
Some of the reunions activi-
ties included a 'Meet and Greet'
at the Church of the Incarna-
tion in Liberty City on Wednes-


day, June 8; a banquet at the
Hilton Miami Downtown Hotel
on Saturday, June 11; and a
worship service at Mt. Olivette
Baptist Church in Overtown
followed by a farewell brunch at
the Rusty Pelican restaurant in
Key Biscayne on Sunday, June
12.


Gay Ferguson Outler, who
attended Saturday's banquet,
said, "The high point of the eve-
ning was [the picture presen-
tation] 'A Stroll Down Memory
Lane: The Way We Were.' This
nostalgic trip facilitated the re-
capturing of numerous joyous
Please turn to BTW 14B


There are many ways to
prompt our forgetful souls
to find quiet time with God.
Here are five of my favorites.
I was in a friend's kitchen
the other day and noticed
a Bible propped open in a
stand on the counter. "That
seems like a good idea," I
commented, "Having the Bi-
ble there, open and inviting."
"I never actually read while
I'm cooking." she admitted,
"though it does remind me
to pray." She went on to de-
scribe how she uses meal
prep as a time to stir up her
heart and remember those
she's cooked with or for. It got
me thinking about the many
ways to prompt our forgetful
souls to talk with God. Here
are some of my favorites:
1. Link prayer to a regu-
lar activity. Find a scrip-
ture verse to get you started
while you get dressed (Isaiah
61:10), drive to work (Psalm
77:12) or do laundry (Psalm
26:6). God should-and
can-be part of our daily


routines!
2. Let your schedule do
the work. Use a date book
with scripture and/or de-
votionals (Guideposts Daily
Planner 2012 is a nice one),
or enter pray as an event in
your daily calendar.
3. Tie a string around
your finger technology.
Use virtual Post-It Notes to
flag quiet time, or sign up for
a scripture phone app like
Bible.is
4. Turn off the vacuum of
social media. Tim Challies
recently posted about how
he uses a program called
Leechblock to restrict access
to certain sites he selects,
at times he specifies. Use
some of that 'saved" time for
prayer.
5. Connect the old-fash-
ioned way. Link up with a
prayer partner you call or
visit with regularly, or join
a group. Having others to
whom you're accountable
is a great motivation to get
things done


CFCE, Inc. hosts annual luncheon


International jazz artist, Nicole Henry, who
provided entertainment, and local artist, Ba-
yunga Kialeuka who hosted an art exhibit
stand beside the Miami Gardens Mayor Shir-
ley Gibson and Miami Gardens Councilman


Melvin Bratton at 34th anniversary luncheon
and fashion show of the Center for Family &
Child Enrichment, Inc. (CFCE) 6n Saturday,
July 9 at the Country Club of Miami in Miami
Lakes.


Florida Baptist Convention helps rebuild Haiti


By Mark Kelly

Rebuild Haiti, the joint
Southern Baptist disaster re-
lief initiative launched in the
aftermath of the massive Jan.
12, 2010, earthquake, will have
built 1,982 houses by the end
of November and has 560 more
in the pipeline before the sched-
uled exit date in March 2012.
"Southern Baptists should
heartily celebrate what has
been accomplished in Haiti,"
said Jeff Palmer, executive di-
rector of Baptist Global Re-
sponse, one of the key partners
in the Rebuild Haiti alliance. "It
is amazing what has happened
in such a short period of time,
but there are still thousands of
people living in tents and much
to be done."
"Rebuild Haiti" is a coopera-
tive venture that also involves
Haitian Baptists, the Inter-
national Mission Board, the
Florida Baptist Convention
and Southern Baptist Disaster
Relief. In the past 18 months,


Southern Baptists have invest-
ed more than $4.5 million in
assisting survivors of the earth-
quake. Besides building hous-
es, the disaster response effort
has included feeding programs,
medical clinics, school assis-
tance, beds for 2,200 orphans
and prosthetics fabrication, as
well as many other projects.
Baptist volunteers from Ecua-
dor, Dominican Republic, Dom-
inica and Grenada have worked
alongside U.S. and Haitian vol-
unteers.

FLORIDA IMPACT
More than 500 families are
living in new cement-block
homes across Port-au-Prince
and the surrounding areas
through the efforts of the Flori-
da Baptist Convention and the
Confraternit6 Missionaire Bap-
tiste d'Haiti, said Eddie Black-
mon, Rebuild Haiti coordinator
for Florida Baptist Disaster Re-
lief.
"These homes have not only
provided a safe haven for fami-


lies once living in destruction
and despair, but are also pro-
viding the local church an op-
portunity to share the love of
Christ and be a light in a dark
world," Blackmon said. "After
the completion of each home,
Rebuild Haiti pastors and case
workers accompany local pas-
tors to distribute Bibles to the
recipient families and to pray
with each family about their
specific prayer requests.
"Through this follow-up in-
dividuals are coming to Christ,
families are being restored,
churches are being planted and
lives are being changed," Black-
mon added. "Rebuild Haiti is
having an eternal impact for
the Kingdom on the communi-
ties within which it is working."
Blackmon shared examples
of the impact Florida Baptists
are seeing:
-- Pastor Pierre, a case work-
er in Tabarre, is training young
men in his church to share the
Gospel.
Please turn to HAITI 14B


Redistricting 2012:


Tell Us Your Story


Attend a Public Meeting


Coming Soon to a Town Near You!




Wednesday, August 17, 2011


MIAMI

10 a.m. 2 p.m.

Miami Dade College

Wolfson Campus Auditorium, Bldg. 1000

300 NE 2nd Avenue

Miami, FL 33132


SOUTH MIAMI

6 p.m. 9 p.m.

FlU College of Law

Rafael Diaz-Balart Hall

11200 SW 8th Street

Miami, FL 33199


Persons in need of special accommodations should contact the
Florida House of Representatives Redistricting Committee
at (850) 488-3928 or mydistrictbuilder@myfloridahouse.gov
at least 5 business days before the meeting,
in order that accommodations may be satisfied.


i I' -- I. ~~r~ .~i3Y:1.1 ~ ~ P Pa ~3C! 'fi 7 " n, \ sr ~ ~ rrr


~irr~


sW" V









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES. AUGUST 10-16. 2011


Testifying the goodness of the Lord


In my last column, I wrote
about not letting the enemy
stop your testimony. But I
must add a footnote to this
plea don't just tell people
you came through, but tell
them how! Sometimes we
stand before the church dur-
ing testimony night and are
exuberant with the news that
we did not know how we were


going to pay our rent, but we
prayed, and someone sent us
a check to pay our rent. That
is great news and worthy of
a praise report. But some-
times, those who are sitting
in the pews wonder why their
breakthrough has not hap-
pened. They look at you in awe
and think what a super prayer
warrior you are, and wonder


why they can't be like that.
So, let's review you had a
need, you prayed, and God an-
swered your prayer and your
need was provid-
ed. What about the
in-between time? Do
we leave out the part
where we doubted
and were not alto-
gether confident that
the check for the
rent would come in
time? Do we leave
out the sleepless nights, and
how we tried to borrow the
money just in case God did
not come through in time? I
mean, you knew that he would
come through, but would it


happen before the eviction
notice was posted? So many
sermons and lessons have
been based on Job, and the
patience of Job. Songs
have been sung about
how Job patiently wait-
ed for the Lord. But if
you have read the en-
tire book of Job, you
know that Job was not
this extraordinarily su-
per faithful man who
did not question any-
thing that happened to him,
and just went around praising
God for the loss of his home,
children, and possessions. He
questioned what happened. He
was confused. Even God rep-


rimanded him for his attitude
,and his words. Yes, he was
faithful. Yes, he was a man
of God. This was why God al-
lowed him to be tested be-
cause of his love for God and
his faithfulness. But he had
some hard moments. It's all in
the book King David was often
distressed about how his life
was going. Some of his Psalms
express his hurt and confu-
sion. But in all of this, Job and
David and others remained
steadfast until the endl They
didn't give up and throw in the
towel. Even when they did not
understand God or his ways,
they never wavered in their
love for him.


Yes, testify of the goodness of
the Lord, but let people know
that there were times before
your breakthrough that you
were nervous or anxious or had
a moment of doubt. Let people
know that even through these
times, you still remained faith-
ful to God, and he remained
faithful to you. Tell them that
you are not a superhuman
man or woman -just a man or
woman who loves God, knows
that he loves you, and you
trust him until the end. Al-
ways leave them with this seed
planted firmly in their spirit -
he did it for me, and he can do
it for you. I'm not super, but my
God is!


Rising number of women becoming unchurched


By Adelle M. Banks

Women, long considered the
dominant pew dwellers in the
nation's churches, have shown a
dramatic drop in attendance in
the last two decades, a new sur-
vey shows.
Since 1991, the percentage of
women attending church during
a typical week has decreased by
11 percentage points to 44 per-
cent, the Barna Group reported
Monday (Aug. 1).
Sunday school and volunteer-


ing among women also has di-
minished. Two decades ago, half
of all women read the Bible in
a typical week other than at
religious events. Now 40 percent
do.
The survey also found a
marked stepping away from con-
gregations: a 17 percentage in-
crease in the number of women
who have become "unchurched."
"For years, many church lead-
ers have understood that 'as go
women, so goes the American
church,'" wrote Barna Group


-M: kaxf


Women in Transition of
South Florida is sponsoring the
"Pearls of Great Worth" Summer
Breakfast" on August 13 at 9
a.m. 786-477-8548.

The Heart of the City Min-
istries invites everyone to morn-
ing worship every Sunday at 9
a.m. and to their first Girls of
Inspiration program at 3 p.m. on
August 14. 305-754-1462.

Family and Children Faith
Coalition is looking for caring
and compassionate adults to
serve as mentors for their Amachi
Mentoring Project. Free training
will be held August 16, 6 p.m. to
9,.p.m. Pre sggistrautio4g ired. ,,
786-388-3000.

New Life Family Worship
Center welcomes everyone to
their Wednesday Bible Study at 7
p.m. and their Let's Talk Women
Ministry discussing 'Sex and the
Church' on August 20 at 1 p.m.
305-623-0054.

The Golden Bells are cel-
ebrating their 33rd Singing An-
niversary on August 13 at Tab-
ernacle Baptist Church at 7:30
p.m.; August 20th at the Word of
Truth Church at 7: 30 p.m.; and
August 21 at New Covenant at 3
p.m. 786-251-2878.

Holy Ghost Faith Deliver-
ance Ministries, Inc. celebrates


their pastor's 13th anniversary
with services on ,August 9 14th
and August 21.

Holy Ghost Assembly of
the Apostolic Faith is hosting a
dinner sale on August 24, 12:30
p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Greater St. James Mis-
sionary Baptist International
Church invites you to their an-
nual Women's Day Celebration
on August 14 at 11 a.m.

Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church welcomes the
community to celebrate their
55th Anniversary on August 14
at 7 a.m. and 11 a.m.
*'-L > s, a; y *
Little Rock Primitive Bap-
tist Church is hosting their an-
nual meeting, August 19-21, 1
p.m. daily. 786-294-8179.

The God is Love Church is
holding a reunion for all members
past and present on Sept. 10,
11 a.m. 6 p.m. at the Newport
Beach Resort. 786-406-4240.

Greater St. Luke Primitive
Baptist Church invites everyone
to their 50th Anniversary Concert
on August 12 at 7:30 p.m. 954-
391-8395,954-966-7656.

Emmanuel Missionary Bap-
tist Church invites the commu-
nity to Family and Friends Wor-


founder George Barna, on his
website. "Looking at the trends
over the past 20 years, and es-
pecially those related to the be-
liefs and behavior of women, you
might conclude that things are
not going well for conventional
Christian churches."
The Ventura, Calif.-based re-
searchers compared surveys of
more than 1,000 people in 1991
and 2011.
They found that the percent-
age of women who strongly be-
lieve the Bible is accurate in


ship Services at 7:30 a.m. and
11 a.m. every Sunday. 305-696-
6545.

Christian Cathedral
Church presents their Morning
Glory service that includes senior
citizen activities and brunch ev-
ery Friday at 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
305-652-1132.

Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist
Church invites the community
to celebrate their 30th Pastoral
Anniversary on August 14 at 11
a.m. 305-607-2015.

God Word God Way is back
open for service this week. 786-
326-3455.

Pilgrim New Hope Bap-
tist Church's 'Convening of the
Evangelist' will be held at the
Palm Beach County ConvioffYo
Center, August 17-20. 561-863-
9192.

Lighthouse Holy Ghost
Center, Inc. invites everyone to
their Intercession Prayer Service
on Saturday at 10 a.m. 305-
640-5837.

Macedonia Missionary
Baptist Church's Usher Ministry
is hosting a Fashion Show and
Musical Program on August 21
at 4 p.m. and is currently seek-
ing models. 305-445-6459.

All That God is Interna-
tional Outreach Centers invites
everyone to their Christian Fel-
lowship and Open Mic Night ev-


all it teaches declined by seven
percentage points to 42 percent.
And those who view God as "the
all-knowing, all-powerful and
perfect Creator of the universe
who still rules the world today"
dropped from 80 percent to 70
percent.
"Women used to put men to
shame in terms of their ortho-
doxy of belief and the breadth
and consistency of' their reli-
gious behavior," wrote Barna.
"No more; the religious gender
gap has substantially closed."


ery Friday at 7:30 p.m. 786-255-
1509, 786-709-0656.

The International Prayer
Center is hosting their Pastoral
Anniversary, Aug. 11-14. 954-
448-4634.

The Faith Church, Inc.
invites you to their service on
Sunday at 11 a.m. and their
MIA outreach service that pro-
vides free hot meals, dry goods
and clothes. Visit www.faith-
church4you.com or call 305-
688-8541.

Running for Jesus Out-
reach Youth Ministries is also
looking for additional praise
dancers, choirs, and soloists to
participate in their Gospel Back
to School Summer Jam Fest on
August 27 at 7:30 p.m. 954-213-
4 3~2.' i :I i .

Redemption Missionary
Baptist Church has moved but
still holds a Fish Dinner every
Friday and Saturday; a Noon
Day Prayer Service every Sat-
urday; and Introduction Com-
puter Classes every Tuesday and
Thursday at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Reverend Willie McCrae, 305-
770-7064 or Mother Annie Chap-
man, 786-312-4260.

A Mission with a New Be-
ginning Church members invites
the community to their Sunday
Worship service at 11:15 a.m.
on Thursday, Prayer Meetings
at 6:30 p.m. and Bible Class at
7 p.m.


Rev. Carvil preaches that sincerity key to baptisms


CARVIL
continued from 12B

through [to get baptized] is be-
cause of the tradition and is the
religious thing to do," he said.
"But what really matters is
accepting Jesus. Christ into
your heart.. Wherever you go
to worship at that, it's up to
you," he said.
His message appears to be
appealing. The Living Word
Baptist Church currently
has an official membership
of 100 with an estimated 55


of them currently active.
The church also offers sev-
eral active ministries. It was
the original home for the now
community-based liturgical
dance ministry, D.C.L.A.R.E.
(Dancers Called, Led and
Anointed to Reach Everyone)
which was founded by Car-
vil's daughter, Genevieve.
While the church continues
to grow, Carvil finds him-
self filling a variety of roles,
from the traditional roles of
teacher and counselor to oth-
er ones including radio host


and maintenance man.
But he says he does not
mind the additional respon-
sibilities.
"I'm a team player," he
said. "If something needs to
be done at the church then
I'm on it." His can-do attitude
combined with pastoral roles
and a full time job as the
sergeant at arms for City of
Miami Mayor Tomas Regala-
do means Carvil generally
works on a daily basis one
way or another.
When asked how he man-


ages his full schedule, the
married father of three
laughed and said, "I thank
God for a loving family and
I thank God that he has
blessed me with the energy
to do it."
And while his family re-
mains understanding, Carvil
still makes a conscious effort
to spend time with them.
"I believe if you want some-
thing to be successful then
you have to keep working at
it, so I make time to spend
with my family," he said.


Muforgo teaches students the arts, show business


MUFORGO
continued from 12B

"Our vision is to perfect the
will of God in everything," said
co-founder Pamela Walker.
Walker, who leads the com-
pany's liturgical dance division
- God's Gift of Praise Dance
Ministry has trained pro-
fessionally and even traveled
throughout the world with com-
panies such as the Alvin Ailey
and Soweto Dance companies.
Pragmatically, MuforGo of-
fers students classes in their
desired artistry field.
"Whether they are coming
in for dance or are musically
inclined, we help them get to
where they need to be," said


Robert Smith, co-founder of
MuforGo and a former singer
with the gospel group Voice'
of Love. "After three or four
months we showcase the new
artists to let people know who
they are and put them on the
map," he said.
One of the company's focuses
is to educate students about
their art and the entertainment
industry. Smith, a former Mi-
ami-Dade County elementary
teacher, also has over 20 years
experience as a gospel singer
and songwriter and is an ac-
complished guitarist.
Besides classes in the basics,
Smith offers advice about the
"full concept of the music in-
dustry."


"I just want to make sure that
they have the whole concept so
that they can move on to other
levels if they desire," he said.
Smith likens the program to
job placement assistance that
gets applicants ready for their
interview. However, they do not
guarantee that their former
students will be employed.
During the showcases, stu-
dents are often able to share
the same venue with more es-
tablished gospel groups like
The Heavenly Express Band
and Voices of Love.
For saxophone player Law-
rence McCoy, associating
with MuforGo Production has
brought welcomed opportuni-
ties for his 17-year-old group,


The Heavenly Express Band.
"The one thing that I've
gained from working with them
is exposure," said 48-year-old
McCoy.
The gospel musician ex-
plained that he has not taken
lessons at the Christian pro-
duction company but his belief
in their purpose and message
led him to accept invitations to
perform at MuforGo's events in
order to expand the playing ter-
ritory for his group.
"When [Muforgo] call us to
perform in Miami, I jump at it
because we're trying to do more
programs here," he said.
For more information about
MuforGo Production, visit
www.muforgo.com.


Poll: Economy still hits


many churches hard


By David Roach

Although the offerings in
most American churches
have met or exceeded bud-
get requirements in 2011,
the economy is still having
a negative impact on many
local congregations.
That's the finding of a
LifeWay Research survey of
1,000 Protestant pastors
that compared with simi-
lar surveys from November
2009 through January
2011.
According to the new sur-
vey released Aug. 1 71 per-
c iht- of pastors report 2011'
offerings at or in excess of
their budget requirements.
That includes 25 percent
with offerings exceeding
budget requirements and
46 percent with offerings
approximately at budget
level. When comparing
2011 offerings to 2010:
22 percent of pastors
report lower offerings in
2011.


36 percent say offerings
are at about the same level
as last year.
39 percent report an
increase from 2010.
On average, churches re-
port a two percent increase
in 2011.
Churches with larger wor-
ship attendance are more
likely to have'increased of-
ferings. Nearly half (49 per-
cent) of congregations with
100-249 attendees report
increased offerings from
2010, as do 47 percent of
congregations with 250 or
more. In comparison, 34
perecthf "fclfufches with '"
50-99 attendees and 23
percent of those with 0-49
report increased offerings
this year.
"Just as there are some
positive signs in the U.S.
economy, we are seeing
more churches with some
growth in offerings for
2011," said Scott McCon-
nell, director of LifeWay
Research.


Church focuses on outreach


JAMES
continued from 12B

something that I always did
like help the homeless and
visit battered women in their
shelters," Cox said.
But not everyone has ac-
cepted James and her new


ministry.
"I've been in quite a few
churches where I was not
welcomed in the pulpit," she
said. "It doesn't bother me be-
cause that was their pulpit.
Besides, wherever I an, I can
still expound upon the word
of God."


Ministires provide hope for Haiti


HAITI
cotninued from 13B

Several families in a re-
mote area of Gressier, where no
church exists, made decisions
to follow Jesus and asked for
help starting a church.'
Pastor Voltaire, working in
the badly damaged area of Bon
Repos, recently counseled a fa-
ther who was concerned he had
neglected his family spiritually.'


After.receiving a Bible, the man
was encouraged and expressed
a desire to read from Scripture
every night with his family.
The partnership with South-
ern Baptist volunteers has for-
tified the Haitian pastors' con-
fidence in facing an uncertain
future, Blackmon added. He
quoted one pastor as saying,
"All the buildings in Haiti could
collapse again, but the Word of
God will stand forever."


Classmates grateful for reunion


BTW
continued from 13B

moments of our high school
days."
Among the Booker T. Wash-
ington Senior High School
Class of 1961 classmates who
attended were Velma Bouie Ar-
nold, Barbara Carr Symonette,
Kelsey Dorsett, Rose Ann Henry
Franks, Lillie Herring Beneby,
Elois Hollingsworth Hayes,
Freddie Johnson, Gus Mar-
shall, Bloneva Morland Smith,
JoAnn Payne Dunn, Yvonne
Robinson Pickett, Annie Thom-
as Starkes, Erma Webster Sol-
omon, Arlester Young, Rose


McGill Terrell, Daisy Williams,
Johnnie Mae Buckles McCarty,
John Goodman, Nellie Green,
Jonnie Buckles McCarty, Al-
thea Ferguson McMillon, Peggy
Brown Hall (Lee), Oscar El-
lis (Thelma), Orville E. Saun-
ders (Zellene), Karetha Times,
George Williams, Mary Atwell,
Lillie Atwell Holloway (Gleason),
Robert Mapp, Fredricka Woods
Pol, and Barbara Scott Gaines.
In addition to the traditional
reunion held on June 9 -12,
the Booker T. Washington High
School Alumni Association
united all graduating classes
ending in "1" on Sunday, May
29.


___ ____ _____ __ ______ ______. ._ I









BOI


Education sways views on religion


Study finds

liberalized beliefs

and practices
By Cathy Lynn Grossman

The old wisdom: The more
educated you are, the less
likely you will be religious. But
a new study says education
doesn't drive people away from
God it gives them a more lib-
eral attitude about who's going
to heaven.
Each year of education ups
the odds by 15 percent that
people will say there's "truth in
more than one religion," says
University of Nebraska-Lincoln


professor Philip Schwadel in an
article for the Review of Reli-
gious Research. Schwadel, an
associate professor of sociolo-
gy, looked at 1,800 U.S. adults'
reported religious beliefs and
practices and their education.
People change their per-
spective because, as people
move through high school and
college, they acquire an ever-
wider range of friendships,
including people with different
beliefs than their own, Schw-
adel says. "People don't want
to say their friends are going to
hell," he says.
For each additional year
of education beyond seventh
grade, Americans are:
S15 percent more likely to


have attended religious ser-
vices in the past week.
14 percent more likely to
say they believe in a "higher
power" than in a personal God.
"More than 90 percent believe
in some sort of divinity," Schw-
adel says.
13 percent more likely to
switch to a mainline Protes-
tant denomination that is "less
strict, less likely to impose
rules of behavior on your daily
life", than their childhood reli-
gion.
13 percent less likely to say
the Bible is the "actual word of
God." The educated, like most
folks in general, tend to say the
Bible is the "inspired word" of
God, Schwadel says.


Hemant Mehta, the Friend-
ly Atheist blogger at Patheos.
com, is skeptical, saying this
"raises an eyebrow at every-
thing I've always heard that
the more educated you are,
the less religious you are. But
it must depend on how you
define religion."
Schwadel's findings dovetail
with findings by Barry Kosmin
of Trinity College in Hartford,
Conn., a co-author of the
on religious beliefs and the
behavior of people with higher
degrees. It turns out that on
Sunday mornings, "the educat-
ed elite look a lot like the rest
of America," Kosmin says just
as likely to believe in a person-
al God or higher power.


Embrace Girls founderhonoredbyM-DCPS


.The School Board of Miami-
Dade County, Florida present-
ed Velma R. Lawrence, founder
and executive director of The
Embrace Girls Foundation,
Inc., with a special recognition
for a decade of community ser-
vice. Lawrence's South Florida
based foundation is a men-
toring programs for girls that
provides academic tutoring,
mentoring, life and social skills
training.
"I am quite humbled to be
the recipient of this most pres-
tigious honor and recognition
and that it comes on the heals
of our 10th year anniversary
and excellent academic year
with great outcomes" said Law-
rence.
According to Tamara Gant,
local radio personality and a
founding Board Member for the
organization, "[Lawrence] is tru-
ly passionate about this organi-
zation. It's been a long journey
and she, more than anyone
I know deserves the recogni-
tion. She walks the walk for
those girls and their families."
School Board Member, Dr.
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall
also believes that Embrace Girls
offers i. iPriceles, ,rpsee -to the
county. "It's simply District. 2
needs Embrace Girls Founda-
tion right here and I will do all in
my power to make sure this or-
ganization has what it needs to
serve every child that comes
through their doors."
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion's Embrace Girl Powerl Af-


(Back L-R) Gabrielle Michel-Johnson, Dahlia Miles, School Board Member, Dr. Dorothy
Bendross Mindingall, Embrace Girls Foundation Founder/Executive Director, Velma R.
Lawrence and Superintendent Alberto M. Carvalho. (Front L-R) Myla Smith, Destiny Johnson,
Alyssa Pelaez and Camelia Miles.


ter Shooqql Programs & Camps, a
not for profit 501c(3) mentoring
program established in 2001,
where little girls learn to be
healthy, confident, ambitious
young ladies who strive for aca-
demic excellence.
Where the lives of elementary
and middle school, aged girls
are improved through academic


tutoring, leadership, life (anc
character educational training
- coupled with social and cul-
tural opportunities and expo-.
sure they might not ordinarily
ever experience but, for their
involvement in our innovative
program that advocates and
serves young girls with a par-
ticular interest in those who are


pgk ., , , .. ..
The organization is currently
accepting Applications for its
All Girl All Powerl After School
Academy, Mentoring Program
and 2012 Summer Camps. For
details or additional informa-
tion about the organization,
visit www.embracegirlpower.org
or call 305-270-4099.


