Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00871
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: February 24, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00871
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text





Youngest leadership takes over N.A.A.C.P. will succeed Julian

y lan Urbina current vice chairwoman, will Bond, right, center,
become chairwoman of the board, Benjamin T.Jealous,
The National Association for the taking the reins from Julian Bond,
advancement of Colored People on who last year, on the eve of the president, as leader
aturday announced the selection organization's centennial celebration, of the 64-member
its first new board leader in more announced his decision to step
lan a decade. down. The 64-member board is N.A.A.C.R board,
Roslvn M. Brock, 44, the board's Please turn to BROCK 5A
the policy making
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LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
205 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
CAIHESVILLE FL 32611-7007


a utatu t i
Tempora Mufantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


D ETUBIRTSID I N M I A M I- D AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER


87 YEARS


Volume 87 Number 26 MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)



Jackson executives: "Stop pointing fingers"


Jackson Health System to lay off hundreds more


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
A slump in the economy has im-
pacted millions of Americans. The lat-
est outlook from The National Asso-
ciation for Business Economics, fore-
see an economic recovery but more
people in Miami-Dade continue to
lose their jobs and homes; businesses
are closing their doors or taking huge
financial hits.
Jackson Health System (JHS) 'is


no exception as they struggle with a
whopping $230 million budget defi-
cit which could result to a number
of layoffs and the closing of various
Jackson facilities.
After a month of scrunity towards
Jackson's management, John H.
Copeland III, Public Health Trust
(PHT) Chairman, said "there -is a
lot of concern and fear is circulat-
ing throughout the system but we
are fundamentally missing the real
cause for Jackson's current


DR. ENEIDA ROLDAN
JHS Chief Executive


financial crisis."
He continued, "We are trying to
treat symptoms rather than the real
problems," said Copeland in phone
interview on Monday. "Our mission is
to provide healthcare to those who do
not have health insurance."

SEIU VS. JACKSON
In a letter to the Miami-Dade State
Attorney's Office last week, Service
Employees International Union (SEIU)
Local 1991 proposed a grand jury in-
vestigation on Jackson and stated:
"The current leadership of PHT/


JHS appears incapable of calculat-
ing the budget shortfall, much less
addressing the deficit. .. Jackson ex-
ecutives also admit the billing system
is inadequate and mismanaged. The
administration has consistently mis-
calculated the amount that could be
collected and has no effective means
of collection. Financial reporting and
billing are so unreliable that the CFO
was dismissed... Our community has
a right to know if public funds have
been misappropriated or misused."
Frank Barrett, Jackson's former
Please turn to JACKSON 4A


. . .... . .. . ...... . ...... . ...... ....... ..... ..o. .... .... o.... ..... ..... .... .... .... ..... ..... .... .... ....


Wood's 'therapy' fuel debate


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... Committee to save Overtown's historic sites
. ........ ........ ....*.* ..****** ******** ******** ******** ******* ******** ********


Special to The Miami Times

A committee appointed
to save Overtown's his-
toric sites from demoli-
tion will begin work im-
mediately. Concerned
that historic Rev. Samuel
E. Sullivan, Sr., senior
pastor of Overtown's His-
toric Greater Bethel AME
Church has agreed to


serve as chair of this im-
portant group.
Appointed by the chair
of the Historic Overtown
Folklife Village/District,
Dr. Dorothy Jenkins
Fields, the committee is
charged with developing
a plan to save, restore,
and locate uses that will
generate revenue for his-
toric Overtown sites.


SAMUEL E. SULLIVAN


Black Archives staff, left to right: executive assistant, Rosa Newman, architect, Silvia Jor-
rin, archivist, Nneka Hanchard, vice chairman, Garth Reeves, Lyric maintenance manager, Fred
McNair, founder Dr. Dorothy Jenkins Fields, project manager Ted Bachan, board member Dr.
Clarence Smith and executive director Timothy A. Barber.


Black Archive begins $10 million addition


Special to the Times
Another milestone was
reached in Overtown on Feb. 18
with the groundbreaking for
the expansion of the stage of
the historic Lyric Theater and
the $10 million construction of
an adjacent building to house
The Black Archives History


and Research Foundation of
South Florida, Inc.
At last Thursday night's
Overtown Community Over-
sight Board meeting, Timothy
A. Barber, executive director of
the Black Archives, made the
historic announcement: "We
have currently provided five
new jobs for Overtown resi-


dents and expect more to come
after this initial phase."
Not only are residents being
supplied with jobs, they are
also gaining instrumental skills
and training that will be trans-
ferrable to other jobs in the fu-
ture. According to project man-
ager, Ted Bachan, at the end of
Please turn to ADDITION 4A


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Lemon City Cemetery:

A final resting place

Ihe Feb. 16 celebration is the result of people from all
Walks of life working together for the goal of justice
Sand respect of each other and the dead of Lemon
City Cemetery. It involves the rich and the poor, the young
and the old, people from various races and walks of life. We
have come to celebrate our differences and our agreements
to work in unity for the betterment of the community.

In April 2009, Historic Hampton House Community Trust
office received a phone call that human bones had been
found at a construction site in Lemon City. The caller said
the bones were believed to be of Black people. The caller felt
that the same leadership that was given to the preservation
of the Circle should he given to the Preservation of Lemon
City Cemetery. It was explained that the City of Miami had
no record of the site being a cemetery and had given the
developers permission to build housing there. When word
about the finding hit the press, more pressure was put on
giving leadership to this discovery. The topic was put on the
May agenda of African American Committee of Dade Heri-
tage Trust meeting. The public was invited to the meeting.

Several ideas were proposed as strategies to deal with the
situation- Dr. Bradford Brown, who represented the NAACP,
suggested that we find people who had relatives buried there
because they had a stake in its preservation. We had to
prove that it was a cemetery since the City of Miami had no
record of a cemetery being there. It was also suggested that
we should seek historic designation.

Another suggested strategy was to ask the Miami Historic
Preservation and Environment Board to pass a resolution
in support of the Historic Preservation of the Lemon City
Cemetery. The resolution was written by Dr. Marvin Dunn
and accepted by the Lemon City Cemetery Task Force. The
resolution was presented to the City of Miami Historic Pres-
ervation and Environment Board on July 7, 2009. The board
voted in favor of the resolution but said it was meaningless.
The property needed Historic Designation. We took their ad-
visement and began working on Historic Designation.

How could we prove that it was eligible for Historic Desig-
nation without the historical information?

How could it be proven that the site had been a cemetery?
How could we find relatives of the deceased since we did
not know who the deceased were? Different persons remem-
bered relatives saying something about a cemetery being in
that area, but no one had definite proof as to exactly where it
was. Leome Culrner was contacted to ask if she knew wheth-
er there was a cemetery in Lemon City. She knew there was
one there but referred the caller to Evangelist Teresita De-
Veaux, a centenarian who she thought would know because
she use to live in Lemon City.

Evangelist DeVcaux continued that there was a cemetery
there. In an interview with a Herald reporter, she said she
attended the funeral of TheopThfus Clark who was buried,
in the Lemon City Cemetery. When Larry Wiggins, a geneao-
gist, read the article, he did research on Theophilus Clark..
.He plugged Clark's name into a Mormon genealogy website
and discovered that Clark was buried in 1926 at a place
called Lemon City Cemetery Wiggins ran a genealogy records
search using the keywords "Lemon City Cemetery." A total
of 523 names came up, all of Black people, many from the
Bahamas or infants of Bahamian settlers. The majority was
buried between 1915 and 1925. right around the time when
millionaires began developing Miami Beach.

The next thing that had to be proven was that we had
the right location. Further research by Larry Wiggins dis-
covered two World War 1 veterans were buried in the Lemon
City Cemetery. The information gave directions from Flagler
Street to the Lemon City Cemetery. This left no doubt of
the Cemetery's location. Further research by Rene Michelle
Harris based on a list of incorporators given by Mrs. Culmer,
revealed that a Black incorporator of the City of Miami was
buried there. With this and other gathered information, thus
,began the writing of the historic designation using Chapter
23 of the city code on Historic Preservation as a guide.

The Lemon City Cemetery Task Force later became the
Lemon City Cemetery Community Corporation. Its goal was
to carry out the strategies suggested for the preservation of
the Lemon City Cemetery.

In a meeting of the developers, the YMCA and the Lemon
City Cemetery Corporation, the developers agreed not to
continue building on the cemetery and to turn the cemetery
into a Memorial Garden. They further agreed to build a mon-
ument to the dead and maintain the memorial.

On November 3, 2009, local Historic Designation was given
to the Lemon City Cemetery by the Historic Preservation and
Environment Board of the City of Miami. We are here today
to say "thank you" to all who have attended meetings, do-
nated money, time and service to bring about the "Local His-
toric Designation of the Lemon City Cemetery." Our theme
today is "The Strife is O'er, the Battle Done, Alleluia, Rest
in Peace." This theme expresses our sentiments concerning
our efforts in relation to the deceased and this project. We
look forward to continuing our work with the developers and
the YMCA to establish the Memorial Garden and the monu-
ment to our loved ones departed. -Enid C. Pinkney


Sffe fiiami Mimau
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Stalion, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES. JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
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Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
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S~CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can Dest lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless of race. creed or color. his or her human and legal rights Haling no person, tearing no person.
the BlacK Press strives to help every person In the firm belief that al persons are hurt as long as anyone Is held back


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3 A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


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What are you doing for Haiti?
Dear Editor: earthquake is bad but there has
been so many bad things hap-
I read the World Health Orga- opening there you don't know
nization says that up to 1000 where to start. More illegal im-
physicians from around the migration is definitely not the
world descended to Haiti in re- answer because America has its
cent weeks to help earthquake own economic problems. What is
victims. Millions of dollars have needed is for the Haitians here
been raised. Here locally, the in Miami to get together and go
Haitian leaders are "furious" help fix their country but not sit
that Haitians are being returned on the sidelines demanding what
to Haiti. Bastien says "this is the everyone else should be doing. If
worst tragedy in 200 years." The helping the orphans is a need,


talk to some of the agencies work-
ing over there and tell them how
to set up things. Haitians here
know the needs and the coun-
try. Work with the agencies for
a better outcome. How can the
Haitians here be so demanding
and furious. They received TPS
(illegals here) to be able to send
money back to those that need it
so what is the problem? It seems
to me the Haitian leaders in Mi-
ami are ungrateful for what the


country is doing and what many
individuals here have done, in-
cluding giving money. To me, it is
not inhumane to take care of the
residents in the U.S. and Miami
first. To the Haitians in America,
I say roll up your sleeves and go
to Haiti and help your people not
just complain. What are you do-
ing to make it better?

Linda Simmons,
North Miami


Take your problems, solutions to the polls


Dear Editor:

What's wrong with jobs at the
City of Miami and Miami-Dade
County? Growing up in pub-
lic housing, I remember having
programs for after school but
over the years things have taken
a -turn for the worst. In our so-
ciety today, so many young kids
are killing each other due to the


lack of summer jobs. Programs
have been cut as the result of a
budget crisis and our kids are
running the streets in the sum-
mer time with no summer jobs.
I think it is sad for the elected
officials, who we voted for to
help the community, to set up
to help get jobs and rebuild our
community.
I find it very strange to see


Jackson Memorial Hospital go
into this crisis budget. They have
allowed too many people come in
to get to free medical care whei
the taxpayers have to fit the bill.
Management should make sure
that the budget is in place and
what is being spent. We should
be holding the top people ac-
countable for this problem. Now
they are closing the doors on


the workers who have no con-
trol of what the budget look like.
I say to this community we need
to start standing up and look at
the upcoming election. We need
to get more people to vote and
teach them how to vote for the
right candidate.

Theophilus Williams
Miami


I support Commissioner Rolle


Dear Editor:

I am responding to last week's
Letter to the Editor entitled,
"What has Rolle done for Dis-
trict 2?" I have lived in the com-
munity for 35 years. I have seen
politicians come and go. I have
lived through the good times
and the bad. And, over the past


10 years, I have seen Commis-
sioner Dorrin D. Rolle right
there with us through it all.
No, people don't always agree
with the way the government
does things but when you call
Commissioner Rolle and let him
know that things aren't going
right, he always ask how can he
help make it right. That is one


of the things about Commis-
sioner Rolle that makes him a
good Commissioner. It's easy to
point out things people haven't
done but when you focus on
when you focus on what they
have done, it far outweighs the
bad. Rolle keeps an old woman
like me looking forward to Val-
entine's Day because I know he


is going to have the "Peppermint
Ball." That's an event where I
get all dressed up and feel like
somebody really loves me. Com-
missioner Rolle cares about the
young and old of the district.,
That is why I support him.

Claretha Mixon,
Miami


Rolle does so much for the kids


Dear Editor:

I am responding to last week's
Letter to the Editor entitled,
"What has Rolle done for District
2?" First of all, I want to thank
Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle
for being the best Commission-
er that District 2 has ever had.


I have read some things in the
paper about you being a "fake"
Commissioner and I would like
to let this person know what
Commissioner Rolle does for our
children. Commissioner Rolle
sponsors a Brain Bowl and Rolle
Bowl Football Classic every year
and he rewards the winners


with $5,000 and the runners up
with $2,500. This is something
that the children of District 2
look forward to because with
the money much needed educa-
tional materials are purchased
and programmatic supplies are
finally received. Commissioner
Rolle is not a "fake" Commis-


sioner. If you just take a mo-
ment to research all of the posi-
tive things Rolle does for District
2, then you too would have to
agree that he does much more
than most.

Connie Johnson,
Miami


The Black Overtown community in the City of Miami- are
paying a heavy price as they struggle to bring some sort
of order to their dying birth place. As suspended Miami
Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones fights to regain her
elected office, former Commissioner Richard P. Dunn fills her
seat -- a post he said he will give up by November's general
election, when the seat opens up again. With this theatrical
tug of war between Gov. Charlie Crist and Spence-Jones
your guess is as good as ours as to who the real loser will be
-- Overtown. Stay tuned.

The Florida Republican party elected state Sen. John
Thrasher its new chairman Saturday. Thrasher is the first
person in Florida in decades to serve as a legislator and state
party chairman at the same time. His reference to Democrats
as "our enemy" prompted Senate Democratic leader Al
Pawson to call for Thrasher's removal from the Senate's
Ethics and Elections and Reapportionment committees. "Both
positions require bipartisan cooperation, and John Thrasher
has demonstrated that he is incapable of conducting himself
in such a manner," Lawson said in a statement. "John
Thrasher's language is beyond the pale and offensive to the
nearly 4.7 million voters who identify themselves as Florida
Democrats."

At least two of Florida's lawmakers are concerned enough
to require state college and universities to interview qualified
minority candidates for coaching and athletic director
vacancies. Rep. Richard Steinberg, D-Miami Beach, and
Sen. Tony Hill, D-Jacksonville, say their proposal is. modeled
on the NFL's so-called Rooney Rule, as well as a new Oregon
law that requires schools to consider a qualified minority
applicant for each major vacancy.

It seems that if you are a big and powerful corporation,.
you can steal the Miami-Dade County blind and still get
a clean bill of health with the county and can compete for
Miami-Dade government contracts in the future. Miami-Dade
Commissioners voted 8-3 Thursday to approve a settlement
with Wackenhut Corp., formally ending the testy dispute
'between the county and security firm that guarded Metrorail
stops for two decades. Under the deal, Wackenhut will pay $3
million to the county and $4.5 million to a former Wackenhut
employee and her lawyers who filed a whistle-blower suit
alleging bogus billing practices.
*********
There's a big tug of war over the rum distilleries between
Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands has spilled over into
the Democratic U.S. Senate race. Maurice Farce, a native
of Puerto Rico who is trailing in the polls, has criticized his
primary rival, Rep. Kendrick Meek, for not siding with Puerto
Rico. Florida Sen. Bill Nelson is said to be drafting legislation
aimed at blocking the deal, enraging allies of the Virgin Islands,
including the National Black Chamber of Commerce, which
fired off a letter to Nelson saying his intervention would hurt
the only African-American majority territory in the United
States. Stay tuned.
********
There's a lot of grumbling going on in Overtown about the
Collins Center and Crosswinds Communities, the Michigan-
based developer brought in six years ago to spearhead the
building of a 1,000 condominium project. Not a single unit
has been built but their land trust has brought up most of
the prime property and seemingly want to demolish most of
the few remaining historic structures remaining here. Latest
target to be destroyed is the old Carl Mitchell building located
at 1024 Northwest Second Avenue, now owned by Rev. Henry
Nevin, the former pastor of St. John Institutional Baptist
Church. Stay tuned.


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER






4.e Fi
..


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 4 THE MIAMI TIMES FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


Jackson slated for more layoffs


JACKSON
continued from 1A

chief financial officer, an-
nounced his retirement earlier
this month.
State Attorney Katherine
Fernandez Rundle said any in-
vestigation was up to the grand
jury, "an independent body of
21 citizens that decides, on its
own, what issue of great im-
portance they will investigate
during their six-month term.
The new term begins in May. .
. As their legal advisor, we will
provide a copy of this letter to
them and certainly assist them
in whatever review they choose
to undertake."
In response 'to SEIU allega-
tions, chief executive Eneida
Roldan says, "Even if all the bill-
ing was perfect, there would still
be a shortfall. It would not be
enough to cover the the service
that Jackson provides."

THE REAL ISSUES OF JACKSON
Jackson, Miami's public hos-
pital, is one of the largest health-
care institutions in the United
States. It is responsible for
almost 2,000 beds and over
11,000 employees throughout
the county, has three hospi-
tals and several other facilities
throughout South Florida.
According to Roldan, 70 per-
cent of patients admitted to
Jackson, 45 -50 percent are
uninsured. Seventy percent
of those who require inpatient
care at least 50 percent are un-
insured.
Roldan, who was appointed
last June as CEO of Jackson,
says that there are other factors
that play in Jackson's situation.
First of all, the non-operating


JOHN H. COPELAND III
Public Health Trust Chairman
revenue (half-penny and ad va-
lorem tax) and operating rev-
enue from patients (more people
out of jobs) have decreased.
With unemployment skyrocket-
ing, patients are unable to pay
their hospital bills so back debt
has soared said Roldan. The
hospital's recent computer con-
version also put a whole in their
pockets.
Roldan suggests that the bud-
get deficit "is not a one person,
this has to be a tbam approach.
We have a system that is too
large but have limited resourc-
es."
Copeland insists the way of
solving Jackson's problems is
not by pointing fingers.
"Management is trying to
workout the best possible solu-
tions so that Jackson can move.
forward, said he said. "We did
not get into this problem over-
night. We are in the midst of an
economic storm."
Copeland adds other factors
contributing to the deficit in-
cluding the cost of charity care,


which is free or reduced prices
provided to low-income pa-
tients, increasing and health-
care cost "spiraling out of con-
trol."

LAYOFFS FROM
TOP TO BOTTOM
Roldan and Copeland agree
that decisions will have to be
made which will affect thou-
sands of employees and the
community.
Twenty-one nursing positions
have been affected: five were
laid off, thirteen nurses were
separated and three who were
recently hired were told not to
come in. Overall, 40 people were
affected by the cuts.
Roldan said that cuts began
at the top. Several non-union
personnel and vice presidents
were laid off. Executive pack-
ages were also cut. Roldan even
asked SEIU employees earning
more than $50,000 to take a
voluntarily five percent pay cut
but no formal talks were made.
"Right now, everything is on
the table," said Roldan.
On Monday, Jackson an-
nounced a proposed plan to cut
900 positions, which include
the elimination of several va-
cant positions, but "these cuts
are not taken lightly and that
contractual obligations with
tour unions will be followed,"
said hospital spokesperson
Lorraine Nelson. Cuts are ex-
pected to come from various
departments within Jackson
said Nelson.
Copeland believes the Public
Health Trust which represents
the interest of the community
must "open up a dialogue as a
community on how we want to
move forward."


Committee formed to create more jobs in Overtown


ADDITION
continued from 1A

the eighteen month project, all
workers that have worked on
the site will receive certificates
of completion that indicate the
skills and degree of training
that they have received in their
respective trades.
Founder of The Black Ar-
chives, Dr. Dorothy Jenkins
Fields is excited and relieved
that this new construction is
finally underway. She said,
"The process of this project
began more than ten years
ago with perseverance and
help from a lot of people, es-
pecially our board member,
the late Athalie Range, former
County Commissioner Bar-
bara Carey-Shuler and inany
others who supported us
through the decades."
Ultimately, this phase of the


Lyric expansion was funded
by a $10 million general obli-
gation bond from Miami-Dade
County through the Depart-
ment of Cultural Affairs. The
City of Miami's CRA depart-
ment was instrumental in
helping to acquire the land
necessary for the expansion.
County Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson's office supported
this project phase. According
to Barber, "The Commissioner
encouraged Brian Gillis to as-
sist us in every way possible."
The challenge now is to plan
for funding so that the theater,
the Archives and the Lyric Pla-
za can be fully operational at
the grand opening, February,
1, 2012. It is Barber's intent
to request the CRA to fund
the artistic facade of the Lyric
Plaza. Working together with
the county and city, these two
components of the project will


I b: %%h Irx% rrsIvWTI"*d. MLj 0, 1 Il.p4a


be completed in time for the
grand opening.
At the same time, it is an-
ticipated that the Overtown
Folklife Village/ District will
open as a cultural heritage
tourism site. The concept is
based on the development of
a "creative economy." A com-
mittee is being formed to work
with the Southeast Overtown
Park West CRA to save, re-
store and locate a new use
that will generate revenues
and jobs for Overtown's his-
toric sites. In this process
there is a possibility that the
training at Work America led
by Herb Coleman will provide
more jobs for Overtown resi-
dents.
Anyone wishing to donate
to The Black Archives may do
so by contacting the office at
305-636-2390 or email: baf@
theblackarchives.org


' kry


aw .em


GREATER MIAMI CHAPTER


cordially invitesyou to











HISTORICAL PROFILES DEPICTING
NOTABLE GREATER MIAMI, FLORIDA PIONEERS
OF AFRICAN DESCENT


Saturday, March 13, 2010
11:00 a.m.


Hilton Miami Airport
5101 Blue Lagoon Drive
Miami, Florida


Guests will receive a numbered copy of
Linkages & Legacies, a limited edition publication.


Donation $150 I RSVP by March 10, 2010
Please make checks payable to The Links Foundation, Inc.
and mail to 1230 NE 102 Street, Miami Shores, FL 33138


For additional information, please call 305.693.5401


SPONSORS

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of Florida


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THE LINKS INCORPORATED GREATER MIAMI CHAPTER


OFFICERS
Angela Robinson Bellamy
President
Renee Jones
Vice President
Valda Clark Christian
Recording Secretary
Donna Ginn
Corresponding Secretary
Rene Beal
Treasurer
Vandra G. Woolfolk
Financial Secretary
Denise Kelly Johnson
Chaplain
Margaret N. McCrary
Journalist
Pearl Patterson Bethel
Parliamentarian
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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


S BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Welterweight champ Andre Berto's focus on aiding Haiti


Titlist skips huge fight to help homeland


Unbeaten welterweight cham-
pion Andre Berto gave up the
biggest fight of his career a
Jan. 30 title bout with Shane
Mosley- after his native Haiti
was hit by a devastating earth-
quake Jan. 12. Berto headed to
his homeland and kept a jour-
nal of his experiences. A few
excerpts:

Jan. 12, 5:58 p.m.:
I got the call. I was informed
that Haiti was rocked by a mas-
sive 7.0 earthquake. I am con-
fused and (have) no idea of how
serious the damage is, so all
we can do is wait. The morn-
ing sun reveals the power of
mother nature thousands
dead on the streets, people be-
ing pulled from the rubble and
buildings that were smashed to
the ground.
As I watched CNN, a chilling
sensation ran down my spine.


I felt the mourning of a nation.

After three days, we got word.
My uncle and seven other mem-
bers of his household were all
found dead. ..
But with darkness comes
light; my sister Naomi and my
niece Jessica were alive. They
were walking to a friend's house
when their home collapsed.
So for now they wander the
streets with the rest of the
homeless looking for shelter
and food. At night they hear
screams and cries of men,
women and children still under
the rubble. ...
They say the ultimate mea-
sure of a man is not where he
stands in moments of comfort
and convenience, but where he
stands during times of chal-
lenge and controversy. I had to
decide to cancel a dream fight
in Las Vegas, but now I have a


fe r '- i M-
-y Cleveland Berto
Unbeaten welterweight champion Andre Berto helps lift the
spirits of young patients at the Medishare tents in Haiti after an
earthquake rocked the nation.


much bigger cause to fight for
in Haiti.


Landing in Haiti:
When the plane door is open,


it seems like I've walked into a
nightmare. The Caribbean sky
is still filled with the smoke and
dust from the rubble. We made
the ride over to the Project Me-
dishare hospital. As I'm walking
into the tent hospital, I make eye
contact with my brother Cleve-
land. ...
When I walk through the aisle,
a little girl grabs my pant leg. I
asked her what her name was,
and she says Measha. I told her
she was beautiful, and she said
"thank you" in Creole. Then she
asked me if I could fix her leg be-
cause it has been hurting. She
pulled the blanket back, and
Ier leg had been amputated. I,
.: couldn't believe how much
strength this little girl had.

