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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00858
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla
Creation Date: November 25, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
lccn - sn 83004231
issn - 0739-0319
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: UF00028321:00858

Full Text






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LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
205 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
CAIHESVILLE FL 32611-7007

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Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis
DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 87 YEARS


Volume 87 Number 12 MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBE Ri 2 R 1, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in rowrd)




Liberty City thankful despite hard times


Local residents feel they have much to be thankful for


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com


The fourth Thursday of November is a
time when Americans stop to give simple
thanks for all the good things in their lives.
Since the meal known as the first Thanks-
giving, which occurred at Plymouth Rock
in 1621, Americans--even before there was
an America--have gathered to give thanks
for what they have. Even in these difficult


economic times, Liberty City's resi-
dents are no exception.
"I'm most thankful for my
wife and children," said Ty-
rone Greene, owner of
Greene Dreams Shoe Repair.. ....
"I thank God for my life, my .,.
health, and my strength. ''/
I'm also thankful to God that
he's still in control of the
Please turn to THANKFUL 4A


Spence-Jones vows to rerun


Locals seek vacant seat
By Sandra J. Charity
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Former City Commissioner Mi-
chelle Spence-Jones arrest earlier
this month locked her up but didn't
knock her down.
The ousted District 5 Commis-
sioner announced Thursday at a
rally in Liberty City that she would
be running in the January 2010
special election for District 5.
'For me not to run is an admis-
sion of guilt," she said on stage in
a strip mall parking lot behind her
campaign headquarters surrounded
Please turn to VOW 4A


ire UP.m, ,.m n .I.: al r,Ira cr.re
Michelle Spence-Jones announces she will re-run for District 5 seat
at Thursday's rally in Liberty City.


Plans change for North Corridor


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

In an effort to gain input from
the public regarding future transit
plans, County Commission Chair-
man Dennis C. Moss, County Com-
missioner Barbara Jordan and
Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Alvarez
hosted the second annual Tran-
sit Summit last Wednesday. More
than 200 local residents attended
the town-hall style meeting, taking
the opportunity to ask direct ques-
tions to their representatives.


Unsurprisingly, the issue of the
long-awaited North Corridor was
raised early in the evening.
"We're going to make good on
that commitment. It may not be
heavy rail, but we will make good,"
said Moss. The "commitment" that
chairman Moss spoke of dates back
to 2002. In the late 1970's, the line
was supposed to go up 27th avenue,
but it was diverted out to Hialeah.
When the People's Transportation
Plan (PTP) was brought back in
2002, it was with the understand-
ing that the North Corridor would


be the number one priority.
"It will come gradually, not over-
night," said Harpal Kapoor. Miami-
Dade Transit Director.
When the PTP was revived in
2002, there were seven metro-rail
expansions tied to the surtax. None
have occurred. According to Moss,
it was also included in the text that
the North Corridor would be given
first priority, as it has been prom-
ised to the constituents in the late
1970's.
It was Theodore Wilde, of Miami
Please turn to PLANS 4A


', .)



-Miami Times Photo/Rich Jackson

Heat host Thanksgiving Celebration

Miami Heat star Dwayne Wade helped to get the holiday started off on
Monday by serving a traditional Thanksgiving dinner at the Miami Rescue
Mission, which is located at 2020 Northwest First Avenue.


GRAVE


ROBBERS


Graveyard vandalism remains a concern
By Tariq Osborne .com
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com


While still a very rare crime, grave robbery
remains a persistent one.
Noel Vernon, 38, who works as a caretak-
er at Evergreen Cemetery says the past year
has shown an alarming upsurge.
"I've worked here for four years, and it
wasn't always like this. It's just been in the
last year or so. Someone's going through
busting them," he said.
The truth of Vernon's statements is evi-
dent, as many of the grave-sites have been
disturbed. The most common apparent
method is the use of a sledgehammer of
some sort.
Evergreen Memorial Park Cemetery,
Please turn to ROBBERS 4A


The graves of children are not spared as vandals assault
Park Cemetery.