IRS warns scam artists

prey on church faithful


By Donna Gehrke-White

Some hucksters are hitting
church pews and other ven-
ues around the country, entic-
ing people to send in false fed-
eral tax returns for cash back,
the Internal Revenue Service
warns.
People are led to believe they


It is occurring throughout the
country, including Florida with
many cases seeming to come
out of the central part of the
state, Dobzinski said.
He issued the age-old warn-
ing: "If it sounds too good to be
true, it probably is."
That includes offers of free
money "with no documentation


He issued the age-old warning: "If it sounds too good


to be true, it probably is."

should file a return with the
IRS for tax credits, refunds or
rebates for which they are not
really entitled, said IRS spokes-
man Michael Dobzinski.
The scam is still going on
even though the April tax dead-
line has long passed, Dobzinksi
said.
"We've seen fliers posted on
church boards," he said.
In some cases people are
charged a fee with the huck-
sters vanishing with the mon-
ey, the spokesman added.
Sometimes the scam artists try
to defraud Uncle Sam by seek-
ing money back from the false
filings: The tardy tax return re-
ports money withheld that re-
ally wasn't, Dobzinski said.


Michael Dobzinski

required," the spokesman said.
They "have been appearing in
community churches around
the country," he added. "Pro-
moters are targeting church
congregations, exploiting their
good intentions and credibility.
These schemes are often spread
by word of mouth among un-
suspecting and well-inten-
tioned people tell their friends
and relatives."
He said he did not have the
names of specific churches tar-
geted.
Anyone with questions about
a tax credit or program should
visit www.IRS.gov, call the IRS
toll-free number at 800-829-
1040 or visit a local IRS Tax-
payer Assistance Center.


St. John observes Hospitality Ministry Day


The Hospitality Ministry Day
will be observed on Sunday, Au-
gust 14th at the 11 a.m. morn-
ing worship service. Our pastor,
Bishop James Adams will be


the morning speaker.
Please come out and support
this effort. Sis. Edwina Pace, is
the president. For more infor-
mation, call 305-372-3877.


Ann Abraham Ministries appreciation program
Ann Abraham Ministries, Elder Abraham.
3415 Grand Ave, Coconut Also join us at 6225 NW 22
Grove appreciation program Ave, August 14 at 3 p.m. with
August 13th at 3 p.m. for Holy Faith Church.


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'
'


Conference teaches


real world spiritual

Pastor and First Lady Keith and Chanel Moore of New Mission
Worship Center hosted a Young Adults Conference, Thursday, Au-
gust 4 through Saturday, August 6. The theme for the conference
was "Real You, Real Jesus, Real Godly Decisions in a Real World."
Every evening featured different speakers including Apostle T.J.
Allen on Thursday, August 4; Elder Odane James on Friday, August
5; and Elder Damion 0. Archat on Saturday, August 6.
New Mission Worship Center is located at 3033 NW 7th Avenue
in Miami.


-Photo credit: Marvin Ellis

Church of the Incarnation

host Torres-Planchat reunion


July 29-31, 2011 was a mar-
velous family reunion week-
end for the children of the late
Bruce Leroy Torres and Cari-
dad Planchat Torres of Miami,
Florida and their Planchat fam-
ily cousins of Tampa, Florida
and Louisville, Kentucky. The
Torres Family (George Torres,
Marie Torres Marvin Ellis, Bea-
trice Torres, Jacqueline Torres
Aranha and their cousin, Alexis
Edwards Virgin) were united
with their Planchat cousins
(Lazaro "Larry" Planchat, Sr.,
his wife, Edna, and their son,
Lazaro, Jr. of Louisville, Ken-
tucky) after Marvin did an in-
ternet search in 2007 for the
relatives of their late mother


who reside in Tampa, Florida.
Until that time the Planchat
cousins has been unknown to
them.
"Larry's" late grandfather,
Enrique Planchat, was the uncle
of Caridad Planchat Torres. His
late father was Henry Valdez
Planchat and his mother, Dalia
Penalver Planchat, still resides
in Tampa.
Last weekend's family reunion
was the third visit to Miami of
the Planchat's to be with their
Torres family cousins. Both
families greatly look forward
to many more visits with on
another and future family
reunions as they maintain their
family bond.


Friday Morning Glory Service


Family, friends and members of Christian Cathedral Church at-
tended one of the weekly Morning Glory Services held each Friday
at the Clover Leaf Park in Miami Gardens. The Morning Glory Ser-
vices draw approximately 25 to 30 people. In addition to a prayer
and worship session, attendants are always provided a brunch
and from week to week can enjoy a wide-variety of activities from
facials, manicures and pedicures to hosting garage sales. Chris-
tian Cathedral Church is lead by Pastor Thea Jones and Associate
Evangelist Birdie Freckelton.



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Fax:305-694-6211


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


^^ai~um P^ *:'HwatfB--
widr,^' "
m^m|P^ v ml,,pi









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Marriage good for gay health?

Citing new research, psychology

group supports gay marriage i7 -. ..


By Sharon Jayson

WASHINGTON The world's
largest organization of psychol-
ogists took its strongest stand
to date supporting full marriage
equity, a move that observers
say will have a far-reaching im-
pact on the national debate.
The policymaking body of the
American Psychological Asso-
ciation (APA) unanimously ap-
proved the resolution 157-0 on
the eve of the group's annual
convention, which opens here
today.
The group, with more than
154,000 members, has long
supported full equal rights for
gays, based on social science
research on sexual orientation.
Now the nation's psychologists
- citing an increasing body of
research about same-sex mar-
riage, as well as increased dis,-
cussion at the state and fediratr
levels took the support to a
new level.
"Now as the country has re-
ally begun to have experience
with gay marriage, our posi-
tion is much clearer and more
straightforward that mar-
riage equity is the policy that
the country should be moving
toward," says Clinton Ander-
son, director of APA's Office
on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and,
Transgender Concerns.
The resolution points to nu-


merous recent studies, includ-
ing findings that "many gay
men and lesbians, like their
heterosexual counterparts, de-
sire to form stable, long-lasting
and' committed intimate rela-
tionships and are successful in
doing so."
It adds that "emerging evi-
dence suggests that statewide
campaigns to deny same-sex
couples legal access to civ-
il marriage are a significant
source of stress to the lesbian,
gay and bisexual residents of
those states and may have neg-
ative effects on their psycholog-
ical well-being."
Six states (Connecticut, Iowa,
Massachusetts, New Hamp-
shire, New York and Vermont)
and the District of Columbia al-
low same-sex marriage.
"Psychologists have been
very important in helping to
keep the discussion at a fact-
based level and not let it steer
off into stereotypes," says M.V.
Lee Badgett, research director
at the non-profit Williams In-
stitute on Sexual Orientation
Law & Public Policy at the Uni-
versity of California-Los Ange-
les.
Sociologist W. Bradford Wil-
cox, director of the National
Marriage Project at the Univer-
sity of Virginia-Charlottesville,
says his board is divided on
the issue and hasn't taken a


-Steve Pfost, AP
LEGALLY WED: Kathy Kane, left, and Mary Kane embrace
each other after saying their marriage vows in a mass wedding
ceremony for gay couples.


stance on same-sex marriage.
He says the APA resolution will
likely have a broad impact.
"I don't think it's very sig-
nificant for the population at
large, but I do think this move
is significant for the ongoing
public policy and legal battles
in Washington and around the
states," he says.
Clinical psychologist Mark
Hatzenbuehler, a Robert Wood
Johnson Foundation Health &
Society Scholar at Columbia
University in New York City,
whose new research is cited in
the resolution, says the courts
tend to look.at these kinds of
policy statements because
"they're really looking to see


what social science research
says about the influence on gay
marriage and marriage bans
on a whole host of outcomes."
Badgett's research of gay
marriage across cultures is
also cited in the resolution.
She says the Netherlands was
the first to allow gay couples
to marry, and it showed "very.
little change in the overall so-
ciety, but it was very important
to gay couples themselves."
The last APA resolution on
sexual orientation and mar-
riage was approved in 2004.
The resolution notes that since
that time, APA has worked on
11 amicus briefs filed in same-
sex marriage cases since 2004.


Fatty foods help curb sad emotions


By Alice Baghdjian

A sweet tooth might not be
the only reason why we reach
for ice cream and cake in times
of stress.
Comfort from the consump-
tion of fatty foods is not derived
purely from the pleasurable
sensory experience of eating
but. a ,kso.thro ghugu-b-aimis sig-s
nailing, according to a study by
scientists a the University of
Leuven, in Belgium.
The study, which was pub-
lished in the Journal of Clini-
cal Investigation, used MRI
scans to investigate the effects
of fatty acids on emotion when
directly injected into the stom-
ach.
Scientists played mournful
music and showed sad images
to a group of 12 participants
before giving half the group
fatty acids through a feeding
tube and a saline solution to


The results showed that
those who were injected with
fatty acids were only half as
sad after watching the images
and listening to the music as
the participants who were giv-
en the saline solution.
"Eating fat seems to make
us less vulnerable to sad emo-
tions, even if we don't know
we're eating fat," Lulkas vanj
Oucen'oivev wo led the re-
search, told medical research
news website HealthDay.
"We bypassed sensory stim-
ulation by infusing fatty ac-
ids directly into the stomach,
without the subjects knowing
whether they were getting fat
or saline," he said.
Although the study has impli-
cations for obesity, depression
and eating disorders, more re-
search is needed to determine
whether the findings may have
any value in treatment of the
illnesses, van Oudenhove said.


the rest.
Without knowing which sub-
stance they received, the vol-


unteers rated their mood on a
scale of one to nine before and
during scanning.


'Food can act as medicine' Americans know it


go percent

can identify

functional'fare

By Gregory Connolly

Say you eat yogurt for your
health, and most Americans
will know what you mean: You
are targeting that food's bone-
building calcium and gut-
friendly probiotics.
In fact, Americans are much
more aware of the health ben-
efits of specific functionall"
foods than they were a decade
ago, reports a survey released
today.
When the International Food
Information Council began its
survey in 1998, "only about
three-fourths of Americans
could name a food and its re-
lated- health benefits," says
the group's Elizabeth Rahavi.
"Now, almost nine out of 10
can. A lot has to do with sci-


entific studies coming
out, talking about
the benefits of a
food and its re-
lationship to good
health."
The IFIC defines
functional foods as
"foods or food compo-
nents that may pro-
vide benefits beyond
basic nutrition."
"People are 1,000 per-
cent more conscious of the
fact that food can act as medi-
cine and help prevent lots of
diseases," says Jean Carper,
author of several best-selling
books about functional food.
With such broad aware-
ness, are people actually eat-
ing heath foods? "Only about a
third of Americans say they're
making dietary changes be-
cause of a health condition,"
says Rahavi. More are "making
dietary changes because they
want to improve their overall
well-being, so they have ener-
gy to go about their day."


Top five functional foods:

1. Salmon: Heart, memory brain
2. Blueberries: Anti-aging, brain
3. Apples: Lung function (be sure to eat the
apple skin)
4. Nuts: Antioxidants, good fat
5. Legumes: Blood sugar, heart


Cost, taste and
availability were the
key reasons given for not eat-
ing health foods.
"Expense comes out on top,"
Rahavi says. "People have this
perception that functional
foods are more expensive, but
in reality, when you look at
something like a whole-grain
cereal or a yogurt, it's not."
The survey was conducted
online by Cambridge, Mass.,
based Cogent Research. There
were 1,000 adults age 18 and
over in the survey with a mar-
gin of error of + or 3.1 per-


cent and a 95 percent confi-
dence level in the results.
Also noted in the survey:
The nutrients and com-
ponents considered most im-
portant by Americans in the
survey include calcium (92
percent), vitamin D (90 per-
cent), protein (87 percent), B
vitamins (86 percent), ome-
ga-3 fatty acids (85 percent),
probiotics (81 percent) and fi-
ber (79 percent).
95 percent of consum-
ers are confident they have a
"great" or "moderate amount"
of control over their health.


Doctors, hospitals fear getting stiffed by U.S.


By Parija Kavilanz

NEW YORK -Doctors, hos-
pitals, nursing homes and
pharmacies might not get
paid for products and services
if the federal government de-
faults on its debt next week.
Some physician groups, an-
ticipating this scenario, have
started to warn their members
that a possible default means


their Medicare paychecks may
not get mailed.
The American Academy of
Family Physicians, which has
more than 100,000 members,
alerted them this week that
a default means the govern-
ment will only have enough
money to pay about half of its
bills, resulting in a likely delay
in Medicare payments to phy-
sicians.


In that scenario, the gov-
ernment would likely halt
Medicare reimbursements to
doctors until the debt ceiling
issue is resolved, the group
said.
"We felt it was important
to tell our members for be
ready for this," said Dr. Ro-
land Goertz. president of the
American Academy of Family
Physicians. "It is highly likely


that there will be some impact
upon Medicare payments."
The American College of
Surgeons sent out a similar
alert via e-mail to its members
this week, warning them that
"if Congress and the president
do not raise the debt ceiling
by Aug. 2, there is a chance
'that Medicare claims will not
be paid."
Please turn to DOCTORS 18B


I'm drinking my


way to health

EVIDENCE NOW SHOWS THERE'S


A BEVERAGE TO


PREVENT


JUST


ABOUT EVERY DISEASE.


By Jim Sollisch

So I'm pretty amped. I mean
I'm hoppin'. I typed those last
two sentences m less than a
second. I went out for a bike
ride earlier today and got
pulled over for speeding. I'm
on my sixth cup of coffee. It's
part of my cancer-fighting
health regimen. Prostate
cancer is the number one
cancer among men over 50.
But thankfully, you can do
something about it. Drink up.
More French Roast, please.
Add another shot of espresso
to that.
(love coffee. Thank God'
for studies like this one that
appeared in the Journal of
the National Cancer institute.
The study of 48,000 men
found that those who drank
more than six cups of coffee
per day reduced their risk
of developing lethal prostate
cancer by 60 percent when
compared with non-coffee
drinkers. And if you're not big
on caffeine, the good news in
the study is that decaf also
works.
I'm also drinking 64 ounces
of water a day. That seems
to be the one thing everyone
can agree on: Drink lots of
water. Your yoga instructor
will tell you that. So will
your dermatologist and your
orthopedist. Who doesn't
understand the toxic-
cleansing joint-lubricating-
skin-hydrating benefits


of water?
There's one business
downside, though. I find that
clients don't appreciate it
when I excuse myself from
meetings every nine minutes.
Besides the water and the
coffee, I'm trying to drink
pure, unsweetened cranberry
juice. It's great for preventing
tooth decay and kidney
stones. Of course, it's pretty
bitter, so I have to mix it
with plenty of pomegranate
juice which, thankfully,
helps reduce plaque build-
up on the arteries and may
help delay that onset of
Alzheimer's. And I always
try to drink several cups of
green tea each day. I wouldn't
want to deprive my body of its
powerful antioxidants. Which
is why I also imbibe as much
pure blueberry juice as I can
afford. Ah, the wonderful
world of beverages. I salute
you.
In fact, I propose a toast
to you. Raise, high, your
wine glasses, comrades-
in-preventive health. Just
make sure they're filled with
nice Cab or Merlot, even a
Zinfandel will do. As long as
it's red. Studies have found
that red wine can help lower
bad cholesterol and blood
pressure. And you don't'
need a study to tell you that
a couple of glasses take the
edge off all that caffeine you
ingested in the battle against
prostate cancer.


Six energy-boosting snacks


By Gregory Connolly

irt's4 p.r. -fter a lol'g day t" '
the office do you know where
your energy is?
Joy Bauer, author of the new-
ly revised "Food Cures" (Rodale,
$21.99), has advice on eating to
help everything from your heart
to your hair. "When it comes to
energy, you really want things
that help stabilize your blood-
sugar levels," Bauer says.
"Some of the best foods will be
things that have a combination
of protein, high-quality carbo-
hydrates and fiber."
Her suggestions for snacks
that boost and sustain energy:
Soy crisps. Rich in protein
and lacking the salt and grease


in potato chips.
Hummus and red bell pep-
per. Ort dh'!ad fiber--rid~c'ip ;
pepper packed with vitamin C.
Orange with nuts. Nut cal-
ories add up fast: 1 1/2 ounces
is all you need.
Grapes and part-skim string
cheese. Full of high-quality
carbs and protein.
Apple with nut butter.
Dress a grab-and-go apple up
with a tablespoon of natural
nut butter peanut, almond
or cashew,
Homemade trail mix. Add
nuts and dried fruit to low-calo-
rie, high-fiber cereal.
Non-fat yogurt and ba-
nana. Choose a six-ounce con-
tainer.


. .


Gone but not forgotten?


Have you forgotten

so soon about your departed

loved one? Keep them in

your memory with an

in memorial or a

happy birthday remembrances

in our obituary section.



Call classified 305-694-6225

classified@miamitimesonline.com


TOie tiami ,ime'


-- Photo Credit Simon Newman
Alexis Coleman spoons coriander creme fraiche onto sweet
potato fritters with fried halloumi during a brunch at her
apartment in London, March 5, 2011. Secret supper clubs,
usually in people's homes, have sprung up all over London
providing adventurous foodies with the chance to eat in inti-
mate and personal settings.









Th 1 iMI i les





Hea th


'e Iiness
Sponsored by North Shore Medical Center
"Once You Know, It's Where To Go"


Wealth plays out differently by race


Well-off Blacks, Hispanics likely to have'
relatively poor neighbors


By Haya El Nasser
The most successful Blacks and
Hispanics are more likely to have
poor neighbors than are whites,
according to new analysis of U.S.
Census Bureau data.
The average affluent Black and
Hispanic household defined in
the study as earning more than
$75,000 a year lives in a poorer
neighborhood than the average
lower-income non-Hispanic white


household that makes less than
$40,000 a year.
"Separate translates to unequal
even for the most successful Black
and Hispanic minorities," said
sociologist John Logan, director of
US2010 Project at Brown Universi-
ty, which studies trends in Ameri-
can society.
"Blacks are segregated and even
affluent Blacks are pretty segre-
gated," said Logan, who analyzed
2005-2009 data for the nation's


384 metropolitan areas. "African-
Armericans v..ho rr.-ill,- su,>-cei-ded
live in neighborhoods where people
around them have not succeeded
to the same extent."
The disparities are strongest in
large metro areas in the Northeast
and Midwest where segregation
has always been high. It's lowest
in more recent booming parts of
the Sun Belt.
"White middle-class families
have the option to live in a com-
munity that matches their own
credentials," Logan'says. "If you're
African American and want to live
with people like you in social class,
Please turn to WEALTH 18B


r


f-1


/y


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Fsh. oil could help.

baie fighSt colds1 *-
-yeLida SCrrollR. marishan, areserche
inS the.Rollins Scho oSubi


WARD OFF
BAD BREATH
Whether you call it bad breath or halitosis,
it's an unpleasant condition that's cause for
embarrassment. Some people with bad breath
aren't even aware there's a problem.
If you're concerned about bad breath, see your
dentist. He or she can help identify the cause and,
if it's due to an oral condition, develop a treatment
plan. In the meantime, try these helpful hints,
courtesy of the American Dental Association:
What you eat affects the air you exhale.
Avoid certain foods, such as garlic and onions,
that contribute to objectionable breath odor.
Brushing and mouthwash will only mask the odor
temporarily.
Brush and floss daily so particles of food don't
remain in the mouth, collecting bacteria while
rotting.
Prevent dry mouth, which may be caused by
various medications, saliilpp~ g)nq(p Ii0an ip i enri I ,
continuously breathing through the mouth. Use an
artificial saliva (prescribed by your dentist), chew
sugarless candy or gum, and increase your fluid
intake.
Stop using tobacco products. Ask your dentist
for tips on kicking the habit.
Bad breath may also be the sign of a medical
disorder, such as a local infection in the respiratory
tract, chronic sinusitis, post-nasal drip, chronic
bronchitis, diabetes, gastrointestinal disturbance,
or a liver or kidney ailment.

WINE MAY PROTECT
SKIN FROM SUNBURNS

By Melissa Dahl

Important health tip for the summer: Drink more
wine! A better protection against harmful sunburns
might be a healthy dose of SPF sauvignon blanc,
suggests a new Spanish study.
A compound found in grapes or grape derivatives
may protect skin cells from skin-damaging ultravio-
let radiation, report researchers from the University
of Barcelona and the Spanish National Research
Council.The flavonoids found in grapes work to
halt the chemical reaction that kills skin cells and
causes sun damage. Here's what happens: When UV
rays hit your skin, they activate "reactive oxygen
species," or ROS, which then oxidize big molecules
like lipids and DNA.This activates particular en-
zymes that kill skin cells.
But grapes' flavonoids work to decrease the for-
mation of the ROS's in skin cells that were exposed
to UVA and UVB rays.The researchers, led by
Marta Cascante, a biochemist at the University of
Barcelona and director of the research project, note
that this finding may lead to better sun-shielding
drugs and cosmetics.
The study was ,pAib.l.;-cl in the Journal of Agri-
cultural and Food Chemistry.
Previously, vino has also been found to fight
Alzheimer's, ward off prostate cancer and even
prevent cavities. We'll drink to that.


- ^ -tj~^U iu * ilatiljti LSam
-1kawy u ur.i6- 4 gAVhzis www
aW" SUC.IC *1I1A111II41 U:-wLfI WiL i Apft;ja-auLL


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Incoromes
People with household incomes of
more than $75,000 live in neighbor-
hoods with this share of household
making less than $40,000:
Non-Hispanic 8.9%
White 8
Black 13.9%
Hispanic 13%
Asian 8.7%
Source: John Logan, Brown University sociologist
and director of the US2010 Project


~p~~s-


--s
--
--
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--
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? T I









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Miami-Dade County places restrictions on pain clinics


On Tuesday, August 2, the
Miami-Dade Commission ap-
proved an ordinance spon-
sored by Commissioner Bar-
bara J. Jordan that requires
all owners of pain clinics
within the county to register
their clinic with the Depart-
ment of Consumer Services
(CSD). Clinics will not only be
required to display this regis-
tration for their patients, but
CSD will maintain a database
of registered clinics to ensure
none are involved in the ille-
gal distribution of prescription
medications.
Several South Florida or-
ganizations have reported


an increase in prescription
drug abuse in Miami-Dade
County. Last August, the
South Florida Behavioral Net-
work gave a presentation to
the Florida Drug and Alcohol
Abuse Association; the find-
ings included ari increased
number of prescription drug-
related deaths due to oxyco-
done and benzodiazepines in
Miami-Dade County over the
past few years. The Miami-
Dade County Addiction Ser-
vices Board has reported that
nearly 1,000 infants born in
Florida hospitals were treated
for drug withdrawal in 2009,
primarily for withdrawal from


BARBARA J. JORDAN
Miami-Dade Commission


oxycodone and other pre-
scription drugs. In addition,
the Florida Medical Examiner
Commission has released an-
nual and interim reports cit-
ing increases in opioid deaths.
While pain clinics are re-
quired to register with the
State of Florida, this ordi-
nance takes it a step further,
allowing for more local control,
the creation of a task force to
review the State's legislation
on pain clinics and its effects
on Miami-Dade, and issuing a
moratorium on new pain clin-
ics for six months to allow any
additional ideas or recommen-
dations to be proffered to the


Debt situation may have impact on healthcare system


DOCTORS
continued from 16B

In 2010, the federal govern-
ment paid out $515.8 billion in
total Medicare benefits to health
care providers, including doc-
tors, hospitals, nursing facili-
ties, home health care centers
and pharmacies.
Here's a breakdown of Medi-
care payments to those provid-
ers last year:
$168 billion to hospitals
$64.5 billion to doctors
$26.9 ,billion to nursing fa-
cilities
$19.1 billion to home health
centers
$61.7 billion to, pharmacies
as part of Medicare's prescrip-
tion drug programs.