Losing a child:
Back at the Medishare hospital,
a truck pulled up with a father
and his daughter (who is) uncoh-
scious. I carried her into the hos-
pital. When I laid her down, she


opens her eyes, and I tell her it's
going to be OK. I didn't think any-
thing was wrong with her. There
were no cuts or bruises. But min-
utes later, she falls into cardiac
arrest. Doctors rip her shirt open
and start CPR. The father starts
to yell and cry. ... He tells me she
is all he has because everyone
else is dead. The doctors revived
her three times before she passed.
Her father grips my shirt in pain
and sorrow and falls to his knees.
... It's hard to imagine a parent
losing their child and witnessing
her death. I assisted in placing
the young girl in a body bag. ...
On random late nights, I walk
around the hospital camp out-
side and hear lovely sounds of
old Haitian spirituals of faith.
My heart fills with joy and pride
knowing that the strength of the
Haitian history still shows proud-
ly. Through all the suffering Haiti
has been through, these are the
people of 1804, the- first free
Black republic.


Ft. Lauderdale police chief cleared in crash probe

By Brittany Wallman It turned out some of the city's did nothing improper and did not Enforcement is also reviewing vealed last fall to be running the
employees at the scene didn't quash a DUI investigation of one the crash, said Mike Momrson, investment scheme. He is await-
'a 'a1., 1 ~ 44 4 1. -vhl- i rp-.i vn1fl vni-ea r vnpcr' ftr nedn
kVL %,LJVWl. h~t h vc dA.AL f) L~th dJJi tl hl. hisL freda- DEsoemni etnig atrpedn


wnen rort Lauaerdaies police
chief turned up next to Ponzi
schemer Scott Rothstein in pho-
tographs taken at a car crash
scene, one of the drivers' attor-
neys asked whether the chiefs
presence influenced the investi-
gation.


BROCK
continued from 1A

the policymaking arm of the
organization.
In being named vice
chairwoman of the N.A.A.C.P.
board at 35, Ms. Brock was the
first woman and the youngest
person to hold the position.
Previously 'she worked in
health care administration and
policy. In her current job as a
vice president of Bon Secours
Health Care, Ms. Brock serves
as the chief spokeswoman on
government relations, advocacy
and public policy.
"This is the time for renewal,"
said Mr. Bond, 70, who took over
the chairmanship in 1998. "We
have dynamic new leadership.
Roslyn understands firsthand
how important youth are to
the success of the N.A.A.C.P.
She was introduced to the
N.A.A.C.P. 25 years ago when
she served the N.A.A.C.P. as
a youth board member and
Youth and College Division
State Conference president."
The most recognized
organization in the civil rights
establishment, the association
was founded in 1909. One of
its main missions was to fight
the lynchings of blacks.
The organization has played
an important role in virtually
every major civil rights issue of
the last century, including the


even low WIU o was, waccor
ing to investigative documents
released to The Sun Sentinel.
Even more of the employees at
the scene didn't know who Roth-
stein was.
The city determined recently
that Police Chief Frank Adderley


landmark 1954 Brown v. Board
of Education desegregation
case, the 1964 Civil Rights Act
and the 1965 Voting Rights
Act.
It has struggled in recent
years, however, with declining
membership, financial
and political problems and
questions of how best to move
forward. The group's reputation
was tarnished in the mid- 1990s
when it fired its president for
using organization money to
settle a sexual harassment
claim against him,. In 2007,,it
laid off more' than a third of
its staff because of a budget
shortfall.
In 2008, the board selected
Benjamin T. Jealous, an activist
and former news executive,
as its youngest president,'
breaking with a tradition of
picking ministers and political
leaders and rebuffing criticisms
that it was out of touch with the
concerns of younger Blacks.
"We're looking at a
generational shift in our
communities," Ms. Brock
said. "We have a 48-year-old
president in the White House,
an N.A.A.C.P. president who
was 35 at the time of his election
and a 44-year-old board chair.
The wisdom of those who stood
the test of time got us to this
point, and the youth are who
will ensure the future legacy of
this organization."


Rothstein.
The Florida Department of Law


The investigation is yet more
fallout after Rothstein was. re-


guilty in the estimated $1.2 bil-
lion illicit operation.


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Brock makes history


MIAMI-DADE
WATER AN gSEWER M
DEPARTMENT By Ana Maria Monte Flores
A A A A A A A A A 'A A A rA 'A

The Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department is pleased to
welcome you to this new feature. Through this column we
will regularly report water news and practical information
that will keep you informed about Miami-Dade's tap water,
how to use it wisely and all the services provided by the De-
partment.

ADJUSTMENTS TO YOUR
MIAMI-DADE WATER AND SEWER DEPARTMENT BILL

You MAY receive an adjustment to your bill in any of these cases:
An incorrect meter reading
An over-or under- estimate
Leakage inside de meter box
Acts of vandalism reported to the police.
Leaks that are hidden underground or behind walls

No adjustment will be made for leaks occurring in clearly visible fixtures,
such as toilets, hot water heaters, washing machines or spigots.

Please call our Customer Relations unit at 305-665-7477 or contact
us online at:
www.mfamldade.gov/wasd for additional information on the qualifica-
tions for billing adjustments.

The goal of the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department is to serve the
residents and businesses of Miami-Dade County by providing high-quality
drinking water and wastewater services, by protecting public health and
by acting in the best interest of our environment.


I


-T-


FREE
THE

Liberty

City Seven]










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


MwaMbe ddeos bAmm lake ovrn i


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Available from Commercial News Providers


* -


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-


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* .


- S.-


Dream Big 1


& give us your best idea!


What is your dream for the arts
We want to know because we can help

"The beauty of this com
stretches boundaries th
a chance for success." Da
FLO


in South Florida?
you realize it.

petition is that it
ie simplest idea has
wn Batson,
RIDA MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY STEEL BAND


--a


4b -

a


,w7


There are just three simple rules:

OYbur idea is about the arts. OYour project takes place in or benefits
South Florida. ()You find funds to match our grant.


eb-waon- %momamGo a a-
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END THE INCONVENIENCE OF EMPTY NEWSPAPER BOXES,

FIGHTING THE WEATHER AND HUNTING DOWN BACK COPIES


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Beacon Hill celebrates the past, present


Black History Month ceremony

recognizes local community leaders


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

The students, faculty and
staff of Beacon Hill Preparatory
School in Miami Gardens cele-
brated Black History Month on
Friday in a ceremony entitled,
"Thinking the Past, Opening the
Door and Unifying the Present."


., .U
-:,'. fI


.A-


Parents and community mem-
bers also joined in the celebra-
tion. Students, aged 5-12, were
attired in their Black history t-
shirts while many faculty and
staff wore African dashikis.
Beacon Hill honored leaders.
in the community that have
impacted the lives of the stu-
dents which included Cherie


SJ . -


1..



i. a


Liss, founder of Beacon Hill
Schools; Kathleen Woods-Rich-
ardson, Director of Solid Waste
Management; Ana Diaz, Child
Development Services; Armen-
thia Dozier Hodge, Teacher;
Dr. Delroy Webb, dentist; Jac-
quelyn and Stephen Magwood,
police officers; Ruthe White,
Summer Program Nutrition
coordinator; Nigel Burton, Al-
pha Phi Alpha; Chief Matthew
Boyd, Miami Gardens Police
Chief; Dr. John Lester II, music
director; Sylvia Brown, North


Dade Regional Library atten-
dant; Shirley Gibson, City of
Miami Gardens Mayor; U.S.
Congressman Kendrick Meek;
state Sen. Frederica Wilson;
The Miami Times; Velma Law-
rence, founder of Embrace Girl
Power; County Commissioner
Barbara Jordan and Andre Wil-
liams, Miami Gardens Council-
man.
"Here at Beacon Hill, we are
committed to your child's edu-
cation," said Dr. Charles Fish-
er, Beacon Hill principal, to the


parents in the audience.
Founded by Irving and Che-
tie Liss in 1959, Beacon Hill
School, an accredited institu-
tion, offers an independent,
traditional and coeducational
curriculum to students from
preschool through fifth grade.
Susan Hyman is the Execu-
tive Director of Beacon Hill.
The sister school is located in
Hollywood. Funding for Beacon
Hill is based on tuition that
ranges from $6,750- 7,830 per
school year.


Ten-year-old Dahlia Miles
sings chart-topping hit song,
Listen by Beyonce.


Petraeus: Troops may not


care if gay ban repealed


The U.S. commander over-
seeing troops in Iraq and Af-
ghanistan says he's not sure
that troops in the field care
about the sexual orientation
of fellow service members.
Gen. David Petraeus says
he's served alongside gays
and lesbians, and what mat-
ters are someone's skills and
smarts.
Petraeus tells NBC's "Meet
The Press" that he supports


Defense Secretary Robert
Gates' plan to study how the
ban could be repealed. Advo-
cates for a quick repeal have
said the yearlong review is a
stalling tactic. But Petraeus
says it's a good idea to look at
potential problems.
He wouldn't give his per-
sonal opinion on whether the
ban should be lifted. He says
he'll do so when he testifies to
Congress in the spring.


Obama unveils a $95oB


restart on health care


By Richard Wolf and John Fritze

WASHINGTON President
Obama took charge of the health
care debate on the 399th day of
his presidency Monday by pro-
posing a 10-year, $950 billion
plan opposed by Republicans and
not yet endorsed by Democrats.
White House spokesman Robert
Gibbs called it "a starting point"
for bipartisan debate at a health
care summit Obama will lead on
Thursday.
But within minutes, Republi-
cans in Congress denounced the
plan, which is designed to reduce
health care costs and expand cov-
erage to 31 million people.
"The well has been poisoned,"
said Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H.
"Mixing two bad bills together
doesn't make a good bill."
It's uncertain whether Demo-
crats can pass the plan in an
election year, even if they impose
procedures to prevent Republi-
cans from blocking Senate action.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-
Calif., and other leaders sounded
positive, but left unclear is wheth-
er enough moderate Democrats
facing tough re-election races
would support it.
"This is sort of the last, best
hope for enacting the bill," said
Robert Greenstein, executive di-
rector of the liberal Center on
Budget and Policy Priorities. "It's
now about to be a very exciting
spectator sport. It is neither a
slam dunk, nor is it hopeless."
Obama's plan is a compromise
between Democratic bills that
narrowly passed the House in No-
vember and the Senate on Dec.
24. Merging the two was delayed
a month after Republican Scott


Brown's upset election to the Sen-
ate from Massachusetts, which
cost Democrats the supermajor-
ity needed to pass the bill's earlier
version.
"This is the president putting
forward what was the emerging
consensus when they still had
60 votes," said Diane Rowland of
the non-partisan Kaiser Family
Foundation.
Obama's proposal would ex-
pand medicaid for the poor and
offer tax credits to middle-income
people who would have to buy in-
surance.
It tries to contain costs by tax-
ing expensive health policies and
slowing the growth of Medicare.
It would prevent insurance com-
panies from denying coverage be-
cause of pre-existing conditions.
Some of the changes would in-
crease subsidies to make insur-
ance more affordable, delay the
tax on high-cost plans until 2018
and give the government power to
block rate increases.
Barring support from Republi-
cans, the White House hopes to
use a legislative tactic that would
require only 51 votes for passage
in the Senate, where Democrats
still control 59 votes.
"The president expects and
believes the American people
deserve an up-or-down vote on
health reform," said White House
communications director Dan
Pfeiffer. "Our proposal is designed
to give ourselves maximum flex-
ibility."
Even if Obama can win 51 votes
in the Senate, House passage is
uncertain. He dropped moderate
Democratic Rep. Bart Stupak's
provision barring the use of feder-
al subsidies to pay for abortions.


GEN. DAVID PETRAEUS


HEALTH SUMMIT AT A GLANCE
What President Otiamna is hotring a bipartisan
mTeeling orn leg'lation to revamp tne nation s
health care sy ltem
When and where rnursday. starlinrg at l a m FT,
al Blair House, Ihe ollicol gu .l res;d.nr.c r,l the
While House.
How to watch: C-SPAN will broadcast live Other
networks may lelelise some parl..
Whi'. riviled Irivll r ncs were i.-n Ito the
congresrsonal leadership, pius the chairman and
rarnkinqg member )lf eje n relevant HouIe and
Semae comIrrn',tie dlealeiir it th hlai3h iare, anri
olncrsir irea bhilIo. The four Ie3der, iTi3ked l*th
an a3.lerist) cn alro de-ilgnatr- an aolitional lour
lawmaker:. I a3nend
SENATE
Senje Majority Leader H]rry Re'd. D-Nlv.
Senate Min'r l, LeaOer Mith McCornrell R-Vy
en Dir.c urbi', D 'll. .]asitrani miaorityr leader
Sen Jon Kyl. R-Ar,. Ripubil:3rn wnip
.ernate Finance Committrlee Charmn Max B3ucus,
D-Mont
Sen ohucr Grassley of Iowa. ranhrg Re ouDlican on
Finance CorrnTinee
Senate e~ealh Commintee Charman Tom Harlin.
D-lowa
Sen Mike Er,!i R-Wyo, r3rlng Republicai on nealin
it,mm'tlee
Sen Cnns lDodd. D-Coirn, member ilf the nealln
crjmm.nee
HOUSE
HOui.e SDealh-r Nancy Pelo.,, D-Cr.a.
HOU'.e Malorv Leader Sleny Hoyer, D-MO
HOu.e Mir oriy Leader Jorn Boenner. P-Onro
HOuse Madl.rtv WfniD Jame' Clyburn, D S C
H.iu.e Mirioiry wnip Eric C3nmor. R Va.
HOJU;h Ways anO l.leans C)mmrtlIe Cinarmian
Cr.rles Rangol., L 1 a
Rei Dave Camp., Mii., ranking Republlcani on
Wavi ana Mear'; Comrnl'lee
Mnuie Energy and Commer.. Commilnee Crairmean
Henry Warmn. D-CaIl
Rep. ilo Barton, R lexa;, rankien ReDublkan orn
Erterqc and CmrrrrTerce 'orr-nine
HouSe EduCjtion arnd Labor ComiT,,rine rCh.3irmar,
Ge'rge P miller. o-Calil
Rep dJhn Kline, r-Mirn ranlnn RPpubitanan on
idul jiirn ndj t.ior ilorrimillee
Pap JOhn [DirigeI,, 0-M ri, jcirman emrer.rus ol Ihe
Energy ano Commerce Comminlee
WHITE HOUSE
V\tce Pre'ider..l Bider,
Health and Hunun Serlile Secireliar Kjaileen
Setel.j;.
rjarcy-Ann DePyric, ]redr.lr o l 1the Oliler r H3alnr,
Reriorm
Wnrie Housir cIel 01 trill Rahm Emranul
OTHERS
P 'pr : 'l c Ir lm trle o I' 1 [ 3ir l l jr.rn3gem rin t
jnd Bujgdl, L(jrigres'nji Bugel Olicer and Joinl
Ci-orrn,,nce Crn ITaal,,3-n
oPvf Muro.r,,ell ,aid Sunda3 hlna re jnd his lelloi
PeDnul,(3' bi er3aor would attend in giod 3Llain.' O'
MIe Hur'e sidre, Boehner ,; roe o.Vly epldjbnan Whh
h)i 'Il :'' jr putilil j ly j ireln er hc l allvr oen C.arl.j,
Camp, Barton and Kline will be going. No Democrats
have backed out.
What will happen: Obama begins with opening
remarks.
Remarks from a Republican leader, to be determined
by Republicans.
Remarks from a Democratic leader, to be
determined by Democrats.
Obama moderates the discussion on each of four
topics: insurance reforms, cost containment,
expanding coverage, and the impact health care
legislation will have on deficit reduction.
l.aur.Wht.auw


Powell defends Obama security policy


By Dan Weil


Former Secretary of State Co-
lin Powell disagrees with those
who claim President Obama has
endangered U.S. security. "To
suggest that somehow we have
become much less safer because
of the actions of the administra-
tion, I don't think that's borne
out by the facts," he said on
CBS' "Face the Nation."
Powell also defends the poli-
cies of the Bush administration
in which he served, and notes
that Obama has continued
most of Bush's security" tnea-
sures. "The Transportation Se-
curity Administration created


by George Bush is still :'= "1
in action working in our
airports," *Powell said.
"They take care of me
every day that'I go to an
airport."
Counterterrorism and
law enforcement per-
sonnel are working hard
too, Powell says. "We PO
have gone after the en-
emy in Afghanistan with 50,000
more troops, more predators are
striking Al Qaeda and Taliban
leaders in Pakistan," he said.
"We have continued the poli-
Scies that President Bush put in
place with respect to Iraq. And
so I don't know where the claim


comes that we are less
safe." Former vice
/' president Dick Cheney
has recently criticized
the Obama administra-
tion for. ending the wa-
terboarding technique
to interrogate suspect-
ed terrorists. Powell re-
WELL buts his former White
House colleague. "The
point is made, 'We don't water-
board anymore or use extreme
interrogation .techniques,'" the
former general said. "Most of
those extreme interrogation
techniques 'and-'- waterboard-
ing were done away with in the
Bush administration.


U.S. driving decline is in reverse

By Larry Copeland


The historic drop in driving
that began in 2007 and the dra-
matic decline in gridlock that
accompanied it have ended, ac-
cording to a report today by a
firm that tracks congestion in
the USA.
Using 12-month averages,
the study found that driving in-
creased by 0.3% in September,
0.2% in October, 0.3% in No-
vember and 0.2% in December
over the same periods a year
earlier, according to federal
data.
Traffic congestion is still
about two-thirds of 2007 peak
levels but likely to get worse,
says Rick Schuman, author of
INRIX's 2009 National Traffic
Scorecard. He cautions that
further softening of the econo-
my or a major hike in gas prices
could cut congestion again. "As
the job situation goes, so goes
congestion," he says. "If we have
a recovery and we start seeing
employment starting to grow,
congestion will grow along with
it."
Kirkland, Wash.-based INRIX
collects data from 1.7 million
GPS-equipped vehicles and oth-
er sources. Its findings are but-
tressed by Federal Highway Ad-
ministration data on the miles
vehicles travel on U.S. roads.
The rebound in driving and
congestion is linked to the im-
proving U.S. economy, experts
say.
"Retail sales are up, the num-
ber of people filing for unem-
ployment is up and down, but
it's better than six months
ago," says Robert Poole, direc-
tor of transportation studies at
the non-partisan, libertarian
Reason Foundation. He says
rising toll collections around
the USA are further evidence
of an economy-fueled driv-
ing rebound. "More people are
moving about, deciding to go
back out into the world."
It's not clear whether the
changes are permanent. The


-2004 AP photo
The Los Angeles area is the most congested metropolitan
area in the country, and the Hollywood Freeway (US-101)
northbound has the worst bottleneck in that region, accord-
ing to INRIX's 2009 National Traffic Scorecard.


rebound is far from the 21%
increase in miles driven from
1995 to 2007, says Ed McMa-
hon, senior research fellow at
the Urban Land Institute, a
non-profit group that promotes
innovative development.
The 2007-09 decline in driv-
ing, the steepest ever, fed a
sharp 'drop in traffic deaths.
Despite the rebound, road
deaths are not expected to rise
this year, says Jonathan Ad-


kins of the Governors Highway
Safety Association.
Among INRIX's findings:
Despite the overall rise in
congestion last year, it was
down during the morning rush
hour, reflecting high unem-
ployment. Traffic was up dur-
ing the rest of the day.
Friday at 5 p.m. is still the
busiest evening commute hour,
the worst day and time during
the week to travel.


--MiamiTimes photos/ Sandra J. Charite
Surrounded by parents, teachers and community leaders,
Beacon Hill Preparatory School students celebrate Black
History Month in a Friday assembly.


SUBSCRIBE TODAY!


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


] 7A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


i .f:1








The Miami Times





Faith


MIAMI TIMES


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 20it


SECTION B


Henry E. S. Reeves Elementary


receives National Merit Award

Special to the Times .-

Henry E. S. Reeves Elementary has been I i
honored as a Magnet School of Distinc- ''' -'". ii
tion by Magnet Schools of America. School ., '17 .. 1

school representatives will be honored at
the a8th Annual Magnet School of America '
Conference as a national Magnet School
of Distinction winner. Hosted by the Hills-
borough County Public Schools in Tampa,
Fla., the magnet conference will be held in
May. In addition to being recognized as a
School-of Distinction, principal Gibbs and :
several members from his staff will be pre-
senting at the conference. Attendees will in-
clude more than 1,000 school administra-




Henry E. S. Reeves Elementarywas named

lisher, Henry Ethelbert Sigismund Reeves. series of learning activities on the computer.
The school has a magnet theme
of, "The Academy of Applied.'-
Technology," which integrates
technipient oflogy throughout the cored.
Henry E. S. Reeves Elementary-was named





curriculum. Some highlights of Gibbs
the school include two computer
labs, on"The Academy of Apex ploratory lab,
six computer student stations
technologysmart througardtechnology pere

classroom, departmentalizedghts of
scheduling, digital photography,,
and the utilization of the Resourcey lab,
Teacher Intervention (RTI) Model,

which aides in additional support
in reading and mathematics. ''J.


Henry E. S. Reeves

Elementary students

make reading a priority.


Rosa Brown celebrates

her goth birthday
The Miami Times StaffReport

Born and raised in Banes, Cuba, Rosa Brown traveled to Mi-
ami in 1971 seeking a better life. Brown, a widow, came with
all eight of her children: seven girls and one boy.
For several years, Brown worked as a housekeeper in Miami
Beach in order to support her family.
She is defined by her daughter Alberta Charles as a "very
loving person who loves to dance."
Last November, surrounded by family and friends, Brown
celebrated her 90th birthday at Paradise Banquet Hall in Hia-
leah. The theme of the party was "Love, Blessings and Ele-
gance." In addition to her eight children, Brown has 34 grand
and great grandchildren.
At the celebration, her family dedicated a poem to her that
read: "Mom, you're very special/ May God always bless your
health/ Keep you close to him/ With a portion of his wealth.
Brown looks forward to celebrating many more birthdays to
come.


REPORT

Recession keeping


marriages intact

By Audrey Barrick

After years of increase, the divorce rate in the United States
fell in 2008, a new report shows, and research suggests it
may be the result of the recession.
"[M]any couples appear to be developing a new apprecia-
tion for the economic and social support that marriage can
provide in tough times," W. Bradford Wilcox, director of the
National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia, says in
the 2009 State of Our Unions report. "Thus, one piece of good
news emerging from the last two years is that marital stability
is up."
The report, which is produced annually, shows that divorce
rates in the country decreased from 17.5 in 2007 to 16.9 per
1,000 married women in 2008. Before the drop in the first
year of the U.S. recession, the rate had consecutively risen
from 16.4 in 2005.
At the same time, credit card debt has declined by $90
billion this past year, possibly contributing to the smaller
divorce rate. The report which seeks to demonstrate that
money matters for marriage points out that credit card debt
is "corrosive" and puts a strain on marriage. It especially
plays "havoc" in the lives of newly married couples.
The economic downturn has also revived the "home econo-
my," according to the report, with couples eating in more of-
ten, growing their own food, and mending their own clothes.
The uptick in thrift has proven to "pay valuable dividends
in the quality and stability of married life in the U.S:," Wilcox
says.
"In these ways, by fostering a spirit of economic coopera-
tion, family solidarity, and thrift that redounds to the benefit
of marriage, the Great Recession appears to offer a silver lin-
ing for marriage," he wrote.
Jeffrey Dew, a faculty fellow at the National Marriage Proj-
ect, says conflict over money matters is one of the most im-
portant problems in contemporary married life and predicts
divorce better than other types of disagreement.
"Compared with disagreements over other topics, financial
disagreements last longer, are more salient to couples, and
generate more negative conflict tactics, such as yelling or
hitting, especially among husbands," he wrote in a separate
report. "Perhaps because they are socialized to be providers,
men seem to take financial conflict particularly hard."
That may be reflected in the long run. Though the country
may currently be seeing fewer divorces, Wilcox cautions that
the long-term consequences of the slower economy could be
"profoundly negative" for marriage. Husbands, he says, do not
like it when they are clearly displaced as the primary bread-
winner in their families. And thus high rates of unemploy-
ment are most likely to harm the quality and stability of mar-
ried life over the long term, he predicts.


---
~- . - ~k .d lir


.^







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4


... ..........


Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity remember the life of Dr. King

As a prelude to Black History ".
Month, the brothers of The Beta '
Beta Lamda Chapter of The Al-
pha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.,
recently gathered at The Epis- z. .
copal Church of The Incarna-
tion, Father J. Kenneth Major,
Rector, to observe their annual
service commemorating the life -
and work of Dr. Martin Luther ,
King, Jr.
The keynote address was de-
livered by Dr. Sandra Thomp-
son, interim president of Flor-
ida Memorial University.
The Greater Miami Chapter .
of The Links, Inc., were also co- :Y'
sponsors of the service. -.


I 9B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


In Lack ('aucus. a fund-rahing pmuerhoumr

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.. ...........
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10B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2,2010


. ) -


BE FREE


Living happily ever after begins with making the right decisions today. If you use tobacco, quitting is your best bet
for good health now and in the future, as well as pushing "till death do us part" off as long as possible. Contact the Quitline
today for free counseling, information and tips to help you succeed. BE HEALTHY. BE HAPPY. BE FREE.