,& "' A. .
Evergreen Memorial T
Evergreen Memorial


Crist appoints Republican

to Broward Commission


The Miami Times Special Report
Governor Charlie Crist has
appointed Albert C. Jones, a
Black Republican, to replace
suspended Broward County
Commissioner Josephus Eg-
gelletion.
While the district is over-
whelmingly Democratic,
Crist had little option but to
appoint a Republican as he
faces intense pressure from
his party.
As a Black Republican
Jones, 63, is a rarity Bro-
ward. He will be the board's
sole Republican and only
Black.
It is not clear how long
Jones will remain on the
commission. His tenure par-
tially depends upon the out-
come of Eggelletion's case.
Also, he does not live in the


district he will represent,
though the county attorney
has said that he has 30 days
to move there.
Jones said on Monday that
he intends to do so, but did
not specify when.
Jones has said that he
will very likely run for the
Please turn to JONES 4A


7D, ay
Weather
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CHARLIE BEr


















OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Sentences a

miscarriage of justice

|he City of Miami has yet another reason to be ashamed.
This time it is our treatment of 24-year-old Burson Au-
gustin and his elder brother Rotschild Augustin, 26.
The pair were recently sentenced to six and seven years in pris-
on respectively. The brothers, along with three others, were ac-
cused of plotting with Al Qaeda to blow up the Sears Tower in
what became known as the the infamous Liberty City 7 case.

Prosecutors were disappointed. They had sought the maxi-
mum sentence for each, which would have been 30 years. The
Associated Press has described the sentences of the Augustin
brothers as "relatively light."

Nonsense.
A just outcome would have been acquittal for both of these
men. More just, would have been a public apology from the
FBI agent who offered them $50,000 to join in a terrorist plot.

Entrapment is the act of a law enforcement official inducing
a person to commit an offense that would be illegal and that
the person would otherwise have been unlikely to commit. This
was entrapment. It resulted in a mistrial--as it should have. It
also eventually resulted in a retrial. It should not have.

Worse still, the FBI informants were unsavory in their own
right. The two informants-Abbas Al-Saidi and Elie Assad-
earned over $130,000 for their services to the FBI, giving them
ample reason to provide (or manufacture) evidence in order to
justify their employment.

Early in the trial, Judge Lenard ruled that key information
about these two men could not be presented to the jury. Al-
Saidi had previously been involved in an attempt to extort
money from a friend who had raped Al-Saidi's girlfriend. He
was later convicted of battery for beating the same girlfriend.

Judge Joan Leonard then, was complicit in railroading these
men.

The prosecution sets a terrible example for the community.
It further marginalizes Blacks from the system. It is another
reason to avoid rather than engage. What it says is that once
accused of a crime, the presumption is guilt, and that the gov-
ernment will continue to press its case until conviction, mak-
ing trial by jury little more than a formality. In the meantime,
the accused sits in jail. Despite the two mistrials, the men re-
mained up from the time of their 2006 arrest.

Even after it became evident that the men were attempting to
scam the undercover agent out of the money without engaging
in any actual terror acts, the trial continued to its pre-deter-
mined outcome. They didn't have the means,, the know-how,
or the desire to destroy the Sears Tower.

Nevertheless, they will remain in jail.
Judge Joan Leonard's "light" sentence probably reflects the
dubious nature of these convictions. But it is not nearly light
enough.
Setting the men free would have been the only fair thing to
do.


Why we're not 'Post-Racial'

When Alabama Congressman Artur Davis voted
against the health-care bill that passed the House
earlier this month, he probably expected some grief
from fellow Democrats. But he couldn't have anticipated be-
ing accused of selling out his race.

Mr. Davis was the only Black Member to oppose the legisla-
tion, and his vote earned him a rebuke from Jesse Jackson at
a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation reception Wednes-
day night. "We even have Blacks voting against the health-
care bill," said Mr. Jackson. "You can't vote against health
care and call yourself a Black man."