Goertz said a halt in payments
is a serious issue to physicians,
especially since about a quar-
ter of all patients seen by his
group's members are Medicare
beneficiaries.
"Unfortunately that percent-
age has been dropping anyway
because of Medicare reimburse-
ment problems to doctors," Go-
ertz said.
He fears that a longer-term
ripple effect of a default could
worsen that trend.
A stoppage in payments be-
cause of default could threaten
to turn more physicians away
from Medicare patients, he said,
adding that doctors who aren't
getting paid may look to replace
Medicare patients with those
who do ensure that physicians


will be paid.
The American Medical Associ-
ation, whose more than 250,000
members include doctors, medi-
cal students and faculty mem-
bers, said it has contacted the
administration and "expressed
the importance of continuing
to process Medicare claims to
ensure physicians are paid in a
timely manner and protect se-
niors' access to health care."
The American Hospital Asso-
ciation said in a statement to
CNNMoney that it was unclear
what impact a default would
have on hospitals.
"When there was the possibil-
ity of a government shutdown,
[the government] did not issue
specific guidance about pay-
ments to hospitals until the


very last minute. We expect
that would be the same case
here as well," said Matt Fen-
wick, spokesman for the hospi-
tal group.
The Centers for Medicare
& Medicaid Services declined
to say whether Medicare pay-
ments to health care providers
would be affected if a default
occurs.
In a statement to CNNMoney,
the agency said: "As the presi-
dent has said repeatedly over
the past six months, there is no
alternative to raising the debt
limit. The only way to prevent a
default crisis and protect Amer-
ica's creditworthiness is to en-
act a timely debt limit increase,
which we remain confident
Congress will do."


Taking extra good care of your body while pregnant


SPF'rCE
coni....u from 17B

with nausea, try eating five or
six small meals a day, rather
than three large ones.
Drink plenty of fluids, but
stay away from large amounts
of caffeine, which have been
associated with a higher .rate
of miscarriage. Becoming
dehydrated can cause
premature or early labor. Avoid
drinking alcohol while pregnant,
as this can damage a developing
baby's nervous system, as well
as cause growth retardation or
facial abnormalities. Also stop
smoking. Smoking is linked
to stillbirth, prematurity, low
birth weight, sudden infant
death syndrome, asthma and
other respiratory problems.
Check with your doctor or
certified nurse-midwife about
starting or continuing an
exercise program. The U.S.


Department of Health and
Human Services recommends
that healthy pregnant women
get at least two and a half hours'
of moderate-intensity aerobic
activity each week or about 30
minutes every day. Exercising
regularly can help improve sleep,
prevent excess weight gain,
lower the risk of developing
preeclampsia or gestational
diabetes, reduce recovery time
and ease pregnancy-related
problems, such as back pain,
constipation, varicose veins,
swelling and exhaustion.
Over-the-counter or
prescription medications may
not be safe for a developing
fetus. If you were taking a
medication before you became'
pregnant, ask your health care
provider if it is safe to continue.
Have regular dental check-
ups because some pregnant
women may experience red,
swollen gums that bleed.


easily. During pregnancy,
women should avoid exposure
to environmental. hazards
including lead, mercury,
arsenic, pesticides, solvents
and secondhand smoke that
could potentially lead to
miscarriage or birth defects.
Healthy pregnancy habits
should start early as early in
the pregnancy as possible, or
even before you get pregnant.
For more information about
staying healthy and safe
during your pregnancy, talk
with your doctor or visit the
March of Dimes Web site at
www.marchofdimes.com.
North Shore Medical Center
offers advanced medical care
by skilled professionals, who
have the experience to handle
routine deliveries and fully
address any complications
that may occur. NSMC has
been delivering babies for a
half century, and their services


have earned the highest
quality ranking. The facilities
at North Shore Medical Center
are designed for the comfort
of you and your family. Each
member of our staff is trained
to enhance the experience of
giving birth. From prenatal
educational classes to our
Neonatal Intensive Care, from
our obstetricians to nursing
staff, all North Shore's services
are focused on' you and your
baby.
North Shore Medical Center
also features the only Level III
Neonatal Intensice Care Unit
(NICU) in Northeren Miami-
Dade county. Services include
24-hour coverage of certified
neonatologists, perinatologists
to treat high risk pregnancies,
and pediatric surgeons.
For more information on
maternity services or classes
at North Shore Medical Center,
please call 305-835-6000.


Asthma related gene in most Blacks recently discovered


ASTHMA
continued from 17B

among Blacks.
Carole Ober of the Univer-
sity of Chicago, who co-leads
the EVE consortium, said the
findings confirm the signifi-
cance of four genes identified
in a large European asthma
genetics study published last
year called GABRIEL, offer-
ing strong evidence that these
genes are important across
ethnic groups.


But because the study was
so large and ethnically diverse
- including data on European
Americans, Blacks, African
Caribbeans and Latinos it
enabled the researchers to find
this new gene variant that ex-
ists only in Blacks and African
Caribbeans.
This new variant, located in a
gene called PYHIN1, is part of a
family of genes linked with the
body's response to viral infec-
tions, Ober said.
"We were very excited when


we realized it doesn't exist in
Europe," she said.
The team stressed that each
gene variant on its own plays
only a small role in increas-
ing asthma risk, but that risk
could be multiplied when com-
bined with other risk genes and
with environmental factors,
such as smoking, that also in-
crease asthma risk.
"It's been extraordinarily
challenging to try to find varia-
tion in genes that are associ-
ated with risk for developing


asthma that can be replicated
among populations. It's a very
complex disease with a lot of
genes and a lot of environmen-
tal factors influencing risk,"
Ober said.
The findings now give re-
searchers new areas to explore
in understanding the interplay
of genetics and the environ-
ment in asthma risk, and may
lead to better treatments.
"What you see here in this
paper is only the beginning,"
Nicolae said.


A* C


Caring for a loved one with cancer


Special to the NNPA


Many cancer patients to-
day receive part of their care
at home. People with cancer
are living longer and many
patients want to be cared for
at home as much as possible.
This support is often given by
family caregivers, who may
be spouses, partners, chil-
dren, relatives, or friends -
anyone who is helping a loved
one get through cancer treat-
ment. Today, family caregiv-
ers do many things that used
to be done in the hospital or
a doctor's office. In fact, they
play a large role in the health
care system in the U.S.
Your life will change in
many ways when you begin
to provide care for someone
with cancer. As the patient's


needs change during and af-
ter cancer treatment, your
role will also change and the
entire experience can affect
your quality of life. There may
be physical and emotional de-
mands from caregiving, and,
for some, social and money
issues as well.
Cancer patients may need
help with many basic ac-
tivities during the day, such
as using the toilet, moving
around the house and chang-
ing positions in bed. As you
try to meet the physical de-
mands of caregiving, you
need to take care of yourself.
In the beginning, there may
be a lot of support from your
friends and you may be able
to continue working and keep
up your relationships. But
some caregivers note that as


they continue to care for their
loved one, the time demands
may increase and friends may
call or visit less often. If this
happens' to you, and if there
are problems in your relation-
ship with the patient, your
sense of isolation can become
a problem and you may want
to seek outside help. On the
other hand, the challenges of
caregiving can also bring you
closer to the patient as you
help them cope with the chal-
lenges cancer brings.
There are many financial
costs of cancer. Families
must pay insurance deduct-
ibles, co-payments, and the
cost of services that are not
covered by insurance, such
as transportation and home
care help. Some caregivers
give up. their jobs and in-


come so they can stay home
with the patient, which can
make it harder to pay for ev-
erything. And financial stress
often causes additional emo-
tional stress.
All of these changing cir-
cumstances, new feelings and
major demands on your time
can be overwhelming. But
this is a crucial time to care
for your own mind, body, and
spirit. Giving care and sup-
port during cancer isn't easy,
yet many caregivers find that
it helps them look at life in
new ways. Some caregivers
find it helpful to join a sup-
port group or to talk to a
counselor, psychologist, or
other mental health profes-
sional. For additional infor-
mation go to www.cancer.
gov.


County Commission. Current-
ly, there are 109 pain clinics
in Miami-Dade County.
"There are many pain clinic
operators who adhere to the
requirements placed upon
them by the State of Florida
in order to run a legitimate
business. However, we cannot
ignore the prevalence of clin-
ics which knowingly prescribe
medication to addicts and
'doctor shoppers," said Com-
missioner Jordan. "This kind


of unconscionable practice
can lead to crime in the sur-
rounding area, not to mention
death by the users who abuse
these powerful drugs. This or-
dinance makes it even more
difficult for those 'pill mills' to
operate within our borders."
The ordinance will be effec-
tive ten days after the passage
of the legislation. A detailed
copy of the ordinance can be
found online here: www.mi-
amidade.gov.


Fish oil protects against colds


FISH OIL
continued from 17B

The new moms were inter-
viewed at one month, three
months and six months after
the babies were born. Each
time, the women were asked
whether the babies had experi-
enced various respiratory symp-
toms, such as cough, phlegm,
nasal congestion and wheezing
in the previous 15 days. They
were also asked if whether their
infants had caught a cold dur-
ing that time.
At one month, babies whose
mothers took DHA experienced
shorter periods of respiratory
symptoms when they got sick.
As for the immune-boosting
effect, Ramakrishnan points to
earlier research showing that
the function of a host of differ-
ent kinds of cells can be im-
proved by omega-3 fatty acids.
Time will tell how well the
results will hold up. Earlier


research suggested that DHA
supplements might boost cog-
nitive development in babies,
but a large study published last
year in the Journal of the Amer-
ican Medical Association found
no such impact.
Dr. Samuel Parry, chief of the
division of Maternal-Fetal Medi-
cine at the University of Penn-
sylvania Health System, is wait-
ing for more research before he
starts recommending the sup-
plement to his patients.
"We don't think DHA causes
harm in pregnancy," he said.
"But we'r6 skeptical that it re-
ally helps prevent colds in ba-
bies."
Parry, a member of the Cen-
ter for Research on Reproduc-
tion and Women's Health, also
urged pregnant women to be
careful when choosing any nu-
tritional supplements, because
many are not regulated by the
federal Food and Drug Admin-
istration.


Wealth depends on ethnicity


WEALTH.
continued from 17B

you have to live in a community
where you are in the minority."
Suburbs of Atlanta and Wash-
ington, D.C., are exceptions be-
cause they are home to large,
affluent Black populations in
established neighborhoods.
In Philadelphia, Hispanics
live in neighborhoods that are
25.4 percent poor and affluent
Hispanics in areas that are 13.7
percent poor.
The average white household
lives in neighborhoods that
are 8.4 percent poor. But fast-
growing cities in Nevada, Flori-
da, Georgia and North Carolina
show a much narrower gap.
Affluent Blacks are more ex-
posed to poverty than the av-
erage non-Hispanic white in all
but two of the top 50 metro ar-
eas with the most Black house-
holds: Las Vegas and Riverside,
Calif.
"Newer growth is less segre-
gated," said Roderick Harrison,
sociologist at Howard Univer-
sity and at the Joint Center for
Political and Economic Stud-


48FOR 2-MONTH
-j 34 8 HIP l'.lI


ies, a Washington, D.C., think
tank. "People are coming into
neighborhoods that have not
become characterized as Black
or white or Hispanic. They're
moving in on a more equal
footing."
Except for the most affluent
Asians, minorities at every in-
come level live in poorer neigh-
borhoods than do whites with
comparable incomes. Affluent
Asians are actually less ex-
posed to poverty in their neigh-
borhoods than even affluent
whites and live in whiter neigh-
borhoods than poor Asians.
Neighborhood poverty is
linked to lower-quality schools
and health care and to higher
crime rates.
"Even though they have in-
come comparable to whites,
they don't have access to
schools or other neighborhood
amenities that would be com-
parable to those available to
white families," Harrison said.
"Some better-off Black and
Hispanic families are neverthe-
less living with the same prob-
lems poor Blacks and Hispan-
ics are living with."


,s32 -
SfFOR 6-MONTH
l Z UT L'RIpi'.O,


CHEK OM NEia [ .a aa[nCOaD Ca RGE M .YREITCRD


Exp___

Fxn


Exp____


Authorized Signature

Name_

Address


City


State_ Zip


Phone


email


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818 or
Subscribe online at www.MiamiTimesonline.com
Includes Foida sates tax


OJ









BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR O\\N DESTINY


19B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Gospel's Delois Campbell dead at 85 Father Rolle


to preacn at

St. Agnes
On Sunday, August 14th,
the Reverend Father Denrick
Rolle, of the Anglican Diocese of
the Bahamas, will be the guest
preacher and celebrant at the 9
a.m. worship.
Father Rolle is a deeply spiri-
tual person who is widely hailed
throughout the Caribbean.
You are invited to worship
and fellowship with us on this
very special occasion.


By Carla K. Johnson

CHICAGO (AP) Delois Bar-
rett Campbell, a member of the
award-winning Barrett Sisters
trio who electrified audiences
worldwide with their power-
ful gospel harmonies, died last
Tuesday. She was 85.
Campbell died at a Chicago
hospital after a long illness,
her daughter, Mary Campbell
said.
The Barrett Sisters, raised
on Chicago's South Side and
coached to sing by an aunt,
grew up to become what mu-
sic critic Howard Reich of the
Chicago Tribune has called
"the greatest female trio in gos-
pel history." Campbell was the
oldest of the three.
"I believe she was born to
sing," Mary Campbell said of
her mother in a July 2011 in-
terview with The Associated
Press. "Each time she sang it
was as if she were perform-
ing to a cathedral full of peo-
ple, no matter how small the


group was."
The trio shared a gospel lin-
eage with the greats. In the
girls' youth, Thomas A. Dorsey,
now considered the father of
gospel, was stirring up change
as music director of the city's
Pilgrim Baptist Church, where
he mixed the worldly and the
sacred during the Great De-
pression.
The Roberta Martin Sing-
ers, a touring gospel group,
emerged from Pilgrim Bap-
tist's youth choir, and Camp-
bell joined it when she was
in high school. The popular
music of the Andrews Sisters
also influenced Campbell and
her sisters. When they were
young, they practiced blending
their voices on both religious
and secular songs. The sisters
recorded their first album to-
gether, "Jesus Loves Me," in
the mid-1960s.
New generations discovered
the Barrett Sisters when they
appeared in the 1982 docu-
mentary "Say Amen, Some-


body."
New Yorker film critic Pau-
line Kael described the trio as
"dramatic, physically striking
women with ample figures in
shiny, clinging blue gowns."
She wrote that they "sing so
exhilaratingly that they create
a problem." Kael wanted more
music, less talking, in the film.
The film opened doors for the
Barrett Sisters, Mary Campbell
said. "That's when they began
their European travels," she


said. "It gave them the public-
ity they couldn't afford."
The sisters appeared in Patti
LaBelle's 1990 television spe-
cial "Going Home to Gospel."
In 2008, they received the Am-
bassador Bobby Jones Legend
Award at the Stellar Awards,
the national gospel music
awards show.
Campbell's husband, the
Rev. Frank Campbell, died
in 2000. The couple had four
children; two are deceased.
The surviving members of
the Barrett Sisters, Rodessa
Barrett Porter and Billie Bar-
rett GreenBey, sang with guest
vocalist Tina Brown in March
2011 to celebrate Campbell's
85th birthday at a gospel
concert in a Chicago church.
Campbell, her voice dimin-
ished to a whisper, watched
from a chair near the altar.
In a video clip from the con-
cert, Brown paid tribute to
Campbell. "She is my personal
queen of the gospel," Brown
said.


Joe Lee Wilson, a leader of '70s loft-jazz movement, dies at 75


By Peter Keepnews

Joe Lee Wilson, an acclaimed
singer who was also a leader of
the loft-jazz movement in the
1970s, died last Sunday at his
home in Brighton, England. He
was 75.
The cause was congestive
heart failure, his wife, Jill, said.
Wilson, a baritone with a res-
onant, seductive voice in the
tradition of Billy Eckstine and
a style rooted in the blues of
his native Southwest, seemed
destined for big things when he
signed with Columbia Records
in 1969. But for reasons that
remain unclear, most of the re-
cordings he made for Columbia


were not released,
and although he
went on to record for
various small labels,
and to enjoy criti-
cal praise and some
success especially
in Europe, where he
spent the last three
decades of his life
- he stayed largely WI
under the radar for
most of his career.
In the early 1970s Wilson be-
came closely associated with
the jazz avant-garde, working
with the saxophonist Archie
Shepp and other exponents
of free jazz. In 1972 he was
among the organizers of the


New York Musicians'
Jazz Festival, featur-
ing avant-gardists who
felt snubbed by the
Newport Jazz Festival,
which was presented
in New York for the
first time that sum-
mer. A year later, Wil-
son was on the New-
ON port-New York bill.
At around the same
time, Wilson opened the 100-
seat Ladies' Fort in a base-
ment on Bond Street in NoHo.
It quickly became one of the
most noteworthy of the do-it-
yourself musician-run perfor-
mance spaces in Lower Man-
hattan, known generically


as jazz lofts, which served as
valuable showcases and work-
shops for more experimental
types of jazz at a time when
musicians were finding em-
ployment opportunities scarce
and nightclubs were going out
of business.
The Ladies' Fort was a shoe-
string operation, generating
more enthusiasm than money.
"Since we were turned down for
a grant, we pay the musicians
by giving them two-thirds of
the receipts we take in at the
door," Wilson told The New
York Times in 1977. "The other
third goes for the rent. Which
is two months behind." The La-
dies' Fort closed in 1979.


?1

I|
%


C,


Father Denrick Rolle


Women's Day at Greater St. James
Greater St. James M.B. In-
ternational Church will host
their 54th Annual Women's
Day. Mrs. Jinnie Cooper, the
wife of J.W. Cooper, Emeritus
of St. Mark Missionary Baptist
Church, will be our speaker at
11 a.m. worship services.
The church is located at 4875
N.W. 2nd Avenue, 305-693-
2726. Chairperson, Mrs. Jan-
nesta Flemings, co-chairper-
son, Mrs. Margaret Rolle.
Dr. William H. Washington,
Sr. is the pastor. Mrs. Jinnie Cooper


Actress, singer Jane White dead at 88


By Paul Vitello

Jane White, an actress who
made her reputation in the
1960s and '70s in Shakespear-
ean and classical Greek drama
in New York but who felt ham-
pered by the racial attitudes of
casting directors toward light-
skinned Black performers like
herself, died on July 24 at her
home in Greenwich Village. She
was 88.
The cause was cancer, said


Joan K. Harris, her friend and
executor.
White, who also employed a
rich mezzo-soprano voice as a
sometime cabaret singer, spoke
openly about the peculiar ra-
cial challenge she faced in the
1960s: though roles for Black
performers were increasing,
casting agents were continu-
ing to think mainly in terms of
"Black" parts and "white" parts.
"I've just always been too
'white' to be 'Black' and too


a .:


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue

Order of Services
Wed Ilwrie'.'.ry Playor
9 m 12 piT,
AMolning S ni,.u II a m
S in. ..[e wounhp 3 JO p ',
lue, Pier Me.r, 1j0 p rT.
fin Bible Siluy i '0 p m


Dr r .S mt


Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue
O n.j ^I (.f


uraer o Services
:.i* diy uhool QP'om
ou, MA),,i,'gi,-,, 11 a m
luidur Bbl. ,iudy
| FIerdo AM."wv" II] 10 i
Wed I ,bl iudNy FI'' A JO p,
SThu'i. U111 rah Mr,,ry I i iOUpm
Rev. D. Gl- T .a .x


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.

Order of Services
Man ihru hFr iNon Ou Proayer
U6lslu dy Ikyul', ?pm
Sunday wo:l,hp 111 a m
Sunder y ',i'11 9 ]U 3 aT





St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sunday 73 rid I I am
Worrh'p %rv,(u
SJO am 'runday i h,li
lurday In BPm bl'lud
Bp r Plrl Melo rg


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Sa-ol 9 45 a m
W worshipp 11am
EBible Study Thuisday 7 30 p m
V--ulh MKnisry
Mon Wed 6 pm




Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Avenue

Order of Services
Eallywot',hp /am
Sunday Srhool 9 am
NB( I 1)S'uam
-t'P11 d II 1nT WolLi4p opn
Mlrun urd Bibl1
CIOH luiday t, 3i p m

.Ta .


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
[oily Sunday Worihip 130 aom
SundaySthoolI a9 30 am
Surday Morr.n Worhlp II aa
Sunday ring Soernie br m
Tuaiday Proy1r M.,', I .W Iitu )P

Rev. Mchael Sre


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue


I *: ii


Order of Services
e civreSp ihsroW: YA0illiS


Morning 10 a.m.
P Church School 8:30 a.m.
L l^ ^ WEDNESDAY
Feeding Ministry 12 noon
S B Bible Study 7 p.m.



Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street

Order of Services
(Churh Sunday Ihoil 8 30a T.
S Sunday Wohipar.. 10 a m
Mid Weel S'r.e wudele.d'y %
Hour oa P0ral r iur Day Pray',
i n I pT,
Ivenrig Wairhp Ipm


93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street

Order of Services
S13 i a m Early Morning Wor irp
11 a m Morning Worhlp
Evening Worship
ki & 3rd Sunday b p -T,
hlu1day Bible rudr 7 pm




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Avenue

Order of Services
SundaySrhool 9 30 am
Morning Pil'.u Vor.hl1 II am
N;rrr and Thid Sunday
ei.nng orsh'p al 6pm
j PayII Meing1& B ble 5idpm
lue,day 7 pm


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International
2300 N.W. 135th Street


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.,
11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
_-1- mm is, ai SuQtis


~1


Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a.m. Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday General Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS/Comcast 3 Saturday- 7:30 a.m.
www.pembrokeporkchurchofchrist.com pembrokeporkcoc@bellsouth.net


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue

--- -- Order of Services
SuTday 730 &I IaB
SundaySvhool loam
I ,).iday Ipm Bble
Sluily Parri Mt inq BlU
B\ i o Ihu,, briloe
FvIIuo 7 I Pr.


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court

SOrder of Ser
t rod lDay Sunday Siah


vices
ol9 4am


SSurday Mornirg Wornh.p I I amn
, Sunday Men B.ble Sludy i p m
Sunday id., BhblSe udy s pm
i Su'd idenilg Wiarhp b pm


Il i


m ath.., ., z'-a.i .g ,_
'4 /. ..,k.., ."'t ,
... i


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street

Order of Services
SHour of Prayer 6-30 a.m. Early Morning Wi
Sunday School 9-30 a m Morning Wor
Youth Minislry Study, Wed 7 p m Prayer Bible


orhip 7 30 a m
ship II am
Study, Wed 7 p m


Noonday Allor Prayer (M F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday II a.m 1 p m
WWw frirnnrdhnmbaimn nrn Ifrndrhirnr. irhl.Inlloni nnor


Minister Brother Job Israel
(Hebrew Israellites)
305-799-2920

--~ al ng' of freedom
SPiason Minilrne
iP\- o. O B Lo26513
aiard'.onlle FL 3.221


r lil peralnl d opp erafle
IndBiblte-,iudr Da.. *144


U


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


Order of Services
S Early ',"unday
Morning W.rrhp 730am
SundaySihool 9 10am
Morning W orh.p II a m
Praye, a.d Bble vud,
.Merirg Ilul I p n It


or T.u .Mi. Si.ismh


~I


IrTIT~KR~


..rm^


I I


I- ... .


-j;


F-A-A


i i


i









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


THILMT rvIIAKTa l -l 91 ul l


Range Wright and Young Card of Thanks Happy Birthday Singer Jane W hite dies


GLADYS P. BRAYNON, re-
tired counselor
died August 1
in Rockledge,
FL. Survived
by two daugh-
ters, Gwendo-
lyn Childred
and Pamela
Braynon; son,
John Braynon, Jr.; one sister, Mary
Wright; one granddaughter, three
grandsons, three great-grand-
daughters, one great-great-grand-
son, numerous nieces and neph-
ews. Delta Sigma Theta Omega
service at Range Funeral Home 6
p.m.,Tuesday, August 9. In lieu of
flowers, please make checks to
Greater Bethel AME Church, YPD.
You may send the checks to Pame-
la at 872 Brookview Lane, Rock-
ledge, FL 32955. Service 11 a.m.,
Wednesday at Greater Bethel AME
Church.

JOHNNIE B. CHAPMAN, 72, re-
tired truck driv-
er, died August
4. Survivors
include: wife,
Roberta Chap-
man; daughters,
Joanne (Levi)
Mosley, Regina
Watkins; son,
David J. Chapman; sister, Gladys
Smathers. Service 11 a.m., Satur-
rlMw t TTrn l I inht rhlnrch of .lnCJe


UlI "J d; IIIU. l.n ll. V I.A IU1n .
Christ.

Hadley Dav
JANET POND WALI
housewife, died
August 3. Ser-
vice 1:30 p.m., [
Saturday at
Friendship Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.



NATHANIEL EBERI
tired bus driver, -
died August 3 at
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 10
a.m., Saturday
at Soul Saving :
Station.



BRICE JACKSON, d
3. Arrangements are inc

BABY GIRL McMUL
July 31. Arrangements
plete.

Poitier
JESSE WALDEN, 90
tor, died August
3 at home. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.





MARVIN CARSON, I
spector, died
August 4 at
Cleveland Clin-
ic. Cherished
memories are
left with his lov-
ing mother, Jim-
mie Carson; his
children, Mar-
vin, Jr. (Octavia), Mar
Tramayne, Navarre ai
his adoring grandchildren
Tionne, Maya, Tramayn
hon and Yohance, Jr.; h
Edward, Patty (sister-il
Ardessa Carson; long
panion, Arlene Love an
hance; devoted friend,
Carson; aunts, Geneva
son, Murdell Whiteheac
Olliff; and a host of nie
ews, cousins and frier
ing 5 to 9 p.m., Friday
Poitier Funeral Home.
p.m., Saturday at Holy
Catholic Church.