Call 1-877-U-CAN-NOW or visit FloridaQuitline.com.

Florida Department of Health


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1







11B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


Rl ACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Are you producing fruits


of the spirit?
There have been numerous
reports to show that fruit is
very good for the body. God
in his infinite wisdom and
design of our bodies created
various fruits with differ-
ent healing and nutritional
value. Fruit is important,
and is good for us. Spiritual
fruit is 'also important, and


is good for
us. In Ga-
latians 5:22-
23, Paul lists
spiritual fruit
that should
be evident
inr our lives. In the natu-
ral sense, fruit needs to be
planted in'the right environ-


ment to grow. I have friends
from other countries that
miss some of their native
fruit. Some of this fruit can-
not be found in the United
States, and if the fruit is al-
lowed to be imported into
this country, it is very expen-
sive, and the taste is just not
the same as it is in the native
country. I'm going to make a
statement that I make quite
often, and it is appropriate
right now, as well what is
true in the natural is true in
the spiritual.
In the beginning of verse 22,
Paul states that it is the Holy
Spirit that is responsible for
producing the fruit that he
names love, joy, peace, pa-


tience, kindness, goodness,
gentleness, faithfulness and
self-control. The Holy Spirit
does not dwell in any and ev-
ery environment. Thus, the
fruit of the Spirit cannot be
produced in any and every
environment. When an ap-
ple seed is planted, you can
look for and expect an apple
tree that will produce apples.
You will not find oranges on
an apple tree. If you see a
grapefruit tree in your neigh-
bor's yard, you can believe
that at some point in time,
grapefruit seeds were plant-
ed. You do not need to dig
up the yard because you
suspect that a peach seed
was planted. God's plan was


that every living thing would
produce from its own kind.
Contrary to the belief of some
- if you observe cruel behav-
ior in a person, it is very like-
ly that seeds of anger, unfor-
giveness, distrust and anger
have been planted.
Do not forget that growing
fruit is oftentimes difficult.
The gardener must prune the
fruit. Ouch, that hurts! How-
ever, it is necessary for the
fruit to grow properly. The
pruner must remove what is
dead or dying; snip off some
of the branches that are pre-
venting sunlight from reach-
ing the branches; increasing
the size and quality of the
fruit; and this one is very im-


portant encouraging more
fruit to grow. I know that it
does not take a theologian
to see how the duties of the
pruner line up with what the
Master Vinedresser is doing
in His vineyard. If you have
not done the exercise that
I mentioned earlier, draw
your own tree, and put your
branches, seeds and roots in
place on your spiritual tree.
You might discover why some
attitudes and behavior are
prevalent in your life. You
should also remember that
those things do not have to
remain that way. Cultivate
an environment in which the
Holy Spirit will be pleased to
dwell.


Miami-Dade State Attorney
Office will have their monthly
Sealing and Expungement Pro-
gram at the Miami Beach Bo-
tanical Gardens from 4-7 p.m.,
Wednesday, Feb. 24. 305-547-
0724.


,The North Miami Public
Library will host its first ever
Black History Showcase cel-
ebrating Black History Month
from 7-8 p.m., Wednesday, Feb.
24. 305-891-5535.


All George Washington Carv-
er High School in Coconut
Grove graduates are invited to
their celebrate Alumni Day at
11 a.m., Friday, Feb. 26. Leona
Baker Cooper, 305-445-6662.


Gospel Concert & Market-
place which will feature music,
dance, poetry, voter education
and vendors, will be held at
the Stephen P. Clark Center in
Downtown, from 11:30 a.m.-
1:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 26. Call
305-375-4606 or email: www.
miamidade.gov/baab


Eagle Care productions
presents "Step to the Stage with
the Joy of Praise" at the El Pala-
cio Hotel on Friday, Feb. 26.
Participants must sign up at 6
p.m. and show starts at 7 p.m.
sharp. Mareeta McIntyre, 786-
346-0021.


Join the Miami Workers Cen-
ter and the Grassroots Global
Justice Alliance (GGJ) for a
reception for local activists and
organizers at the Harvey's By
the Bay from the 7:30 10 p.m.,
Saturday, Feb. 26. Joseph Phel-
an, 305-759-8717 ext. 1031


Curley's House Food Drive
is looking for volunteers for the


Triangle Hope Ministries
(Church of God) in Opa-locka
will have their Abigail Woman's
Conference at 7:30 p.m., from
Feb. 25 27. 305-318-8886.


The Spirit of Christ Church
will be hosting a "Resource
Fair" in which the Public De-
fender's Office will be offering
their Redemption Workshop
for people who desire to have
their records expunged. The
event will be held from 10:30
a.m. 2:30 p.m., Saturday,
Feb. 27. Arnetha Thomas,
786-488-4792.


Holy Ghost Assembly of
the Apostolic Faith will host
a dinner sale from 11:30 a.m.
- 3:30 p.m., Saturday, Feb.
27. 305-836-6258.


Redemption Missionary
Baptist Church will be having
an "All You Can Eat Fish Fry"
from 2 5 p.m., Saturday,
Feb. 27. Rev. McCrae, 305-
793-7388, Rev. Salis, 305-
747-8495 or 305-536-1990.


17th annual Bob Marley Move-
ment Caribbean Festival to be
held at the Bayfront Park on
Saturday, Feb. 27. Volunteers
are needed between the hours
of 8 a.m.-12 midnight. LaVerne
Holliday, 786-237-9435 or cur-
leyhouseinc@yahoo.com


The Miramar Cultural Cen-
ter's celebration of Black His-
tory Month culminates at 7
p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 27, with
a free performance of "Rhythms
of Africa, Music Around the
World" by Willie Stewart, of the
internationally acclaimed band
Third World. 954-602-4500.


The Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity Concert Chorale will
be presented in concert at First
Baptist Church in West Oak-
land Park at 4 p.m., Sunday,
Feb. 28. Hattie Harden, 954-
735-6289 or Ethel Frazier, 305-
836-1317.

***********
You are invited to a Black
History Celebration in song
called "Climbin Up the Moun-
tain" at the African Heritage
Cultural Arts Center at 2 p.m.,
Sunday, Feb. 28. 305-606-
2438.


Booker T. Washington
Alumni Association will honor
former teachers and staff at its
third annual "Orange, Black
and White Tea" in recognition of
Black History Month in the BTW
auditorium at 4 p.m., Sunday,
Feb. 28. Madeline Atwell, 305-
696-2498 or Phyllis V. Myers,
305-685-2840.


The Women's History Co-
alition invites you to their
Women's History Month kickoff
observance at the gravesite of
Julia Tuttle at the Miami City
Cemetery at 12 noon, Monday,


First Baptist Church of
Bunche Park will present
their 22nd annual Black his-
tory concert at 7 p.m., Satur-
day, Feb. 27. 305-681-0457 or
305-493-1890.


St. Matthews Free Will
Baptist Church invites fam-
ily and friends to their "Willing
Workers Day" on Sunday, Feb.
28. 305-751-4251.


Jimmie Lee Gilchrist
I am searching for fam-
ily members of Jimmie Lee Gil-
christ.
Please contact Nancy Wil-
liams, at 305-331-0568 or 305-
688-7923.



'oin d e : in qoui EitFi
by becoming a member of our

CALL 305-694-6210
CALL 305-694-6210


You are invited to a Men's
Day at Metropolitan A.M.E.
Church at 7 a.m, and 11 a.m.,
Sunday, Feb. 28.

********
Members of Mt. Vernon
M.B.C. family cordially invite
you to annual Black History
Worship Service at 11 a.m.,
Sunday, February 28. 305-
754-5300.

*********
The Wimberly Sisters Out-
reach is sponsoring a Black
history musical at Pentecos-


March 1. Laura Morilla, 305-
375-4967.
*********
Concerned Citizens Com-
mittee will host two rallies to
ask for County mayor resig-
nation. The rallies will be held
at the Joseph Caleb Center in
Brownsville at 6 p.m., Tuesday,
March 3 and at the Stephen P.
Clark Center at 3 p.m., Wednes-
day, March 4. Call Lazaro Gon-
zalez, 305-445-7364.


Tournament of Champions
(TOC), an organization that has
a legacy of conceptualizing and
executing sporting events in the
United States, has partnered
with the Miami HEAT to host
the 15th annual South Florida
High School All-Star Basket-
ball Classic(Dade vs. Broward)
at the American Airlines Arena
at 5 p.m., on Sunday, March 7.
786-897-8854.


Miami-Dade Parks is ac-
cepting applications for sum-
mer jobs until March 12 for
a variety of summer jobs at
Miami-Dade Parks, including
pool managers, lifeguards, park
service aides and recreation
leaders. Applicants must be at
least 17 years old and apply via
the Miami-Dade County Online
Employment Application site
at www.miamidade.gov/jobs.
They must also contact the
Miami-Dade Park where you
wish to work and the Summer
Job Hotline at 305-755-7898 or
visit our web site.


The Liberty City Trust will
be hosting a First-Time Home-
buyer's Workshop at St. Luke
Missionary Baptist Church,
from 9 a.m. 5:30 p.m., Satur-
day, March 13. Rachel Walker.
305-635-2301 ext. 374.


Dade County Alumnae
Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority will have their annual
college scholarship fundraising
"Putting on the Ritz" gala will
be held at the Intercontinental
West Hotel Ballroom in Doral,


tal Church of Christ at 3 p.m.,
Sunday, Feb. 28.


A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to come fellowship
at 11:15 a.m., on Sundays and
Bible class weekly at 7 p.m.,
Thursday.

*******
God Word God Way Church
of God in Christ doors will open
for their first prophetic service
at 6 p.m., Sunday, March 1.
786-326-3455.


from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., on Satur-
day, March 13. 305-758-4166.


South Dade Adult Education
.Center/Skills Center Campus
in Homestead will be holding its
fourth annual Career Fair from
9 a.m. 12 p.m., March 17.
Cooperal@dadeschools.net

**********
Miami-Dade County will be
hosting the 22nd Annual In the
Company of Women Awards
Ceremony at the Biltmore Hotel
in Coral Gables, from 6 9 p.m.,
Thursday, March 18. 305-358-
5885.

*********
The McIntyre Institute pres-
ents the "Called 2 Dance Mini
Conference" at the Don Shula
Hotel in Miami Lakes for ages
12 to mature adults from March
19-20. Call 954-345-3949. Call
now to register before March
10.


200 Women in Hats Fashion
Show will be held at the Omega
Activity Center (Florida Memo-
rial University) from 12 3 p.m.,
Saturday, March 20. Call 305-
651-9139 or 305-527-9300.

********
The AIDS Awareness Po-
ets will host their third annual
National AIDS Awareness 'P6-
ets Conference, "Let's Change
Something" at the historic Afri-
can American Research Library
and Cultural Center in Ft. Lau-
derdale from March 25-28. To
register, visit www.aapoets.org.


Xcel Family Enrichment
Center presents a celebration
of love in their first annual
Black Marriage Day Walk start-
ing at the North Dade Regional
Library in Miami Gardens and
ending at the Carol City Park.
The event will be held from 9
a.m. 1 p.m., March 27, Ms.
Gilbert, 786-267-4544.

********
The Experts Resource Com-
munity Center will hold a
weekly Foreclosure Prevention


Clinic, from 6 -8 p.m., every
Thursday. Call 305-652-7616
or email lou@ercchelp.org


Miami-Dade Community
Action Agency's (CAA) Head
Start/Early Head Start Pro-
gram will begin its open enroll-
ment for the 2010-2011 pro-
gram year, which will begin in
August. Applications are being
accepted until April 30 for preg-
nant women and children ages
two months to five (5) years old
(after Sept. 1). Applications
and a list of Head Start Centers
may also be downloaded from
the County's Portal at www.
miamidade.gov/caa/hsrecruit-
ment.asp


Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11 Reunion.
Classmates are urged to re-
connect through the contact
information listed below, pro-
viding your address, phone,
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion6t5@cfl.
rr.com

********
"The Friends 2 Family"
Travel Group is sponsoring
an unbelievable historic jour-
ney: This is a seven-day bus
trip. Come go with us to: St.
Augustine, Jacksonville, Sa-
vaiiaDh'_ Chafle'sfohbn 'Birming-
ham, Jackson, 'New Orleans &
Tallahassee. Trip dates: July
19-25. Cheryl Watts Brown,
305-333-7613 or clb1107@aol.
com


Miami Northwestern Se-
nior High and Miami Jackson
Senior High Alumni Asso-
ciations are asking all alumni
cheerleaders and basketball
players that would like to par-
ticipate in the upcoming Alum-
ni Basketball game to call (Bulls
only) 786-873-5992, and (Gen-
erals only) 786-256-2609.


National Investment Devel-
opment (NID) Housing Coun-


Black History musical program
The Wimberly Sisters Out- Wimberly Sisters, Golden Bells,
reach, Inc. is sponsoring a South Florida Singers, Souther-
Black History musical, 3 p.m. naires, Dynamic Stars and oth-
Sunday, February 28th at Pen- ers.
tecostal Church of Christ, 2185 Come out and celebrate with
N.W. 87th Street. us.
The program features The No admission.


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FORMER sTUDENTS & STAFF OF

THE LEARNING DEVELOPED CENTMCERY
WJ. REDMOND CHRISTIAN ACADEMY ad
J. D. OWENS CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

please contact SLVU

305.688.400 or 1.877 35LOV

nt formation regarding
For importa Redmon
Mrs. EssiM
0 0 sow 0


YI1__~_ ____~_ I


I


-.1-


selling Agency, a HUD approved
organization, is offering free
Housing and Legal Counseling
for Homeowners at the Experts
Resource Community Center,
9 a.m. 5 p.m., M-F. Call 305-
652-7616 or 786-512-7400 or
email: Igreen@expertsresourc-
es.com or lougreen2@yahoo.
com for appointments.
*******
The Florida Film Institute
presents Cinema Saturdays at
the Little Haiti Cultural Center,
from 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.,
until April 10. 305-891-3456
or register at www.fifilminsti-
tute.org


Rendo -Goju-Ryu Karate
Academy will be offering free
Karate lessons at the Liberty
Square Community Center
from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesdays and
Thursday. 305-694-2757.

********
The City 'of Miramar's NFL
Youth Flag Football League
looking for boys and girls aged
5-8 interested in participat-
ing in football. Games will be
played at Perry Wellman Field
"and Miramar Regional Park on
Saturday mornings between
the hours of 10:30 a.m'. 12:30
p.m. Participants can register
at Miramar Youth Enrichment
Center, Monday thru Saturday,
frorim'27T'.m. and Sunset Lakes
Community Center, Monday
thru Saturday, from 9 a.m.-7
p.m. Registration will continue
until April 10. 954-602-4780 or
954-602-4791.


The Theodore & Thelma
Gibson Charter School, a tu-
ition-free public charter school
located in Overtown / Down-
town Miami, is now accepting
applications for the 2010-2011
school year. Applications and
enrollment information is avail-
able at www.gibsoncharter-
school.com or by calling 305-
438-0895. Parents / guardians
may also visit the school's main
office, Monday-Friday (9 a.m. -
3 p.m.), for applications.


I







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SInclusion Teacher
Pinecrest Elementary School
Ph.D. in Education from Southern Illinois
University-Carbondale
I.* Masters Degree in Elementary Education
Masters Degree in Library Science
Adjunct Faculty at Nova Southeastern University
teaching Educational Media, Computer and
Social Networking courses
Awarded American Library Association Grants to
attend Book Fair Guadalajar, Mexico and to
attend Book Fair Zimbabwe, South Africa
Miami-Dade Media Specialist 13 years
Realtor, Certified Residential Specialist
Member, United Teachers of Dade


UNITED TEACHERS OF DADE
The Education Experts
www.UTD.org






Everybody reads


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I -I - _


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010 1


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


~CI
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The Miami Times



Health


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


BI41 Till MIAMI TIMFe FFRRIIARY 'hI-MARCH 9. 2010


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Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


BISHOP CHARLES E. CARTY

Family affair at
New Beginning
You 'are cordially invited to
a family affair with Bishop
Charles E. Carty of New Be-
ginning Church of Deliverance,
former Union Senior Vice Presi-
dent for Custodians of Dade
County Public Schools and his
congregation to a family affair
on Thursday, February 25, 6
p.m., 3320 N.W. 214 Street.
Gifts are welcomed.


APOSTLE S.D. JAMES

Revival
Announcing a Revival with
God's Prophet and Messenger,
Apostle S.D. James, Feb. 26-
28, 8 p.m. nightly, Evangelis-
tic Pentecostal Church of Our'
Lord, 2353 NW 152 St, Miami
Gardens.
For more information contact
Pastor Jimmie L. Brown at 305-
688-8143.
Plan now to attend this great
Revival!


AMWANB celebrates Bishop


14th anniversary


Eugene Joyner's
A Mission with a New Beginning
will celebrate the 14th annual
appreciation/anniversary service
of Bishop Eugene Joyner.
On Wednesday, March 3, 7:30
p.m., the guest speaker will be
Bishop John H. Taylor, New Be-
ginning Praise Tabernacle.
Thursday, March 4 at 7:30
p.m., the guest speaker will be
Pastor Ronald Johnson, Grace
and Truth Outreach Ministries.
Friday, March 5, 7: 30 p.m.,
Bishop Otis Kemp, Missionary
Evangelist Center, Pompano.
Sunday March 7, at 1115
a.m., the guest speaker will be,
Pastor, Elder Calvin Joyner Sr, A
Mission with a New Beginning,


Anderson retires after 32 years
Congratulations are in order
for Ozzie Anderson, who is re-
tiring after 32 years of service
with the City of Miami Depart-
ment of Public Works.
Anderson began working with
the department in 1975 through I
the CETA program.
After three years, he be- :LOW'
came a permanent employee : '
and moved up in ranks from
a heavy equipment operator to
Labor Crew Leader II and with OZZIE ANDERSON
wisdom, knowledge and expe-
rience, trained and motivated early all who came after him.


Sunrise Missionary Baptist Church
3087 N.W. 60 Street
smbcpastorjds@aol.com

Order of Services
Sunday oihool 10 erim
Sunday hoilshp 11 am
r ayer Meerilng e bl
Study Wed 110 Prm
Mid week Worhip uridoy
7 30a i



Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 o.m.- 11:15 a.m.
Sunday Shaool 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
royer Meeling -Tues.-6p.m.


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W.15th Ave.

Order of Services
v9a,,II 12pm
Murm i Ser.,e 11 a '
Sun [.e Wolhip 710 I p m
T es Praye, Meeiing 7 30 p .n
In BMble lud, I p1 0 p ,




St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
,Sudor 1 30 and lI a
Wor ,i.. Servit
30) am Surdoy,'rhool
i pm Po'ae MeerlIg
lueRday J pn BbpeFili


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International
2300 NW 135th Street


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.,
11 a.m., 7pm.
Sunday School 9.30 a m
Tuesday (Bible Study) 645p m
Wednesday Bible Sludy
10.45 a m


B is i. Cury gI In., I.lSno Hat r/Teche


Ii/,ali a-l*/m,!S m l


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-6853100
Fox 3056850705
www newbirlhbaplisliomi org


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.

SOrder of Services
Mon. hru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study, Thors 7 p.m.
Sunday Worship 7-11 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.





Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.

Order of Services
Burlw uhip lam
Sunday chol 9 aR,
ll( 100OSam
i W .[ II o ,. Wu .hLp 4 pm
M,;,on end B-ble
(lus Tue.day t 30 p m




Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue

Order of Services
SundaySchool 9:45a.m.
Sun. Morning Servs 11a.m.
Tuesday Bible Study
Feeding Ministry....0 o.m,
ed. Bible Study/Proyer..6:30 p.m.
urs. Outreach Ministry...6:30 p.m.


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street
-3 05 759887
Order of Services
Hour of Prayer 6:30 a.m. Early Morning Worship 7:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.
Youth Ministry Study, Wed 7 p.m. Prayer/Bible Study, Wed 7 p.m.
Noonday Altar Prayer...(M-F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday........ 1 a.m.-1 p.m.
www.friendshipmbcmia.org friendshipprayer@bellsoulh.net
Rev. Gasfcfton SmithSei or PastoBJ r/Teacher^


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
15250 N.W. 22ND AVENUE


Order of Services
SUNDAY:WorshipService
Morning 10 o.m.
Church School 8:30 o.m.
WEDNESDAY
Feeding Miniltry 12 noon
Bible Study 7 p.m.



Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.

Order of Services
iuday 9 I sh o o 3p0 a am
Morning Pia., 'Worship I I am
Fri a ,, I vid Sunday
esrna .r..tp at 6 pm
SPoye Meerng & BRble SIldy
Tueidy Ip mp
Rev. Dr. W. E w r Mthl


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
l I T I l I N 'MgV


4


Order of Services
Sunday Sfhool 9 45 a m
S Wurhip lIIam
S Bible ludy Thur.day 7 0 pm
I hulh Mnisrry
Mon Wed 6 pm


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
SEarly u.i',d Wiurhip 1 0 a
S Suday Sihool 9 30U a
Sunday Morning Worlp I I am
Sunday ,Bvuri..g eii(e 6 p m
Tueda Pru, r rMeering / 30 p m
Wednreday Bible Sludy ij0 pm
9I t


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023

n Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a m. Morning Worship 10 a m
Evening Worship 6 p.m
Wednesday General Bible Sudy 7:30 p m
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS,'Comcast 3 Solurday 7 30 a.m.
L .. ww pembrokeparlchurcholchist om pembioleparktot@bellkoulh nel
Avi


93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street

Order of Services
I om J O 11iy M0mirg Wu,,,p
I1 am Mom.g Worhip
F.nnlng Ww,,hipp
1;1"i, S Ird uidlv I n
lue.d ,y Bble l dy 1 p I
.eb,.&Ai Amb org


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
1LIMs I I *ins1i


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street

Order of Services




Thurs fellowship 10 aim



Antioch Missionary Boptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W 46th Street

Order of Services
hord o SurFdai tholgJoan
O dundayWo.hlp Serve 10om
I '. WeeSern eWedne,days
HOul al of l xPw 1 Doy Proyir
12 p I. Ipm
[ reai n rWol 'rhp Ipm




Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.'


Older of Services
unday Momrning wor
,hip nl 8 1I am
Sunday Shool alg45 o1m
Thutday Bible Sudy rI I rn
Somrdor No Sere




Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sur, da mornirg Ser.res
Sunday SWol 10a m
Worhi, rv,hr e II am
luedoay ,tble r lud y. 8B
[hurdoay Prayre er
Pat r C & D


I 11ILa, FLORUMIXI Lt-MMM -ll /-, 'Lulu I I


I


I L--AW,7777-m


? ^.'f^''


BISHOP EUGENE JOYNER
Georgia.
Our theme 'A man of God man-
ifesting the fruits of the spirit'...
Galatians 5:22-23, Colossians
3:12-14.









15B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Manke,
ADRIANNE MONIQUE JACK-
SON, 33, ca-
shier, died
February 18 at
North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 11 a.m.,
Covenant Mis-
innarv RBaptist :I '


Church.

PAULETTE M.
DUKES, 51,
secretary, died
February 18 at
Jackson North
Medical Center.
Service 1 p.m., [,
Saturday, New 4-
Shiloh Mission-
ary Baptist Church.


Royal Grace -
LULA BELL HUDSON, 94, food
server fr VA THELMA JOHNSON, 90, retired
hospital, died LPN, died February 16 at Jackson
February 21. North Hospital. Service 1 p.m. in
Final rites and the chapel.


burial, aturoay
in Dublin, Geor-
gia.


OLIVER ROBINSON, 65, chef,
died February
RODGERS 20. Visitation 4
to 9 p.m., Fri-
day. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Grace Church
of The First
Born.


V


MAHDI SHABAZZ DANIELS,
37, laborer,
died. Service
noon, Saturday
in the chapel.





Wright and Young
JAMES DOUGLAS JONES, III,
19, died Febru-
ary 28 at North-
shore Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
mother, Alma
Williams; father,
James Jones,
Jr.; foster moth-
er, Gladys Machado. Service 2
p.m., Saturday in the chapel.

GEORGE DAVIS, JR., 59, en-
trepreneur,
died February
19. Survivors
include: wife,
Selina; son,
Andre Moody;
daughters, Anti-
'riis e7limpson,;
Priscilla Thom- wi-,
as and Pamela Johnson; brothers,
Gerald and Timothy Davis; sister,
Sabrina Davis. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Holy Redeemer Catho-
lic Church.

SALLIE MAE MCGLOND, 98,
died Febru-
ary 20 at Pine-
crest Nursing
Home. Survi-
vors include:
daughters,
Betty Meller-
son, Dorothy
Wighton and
Elizabeth Jones; son, J.C. Jones;
sister, Pauline Cepes. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, Peaceful Zion MB
Church.

Jay's
TREVON PRESLEY III, 4, died
February 17 at
Baptist Hospi-
tal. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
National Church
of God.



DORISTINE ATWATER, 70,
died February
21 at Select
Specialty Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday
at I Morningstar
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.


JOHN MYERS, 71, social work-
er, died February 20 at Munnes
Living Facility. Arrangements are
incomplete.