Mr. Davis is running for governor in a state that John Mc-
Cain won last year, and his vote was surely influenced by the
reality that Alabamans aren't the biggest fans of ObamaCare.
The Congressmen, to his credit, took the high ground in re-
sponse to Mr. Jackson's low blow. "One of the reasons that I
like and admire Rev. Jesse Jackson is that 21 years ago he
inspired the idea that a Black politician would not be judged
simply as a Black leader," he said in a statement referencing
Mr. Jackson's 1988 Presidential bid. "The best way to honor
Rev. Jackson's legacy is to decline to engage in an argument
with him that begins and ends with race."

Liberals insist that America still isn't "post-racial," notwith-
standing the election of President Obama. But when a politi-
cian's skin color is gratuitously invoked in a debate about
whether the government should have more control of health
care, you have to wonder if the political left has any seri-
ous interest in a color-blind society. Former President Jimmy
Carter suggests that whites who oppose the President's poli-
cies are racists; Mr. Jackson says Blacks who oppose them
are betraying their race.

Even in the age of a Black President, too many liberals still
believe they have more to gain from identity politics than from
a post-racial America. -Wall Street Journal


Uibe 1*iami Tnime

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 541n Street,
Miami Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Slaiion. Miami. Florida 33127
Phone 305-694 6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES. JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES. Publisher and Chairman


For decades now, I have trav-
eled across this nation to listen,
learn and absorb the concerns
and frustrations of the commu-
nity. I've marched with victims
of police brutality, consoled
families who have viciously lost
loved ones and called for trans-
parency and proper judicial
proceedings for those that have
been wrongfully victimized by
our system.
But after years of civil rights
activism, and after years of
countless troubling incidents,
never before have I been as out-
raged as I. am today. On Nov.
16, a 15-year-old girl in the
Bronx, NY was walking home
from school when a stray bul-
let struck her in the back of the
head. The alleged shooter, de-
scribed by mainstream media
as a 'baby-faced 16-year-old'
is now held without bail, along
with four others all 23 and
younger who authorities say
coerced the young shooter to
pull the trigger.
Last month, a Decatur High
School junior football varsity


1~t.e
~ MOF#AL,
w


Member of -National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster Send address changes to The Miami Times. P.O Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
Tne Black Press believes thai Amenca can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person regardless of race. creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Hating no person, tearing no person, the
Black Press sinves to help every person in the firm beihel that all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back


_ Ap


I-a
The Media Audit ,r-


player in Atlanta was laid to
rest after falling victim to a
drive-by shooting. In Baton
Rouge, LA, a 16-year-old was
shot and killed as two Then'
struggled over a handgun in
early October. The shooter in


Center, firearms are the second
most frequent cause of death
overall for Americans aged 15-
24. If we are not fed up and
outraged already, the time to
stand up and do something is
NOW. We cannot sit idly by and


The plight of violence in urban communities is horrendous, wor-
risome and simply out of control. It is our babies, sons, daugh-
ters, grandparents and loved ones that are losing in every sense
of the word.


this case a 22-year-old who watch our innocent children die
is now charged with negligent so senselessly. Nor can we run
homicide. And a few weeks from the underlying issues that
ago, a Spelman College sopho- lead some young people to pick
more was hit and killed by a up a gun in the first place, and
stray bullet while walking on in turn, ruin their own lives.
campus. Sadly, the list of in- On Nov. 23, National Action
nocent victims appears to have Network, along with commu-
no end in sight., nity members from around the
The level of gun usage and the nation will lead a first ever Na-
epidemic of violence in commu- tional Day of Outrage. We will
nities across the country has simultaneously convene at 2
hit an astronomical level. Ac- PM EST in cities like Los An-
cording to the. Violence Policy geles, New York, Chicago, At-