Emmanue


LASHAWN SIMMONS,
housekeeper
died July 24th
at North Shore
Hospital.
Survivors
include: mother;
and daughter,
Antwalett
Simmons .
Services were held.


LOUIS B. McDONALD, JR., 31,
student, died
August 6. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday at St.
James AME
Church. -


ELLIS TYRONE JAMES RAY,
48, chef, died
August 3 in Pom-
pano Beach, FL.
Wake 4-8 p.m.,
Friday at Wright ~
and Young Fu-
neral Home,
15332 NW 7th
Avenue. Service
11 a.m., Saturday at Antioch Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, 21311 NW
34 Avenue, Carol City.

ELIZABETH D. DANIELS, 85,
retired, died Au-
gust 6 at Kin-
dred Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday at Mt.
Calvary Mis-
sionary Baptist
Churchane's Cremations



Diane's Cremations


. MARTHA PORTER, 63, bus
attendant,
died August
iis 4. Survivors
include"
LACE, 51, dau hte

Crystal R.
Porter; and son,
Bural W. Porter.
Repass 4 p.m.,
Saturday at 401 NW 48 Street.


Manker
JEROME P. TRAPP, 61, music
HART, re- professor, died
August 6 at
Jackson
Me m o r i a Il
Hospital.
Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday at
Greater Bethel
AME Church.


ied August Premier
complete.
e DEACON JOSEPH WILLIAMS,
LEN, died 94, retired, died
are incom- August 5 at
Miami Jewish
Home. Survi-
vors are wife,
Gladys Williams
Scontrac- of Panama City;
daughter, Sha-
ron R. Williams
of Miami; granddaughter, Sherri
Johnson-Campbell (Christopher) of
Miami. Visitation 2-5 p.m., Thurs-
day at Manker Funeral Home. Ser-
vice 11:30 a.m., Saturday at Mace-
donia Missionary Baptist Church,
Panama City, FL. Burial Hillside
Cemetery, Panama City, FL.
building in-

Grace
JAYKIA PITTS, 17, student,
died August 7
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospi-
tal. Service 1
p.m., Saturday
at Faith Com-
y, Kriston, munity Baptist
nd Monte; Church.
an, Montre,
e, Jr., Kes-
his siblings,
n-law) and
-time com- Richardson
id son, Yo- REV. DR. L. B. JOHNSON,
Sandra J. 84, pastor of
"Tee" Wil- New Hope
i, and Eva Baptist Church
ces, neph- of Goulds, FL
nds. View- died August
at Roberts 6 in Miami.
Service 1 Survivors are
Redeemer wife, Frances
Johnson; two
daughters, two sons. Viewing 1-6
p.m., in the chapel. Service 11
l a.m., Saturday at New Birth Baptist
Church.


Mitchell
GLADYS MARIE BELL, retired
custodian supervisor, died August
1 at Memorial Pembroke Hospital.
Viewing 4 p.m. 8 p.m.,August 11at
Mitchell Funeral Chapel. Service 11
a.m., August 12 at Love Tabernacle
of God, 1750 NW 1 Court.


As we the family of the late,


In loving memory of,


17


WILLIAM S. DUDLEY

approach his birthday, we
pause to say "thanks."
It is family and friends like
you who cared enough to
share your time, talents and
treasures that helped us en-
dure.
Special thanks to Rev. C.P.
Preston and Peaceful Zion;
Bishop Victor T. Curry and
New Birth Baptist Church;
Jr Church of Yester-Year St.
John Baptist Church, Lor-
raine King and Wright and
Young Mortuary.
May God continue to em-
power you to be a blessing to
others in their time of need.
Sallie Dudley and family.


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


MOTHER MARIE
MCKINNEY


gratefully acknowledges your
kindness and expressions of
sympathy,
Your visits, prayers, cards,
telephone calls, monetary do-
nations and covered dishes
were appreciated.
Thanks to Pastor Kenneth
Dukes and New Jerusa-
lem Baptist Church. Special
thanks to Martha Wells, Com-
missioners and Mayor of Opa-
Locka.
May God bless each of you
is our prayer.
The Family


Card of Thanks


The family of the late,


A


JOHN VINCENT
COOPER
"J-MO"
08/16/79 03/15/08


WHITE
continued from 19B

'white' to be Black' and too
'Black' to be 'white,' which, you
know, gets to you after a while,
particularly when the roles keep
passing you by," she told an in-
terviewer in 1968.
She rebelled against such ra-
cial straitjacketing and es-
caped her limbo status by
choosing roles that transcend-
ed, or at least predated, the.
American race problem.
She played the shrewish Kate


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


We miss you and think of
you always,
Happy Birthday, from your
whole family.


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


HENRY CHARLES SMALL
08/10/46 -05/16/05

You will forever live in our
hearts, but today we say,
Happy Birthday.
Your Family


WALTER FANNIN, JR.
"Ricky"
04/24/58 08/12/04

You heard God's call, you
slipped away and left us all.
We love you and we miss
you.
Love your mother, Ruby and
family.



In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


WILLIE RACHEL SR.
aka "Ray"
08/31141-08/08/10


Ill miss you forever, you will
always be in my heart, never
to be forgotten.
Love, Val


In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


MOTHER BESSIE D.
PIERCE


your kind expression of
sympathy will always be held
in grateful remembrance.
May God bless each of you
is our prayer.
The Family


HONOR YOUR

LOVED ONE

WITH AN

IN MENIORILAM

INTHE

.MIAMI TIMES
S : '


NANCY BOYD SEWARD
"Fancy Nancy"
11/10/50 08/07/09

It has been two years since
you left us and we miss you
dearly. But we hold onto the
memories which keep us alive
in our hearts always. God has
you in his arms. You are sadly
missed.
Love your husband, daugh-
ter, family and friends.


A


Complete Services
Starting From
$2695.00


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ask for your


SE AUGUST10-16 2011


20B THE MIAMI TIN


. .... .. LIA I M If t 15


in "The Taming of the Shrew" at
the 1960 New York Shakespeare
Festival and Helen of Troy in a
1963 production of "The Trojan
Women," directed by Michael
Cacoyannis, who died on July
25. A pair of roles in the 1965
Shakespeare Festival Volum-
nia, the mother of the title char-
acter in "Coriolanus" and the
princess in "Love's Labor's Lost"
- earned her an Obie.
Jane White was born in Har-
lem on Oct. 30, 1922, the first
child of Leah Gladys Powell,
whose heritage was Black, white
and Cherokee, and Walter Fran-
cis White, who identified him-
self as Black but who calculated
that he was only 1/64 Black. A
younger brother, Walter Jr., died
in 1975.
Paul Robeson, the legend-
ary actor and singer, who was
a friend of her father's, helped
White get her first stage role
the next year, as the lead in
Lillian Smith's "Strange Fruit,"
a short-lived Broadway play
about a doomed interracial love
affair. The play received mixed
reviews, but Eleanor Roosevelt,
in her nationally syndicated
newspaper column, "My Day,"
praised White's acting for its
"restraint and beauty."
She played many more stage
roles after that, had recurring
parts in soap operas, was cast
in the movie "Beloved," made
cameo appearances in spoken-
part roles at the Metropolitan
Opera and performed as a caba-
ret singer at Alfredo's Settebello,
the restaurant in the Village that
she and her husband opened in
1976. Viazzi died in 1987.















Lifesty e


Entertainment
FASHION Hip HoP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


EARNEST PUGH


CD battles Smallwoodfor #1
By D. Kevin McNeir
k olL I ,ir a','i ,,iilit:ir esonline.comn

He was recently dubbed as gospel music's "new leading man," but
SEarnest Pugh, 45, is no stranger to the power of praise and wor-
h ship or to the world of music. His fourth CD "Earnestly Yours"
debuted at #1 on the Billboard Top Gospel Albums Chart,
Beating out the likes of Kirk Franklin and Richard Smallwood
S'.. for the coveted position.
The Memphis native now lives in Washington, D.C. and
says that much of his recent success is due to the support
and guidance of Kerry Douglas, a marketing and promotion
j hiz that has previously helped artists like James Fortune and
SFIYA make their leaps to stardom.
S'"He [Douglas] told me back in 2008 that he could take my
single "Rain On Us" to number one and he did just that in less
than eight weeks," Pugh said. "Folks began calling into the
radio stations and things just started happening. And good
S things are still happening."
S( Pugh's latest single "I Need Your Glory" has become one of
the fastest-selling singles on itunes and has made him one
Sof the shining stars for Black Smoke Music, the label that
< produces his work. In fact, it's the first #1 CD in the 16-year
history of the company. Pugh says he isn't totally surprised by
his success. After all, music has always been part of his life.
Please turn to PUGH 2C


"I grew up in a family that was musically-
oriented and I have been leading praise and
worship at a number of churches for over 20
'ears so I didn't come out of nowhere."

-- &valeftf


Following legacy of great Black comedians


Hart's comedy tour

breaks all records

By D. Kevin McNeir
kmcneir@miamitimesonline.com


There is an old adage that says "music soothes the sa -
age beast." But there's something to be said about the
healing power of a good, hearty laugh as well. And that's
what North Philadelphia native Kevin Hart has been doing
ever since he can remember making people laugh
In fact, Hart has become quite good doing what
apparently comes so naturally for him .and has
recently made a meteoric leap in one of the tough-
est genres of entertainment comedy. Old school
comedians say comedy is about getting one's
audience to laugh with you, not at you, and Hart,
32, says he has patterned himself after some of
the greatest Black comedians in history.
Now he's laughing all the way to the bank after
completing one of the most successful comedy
tours in U.S. history breaking attendance re-
cords previously set by industry icons like Richard
Pryor, Redd Foxx and Eddie Murphy.
The final leg of his tour in Los Angeles drew such
a huge crowd that the decision was made to film
Hart at his best. In September, in the tradition
Please turn to HART 2C


-Photo by Lee Wexler
It Ain't Nothin' but the Blues The musicians Brett Pontecorvo, far left, and Jeffrey
Bolding (in hat) lead the cast members, from left, Darilyn Castillo, Dameka Hayes, Ta-
tiana Adams, Marvel Allen and Nathaly Lopez in this production at Aaron Davis Hall, City
College, in Hamilton Heights.



Exploring the far reaches



and forms of the blues


Riding a bus from

the Bronx to New

Cultural Horizons

A writer, Liz Welch,
speaking with students in
a summer program as the
Bronx Write Bus headed to
Manhattan recently.

-SEE STORY ON PAGE 3C


By Rachel Saltz

Watching "It Ain't Nothin'
but the Blues," a musical re-
vue at Aaron Davis Hall, feels
a bit like being on a sightsee-
ing tour with an uninspired
guide. The things you see may
be appealing or even thrilling,
but you're not going to learn
much about them that you
didn't already know.
With more than 30 num-
bers, this second production
of the New Haarlem Arts
Theater, the recently formed
professional company of
City College, really is more


dressed-up concert than play.
Costumes change, and there's
a bit of narrative patter and
some dancing, but the songs
remain front and center. Here
are the blues in every per-
mutation: country, city and
church blues; happy blues
and sad blues; slow burns
and fast-talking come-ons.
The show, first seen in 1994
in Denver and at the New
Victory Theater in New York
in 1999, gives you a strong
sense of the elasticity and lon-
gevity of the form, but that's
about it. There is no overarch-
ing narrative idea; instead


the writers (five are credited)
present the music's story in a
roughly chronological way, be-
ginning with chants in Africa
and ending, more or less, with
postwar urban blues.
If the revue, directed by
Alfred Preisser (the found-
ing artistic director of the
Classical Theater of Harlem),
never gains much cumula-
tive power, it still has lots of
standout moments, thanks to
a strong, nicely varied cast of
eight performers. (A liveband
provides accompaniment.)
Some highlights: Dameka
Please turn to BLUES 3C


Hep Cats and Zoot Suits defined 1940's era


By Eric Felten

Amid the great and gro-
tesque "isms" battling for
primacy in World War II, a
curious ideological contest
was fought out in America:
the epic struggle over the
zoot suif. Was the fashion, as
singer, bandleader and hep-
ster extraordinaire Cab Cal-
loway defined it, "the ultimate
in clothes. The only totally
and truly American civilian
suit"? Or were those long.
baggy glad-rags a treasonous
waste of woolens desperately
needed for the war effort?
Frank Walton at the federal


War Production Board voted
for the latter: "Every boy or
girl who buys such a garment
and every person who sells it
is really doing an unpatriotic
deed."
This debate is at the heart
of Kathy Peiss's social his-
tory, "Zoot Suit: The Enig-
matic Career of an Extreme
Style." What was the zoot
suit, a threat to the nation or
a yawping expression of the
very freedoms that the coun-
try was fighting for?
Two wartime animated
cartoons capture the often
comical debate over the zoot
suit. There is "The Spirit


1943.
Zot-uie teen aaNei k'retuatiNwYo n
19LC"43.7~',CL


of'43," a ham-fisted and
humorless Disney short in
which Donald Duck, with a
fresh payday bankroll from


would reinvent that charac-
ter after the war as Scrooge
McDuck, with a less favorable
gloss on frugality) Voicing the


Were those high waisted pants ballooning at the knee
- with that wide-shouldered acket and wide-brimmed
hat an expression of freedom and prie or a danger to
the nation?


his defense-factory job, is
tempted to blow all his cash
juking the night away instead
of saving his money to pay his
taxes. Voicing the cause of
patriotic restraint is a penn'y-
pinching Scots duck (Disney,


pleasures of high living is a
duck in full zoot regalia- the
high-waisted pants ballooning
at the knee and tapered to an
ankle-choking peg; the wide-
shouldered jacket swooping
Please turn to HEP CATS 2C


I/1





i, I):ct uP


1.. 8'1. ( ii
'i Ii)


-(I










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


c1.atrfia ,A1"l
By D, Rc.-ardSixcha


An e-mail from Bethune-
Cookman University recruiter
Spyder McCoy to Carol
Weatherington, president,
informed her that 173
freshmen will matriculate this
2011 year. Weatherington
collaborated with Martha Day,
Nancy Dawkins, Anna Grace
Sweeting and other alumni
members to effect a "Wildcat
Bonvoyage" at the Omega
Activity Center, last Saturday.
Some ofthe early arrivals from
Booker T. Washington included
Jose Deivilla, Robin Wilson
and Deborah Breedlove.
The program began
with President-elect
Wayne Davis praying,
blessing the food, and
congratulating the
freshmen for selecting
B-CU. President
Weatherington
introduced John
Williams, former
president and National HA
Alumni President. He
began by stating the motto:
"Enter to Learn, Depart to
Serve." Other speakers that
gave remarks were Dawkins
and Day,. financial supporters
for 40-years.
Weatherington introduced
the speaker, former Judge
Shirlyon McWhorter-Jones.
She began informing the
students she came from a
small town called Wachula,
where she had to pick oranges
to survive and it forced her to
attend B-CU, rather than pick
oranges.
She continued by informing
them of her desire to graduate
and matriculate at the
University of Florida for a law
degree. She passed the bar


her first time
taking the test.
and began her
law practice in
Miami. In a few
years, she was
appointed to judge by Governor
Bush. She challenged the
students to study hard and
work toward achieving summa
cum laude as a top student
upon graduation. Her last
statement was: "You're not
going to college to have a baby,
you're going to get a good
education without nicotine or
drugs."
She' received a
Standing ovation from
Ashante Thurston,
Pace High; Janik
Hall. Coral Gables;
Xavier Campbell,
Norland; Sherrick
Lewis, Pace High;
Aartene Griffin,
Michael Fenderson.
-GREEN Shemor Lewis, Pace
High; Carraway
Kilystal, Northwestern'
Sheldon Rock, Northwestern:
Austin Easterling,
Hialeah High; Danielle
Baily, Dr Michael Krop;
Karanita Cummings,
Miami Springs; Tarquise
'James, Carol City;
Henrietta Isaac. Turner
Tech.
Yours truly introduced
the "Fight Song." Then
Sweeting was called upon
to motivate the freshmen.
She used her People Column
to break down leaving home
for the first time. She also
stressed focusing on their
studies 24-7 and stay away
from the influence of the
male. Set goals and meet them


during the four or five years
preparing to graduate. They
gave her a standing ovation,
as the DJ took over and the
grown folks gave the floor to
the youngsters.
****************
-Departing is such sweet
Sorrow" stated Shakespeare.
It was evident Minister
Dr. Pamela Hall-Green
announced leaving Ebenezer
UMC to study for a Ph D. at
Emory Candler School
of Theology. A special
program to tap tributes,
present gifts, and extolled
reflections was handle
by T. Eileen Martin
Major, orchestrator of
the event.
As "Order My Steps"
was played, Bruce BRA
Martin escorted the
honoree, while the Mass
Choir provided "Praise &
Worship;" Rose Moorman
prayed; Priscilla White
read the scripture; Shirley
Jackson, occasion; reflections
from the church members,
beginning with Rev. Rich,
Minister Joanne Brookings,
Minister David Larmond,
Samuel "Chase" Williams,
Minister Wilcox, Minister
William Clark, Dr. Herman
Dorsett, Bertha Martin,
Shirley Jackson,
and Eboni Finley,
who videotaped her
reflections, w ith
kudos going out to
Charles Dunbar for
his videographing
the special event.
Pernella Burke
BROWN filled up the edifice
singing "To God Be
the Glory." She was followed
by M.A.S.K. performing
"Something About That Name"
and more reflections from the
audience including Rev. Dr.
Joreatha M. Capers, senior
pastor, offering, and remarks


from the honoree who shed
much tears during her remarks.
Others in attendance were
Bethenia Bullard, Tim
Strachan, Betty Bullard,
Rene May Green, Cynthia
Sweet, John Thomas, Walter
Johnson, Rev. Purnell Moody
and wife Abrille, Edward and
Laurita Robinson, Maurice
Robinson, Helen Boneparte,
Marva Hill, Jean Albury
Perry, Corine Bradley, Vera

Gibson, Flora Owens
and Karri Brookins.
7***************


Danielle, Amanda, Blake and
Jennifer. Soror Bernice Carey
gave a dissertation of her life
to the delight of the family,
while Pernella Burke sang "To
God Be The Glory" and Hall,
Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
eased the family pain singing
"It Is Well With My Soul."
***************
Samuel "Sambo" Harrison,
a cabinet maker and musician,
reported tasting death a
few years ago, as well as
experiencing the death of
his wife, Alice, the love
of his life. When asked


SIsabelle Hopkins- if he plans to marry, his
Brown, a pillar and answer was a blatant
teacher at Liberty City "no,", because- he's set
Elementary, left this in his ways and being
earth July 22 and single, his avocation
YNON was laid to rest, last keeps him extremely
Saturday, at Ebenezer busy. STRJ
UMC by Rev. Dr. Joreatha However, he meets at
Capers, senior pastor. Gee Restaurant every
Isabella was born to Charles Thursday to fraternize with
and Laura Burnside-Hopkins Elliot Flanders and Walter
in Miami. She also was a Johnson longtime buddies
Bahamian decent and the from Overtown. They spend
youngest of seven children. their time reminiscing of the
She graduated from Booker T. good days, where Harrison
Washington High in 1952 and used his carpentry skills to
went on to Nova University to construct a movie house in
obtain a Bachelor of Science in his backyard and charged five
Education. She gave 25-years cents for the customers to
to the Miami-Dade County come.
Public Schools. Other groups that utilizing
Her legacy included being their time are Frank Pinkney,
"Who's Who Among America's.:'president, Tree of Knowledge,
Teachers in 1996." She also and the Street Burners off of
made a significant impact and 64th Street. There are more and
difference in the lives of her as long as they congregate on
students. Her value was not the corners doing their thing; it
money, but students coming is therapy and long life.
blL U h n hIzinc k hI r


Ulac L U l LJoIJI 11an ng er
for success in life. Along her
tenure in life, was Gamma
Delta Sigma Chapter of Sigma
Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.
She will be missed by
Caroline, Sheryl, Debra, Big
Charles, Lil Charles, Randy,
Eric, Michael. Peaches,
Donald, Donnello. Tasha,
Tabatha, Steven, Cameron,


The celebration of life for The
Honorable Harold Leander
Braynon, Sr. was held last
weekend. A memorial service
was held Friday night at Range
Funeral Home and the final
rites on Saturday, with a crowd
consisting of 50 brothers from
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.,
church members and family.


Presiding Elder, Rev. Vincent
F. Mitchell delivered the words
of comfort, while his Booker T.
Washington, Class of 1949,
came in masses, including
Ret. Col. Albert Ferguson,
who spoke brilliantly about
Braynon and the fun, 'travel,
and fraternization they had
together. ,
.Percy Oliver, president of
the Class, added to the positive
side during his lifetime,
followed by Lenora Braynon-
Smith. Father J.
Kenneth Major and
Wilhelmina Minnis,
soloist; and Rev.
Robert Jackson, III,
pastor, St. PaulA.M.E.
Reverend Mitchell
alluded to Judge
Braynon legacy
CHAN beginning when he
graduated from BTW
and matriculated at
Morehouse and then Howard
University, where, began
studying law and serving time
in the U.S. Army. With his
law degree, he became busy
with court cases involving
desegregation. He. started in
Monroe County and ended up
in Miami with a popular "Talk
Show" and hooked up with
Matthew and Mapp to serve
the community.
Missing him are Glory
Braynon Watson, Harold,
Jr., Gla, Dedra, LaTaryn
Gay, Harland, Derrick, 10
grandchildren, Anthony
Simons, Johnny Stepherson,
Ms. Rolle and other relatives.

Dr. Lorraine F. Strachan
would have celebrated 74
years on August 17 The King
Daughters of Bethany Seventh-
Day Adventist will pay tribute
to her on Saturday, August 20,
during the morning worship,
followed by fellowshipping and,
subsequently, blessing the
Museum set aside at her home.


Agnes Rolle-Moten and
her sister Naomi Rolle,
are in Fort Washington,
Maryland visiting their
brother, Dr. Albert Rolle
and his family. Dr. Rolle's
birthday was August 3rd
and his sisters were there
to celebrate with him and
extend get weU wishes to him.
Your hometown buddies and
classmates also send a big
hello and get well wishes to
you, Doc.
Miami Dade Chapter
of Bethune-Cookman


University held
a welcome
reception for
the newly
committed
students who will attend
B-CU in the fall. John
Williams, brought
greetings from our National
Alumni Association, Carol
Weatherington, president
and Wayne Davis, president
elect brought greetings to
the large group. Words of
wisdom/inspiration was
also given to the group


by Shirlyon McWhorter-
Jones, B-CU Miami Dade
Alumni and former judge
and now Delta's president
(Miami) chapter. After the
meet and greet, a delicious
meal was served and the
students 'danced. Thanks
to our community partners.
Let's go Wildcats!
Wedding anniversary
greetings go out to the
following love birds: Samuel
and Helen S. Bennett, their
31st on August 1; Antwan
and Dortresia J. Jones,
their 2nd on August 1; Lionel
A. and Lois Ferguson, their
51st on August 6.
John H. Johnson, the late
founder and publisher of Jet
and Ebony, who used the


magazines to celebrate the
achievement of Black people,
will be honored with the 2012
Black Heritage stamp.
Get well wishes to all of
you: Rachel Reeves, Edith
Jenkins-Coverson, Willie
Williams, Ernestine Ross-
Collins, Mary Allen, Lillian
E. Davis, Dwight L. Jackson,
NaOmi A. Adams, Sue
Francis, Nathaniel Gordon,
Fredricka Fisher, Inez
McKinney Dean-Johnson,
Hansel Higgs, Joyce Gibson
and Mildred "PI" Ashley.
Saint Monica's Chapter of
Episcopal. Church Women
presents their Summer
Extravaganza Luncheon
featuring fashions and
babies on Saturday, August


13 at 12 noon in Blackett
Hall. Little Miss Savaughn
Wright and Little Miss Skyla
Carroll are the contestants.
Join them for a fun filled
afternoon.
Miamians were saddened
once again to hear the death
of Gladys Payne-Braynon,
who expired last week in
Rockledge, FL. Gladys was
the wife of John Braynon,
baby brother of the Braynon
clan. Gladys finished in
1942, her class was the
"Amphions," in those days
classes at BTW had jackets
and class names. Deepest
sympathy to the Braynon
family. Gladys is survived by
three children, one preceded
her in death.


Get ready for some-football!
On September 12, our
Dolphins will kick-off their
season when they tackle the
New England Patriots and
end their regular season
when they play the Jets on
January 1st. Best of luck
Dolphins!
May our teachers,
principals, assistant
principals, office staff,
cafeteria workers, security
guards, aides and all of our
students have a safe and
wonderful school year. Boys
and girls, remember what you
are there for. Be extremely
careful, study and make
yourself and your parents
proud. The streets offer you
nothing but trouble


Unique trend of the zoot suit redefined the 1940s


HEP CATS
continued from 1C

down to fingertip-length; the
pavement-skimming watch
chain; and the wide-brimmed
hat with a long, angled feather.
The "sharpie" tries to lure Don-
ald into a saloon; but just in
time he sees that the zoot-suiter
has a shock of Hitler hair and a
little square mustache. Donald
gives him what-for.