Genesis-g--
REBA WILLIAMS, 85, execu-
tive supervi- -
sor, died Feb-
ruary 20 at
Baptist Hos-
pital. Viewing -
Thursday 12
p.m and Ser-
vice 1 p.m.
Sweet Home
Missionary Babtist Church, Per-
rine.


ROSA THORNTON, 78, reg-
istered nurse,
died February
19. Visitation 5
to 9 p.m., Sat-
urday, Mount.
Hermon A.M.E.
Church. Service
1 a.m., Satur-
day, Mount Her-
mop A.M.E. Church.

TRAVIS LATTIMORE, 21, la-
borer, died Feb-
ruary 14. Visita-
tion 4 to 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day in the cha-
pel.


LADARIUS HUMPHREYS, 22,
laborer, died
February .17.
Visitation 4 to
9 p.m., Friday.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


SYLVIA DAVY, 66, housewife,






ments are incomplete.

ERROL DIXON, 20, laborer,
died February 21. Arrangements
are incomplete.

WILLIS BRITT, 70, airport shut-
tle driver, died February 21. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

CHARLES MONDESIR, 67, toll
booth clerk for DOT,died Febru-
ary 16. Visitation 4 to 9 p.m., Fri-
,day. Service 1 p.m., Saturday in
the chapel.

Richardson
ROBERT LOUIS SWINDLE,
75, truck driver,d
died Febru-
ary 21. Service
noon, Satur-
day, Antioch of
Brownsville.



LEON LORENZO THOMP-
SON, 74, car-
penter, died
February 16.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, First
United Method-
istd Church of
South Miami.


MILTON TRAVIS HARELL, 21,
died February
14. Service was
held.






JOSEPHINE WILLIAMS, 87,
domestic worker, died February
17. Service was held.



Faith
RONALD T. WOODLE, 26, U.S.
navy seal, died February 16 at
Lower Keys Medical Center. Re-
mains shipped to North Carolina.


HUBERT ORR, 57, custodian,
died February 17 at Fairhaven
Nursing Home. Service was, held.

JOSEPH M. CELESTIN, 79, la-
borer, died February 18. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Lithgow Bennett Philbrick
JOHN H. EAFORD, 62, trans-
portation
worker, died
February 14
at home. Sur-
vivors include:
children; sisters
and brother.
Service 1p.m.,
Saturday, Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church.

Eric George
KHARI NATHANIEL DAVEN-
PORT, 34, cell phone technician,
died February
16 at Broward
General Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: moth-'
el; father; five
children; two
sisters; a host
of relatives and
friends. Service was held.

OTIS JENKINS, 51, truck driv-
er, died February 19. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, St. Ruth M. Baptist
Church, Dania Beach.

JERRY SMITH BENEBY, 55,
city worker, died February 19.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, Sure
Foundation Ministries, West Park.

ALLEN JUNIOR FRAZIER JR.,
60, painter and groundskeeper,
died February 20. Service 11 a.m.,
Friday, Universal Church of Christ,
Oakland Park.

Nakia Ingraham
TIMROD FUNCHESS, 69, crane
operator, died February 16 at Me-
morial Hospital. Service today in
the chapel.

MARY LOU DAVIS, 89, house-
wife, died February 18 at Memo-
rial Hospital. Service 10 a.m.,
Thursday in the chapel.

MAXINE BOATWRIGHT, 50,
domestic employee, died Febru-
ary 12 at home. Service,11ll a.m.,
.L.A. Lee Branch YMCA.


Carey Royal Ram'n
ISIAH BROOKS, 65, carpen-
ter, died Feb-
ruary 20 at
North Shore
Medical Cen-
ter. Service 2
p.m., Saturday,
Walker Temple :
Church of God -'
In Christ.

Hadley-Davis
KESSINGTON AGBOKS, 45,
paralegal, died
February 15 at
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service' noon,
Saturday in the
chapel.

FRANK PATTERSON, 54,
electrician,
died Febru-
ary 19 at North
Shore Hospi-
tal. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Friendship Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

FELTON ADAMS, 84, home-
maker, died February 18 at Red-
sord Geriatric Nursing Home
in Detroit, Michigan. Arrange-
mentsare incomplete.

OWEN ALYSUIS BRITTON, 58,
laborer, died February 21 at Miami
Jewish Home. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Death Notice

5- -
: ; ..-.


GERDA MARIE CHANGE,
61, respiratory therapist for
Mercy Hospital and Doctors
Hospital, died February llth
in Georgia.
Survivors include: sons,
Devon and Steavens Cange
and two grandchildren. View-
ing 5 to 7 p.m., Friday.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
First Haitian Baptist Church
of Pompano, 311 N.W. 3rd
Street, Pompano Beach, 954-
782-4832.
Arrangements entrusted
to James C. Boyd Funeral
Home, 2324 Sistrunk Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdale, 954-584-
3940.


Death Notice


GUY CANGE, 65, credit
representative for JMH, died
February 11th in Georgia.
Survivors include: sons,
Devon and Steavens Cange
and two grandchildren. View-
ing 5 to 7 p.m., Friday.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
First Haitian Baptist Church
of Pompano, 311 N.W. 3rd
Street,. Pompano Beach, 954-
782-4832.
Arrangements entrusted,
to James C. Boyd Funeral
Home, 2324 Sistrunk Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdale, 954-584-
3940.

Death Notice


,' ,
: ,


SARAH KYLES-WALKER,
73, dietician, died February
15. Service 11 a.m., Satur-
day Mt. Tabor M.B. Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Poitier Funeral Home.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


BLANCHE C. JOHNSON
02/23/35'- 09/09/07

We don't need a special
day to bring you to our minds,
days without a thought of you
are very hard to find." Happy
B-Day your loving family and
friends.

Death Notice

JOSEPH A. JOHNSON, 95,
died February 4 at Holy Cross
Hospital.
Service was held 11 a.m.,
Saturday, February 13th at
Roy Mizell and Kurtz Worship
Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


MALINDA S. BARTHELL
02/23/67 -'03/19/09

With all our love,
The Barthell family.


Death Notice


GENEVA SIMMONS
GARLAND, 68, died February
19 at University of Miami
Hospital. Service 4 p.m.,
Wednesday in the chapel.
Arrangements entrusted
to Hall Ferguson Hewitt
Mortuary.


REV. CHARLES R. BOYD,
79, retired pastor of Day Spring
Missionary Baptist Church died
February 17 at Jackson North
Medical Center.
Survivors include: wife, Jose-
phine;,sons, Charles Jr., Terry,
Reginald and Franklin; daugh-
ters, Patricia Edge, Jacquelyn
Hawkins, Evelyn Brant, Cheryl
Carwell, Angela Whitlow and
Tangela Hayes; brothers, Fred
and Benjamin Boyd.
Viewing 4 to 8 p.m., Thurs-
day in the chapel, 4 to 7 p.m.,
Friday, Day Spring Missionary
Baptist Church, 2991 N.W. 62
Street.
Memorial Service 7 p.m., Fri-
day at the church.
Service noon, Saturday, Jor-
dan Grove Baptist Church,
5964 N.W. 12th Ave.
Service under the direction of
Alfonso M. Richardson Funeral
Service, Inc.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


MYRTLENE WHITE
02/23/47 -01/24/09


You are truly loved and
missed.
From your mother, family
and church family.


Death Notice

LARRY DANIELS, 52, State
of Florida, died February 18
at St. Joseph Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Saturday at Hall
Feguson Hewitt Mortuary.


SUBSCRIBE

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Death Notice


I -

JOSEPH MICHAEL
COOKS, 60, telemarketer,
died February 17 at home.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday
at Ebenezer UMC. Arrange-
ments entrusted to Hall Fer-
guson Hewitt Mortuary.


Join tI-,E JId nigoui EfittC
by becoming a member of our
CAuJ 5-Li9c.ato2y
CALL 305-694-6210


your funera~ l horne fo

Yordicun ouo,,,


r
i








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


IAR THF MIAMI TIME FFRRIIARY 24-MARCH 2 2010 I


In Memoriam Death Notice Death Notice Death Notice
In loving memory of,


HAROLD FRANCIS JR.
02/15/29 02/22/06

It's been four years since
seeing your smiling face.
We miss you very much.
Love, Harriet, Lolita, Angie
and the family.

Death Notice


MARY BRANTLEY PERRY,
80, died February 18 at Uni-
versity of Miami Hospital.
Viewing 4 to 8 p.m., Fri-
day.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
Faith Community Baptist
Church, 10401 N.W. 8th Ave.
Arrangements entrusted to
Mitchell Funeral Home.


Death Notice
'" ,' .. .


ALLYSIA JOHNSON, 43,
day care teacher, died Febru-
ary 22, at Memorial Pembroke
Hospital. Survivors include:
sons, Marquise Reddick, La-
Vale Kent; grandson, LaVale
Jr.; mother, Faye Yates; fa-
ther, Milton Johnson; sib-
lings, Dwayne Yates, Charles
Mills and LaToya.
Service 2 p.m., Saturday,
Freindship Missionary Bap-
tist Church.
Arrangements entrusted
to Wright & Young Funeral
Home, Inc.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


GEORGE DEAN
03/01/42 03/05/05


It's been five years but in
our hearts, it seems like yes-
terday.
We will always love and
miss you, your wife, family
and friends.

Death Notice

HAROLD JOHNSON, 89,
retired mechanic died Febru-
ary 16. Service 11 a.m., today
(Wednesday) at Peaceful Zion
M.B. Church. Arrangements
entrusted to Range Funeral
Home.


SHARSKINA Y. WOODS, 35,
died February 14.
Affectionately known as
'KINA', she was a devoted mom,
a loving daughter and baby sis-
ter who will never be forgotten.
Survivors include: mother,
Vera Woods; brothers, Sgt. Er-
rol Woods (Yasheika), Ft. Hood,
Texas, Jimmy Ware (Stephanie)
and Arthur Strachan; children,
Shaquondra, Raekwon, Andre,
Jeffrey Jr. and Jakira; a host
of loving family members and
friends.
Service 2:30 p.m., Saturday,
Mitchell Funeral Home in the
chapel, 8080 N.W. 22 Ave.

Death Notice


ANNA G. HIGGS, 88, retired
office worker, died February
22.
Survivors include: daugh-
ter, Grace Porter; son, Patrick
Porter(Jacqueline); grandson,
Patrick Porter,Jr.; granddaugh-
ter, Zenobia Thompson; four
great-grandchildren; a host of
other relatives and friends. Ser-
vice will be held Saturday 2:30
p.m. at New Mt. Calvary M.B.
Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.

Death Notice


hr-1--44W


JONES PEOPLES, 89, died
February 21 at home. Service
1 p.m., at Hall Ferguson He-
witt Mortuary.


Death Notice


BERTRAM H. EDGECOMB,
91, retired baker, died Febru-
ary 19.
Survivors include; daugh-
ter, Gwendolyn Edgecomb,
Virginia Health (Thomas Jr),
Theresa Cottle (Jack) and
Anita Edgecomb; sons, The-
odore Edgecomb (Theresa),
Steven Edgecomb (Frances)
and Kevin C. Edgecomb Sr.
(Debbie); numerous grand
great service and great great
grandchildren and ahos of
other relatives and friends.
Service 11 a.m., Thursday
at Memorial Temple Baptist
Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.

Death Notice


ANNIE BECKWITH, 95,
homemaker, died February 19.
Survivors include: broth-
er, Franklin Beckwith; niece
Nancey Brown, Judith R. Beck-
with and Barbara Kirlsey; son,
Franklin Beckwith; numerous
grandnieces and grandnephews
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, Mt.
Zion Baptist Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.

Death Notice


. ... ,,





JACKIE CANNON, 60,
salesman, died February 22
at Memorial Pembroke Hos-
pital.
Service 2 p.m., Saturday in


FLOREATHER McNEIL, 90,
retired factory worker, died Feb-
ruary 22.
Survivors include: daughter,
Mildred Chapman; sons, Alex
McNeil, and Walter McNeil; sis-
ters, Callie Williams, Jeather
Franklin, Frankie Bruce, Alice
Williams, and Bernice Scott;
brothers, J.C., Clifton, James
and Joseph Sutton; numerous
grand, great-grand and great-
great grandchildren; a host of
nieces, nephews, cousins, other
relatives and friends.
Service will be held Saturday
2 p.m., at New Jerusalem Prim-
itive Baptist Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.


HELEN MOORE EVER-
ETT, died February 18. Affec-
tionately known as 'Skipper',
she resided in Miami, Florida.
She proudly served in the
Dade County Public School
System as an educator.
Mrs. Everett was a devoted
deaconess and an avid bowler.
She will be missed and loved
by family and friends.
Cherished memories will
always be remembered by her
two sons, Paul and James Ev-
erett, Jr; daughter-in-law, Al-
ice everett; uncle, Bill Kinsler;
granddaughters, Eonne and
Erika Everett; loving Godchil-
dren and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Service was held Tuesday
at The Church of the Open
Door.
Arrangements entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.


Death Notice


"d~ *


:, .4

.Jr


GERALDINE SPANN, 74,
retired bank teller for South-
east Bank, died February 20.
Survivors include: husband,
Willie Spann; daughter Kathy
Michelle Spann; brother, Al-
vin Lewis; aunt, Julia Hamp-
ton and Ella; uncle, Alvin
McKenzie; one granddaugh-
ter; a host of nieces, nephews
other relatives and friends.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday
at Mt. Calvary M.B. Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.



f ioui aLit
by becoming a member of our

CALL 305-694-Lto
CALL 305-694-6210


NEKEISHA 'KEKE' ELLIS,
35, united customer service
rep, died February 14, Ser-
vice will be held Saturday, 1
p.m., at New Vision For Christ
Ministries Church. Arrange-
ments entrusted to Hall Fer-
guson Hewitt Mortuary.


ERIC LAMAR FLOYD, 41,
Laborer, died February 23 at
Jackson North Medical Cen-
ter. Survivors include: parents,
Samuel and Sylvia; children,
Lafayette Vance, Eric Jr., De-
ric Floyd, Taquesha Robinson;
siblings, Erica Hamilton, Taf-
fie Jackson, Shelia Thomas and
Antonio.
Visitation 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.,
Friday, Wright & Young Funeral
Home.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday, St.
James A.M.E Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Wright & Young Funeral Home,
Inc.
Death Notice


S.-1 _
LARRY JAMES BROWN, 55,
died February 22 at Jackson
North.
Service 3 p.m., Saturday, Love
Tabernacle of God Praise and
Worship Christian Center.
Service entrusted to Hadley
Davis Funeral Home.


VENETIA FARLEY, 77,
homemaker, died February 11
at University of Miami Hospi-
tal. Service noon Saturday at
Christian Fellowship MBC.
Arrangements entrusted to
Hall Ferguson Hewitt Mortu-
ary.


Death Notice


WILLIE BELL, 70, Depart-
ment of Transportation em-
ployee, died February 21, at
University of Miami Hospital.
Service 2 p.m., Saturday at
Gracie Church of Nazarene.
Arrangements entrusted to
Hall Ferguson Hewitt Mortu-
ary.
Death Notice


BRYAN D. BROOKS SR, 50,
lawn service specialist, died
February 20.
Survivors include: son, Bry-
an Dewayne Brooks Jr; father,
Lamon Brooks; mother, Bet-
ty Brooks; sister Tonia Lynn
Brooks; brother, Andra Brooks;
aunts, Juanita McArthur, Ruth
McDaniel and Ida Lee Thomas;
uncle, James A. Brooks; great
aunt, Amanda Cox; a host of
other relatives and friends.
Service "1 p.m., Saturday at
New Birth Baptist Church Ca-
thedral of Faith International.
Arrangements entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.


IOD i nE immyn 1 I 11VILa, ULL\V I1RI L- I-PIIV L, LV V


i


i








The Miami Times


lifestyle


FASHION HIP HoP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010 THE MIAMI TIMES
Mourning, with the help of
An |"" Project Medishare, recently
z made several trips to Haiti
A lonzo M oin following the devastating

in relief efforts and
n am ed NBA Leg e nt,.eatukH
has since raised more
than one million dollars
S- .to recovery efforts.


of


Special to the Times devastating earthquake to help in relief efforts
and has since raised more than one million
The NBA announced that Miami HEAT Vice dollars to help in recovery efforts. The 15- l
President of Player Programs Alonzo Mourn- year NBA veteran and 2006 NBA Champion
ing has been named as the 2010 NBA Legend established Alonzo Mourning Charities, a
of the Year. Mourning received the honor from not-for-profit 501c3 foundation, which
NBA commissioner David Stern at the annual is designed to raise money for various
Legends Brunch on Sunday, Feb. 14 during NBA organizations that support abused and
All-Star Weekend. neglected children, including children
"This is a tremendous honor," said Mourning who live in at-risk situations.
during the ceremony. "The work that I have done This past summer he completed his
on the court is nothing compared to the work 13th annual Summer Groove which
that I have to continue to do on this earth, to has raised over $7 million dollars to
continue to make this world a better place." date while also establishing Zo's Fund
Mourning, with the help of Project Medishare, For Life. He formed Zo's Fund For
recently made several trips to Haiti following the Please turn to LEGEND 2C



Shani Davis wins gold in


men's 1,00) speed skating


'w


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Syndicated Conten t


IAvailable from Commercial Ne-ws-Pro I-



..........

....m "iii i amm *"w* d m m am
-==


Chris Brown is 'doing well' judge says


The 20-year-old has so far
met the terms of his proba-
tion, not missing a session
of domestic violence class-
es, his lawyer told a Los
Angeles court.
"It looks like you're doing
really, really well," Supe-
rior Court Judge Patricia
Schnegg said.
Brown has also complet-
ed 32 of his 180 days com-
munity labour sentence.
Laywer Mark Geragos
said Brown had so far at-
tended 17 of his 52 do-


mestic violence counsel-
ling sessions.
Brown was permitted to
serve his probation in his
home state of Virginia,
but the judge wanted him
to return to court in Los
Angeles for frequent up-
dates.
Judge Schnegg also ruled
that the singer can travel
out of the US for concert
dates in May and June.
Brown is next due back
in court on May 11 for an-
other update.


"By the time you come
back, you'll be way over
halfway there," the judge
told him.
The singer spoke only
once during the brief
hearing, telling the judge
"thank you" after her com-
ments.
Brown was sentenced to
five years of probation and
six months of community la-
bour after pleading guilty to
assaulting Rihanna in their
car on the eve of last year's
Grammy Awards.


li~~s~~


WaZA


le~~"










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


they agreed. When she return,
she gave him bacon, eggs, grits
and coffee. He thanked her
--A AA --...


The wedding between Darrian
and Sekena Baker on Valen-
tine's Day at New Birth Cathe-
dral, included a 22--passenger
Hummer for the brdal party, a
white Rolls Royce for the bride,
several hundreds of people rush-
ing from the parking area to be
on time for the processional to
witness the men attired in green
accessory over a white tuxedo
with an extra long coat, compli-
mented by the women.
Family of the groom led by Al-
ice Ashley, Debra Baker and
Sebrina Thompson was joined
by Johnnie and Norma Griffin.
Parents of the bride, preceded
by Pastor Mary Edwards, offi-
ciant, Eddie Edwin and Erwin
Finley, best men and the groom.
Other members of the bridal
party included bridesmaids
and groomsmen: Katherine
Munnigham and Corey Hollis,
Lametris McBride and Darrian
Williams, Sabrina Simmons
and David Williams, Shaquina
Baker and Gerald Baker, Shau-
rade Baker and Jynio Phyl-
lis, Shontavia Munninghman
and Leo Washington, Tammy
Ashley and Thoma Baker and
Tiara Lee and Windell John-
son; Matron of honor, Nicole
Hawkins and Kashawashawa
Kichens, maid of honor; Kay-
den Glation and LaParis Har-
ris, flower girls; Stephen Clark,
ring bearer; Shadarrian Baker,
Jr. Bride and Darrian Baker,
Jr., Jr. groom.
The bride entered the cha-
pel escorted by her stepfather
Johnnie Griffin attired in a
mini-veil, mini-earrings, a triple
beads of pearls matching a tiara
and a flowing white gown with
a inini-train, while the ceremo-
ny included the singing of the


ana screamed, you did not
bring my toast". It settled the
crowd, as they engaged
-Lord's Prayer" by in raising their glasses..-
Mehemie Celestin to a sip of wine, while
and "jumping of Lee Johnson sang, "My
the broom" follow- Funny Valentine".
ing the pronounce- Dr. HermanPrattwas
ment of marriage. called upon to provide
Following the recessional, the the invocation and when
bridal entourage ended up at he finished, his wife sup-
Violines Banquet Hall for the ported his prayer with a BAI
reception and celebration with loud "Amen". President
the bride and groom dancing Baljean Smith was introduced
the first dance, dinner, cutting to welcome everyone and.Sta-
of the cake, toasts by the maid cey W. Jones closed it out with
and matron of honors, as well a brief subscription of "why"
as the best men. Furthermore, Omega Men remember Quettes
thanks were given by the newly as Thelma Gibson ((Father
weds to First Class Productions, Theodore Gibson), Billie Greer
Iseia Polus, who flew in from (Dr. Tee S. Greet), Eugenia B.
Tallahassee and parents of the Thomas (Judge Lawton Thom-
bride and groom: Walton Hol- as), Toni Gary (E. G. Williams),
lis and Doris Baker, re- and Elliot J. Scavella
spectively. -and more.
SIn addition to the
* * * * l opulent luncheon,
Speaking of St. Val- Smith recognized. Garth
entine's Day, it engen- Reeves and Stan Allen,
der Stacy Jones and '"- while the band played
his committee to pro- l"' "Happy Birthday" 'to
vide a formal luncheon the both of them, along
for the Men of Omega RICHARDSON with Reeves celebration


and their wives, sweet-
hearts and significant others in
the ballroom of Omega Activity
Center. The tables were decorat-
ed with colors of red and white
and the chairs with red ribbon
bows with a center piece' of red
roses. And, of course, the mu-
sic was provided by The Psi Phi
Band that filled the room with
the guests' favorites.
After an hour of mixing, Bro.
Johnny Stepherson, emcee,
was introduced to assemble ev-
eryone in the room. He did it
by telling the joke of the elderly
man who asked his wife to bring'
back ice cream from the kitchen.
She indicated bring his favorite
with a cherry and chocolate and


71-years an Omega and
announcing 92-years of living
with an appearance and meaner
of a man of agility, gait, and en-
durance for his age.
Moreover, the men ordered
Valentine bags for the quettes
and presented to them as the
band played "Let Me Call You
Sweetheart" and "I Love You
Truly". Dancing followed and
the men ended with the singing
of the Sweetheart Song to all of
the females in attendance.
Some of the special guests
included Baljean Smith with
Naomi Smith, Thomas Albury,
Dr. Charlie Albury, Carliss and
Odessa Cook, Verna-Edington,
Norma Mims, Melodie Delanc-


rcha~i0,Ar r


Higgs, Maray Jones, Henry
Mingo and guests, Ric Powell,
Audley Salahud-Din, Arthur
and Ruth Simms, Anthony
and Caroline Simons.


Kay Madry Sullivan,
Basileus, Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, Inc. and members are
still beaming over their recent
Gamma Zeta Omega Chapter
Founders Day Observance, at
Ebenezer UMC on Feb. 7, where
Soror Dr. Joreatha Capers
delivered the sermon on Su-
per Bowl Day: Super Bowl for
Christ. She interfaced
the rules of the football
game with biblical scrip-
tures and demonstrated
her knowledgeable skills
to a comprehension end-
ing of stating: When you
win a super bowl game,
you get a ring, but when
you win a super bowl in
.. heaven, you get a golden WIL!
crown. Her answer was
getting a crown in heaven any-
time. She closed to a standing
ovation, while the membership
jockeyed for pictures.
Other members not men-
tion were Quanita Kelly, Leah


S -' -'s~n


Roland "Box" Ingram, made his annual trip
home to Miami where each year he throws the.
biggest "Superbowl" party for all of his. family and
old classmates and friends. You name it and it is
there for you to enjoy and take home to later enjoy.
A very nice gesture each year "Box." He now lives in New
Jersey and returns home to meet and greet his old buddies
each "Superbowl Sunday."


Hearty congratulations to one of my former students
Jacqueline Charles who is a reporter for The Miami Herald
and will be honored at the Miami Intercontinental Hotel on
Feb. 25 along with two other for their excellent coverage on
Haiti. Charles' stories and work in the aftermath of this year's
earthquake acquainted the world with the struggles of the
Haitian people.

Get well wishes to Fr. J. Kenneth Major, Joyce Major
Hepburn, Cecelia McCartney, Cynthia T. Brown, Elveda
Brown, Vera Charlow-Higgs, Ernest "Red" Knowles, Freddy
"Jabbo" Johnson, Claretha Grant-Lewis, Ernestine Ross-
Collins, Ida Knowles-Engram, Helen Ward Sands-McKoy,
Jessie Stinson, Inez Farrington, Luria Davis and Rose
Mary Braynon.

Old time Miamians were sadden to hear of the demise of
Fernley Murray in New .York City and Clarice Allen-Huges
who died at North Shore Hospital last Saturday.