lanta, Philadel- ,-i m
phia and many
in between. As parents, aunts,
uncles, cousins and more join
together to honor their lost
loved ones, concerned citizens,
elected officials and community
activists will call for an end to
the unprecedented and fright-
ening national epidemic.
We all watched the graphic
videotape of the beating death
of 16-year-old Chicago Fenger
High School honor student
Derrion Albert. But what many
not realize is that this high
school remains a 'war zone'
where children simply seeking
an education to advance them-
selves do not feel secure even
in a classroom. How can we
urge our kids to strive for high-
er achievement when we fail
to provide them with the ba-
sic tools of development? And
what can we expect for the fu-
ture of the United States when
our most precious citizens are
arming themselves and engag-
ing in warfare on streets in vir-
tually every state.


..
. -


N "N'" ,


* ~


Health Care Bill passes in House, now Senate must act


After winning this year's
American League Eastern Di-
vision championship, the New
York Yankees faced a gauntlet
of 11 more games before they
could claim their 27th World
Series title. Each playoff vic-
tory' took the team closer to
its final goal, but as Yankee
legend, Yogi Berra once said,
"It ain't over till it's over." The
same can be said about health
care reform. On November 7th,
the American people won the
first round of their health care
championship series when the
U.S. House of Representatives
passed the Affordable Health
Care for America Act, which
would extend health care cov-
erage to 96 percent of Ameri-
cans and guarantee stability,
lower costs, and higher qual-
ity while strengthening efforts
to address racial and ethnic
health disparities.
It was an historic achieve-
ment, marking the first time
that any chamber of Congress


has ever passed comprehensive
health reform. And it could not
have happened without the te-
nacious leadership of Speaker
Nancy Pelosi, the strategic ge-
nius of Majority Whip, James
Clyburn or the principled par-
ticipation of the Congressional
Black Caucus led by its dynam-


Afro Newspapers, "The 'war
room' includes phone banks,
cross-country rallies and the
mobilization of Black radio
stations to marshal the votes
needed..." for real health care
reform with a public option.
These efforts were instru-
mental in securing the passage


t was an historic achievement, marking the first time that any chamber
of Congress has ever passed comprehensive health reform. And it
could not have happened without the tenacious leadership of Speaker
Nancy Pelosi, the strategic genius of Majority Whip, James Clybum ...


ic chairman, Congresswoman
Barbara Lee of California. Pas-
sage of the House bill was also
assisted by an unprecedented
Civil Rights Health Care War
Room effort.
This is a grassroots cam-
paign to mobilize public sup-
port led by the joint efforts of
the National Urban League, the
NAACP and the Black Leader-
ship Forum. As reported in the


of the House bill, but this was
just a first round victory. The
second round involves passage
by the Senate and the opposi-
tion promises to be even tough-
er. President Obama has said
that he wants to sign a final bill
before the end of this year. But
opponents are already gearing
up to delay and ultimately de-
feat a Senate bill. That is why
we are keeping the Civil Rights


BY GARY L. FLOWERS, NNPA


Junk food stores are jacked up
As we prepare to advocate foods-particularly fresh ets. Poor diets arise from junk
for universal health care in the produce-is a key element food. Convenience stores jack
United States Senate one issue to disease prevention. Like- up Black diets by selling junk
that impacts people's health is wise, eating bad food has bad food.
the quality of food available to health results. It does not take Convenience stores are cen-
them. Wealthy people tend to a "rocket scientist" to figure tral culprits in not only offering
have better health in part due out the connection between low-quality food products but
to their diet of quality foods. diet and disease. The phrase, also by jacking up their prices.
Conversely, poor peoples' poor "you are what you eat", plays On average, poor people pay a
health is usually predicated out every day in poor neigh- territory tax on food because
on their choices in food. borhoods. Predictably, diabe- of the perception of crime in
One reality for poor people tes, high-blood pressure, and low-income areas (of course
of all pigments is that they obesity plague poor neigh- low-income neighborhoods
have less choices of good food borhoods, disproportionately have more crime due to the
in their neighborhoods. Unlike Blacks. lack of lack of jobs and capi-
well-to-do neighborhoods with According to the Office of tal, but I will save the subject
gourmet grocers and organic Minority Health, Black women for another column). Research
options, poor people must, in are 70 percent more likely to reveals that poor people pay
many cases, use convenience be obese than White women; as much as 20 percent more
stores to purchase produce Blacks are 30 percent more than the national average for
and meats. For most poor peo- likely to have diabetes than food. Some experts assert that
ple of color high quality meats Whites; and Black men are 30 such jacked up prices amount
and produce is virtually non- percent more likely than their to $1200 more for the poor.
existent. White counterparts of acquire Black communities have half
The results are predictable. heart disease. Many of these as much access to chain su-
The consumption of healthy maladies arise from poor di- permarkets than White neigh-