ALLIGATOR AN THE
RIGHT SIDE
The "Tom and Jerry" anima-
tors at MGM took a rather more
lighthearted approach. Tom the
cat tries to woo a jitterbug kit-
ten, showing up at her door to
knock out a hot-cha tune on the
ukelele. "Boy, are you corny," she


sneers. "You act like a square at
the fair." Tom, humiliated, hears
a radio ad for zoot suits, and
soon he is cutting up an orange-
and-green hammock to make his
own drape-shaped, reet-pleated
threads. (He achieves the de-
sired shoulder width by leaving
a coat-hanger in the jacket while
he wears it.) "Jackson!," the kit-
ty cutie declares when she sees
the newly hep cat: "You're on the
right side, you alligator, you."
The "Tom and Jerry" cartoon
appeared in 1944, not long af-
ter the cultural conflict over the
zoot suit had taken an ugly turn.
On the pretext that zoot-suited
Mexican-American teens were
wearing seditious togs, sailors
on leave in Los Angeles went
on a rampage in 1943, chasing
pachucoss" and ripping the of-


fending jackets and trousers off
them. The police responded by
locking up the Mexican teens.

"DOWN TO THE BRICKS"
Peiss argues that the zoot-
suit riots, as the series of street
fights came to be called, were
actually old-fashioned race ri-
ots. In any case, a style that had
managed to overcome some ra-
cial barriers ended up as a pre-
text for racial violence. The dis-
tinctive clothes had originated
with urban Blacks, who looked
to dress "down to the bricks" by
exaggerating the drape of Eng-
lish bespoke tailoring (the sort
of suits favored by the Prince of
Wales and Cary Grant). But the
extreme drape-shape was em-
braced by swing-besotted white
teens as well as by Mexican-


American youth, making the
style a rather confused stand-in'
for race.
As Peiss tells it, the zoot suit
became particularly problem-
atic in Los Angeles when ethnic
sensitivities prompted the adop-
tion of an unhelpful journalistic
shorthand. The California press
found itself chastised by the
Mexican government for telling
lurid stories of young Mexican-
American delinquents and their
gangs. Urged by U.S. officials
not to offend a wartime ally, the
papers stopped using the word
"Mexican" and, with a wink and
a nod, warned instead of "zoot
suiters." A style that in many
quarters had been regarded as
unpatriotic came to be synony-
mous with downright criminal-
ity.


By David F. Robinson Miami, FL

Me, myself and why
From my perspective, everything that revolves around me seems difficult
and in sin, because when something unfortunately happens, the earth stops it's
spin, the skies fall and my enemies win
I'm all alone, amongst millions throughout this vast and enormous globe,
Even when I'm happy, misery, sadness and pain are my humble abodes
Should I only be concerned with myself,
Pick up my heavy burdens, start moving forward and just forget about every-
body else
Does anybody even care about how I feel, what I think, what I want, what I've
accomplished or earned,
Why am I concerned? Because life is short and the hands that's inside the
clocks on the walls, continues to turn
Will my soul burn or will it be air conditioned, naturally, alongside milky
streams and under shadowy palm trees of bliss?
Will I be remembered? How will I be remembered? Will I even be missed?
I once was the life of the party, but nowi'm appearing to be as dead as funer-
als, my objectives are tasteless and my ambitions and aspirations are wasteless
Maybe, if I share my vision, my hopes, my dreams with the entire world, aban-
don my gluttony for power and success, by not trying to devour the entire Ameri-
can pie, and stop just focusing on ME, I probably won't be asking MYSELF WHY...


Pugh remains humble in midst of his success


PUGH
continued from 1C

"I grew up in a family that
was musically-oriented and I
have been leading praise and
worship at a number of church-
es for over 20 years so I didn't
come out of nowhere," he added.
Pugh calls himself a fam-
ily guy, the father of a 24- and
22-year-old. He's a 15-year
veteran of the U.S. Army who
has .never taken his eye off of
his dream, performing in stage
plays whenever the opportunity
arose and working as a musical
worship leader. Unable to per-
suade industry leaders that his


songs were marketable, he de-
cided to open his own company
and start his own label.
"My mother believed in me
and what I could accomplish,"
he said. "Her death a few years
ago hit me hard but I used that
pain to inspire my writing on
my last two CDs. We are con-
fronted with good and bad situ-
ations throughout our lives and
somehow we have to face them.
Some write poems or books or
plays as these circumstances
arise for me the lyrics just
came off the paper and they be-
came the songs that people are
enjoying today."
Pugh is busy making his way


across the country, leading re-
vivals in Mississippi, Orlando
and wherever his powerful
voice and God-given talents are
requested.
"We just got off a series of
12 listening parties that were
meant to undergird and guide
the direction of the CD," he
said. "I had a great tour with
Yolanda Adams and a few more
are in the works. You can imag-
ine that I haven't had much
sleep."
After years of service in the
gospel world, he has finally
made it big. And from where
we sit, it is definitely well-de-
served success.


Kevin Hart's comedy tour breaks all records


HART
continued from 1C

of Murphy, "Laugh at My Pain"
will hit theaters throughout
the U.S. It solidifies Hart's in-
auguration into an elite group
of kings of comedy a feat
that he describes as "huge."
"I go on stage and tell the
truth and let people into my
life," he said. "I'm a huge Bill
Cosby fan and Richard Pryor
too. But I idolize Chris Rock
and what he's done with his
career. I suppose I like taking
chances like him, in film and
television, but can't imagine
not doing standup comedy. It's


what I love doing the most -
other than chilling with my
kids [he has a son and' daugh-
ter, 3 and 6]. For me, making
people laugh comes naturally
and I take my work seriously."

TELLING JOKES IS A LOT
LIKE TELLING A
GOOD STORY
"Many of my jokes are family-
related but I'm not as clean as
someone like Cosby," he said.
"I use some profanity but it
fits my personality it works
for me I think because people
see that I am real and genuine
and they accept it. I tell folks
about my family, my kids, my


divorce, my relationships and
even some of the personal
problems I have faced."
Hart models himself after co-
medians like Murphy and Foxx
who he says had real "person-
ality." He's been at his craft for
over 14 years now and admits
that in the early years there
were a lot of bumps along the
road.
"It's a challenging busi-
ness and yes, I have flopped
more than once," he said. "But
things are great these days.
Right now I'm going to take a
year off and revamp, put some
new material together and get
back to doing shows in 2012."


I


I By Ann Sweetin


A


A


L-










3C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OW\N DESTINY


Riding a bus from the Bronx to new cultural horizons


By Andrew Boryga

Edgar Dofie, 12, lives on
College Avenue in the South
Bronx and likes baseball,
swimming and math not
reading or history. He cannot
recall the last book he read,
and until recently, he was
Unfamiliar with Anne Frank.
Asked about the Holocaust, he
responded, "the holo-what?"
Recently, he was one of 10
children who boarded a bus
on the Grand Concourse and
headed to the Anne Frank
Center in SoHo, where he re-
ceived an answer to his ques-
tion.
Edgar and company were
part of a new summer pro-


gram sponsored by the Bronx
Council on the Arts called
Bronx Write Bus, which every
Tuesday in a program ending
next week has been providing
young people from the Bronx
transportation and admission
to cultural events outside the
borough, with writers coming
along for the ride.
Bronx Write Bus's direc-
tor, Maria Romano, conceived
the program which also
includes classes Wednesdays
and Thursdays to keep
students academically stimu-
.lated during the summer and
expose them to places out-
side the Bronx they otherwise
might not visit.
"In some ways, boroughs


like the Bronx feel like a small
town and you end up not leav-
ing very often," said Roma-
no, who directs the council's
Bronx Writers Center.
Reggie Hester, 12, of Jessup
Avenue in the South Bronx,
had never visited SoHo before
- though he heard it resem-
bled "a small China."
After spending the afternoon
on Crosby Street, he conclud-
ed differently. "Not really Chi-
na, just weird," he said.
Every Tuesday, Bronx Write
Bus students board a bus in
front of the Bronx Museum
of Arts and are handed a
notebook, pen and sandwich
before taking their seats. A
writer related to the genre of


the day's cultural event joins
them.
Last Tuesday, Liz Welch, co-
author of "The Kids Are All
Right," a 2009 memoir about
siblings who are sent to dif-
ferent homes after their par-
ents die, stood at the front of
the bus speaking on the writ-
ing process and dishing out
quick writing assignments as
it drove along the Edward L.
Grant Highway north of Yan-
kee Stadium.
On hard turns, she gripped
the headrests while teetering
up and down the row of seats,
stopping every few minutes
to peer over the shoulder of a
scribbling boy or girl and chat
about the child's sentences.


Along the West Side High-
way, the bus descended to-
ward Lower Manhattan, the
Midtown piers providing a
charming distraction from
writing for students like So-
len Washington, 13, who took
a break after sensing mo-
tion sickness coming on, and
Danvel Diarra, 13, who could
not resist his bacon, lettuce
and tomato sandwich any lon-
ger.
At the Anne Frank Center
on Crosby Street, the students
listened to the personal ac-
count of Sally Frishberg, 77, a
Jewish woman who survived
the Holocaust as a child in Po-
land.
Frishberg recounted escap-


ing into the farmlands with
her family the night before a
train headed to a concentra-
tion camp was set to depart,
and spending two years hid-
ing in the attic of a farmer's
house, surviving with hay
furniture, a bucket for a bath-
room and a steady diet of
boiled beans and potatoes.
On the ride back to the
Bronx, students reflected on
Frank's and Frishberg's sto-
ries, jotting down notes about
their own lives for personal
stories they would be working
on the following two days in
class.
Edgar was impressed with
Frishberg's story particu-
larly her hiding ability.


Two rap superstars are better than one


Jay-Z and Kanye

ascend 'Throne'

By Steve Jones

As soon as Jay-Z and Kanye
West announced they were
naming their joint album proj-
ect Watch the Throne, it was
clear that the superstar rap-
pers were aiming to raise the
creative bar for themselves and
hip-hop in general. They've
realized those ambitions on
Throne (**** out of four), a po-
tent set of tracks that finds
them stepping up their games
and stepping out of their com-
fort zones.
While both display their
characteristic swagger and
dabble in materialism, they
also ruminate on religion, pov-
erty, crime, loss and the price
of success. Their chemistry -
born of a decade-long associa-
tion allows each to carve out
his own stylistic space, with
Jay-Z coolly delivering his in-
cisive lyrical darts, while the
more emotional West thrives
on adrenaline-fueled punch-
lines.


Kanye West and Jay-Z's 'Watch the Throne' also features
other superstar contributors, including Beyonce.


Throne, which has been an-
ticipated for nearly a year, be-
came available exclusively on
iTunes Monday. (The CD will
be in stores Friday.)
West oversaw production of
the album, which has a broad
sonic palette thanks to the
contributions of RZA, Swizz
Beatz, Mike Dean, Jeff Bhask-
er, Q-Tip and others.
The percussive drive of al-
bum opener No Church in the
Wild underpins Jay-Z's con-
templation of the relevance of
the clergy and ancient philoso-
phers to someone who makes
his living on the streets, while


R&B star Frank Ocean ques-
tions, "What is a God to a non-
believer?" That song's edginess
gives way to a swirl of synthe-
sizers on the epic anthem Lift
Off, which features Beyonc6.
Two songs later, the rappers
wallow in luxury on the hu-
morous Otis, built on soul
great Otis Redding's Try a Lit-
tle Tenderness.
They veer back to more seri-
ous themes with the introspec-
tive New Day. Both wonder how
they would raise the sons that
neither of them have. Reflect-
ing on his own controversies,
West says, "I just want 'em to


have an easy life / Not like
Yeezy life / Just want 'em to
be someone people like / Don't
want 'em to be hated all the
time, judged." Jay-Z expresses
concern about the inevitable
media attention that would
be drawn to any child he and
Beyonce might have: "Sorry,
Junior, I already ruined ya /
'Cause you ain't even alive, pa-
parazzi pursuing' ya."
Welcome to the Jungle finds
Jay-Z lamenting personal
losses and overcoming his
struggles ("I look in the mir-
ror, my only opponent"). Mur-
der to Excellence delineates
the homicide rate in urban
communities, but is hopeful
that the senseless violence can
be stemmed by more achieve-
ment. On an equally potent
Made in America, the two talk
about their rises to fame, while
acknowledging those who
helped and inspired them.
They've also clearly inspired
each other. Star collaborations
don't always work out as well
in practice as they do on paper
(see: Jay-Z and R. Kelly). But
in this case, they've created an
artistic Throne that other rap-
pers can aspire to.


RZA lands role in upcoming film


By Leslie Pitterson

RZA made his name from his
Wu Tang days, but the rapper-
producer is cultivating his act-
ing skills. According to reports,
the rapper has landed a role in
one of Hollywood's most antici-
pated sequels, G.I. Joe.
RZA will be joining the cast
of the action movie, which
has already roped in Chan-
ning Tatum and Dwayne "The
Rock" Johnson. His character
is named the Blind Master, a


martial arts guru who trains
the Joe commandoes.
RZA along with the rest of
the cast will be working with
director Jon Chu. G.I. Joe will
pick up where its first install-
ment, G.I Joe: The Rise of Co-
bra, left off.
While playing a martial arts
guru may seem like a stretch,
RZA has been steadily landing
small roles in several big films
in the past years, including
American Gangster, The Next
Three Days and Repo Men.


Mixed reviews on blues musical


BLUES
continued from 1C

Hayes's "Fever," Marvel Alien's
"St. Louis Blues". and Shawn
Brown's sweet and shyly low-
down "Candy Man."
The most sustained section
- a "give the ladies the mike"
cluster of songs is, not co-
incidentally, the most excit-
ing, and it contains the show's
high point: Nathaly Lopez's
vampy-funny "Come On in My
Kitchen." She understands how
to find the drama in the blues,
and milks the song for all she


can get. (Plenty.)
Too often, though, the the-
atrical presentation works
against the music, smoothing
its rough edges and making its
ache sound rehearsed. As my
friend said afterward, "They
gave you the songs, but where
were the blues?"
"It Ain't Nothin' but the
Blues" continues through Aug.
21 at Aaron Davis Hall, City
College, West 135th Street
and Convent Avenue, Hamil-
ton Heights; (212) 868-4444,
newhaarlemartstheatre.org,
smarttix.com.


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4C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


xfinity



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LACKS MUST CONTROl. THEIR OWN DESTINY












SAVI AYm ISYiEN


LAVI AYISYEN


HAlT


IAN


LIFE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 10-16, 2011



Group prepares for




the worst in Haiti


ORGANIZE

By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com

Last weekend, a local service
organization made the journey
to Haiti to provide some relief to
the nation. SMILE Haiti visited
Our Father's House, an orphan-
age located in Petion-Ville, Haiti
to put smiles on kids faces with
toys and other essential items to
childhood.
"The kids were overly excited
they ate sweets all day long,"
said SunJa Leon, coordinator of
the group. "When they are in the
orphanage there are only three
meals a day and there is no extra
juice and candy and cup cakes.
They were really happy about
what we did for them."


-S ORPHAN

SMILE provided the children
with essentially a day off from be-
ing an orphan.
"We brought then to a national
park and we stayed the entire
day from 10 until 3," Leon said.
"We had a bounce house, cotton
candy, pop corn, face painting,
people singing and dancing. This
was just a day out of the orphan-
age just to try to give them some
normalcy."
Our Father's House is home to
64 boys between the ages of five
and 16 years old.
Many of these kids were either
abandoned by their parents and
family members or found wan-
dering the streets. In June, the
service group organized a make-
over of the orphanage, where they


SMILE leaders

prepare to take

the children

w '-flrTr a

day of fun.


S DAY OUT

brought the boys out on a field
trip for an entire day. They also
had staff at the orphanage clean-
ing, repainting, and fixing the
facility. They also gave 64 beds to
the boys as a surprise.
This is the first time SMILE has
done something like this.
"This is first time we have had
something like this," Leon said.
"We contacted an owner of a park
in Haiti and he told us that we
could have the event there so we
could do it on a bigger scale. I
don't know if we will always do
this the same way, but we are
trying to get a contract to have
things like this more often."
SMILE has been in existence
here in Miami for nearly a year,
since December 2010.


HAITI BRACES


By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com

While Tropical Storm
Emily is holding steady
after brushing past Puerto
Rico, it now has Haiti
in it's sight. More than
630,000 people are still
without shelter after last
year's earthquake in the
impoverished nation.
Locally, aid groups
and cities in Miami-Dade
County are gearing up to
offer aid if the worst hap-
pens.
"North Miami is keeping
a close eye on what is hap-
pening over in Haiti with


the need present its
"We have already
tacted companies fo
kets, food and water
SunJa Leon, coordir
of SMILE Haiti. "We
to make sure they h
these essentials. Ho
nothing goes as bad
what happened with
earthquake. But we
contacted several co
panies to make sure
the people of Haiti w
be taken care of after
tropical storm passe
In Haiti, civil defel
officials and the mil
have already begun
ing people out of hig


FOR STORM

elf. zones ahead of the storm.
con- Haitian authorities urged
r blan- people to conserve food
r," said and safeguard their be-
nator longings.
want Jeanie Cassius, a native
.ave of Haiti who survived the
pefully 2010 earthquake, said she
as hopes her country doesn't
the endure the same disaster.
have "Haiti is very, very frag-
im- ile right now," she said. "A
that lot of people didn't make
ill it out of the earthquake,
er the I was lucky. Haiti can
es." not have another natural
nse disaster it is just not pos-
itary sible. I pray that if we do
mov- need help the world will
gh-risk open its arms to us again."


.k








Associated Press
A worker from a private company cleans a drain in preparation for Tropical
Storm Emily in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Aug. 3, 2011.


Tropical Storm Emily,"
said Andre Pierre, mayor
North Miami. "We are a
member of the world sister
city and and we do have
a sister city relationship
with a city in Haiti. So our
duties as a world sister
city is to help our city and
other cities in that country
with aid during emergen-
cies."
The City of North Miami
lent their help in 2010 to
Haiti after the devastating
earthquake. North Mi-
ami's sister city is Delmar,
Haiti.
SMILE Haiti, a local
service group, has also
vowed to help Haiti out if


Bands celebrate musician's legacy

By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com


Last month, a celebration
was held to honor the life
.and music of Azor, singer and
drummer for the band Racine
Mapou de Azor. Local Haitian
musicians gathered to hon-
or the legend's life through
music. Azor passed away on
July 16, in Port-au-Prince af-
ter a performance, he was
46-years-old.
"We had a big, big celebration
for him, the last celebration for
him," said Wilnort Emile, Hai-
tian musician, who helped to
orchestrate the celebration.
"He used to be with us all the
time, we use to play music to-
gether a lot. I am a musician
also, so that is why we put this
celebration together for him."
Bands Vodou Lakay and
Rara Lakay performed before
a packed crowd of an esti-
mated 200 plus people. Artists
graced the stage to sing and
play instruments at Ent USA
Carwash in Miami. People
were also invited to come on to
stage to reflect on the life and


Pihto Credil: Mlarvn Ellolt Ellis
Singer/dancer Nerlande
Desir of Vodou Lakay per-
forms in honor of Azor.
music of Azor.
"We had a lot of people to
show up and I think they all
enjoyed themselves," Emilie
said. "I could tell that they ac-
tually cared about what were
trying to do. The last memo-
rial from him was very memo-
rable."
Pierre Jeffery, music love
who attended the event said it
was flawless.


-Photo Credll: Marvin Elliolt Ellis
Pascal Elisson and Wesnel Chares, Rara Lakay play the


drum at the celebration.
"I could really feel his spir-
it w hen those artist were on
stage," he said. "His music was
incredible and I know he will
truly be missed. When a leg-
end dies, a true legend like he
is, those shoes will never be
filled."
The popular musician was
one of the experts of tradition-
al music and a tireless ambas-
sador of Haitian culture. With
the music of Vodou ceremonies
as his foundation, Racine Ma-
pou de Azor toured the world
helping his audiences discover


the value of the music of the
lakous and its link to Haitian
identity. Azor had been a mem-
ber of several bands of konpa
and folklore, before joining
Racine Kanga de Wawa. With
Wawa, Azor started to play
Vodou music in concert, shift-
ing it from the Vodou ounfo
to the live stage. His success
with Racine Mapou de Azor
contributed to the recognition
of Vodou as an integral part of
Haitian culture, and the ac-
ceptance of the African and
rural part of Haitian identity.


wIP

7)


14
'." '." "5 J

Associated Press
Haiti awaits tropical storm Emily, which will bring
further misery to the 634,000 earthquake survivors
living in displacement camps.


Haiti rebuilds


hospitality industry


By Melanie Nayer

Within minutes of the earth
shaking on January, 12, 2010,
one of the Caribbean's most be-
loved islands became the cen-
ter of international attention.
The 7.0-magnitude earthquake
that struck Haiti simply left the
Caribbean nation in shambles.
Haiti has historically been
one of the Caribbean's most
economically successful des-
tinations and the hospitality
industry is set on ensuring it
remains that way.
Derek Johnson, CEO of Yele
Haiti Foundation and Parris
Jordan, managing director of
the hospitality consulting firm
HVS's office in the Caribbean,
created a partnership in which
both organizations will educate
Haiti residents in the hotel in-
dustry. The program is a voca-
tional training initiative taking
place in the port city of Jacmel,
one of Haiti's renowned resort
destinations, which suffered
severe damage after the earth-
quake.
"We're still in the bowel of


reimergence. As relief dollars
disapate we believe that peo-
ple desperately need to cre-
ate and persue opportunity
for themselves," said Johnson.
"This series of vocational train-
ing initiatives are all aimed at
sectors we believe the country
must grow in if it is to reemerge
from the catastrophic circum-
stances."
Yele Haiti, which was found-
ed in 2005 by Grammy-award
winning musician Wyclef Jean,
was set up a grassroots, non-
political, charitable organiza-
tion focusing on emergency
relief, employment, youth de-
velopment and education.
"Our region experienced the
greatest loss in hospitality
and leisure tourism demand
worldwide in 2009, and un-
fortunately Haiti stands at the
bottom of the list in terms of
tourism dollars," Parris said.
"The program initiated by Yele
Haiti combined with our exper-
tise in hospitality and training,
is needed to help the country
increase its share of tourism
revenue."


L









BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


6C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


City of Miami Gardens
Councilman Andre Williams will
be hosting "Closing the Achieve-
ment Gap," a community conversa-
tion on Wednesday, August 10 from
5-8 p.m. at Miami Norland Senior
High, 1050 NW 195th Street in the
Auditorium, There will be cash door
prizes available. RSVP with Latisha
Lewis at 786-594-0227 or email at
latisha@utd.org.

The City of Miami Gardens
Code Compliance Division has
partnered with the Greater Miami
Gardens Chamber of Commerce
to host the 4th Annual Business
Expo on Thursday, August 11 from
9 a.m.-12 p.m. at the Betty T. Fer-
guson Recreational Complex, 3000
NW 199th Street. Are you a busi-
ness owner in the City of Miami Gar-
dens? Are you seeking an opportu-
nity to expand your business? Join
us and get the information that will
get you organized and ready for the
next steps to success.

The Miami Jackson Class of
1976 will meet on Thursday, August
11 from 6-7:30 p.m. The meeting
will take place at Range Park, 525
NW 62nd Street. Please be on time.
For rrore information or directions
to the Park, contact Kevin Marshall
at 305-519-8790 or Karen Gilbert at
786-267-4544.

Miami-Dade County Mayor
Carlos A. Gimenez is hosting a
series of Budget Town Hall Meet-
ings, where residents will be able to
ask about the proposed Fiscal Year
2011-2012 County budget. It will be
held at several locations from 7-8
p.m.: Thursday, August 11 at Miami
Gardens City Hall, 1515 NW 167th
Street; Miami Art Museum, 101
West Flagler Street; and Thursday,
August 18 at Coral Gables Country
Club, 998 North Greenway Drive.
For more information, visit www.
miami-dade.gov/budget.

Chai Community Services,
Inc. In collaboration with A Betta-
Dry Cleaning & Laundry, Inc. will
host its 7th Annual Back to School
Bash-School Supply giveaway on
Saturday, August 13 from 1-5 p.m.
at 2971 NW 62nd Street. For more
information, call 305-691-0233.

Booker T. Washington


Class of 1965 will meet on Satur-
day, August 13 at 4:30 p.m. at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts Cen-
ter. For more information, contact
Lebbie Lee at 305-213-0188.

The Poemedy Project will
present Rubin Stacy: Seven
Moves at the Lion's Den, 6700
Biscayne Blvd on Saturday, August
13 from 6-10 p.m. For more infor-
mation, contact Raymond Akbar or
Lowell Williams at 213-537-5887,
email at poemedy@gmail.com or
visit www.poemedy.com.

The Seminole Hard Rock
Hotel & Casino presents "Laughs
for Literacy" to benefit The Russell
Life Skills and Reading Founda-
tion on Saturday, August 13 start-
ing with a reception at 5 p.m. and
dinner, drinks and comedy show
at 6:30 p.m. at the Seminole Hard
Rock Hotel & Casino/Seminole
Paradise, 1 Seminole Way in Hol-
lywood. To purchase tickets, visit
www.russellreadingroom.com, call
954-981-5653 or email events@
russellreading.com.