With February being the month in which Blacks are
recognized more than any other eleven months, may I remind
you of the contributions made by Blacks throughout history.
In the area of entertainment: Dorothy Dandridge, Sammy
Davis, Jr., Josephine Baker, Alvin Ailey and many more.
Visual Arts: Henry Ossawa Tanner, Edmonia Lewis and many
more; Sports: Joe Louis, Jesse Owens, Jackie Robinson,
Althea Gibson and Arthur Ashe.i Science and invention:
Benjamin Banneker, George Washington Carver, Percy L
Julian and Mary E. Hill. Journalism and law: Ida B. Wells,
Sam Lacy, Charles Hamilton, Paul Murray, John S. Rock
and Ethel Payne. Education: Mary McLeod Bethune, Carter
Woodson, Naomnie Helen Burroughs and Charles Spurgeon
Johnson. Business: John Johnson, Annie Turnbo Malone,
John Merrick, Phillip A. Payton, Jr. and James Forten.
Politics and government: Shirley Chisholm, Ralph Bunche,
Barbara Jordan, James Farmer and many more. Military
and aviation: Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., Crispus Attucks,
Mary Elizabeth Bowser, Prince Whipple and Charity James
Earley. Literature: James Baldwin, Paul Lawrence Dunbar,
Ralph Waldo Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Childress
and Lorraine Hansberry. Faith and religion: Richard
Allen, Absalom Jones, Daniel Coker, Lightfoot Solomon
Michaux, Patrick Francis Healy and many more. Activism:
W.E.B. DuBois, Dr. Martin Luther King, Roy Wilkins, Rosa
Parks, Sojourner Truth, Carter Woodson, James Farmer
and many more.

Wedding anniversary greetings to the following couples:
Hughie and Lois M. Nairn, Sr., Feb. 15, their 61st and
William and Jessie C. Pinder, Feb. 20, their 60th.
I heard Booker T. Washington School colors are now: orange,
black and white. Will someone tell me who and when did white
become a part of our school colors? Who made that decision?


- 4 0


0r


- r a

0


. v


Copyrighted MaterialU



Syndicated Content


If Available from Commercial News Providers










5 0


ey, Pamela and Renee Jones,
and Romania Wilson; Oscar
Jessie with Mary D. Jesssie,
Marie Singletary, Gibson,
Loretta Whittle and Tyson
Woods; Earl and Alice
Daniels, Mary Lane,
Ethel Smith, Lula
M. Thomas, Willie B.
Cobbs, John H. Taylor,
Curtis Taylor, Ted and
Kitty Blue, Dr. Edward
Braynon, Jr. (29th Na-
tional Basileus), Har-
KERS court Clark, Norman
and Estella Cox, El-
ston and Lillian Davis, John-
ny Davis, Harry and Carmen
Dawkins, Dr. Herman Dorsett,
Eberneza Edwards and family,
Dr. Andrew G. Forbes, Hansel


Swilley Watts, Leona Swilley, Pritchett, Maxine Roberts,
Linda Johnson, Loretta Whit- Janet Symonette, Dorothy
tle, Lori Bailey, Mary Jessie, Thompson, Rosa Thorn-
Maryline Montes-Gelin, Nez- ton, Leelia Troutman, Julia
zie Stewart, Polly Hamilton, Tynes, Gwendolyn Waters
Priscilla Dobbs, Ruthel Blake, and Sylvia Williams Garner.
Sandra Jackson, Shaquita
Rahming, Veronica Rahming, ********
Shirley Archie, Susie Robin- Congratulations to Collette
son, Verna Edington, Hart Richardson who
Ather Mae Starke, Deb- was installed Dec. 22,
orah Simmons, Kim- 2009, as the 30th Illus-
berly Brown, Carol bos- trious Commandress
ton, Sharletta Rawls, of Kazah Court #117,
Fannie Humes, Allison '- Daughters of Isis, Oa-
Brooks, Stephenia Wil- sis of Miami, Desert of
Us M. Dianne Williams Florida for the ensu-
Taquan Williams, Mary ing year 2010. Rich-
Martin, Lavonne Moore REEVES ardson enhanced a
and Donna Payne. strong family tradition
started by her father,
******* Willard W. Hart, a three-time
Alpha Gamma Chapter of Eta Potentate of Karah Temple
Phi Beta Sorority held its an- #249 and sister Allyson Hart
nual candlelight Vesper Service Bryant, 26th Commandress of
at New Beginnings Mission- Kazah Court #117.
ary Baptist Church where Rev. This proud Commandress
Eric Readon is the pastor and graduated from Miami Central
teacher. Bea Hines, reporter for High and Clark Atlanta Uni-
The Miami Herald and Broward versity, where she served as a
Neighborhood Section delivered cheerleader then furthered her
a powerful message on women educational mobility to Nova
in today's society. Other pro- Southeastern University, Em-
gram participants were Jean ory University, Barry Univer-
Solomon Brown, who gave a sity, Florida Atlantic Univer-
fantastic musical selection of sity and University of Miami
"Oh Holy Night"and Althea during her 20-year time as a
Sample rendered "Ava Maria" teacher to assistant principal
on her flute. Each one at Norwood Elementary in Mi-
received a standing ova- ami Gardens.
tion. Other members Dr. Richardson feels indebt-
in attendance included ed to her late mother, Lillie
Tawana Boykin, Cindy Bell Brown Hart, a Language
Campbell, Arleace Car- Art teacher at Miami North-
S rion, Janett Edwards, western, aunt, Mary Wallace
Janice George, Debra Hunter, son, Woodrow Rich-
Hinds, Nykeva Hinds, ardson, sister, Beverly H.
Angela Huyrst, Roslyn Luckie, Dt. Charlie P. Albury
SON Jackson (Chairman), and Commandress Lona B. Ma-
Twyla Miller, Barbara this. Her goal for 2010 is to fulfill
Killen, Wartrante Lewis, Doris her dream, inspire, empower and
Lynch, Carolyn Mayed, Dan- enhance her mission as high as
nie McMillion, president, Le- she can go and continue working
atrice McMurray, Betty Mur- with the many community orga-
ray, Rosetta Nelson, Joann nizations, especially Delta Sigma
Parks, Neil Philsnor, Sharon Theta Sorority, Inc.


r











I I


Cash Money music moguls



know the real money is in oil


Cash Money Records found-
ing bailer Bryan 'Birdman' Wil-
liams aka Baby has upped the
bling ante, bypassing the plati-
num hub caps and diamond-
laden grill for the ultimate show
piece: an oil rig tattooed on his
head. That's because Birdman
and his brother Ronald "Slim"
Williams know the real money
is in oil. And once you've seen
the light or the cash in the
crude the only logical thing
to do is start your own oil and
gas exploration business.
I guess in the rap world, oil
and gas simply has more ven-
ture capitalist street cred than
clean energy.
And why not? Who says only
guys with 10-gallon hats and
contributors to the Republican
party get to be in the oil busi-
ness. Actually, when you think
about it, they're pretty similar.
I want to take this seriously.
Really, why not launch an oil
and gas exploration business?
The Williams brothers have al-
ready proved themselves as
savvy businessmen with their
Cash Money Records label, with
artists like Jay Sean and Lil'
Wayne. But then they had to
turnaround and name the com-


IUNEIT KCEUKU
Slim and Birdman


pany Bronald Oil & Gas LLC
- yes, a combination of their
names.
The company is described
on its Web site as an inde-


pendent oil and gas company
focused on exploration, pro-
duction and development of
oil and gas reserves from
conventional -and uncon-


ventional formations. The
company will focus on ex-
ploration and development
properties in Osage Coun-
ty, Oklahoma as well as
Texas, Louisiana and Cen-
tral America. Heck, they're
even interested in uncon-
ventional shale gas.
Bronald isn't exactly
busting down doors to
buy up property irf Osage
County. Chaparral En-
ergy, which operates 40
percent of the wells in the
county had not been
contacted by Bronald, the
company's senior vice pres-
ident told Bloomberg News.
Bloomberg hunted down
other great little tidbits,
including the fact that the
address listed for Bronald
with the Oklahoma Cor-
poration Commission is a
beachfront condo in Flori-
da.
Tudor Pickering Holt &
Co. better watch its back
though. The Houston invest-
ment bank firm said rap-
pers getting into the industry
was the sign of the end of an
oil-market rally, Bloomberg re-
ported.


Hip-hop rapper eve facing tax problems


By Mike Winslow

Rapper/actress Eve is the lat-
est artist to run into tax troubles,
as her tax bill recently landed on-
line.
According to The Detroit News,
Eve owes over $357,000 to the
IRS in delinquent state and fed-
eral taxes.
The IRS in Los Angeles filed two
liens against her in January 2008,
one for $242,245 and another for
$56,597.
In January of 2009, the Los
Angeles IRS filed two more liens
against Eve, one for $29,439 and
other for $29,059.
In January of 2010, Eve placed


her four bedroom, five bathroom
Los Angeles mansion up for sale
for $2,295,000.
In February, it was revealed
that Eve was a part of the federal
government's investigation into
her ex-boyfriend, Teodorin Ngue-
ma Obiang, son of President Te-
odoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo of
Equatorial Guinea.
Obiang is accused of setting up
a number of front companies, in-
cluding one in honor of Eve named
Sweet Pink Inc.
He then allegedly laundered
hundreds of millions of dollars in
corrupt funds that were reported-
ly illegally diverted from Equatori-
al Guinea's gas and oil reserves.


EVE
Rapper/Actress


Nas pleads not guilty to

contempt in divorce case


Nas faces a criminal con-
tempt charge for unpaid child
and spousal support in his di-
vorce from fellow singer Kelis.
The rapper pleaded not guilty
through his attorney and was
ordered back for a March
hearing in Los Angeles.
Kelis' attorney says Nas is
$200,000 behind on child
and spousal support. He was
ordered to pay more than
.$51,000 per month to his for-
mer wife and infant son in De-


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
You're running on pure faith that this
will take care of itself. I have a feeling
you're right but before you give it all up
to the Creator, take a quick look at wheth-
er or not you really believe that. Lucky
numbers 10, 13, 17, 21, 26

TAURUS: APRIL 21- MAY 20
It's hard to see that everything's going
to be fine when it's such a mess. Don't
be too concerned about how things look.
Take a deep breath and ask yourself; what
makes you freak out whenever things
change? Lucky numbers 5, 10, 15, 25, 30

GEMINI: MAY 21 JUNE 20
Things are nuts. This time it's in a good
way.The 3-ring circus is amusing at least
so for now just sit back and enjoy it. Soon
enough the side effects of all the crazi-
ness will bring you back down to earth.
Lucky numbers 15, 21, 26, 30, 35

CANCER:JUNE 21- JULY 20
You're looking at what you've got and
wondering how you're going to stretch
it. Tightening your belt isn't the answer.
When times are tough it's always best to
spread the wealth. Trust me; that's how it
works. Lucky numbers 7, 14, 20, 26, 30


cember.
Judge David S. Cunning-
ham III, who is overseeing the
divorce proceedings, said Fri-
day it's starting to 'look like'
the rapper is trying to evade
court orders.
One of Nas' attorneys, Antho-
ny Ukran, told Cunningham
the rapper needs more time to
prepare his defense and show
he's unable to pay the court-or-
dered support amounts.
Kelis filed for divorce in May.


LEO: JULY 21- AUGUST 20
Not everyone is incurably romantic.
Whoever you're stuck on may not have
more than a fling on their mind. If you can
deal with that go ahead and jump down
this rabbit hole. If you can't, don't fall in
love this time. Lucky numbers 10,.15, 21,
24,29

VIRGO:AUGUST 21 SEPT 20
Finding the strength to go through this
one more time has you wondering why.
Being too big hearted, you can't say no.
Don't judge it. Maybe another rerun is
what it will take to get you past the issues
that keep it going. Lucky numbers 6, 12,
17, 21, 28

LIBRA: SEPT 21 OCT 20
You've finally flown the coop. It's been
so long since you've felt this free you don't
even know what to do with yourself. Chill
out and breathe. It won't take long to re-
member who you are and what you love.
Lucky numbers 9, 14, 19, 24, 30

SCORPIO: OCT 21- NOV 20
You don't need to figure this out. What
doesn't make sense is usually in our best
interests. Second guessing your reasons


NAS
Rapper/Actor


for taking this leap will keep you from get-
ting in touch with the fact that you want
to. Lucky numbers 10, 13, 17, 21, 26

SAGITTARIUS: NOV 21 DEC 20
Don't put your faith in outer things
right now. Nothing out there's going
to change this. The lesson seems to be
about you finding the strength to do
things without needing anything but your
self to make them happen. Lucky numbers
12, 16, 18, 21, 25

CAPRICORN: DEC 21 JAN 20
Too far, too fast or too little, too late
kinda sums it up; what were you think-
ing? If you can't laugh this off you're
gonna have a hard time living through
it. And if you can't switch to Plan B, start
praying. Lucky numbers 15, 19, 23, 26,
31

AQUARIUS: JAN 21- FEB 20
You don't need to worry about wheth:
er you'll get through this. It's not as
'bad as it looks. Don't make it worse by
expecting too much from yourself. And
stop feeding the notion that you're going
down the tubes. Lucky numbers 5,10, 12,
14, 27

PISCES: FEB 21 MARCH 20
You can say what you want about peo-
ple but it doesn't make you right. Until
you understand why they do what they
do you've got no business judging them.
Look in the mirror. Whatever this is about
it's your stuff. Lucky numbers 7, 13, 16,
23,27


in February, it was revealed that

Eve was a part of the federal

government's Investigation into

her ex-boyfrlend,Teodorin Ngue-

ma Oblang, son of President Te-

odoro Oblang Nguema.Mbasogo

of Equatorial Guinea.


Lil Wayne gets eight


root canals in one day


If reports are to be believed,
. the dental surgery that de-
layed Lil Wayne's sentencing
on weapons charges was in-
deed serious business. Accord-
ing to TMZ, Wayne visited his
dentist in Miami on Tuesday
for an eight-hour session that
included eight root canals,
work on his signature diamond
grills, the replacement of sev-
eral tooth implants, as well as
the addition of a few new im-
plants and work on his remain-
ing original teeth.
A spokesperson for Wayne
confirmed the report but clari-
fied that the rapper did not
have any work done on his cus-
tom grill.
On Feb 9, a New York judge
agreed to delay Wayne's sen-


tencing for attempted weapons
possession until March 2 in or-
der to allow the rapper's den-
tist to do the surgery.
The rapper was originally
scheduled to be formally sen-
tenced to begin serving his one-
year term from a 2007 arrest
on Feb 9. At the time, lawyer
Stacey Richman said the sur-
gery was scheduled for Feb 12
in Miami and would require 10
days for recovery.
While not entirely unexpect-
ed, the delay has surprised
many, considering that Wayne
has been hard at work in recent
weeks recording music and vid-
eos to be released during his
time in jail, and even said good-
bye to fans in a live streaming
video last Tuesday..


FOR THE*PERFORMING ARSOFMIAMI-SDADECOUNTY

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2 PM and 7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater (in the ZBOH)
FLORIDA GRAND OPERA PRESENTS
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OW;N DESTINY


[ THU MARCH 4 1


[ FRI MARCH 5 )


By Minerva


[ SAT MARCH 6 1


I 3C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


-. , ,'Soldier of Love' was a long

S-time coming for reclusive Sade
V 'Ai: ,. - "


Nate Parker star in powerful new movie based on acclaimed novel.


"Blood Done Sign My Name" portrays a true


story of leadership and struggle for social justice


The Miami Times Staff Report

The American people turned
a critical corner in honoring the
legacy of the civil rights move-
ment by electing Barack Obama
as the first Black President of
the -United States on Nov. 4,
2008. For many, his inaugura-
tion demonstrated a major shift
toward sincerely embracing the
dream of Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr., that "a man be judged not by
the color of his skin, but by the
content of his character."
In the powerful new movie,
Blood Done Sign My Name,
starring Nate Parker (The Great
Debaters and the forthcom-
ing Tuskegee Airmen saga, Red
Tails), Darrin Dewitt Henson
(Stomp the Yard), Omar Benson
Miller (Miracle at St. Anna) and
Lela Rochon (Waiting to Exhale),


audiences are taken to a time
decades before Barack Obama's
presidency years after the
bus boycotts and sit-ins of the
1950's and 1960's and directly
into the middle of a tragic event
of racism.
SSet in Oxford, North Carolina
in 1970, Blood Done Sign My
Name is an epic drama based
on the acclaimed book of the
same name by prize-winning au-
thor and Black studies scholar,
Timothy Tyson. Part autobiog-
raphy, part history of the civil
rights movement in the South,
it recounts the murder of Hen-
ry Marrow, a 23 year-old Black
Vietnam veteran who was shot
and beaten to death by a promi-
nent white businessman and his
grown sons' It also chronicles
the reaction to Morrow's killing
by his cousin, Ben Chavis (Park-
er), as well as a ten-year-old Ty-


son (Ricky Schroder, Lonesome
Dove, NYPD Blue), who watched
as his father, the pastor of the
all-white Methodist church, tried
to get his congregation to accept
the inevitability of integration.
While many young Black men
in the community took to the
streets, engaging in riots and
vandalism in response to the
crime, and sham trial that fol-
lowed, Chavis, a schoolteacher
and burgeoning activist (who
went on to become head of the
NAACP) decided that the best
way to protest the injustice was
to organize a peaceful march.
What began as a small group of
outraged friends and relatives
grew to a crowd of thousands
over the three-day, fifty-mile trek
to the state capitol in Raleigh.
Blood Done Sign My Name is
a candid account of a shocking
episode in the last days of Jim


Crow North Carolina an event
that took place nearly a decade
after the civil rights movement
was supposed to have purged
the south of the evils of segre-
gation.
Speaking on the importance
of telling this story, Parker says,
"This movie shows a young per-
son, a student, leading; that's
what attracted me to this role. It
shows that we, the black com-
munity, can become leaders,
like Dr. Chavis. We have to be
more proactive. We have to move
away from the instant gratifi-
cation attitude. Change takes
time.",Chavis adds, "I hope that
people see that, although we
have made progress, that there's
more progress to make. I think
it's going to open a lot of eyes,
and hopefully inspire people to
take a look at this period of his-
tory."


First album in a decade:Sade says she and her bandmates
can "pick up where we left off in terms of our musical
friendship."


By Steve Jones

Sade's jazzy soul songs have
often teetered between heart-
break and hope, and the title
track of her just-out Soldier of
Love album walks that emotion-
al line over a crackling martial
groove that returns the British
chanteuse to the spotlight for
the first time in a decade.
She says fans were always
asking when she'd release a
successor to 2000's Lovers
Rock, which sold nearly 4 mil-
lion copies, bit she was never
ready to set aside a block of
time to record one.
"Life kind of gets in the way
of it, and time always passes
quicker than you think," says
Sade (aka Sade Adu), 51, by
phone from her home in Eng-
land. "One of the reasons it
takes me a long time to get back
into the studio is that once I go
in, I'm there for the duration.
"It's like embarking on a long
journey on a ship, and once I'm
on it, I can't get off."
She and bandmates Stu-
art Matthewman, Paul Den-
man and Andrew Hale broke
through in 1984 with Diamond
Life, which earned them the


best-new-artist Grammy. A
performance at Live Aid ex-
posed the group to a global
TV audience of 1.4 billion, and
all of Sade's subsequent, less
frequent' albums -Promise
(1985), Stronger Than Pride
(1988), Love Deluxe (1992) and
Lovers Rock (2000) went
multiplatinum.
The album makes its debut
at No. 1 on Billboard's album
chart, with first-week sales of
502,000, according to Nielsen
SoundScan.
The band began crafting the
10-song Soldier of Love two
years ago, and Matthewman
and Denman commuted from
the USA for a series of two-
week sessions at a studio near
Sade's home in rural Glouc-
estershire. The quartet, who
have worked together since
their pre-fame days as part
of the Latin funk band Pride,
managed to rediscover their
chemistry, even though they
had seen little of one another
in the past decade.
. "It's like a real powerful long-
distance relationship," she says.
"We really do pick up where we
left off in terms of our musical
friendship."


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Albacoi "
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es Chunk White Tunaf6.4- Torte
ffs, Premium Albacore, 6.4-oz pkg. Assorted
oast Quantity rights reserved. (Excludil
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-- -~--~_____________4_______________- __----- -- ------- _-- * --
Prices effective Thursday, February 25 through Wednesday, March 3, 2010. Only in Miami-Dade. Broward, Palm Beach, Martin. St. Lucie, Indian River,
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties. Any item carried by Publix GreenWise Market will be at the Publix advertised sale price. Quantity rights reserved.
+ *** *** ** ******** **** ***** **** ****************** 4 ^ 6 ss.


Publix.


LA IIV I-


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MAKE IT ITALIAN TONIGHT








'The Miami Times



Business


i
I.;


if-i/~Mi T'-.'ES


The Men of Distinction outside of the Frank C. Martin International K-8 Center on Feb. 12.



Men of Distinction host Black Professional Day


Special to the Times

The Men of Distinction held their annual
Black History Month event at Frank C. Martin
International K-8 Center on Feb. 12 in which
approximately 70 Black professional men
from the community visited the school to
speak to the children about their profession.
This event ensures that all of our students
have an opportunity to meet and interact


with professional Black males as positive
role models. Many of these men have been
making a difference in the lives of our
students at Frank C. Martin International
K-8 Center for the past 12 years.
Among the attendees included: Ken
James, radio personality; Dallas L. Manuel,
a representative from County Chairman
Dennis Moss' Office; Dr. Wilbert T. Holloway,
School Board Member; Steffond Cone,


District Director; Jim Berry, CBS WFOR news
anchor; Melvin Dennis, retired principal;
Mark Beckford, retired police officer; Perly
Richardson, accountant; Dr. Albert Dotson,
Sr., Orange Bowl Committee; Rev. John A.
Ferguson, community activist and Anthony
Adams, Dade County Public Schools.
Frank C. Martin International K-8 Center,
located in Richmond Heights, has been
recognized by the United,States Department


.i-'~~~~~~ ~ *'I-L ~ l~:Li* .~~L~~r


of Education as a Blue Ribbon Award School.
The school is Florida's first international
K-8 Center to house both the International
Baccalaureate Primary Years and Middle
Years Programmes, 2008. In addition, Frank
C. Martin International K-8 Center has been
nationally recognized for the 11th time as a
recipient of the Magnet Schools of America
Excellence Award. The school's principal is
Pamela F. Brown.
.*. s ....-J. -- -.1s4


Jobless claims unexpectedly jump


The number. of newly laid-off workers
filing applications for unemployment ben-
efits unexpectedly surged last week af-
ter having fallen sharply in the previous
week. The' gain dampened hopes about
how quickly the labor market may im-
prove this year.
The Labor Department said Thursday
that first-time claims for unemployment
benefits rose by 31,000 to a seasonally
adjusted 473,000.
The increase followed a drop of 41,000 in
the previous week which had raised hopes
that the labor market could be improving.
There have been 8.4 million jobs lost since
the recession began in December 2007.
Thursday's news deflated analysts'
hopes that new claims would continue to
decline. Economists surveyed by Thom-
son Reuters had expected new claims to
fall modestly.
Still, the four-week average for claims
dipped 1,500 to 467,500, near the lows
that were reached at the end of last year.
The average is considered a more stable
indicator because it smooths out the
week-to-week volatility.
Claims at the beginning of this year had
been affected by a holiday backlog. The
easing of the backlog had elevated the
numbers for the previous three weeks..
That temporary boost appears to have
worn off.
The weekly numbers are also muddied


by the ripple effects of last week's record-
setting Mid-Atlantic snowstorms.
Analysts say the closing of businesses
and government offices may have prevent-
ed some newly unemployed workers from
filing their initial claims.
These data were collected as the govern-
ment gathered information for the Febru-
ary report on the unemployment rate and
employer payrolls.
The severe, weather may distort those
figures, too, economists said. That could
make it hard to get an accurate picture of
the job market for several weeks.
Some experts say the snowstorms may
have cost the economy as many as 100,000
jobs in February. Government hiring for the
census also could be delayed.


-Ali. NIL








Photo/Shawn Williams.
Miami Job Corps 2010 graduating class participate in the commencement on Friday,
Feb. 12.