Health Care War iJ
Room in opera-
tion until we achieve a final vic-
tory. I urge you to call the war
room hotline at 1-866-783-
2462 to speak to your Senator
and make your voice heard.
Health care reform is especial-
ly critical to our communities.
People of color are more likely
to suffer and die from chronic
diseases like cancer, diabe-
tes and heart disease. At that
same time, they are less likely
to have health insurance and
on average spend more of their
income on health care.
As Congresswoman Barbara
-Lee has said, "Grassroots mo-
bilization helped elect the first
African American to the presi-
dency of the United States of
America. Grassroots activism
will help us pass a health care
reform with a strong public op-
tion." We won round one, but
we need your help to achieve
a final victory. Remember, "It
ain't over till it's over."


-,



borhoods. Latinos
have 30 percent less access
to chain stores than Whites.
With the absence of national
chain stores allows for small
convenience stores predomi-
nate poor communities.
Congress should enact leg-
islation to end racial redlining
in retail food stores by regu-
lating convenience stores that
sell junk food. For example,
regulating junk food in the
same manner that was done
for tobacco and alcohol would
go along way in reducing dis-
ease diets in Black commu-
nities. Why not require junk
food producers in convenience
stores to print warning labels
reading, "Eating this product
could lead to diabetes, high
blood pressure or obesity?"
Congress should jack up
convenience stores and junk
food peddlers.


.WEv,, AL SHARPTONIAIA.


Black community: We must reclaim the value of life

















LOCAL


OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


BY REGINALDCLNE, ESQ


Just because; re-elect

Spence-Jones

I strongly advocate that indi- back, but ul-
viduals in public office should timately end-
be held to the highest standards ed up laying
and strongly support Katherine off staff.
Fernandez-Rundle for having Most re-
the guts to go after corrupt poli- cently, Jessie Trice Center had
ticians. However, in the case money slated to build a new
of Michelle Spence-Jones, I feel headquarters. They spent
that the current prosecution is $600,000 in pre-development
ill-timed. Allegedly, the State money. The shovels are ready to
Attorney had charges ready to break ground. It would be sec-
drop in August, but held off be- ond development in Brownsville
cause they did not want to im- area in last 7 years, it would
pact the on-going election. The bring in 150 construction jobs.
State Attorney had been criti- It would help deliver health care
cized in the past for filing indict- to the poor and needy in one of
ments during elections, which the worst poverty stricken dis-
obviously savings the election to tricts in our community. Well,
the opponent. The only problem the money is gone. Someone at
with the late filing is that the County redirected it. I bet you
timing is suspicious. $1,000,0000 that no one is in-
After Spence-Jones was elect- dicted, that no press comes of
ed, she publicly stated her it. It is just another Black run
innocence and that she was organization getting the shaft. I
subject to a technical lynching bet $10 million dollars that The
which are statements that at- Miami Herald does not run a big
tack the State Attorneys Office. expose on this issue. I bet $100
Two days later, she is served million that the New Times does