Tooth Tales Pediatric Den-
tistry is hosting a back to school
drive until Monday, August 15th to
collect supplies for the Broward Ed-
ucation Foundation. The drive will
take place at the Tooth Tales office,
12781 Miramar Parkway Suite 306.
Donations can be made at the of-
fice Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-5
p.m. For more information, visit
mytoothtales.com or contact Sara
Shake at 954-336-3275 or sara@
exposedprandevents.com.

Representative Dwight M.
Bullard will be hosting "The Fu-
ture of Florida's Public Education
Forum" on Monday, August 15 at 6
p.m. at Southridge Senior High Au-
ditorium, 19355 SW 114th Avenue.
Thirty minutes prior to the forum,
parents and students are invited to
the "Empowerment Hour." Organi-
zations will provide information to
students and parents, increasing
their level of preparedness for this
school year and graduation.

The Miami-Dade Cham-
ber of Commerce presents Mis-
sion Possible: Cracking the Code:
SBusiness Technology," a Business
Empowerment Network Series 2.0


O
~1~~1~-~643 1 iej tF~~ O~ ore


on Wednesday, August 18 from 9
a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Jungle Island's
Treetop Ballroom, 1111Parrot Jun-
gle Trail. The networking series is
open to the public, $20 for cham-
ber members and $30 for non-
members. Attendants are required
to bring a laptop with them for
interactive portions of the event.
For more information, call The
Chamber at 305-751-8648 or visit
www.m-dcc.org.

CHARLEE Homes for Chil-
dren ensures that children who
have been abused, abandoned or
neglected and are in foster care
are prepared to begin the school
year with the school supplies they
need. Donations can be dropped
off at any BankAtlantic branch in
Miami-Dade County or at the CHAR-
LEE office until August 19th. The
CHARLEE office is located at 155 S.
Miami Avenue, Suite 700. Contact
tins Grunwaldt at 305-779-9697
or hans.grunwaldt@charlee.org for
further information or to coordinate
the drop off of your donation. Do-
nations are fully tax deductible.

The City of Miami Gardens
will host a Lien Amnesty BloWout
event at City Hall, 1515 NW 167th
Ave., Bldg. 5, Suite 200 in Miami
Gardens on Saturday, August 20
and Saturday, August 27 from 9
a.m.-2 p.m. This will be an op-
portunity for property owners with
liens on their property to satisfy
all liens for just $500.00 per lien
with all application fees waived.
For more information or to sched-
ule an appointment, contact the
Code Compliance Division at 305-
622-8000 ext. 2610 or ext. 2614
or contact Maggie Castor by email
at mcastor@miamigardens-fl.gov.

The African-American Re-
search Library and Cultural
Center will be hosting free em-
powerment workshops on Satur-
day, August 20 from 11 a.m.-4:30
p.m. (pre-register by August 12
for "Starting your own nonprofit")
and Saturday, September 3 from
11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (pre-register by
August 26 for "Grant Writing"). For
more information and/or to regis-
ter for these workshops, contact
Norman Powell at 954-624-5213 or
email posimo@aol.com.

E The Booker T. Washington
Class of 1965, Inc.'s Class Mem-
ber's Picnic will be held on Satur-
day, August 20 at Amelia Earhart
Park. Class members are asked to
contacfd'135-625-6720 to advise
your foqd contributions.


Congresswoman Frederica
S. Wilson in partnership with Miami
Mayor Tomas Regalado and Com-
missioner Richard P. Dunn II is host-
ing a town hall meeting discussing
the Congressional Black Caucus for
the People Jobs Initiative H. Res.
348 on Monday, August 22 at 6 p.m.
at Mt. Hermon AME Church, 17800
NW 25th Avenue in Miami Gardens.
For additional information, visit
www.wilson.house.gov or call 305-
690-5905..

Congresswoman Frederica
S. Wilson will host a job fair on
Tuesday, August 23 from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. at the James L. Knight Cen-
ter, 400 SE 2nd Avenue in Down-
town Miami. Registration begins at
8 a.m. For additional information,
visit www.wilson.house.gov or call
305-690-5905.

The Office of the State At-
torney is hosting a 'Second Chance'
Sealing and Expungement Program
on Thursday, August 25 from 4-7
p.m. at the Miami Beach Conven-
tion Center, 1901 Convention Cen-
ter Drive, Hall D. To avoid waiting a
long period of time in line you could
pre-register at www.miamisao.com
or fax a clear copy of your valid pic-
ture ID and phone number to 305-
547-0723, Attention: Katherine Fer-
nandez Rundle, State Attorney. For
more info, call 305-547-0724.

Great Crowd Ministries
presents South Florida BB-Q/Gospel
Festival at Amelia Earhart Park on
Saturday August 27, September
24 and October 29 from 10 a.m.-
9 p.m. The park fee is $6 per car.
All artists and vendors are encour-
aged to call. For more information,
contact Constance Koon-Johnson at
786-290-3258 or Lee at 954-274-
7864.

Miami-Dade County Park
and Recreation Department and
Miami-Dade County Commis-
sion for Women celebrate Women's
Equality Day on Friday, August 26
from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. held at the
Roxcy O'Neal Bolton Women's His-
tory Gallery at the Women's Park,
10251 West Flagler Street. For more
information, call 305-480-1717.

Chai Community Services,
Inc. in collaboration with A-Betta
Bail Bonds, Inc. will host its an-
nual CCS Career Expo (Job Fair) on
Saturday, August 27 from 10 a.m.-
6 p.m. at the DoubleTree Hotel &


Exhibition Hall, 711 NW 72nd Ave.
For more information, call 786-273-
0294.

Playing the Game of Life
(PGL), a turn-key program for
teaching social skills through an
arts-based curriculum, invites the
community to a free back to school
event for children four-12 years
old on Sunday, August 28 from 11
a.m.-1 p.m. at the PGL Enrichment
Center, 7144 Byron Avenue in Mi-
ami Beach. For more information,
call 305-864-5237 or email info@
ecqc.biz.

P.H.I.R.S.T. Impressionz, b
dinner poetry event returns at Oasis
Cafe, 12905 NE 8th Avenue in North
Miami. It will be held on Sundays,
August 28, September 25, October
30, November 27 and December 18
at 7 p.m. Admission is $10, which
includes performance, dinner and
drink. Anyone interested in partici-
pating needs to contact at least one
week in advance. 786-273-5115.

The Bohemia Room presents
The Acoustics featuring Philly SoUl
Diva and Indie Soul icon Jaguar
Wright on Wednesday, August 31.
The doors open at 8 p.m. Admis-
sion is $15. The event will be held
at V Midtown Lounge, 3215 NE 2nd
Avenue. For more information, visit
www.Jaguarwright.com or www.
thebohemiaroom.com.

The Miami-Dade County
Health Department, Special
Immunizations Program will be
providing free Back-to-School im-
munizations to children between
the ages of two months through 18
years of age. Parents need to bring
their child's immunization record
and a picture ID. For more informa-
tion, call 786-845-0550.

There will be a meeting about
the Memorial Day's Urban Week-
end in August by the City of Miami
Beach. Persons interested in attend-
ing should email lindasimmons43@
yahoo.com, African-American Foun-
dation of Greater Miami.

Zoo Miami will show its appre-
ciation during August to those who
have served and are serving in the
military. Any active-duty member or
veteran presenting a valid military
ID will be able to take advantage of
one of these offers: Enter the zoo
with a "buy one, get one free" ad-
mission. This offer is valid for up to


"THE FUNNIEST MOVIE


OF THE YEAR:
Robert Fure, FILM SCHOOL REJECTS


"FULLY WORTHY OF ITS

R-RATING. GENUINELY RUDE,

OUTRAGEOUS AND FUNNY"
Stephen Rebello, PLAYBOY


"YOU'LL LAUGH SO HARD

YOUR FACE WILL HURT."
Steve Weintraub, COLUDER


OHANGE-UP

UNIVEMAL PICTUBES PRISENTS IN ASSOCIAION WH RELATIVIIY MDIA AN ORIGINAL FILM/BI KI PICURFS POOUCUON
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NLAGUAGMESOMEgW HICUMifY AND DRUG 0SE

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES


I __


six people and expires August 31.
Also, 15 percent off the Annual Pass
to Zoo Miami valid for 365 days of
admission. Zoo Miami provides a
25 percent off regular adult or child
admission for all military mem-
bers year-round. Identification is
required at time of admission pur-
chase.

The Miami-Dade Public Li-
brary System continues to cel-
ebrate its 40th anniversary with a
flashback to the books, movies and
music of the 1990s! This summer,
the Library System kicked-off its
look back at the 1990s, which will
run through September. Special sto-
ries, classic board games, crafts and
more, as well as '90s trivia contests,
book clubs and quilt making will be
held throughout the month of Au-
gust. All events are free and open
to the public. To find an event near
you, visit www.mdpls.org and click
on Calendar of Events or call 305-
375-2665.

The City of Miami Gardens
Youth Sports (CMGYS) Football
and Cheerleading program is now
accepting registrations for the up-
coming 2011 season. The program
is available for youth ages four-15.
For more information on registra-
tions and payment options, call
305-622-8080 or visit www.cmgys.
com.

Summer BreakSpot, part of
the USDA Summer Food Nutrition
Program, will be open now until
August 2011 at hundreds of sites
across Miami-Dade County, provid-
ing free nutritious meals break-
fast, lunch and snack all summer
long for kids and teens, 18 and un-
der. To find a Summer BreakSpot
site near you, visit www.summer-
foodflorida.org or call 211.

Epsilon Alpha and Zeta Mu
Chapters of Alpha Pi Chi Na-
tional Sorority, Inc., of Miami are
completing a project of Red Cross
Readiness. The chapters are collect-
ing first-aid supplies and emergen-
cy items for Emergency Kits. These
kits will be distributed to the elderly
community of Miami for use during
this hurricane season. If you are in-
terested in donating and contribut-
ing first-aid supplies, call 305-992-
3332 before September 17. If you'd
like more information about this or-
ganization, contact Linda Adderly at
addlmh@aol.com.
Please turn to LIFESTYLE 10D


- mA















i Business
S DadeC TI

SECTION D 4 2 Oi


ARMANI DANCE STUDIO


I


brings davnce to the hood


New school opens in Liberty City


Duo

-Photo credit: Rardy r,,:e
Dance instructor teach-
es budding dancers to
.stretch properly.


By Randy Grice
rgrice@miamitimesonline.com


A dancing duo has teamed up to bring their
talents to the heart of Liberty City. Studio
Director Genesis Love, 22, and Artistic Direc-
tor Kyle Byron, 25, have opened Armani Danz
Studio, 5601 NW 7th Ave. The two set up shop
close to a month ago.
"We are going to offer these kids a different
career besides being behind a desk or being a
truck driver, whatever may be the case," Love
said. "We want them to know that you can be
different, you can play an instrument, you can
draw a picture, you can do this and it can be a


career and
something
that you
love to do."
The stu-
dio focuses
on a broad
range of dance styles that include hip-hop.
jazz, ballet, contemporary and modern dance.
Currently, the two are pursuing grants through
the government to provide free classes and ad
to the programs they already provide at the
studio. To register at the studio there is a $25
non-refundable fee and they.offer three classes
Please turn to ARMANI 10D


A fresh model for housing the poor


New Orleans traded all its projects 1I
for housing aimed at evicting crime i I I.
1- '.'em


By Rick Jervis

NEW ORLEANS The decay-
ing brick buildings of what was
known as the Magnolia Projects
are now rows of freshly painted
town homes with ornate bal-
conies and manicured lawns.
Stoops where dealers once sold
dope and shot at rivals have
been replaced by a clubhouse
featuring a flat-screen TV and
a pool where neighborhood kids
splash.
The Magnolia Projects, once
one of the city's most notori-
ous public housing complex-
es, today is Harmony Oaks
Apartments, a 460-unit mix
of government-subsidized and
market-priced apartments. It
replaces one of six public hous-
ing projects across the city re--
cently razed to make room for
new apartments and a fresh


approach to housing the city's
poor.
"I never thought I'd be able
to live like this," says Harmony
Oaks resident Larry Berzat, 60,
who grew up in the former Mag-
nolia Projects. "It's a whole lot
safer. And a whole lot better."
Following a national trend,
New Orleans' traditional mod-
el of corralling all subsidized
housing into one location is
being replaced by newer devel-
opments that mix subsidized
and market-priced homes.
More than 900 such units have
opened in New Orleans already;
another 3,100 are on the way.

MORE LIABLE SEES CRIME
Public housing projects in
Chicago, Atlanta, Salt Lake
City and other cities have fol-
lowed a similar trend, says Lin-
da Couch of the Washington-


-By Jonathan E. Bachman
KID SAFE: Jamie Jones and Missa Smith, right, supervise
Ashley Colemen as she explores a newly built playground at Har-
mony Oaks Apartments, standing on what was a notoriously risky
housing project.


based National Low-Income
Housing Coalition. What makes
New Orleans unusual is how
the city toppled all of its major


public housing projects at once,
choosing a swift overhaul to its
public housing over a phased
redevelopment, Couch says.


"People will be watching New
Orleans closely," she says.
Residents and city leaders
agree that the new develop-
ments are far more livable and
draw less crime than the previ-
ous structures, some of which
were more than eight decades
old. But housing advocates
warn that the new plans will
steeply drop the number of
available public housing units,
leaving thousands iof- low-in-
come families without afford-
able places to live.
Across the city, about 3,500
fewer units will be available,
says James Perry, head of
the Greater New Orleans Fair
Housing Action Center.
"You're going to have a large
number of people without hous-
ing," Perry says.
Most of New Orleans' public
housing complexes were built
after the Great Depression as
a way to create jobs, and the
structures deteriorated over
the decades, according to the
Housing Authority of New Or-


leans. Neglect and the unsafe
environs steadily drove resi-
dents away. Hurricane Katrina
in 2005 further scattered resi-
dents.

MORE LIABLE LESS CRIME
After the storm, only 5,000
families lived within the city's
12,000 public housing units,
according to housing authority
statistics. City leaders decided
to knock them down and. part-
ner with- private developers to
rebuild.
Tammy Cowart, 49, lived in
one of the old complexes, the
St. Bernard Housing Develop-
ment. Drug dealers prowled the
property and shootings were
rampant, she says.
Today, Cowart lives in a
roomy one-bedroom apartment
on the same land, redeveloped
and renamed Columbia Parc at
the Bayou District. Crime has
all but vanished and some of
her neighbors are even New Or-
leans police officers, she says.
Please turn to HOUSING 10D


Lord hotel chain expected

to branch across the U.S.
By D. Kevin McNeir Minnelli. Hotel owner Brian
kmcnetr@miiiamitmesonline.cmn Gorman says he came up
with the idea after conduct-
It is probable that more ing a survey of 20,000 gay
members of the LGBT .4. U.S. citizens who
community will begin said they would
to flock to Miami to en- prefer to stay in a
joy the tropical weath- gay-oriented hotel,
er of southern Florida if one were avail-
with the recent open- able. Gorman has
ing of the Lords Hotel plans to extend his
- America's first gay chain to cities that
hotel chain. GORMA include New York,
Located on Miami's Los Angeles, Las Ve-
popular South Beach gas and San Fran-


SOBE to the locals some
call the move a "quantum
leap in gay travel," with ac-
coutrements that include
Cha Cha bars and posters
of the incomparable Liza


cisco.
Of course, the hotel is open
to patrons of all sexual per-
suasions but is aimed at
those who are either gay
Please turn to HOTEL 8D


Five ways to find cheap gas
By Tara Baukus Mello

Gas prices are on the rise again, with
the possibility of prices this summer in-
creasing 35 cents to 85 cents per gallon over
current rates, according to the federal Energy
Information Administration. Gas prices can vary
widely not just from one region to another, but
even at stations within the same geographic area.
Here are some tips for finding cheap gas near you.
Monitor gas prices
Pay attention to gas prices as you drive around
your town and in any other towns you frequent,
and take note of the stations where you can find
cheap gas on a regular basis. Head to one of
those stations when you need to fill up.
Choose an unbranded gas station
Gas stations that are not affiliated with q
specific oil company or gasoline brand often
have cheap gas prices per gallon because
They purchase excess gas from multiple
oil companies.


Please turn to GAS 10D


Jennifer Carroll named


to leadership of NLGA

Florida's lieutenant gov-
ernor, Jennifer Carroll, is
serving on the leadership
committee of the National
Lieutenant Governors Asso-
ciation (NLGA). NLGA is the
professional association for
the officeholders first in line
of succession to governor in
all 50 states and the U.S. ter-
ritories.
Lt. Governor Jennifer Car-
roll is serving as South Re-
gional chair of the NLGA
Executive Committee. "The
lieutenant governor was
elected to this position bi-
partisanly by her peers," said
NLGA Executive Director JENNIFER CARROLL
Please turn to CARROLL 10D Florida's Lieutenant Governor


The Black middle-class remains unable to find employment


By Wendell Hutson
Special to the NNPA

Not since the Great Depression
has the U.S. economy been so bad
that millions of people have been out
of work for two years or more. And
even though the economy is showing
some improvement, economists have
forecasted a long recovery and noted
that the Black middle-class remains
one of the core groups still unable


to find employment. Moleska Smith
is among the long-term unemployed.
Before she lost her $90,000 a year
marketing job at a Chicago bank in
2009 she said life was good for her.
She was able to pay her mortgage
on time for her south suburban
home, monthly tuition payments to
her daughter's private high school
were paid on time and she was able
to travel and build up her emergency
fund for the unexpected. That has


all changed now that she
has exhausted her 99-weeks
of unemployment benefits.
"Never in a million years did
I think I would be unem-
ployed this long. I am deter-
mined to find new employ-
ment regardless of how long
it takes," Smith told the Cru-
sader. "God has been good
to me. He makes sure all my
needs are met." An alumnus


Sof Columbia College, Smith
said one reason why it has
taken her so long to find
new employment within
her industry is because of
outsourcing and downsiz-
ing that continues to take
place at companies big and
small.
S"Marketing is a tough in-
dustry to stay in because a
HUTSON lot of employers are farm-


ing out their marketing needs to
save money," explained Smith. "It is
cheaper to pay an outside agency than
to pay an employee a salary, health
benefits and taxes." For now, Smith
said she plans to continue working
as a self-employed marketing consul-
tant. "I have had to re-invent myself
and sit down to evaluate if marketing
is still a feasible career. While I love
working in the marketing industry, I
Please turn to UNEMPLOYED 8D


K-'rKq


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'~PSi~~

Il(~fy,

5


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Poorest customers hit by MetroPCS slowdown


Wireless carrier attributes fewer

subscribers to tough economy


By Greg Bensinger

MetroPCS Communica-
tions Inc. said recently the
sputtering U.S. economy
is forcing more of its most-
vulnerable U.S. customers
to drop their prepaid wire-
less service or to seek even
cheaper options.
The trend, which cut into
the company's subscriber
growth, weighed on the
company's second-quarter
results and pointed to a
tough second half. At 4 p.m.
composite trading on the
New York Stock Exchange,
MetroPCS shares were off
37 percent.
Shares of MetroPCS tum-
bled last Tuesday after the


wireless provider posted
results that missed Wall
Street's projections. Rex
Crum joins digits to discuss
Comments by MetroPCS
executives marked the con-
tinuing challenges to con-
sumer spending, especially
among the poorest, and
bode ill for wireless rivals
Leap Wireless Internation-
al Inc. and Sprint Nextel
Corp.
"We do see it being tough
out there currently," Me-
troPCS Chief Operating
Officer Thomas Keys said.
"We see anecdotal evidence
in our stores, with our
subscribers, through con-
versations, through focus
groups."


from an all-time high of
, .- 725,945 in the first quarter
and less than analysts had


IL:


MetroPCS, which offers flat-rate, no-contract ser-
vice, reported a profit of $84.3 million for the quar-


PRICES CUT
Dallas-based MetroPCS
reported a sharp slowdown
in additions to its flat-rate,
no-contract wireless ser-


vice, which tends to attract
low-income users. The com-
pany added about 199,000
new prepaid customers in
the second quarter, down


expected.
MetroPCS, which has cut
some prices and begun to
offer speedier fourth-gen-
eration wireless service in
some markets to attract new
users, said the economy
was weighing on customers
who gravitate to the lowest-
end offers, such as Sprint's
government-subsidized As-
surance Wireless service.
Sprint's Assurance brand,
which offers a free cellphone
and minutes in certain
states to some consumers
on food stamps or Medicaid,
was the "MVP" of the car-
rier's second-best prepaid
quarter in history, Sprint
Chief Executive Dan Hesse
said last week. Assurance
Please turn to PHONE 10D


A Hialeah Womens Center Family Planning
Advanced GYN Clinic
All Motors
Blue Cross Blue Shield of FL
C. Brian Hart Insurance
Clyne & Associates, P.A.
Comcast
Don Bailey's Carpet
General Motors
Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau
J&K Roofing
Jackson Health Systems
Macy's
Miami Childrens Intiative
Miami-Dade Supervisor of Elections
Miami-Dade Office of Strategic Business Mgmt
North Shore Medical Center
Publix
St. Matthews Missionary Baptist Church
Suntrust
The Children's Trust
The Florida House of Representatives
Universal Pictures
Wachovia


Black middle-class unable to fil


UNEMPLOYED
continued from 7D

love it more when I can
pay my bills on time."
Age is what Charles
Porter cited as his
reason for being un-
employed for over two
years. "While employ-
ers are not saying it,
age also works against
the unemployed and
contributes to why so
many people have ex-
hausted their unem-
ployment benefits and
still remain jobless,"
Porter, 56, a former
electrical engineer,
said.
Porter now works for
temporary agencies
to support his family.
"One temp agency told
me I should consider
dying my hair to im-
prove my chances of
getting hired," he said.
"I guess no one wants
to hire a grandfather."
Illinois' unemployment
rate for June matched
the national rate of 9.2
percent and has been
equal to or below the
national rate for nine
consecutive months,
according to the Il-
linois Department of
Employment Security.
And Illinois has also
reported declines in 15
of the past 17 months
but has added thou-
sands of manufac-
turing and construc-
tion jobs. "Illinois
has added more than
10,000 manufacturing
jobs and nearly 9,000
jobs in the construc-
tion sector over this
time last year, includ-
ing strong growth over
the past month," said
Jay Rowell, director of
the IDES. "While un-
even movements are
an expected part of an
economic recovery, Illi-
nois is building on the
steady progress that
has been made." Edu-
cation is often seen as
a plus for anyone look-
ing for a job but De-
shawna Olgesby, 36,
said it could also serve
as a deterrent when
applying for entry-level
jobs.
"I have a bachelor's
in communications
and a master's in
counseling and when
I go to apply for entry-
level jobs at depart-
ment stores and fast-
food restaurants I am
always turned down,"
she said. "Managers
have told me when ap-
plying that I was over
qualified and they
feared I would leave
within a year." For
the past seven years,
Olgesby had worked
as a family counselor
for a West Side non-
profit organization but
due to a dip in state
funding she was laid
off and has not found
a new job. Greg Ri-
vara, a spokesman for
IDES, said candidates
should improve their


interviewing skills so
they can better explain
to employers why they
should take a chance
on hiring them.
"This has to also be
conveyed in cover let-
ters too. I don't want
to tell a person to
take off their educa-
tion on their resume
but that's also a pos-
sibility if they think
it is hindering their
search," he said. And
unlike. Smith and Por-
ter, who collected un-
employment benefits
for nearly two years,
thanks to Congress
extending benefits, Ri-
vara said that cush-
ion is no longer avail-
able. "If someone had
applied for benefits in
June they would not
be eligible to receive an
extension after their
standard 26 weeks of
state benefits expire.
They would have had
to apply for benefits
in May or before to be
eligible," Rivara said.
"All federal extensions


expire January 2012."
Unemployment com-
pensation is funded
by unemployment in-
surance, which is paid
for by employers and
not taxpayers, accord-
ing to Rivara. And
the maximum pay-
ment someone could
receive is $531 a week,
depending on such
things as their marital
status, earnings while
employed and depen-
dents, such as a child
or unemployed spouse.
Another aspect to
the long-term un-
employed especially
for Blacks, who have
traditionally worked
white-collar jobs, such
as secretaries or of-
fice managers, is the
ability to transition
into new industries.
Manufacturing and
construction, which
are considered blue-
collar jobs, have domi-
nated the job growth
in Illinois the past
two years, according
to IDES records. And


nd work
transitioning into one
of these jobs is not an
easy thing to do, said
Antonio Wheeler, 46,
who knows first-hand.
For 12 years he worked
as an office manager
for a real estate com-
pany. He was laid off
in 2007 and has yet to
find new employment.
"I was paid to man-
age 10 employees and
perform clerical duties
in the office," he said.
"Now I find most of the
job leads I discover are
for blue collar jobs."
Wheeler, who is single
with no children, still
maintains a one bed-
room apartment in the
North Lawndale com-
munity on the West
Side and still drives
his 2008 Ford Explor-
er despite not making
any monthly pa, ments
since last year
"You don't want to
knov, h.-o. I am mak-
infg it.'" tir'.l.1"i"~-f' Y el?
just sa:, tlh_t i am do-
ing \,hat is r'.iquired to
survive.


Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Resolution No. R-597-11, adopted on July 19, 2011,
by the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida, notice is hereby
given of a Special Election on September 13, 2011, for the purpose of submitting to
the qualified electors residing in the proposed district, for their approval or disapproval,
the following proposal:
Shall Resolution No. 9165 relating to Carol City Street Lighting
Improvement District be amended to Annex the Venetian Gardens Area,
as provided for in County Ordinance No. 11-50?
Ballots will be mailed to all registered voters residing within the proposed area who will
be eligible to vote YES or NO for the proposal. All marked ballots must be received by
the Miami-Dade County Supervisor of Elections by 7:00 p.m. on the day of the election.
This special election will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Code of
Miami-Dade County and other applicable provisions of general law relating to special
elections.
Lester Sola
Supervisor of Elections
Miami-Dade County, Florida









I=sl Ii *-


Miami-Dade County will hold a public meeting in your area to discuss proposed
adjustments to taxes and/or fees. On each of the dates and locations listed below, the
Office of Management and Budget will make a presentation to discuss the FY 2011-12
Proposed Budget.

Ted.5 AgutI, 2 011] 70,0 ]pm li Tu1", Au g lu ,11, l 2iI.ll


,Palmetto Bay Village Hall
9705 East Hibiscus Street
Miami, FL 33157


Miami Arts Museum
101 West Flagler Street
Miami. FL 33130


Miami Gardens City Hall
1515 NW 167 Street
Miami, FL 33169


Coral Gables Country Club
997 North Greenway Drive
Coral Gables. FL 33134


Hialeah Senior High School
251 East 47th Street
Hialeah, FL 33013

All of these sessions are free and open to the public. For further information, please call
Anita Gibboney at 305-375-5414. For sign language interpreter services and for materials
in accessible format, call 305-375-5143 five days in advance of the meeting you plan to
attend.

For lega ads onine ot tpIg alad.miamdad go


America's first gay hotel opens in Miami

HOTEL said to resemble a Mi- "It was supposed to thing different than
continued from 7D ami townhouse. be something spirited, they've seen before. If
The hotel was de- happy, playful but def- you stop by the hotel,


or at least gay-friendly.
The 54-room hotel is
decked out in bright,
playful colors and is


signed by Dan Maz-
zarini along with his
partner, Brian Hum-
phrey.


initely well-designed pay s
that a discerning gay to the
audience would ap- giant
preciate and some- lobby.


special attention
glittery bar and
polar bear in the


I


1


I Tuesday. August 16, 2011 7:00 pm Thursday, August 18, 2011 7:00 pm


KIMMIL-?






9D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Am


With you when growth

begins in the community


Wachovia is now Wells Fargo in Florida vje co ,d just tell you that ox.
co.mmnty i:;:- ;~,. .-t to us, but our goal :s to sho..w you. Yo.'l I :ee o our cornm itm ent tor
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real solutionr.3 writhur!ur i~l workshops, money n:anagser ent college tours, homebul-.:,vy
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for yourself ar t onr iisity. Plus, you .:-i .-..) c: the ~ service that you dcserv'.
Call 1- S"o-TO .) L ( -8 -869-3557) or op by ;d t: ells Fargo banker to:y.


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irfa.^.A


2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC.


Bl.,-caK Ml ST CO%'IRol [111IiR 1 O\V\ r)RllSr Y










BLACKS MUST CONTROl. THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Ali writes letter to people of Norway


Muhammad Ali expressed his
sadness about the bombing and
massacre in Norway, saying he
is heartbroken by the senseless
deaths and the reasoning of the
man behind them.
In a letter to the people of
Norway written under his
name, the boxing great says his
"heart goes out to each of you
as you deal with the unimagi-
nable grief of your loss."
Ali wrote that the richness
of diversity is something that
makes the world a better place
and that no one should fear
multiculturalism. People, he
said, have the same ideals no
matter what religion or race
they are.
"I see the same wishes for our


children to
have hap-
py, healthy
lives; I see
the same .
concerns for
others less
fortunate
than our-
selves; I see
the same ALl
desire for
peace and dignity," Ali said.
The man who confessed to
carrying out the massacre, An-
ders Behring Breivik, has said
the attacks were part of a plan
to start a cultural revolution
and purge Europe of Muslims
while also punishing politi-
cians who have embraced mul-


ticulturalism.
Ali, a Muslim, said those who
commit unspeakable acts in
the name of race and religion
"fail to understand that we
share far more with our fellow
beings than those aspects that
set us apart."
He went on to say that the
best way to honor the victims
in Norway is to reach out and
embrace others in a celebration
of common human values and
aspirations.
"The collective power of such
individual proactive acts can
have a tremendous aggregate
impact and provide a lasting
honor to those who are no lon-
ger able to take such action
themselves," Ali wrote.


Public housing units get a fresh start


HOUSING
continued from 7D

There's bingo night at the
clubhouse, movie showings and
a van that pulls into the com-
plex every other week carrying
job listings.
"It's a whole new world," says
Cowart, who pays $72 a month
for her apartment. "It's much
better living" but better only
for those who get in.
Public housing units account
for about one-third of the new,
developments, and many fami-
lies who once lived in the proj-
ects will be left out, housing offi-


cials say. At 460-unit Harmony
Oaks, for example, there's a
4,000-person waiting list.

MIXED INCOME
Families who don't get into the
complexes can apply for a fed-
eral voucher and live in market-
priced apartments that accept
them, says David Gilmore, a pri-
vate contractor hired by the U.S.
Department of Housing and Ur-
ban Development to oversee the
New Orleans Housing Authority.
But there's also a waiting list for
those: about 22,000 families.
Shrinking budgets and lack
of federal support have led lo-


cal housing authorities across
the USA to partner with private
developers and build mixed-
income projects that are better
for the community but lower the
overall number of subsidized
units, he says.
"You have a choice," Gilmore
says. "Do you serve 800 fami-
lies in deplorable conditions or
300 in much better conditions?
I know what choice I would
make."
Harmony Oaks once was the
site of the C.J. Peete public
housing complex, where crime
rates routinely exceeded the
city's.


Carroll serving on NLGA committee


CARROLL
cotninued from 7D

Julia Hurst.
"As a NLGA leader, Lt. Gov-
ernor Carroll will work with
her peers across the nation
to find and foster multi-state
and regional solutions to
problems," said NLGA Chair
Nebraska Lt. Governor Rick
Sheehy. "Through NLGA, the
nation's lieutenant governors
discuss shared concerns and


seek to influence national dia-
logue."
"I am honored for the op-
portunity to serve the south-
ern region of the nation," said
Lt. Governor Jennifer Carroll.
"Next to Texas, Florida is the
largest state in the south, the
gateway to the international
business community, and the
national leaders in job cre-
ation. I look forward to sharing
Florida's enterprising ideas, as
well as to learn best practices


from other states."
The committee meets about
three times a year and is re-
sponsible to chart the course of
issues and work to be pursued
by the nation's second-highest
state and territorial officehold-
ers. In addition to its specific
duties, the committee will also
address issues of mutual con-
cern to all members. The posi-
tion is a one-year term with Lt.
Governor Carroll serving until
July of 2012.


Cutting costs on purchasing cheaper gas


GAS
continued from 7D

Check prices online or on
your smart phones
Websites such as Automo-
tive.com, FuelMeUp.com,
GasBuddy.com and GasPrice-
Watch.com list gas prices re-
ported by drivers who have
recently purchased cheap
gas.


For drivers with smart-
phones, several websites and
applications are available to
find gas prices as well as a
map of the stations. Check
out MSN Autos' interactive
gas center, the gas price fea-
ture from MapQuest, Bing
Maps gas prices app, the app
from GasBuddy.com and the
Where app.
Pay cash


Some gas stations offer dif-
ferent prices for cash and
credit, while other gas sta-
tions take only cash. Often
the cash price is cheaper
than the stations that charge
the same price for cash and
credit card customers. Take
note if this is the case in your
area, and you have cash in
your wallet reserved for filling
up your tank.


LIFESTYLE
continued from 6C
The Miami Jackson Class of
1976 will be celebrating their 35th
Class Reunion on September 9-11.
Activities will include: Meet and
greet at the Misty Lake South Club-
house, 625 NW 210th Street; Picnic
at Amelia Earhart Park, 401 E 65th
Street, Pavilion #8; Sunday morn-
ing worship at El Bethel Ministry,
4792 NW 167th Street. T-shirts are
$10 and the fee for the combined
events is $20. For more informa-
tion, call Kevin at 305-319-8790 or
Karen at 786-267-4544.

Miami Northwestern Class
of 1972 Scholarship Fundraiser
Bus Trip to Atlanta, GA for FAMU
Classic on September 23-25. For
additional information, contact Cla-
rateen Kirkland-Kent at 305-323-
5551 or Glenda Tyse at 954-987-
0689.

Women First Body Care and
Mama Senna Essence, a natural
Beauty company based in Dallas,
Texas will present its first South
Florida "Saturday Pamper Me Work-
shop" on Saturday, September 24
from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts Cen-
ter, 6161 NW 22nd Ave. The work-
shop, including all materials cost
$40 and registration and payments
can be made for the workshop by
visiting www.womanfirstbodycare.
com/a hcac-aromatherapy-work-
shop.html. For more information,
call 817-770-2029 or visit www.
womanfirstbodycare.com.

Rainbow Ladies and Beta
Phi Omega Sorority are spon-
soring a Health Expo for lesbians,
bisexual and transgendered (LBT)
women of color on Saturday, Sep-
tember 24 at the Pride Center in
Wilton Manors. Free screenings and
health promotion education will be
provided by several local agen-
cies and organizations. Everyone
is invited. There will be food, en-
tertainment and raffles. For more
information, call 305-772-4712,
305-892-0928 or visit www.rain-
bowladiesourspaceinc.org.

The Inaugural Northeast
Florida Blue and White Schol-
arship Golf Invitational will be


held on Saturday, October 15 at
the Magnolia Point Golf and Coun-
try Club in Green Cove Springs, FL.
Proceeds Will go towards college
scholarships for Jacksonville-area
students and assist our organiza-
tions' community service programs.
For more information, visit www.
neflblueandwhitegolf.com.

Coming this fall, a charter
bus leaving the Miami area going
to FAMU campus for the students.
For more information, call Phillip at
786-873-9498.

Calling healthy ladies 50+ to
start a softball team for fun and
laughs. Be apart of this historical
adventure. Twenty-four start-up
players needed. For more informa-
tion, call Jean at 305-688-3322 or
Coach Rozier at 305-389-0288.

Knoxville College, a
136-year-old Historic Black Col-
lege, is kicking off a three-year, ten
million dollar campaign to revitalize
the College under the leadership of
its new President Dr. Horace Jud-
son. All alumni and the public are
asked to donate to this campaign.
To secure donor forms, go to www.
knoxvillecollege.edu and scroll
down to K.C. Building Fund. Click
on it for the form or call Charlie
Williams, Jr., president of the local
alumni chapter at 305-915-7175
for more details.

The Miami Northwestern
Class of 1962 meets on the sec-
ond Saturday of each month at 4
p.m. at the African Heritage Cul-
tural Arts Center, 6161 NW 22nd
Avenue. We are beginning to make
plans for our 50th Reunion. For
monfore information, contact Evelyn
at 305-621-8431.

0 Family and Children Faith
Coalition is seeking youth ages
four-18 tq connect with a caring
and dedicated mentor in Miami-
Dade or Broward County. Get
help with homework, attend fun
events and be a role model for
your community. For more infor-
mation, contact Brandyss Howard
at 786-388-3000 or brandyss@
fcfcfl.org.

Work from home and earn
money. The CLICK Charity,


o

~i~s~ DJI DX~


Young dancers open studio for children


ARMANI
cotninued from 7D

a week for $80.00 a month and
five classes a week for $160.00
a month. In the future, they
have their sights on adding a
recording studio to the facility
to allow kids to pursue their
musical talents. The opening
of school is right around the
corner and Byron believes that


will help to boost the studio's
enrollment.
"As far as calls we have a bunch
of calls," Byron said. "Normally,
in this community, the regis-
tration process is right before
school so we will give it at least
about another two weeks before
those people that have been
calling in and enquiring to pur-
sue enrollment. We are set to
register at least 80 kids with in


the first two weeks of school."
For Love, the studio goes be-
yond just being a business.
"For me personally dancing has
always been a lifesaver," Love
said. "Growing up I didn't have
it easy and this was my way to
release my anger or show that
I was happy or to tell my story.
I want the youth around me to
do the same thing that is my
main goal in this studio."


MetroPCS slows down, asks customers to drop pre-paid service


PHONE
continued from 8D

users get 250 free minutes and
discounted offerings for addi-
tional minutes or texting capa-
bility.

$40 A MONTH
DISCRETIONARY
A jump in customers seek-
ing out the Assurance brand
or dropping their traditional
prepaid service suggests cus-
tomers in the lowest economic
tiers may be scraping bottom
to pay for more essential goods


and services, said Michael Nel-
son, a Mizuho Securities ana-
lyst.
"There's an increased risk
that more of these lower-in-
come customers will discon-
nect their phones as economic
pressures mount on them," he
said. "For a certain segment
of the population, $40 or $50
a month is real money, and
phone service is discretion-
ary."
MetroPCS's rate of customer
losses rose to 3.9 percent last
quarter, from 3.3 percent a
year earlier.


MetroPCS acknowledged
that rising competition 'con-
tributed to its slowdown in
subscriber growth, pointing
to special offers at Sprint and
Deutsche Telekom AG's T-Md-
bile USA. Last week, Sprint
said it added 674,000 prepaid
subscribers.
"There are more people en-
tering poverty so the market
is growing, unfortunately, for
these kinds of products," John
Carney, Sprint's senior vice
president of consumer mar-
keting, said Tuesday. He added
that some of the growth in its


Assurance brand was due to
launches in new states, such
as Ohio and Kentucky in the
second quarter. Assurance
has grown to 26 states and the
District of Columbia from four
states in 2009.
Carney said Sprint's fo-
cus on different demographic
segments among its prepaid
brands helped protect it from
big changes in churn from
quarter to quarter, noting that
the price sensitivity of prepaid
customers "is extremely high."
Shares of MetroPCS, up 81
percent over the past year


before Tuesday, fell $5.92 to
$10.26 on Tuesday. Shares of
Cricket-parent Leap Wireless,
which reports its earnings,
dropped 21 percent to $10.27.
Sprint, which also sells the
Boost and Virgin Mobile pre-
paid service, lost 6.8 percent
to $4.
For the quarter, MetroPCS
reported a profit of $84.3 mil-
lion, or 23 cents a share, up
from $79.9 million, or 22 cents
a share, a year earlier. Revenue
jumped 19 percent to $1.21 bil-
lion. Analysts polled by Thom-
son Reuters had forecast earn-


ings of 28 cents a share on
revenue of $1.23 billion.
Average revenue per cus-
tomer rose 1.6 percent, while
the cost per user increased 5.8
percent. Operating margin fell
to 17.4 percent from 19.6 per-
cent, reflecting'a 19 percent
increase in the cost of service
and a 46 percent jump in the
cost of equipment.
The company raised its esti-
mate of 2011 capital expendi-
tures to between $900 million
and $1 billion, up from its pri-
or forecast of $700 million to
$900 million.


C. BRIAN HART

INSURANCE CORP.

We do Auto, Homeowners



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Fax: 305-696-8634
e-mail: info@cbrianhart.coup 1
9 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. Mon-Fri
7954 NW 22ND AVE., MIAMI FL, 33147
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ROOFING ,,', .--..
_ ,. -inn 3rf^


5530 NW 17th Avenue, is offering
free computer web design classes
for middle and high school stu-
dents. Work at your own pace
and receive one-on-one instruc-
tion in learning a very valuable
trade. Registration and classes
are free! Open Monday-Friday,
2-7 p.m. Don't wait call, email or
come by today: 305-691-8588 or
andre@theclickcharity.com.

There will be a free first-
time homebuyer education
class held every second Saturday
of the month, at Antioch Mission-
ary Baptist Church, 21311 NW
34th Avenue, from 8:30 a.m.-5
p.m. For more information, call
305-652-7616 or email fgonza-
lez@ercchelp.org.

Free child care is available at
the Miami-Dade County Com-
munity Action Agency Head-
start/Early Head Start Pro-
gram for children ages three-five
for the upcoming school year. In-
come guidelines and Dade Coun-
ty residence apply only. We wel-
come children with special needs/
disability with anr MDCPS IEP.
For more information, call 786-
469-4622, Monday-Friday from 8
a.m.-5 p.m.

Looking for all former Mon-
tanari employees to get reac-
quainted. Meetings will be held
at Piccadilly's (West 49th Street)
in Hialeah, on the last Saturday
of each month at 9 a.m. We look
forward to seeing each and every
one of you. For more information,
contact Loletta Forbes at 786-
593-9687 or Elijah Lewis at 305-
469-7735.

Xcel Family Enrichment
Center, Inc. will be celebrating
it's 2nd Annual Black Marriage
Day Walk on March 24, 2012.
Xcel operates as a privately-
owned 501(C)(3) not-for-profit
community based organization
that provides social services to
low/moderate income families.
Its main focus is to strengthen
marriage and families from a ho-
listic approach. Xcel is seeking
donations for this event in the
form of monetary, talent, mar-
riage counselors (as a speaker),
DJ, etc. Xcel is registered with
the Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services
Solicitation of Contributions Di-
vision. Your donation is tax de-
ductible. For more information,
call Ms. Gilbert at 786-267-4544.


I


.......... ~,,


---- -- --- ----


I ,














_I'( TIOND )


1150 NW 1 Place
SOne bedroom, one bath,
$450. Mr. Willie #6

1212 NW 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$450. Appliances.
305-642-7080
1215 NW 103 Lane
Two bdrms, gated security,
tile, $700 mthly, $1000 to
move in. 305-696-7667
1229 NW 1 Court
One bedroom, one
bath, $500. Appliances,
free water.
305-642-7080

1231 NW 58 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath.
$450 monthly, $700 move
in. All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV. Call
Joel
786-355-7578

12400 NE 11 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1,000. Appliances, free
water. 305-642-7080

1261 NW59 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1317 NW 2 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$425. Ms. Shorty in #1.
1326 NW 1 PLACE
Clean, one bedroom, one
bath. $430 monthly.
786-419-6613
140 NW 13 Street
TWo bedrooms, one bath
$500. 786-236-1144 or
305-642-7080

14043 NE 2 AVENUE
Two bdrms, two baths. $950.
305-254-6610
1425 NW 60 Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath,
$570 mthly. Includes refriger-
ator, stove, central air, water.
S$725 Move In. 786-290-5498
14350 NW 22 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $450
Two bdrms, one bath $550.
Ms. Jackson 786-267-1646

1450 NW 1 Avenue
One bdrm, one Daln $425
Two bdrms, one bath $525
305-642-7080

1525 NW 1 Place
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bdrm, one bath, $350
monthly. $575 move in. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1535 NW 1 Place
One bedroom $475, call
786-506-3067
1540 NW 1 Court
Studio $425, one bedroom
$525, call 786-506-3067
1718 NW 2 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $425.
Mr. Gaiter in #1

1721 NW 183 Drive
Two bedrooms, two baths, tile
floors, near all facilities, free
water. $800 monthly. Security
required. 305-493-9635
1744 NW 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$495. Two bedrooms, one
bath $595. Appliances,
Ms. Bell #9

1835 NW 2 Court
Two bedrooms. Free water.
$900 move in. $450 deposit.
$450 monthly. 786-454-5213
1943 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, $500, two
bedrooms, $650, move in to-
day, quiet, 786-506-3067
S1969 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$475 Appliances, free gas.
786-236-1144

200 NW 13 Street
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438


210 NW 17 Street
One bdrm, one bath $450,
appliances. 305-642-7080
2565 NW 92 Street
EXTRA CLEAN!
One bedroom, one bath,
stove, refrigerator, water and
lights included. Nice neigh-
borhood. $730 monthly,
$2190 move in or $365 bi-
weekly, $1095 move in.
305-624-8820
2804 NW 1 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath, $595
monthly, $900 move in.
All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV Call
Joel 786-355-7578

2940 NW 135 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, very clean, quiet build-
ing, Section 8 welcome.
954-732-5319


411 NW 37 Street
Studio, $395 monthly.
One bdrm, one bath, $395
monthly. All appliances
included. Call Joel
786-355-7578

4470 N.W. 203 Terrace
Large two bedrooms apt., one
bath, walk in closet, fenced in
yard. 305-401-7227 or 305-
812-3773.
-458 NW 7 STREET
One bedroom, very nice $450
a month. Call 305-557-1750
467 NW 8 Street
Efficiency $425. Appliances
and free water.
305-642-7080

5200 NW 26 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath. Free
gift for Section 8 tenants.
$300 deposit. $675 first
month, $975 moves you in.
Jenny 786-663-8862

540 NW 7 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$500. 305-642-7080

561 NW 6 Street
One bdrm, one bath $495.
305-642-7080
60 and 61 Street
One and two bdrms, $595
and $695. Call 954-482-5400
60 NW 76 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$500 and $600, Appliances,
free water. 305-642-7080
6229 NW 2 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 55 and older pre-
ferred.
305-310-7463
6324 NW 1 Place
Two bdrms, one bath, cen-
tral air, rear, second floor apt.
$785 monthly. 305-206-1566
6832 NW 5 Place
Studio $110 weekly, $450 to
move in. 786-286-2540
731 NW 56 Street
One bdrm one bath Free
water. $550 monthly
Call 786-333-2448

8390 NW 15 Avenue
One Month Free. Large, one
bedroom. Call 786-290-6333
ALLAPATTAH AREA
One bdrm, tile, central air,
water included. $750. Section
8 OKAY! 786-355-5665
ARENA GARDEN
Move in with first month rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, three bdrmsair, appli-
ances, laundry, gate. From
$400. 100 NW 11 St.
305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. Call for specials.
capitalrentalagency.com

GRAND OPENING
NEW ARENA SQUARE
Walking distance to school
from $400. Remodeled
efficiencies, one, two, three
bdrms; two baths. Central air,
laundry, gated. Office 1023
NW 3 Ave. 305-372-1383
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in spe-
cials. One bedroom, $495;
two bedrooms, $595; Free
water 786-236-1144

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450 monthly. 305-722-4433
LIBERTY CITY SPECIAL
One and two bdrms.
1250,1231 NW 61 St
6820 NW 17 Avenue
305-600-7280
305-458-1791
305-603-9592
MIAMI LITTLE RIVER
Remodeled one bedroom.
$625 to $775. NE 78 Street
305-895-5480
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Corner of NW 103 Street
Beautiful two bedrooms, $700
monthly, $1000 to move in.
Gated, security, tiled floors,
central air. 786-402-0672
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Overtown Area,
One bdrm, $400
305-603-9592 305-375-0673
Call Mon-Fri 9 am 4 pm
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms, one bath, $868,
one bedroom, $704, studio
$553, deposit. 305-297-0199
OPA LOCKA AREA
One bdrm, one bath. Special
$400. 305-722-4433
OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750. Section 8 welcome.
305-722-4433
OVERTOWN SPECIAL
APARTMENTS
One two, three bdrm,
1558, 1710, 1730 NW 1 PI
1130, 1132, NW 2Ave
Please Call 305-603-9592
305-600-7280
305-458-1791


5407 SW 41 Street
Broward
Three bedrooms, two and
half baths, Section 8 okay,
$1600 a month, call:
786-277-4395
64 NW 166 Street
N. Miami Beach twnshe, new
four bedrooms, two baths.
$1600. Sect. 8 preferred.
305-528-9964
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath
close to stadium. $950
monthly. 954-663-3990


1097 NW 51 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath, wa-
ter and appliances included.
Section 8 OK! 786-444-1015
1228 NW 1 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath. $450.
305-642-7080

1510 NW 65 St #3
Two bdrms., one bath, air
and water, $850, Section 8
okay, 305-490-9284.
1524 NW 1 Avenue
One bdrm one baih $475.
'ree water 305-642-7080
1542 NW 35 Street
Really nice, two bdrms, air
and some utilities, $850
monthly. 786-488-0599
1612 NW 55 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, appliances.
Section 8 OK! 305-720-7067
172 NW 52 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Free water/electricity
305-642-7080

1747 NW 40 Street
Two bdrms, one bath $750
SAppliances. 305-642-7080
1751 NW 50 Street
Two bedrooms, low deposit,
very clean, Hialeah or Miami
Beach Section 8 Welcome!
Call 305-871-3280
1826 NW 46 Street
New remodeled two bed-
rooms, one bath, central air,
appliances, Section 8 wel-
come. 305-335-0429
2369 NW 50 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, very clean, quiet build-
ing, Section 8 welcome.
954-732-5319
2373 N.W. 61 Street Rear
Two bedrooms.
305-693-1017, 305-298-0388
2452 and 2464 NW 44 St
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$975; Three bedrooms, two
baths, $1050 monthly. Cen-
tral air, low down payment,
786-877-5358.
2531 NW 79th Terrace
One bedroom, one bath,
kitchen, dining, terrace,
fenced, Section 8,
305-219-2571
265 N.E. 58th Terrace
Huge three bedrooms, two
baths, all new! Central air,
Walk-in closets. $1275
monthly, 305-793-0002.
3047 NW 92 Street
Section 8 Only! One bed-
room, one bath, $625 month-
ly. 786-447-9457.
3047 NW 92 Street
Section 8 Onlyl One bed-
room, one bath, $650 month-
ly. 786-447-9457.
3105 NW 133 Street
Huge one bedroom, one bath,
newly remodeled, Section 8
welcome.786-797-7878
3359 NW 51 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, tile,
big back yard. $775 monthly
plus deposit. 786-210-7666
3849 NW 157 Street
Two bdrms., one bath,
$1,050 mthly. 305-751-3381
5509 N.W. Miami Court
One bdrm, one bath. Newly
renovated $650 mthly, first,
last, security. 305-751-6232
5511 NW 5 COURT
Two bdrms, one bath, all
appliances, air, security bars.
Senior discount. $800 mthly.
$600 security. 305-979-3509
after 5 pm
8001 NW 11 Court
Units 1 4
Spacious one bedroom, walk-
in closet, $700 monthly, in-
cludes water, $1000 to move
in, tile floors, all new appli-
ances. 305-305-2311
8092 NW 5 COURT
Two bedrooms, two baths,
central air, free water, and
fenced yard. $850 monthly.
305-992-7503
8203 NW 6 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath, air.
$875 monthly. 954-687-2181
928 NW 55 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath.
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080

94 NE 59 Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, bars, $900 mthly. Section
8 OK. 305-490-9284
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1550 and two bedrooms
and one bath, $1100, Section
8 welcome. 305-332-0072.