Commissioner gives keynote address

at Miami Job Corps commencement


Special to the Times


After 34 years of employment with the Unit-
ed States Postal Service andt eight years as an
Opa-locka City Commissioner, Dorothy "Dot-
tie" Johnson was excited about the opportu-
nity for the second consecutive year to en-
courage, uplift and spread hope to the gradu-
ating class of the Miami Job Corps Center.
The graduation took place at the Job Corps


Center in Miami Gardens on Friday, Feb. 12.
During her .commencement speech, Com-
missioner Johnson mapped directions to suc-
cess, through a course which included guide-
lines for having the right attitude.
Miami Job Corps is a no-cost education and
career technical training program adminis-
tered by the U.S. Department of Labor that
assist eligible youth, ages 16- 24, incareer
Please turn to CORPS 5D


Time to get wrkiou ahout creating Jobi for American




uCopyrighted Material



a t Syndicated Content




'Available from Commercial News Providers


- - : '


Y


r.rr










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010 1


One year later: Barack Obama

defends economic stimulus


By Steve Holland

President Barack
Obama vigorously de-
fended his $787 billion
stimulus on Wednes-
day, insisting it rescued
Americans from the
worst of the economic
calamity and ripping
Republican critics who
called it a waste.
Obama and Vice
President Joe Biden
launched a sweeping
effort to convince skep-
tical Americans that
the stimulus has been
beneficial on the one-
year anniversary of a
plan that was pushed
through the U.S. Con-
gress by Democratic
majorities.
Obama, in a White
House speech, said he
believed. the stimulus
will save or create 1.5
millionjobs in 2010 af-
ter saving or creating as
many as 2 million jobs
thus far.
His point was to show
that the stimulus, while
admittedly unpopular,
had the effect of keeping
the U.S. economy from
plunging into a second
Great Depression.
"Our work is far from
over but we have res-
cued this economy from
the worst of this crisis,"
he said.
As Obama spoke,
many administration
officials were fanning
out across the country
this week to promote
projects that have been
funded by the stimulus.
to show Americans its
results.
For example, the U.S.
Department of Trans-
portation awarded $1.5
billion last week in
stimulus grants to local
and state governments
to back 51 transporta-
tion projects.
The White House
hoped that once Ameri-
cans in their towns and
cities saw the results
of the stimulus, they
would realize it has
helped.
Obama has much
work to do to convince
Americans who are still
struggling to find work
amid a 9.7 percent job-
less rate.
A CBS News/New
York Times poll last
week found that only
six percent of Ameri-.
cans believed the pack-
age had created jobs.
Another poll by CNN/
Opinion Research Cor-
poration showed a ma-
jority opposed the stim-
ulus program.
And the price tag of
the stimulus has gone
up. The Congressional
Budget Office estimates
that when all is said
and done, the package
will end up costing $862
billion because unem-
ployment compensation
has been costlier than
expected.
All this comes as
Obama and his Demo-
crats face pressure to
show results in an elec-
tion year in which their
large majorities in Con-
gress could be at risk.
Republicans eager to
score political points
emailed out to report-
ers the original admin-
istration estimates from
a year ago that showed
the U.S. jobless rate
would only rise to eight
percent under the stim-
ulus.
"In the first year of
the trillion-dollar stim-
ulus, Americans have
lost millions of jobs,
the unemployment rate
continues to hover near
10 percent, the deficit
continues to soar and
we're inundated with
stories of waste, fraud
and abuse," said Sen-


ate Republican leader
Mitch McConnell.


BARACK OB
U.S. Presidi

"This was not t
Americans asked
the results the
promised," he sa
Anger and.


tion over high govern-
ment spending and
deficits have been lead-
ing causes of a wave of
public discontent with
Washington, and Re-
Spublicans sought to
ride the current.
"One year later, we
see plainly that the
stimulus was not a
well-thought-out plan,"
2008 Republican vice
IAMA presidential candidate
ent Sarah, Palin said on
Facebook. "It hasn't re-
the plan vived our economy; in-
d for or stead the debt-ridden
;y were package will prove to
aid. be a drag on our econ-
frustra- omy."


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City of Miami Notice of Bid Solicitation

Title: Brickell Key Bridge Repair Project B-30634
Due Date: March 29, 2010 @ 2:00 p.m.
Pre- Bid Conference: March 10, 2010
@ 2:00 p.m.
(Non-Mandatory) Site Visit to Follow
ITB/RFQ No.: 09-10-010
For detailed information, please visit our Capital
Improvements Program webpage at:

www.miamigov.com/capitalimprovements/pages/
ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE
"CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH
SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY CODE.

Carlos Migoya
City Manager


DP No. 008977.



Richmond-Perrine

Optimist Club

A Private Non-Profit Organization

Currently Hiring

Program Aide: Provide recreational activities
to youth after school. HS Diploma or
GED preferred. P/T, M-F, 12 pm 6 pm.

Must pass background check.
Mail / Fax resume: 18055 Homestead Avenue
Miami, FL 33157 X (305) 232-7815
Funded by The Children Trust


City of Miami Notice of Bid Solicitation

Title: NW 14"t Street Multimedia Entertain-
ment District Streetscape Improvement Project,
B-30394
Due Date: March 22, 2010 @ 2:00 p.m.
Pre- Bid Conference: March 5, 2010 @10:00 a.m.
(Non-Mandatory)
ITB/RFQ No.: 09-10-010
For detailed information, please visit our Capital
Improvements Program webpage at:

www.miamigov.com/capitalimprovements/pages/
ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE
"CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH
SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY CODE.

Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.,
City Manager

DP No. 008976




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CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami
City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500
Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the
following:

IFB NO.177145 INVITATION FOR BID FOR
FIRE-RESCUE UNIFORMS AND SAFETY SHOES
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M. FRIDAY, MARCH
12, 2010

Detailed scope of work and specifications for this
bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing
Department, website at www.miamiqov.com/
procurement Telephone No. 305-416-1958.

Deadline for Request for Clarification: Wednesday.
March 3. 2010 at 5:00 P.M.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO
THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE
WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74
ORDINANCE NO.12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager



AD NO. 12627


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"James A. Cummings, Inc., a Tutor-Fermi Com-
pany, will be accepting subcontractor bids for the
construction of the Miami-Dade County Children's
Courthouse before March 24, 2010 at 2:00 PM
James A. Cummings, Inc. is actively seeking certi-
fied CSBE subcontractors and suppliers. The work
includes all trades for CSI Divisions 2 thru 16. All
subcontractors andisuppliers must be pre-qualified
by James A. Cummings, Inc. Pre-qualification
Statements are available from Cummings. Bid
documents can be obtained through Cummings, or
can be reviewed at Dodge and Reed Construction.
For more information please call Patrick Holland ii
James A. Cummings, Inc. @ 3575 NW 53rd Street;
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309; (954) 733-4211 or
Fax: (954) 485-9688.


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."



....* . ,. .. =. ,.'s ,i , .! ,:.-* :.: ... , . : .. .. .. .. *.i .. . -,' .


003-KK08 3/16/2010 Physical Examinations Bus Drivers North of
Flagler Street
Any inquiry, clarification, or
information regarding this bid
must be requested in writing
sent by courier, e-mail, fax,
042-JJ03 3/11/2010 Ice and Water Products, Machines, and Parts or mail and received no later
than 2 PM EST on February
25, 2010 to M-DCPS to al-
low sufficient time to address
submissions.

RFP 029-KK10 3/9/2010 Financial Advisor

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


I


ADVERTISE HERE
















es


ss


SECTION D




Apartments

101-A CIVIC CENTER
AREA APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL! One
bedroom $650 rent, $325
security. Free water central
air, appliances. Quiet. NO
CREDIT CHECK. For a
limited time. 1545 N.W.
8th Ave. 786-506-3067
1031 NW 197 TERRACE
One bedroom, one bath.
Rooms also available.
Call Linton at 786-222-6764
1140 N.W. 79 ST.
One bdrm, one bath $550.
Free Water. Mr. Willie #109
305-642-7080

115 NE 78 STREET
Three bdrms Special $845,
two bdrms $795 and 1
bdrm, $700. nice and clean,
parking. Section 8 OK!
786-326-7424
1212 N.W. e1t Avenue
$475 MOVE IN. One
bedroom, one bath $475.
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

1215 NW 103 LANE
Two bdrms, gated security,
tile. $700 mthly, $1000 to
move in. 305-696-7667
1229 N.W. 1 Court
$500 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $500,
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080,
786-236-1144

1245 NW 58 STREET
Move in special. One
bedroom, one bath. $495
monthly, $750 to move in.
All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bath
$525, Free Water.
305-642-7080

1257 NW 61 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath,
renovated, wafer included.
Section 8 ready. $600 monthly.
$800 Move in Special! 786-
229-6567
1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath
"$' 550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One
bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty #1
786-290-1438

1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $450.
305-642-7080


139 N.W. 118 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$800, $850. Free water.
electricity. 305-642-7080

140 N.W. 13 Street
$500 MOVE IN.
Two bdrms, one bath $525.
786-236-1144/305-
642-7080


1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bdrm, one bath $425,
305-642-7080

1459 NW 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances,
tiled floors, $550 monthly..
ONE MONTH MOVES U IN
Call 305-458-3977
1718 N.W. 2nd Court
$425 MOVE IN, One
bdrm. one bath, $425
305-642-7080

172 N.W. 52 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Free water/electricity.
305-642-7080

1720 NE 149 STREET
Two bdrms one bath $888
and up.
305-297-0199
1780 N.W. 55 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. 786-260-3838,
305-218-1227
1801 N.W. 2 AVE.
Move In Speciall Two
bedrooms, one bath. $600
monthly. $900 to move in.
All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


1955 N.W. 2 COURT
Onel bedroom, one bath.
$450. 305-642-7080
1969 N. W. 2 Court
$500 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath,
$500, stove, refrigerator,
air, free water.
305-642-7080,
786-236-1144

2020 N.E. 135 St #607
Beautiful remodeled
apartment, pool, overlooking
marina. Call 305-675-1740
2040 N.E. 168th Street
One bedroom, one bath
water included, washer,
dryer facility. Section 8
Welcome. 786-277-9925
210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475. Call 305-642-7080

2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one
bath. $650. Appliances,
tree water.
305-642-7080

2701 NW 1 AVENUE
MOVE-IN SPECIAL!
One bedroom, one bath.
$500 month. $750 move in.
SAll appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578

2804 N.W. 1 AVENUE
MOVE IN SPECIALt
Two bdrms, one bath, $600
a month, $900 move in.
All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578


2972 N.W. 61 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, $550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

472 N.W. 10 Street
One bedroom one bath. $525.
305-642-7080
48 N.W. 77th Street
Beautiful one bedroom, $570.
Two bedrooms $725 monthly.
Call after 6 p.m.
305-753-7738
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
,IN SPECIAL'
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water,, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699
5509 N.W. Miami Court
One bdrm, one bath. $650
mthly, first, last, security.
305i751-6232
5510 S.W. 32nd Street
Pemroke Park Area
Two and one half bedrooms,
one bath, with living room and
washer and dryer connection,
$850 monthly. First and last
to move in.
786-370-0832
561 N.W. 6th Street
Move in Special. Two bdrms
one bath $595. Free water.
305-642-7080

5842 N.W. 12th Ave #1
Two bedrooms, one bath,
water included. Section 8
Welcome. 786-277-9925
305-494-8884
60 and 61 STREET
One and two bdrms, $595
and $695. Call 954-638-2972
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699
65 NW 27 STREET
Five bedrooms, three
baths. $1100 monthly, all
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV! Call Joel
786-355-7578

7001 NW 15 AVENUE
Move In Special! One
bedroom, one bath. $395
per month, $600 to move in.
All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV.
Call Joel: 786-355-7578
7615 N.E. 4 Court
Studio, one bath $425. Stove,
refrigerator, air. 305-642-
7080.
8475 NE 2 AVENUE
One and two bdrm apts.
Section 8. 305-754-7776


ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699
ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one and three bdrms.
From $775, Section 8 OKAY!
786-355-5665
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two,
and three bedrooms, air,
appliances, laundry and
gate. From $450. 100 N.W.
11 St. 305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same
day approval, For more
information/specials.
capltalrentalagency.com
DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
Available Immediately! No
Credit Check! 1312-1315
N.E. Miami Court. One bdrm,
one bath, safe, clean, new
kitchen, new tile, fresh paint,
secured parking, $595-$650.
305-528-7766
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in
special.One bedroom, one
Sbath, $495, two bedrooms,
one bath, $595. Free water
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath, $450
a month. 305-717-6084



Miami Now Pre-Leasing
A Rental Community for
SENIORS 55 PLUS

CAMACOL TOWER APTS
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami FL 33135

Affordable One and
Two Bedrooms.
Starting at $706 for
Leasing Information
Visit:
Rayos Del Sol Apartment
185 NW 13th Avenue
Miami, FL 33125

Call: 305-642-1400

*Income and Age
Restrictions Apply.
Rents are Subject
to change.


MOVE IN SPECIAL
Corner of NW 103 St. Beautiful
two bedrooms. $700 monthly.
$1000 to move in. Gated,
security, tiled floors, central
air. 786-402-0672
N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No
Deposit For Section 8.
786-488-5225
OPA LOCKA AREA
Special! One bdrm, one
bath. $425 monthly.
305-717-6084
Opa-Locka Area
One bedroom. All utilities'
included. $700 monthly, first
and last. 305-467-6095
SANFORD APTS.
1907 N.W. 2nd Court
Nice two bdrms, air condition,
window shades, appliances.
Free hot water. $470 monthly
plus $200 deposit. 305-665-
4938 or 305-498-8811.
SECTION 8 WELCOME!
South Miami area, near Metro
Rail. Two, three, and four
bedroom'apartments for rent.
CALL 786-543-3872

Business Rentals
RENTAL SPACE
AVAILABLE
for church services,
meetings, banquets,
luncheons, baby showers
and group meetings.
Day and evening times
available. Reasonable rates.
Miami Gardens Area.
Call 305-620-4983
for information.


ICondosrrownhouses

3 AVE. N.W. 177 ST.
Across from Walmart. Two
bedrooms, one bath, jacuzzi,
newly remodeled, surround
system, gated, security,
central air, tiled. $1050 mthly,
security deposit negotiable,
water included. Pets allowed.
Section 8 Accepted.
305-431-9994
BROWARD COUNTY AREA
Two bdrms, two bath, central
.air, appliances, Section 8
Welcomed! 786-301-4368
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
One bedroom, one
bath, fully upgraded,
$875 monthly. 900
square feet with den.
Also available;
Four bedroom, two
bath home. stainless
steel appliances, tiled
throughout. $1900
monthly. 2000 sq. feet.
Section 8 welcome.
786-260-5708 Cell
305-652-2257 Office
GUY RAMSEY

MIRAMAR AREA
Two bedroom, two bath
condo in gated community.
$1100 monthly. Section 8
accepted. 305-812-7029

Duplexes
1081 N.W. 100th Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, fenced, $900 mthly,
first, last and sec. to move
in. Call 305-986-8395.
1175 N.W. 88 Street
Completely remodeled, two
and three bedrooms, all
appliances, water and central
air. Call 305-305-4665
1256 NE 110 TERRACE
Three bdrms, two baths,
large fenced yard, Section 8
OK! $950 mthly.
305-675-1740
13315 ALEXANDRIA DRIVE
Two bedrooms, one bath
$775 monthly plus first and
last. Section 8 WELCOME!
704-430-7039, 786-252-4953
1372 NW 83 STREET
One bedroom, central air,
tiled throughout. Section 8 ok.
Contact Sylvester at:
954-275-0436
1373 N.W. 58th Terrace
Huge two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, new appliances,
indoor laundry room and tiled.
Section 8 welcome!
Call 305-490-7033
1817 N.W. 41 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. $2100 to move
in. Section 8 welcome.
305-634-5794
21301 N.W. 37 AVE.
Two bedrooms, air. $895.
786-306-4839
247 N. E. 77 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
refrigerator, stove, microwave,
water, parking. $700 monthly
plus security. Section 8 ok.
786-216-7533
2632 N.E. 212 TER
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$925. Appliances.
305-642-7080

2827 N.W. 10 AVE.
Section 8 Welcomel One
bedroom, tiled throughout.
$500 Deposit. 786-262-7313
3030 NW 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776
3310 N.W. 49 STREET
Two bedrooms, $800
monthly.
786-290-7333
5520 N.W. 5 AVE
One bedroom. $675 mthly.
786-290-7333
574 N.E. 65 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1000.mthly, $800 Security
Deposit. 786-488-2264
5803 N. MIAMI AVE
Two bedrooms, one bath
$825 Specials. 305-758-7022
Frank Cooper Real Estate
60 NW 170 STREET
Two bedrooms, laundry room,
new air. Super large. $975
monthly. 786-306-4839
6250 N.W. 1 Ave
One bedroom, one
bath $650 Free water,
electric, appliances.
305-642-7080,
786-236-1144

6770 NW 4 AVENUE
One and two bdrms, with air,
appliances. 305-688-7559
7820 N.E. 1 AVENUE
Two bdrms, one bath.
$895. Appliances,
free water.
305-642-7080


1201 NW 178 TERRACE
MIAMI GARDENS Unfurnished Rooms
Two bedrooms, one bath. IAM AD A A
Utilities and appliances MIAMI GARDENS AREA
included. Section 8 welcome. (19th Avenue)


8081 NW 12 PLACE
Two bedrooms, one bath. Air
and appliances. Section 8
welcome. 770-598-8974
86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776
93rd St. NW 18th Avenue
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1350. 786-355-5665
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 pr apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace
NEW N.W. 76 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths.
Section 8 OK. 305-258-6626
NORTH WEST AREA
Large two bedrooms, Section
8 Special. 786-269-5643

Efficiencies

100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, private
bath and kitchen, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN).
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232
1672 N.W. 116th Terrace
Lights, water and central air.
Dish TV 200 channels, $650
monthly Call 305-688-9068.
Close to Miami Avenue
on N.E. 84th Street
Laundry room, waterincluded,
new ceramic tile floors.
$525 monthly. 305-970-5574
MIAMI GARDENS
Furnished, private entrance.
786-287-0864,786-306-4519
Miami Gardens Area
Private entrance $600 month
786-210-2466

Furnished Rooms

1010 N.W. 180 TERR
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air and use of
kitchen. 305-835-2728
1775 N.W. 151 Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable, air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996
1899 N.W. 83 TER.
Nice and clean, air, $100
weekly, $200 to move in.
786-426-6263
210 N.W. 43rd Street
Full kitchen, use of whole
house, utilities included. $450
a month, $250 security, $700
to move in, call 305-836-5739
or 305-335-6454.
2373 N.W. 95 St.
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-915-6276, 305-474-8186
4100 NW 11th PLACE
$150 weekly with air,
$300 to move in.
786-286-7455, 05-788-3610
6233 NW 22nd COURT
Nice room, utilities included.
Move in immediately. $100
weekly, $200 moves you
in.Call 786-277-2693
6601 N.W. 24 COURT
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
74 STREET NW 7 AVENUE
$125 weekly, cable and
utilities included. $225 moves
you in. 786-306-2349
MIAMI DESIGN
DISTRICT
4625 N. MIAMI AVE
MUST SEE! Newly renovated,
one bedroom, one bath. New
kitchen and bath. Free cable.
$525 monthly. First and
security required.
Limited Time Only
Call 954-445-2060.
NICELY FURNISHED
Clean, air, cable, TV. $135
wkly. 786-290-0946
OPA LOCKA AREA
2170 Washington Avenue
Clean rooms, $110
weekly, $476 a month
786-277-3434,786-298-4383
PEMBROKE ROAD
$550 monthly. With own bath.
954-610-5772
WYNWOOD SOBER LIVING
Now offering shared rooms
starting at $85 weekly.
Call 786-366-9844
2158 N.W. 5 Avenue, Miami
Houses

1009 N.W. 42 Street
Three bedrooms, air, carport.
$975. Need Tender Loving
Care. 786-306-4839


ADVERTISE TODAY


786-267-3700
12150 S.W. 218th Street
One bdrm., one bath,
$600 305-642-7080
1278 N.W. 55 Street
Two bedrooms, free water,
stove, refrigerator and air.
$700 monthly. 305-642-7080
14410 NW 13th ROAD
Two bedrooms, two baths,
$1100 mthly. 786-290-7333
17141 NW 29 PLACE
Four bedrooms, two baths,
den. Section 8 OK. $1728
monthly. 305-343-9930
1734 NW 69 STREET
Beautiful three bdrms, one
bath, $1375 monthly, Section
8 Welcome! 786-277-7776
1863 N.W. 91st Street
Beautiful one bedroom, totally
remodeled, all appliances.
$650 monthly, first and last to
move in. 305-746-4551
1871 Wilmington Street
Two bedrooms one bath.
Central air. Section 8 OKI
786-356-1457
19031 NW 43 AVE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Appliances included. Section
8 welcome. 786-277-9925
2049 N.W. 68th Terrace
Three bedroom, one
and a half bath. $1000
Stove, refrigerator, air
305-642-7080

2356 NW 55 TERRACE
Small one bedroom house
with carport. Enclosed
fenced yard. Section 8. By
appointment only. Call 305-
892-6369.
244 NW 59 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath, all
appliances, central air, heat,
Section 8 welcome! $1200
monthly 305-345-2904
2545 N.W. 167th Street
Three bedrooms, one and
one half bath. $1400 mthly.
Section 8 welcome. 305-896-
3976
281 N.E. 57 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, Section 8, call
305-586-0507.
2920 NW 161 TERRACE
Three bedrooms. Move-in
special. $1400 monthly.
305-896-3976.
2968 N.W. 51st Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 welcome,
Call 786-277-2693
3750 N.W. 161 STREET
Large, three bedrooms, 2
baths, family room. $1500
mthly. Call Sandy; 786-306-
1597, Linda Marx Realty
5719 NW 5 COURT
Large one bedroom,
one bath house Private
entrance. Section 8
accepted, $750 monthly
786-210-7666.
600 NW 98th STREET
Three bedrooms. Other
properties available.
Ted 954-274-6944
649 N.W. 65th Street
Three bedrooms, one
bath, $1150 monthly.
786-344-2964
7711 N.W. 13th COURT
Four bedrooms, two bath,
fenced yard. 786-286-9351
936 NW 29 STREET
SECTION 8 SPECIAL
Huge Three bdrms, two baths.
Central air. $1000
deposit. 786-262-7313
DADE/BROWARD AREA
Change from rent to own.
Two, three, four bdrms. From
$1000 mthly 786-468-0198
DOWNTOWN/
OVERTOWN AREA
Three bdrms, two and a half
baths, modern key west
style home, washer/dryer,
wraparound porch. $1475
mthly., immediate occupancy,
Section 8 OK! Call: 305-522-
0508.
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Lovely three bdrms, one bath,
nice tile, storage, big yard,
schools and bus line. Section
8 ok. Call 305-321-5936.
MIAMI GARDENS
Four bedrooms, 3 baths.
$1600 monthly. Will accept
Section 8. 305-812-7029
N.W. 133 St. and 18 Ave
Three bedrooms, two
baths. Call 305-754-7776
NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
appliances. $800 monthly.
305-836-7306


BROWARD ROUTE
DRIVERS
We are seeking dnvers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only

You must be available
between the hours of 6
a m. and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle and
current Dnver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W 54th Street


CASTING CALL
No Jive Productions
Seeking talented actors for
the stage play "Why Does
Love Hurt So Bad?" Call:
305-628-0068


CHILDCARE TEACHERS
With three years or more
experience. 305-812-2723

EXPERIENCED
COLLECTOR
Strong organizational skills
required to coordinate
collection process Email
resume along with salary
history to employment@
mlamitimesonline.com.
The Miami Times


IN HOUSE SALES REPS
Highly motivated,
professional individuals
for fast paced newspaper.
Must type 45 wpm, well
organized and computer
literate with excellent oral
and writing skills. Must
have a minimum of an
AA or AS degree. Email
resume along with salary
history to employment@
miamitimesonline.com.
The Miami Times


Roommate needed, own
room, use of house, utilities
and cable included, internet
access. $450-$500 mthly.
$150 deposit. 817-655-3090,
786-306-5573



ICondosrTownhouses
Northeast Miami
Wide bay view, waterfront.
Gated, furnished co-op
condo. Perfect for a home,
weekend get away or
retirement. Only $120,000.
To see, call 305-751-9739.
i---u-,e-- e i
Duplexes

N.W. 2 Ave and 46 ST.
Three units. $168,500.
Urban Real Estate
License Real Estate Broker'
786-367-4004, 305-681-2886

Houses

150 N.W. 49 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Owner finance, no qualify.
Low down payment.
Molly 305-541-2855
1853 N.W. 63 Street
Very nice three bedrooms,
remodeled, central air, all
appliances. 786-357-5066
3718 NW 213 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Owner financing. $89K
repaired or $79K as is. $700
monthly. Look at property then
call Jack,' 954-920-9530.
5601 N.W. 10 AVE.
Corner lot, three bdrms, two
baths. Large living room,
wooden plus tile floors, wash
room, security bars. $120K
negotiable. 305-693-8886,
954-205-6685



HANDYMAN
Plumbing and
Carpentry 305-401-
9165, 786-423-7233
TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing, and leak
repairs. Call 305-491-4515


: ?! 1-~: i...

II .- .. .



'I-." II ,


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,' ft
I C ;Iih~,
4"


S


Looking For
Compassionate Teachers
40 hours, CDAE or in
School, starting potential
salary $8.00 hourly.
Call Monday through
Friday 10 a.m. to 5
p.m., 305-691-6868


MUSICIAN NEEDED
New Mount Calvary
M.B. Church is seeking
a Musician. For more
information contact
305-681-2137.

ROUTE DRIVERS

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available
between the hours of 6
a.m. and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

Freelancer Wanted
Looking for a freelance
writer
with journalism experience
and an excellent writer.
Able
to work on weekends,
complete
required assignments
and meet acceptable
deadlines
for the weekly paper. For
more information, please
call
the Editorial Department at
305-694-6216.




BRAND NAME DRESSES
Warehouse in Hallandale.
Missy and Plus sizes.
Wholesale only!
954-649-7708 By Appt


'DNA PATERNITY TESTING
Fast and affordable. $300
Payment plan available.'
Call now: 305-725-5650
The King of Handymen
Special: Carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
laying tiles, bathroom
remodeling. 305-801-5690
WORK FROM HOME
In these harsh economic
times, working for someone
else is always difficult. Trying
to find a suitable job is
almost impossible. I can help
you start your own home
based business. I need 120
people for this area. You
must want to change your
circumstances. You must
be teachable. You must
be willing to work smart. If
you are serious, call for an
appointment. Fee involved.
Call Bob, 786-299-2644.





NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the
fictitious name of:
LAWRENCE COMPANION
SERVICES
4221 N.W. 11 COURT
Miami, FI 33127
in the City oF Miami, FI
NOTICE UNDER
Owner: Patrice Lawrence
Name with the Division
of Corporation of State,
Tallahassee, FL. Dated this
24th day of February, 2010


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010 1


Johnson shares her journey with graduation class


CORPS
continued from 8D '

technical and aca-
demic training, while
teaching them the
skills they need to
become employed
and independent.
The program plac-
es young people in
meaningful jobs or
further education,
but it was Commis-
sioner Johnson who
sealed the lesson at
the graduation, on
"taking lemons and
making lemonade" in
the workforce.
Johnson stated,
"Positive attitudes
will yield positive
outcomes," as she
shared with students
the correct methods
to becoming and re-
maining employable.
Johnson included,
"maintaining the
right attitude, deter-
mination and mak-


ing it (life) better for
somebody else," as
tools needed for
advancement. She
declared a belief in
giving, and while at
the podium, donat-
ed $300.00 to the
Honor Student Gov-
ernment Commit-
tee of the Miami Job
Corps Center. To


further inspire the
graduates, Johnson
routed her journey
from the Postal Ser-
vice in 1975, where
her career began at
a .meager $4.34 an
hour and elevated
to a yearly $82,000
salary in 2008, be-
fore her retirement.
Johnson said she


now yields an annu-
al six figure income,
which she attributes
to the generosity,
care and concern
she has for oth-
ers. "Make it better
for someone else,"
Johnson noted. "My
Commission check
is given away before I
even get it!"


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

IFQ NO. 201188 KENNEDY PARK TRAIL POUR-IN-PLACE SURFACING
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 10:00
A.M., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17, 2010

A MANDATORY pre-bid conference and site visit will be held on Wednesday,
March 3. 2010 at 10:00 am at'David Kennedy Park, 2600 South Bayshore
Drive. Miami. FL. The purpose of this conference is to allow potential Bidders
an opportunity to present questions to staff and obtain clarification of the re-
quirements of the IFQ documents. It is mandatory that a representative (s) of
the bidder attend in order to qualify to bid. Detailed specifications for this bid are
available at the City of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at
www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

Pete Hernandez
City Manager / t


AD NO. 002083


NOTICE
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CONSTRUCTION BIDS


Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, for the project listed herein, until 2:00
P.M. local time, Tuesday, the 23rd day of March 2010, at 1450 N.E. Second Ave, Room 351, Miami, Florida, fol-.
lowing which time and place, or as soon there after as the Board can attend to'the same, the said bids will be publicly
opened, read and tabulated in the Board Auditorium, Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building, by an
authorized representative of the Board. Award of the contract will be made to the lowest, pre-qualified responsible and
responsive bidder for the actual amount bid considering base bid and accepted alternates (if any) as listed in the bid-
ding documents. The Board will award the contract based upon the results of the tabulations as covered by applicable.
laws and regulations..

PROJECT NO. 00457401
STORM DRAIN IMPROVEMENTS
CENTRAL MAINTENANCE
FACILITIES OPERATIONS MAINTENANCE
12525 NW 28 AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33167


DAVIS-BACON ACT LABOR STANDARDS:

This Project may be funded in whole or in part under the provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009 or other Federal funding program. Therefore, the Bidder shall comply with all applicable provisions of 40 U.S.C.
276a-276a-7, the Davis-Bacon Act, as supplemented by the Department of Labor regulations (29 C.F.R., part 5
"Labor Standards Provisions Applicable to Contracts Governing Federally Financed and Assisted Construction"). Ac-
cordingly, the Base Bid and Alternate Bids for this Project shall be in full compliance with the aforementioned provisions
as further described in the Contract Documents and all bids shall be calculated in compliance with the Davis-Bacon
Act wage determination applicable to this Project. Under the Davis-Bacon Act, contractors are required to pay laborers
and mechanics not less than the minimum wages specified in a wage determination made by the Secretary of Labor,
which wage determination will be attached to and incorporated into the Construction Bid documents. The award of a
construction contract is conditioned upon the Bidder accepting the wage determination.

CONE OF SILENCE:

Pursuant to Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted beginning with issuance of the Legal Adver-
tisement and ending at such time as the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to award or
approve a contract, to reject all bids or responses, or otherwise takes action which ends the solicitation and review
process. Any violation of the Cone of Silence may be punishable as provided for under Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212,
in addition to any other penalty provided by law. All written communications must be sent to the Project Architect/En-
gineer, ADA ENGINEERING. INC.. 8550 NW 33 Street, Suite 101. Doral, FL 33122, and a copy filed with the Clerk of
The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 268, Miami, Florida 33132.


NOTICE & PROTEST PROCEDURES:


Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11, and in
accordance with 120.57(3), Fla. Stat. (2002), shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida
Statutes. Any person who is adversely affected by the agency decision or intended decision shall file with the agency
a notice of protest in writing within 72 hours after the posting of the notice of decision or intended decision. Failure
to file a notice of protest or failure to file a formal written protest within the time permitted shall, constitute a waiver of
proceedings. With respect to a protest of the terms, conditions, and specifications contained in a solicitation, including
any provisions governing the methods of ranking bids, bids, or replies, awarding contracts, reserving rights of further
negotiation, or modifying or amending any contract, the notice of protest shall be filed in writing within 72 hours after
the posting of the solicitation. In either event, the protest must include a bond in accordance with the provisions of F.S.
255.0516 and Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11. The formal written protest shall be filed within 10 days after the date the
notice of protest is filed. The formal written protest shall state with particularity the facts and law upon which the protest
is based. Saturday, Sundays, and state holidays shall be excluded in the computation of the 72-hour time periods
established herein.

JESSICA LUNSFORD ACT

The successful Bidder shall fully comply with the Jessica Lunsford Act and all related Board Rules and proce-
dures as applicable.

THIS PROJECT IS OPEN ONLY TO THOSE BIDDERS WHICH HAVE BEEN PRE-QUALIFIED BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PRIOR TO BIDDING

MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE

The Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference has been scheduled for Thursday, March 11, 2010 at 10:00 A.M., at 12525
NW 28 Avenue, Miami, FL

PRE-BID CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR ITS QUALIFIED REPRESENTATIVE IS MANDATORY.

Pre-qualified bidders may obtain one or more sets of bid and contract documents at the Pre-Bid Conference or
at 12525 NW 28' Ave. Miami. FL. on or after February 22. 2010. contact no. 305 995-4902 with deposit of
$75.00 per set, (Cashier's Check or Money Order, payable to The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida).
Deposit will be refunded when documents are returned, in good condition, no more than 10 days after award or
rejection of Bid. Deposits will be retained by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, if documents are
not returned within the above stipulated time and/or condition.

The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA


By:Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


LEGAL NOTICE
Pursuant to F.. 98.075(7), notice is hereby given to the voters listed below. Please be advised that your eligibility to vote is in question based on information provided by
-the State of Florida.You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections in Miami-Dade County, Florida, no later than thirty days after the date of this Notice in order to
receive information regarding the basis for the potential ineligibility and the procedure to resolve the matter. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility
by the Supervisor of Elections and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. If you have any questions pertaining to this matter, please contact
the Supervisor of Elections at 2700 NW 87th Avenue, Miami, Florida or call 305 499-8363.
AVISO LEGAL
Conforme a F.S. 98.075(), por el present se notifica a los electores enumerados a continuaci6n que segun informaci6n provista por el Estado de la Florida, se cuestiona su
elegibilidad para votar. Ousted debe comunicarse con el Supervisor de Elecciones del Condado de Miami-Dade, Florida, dentro de los treinta dias, a mas tardar, desde la fecha
de este Aviso, con el fin dee o se le informed sobre el fundamento de la possible falta de idoneidad y sobre el procedimiento para resolver el asunto. Si ousted no cumple
con su obligaci6n de responder, se emitiri una declaraci6n de falta de idoneidad, per pane del Supervisor de Elecciones, y su nombre se eliminari del sistema de inscripci6n
de electores de todo el estado. Si tiene alguna duda acerca de este tema, por favor, contunlquese con el Supervisor de Elecciones, en 2700 NW 87th Avenue, Miami, Florida,
o por telefono, al 305-499-8363.
AVI LEGAL
Dapre Lwa Florid F.S.98.075(7), yap avize vote yo ki sou lis pi ba la-a.- Nap avize w ke baze son enfomasyon nou resevwa nan men Eta Florid, nou doute si w.elijib pou
vote. Yap made nou kontakte Sipevize Eleksyon Konte Miamli-Dade, Florid, pa pita ke trant jou apre resepsyon Avi sa-a pou nou kapab resevwa enfomasyon sou kisa yo
bare kestyon ke w pa elijib la epi pou nou we kouman pou nou rezoud pwoblem la. Si w pa reyaji epi w pa reponn a let sa-a, sa gen dwa mennen Sipkvize Eleksyon an
decide ke w pa elijib epi yo va retire non w nan sistim enskripsyon voth Eta-a. Si w genyen ankenn kestyon sou koze sa-a, tanpri kontakte Sipivize Eleksyon yo nan 2700
NW 87th Avenue, Miami, Florid oswa rele 305-499-8363.
Notice is hereby given to: Last known address: Notice is hereby given to: Last known address:
Por el present se da aviso a: iltima direcci6n conocida: Por el present se da aviso a Iltima direcci6n conocida
Yap avize: Denye adrs nan rejis: Yap avize: Denye adrks nan rejis:
Adams, Joseph G .10421 NW 17Th Ave #8310 Miami FL 33147 JonesLeroy 9420 NW 14Th Ave Miami FL 33147
Aguiar, Xiomara 7736 SW 34Th Ter Miami FL 33155 Jonesernderris 1360 NE 141St North Miami FL 33161
Alide, Dagobert 630 NE 83Rd Ter Miami FL 33138 ordan, Earl R 10843 NW 8th Ave Miami FL 33168
Alexander, Leshon M 1321 NW 13Th St Miami FL 33125 Kennedy, Katherine E 1943 NW 2Nd Ct #5 Miami FL 33136
Allen, David T 11948 NW I ITh St Pembroke Pine FL 33026 King, Kenneth A 9401 NW 8Th Ave #1 Miami FL 33150
Almonte, Ivette 3888 SW 107Th Ave Miami FL 33165 Lee, leraine R 21715 SW 120Th Ave Miami FL 33170
Anderson, Carol 18430 NW 43Rd Ct Miami Gardens FL 33055 Lemus, Armando 11121 NE 9Th Ct Biscayne Park FL 33161
Anderson, Raymond 726 NE ISt Ave Miami FL 33132 Lewis, Christopher N 917 SW 7Th PI Homestead FL 33034
Armstron, Elijah D 3096 NW 102Nd St Miami FL 33147 Logan, Kenneth C 2035 NW 93rd Ter Miami FL 33147
Austin, Larry K 1871 Wilmington St Opa Locka FL 33054 Lopez, Sam A 2258 NW 63Rd St Miami FL 33147
Barber, Angeline J 1161 NW Miami FL 33136 Lott Corey 8 1430 NW 139Th St Miami FL 33167
Barberena, Leandro 8015 NW 8Th St #111 Miami FL 33126 Louis, Bradley V 161 NW 108Th St Miami Shores FL 33168
Baugh, Theresa C 22790 SW 112Th Ave Miami FL 33170 Macklin, elvin T 8340 NW IOTh Ave Miami FL 33150
Baum J, Gary 8 18680 SW 376Th St Homestead FL 33034 Madison, Desmond 10540 NW 8Th Ave Miami FL 33150
BennettJermaine 2126 NW 54Th St #A Miami FL 33142 Maduka,Azikiwe 763 NW 41St St Miami FL 33127 .
Bermudez, JorgeA 6421 Cow Pen Rd #M106 Miami FL 33014 Maliavos, lohn A 3719 NW 19Th Ave Miami FL 33142
Black, Kimberly D 13920 NW 22Nd PI Opa Locka FL 33054 arquez Omar 8447 Scotts Mill Dr N Charleston SC 29420
Blake I& Kenneth L 470 HE 126Th St North Miami FL 33161 Martin, Ricky 0 1250 NW 192Nd St Miami Gardens FL 33169
Bowens, Greory 12401 NW 27Th Ave #206 Miami FL 33167 MartinezNestor P 14930 SW 307Th St Homestead FL 33033
Bradley IWillie 12405 NW 135Th St #112 Miami FL 33167 Hayes SkVal C 2170 Rutland St Opa Locka FL33054
Brady, Lonnie T 914 NW 3Rd St Florida City FL 33034 Mayfield, Tommy L 27036 SW 135Th Ave Homestead FL 33032
Brantley,Vanshion L 11325 SW 216Th St Miami FL 33170 Mc Coy RodneyW 9536 NW 8Th Ave Apt 2 Miami FL 33150
Bresile. D'Angelo K 18120 NW 6Th Ct Miami FL 33169 Me Donald, Maurice S 1035 NW 130Th St North Hiami FL 33168
Brooks, Demetrius L 1566 NE 191St St #427 Miami FL 33179 Mc Fadden IR, Calvin 1748 NW 65Th St Miami FL 33147
Brown R, ames L 11617 SW 224Th St Miami FL 33170 Mc Gill, Edwardo 2416 NW 79Th Ter Miami FL 33147
Brown, Adrian D 17100 SW 100th Ave Hiami FL 33157 Mc Hillan,James D 6232 NW 14Th Ave Miami FL 33147
Brown, Alviana 18665 NW 37Th Ave #241 Miami FL 33056 McCray, David j 9000 SW 202Nd Ter Cutler Bay FL 33189
Brown, Armona C 15770 NW 18Th PI Miami Gardens FL 33054 Mclver, Kenneth L 10820 SW 200Th Dr #450 Miami FL 33157
Brown, Charles j 16201 NW 27th Ave Miami Gardens FL 33054 tcRoy erry 638 NW 62Nd St Miami FL 33150
Brown, Christopher A 11035 SW 221st Ter Miami FL 33170 Meiias, Felix M 399 NE 191St St Miami FL 33179
Brown. Damian K 2407 NW 135Th St #309 Miami FL 33167 Mendoza, Lazaro R 765 E 7th St Hialeah FL 33010
Brown, Johnathan A 13401 SW 265Th Ter Homestead FL 33032 Heneses, Teddy 10950 SW 200Th StApt 14 Miami FL 33189
Brown. afield 2880 NW 132Nd Ter Opa Locka FL 33054 obleyDarrian 1670 HW 4Th Ave #E12 Miami FL 33136
Brown, Tony 20201 SW 114th PI Miami FL 331.89 ModestWillie 2538 NW 65Th St #4 Miami FL 33147
Bryant, Lorenzo K 1180 NW 2Nd Ave #8 Miami FL 33136 Moncrief, Tawon R 1780 NW 153Rd St Hiami Gardens FL 33054
Buford, Edilon K 15455 NE 6Th Ave #C227 Miami FL 33162 Moore, Boris j 2930 NW 156Th St Miami Gardens FL 33054
Butler, acquee MG 1055 W 68Th St #102 Hialeah FL 33014 Horagez, Ricardo E 2632 W 60Th St Hialeah FL 33016
Butler, Vicor 845 SW 3rd St Florida City FL 33034 Morgan, Sharika S 1130 NW 62Nd St Miami FL 33150
Calloway. Crystal C 3411 NW 210Th Ter Miami FL 33056 Morris Antwan D 1380 NW 199Th St Miami FL 33169
CampbellValerie 701 NW 214Th St #519 Miami FL 33169 Hunoz-Reyes Felix j126 E IOTh St Hialeah FL 33010
Carballedo, lose 3031 NW 91St St Miami FL 33147 Murphy, Curtis A 900 NW 63Rd St Hiami FL 33150
Carmona Alex 11830 SW 204Th St Miami FL 33177 Murphy, Sean P 7850 Camino Real Apt 101 Miami FL 33143
Cartaena, Charlie 3140 NW 27th St Miami FL 33142 Nelson, Larry 2210 NW 117th St Miami FL 33167
Cartaya-Luque, uan M 1301 NE Miami Gardens Dr #16 Miami FL 33179 NewsomeXavier P 16425 NW 162Nd Street Rd Miami FL 33054
Carter SR. Joseph G 11329 SW 189th Ter Miami FL 33157 Neuven, Nancy T 6755 Brookline Dr Hialeah FL 33015
Cash, erome 1900 NW 33rd St Miami FL 33142 O'Hara, Clintawn 2771 NW 151St St Miami Gardens FL 33054
Charles,Gregory E 860 NW 213Th Ter #202 Miami FL 33169 Orozco, Kenneth J 776 SE 9Th PI Hialeah FL 33010
Clark Milous 70 NW 189Th St Miami Gardens FL 33169 Patrick R, 0 T 8035 NW 13Th Ct Miami FL 33147
Clark Rommel 16100 SW 109th Ave Miami FL 33157 Penson,Astley G 8960 NW 24Th Ave Miami FL 33147
Clements Tawanda M 15930 NW 27Th Ct Miami Gardens FL 33054 Perez, lose M 1339 W 49Th PI #311 Hialeah FL 33012
Coleman. Greg S II NW 200Th Ter Miami FL 33169 Pierre SaintPatrick .1160 NW 124Th St North Miami FL 33168
Collie Lana V 13201 NW 28Th Ave #139 Miami FL 33054 Poitier, Jamaal R 1995 NW 152nd St Miami Gardens FL 33054
ConsuegraZoraida R 10250 W Bay Harbor Dr #48 Miami FL 33154 Porter SR. Frudrias D 930 NW 83rd Ter Miami FL 33150
Corneilsen, Scott 8202 NW Miami Ct #1505 Miami FL 33150 Powell, Tyrdell J 14625 SW 107 Ave Miami FL 33176
Cortaza. oorge F 27 NW 7Th Ave #202 Miami FL 33128 Preston, Latonya 1 10000 W lessamine St #5 Miami FL 33157
Cotman, Torrey 1601 NW ISt Ct Apt 208 Miami FL 33136 Quesada, lose QL 778 NW 108Th St Miami FL 33168
Cowart SR, Eddie L PO BOX 551801 Miami FL 33055 Rabel,julio 1555 Pennsylvania Ave Miami Beach FL 33139
Cox, Brigitte C 11685 Canal Dr #203 North Hiami FL 33181 Ramos, David 1410 NW ISt Ave #11 Miami FL 33136
Daniels, Gerald L 3101 NW 48Th Ter Miami FL 33142 Remedios, Alexander N 3915 SW 5Th St Miami FL 33134
Davis J, Charles L 1280 SW 3Rd St #8 Homestead FL 33030 Reynes JR,.iguel 1065 W 27Th St #10 Hialeah FL 33010
Delgad dooA AIdo 11750 W 56Th St #108 Hialeah FL 33012 Rivas-Colon, Angel HM 660 SW 9Th St #4 Miami FL 33130
Descolline, Michael 925 NW 131St it North Miami FL 33168 Rivera, Emmanuel 1885 W 56Th St Apt 409 Hialeah FL 33012
Dirosier, Moses 3173 NW 93Rd St Miami FL 33147 Rivero, Samuel 8510 SW 149Th Ave #1109 Miami FL 33193
Dixon, Alfonso 760 NW 178th Ter Miami FL 33169 Roberts, Kenneth L 1310 NW 179Th St Miami Gardens FL 33169
Dixon, Willette M 3460 NW 208Th St Miami Gardens FL 33056 Robinson, Clarence L 2490 .NW 131St St Miami FL 33167
Dorsey JR, Lesley 15800 E Bunche Park Dr Miami FL 33054 Robinson, Shanetta M 9111 NW 29Th Ct #B Miami FL 33147
Dukes, Tyrone A 6941 NW 21St PI Miami FL 33147 Robinson,Victor 2050 NW 65Th St Aptl02 Miami FL 33147
Dunkley S, Eric J 277 NW 33Rd ST #8 Miami FL 33127 Robles, ohn D 939 NW 81St St #D-428 Miami FL 33150
Eckford R, Jimmie F 1165 NW 120Th St North Miami FL 33168 Rodriguez Alexander 7930 NW 185Th St Hialeah FL 33015
Edwards, Isaiah T 925 NW 117th St Miami FL 33168 Rodriguez, Raymond 2041 SW 62Nd Ave Miami FL 33155
Estremera, Brauly A 1470 NE 125Th Ter #310 North Miami FL 33161 Sainvelus, Harc E 344 NW 97Th St Miami FL 33150
Estripeaut, Rodolfo A Punta Pacifica Blvd Ocean ParkApt #178 Panama Salas, Hector D 22021 SW 103rd Ct Miami FL 33190
Ferguson Kenneth E 1801 NW 2Nd Ct #203 Miami FL 33136 Sampson, Gregory 726 NE ISt Ave Miami FL 33132
Field. Curtis 12190 NW 96Th Ter #D Miami FL 33147 Sanders. Mildred W 1730 NW 66Th St Miami FL 33147
Finch, Nicki N 10126 W Circle Ph Hiami FL 33157 SantanaAlexis J 12531 SW 106Th Ter Miami FL 33186
Fisher,Anthony L 18405 SW 129Th Ct Miami FL 33177 Sharpe JR, John W 21811 SW 112Th Ave Miami FL 33170
Fleuranville lef T 1079 NW 112Th Ter Miami FL 33168 Shelby, Cory R 17940 NW 16Th Ave Hiami gardens .L 33169
Floyd, Johnny L 15920 NW 20Th Ave Miami Gardens FL 33054 Sigler, Alexander I 7940 NW 179Th St Hialeah FL 33015
Forbes, Dobrie D 13201 NW 26Th Ct Miami FL 33167 Simmons, Miquell 26597 SW 129Th Ave Homestead FL 33032
Franklin, Troy L 7004 NE 5Th Ave #209 Miami FL 33138 Singletary, jerry L 2927 NW 57Th St Miami FL 33142
Fuentes, Jorge 8772 SW 145th St Palmetto Bay FL 33176 Slaton,Andre Q 1435 NW 112Th Ter Miami FL 33167
Garcia, Sonia 13018 NE 6Th Ave #204 North Miami FL 33161 Smith, Lance J 638 NW 62Nd St Miami FL 33150
Gardner, Gregory1 1940 NW 84Th St Miami FL 33147 iStafford Ill,. Charales H 1151'0 SW 136Th St Miami FL 33176
Garland, Matthew, 180 NW 17Th St #4 Miami FL 33136 Stallworth. Stanley 2005 Ali Baba Ave #B Opa Locka FL 33054
Gibbs, Jeffery L 1171 NW 64Th St Hiami FL 33150 _Stewart, Damion C 340 NW 20Th St Miami FL 33127
Glenn, Parthenia 0 23142 SW 107Th Ave Miami FL 33170 Tate. Gerald A 10382 SW 173Rd St #2 Hiami FL 33157
Glover, Arthur L 10800 NW 18Th Ave Miami FL 33167 Taylor IR Daniel 1550 NE 138th St North Miami FL 33161
Gonzalez, Christian W 5501 NW 7Th St #E302 Miami FL 33126 Taylor, Carl 1142 NW 65Th St Hiami FL 33150
Gonzalez, Ricardo D 1498 NE 183Rd St N Miami Beach FL 33179 Taylor, Jarvis L 900 NW 84Th Ter Miami FL 33150
Gonzalez, Rolando 10332 NW 31St Ct Miami FL 33147 Tennie hnnieC 10250 SW 119Th St Miami FL 33176
Gonzalez, Rolando 726 NE ISt Ave Miami FL 33132 Terry, Terrance L 1039 NW ISt St #104 Miami FL 33128
Gordon, Tamisha D 1385 NW 75Th Ter Miami FL 33147 Thomas, ames 14265 NW 22Nd Ave Opa Locka FL 33054
Green, Chad E 6940 NW 186Th St #116 Hialeah FL 33015 Thomas. Tavarris L 13875 NW 22Nd Ave #260 Opa Locka FL 33054
Griffin, Dangelo C 1721 NW 131St St Miami FL 33167 Thompkins. Carter T 1470 NW 113th Ter Miami FL 33167
Griffin, Timothy W 6363 Cotton Tail Rd Miami Lakes FL 33014 Vazquez.Anthony PO BOX 771447 Miami FL 33177
GuerraAnn A 12635 SW 84Th Avenue Rd Miami FL 33156 Vergara, avier G 8100 NW Geneva Ct #143 Doral FL 33166
Guillaume, Kerlyn 380 NW 135Th St North Miami FL 33168 Vicks J|, Oliver 16224 NW 82nd PI Miami Lakes FL 33016
Gustin, Patrick 510 NE 70Th St Miami FL 33138 Watts, Travis L 21491 SW 114Th Ct Miami FL 33189
Hamilton, Benny j 1071 NW 119Th St North Miami FL 33168 Wave, Dion 1131 NW 118th St Miami FL 33168
Hamilton, HenryL 10015 SW 171St #2 Miami FL 33157 West Kenneth L 18115 Palm Beach Dr Tampa FL 33647
Harbin Shekeetha L .. 1410 NW 63Rd St Miami FL 33147 White. Brenda L 11256 SW 189Th Ter Miami FL 33157
Harris R, Gerard 5123 NW 18Th Ave Miami FL 33142 White, Damon J 2101 NW 3Rd Ave #377 Hiami FL 33127
Henderson, Crystal 610 SE 12Th Ter Homestead FL 33033 White, Jose L 1000 NW 155Th Ln Miami FL 33169
Henry, Carl 390 NE 162nd St Miami FL 33162 Whitehead, Randy R 13131 Nw 26Th Ct Miami FL 33167
Hernandez, Michael 1339W 49Th PI #103 Hialeah FL 33012 Wilcox Terry H 1999 NW 5Th PI Miami FL 33136
Hernandez, Pommel 12031 SW 176th Ter Hiami FL 33177 Wilhelm Joseph A 532 H Miami Ave #9 Miami FL 33136
Herrera, Aleandro F 90 NW 185Th Ter Miami Gardens FL 33169 Wilkerson, George 1610 NW Illth St Miami FL 33167
Hibbert, Geore C 19920 NW 3Rd PI Hiami FL 33169 Williams, Demetrius S 2989 NW 58Th St Miami FL 33142
Hickson JR,Willie 1530 NW ISt PI #9 Miami FL 33136 Williams, Derrick L 19410 SW 103Rd Ct Culler Bay FL 33157
Higgs, Cassandra 9234 NW 3Rd Ave #B Miami FL 33150 Williams. Kerry B 6901 NW 8Th Ave #9 Hiami FL 3150
Hood, Marvin 8951 NW 35Th Ct Miami FL 33147 Williams, Marcel D 6053 SW 63Rd Ter South Miami FL 33143
ackson, Eric N 2255 NW 165Th St Miami Gardens FL 33054 Williams. Ricardo H 676 HW lRd Ave FInritn vity Fl WtdA
james, effect H 1475 NE IIITh St #205 Miami FL 33161 Williams, Richard C 1410 NW II11Th St Miami FL 33167
Jean-Marie, Frantzy 1264 NE 147Th St Miami FL 33161 Williams, Vernon K 8250 NE 4Th PI #124 Miami FL 33138
Johnson, Andrae L 18850 NW 57Th Ave #207 Hialeah FL 33015 Williamson. Antoinette H 15421 SW 106Th Ave Miami F 33157
Johnson, Betty | 555 NE 123Rd St #203 North Miami FL 33161 Wilson, Freddie 14560 NE 6th Ave #309 North Miami FL 33161
ohnson, Demetrius L 10005 SW 173Rd Ter Miami FL 33157 Wilson, lames H 10635 NW 12Th Ave Miami FL 33150
Johnson, ohn E 891 NE 88Th St #1B Miami FL 33138 Wilson, Raymond 5 9239 Saffron Dr E Jacksonville FL 32257
Johnson, Joseph 26326 SW 140Th PI Homestead FL 33032 Wilson, Reginald L 10805 SW 156Th Ter Hiami FL 33157
johnson, Kashe C 22210 SW 116Th Ave #4 Miami FL 33170 Wilson, Russ F 1335 NW 122Hd St North Miami FL 33167
Jonassaint Freeman P 2203 NW 115th St Miami FL 33167 Wino, amarcus 11331 SW 224th St Miami FL 33170
ones SR. Alfred 5 2686 NW 49Th Ter Miami FL 33142 Woodward, Todd 20821 NE 13Th PL Miami FL 33179
ones, Angelo D 10731 SW 150Th Ter Miami FL 33176 Wright, Otis C 3681 Florida Ave Miami FL 33133
Jones.Danelle A 1229 NW 1St Ct #104 Miami FL 33136 WrightVyrlle B 2022 SW 123RD Dr Miami FL 33017
Jones, Lawford 726 NE ISt Ave Miami FL 33132 Young, Porchai D 10421 NW 17Th Ave #8310 Miami FL 33147