I am nota resident of District 5. do not advocate supporting corrupt
politicians, but if I was a resident of District 5,1 I would put Spence-
Jones back in office without a moment of hesitation. Why?...


with an indictment. Makes you
think hmmm isn't that tim-
ing lovely.
While State Attorney may
have filed late to avoid affecting
an election, the current deci-
sion is worse. Now we have to
go through another election at
a cost of $200,000 to the tax-
payers when the City is already
struggling through a finan-
cial crisis. The State Attorney
dropped two bombs in succes-
sion, leaving us with three com-
missioners instead. of five, so
the City is effectively crippled
from doing any business as the
new Mayor enters office. I guess
that is a welcome to the Mayor's
Office for Mr. Tomas Regalado.
I am not a resident of District
5. I do not advocate support-
ing corrupt politicians, but if I
was a resident of District 5, I
would put Spence-Jones back
in office without a moment of
hesitation. Why? Despite re-
peated attacks on her, which
do take their personal toll, she
has been working hard and de-
livering to her district. She is a
fighter, and I admire fighters. I
remember that I was impressed
with her during the stadium
wars for coming out of bed after
just delivering a baby to make
sure that money was slated for
her district. She used her swing
vote effectively. She has made
inroads to combat problems of
crime, she has made inroads to
start some development in her
district, and she is working on
delivering jobs.

DISAPPEARING
ACT OF COUNTY FUNDS
The issue of money being slat-
ed for one entity and being shift-
ed to another the great act of
corruption that occurred when
she was just an ordinary citizen
trying to get her small piece of
the pie is just not corruption.
It happens all the time. The
County habitually has money
moving from one entity to anoth-
er. I have seen money budgeted
for Tools for Change taken away
without notice, because some
commissioner felt the money
would be better served going to
another entity. The end result
was Tools for Change cried a
little, fought to get their money


not run a story. Why because it
happens all the time. It is called
politics, it is called business as
usual at the County.

LET HER WORK CONTINUE
The shame is that Spence-
Jones money was used to re-
develop an area in Liberty City.
The money did not just disap-
pear there are visible results.
I also know that funding is
used for a variety of purposes
by receiving entities. Absent
a Herald expose, no one has
been prosecuted for reimburs-
ing their credit card expendi-
tures. In fact, in recent history,
the only two people who have
been indicted for such activity
are Rev. Gaston Smith, pastor
of Friendship Baptist Church,
and Spence-Jones two high
profile Black people who have
ruffled feathers.
In the few instances, when the
County claims someone used
money inappropriately, they are
required to make restitution.
No one is indicted, no one goes
to jail. The entity might lose its
next contract.
While I think all public mon-
ey is important, and should be
safeguarded. I ask myself, when
you have cost overruns in the
billions at the airport, why are
the limited resources of State
Attorney focused on $50,000?
Why not go after the big con-
tractors, American Airlines, and
the other major players who
through judicious change or-
ders, cost overruns and other
technical ploys have taken liter-
ally billions from the taxpayer.
Maybe it is the rebel in me,
maybe it is the part of me who
hates to see bullying, maybe
it is the part of me who hates
unfairness, maybe it is part of
me that is suspicious of attacks
on our leaders I can't tell you
why. But my gut tells me that
Spence-Jones should be re-
elected and allowed to finish
some of the good work that she
has started. I don't know who
else is running, and I am sure
that I am stepping on power-
ful toes. I seem to do that a lot
lately, but just because every-
one is picking on her I would
love to see her get a few blows
back.