NEWr


Three bedrooms, one bath
house, $999 monthly. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578


NORTHWEST MIAMI
Two bdrms, air, washer, dryer
hook up, bars, fenced Section
8 ok. 954-260-6227
NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedrooms, central air.
Section 8 Ok! 786-269-5643


100 NW 14 Street
Newly renovated, private
bath and kitchen, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN). 24
hour security camera, $185
wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232
1612 NW 51 Terrace
$550 moves you in. $140
weekly. 786-389-1686
2905 NW 57 Street
Small, furnished efficiency.
$550 monthly plus $100
security deposit, first and last
month. $1200 to move in.
305-989-6989,305-635-8302
3047 NW 92 Street
Section 8 Only! Extra large,
$500 monthly. 786-447-9457
3150 NW 97 Street, Rear
Large bedroom cottage with
kitchen and bath. Nice, clean,
unfurnished. 305-691-6958
9000 NW 22 Avenue
Air, electric and water includ-
ed. Furnished, one person
only. 305-693-9486
9536 NW 8 Avenue
Free water, very quiet and
parking, $500. Can be seen
Mon. Sat. 10 a.m. 2 p.m.
OPA-LOCKA AREA
Move-In Speciall $375
monthly. Call 305-717-6084.


13387 NW 30 Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486
1527 NW 100 Street
Rooms for rent. $125 weekly,
air included. 305-310-7463
15341 NW 31 Avenue
Large room, full bath, private
entrance. 305-687-8187
15810 NW 38 Place
Private entrance $90 weekly.
Free utilities, bath, kitchen,
one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486
1722 NW 77 Street
$115 weekly, air,
305-254-6610
1775 NW 151 Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable, air and
heat. Two locations.'
Call 954-678-8996
2373 NW 95 Street
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-915-6276, 305-691-3486
5500 NW 5 Avenue
$85 wkly, free utilities, kitch-
en, bath, one person.
305-691-3486
6835 NW 15 Avenue
Utilities included, air. $90
weekly. Move in special $200.
Call 786-558-8096
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Rooms, central air, applianc-
es. $100 and $110 wkly.
954-588-6656
MIAMI AREA
Cable TV, utilities included,
$550 monthly. 305-687-1110
NORTHWEST AREA
Clean and nice, air. $100
weekly, $200 to move in.
786-426-6263
NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance, all utilities
included. 516-847-4520
OPA LOCKA AREA
2170 Washington Avenue
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly.
786-277-3434,786-298-4383


1014 N.W. 60 St
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, heat, all appli-
ances, alarm system, washer
and dryer. $1150 mthly. Sec-
tion 8 Welcome.
786-229-9488
10240 SW 171 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1345, appliances, central
air, fenced yard.
305-642-7080

1042 NW 49 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
$875. 954-687-2181
1110 NW 112 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Like New! Tile, central air
$1300 monthly 305-662-5505
1160 NW 105th St
Two bedroom, one bath.
$2500 move-in and $1150
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
Contact Tonya at:
786-523-6045
12620 NW 15 AVENUE
Rent to own two bedrooms,
one bath, central air, $1300
mthly. Call 954-357-3227.
12845 NW 17 Court
Three bedrooms, new bath,
bars, air, tile, $1,100. No Sec-
tion 8! Terry Dellerson, Real-
tor, 305-891-6776
13070 NW 16 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
tile, central air, carport. $1275
monthly. 305-662-5505
1417 NE 152 Street


$1400 monthly. First and last.
Month to month lease. 305-
600-8603


14200 NW 3 Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air. 305-978-1324
1490 NE 152 Street
Three bedrooms, one new
bath, tile, air, bars, $1150. No
Section 8! Terry Dellerson,
Realtor. 305-891-6776
1510 NE 154 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, den, air
condition units, tile floor. $850
monthly. 786-489-4225
1580 NW 129 Street
Brand new three bedrooms,
one bath with big yard,
$1,450. Section 8 welcome!
305-300-5913
1580 NW 64 STREET
SECTION 8 WELCOME
Large three bedrooms,
two baths, $1395 monthly,
central air, garage. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

15925 NW 22 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
tile, central air $1250 monthly
305-662-5505
16415 NW 23 Court
Updated two bedrooms, one
bath, tile, central air $1100
monthly. 305-662-5505
17225 NW 12 COURT
Three bedrooms, two baths
$1550 monthly Section 8 OK.
786-277-9378
175 NW 117 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1250. 786-286-2540
1852 NW 85 STREET
Three bdrms, one bath.
$1000 monthly.
305-345-2904
18620 NW 8 ROAD
Four bedrooms, two and one
half baths. Central air, wash-
er and dryer. $1650 monthly.
Section 8 o.k. 786-797-7878
1886 NW 85 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, tile, air, $1200, No Sec-
tion 81 Terry Dellerson, Real-
tor. 305-891-6776
2130 Service Road
Two bdrm, one bath, air, tile,
Section 8 OK. 786-277-4395
2140 NW 96 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
tile, central air. $1275 month-
ly. 305-662-5505
221 NW 82 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath, in-
cludes water, $850 monthly.
305-267-9449
2770 NW 194 Terrace
Section 8 OKI Three bdrms,
one and a half baths, cen-
tral air, fresh paint. $1395 a'
month. Call Joe
954-849-6793
2950 NW 49 Street
Three bedrooms, Section 8
OK. 305-693-1017
305-298-0388
3066 NW 94 STREET
Updated two bdrms, new
kitchen, central air. $975 mth-
ly. 305-662-5505
3501 NW 9 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$995, stove, refrigerator, free
water. 305-642-7080
3833 NW 209 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1150, appliances.
305-642-7080
55 NW 83rd Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
fenced yard, and central air.
Section 8 preferred. Call Mr.
Coats at 305-345-7833.
901 NW 49th Street
Three bedrooms, two and
half baths, $1500 monthly,
first, last and $1,000 deposit.
Call 786-541-5234
9012 NW 22 Avenue
Small two bedrooms
305-693-9486 ,
BROWNSVILLE AREA
Three bdrms, one bath and
extras. Section 8 OKI Avail-
able Sept. 1st. 786-546-5290
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Spacious four bdrms, two
baths, living room furniture,
plasma TV included. Section
8 Welcome! Others available.
305-834-4440
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath.
First, last and deposit re-
quired. 954-435-2254
NORTHWEST 51 TERRACE
Completed renovated three
bedrooms, Section 8 house.
Laundry, central air, wood
floors. Everything new. Ready
to move in. 561-727-0974 or
305-905-2020
SOUTH MIAMI AREA
21425 SW 119 Avenue
SECTION 8, three bdrms,
one bath, central air, appli-
ances, laundry room and
large back yard, quarter
acres. $1150 monthly, $1000
deposit. 305-628-3806



7000 NW 21 Avenue
Clean rooms, air, $395 a
month. Move in August 1st.
786-953-8935





4915 NW 182 Street
Four bedrooms, three baths,


PLACE YOUR
CLASSIFIED HERE
305-694-6225


College fees fill


gaps in funding


'ATTENTION'
Now You Can own Your
On Home Today,
""WITH."
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty




PRESSURE WASHING/
HANDY MAN
We do it all, no job to big or
to small. 786-350-5874



ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Full-time Administrative As-
sistant / Office Manager for
fast-paced private research
and technical assistance
firm any years experience
with proficiency in Microsoft
Office Suite 2007, excellent
phone and communication
skills required. Must have
strong organizational/pro-
fessional skills. Competitive
salary with great benefits.
Send resume and cover
letter email ben.byers001 @
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HAWKERS
WANTED
305-694-6214

MEDICAL BILLING
Trainees Needed!
Hospitals and Insurance
Companies now hiring.
No experience needed!
Local Job Training
and Job Placement
Assistance available
1-888-219-5161


ROUTE DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street



Toro Z Master Lawn Mower
Low mileage, Kawasaki
engine, 6 x 9 trailer VICO,
closed end $7500.
954-744-6841



BE A SECURITY OFFICER
24, 40 hours renew G, and
Concealed $100, Traffic
School $35, first time driver.
786-333-2084



GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14130
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.
Super Clean Carpet
Cleaning Service
Entire house $75. No appoint-
ment necessary. Miami-Dade
and Broward Counties Call
Mr. Charles. 786-372-1128.
T & J Insurance
Home, Auto and Business.
Free Quote. 305-474-4639




NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
THIRD DAY HAVEN
TRANSIT SYSTEMS INC.,
intends to register that the
undersigned, desiring to
engaged in business under
the fictitious name of:
Chariots of the Gods
Third Day Transit System
1140 NE 163rd Street
Suite 20-187
North Miami Beach,
FL 33162
in the city of North Miami
Beach, FL
Owners: Rufus Pace,
President.
intends to register the said
name with the Division of
Corporation of State, Talla-
hassee FL Dated this 10th
day of August, 2011,


are determined, identified
and justified.
"A big part of planning
for college (is) knowing how
much things are going to
cost," says Emily McLain,
executive director of the
Oregon Student Associa-
tion. As a student in 2007,
she and other students
worked with state legisla-
tors to force the state uni-
versity system to phase
out a laundry list of fees
by this fall. Many fees had
been added more than a
decade ago to get around
a state-imposed tuition
freeze and budget cuts,
says Jay Kenton, a system
vice chancellor.


Richard Falson


By Mary Beth Marklein

Colleges are tacking on
mandatory student fees at
a time when state funding
is dwindling and public
universities are trying to
hold the line on tuition.
Indiana University-
Bloomington is adding a
$180 "temporary repair and
maintenance fee" this fall;
next year it doubles. Fresh-
men and transfer students
this fall at Southern Illinois
University in Carbondale
will be charged a one-time
$150 "matriculation fee" for
orientation costs. Students
at Georgia's public univer-
sities will pay three percent
more in tuition, but with
fees the increase jumps to
an average nine percent
more than last year. The
rise is driven primarily by
a "special institutional fee"
that will cost as much as
$1,088 next year for some
students. For Georgia Tech
freshmen, all fees total
$2,370 about a quarter
of the total charge, $9,652.
The special fee, a tem-
porary measure to help
make up for budget short-
falls, "keeps the lights on. It
pays the faculty. It pays for
all the things that tuition
pays," University System of
Georgia spokesman John
Millsaps says.
A USA TODAY analysis
last year of athletics fees
found that many NCAA
Division I schools don't
itemize what student fees
pay for. Lawmakers in sev-
eral states are demanding
transparency.
Colorado, where a 2010
audit of public universi-
ties found "some fees may
be higher than necessary,"
enacted a law this summer
making it easier for stu-
dents to question proposed
charges. Between 2006 and
2010, fees in Colorado rose
142% vs. 69% for tuition,
auditors found.
New Jersey state Sen.'
Joe Kyrillos, a Republi-
can who was incensed this
spring that Jersey Shore
star Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi
was paid $32,000 in stu-
dent activity fees to speak
at Rutgers University, pro-
poses that state schools be
required to detail on tuition
bills how fees are allocated.
Beginning next month,
North Dakota state uni-
versities must publish an
online breakdown of how
mandatory fees are spent:
Legislators also have or-
dered a study of how fees


,on-arq The Miami Children's Initiative has
1 a scheduled a meeting for its Educa-
Stional Services Committee {Dr.
lCll Cathia Darling, Committee Chair}
on Wednesday, August 24, 2011
at 4:00 pm and the Youth Advisory Committee
{Thema Campbell, Committee Chair} on Tues-
day, August 30, 2011 at 12:30 pm. They will be
held in the 4th Floor Conference Room of the Jo-
seph Caleb Center, 5400 NW 22nd Avenue. All
are welcome to attend.





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BLACKS MIT CONIROI THEIR OWN DESTINY


12D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 10-16, 2011


Randy Moss: One of the greatest

Deion Sand- before an enthusias- Moss will forever be


ers joined Marshall
Faulk in entering the
Hall of Fame in their
first year of eligibil-
ity. Shannon Sharpe,
Richard Dent, Chris
Hanburger, Les Rich-
ter and Ed Sabol
also were enshrined


tic crowd. And while
each of these men are
deserving of the hon-
or, there is one other
NFL star who retired
last week and will un-
doubtedly make his
way to the Hall as well
- Randy Moss.


remembered as one
of most talented wide
receivers the NFL has
ever seen. The num-
bers speak for them-
selves. No one can
refute the fact that
Moss terrorized de-
fenses with an array


of highly-impressive
statistics: 153 touch-
downs, 14,858 total
yards and a single-
season record of 23
touchdown passes.
Impressive numbers
yes, however, they
don't tell the whole
story of Moss at his
game-breaking best.
He changed the game
every time he made
one of his "how-the
heck-did-he do-that"
touchdown recep-
tions.
Nobody could stop
Randy Moss except,
well, Moss himself.
With his gifted abili-


ties, he made his he-
roics seem effortless.
So much so that peo-
ple would notice when
he appeared to be dis-
tracted even turn-
ing it off as he desired.
We may never know
just how good Moss
could have been.
Despite his tal-
ent, he clearly had
his share of detrac-
tors.. Nonetheless, he
earned the respect of
some of the greatest in
the league including
Jerry Rice, Michael
Irvin and Terrell Ow-
ens guys who were
perceived as- hard


workers at the same
position. He frustrat-
ed his early mentor
Cris Carter who saw
what everyone else
did but struggled to
keep Moss motivated.
Perhaps it all came
too easy for him he
was so much .better
than those who tried
to stop him that he
sometimes toyed with
the opposition.
Moss could be dif-
ficult to like because
like several of his
peers, he gained the
reputation of being
a "diva" especially
when he got cocky -


"straight cash, hom-
ey," he once famously
uttered. It was hard
for us to focus on his
game given his over-
the-top antics. We
tend to be more com-
fortable with athletes
like Barry Sanders
who hand the ball
over to the referee af-
ter every play and re-
main humble.
Moss was clearly
a different breed. He
played with a physi-
cal intelligence that
was easy to ignore or
take for granted. He
displayed exceptional
speed and covered


the field with long,
graceful strides. De-
fensive coordinators
lost sleep at night
trying to come up
with a plan to slow
Moss down but noth-
ing seemed to work.
Never have we seen
a wide receiver that
was so dominant.
He dared you to stop
him, he taunted help-
less defenders and
once mooned Packer
fans at legendary
Lambeau field. Talent
like his only comes
around once in a life-
time. Moss was truly
one of the greatest.


'Prime Time' high steps right into H
By Jarrett Bell n ,ip *J


CANTON, Ohio Near the
end of a swaggering Pro Foot-
ball Hall of Fame weekend
entry that was distinctively
"Prime Time," Deion Sanders
basked on stage with one of
the high-profile participants
at his not-so-typical post-
induction bash. Snoop Dogg
flew in from overseas for this.
Wearing a faux Hall of Fame
gold blazer, the rapper per-
formed for an hour in a huge
tent on the grounds of the
Hall of Fame that housed the
celebration for Sanders and
fellow first-ballot inductee
Marshall Faulk.
Just before 2 a.m, as Sat-
urday night faded to Sunday
morning, Snoop who fol-
lowed hip-hop artist Nelly -
offered analysis.
"I like the way you put the
do-rag on the bust," he told
Sanders, who added that
crowning feature after his
induction speech. "That was
so gangsta ... so hood. When
I come to the Hall of Fame, I
want to see it. They'd better
not take it off."
Sanders doesn't expect the
do-rag will stay. He wanted
a bandana bronzed into his


I.-.


SIGNATURE MOMENT: Former cornerback Deion Sand-
ers added his trademark bandana to his Hall of Fame bust af-
ter his sppech.


bust, requesting as much to
the Hall.
"That's how a lot of fans re-
member me, from way back,"
he said. "So I asked. They told
me that Walter Payton's bust
doesn't have a headband. But
did he request it?
"The least I could do was to
put it on after the speech. So
we got that moment."
A signature snapshot from
Sanders, a phenomenal ath-
lete who also made a prolific
mark as a high-stepping en-


tertainer.
"I had to go in being me," he
said.
Sanders realizes that
not everyone embraces his
style and, as reflected in his
25-minute speech, doesn't
aim to please the masses.
There was a striking thread
that connected Sanders'
speech to messages deliv-
ered by Faulk and Shannon
Sharpe. Each shed light on
their version of the American
journey and how their world


all of Fame
views were shaped as they
climbed from challenging so-
cioeconomic conditions.
Sanders talked about be-
ing ridiculed by a classmate
for his mother's work as a
hospital aide and how it moti-
vated him to ensure that Con-
nie would never have to work
again after he turned pro and
fueled creation of his "Neon
Deion" image.
"If your dream isn't bigger
than you," he preached, "then
there's a problem with your
dream."
With seven inductees, in-
cluding NFL Films founder Ed
Sabol, Richard Dent, Chris
Hanburger and the late Les
Richter, the enshrinement ex-
tended nearly four hours.
"You can't prepare for the
emotion and excitement of all
this," Sanders said. "And to
be on stage, performing with
Snoop? That's icing on the
cake."
The concert ended with
Snoop helping on Sanders'
1995 rap song, Must Be The
Money.
Persona intact.,
Said Sanders, "I guarantee
there will never be another
Hall of Fame weekend like
this."


LaMarr Woodley signs $61.5M deal


Steelers lock LB

for six years
Associated Press

LaMarr Woodley didn't
groan when the Pittsburgh
Steelers slapped him with
their franchise tag.
He didn't panic either. His
goal was always to remain
with the defending AFC
champions, and the news of
the contract that will keep
him in Pittsburgh was so
good he couldn't keep it to
himself.
Rather than get extra rest
entering the second week of
training camp, Woodley took
to Twitter around 6 a.m. Fri-
day to break the news about
his six-year, $61.5-million
deal.
"I set my alarm and I decid-
ed I was going to tweet this
first thing in the morning,"
Woodley said. "That was the
whole thing breaking the


story first."
Figures. It's Woodley's way
to be in a rush.
The deal makes the Pro
Bowl linebacker one of the
highest-paid players at his
position in the league while
also providing the team with
salary cap relief.
The Steelers were $10 mil-
lion over the $120.4-million
salary cap when camp be-
gan, a figure that included
the 'one-year, $10-million
contract tendered to Woodley
in February when the' Steel-
ers designated him with the
franchise tag.
The new deal is front-load-
ed with bonus money, helping
Pittsburgh to get breathing
room under the.cap.
The 26-year-old was only
too happy to move the num-
bers around to make the
contract cap-friendly. All
that really mattered was the
opportunity to stay in Pitts-
burgh.
"That's something I wanted


-Keith Srakocic / Associated Press
Steelers linebacker LaMarr Woodley runs a drill during
practice last week in Latrobe, Pa.


to happen when I first came
in the door and saw the great
linebackers who had come
through here," Woodley said.
"I wanted to be a part of that
great tradition and history
around here, but to do that I
had to be around here."
Woodley has developed into


one of the NFL's top young
linebackers since the former
Michigan star was chosen
by the Steelers in the sec-
ond round of the 2007 draft.
He has recorded at least
10 sacks in each of the last
three years, including 131/2
in 2009.


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UNCOMMON FACE: Yankees center fielder Curtis Grander-
son is one of the top players in the majors. But aspiring Black
players, he says, are without clear role models today.


Granderson wonders,


where are Black fans?


By Seth Livingstone

New York Yankees outfielder
Curtis Granderson isn't telling
Major League Baseball any-
thing it doesn't already know.
Baseball appears to lack
appeal and access to some
Blacks, whether they are par-
ticipants or fans. And Grand-
erson wasn't necessarily try-
ing to stir the pot when he told
the Fort Worth Star-Telegram:
"Count the number of African-
American fans."
On a recent trip to Texas,
Granderson said it was diffi-
cult to push the count to dou-
ble digits.
"At first, it starts off as a joke
(with teammates)," Grander-
son said. "As the game moves
on, you'll get to 10, or maybe
15. Depends on where you are,
too. Places like Chicago or New
York, other places it's easy. (In
Texas), it's hard. So after a
while it becomes, 'Told you so.'
"As it was reported in April,
the percentage of Black play-
ers dropped to 8.5 percent on
opening day this year, down
from 10 percent at the start
of last season and its lowest
level since 2007, according to
the University of Central Flori-
da's Institute for Diversity and
Ethics in Sports. More than
80 percent of NBA players are
Black and the percentage of
Black players in the NFL is
more than 60 percent.
Possible reasons appear


myriad for baseball's drop in
Black players. The Star-Tele-
gram cites costs for equipment
and league participation as
possible reasons for baseball's
lack of appeal, to say nothing
of admission prices.
"I know it's expensive, but
I've gone to places and there
are fields," Granderson said.
"You can easily get equipment
donated. I don't know how you
fight this one. I've heard a lot
of kids just say, 'I don't want
to.' That's not a Black/white
thing, that's a kid thing. So
they play on their computer,
and they say, 'I want to just
stay right where I am. I'm not
getting into any trouble so you
can't force me.
"If you poll a lot of African-
American guys that are be-
tween 20 and 40 years old
(and ask) what NBA player
'did you watch and want to be,
they're all going to say '(Mi-
chael) Jordan.' He was the best
player and he looked like us.
(In) baseball, you have a group
playing right now who could
say 'Ken Griffey Jr.,' but he's
no longer in the game, and
there hasn't been anybody to
replace him."
Although MLB has made ef-
forts to promote the game, in
part through its RBI (Reviving
Baseball in the Inner Cities)
program, which boasts nearly
200,000 participants across
the country, the fruits have
been difficult to decipher at


Reggie Bush: Trade to Miami Dolphins is 'surreal'


By Tim Reynolds

DAVIE (AP) Reggie Bush
watched part of his first prac-
tice with the Miami Dolphins
from an end zone, arms across
his chest, nodding and smiling
as he studied what was hap-
pening on the field.
He can't wait for a different
view.
Bush's next chapter formally
began last Friday, one day af-
ter he was acquired 'by the Dol-


phins in a trade with the New
Orleans Saints and agreed to a
two-year contract worth nearly
$10 million. He couldn't prac-
tice with the club until Aug. 4
because of NFL rules, but is in
camp and already knee-deep
into the process of learning ev-
erything about his new team.
"It's still pretty surreal for
me," Bush said after practice.
"This whole experience is great.
I'm looking forward to this op-
portunity. I think this is an


amazing city to play in
and I'm just looking for-
ward to being able to
come in here and con-
tribute right away and be
a difference-maker and
help this team win."
Bush said he and the
Dolphins are still figur-
ing out how he'll be used,
but noted that he'll be a run-
ning back first clearly his
top priority. In five years with
the Saints, Bush only carried


the ball 524 times,
actually gaining more
yards as a receiver
i than a runner.
"It's an opportunity
I've wanted and envi-
sioned as long as I've
played football," Bush
BUSH said. "I've always
wanted to be a fea-
tured back and the main guy
and I feel like there's an oppor-
tunity here for that. And there's
also an opportunity for me to


be a leader and a contributor
and help some of the young
guys come along too. I've been
in the league five years and I
can't believe it, but I'm kind of
one of the older vet guys now."
Bush is a dynamic kick re-
turner and receiver out of the
backfield when he is healthy.
And although plagued by a se-
ries of injuries in his career, he
gained 4,982 all-purpose yards
for the Saints and scored 33
touchdowns.


Bush was due about $11.8
million this season, the final
year of his contract with the
Saints, who face salary-cap
constraints.
He helped the Saints win the
Super Bowl in February 2010
- on the Dolphins' home field.
But he has never been to a
Pro Bowl or even rushed for as
much as 600 yards in a season,
though the sort of speed he has
is something Miami desperate-
ly coveted.


,87a a 50gt QOAY


-. --- -


*Rate quoted for a 26-year-old male non-smoker in Hernando County. Rates may vary by gender, age. county and tobacco usage. Limitations and exclusions may apply Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc.. is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 71364-0511


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