I


Lester Sola
MIAMIW=.DESupervisor of Elections, Miami-Dade County
MIAMSupervisor de Elecciones, Condado cle Miami-Dade
Sipivizi Eleksyon, Konte Miami-Dade












BLACKS MUST


S9D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 2, 2010


CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


e FOR THE WEEK OF FEB. 23 MARCH 1, 2010


SAC / VSU Sports Photos
ONES TO WATCH: St. Aug's
Chris Jordan and Virginia
State's Rhon'neisha Taylor
lead their top teams into
CIAA Toumament action.


I CIAA TIPS OFF TOURNAMENT SEASON;
CIAA ALL-STARS, TOURNEY SCHEDULES





UNDER THE BANNER

WHATS GOING IN AND AROUND BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


MIDDLETON


CIAA HOOPS ALL-STARS
The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Shas announced its all-conference
teams and, players of the year as
selected by the men's and women's
basketball coaches associations.
The women's team is head-
lined by Virginia Union forward
Tonaye Smith (Sr./F/5-1.l/Detroit,
MI), who has been named the 2010
SMITH
SMITH CIAA Player of the Year. Smith leads

the CIAA in scoring, averaging 18.9 points per game. She
is also averaging 7.2 rebounds per game.
Defensive Player of the Year honors went to Deja
Middleton of Fayetteville State, who led the conference
in blocked shots (2.0) and was second in rebounding at 9.2
per contest.
The men's team is headlined by Bowie State's Player
of the Year, Duke Crews (Sr./F/6-8/Hampton, VA). Crews
is the only player in the CIAAtaveraging a double-double,
recording 16.8 points and 10.3 rebounds per game. In
addition, he ranks second in the conference in blocked
shots, averaging 2.5 per game.
Defensive Player of the Year honors for the men went
to Bowie State's 6-11 center Travis Hyman. Hyman leads
the conference blocking 4.0 shots per game, fourth best in
the nation. He also averages 6.5 rebounds per game to go
with a 10.3 points per game scoring average.
The AII-CIAA Teams and Players of the Year were
honored at the 2010 CIAA Basketball Tournament Tip-Off
Luncheon on Tuesday, February 23rd. A complete list of
All-Conference performers is provided below:


2010 ALL-CIAA WOMEN'S TEAM
FRONT COURT


20 Teaunsha Robinson BSU Jr. F


Tiffany Haywood
Demetria Bell
Keyona Bryant
Allison Sikes
Tonaye Smith
Kenyatta Gill

Bianca Lee
Tatiana Ellis
Kayler McBride


FSU Jr. F
JCSU Sr. F/C
SAC So. C
SAC Jr. F
VUU Sr. F
ECSU Jr. F
BACK COURT
BSU .Sr. G
SPC Sr. G
LC Sr. G


20 Rhon'Neisha Taylor VSU Jr. G
3 Tanisha McGaughey SU Sr. G


6-0 Baltimore, MD
5-9 Fayetteville, NC
C 6-0 Indianapolis, IN
6-0 Springdale, MD
5-10 Richmond, VA
5-11 Detroit, MI
6-1 Mobile, AL

5-6 Temple-Hills, MD
5-9 Harlem, NY
5-7 Ocala, FL
5-8 Nashville, TN
5-11 Norfolk, VA


PLAYER OF THE YEAR:
Tonaye Smith, Virginia Union (Sr./F/5-11/Detroit, MI)
DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR:
Deja Middleton, Fayetteville State (So./C/6-4/Richmond, VA)
ROOKIE OF THE YEAR
Talaya Lynch, Chowan


2010 ALL-CIAA MEN'S TEAM
FRONT COURT


Duke Crews
Lando Morrison
Jerry Hollis
James Dillard
Hayward Fain
Rodney Callwood
Jamel Carpenter

Jaleel Nelson
Marquie Cooke
Jarred Stockton
Chris Jordan
Braxton Byerson


BSU Sr. F
CU Sr. F/C
JCSU Sr. F
JCSU Sr. F/C
SAC Jr. F.
SU Sr. F
FSU Jr. F
BACK COURT
CU Sr. G
ECSU So. G
LC Jr. G
SAC Sr. G
VUU Jr. G


Hampton, VA
Yorktown, VA
Charlotte, NC
Apex, NC
Akron, OH
Long Island, NY
Salisbury, NC

Suffolk, VA
Suffolk, VA
Jacksonville; FL
Houston, TX
Col. Heights, VA


PLAYER OF THE YEAR:
Duke Crews, Bowie State (Sr./F/6-8/Hampton, VA)
DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR:
Travis Hyman, Bowie State (So./C/6-11/Annapolis, MD)
ROOKIE OF THE YEAR
Angelo Sharpless, Elizabeth City State.


CIAA CEHEAL ITECOLLEGWT
l ATHLETIC ASSOCITION
FINAL CONF ALL
W L W L
S81 Augustne's 17 3 23 4
SBowle State 14 6 16 9
a Wglina Union 14 6 19 8
4 Chowan 13 7 17 9
s JC,Smith 12 8 18 9
a Shaw 11 9 14 13
r EIi CityStale 8 12 14 13
e Uvlngstone 8 12 11 15
SVirginia State 5 15 7 19
io Fayettevllle State 5 15 8 18
t StPaul's 3 17 6 19
CIAA PLAYER OF THE YEAR
PLAYER /
Due Crewse, 8r., F. BOWE STATE Averaged
double-double d 168 poris and league-leadng
103 rebound for secomndace & ogs. Also
raekd second n bocks (2.5 bpg.
ROOKIE
Angelo Sharpl -4, F, ECSU n 15
games averaged 13.4 poins, 65 rebounds, shot
568 2% Irm te eld 5a22% from 3-pit range.
DEFENSE
Travis Hyman, 611, So., C, BOWIE STATE CItM
beet 4.0 tlocs per game 103 points per game
and 6.5 rebodpergame.
COACH
Jasi Hill, VIRGINIA STATE Led Lady Trolans to
national aning. lop seed in CIM lourey


C IAA CENTRAL INTERCOLLEGIATE
C l A ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
CONF ALL
FINAL W L W L
SVirginia State 16 4 21 5
2 BowieState 15 5 16 7
SSt. Augustine's 14 6 18 9
4 Fayetteville State 13 7 17 9
sJ.C.Smlth 11 9 18 9
SEliz. CtyState 11 9 17 9
7Shaw 10 10 15 11
SLivingstone 6 14 10 17
SSt. Paul's 6 14 7 19
0o Chowan 6 14 9 16
i Virginia Union 2 18 7 18
CIAA PLAYERS OF THE YEAR
PLAYER
Tonaye Smith, 5-11, 8r., F, VA. UNION Scored
CIAA-best 18.9 points per game, also got 7.2
rebounds per game and shot 44.9% from the lield
ROOKIE
Talaya Lynch, 5-7, Fr., G, CHOWAN Averaged
11.3 points, shot 32.5% iron 3-poml range canning
1.5 per game. Also made 68.91( FTs and averaged
1.9 steals per game.
DEFENSE
Dela Mlddleton, 64, So., C, FAYETTEVILLE
STATE Led league at 20 blods per game, 9.2
rebounds per contest was second best.


MEAC MEAST
MEACATrHAETiC COWERENCE
CONF ALL
W L W L
MorganState 12 1 21 9
DelawareSlate 10 4 15 10
SCState 8 6 14 12
NorfolkState 7 6 9 17
Beltune-Cookman 7 7 15 13
Md. EastenmSore 7 7 9 19
NCA&TState 6 7 10 18
Howard 6 8 7 22
Hampton 6 8 10 17
FtondaA&M 4 10 7 20
CoppinState 2 11 7 19
MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Miha DeloeIck 6 Sr., G, NSU -Averaged
170 poins 4 rebounds. 4.5 asists and 1.5 steals
in ins over Howard and WSSU. Had 16 pis. 7
boards vs. HU, 18 ps. 5 assistsvs WSSU.
ROOKIE
Marques Over, 6-7, Fr., F, DSU In 1-1 week,
Oler scored 24 pits, got 11 rebounds and 5
bloks. Had 12 poins in in over FAMU, another
12 in loss to MSU.
DEFENSE
Tyler Hn ir, 6 FS C, UMES -13 rebounds
v. Coppin Slale, 1 reboundsin two games.


M EACATNLF~fC OFERNCE


NC A&T State
Hampton
Bethune-Cookman
Morgan Slate'
Howard
Florida A&M
Md. Eastern Shore
Coppin State
SC State
Delaware State
Norfolk State


ALL
W L
19 8
15 11
14 12
14 12
14 12
15 10
10 14
9 16
9 17
6 21
4 19


MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE
April McBride, Sr., F, UMES Averaged 307
points and 8 7 rebounds in two games, 31 points,7
rebounds in loss to FAMU, 27 points, 12 boards
vs.B-CU.
ROOKIE
Saadia Doyle, Fr., F, HOWARD Totalled 34 pants
and 22 rebounds in two games, getting 17 pts., 11
reb, vs, NSU, 17 pts., 11 treb vs. FAMU
DEFENSE
DeMetrla Frank, Jr., 0, B-CU Gratbed 16
rebounds and 8 steals to go along with 32 points
and assists in wins


SIAC ATHLETIC COFE.EMrC


Cark Atlanta
Tuskegee
Claftin
Benedct
Lane
LeMoyne-Owen
Albany State
Stlunan
Kentucky State
Paine
Fort Vaiey State
Morehouse
Miles


CONF
W L
18 4
15 7
15 8
13 7
12 8
13 10
13 10
12 10
8 13
8 16
7 16
6 15
3 19


ALL
W L
21 4
15 9
16 10
14 9
14 9
15 11
13 13
14 10
8 16
8 19
9 17
6 17
3 22


SAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
David Brown, 4, Jr., GF, CLARK ATLANA
SScored in dole figaes and averaged 153
points in three Panther wis getting 13 in Wn over
Mrehouse, another 13 in win over Fort Wiley
State and team-hlg 20 in win over leS.


SIAC ALIOSC


Fort Valley State
Kentucky State
Benedict
Tuskegee
Miles
LeMoyne-Owen
Lane
Albany State
Stillman
Claflin
Paine
Clark Atlanta


CONF
W L
20 1
15 5
16 6
12 8
11 9
11 10
9 11
9 12
8 12
5 16
5 17
3 17


ALL
W L
25 1
15 9
19 8
12 13
14 11
13 13
9 15
9 17
10 13
5 17
6 19
3 22


SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Kendra Evans, FORT VALLEY STATE Got 9
points, 9 rebounds in win over Clark Atlanta,
points, 5 boards in win over Benedict


SWAC
SWACWATHLETIC CONERENCE
DIV ALL
W L W L
JadasonState 13 1 15 11
Ark PineBluff 12 3 12 14
Texas Southem 8 6 12 14
PrairieViewA&M 9 5 14 11
Alabama State 9 5 12 13
AlabamaA&M 7 7 10 12
Miss. ValeySt. 7 8 8 20
GramblingState 4 10 6 16
Southern 2 13 4 23
AlcomState 1 14 1 27"
SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Lebaron Weathers, $, St., F, ARIL-PIE
BLUFF -LedUAPBtotwoovatimevidoriesal
home vs SWAC Texas lens Scred UAPEs
last ive pnbis hitudng wing jper in
overie haT gave the Golden Lins a 57-55
win over Prai Vew Saday. Had game-
igs ol 21 points 13 rebounds and five tdos.
Came back in Monday' 57-53 OT win vs Tea
Soutem to score paints, gab 7 reounds
and ge 3 blocks.


QWA ^ SOuTHwESTERN
SWACAT E wmNE
DIV ALL
W L W L
Southern 11 4 17 8
Prarie ViewA&M 10 4 13 10
AlabamaA&M 10 4 14 9
Grambling State 8 6 11 12
Texas Southern 7 7 10 15
Alabama State 6 8 9 14
AlcomState 6 9 6 18
Miss. ValleySt 6 9 9 17
Ark. Pine Bluff 6 9 7 19
Jackson State 2 12 3 21
SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Karlch Wlliams, 5-8, Sr., G, ALABAMA A&M
- Averaged 20.5 points and 45 rebounds in two
wins as A&M moved to with a half-game of first
place. Scored 23 points and had 4 rebounds in
win over Alcom Slate. Added 18 points and 5
rebounds in vn over Southem.


INDEPENDENTS
W L
W. Va. State 23 3
CentralState 20 5
Cheyney 15 10
Xavier(La) 17 12
W-Salem State 11 15
Savannah Stale 10 15
EdwardWaters 9 18
FloridaMemorial 9 19
Tennessee State 8 21
N.C.Certtal 7 21
Lncoln(MO.) 4 21
Uncoin(Pa.) 4 22
UDC 1 18
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Cole ophe. 5-, So, 0 CENTRAL
STATE Led Marauders wis IS pants in
i ver UDC. cam e back gel 18 poks 5
boards inmw overSL tJoe Coe.
Jaon Emenon. 6-1 Sr., G, WVSU Had
8 34poMters in b adc gnms. getng
24 pots alm 3s n in n over Bf e d Sale,
ad Bd 26 pevs hin over Conco


CIAA Tourney tips in Charlotte


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
The on-court excitement and off-court fun
of the CIAA Basketball Tournament arrives this
week in Charlotte as droves of fans descend on
North Carolina's'Queen City for the five-day
extravaganza.
The men of St. Augustine's and women
of Virginia State are the top seeds on the court
looking to put a cap on outstanding regular sea-
son performances. Both should face stiff chal-
lenges.
Off the court, the headliners include gos-
pel singer Yolanda Adams and comedian Steve
Harvey, but there's plenty more for the expected
crowd of over 150,000 that will inundate the
city. Non-stop official activities (see sampling,
of official list below) and the equally non-stop
unofficial events go on past Saturday evening's
championship games.
St. Augustine's (17-3, 21-4), under second-
year coach Lonnie Blow, Jr., won 14 of its last
15 games to take the men's regular season crown
by three games over second-seed Bowie State.
The Falcons are led by 6-2 senior guard
Chris Jordan (16.2 ppg.), the top 3-point marks-
man (40.9%) in the conference, and 6-5 junior
forward Haywood Fain (11.7 ppg., 8.1 rpg.),
both all-CIAA performers. SAC also leads the
league in scoring (76.2 ppg.) and holds oppo-
nents to 36.2% shooting from the field, tops in
all of Div. II basketball.
The Falcons' losses in conference play were
to the Nos. 2, 3 and 4 seeds Bowie State (14-6,
16-9), Virginia Union (14-6, 19-8) and first-


65th Men'
Tourname


r~ -
's 351
nt TO

~y


th Women's
umrament


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23
W #6 Eliz. City St. vs #11 Va. Union 5p
W- #8 Livingstone vs #9 St. Paul's 7p
W #7 Shaw vs #10 Chpwan 9p

WEDNESDAY,'FEBRUARY 24
W #3 St. Augustine's vs #6/11 1p
W #4 Fayetteville St. vs #5 JC. Smith 3p
M -#6 Shaw vs #11 St. Paul's 5p
'M #7 Eliz. City St. vs #10 Fayetteville St. 7p
M #8 Livingstone vs #9 Va. State 9p

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25
W #2 BoWie St. vs #7/10 8a
W #1 Virginia St. vs #8/9 10a
M- #2 Bowie St. vs #7/10 Ip
M #3 Va. Union vs #6/11 3p
M #4 Chowan vs #5 J C Smith 7p
M #8/9 vs #1 St. Augustine's 9p

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27
W #4/5 vs #1/8/9- 1p
W #3/6/11 vs #2/7/10 3p
M #3/6/11 vs #2/7/10 7p
M #4/5 vs #1/8/9 9p

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28
M Championship Game 6p
W Championship Game 9p
ALL GAMES AT TIME WARNER CABLE AREA

time tournament participant Chowan (13-7,
17-9). Two-time defending tournament champion
Johnson C. Smith (12-8, 18-9) comes in as the
fifth seed.


CIAA TOURNEY MENU SAMPLING


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25
* The Yolanda Adams Morning Show presented by Lowe's
Doors open at 5:30 a.m Show starts at 6:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m.
Charlotte Convention Center Hall C

* Food, Health and Wellness Symposium
TWCA Practice Court 11 am to 11 pm (Thru Saturday)

* 2010 CIAA Ford Fan Experience -
Doors open at 4:30 p.m.
Charlotte Convention Center Hall C
KJon (7 p.m.) Melanie Fiona (9 p.m.)

* CIAA Career Expo
10:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
Charlotte Convention Center Ballroom A-D GINUWINE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26
* Steve Harvey Morning Show
Doors open at 5:30 a.m. Show starts at 6:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m.
Charlotte Convention Center Hall C

* 2010 CIAA Ford Fan Experience
Doors open at 4:30 p.m.
Charlotte Convention Center Hall C (Thru Saturday)
Laura Izibor (7 p.m.) Ginuwine (8 p.m.)

* UPTOWN magazine presents: the Aristocrat Lounge
Fundraiser for the CIAA General Scholarship
Ritz Carlton Charlotte 7:00 p.m. 1:00 a.m.

* 2010 CIAA Step Show
Bojangles Coliseum
Doors open at 6:00 p.m. Show starts at 8:00 p.m.


ADAMS
slmiue mum


HARVEY


BOW WOW


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26
* 2010 CIAA McDonald's Super Saturday
Featuring Darrin Henson & Bow Wow
Time Warner Cable Arena
(Cheerleading Exhibition, Miss CIAA Pageant,
Doors open at 8:30 a.m. Show starts at 9:00 a.m.

* CIAA Championship Concert featuring En Vogue
FREE with a CIAA Ticket Book
Time Warner Cable Arena
Doors open at 4:30 p.m. Show starts at 5:00 p.m.


Virginia State (16-4, 21-5) won nine of its
final ten games to win the women's regular sea-
son title by one game over Bowie State (15-5,16-
7). St. Augustine's (14-6, 18-9) and Fayetteville
State (13-7, 17-9) followed closely behind.
VSU fourth-year head coach James Hill had
only one player, 5-8 junior guard Rhon'nelsha
Taylor (14.9 ppg.) on the all-CIAA team but
boasts an experienced team that led the con-
ference in scoring (69.2 ppg.). Like the men,
defending tournament champion Johnson C.
Smith (11-9, 18-9) is the fifth seed.
Besides the coveted CIAA titles, the men's
and women's teams are playing for the oppor-
tunity, to advance to NCAA regional play. The
tournament champs will receive automatic bids
to the Atlantic Region tournament Eight teams
will make the region field
The 35th Women's Tournament tipped off
Tuesday evening with three first round games.
Women's quarterfinal action began Wednesday
morning with three men's opening round games
beginning Wednesday evening. Women's and
men's play continues everyday thru Saturday's 6
p.m. men's final and the 9 p.m. women's champi-
onship game.
S Thursday's four men's quarterfinal games
and Friday's two men's semifinals will be carried
live on TV One. Saturday's men's final will be
carried live on ESPNU. The women's final will
be carried on Comcast Sports Southeast (tape
delayed Sunday) and on ESPNU.


SAT., FEB. 27
MEAC
UMES @ Howard
Norfolk State @ Morgan State
NC A&T Coppin State
Florida A&M @ WSSU
Bethune-Cookman @ SC State
Delaware State @ Hampton
SIAC
Morehouse @ Kentucky State
LeMoyne-Owen @ Lane
Tuskegee @ Stillman
SWAC
Alabama State @ Texas Southern
Ark.-Pine Bluff @ Grambling State
Southern @ Alcom State
Miss. Valley State @ Jackson State
Alabama A&M @ Prairie View A&M
MON., MARCH 1
MEAC *
Florida A&M @ SC State
Bethune-Cookman @ WSSU
Longwood @ Hampton
Norfolk State @ Coppin State
NC A&T @ Morgan State
SWAC
Ark. Pine Bluff @ Jackson State
Alabama A&M @ Texas Southern
Alabama State @ Prairie View
Miss. Valley State @ Grambling State
TUES., MARCH 2
SIAC
Tournament Begins
THURS., MARCH 4
MEAC
UMES @ Delaware State
Coppin State vs. Morgan State
Bethune-Cookman @ Florida A&M
WSSU @ SC State
Howard @ Hampton
Norfolk State @ NC A&T
SIAC
Tournament
SWAC
Jackson State @ Alabama A&M
Grambling State @ Alabama State
Miss. Valley State @ Ark.-Pine Bluff
Prairie View A&M @ Southern
Texas Southernm @Alcom State


INDEPENDENTS
W L
Xaver(La.) 24 5
W. Va. State 16 10
UDC 12 13
Uncoln (Mo.) 11 13
CentralState 9 15
Cheyney 9 15
Tennessee State 9 16
N. C. Central 9 16
Savannah State 9 20
Uncoln (Pa.) 5 21
W.Salem State 2 25
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Marchele Jone, So., G XAVIER Jones,
a sophooroe point guard, had 12 points,
lr assist and threesteals to help te Gold
Nuggets win 50-36 at Loyola and earn their
frst Gull Coast Athleic Conerence regular-
season championship since 204-5.


1* 00 10s AC 0L GE ASK TBA L(ens eulsSanins hr 22/1 -ad eel Hnos


C-I

DOUBLE A

TOURNEY

FIRST UP


CREWS HYMAN


1 C 0 LLE G E BA S K ET W m nsR s ls Sta di gs- 22210- andCWe ekly Hono s)


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 212010


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