"... I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action ..'
Malcolm X


BY D.C. CLARK


Raising expectations in the Black community JM
belong to any of these groups, cials show little white and tends to e -
Part HII then your path to success is Asian toddlers being taught professional
Question? Do you remember going to be very difficult at how to read before the age of class as well. Instead of tak-
when our parents and teachers best. Since Blacks have yet to six months, some Black par- ing some of the billions of dol-
use to tell us that Black people develop a degree of power that ents are still goo going and lars we gross in this country
have to work twice as hard as will place us on par with oth- gaa gaaing little Shaniqua and every year and reinvest in our
everyone else in order to make ers, we are going to continue Ray Ray until they are nearly communities, we would rather
it? You remember when they to depend on those very same three-years-old. It's very ob- blow it on frivolous things that
told us that we would have to groups to make us whole. And vious who has the advantage does very little to help anyone.
produce more than all others A snapshot of how ridiculous
just to be treated fairly? If so we've become is captured on
then tell me, when was this according to historian Harold Cruse, even though America ide- a recent video that has been
link broken? When did we as a alizes the rights of the individual, in reality, this is a country floating around lately. It
people stop realizing we are liv- dominated b the social power of groups, classes in-groups shows former NFL lst round
ing in a very competitive soci- ddraomftinated by the social power of groups, classes, ingroups choice, Adam "Pac Man"
ety and that we have to be bet- and cliques both ethnic and religious. Jones, showering dancers in a
ter prepared than anyone else strip club with approximately
just to survive this madness? $100,000 at one time. That's
According to historian Har- if you know like I know, the coming out of the gate. Also, $100, 000 that he could have
old Cruse, even though Amer- powerful has never granted the what about the names we tag contributed to creating a busi-
ica idealizes the rights of the powerless the necessary tools our children with. We brand ness in the Black community.
individual, in reality, this is a to elevate to his equal. This our children with names that The brother has so much cash
country dominated by the so- means the competitive nature have no meaning, names that in his arms, he could hardly
cial power of groups, classes, that America demands from have no cultural, historical or carry it all. Now he is out of
in-groups and cliques both each of it's citizens, is magni- social significance, once again the league, trying to petition
ethnic and religious. To make fled tenfold when it comes to placing our children at a dis- the CFL (Canadian Football
it plain, America is run by being Black in this country. tinct disadvantage even be- League) to give him a tryout.
power groups (i.e. Jews, Ger- What Blacks must realize fore they can mutter a single He hopes to make approxi-
mans, Irish, Catholics, His- is this competition begins at word. mately $100,000 for the entire
panics, etc.). and if you don't birth; While today's infomer- This competition also ex- year.


Will history be repeated in the District 5 race?


Dear Editor:


I am writing this letter in re-
sponse to The Miami Herald
James H. Burnett, III column,
"Why politicians under a cloud
keep winning" on Nov. 20.
Burnett must be new to this
community and he did not do
his research. If he had, he
would have learned that his-
torically, Miami's Black com-
munity does not elect indicted
Commissioners; that's a char-
acteristic attributed to the Lat-
in Community.
The only Black elected of-
ficial to run for office while
under indictment was County
Commissioner James Burke
and he was defeated. How-
ever, Billy Hardemon ran while
under a cloud of indictment
and he lost. And, the late Mi-
ami Commissioner Art Teele
won his first election defeating
seated Commissioner Barbara


Carey, while she was under a
cloud of suspicion.
The reason this community
elected Michelle Spence-Jones
while she was under a cloud
of suspicion was because the
on-again, off-again investiga-
tion confused the voters. Dur-
ing the election the rumor mill
and her campaign kept tell-
ing voters that Miami-Dade
County State Attorney Office
had cleared Spence-Jones of
all alleged charges, which was
indeed the case. As you know,
several months prior to the
election Miami-Dade State At-
torney Katherine Fernandez-
Rundle issued a statement
clearing Spence-Jones of some
alleged charges. When the
State Attorney issued charges
the day after the election, the
new charges created a "wall of
confusion" and Spence-Jones
campaign capitalized on that
confusion. The voters did not


understand that the pending
and subsequent indictment
was new charges stemming
from the same investigation.
Based on the initial statement
from the County State Attor-
ney's office, District 5 voters
were under the impression,
that Spence-Jones was cleared
on all charges and the hoop-la
surrounding a new indictment
was a campaign tactic engaged
by Spence-Jones opponents to
discredit her.
During the January 2010
election, there will be no con-
fusion, it will be clear to the
voters that Spence-Jones has
been indicted and a trial is
pending. Will she win election
anyway? Well, if history is a
guide, Spence-Jones will lose
her seat on the City of Miami
Commission. Also, the politico
who are predicting that Spen-
ce-Jones will win have appar-
ently not looked at the num-


Personal survival over community needs
Dear Editor: addressed her supporters. I community will have a sitting
came out of that meeting feel- Commissioner serving while
Whether you believe that Mi- ing very conflicted at her de- under a criminal investigation
chelle Spence-Jones is guilty cision to enter in the special awaiting trial. Soon, it will al-
or innocent of the charges election. I agree that she has most feel like the community
against her, it is clear, that the the right to clear her name but is on trial with her. The trial
communities in District 5 is at what cost to the communi- will surely have a circus at-
destined to face a traumatic ty? For the sake of argument, mosphere particularly when
and embarrassing ordeal. Re- let's envision the Commission- the sworn statements from
cently, I attended a P.U.L.S.E er winning the special elec- her mentor former County
meeting where Spence-Jones tion in January 2010 then the Commissioner Barbara Carey-


bers.
There are 39,960 registered
voters in District 5 and less
than 3,500 voters showed up
to the polls and all 3500 vot-
ers did not vote for the Com-
missioner. Why only 5,000
voters show up to the polls?
Some politicos are saying a low
voter turnout was expected
and others are saying that the
low turnout is a sign that the
confusion weight heavily on
the minds of the more than 39,
000 voters who did not go to
the polls.
With such a large number of
registered uncommitted voters
this election is wide open. And
the winner will be the candi-
date who can "shake the trees"
and get the voters to the polls.
Also, in my humble opinion, I
think history will prevail.

Tangela Sears
Miami



Shuler and her Pastor/Friend
Reverend Gaston Smith are
discussed. Can the communi-
ty endure a year or two of this
level of scrutiny and embar-
rassment? The community
will have a chance to answer
this question in January.

Dr. Robert Malone Jr.
Miami
-" "- .. < ,-m -
'


Has the economy changed your Thanksgiving holiday plans?


WILLIAM HOWARD, 57
Unemployed, Miami


my family. It's
no different
than during
better eco-
nomic times.
Thanksgiv-
ing's always
been about being together and
giving thanks for what we have.
It shouldn't be about complain-
ing about what you don't have.
Thanksgiving's a time for family
and being together. The econo-
my doesn't change that.

JEANETTE JONES, 44
Boutique Owner, Liberty City

I plan to
go to North
Carolina and
enjoy the holi-
day with some '
family I have
up there. i
think times


are getting better. When they
were harder, I wouldn't have
been able to go, but Obama's
fixing things.

BETTY DEAN, 54
Retired, Miami

I"ll be feed-
ing 20 home-
less people. I
guess if times
were harder,
I'd be feeding
more, but re-
ally the econ-
omy isn't making that much of
a difference. It isn't the econo-
my that makes things hard for
people anyway, it's personal
responsibility. I've been lucky
that nursing jobs--which is
what I did, are recession proof.
But people need to be more in-
dependent and stop blaming
the economy. There's still work
for people who get out and look
for it. But Thanksgiving--and
and the other holidays, should
be about giving and service.


GRADY MUHAMMAD, 42
Grant Writer, Overtown

My plans
are just to en-
joy it; to spend
time with my
family and my
children and
to give bless-
ings to God.
This is what
we do every
year. It's a time
to reflect and to enjoy yourself.
It's a good time to watch foot-
ball and eat turkey. You don't
need to be rich for that.

TIMOTHY DRAKE, 46
Cook, Liberty City

I'm going to
spend it with
my wife and
kids, which
is what I'd be
doing no mat-
ter how the
times were. I


might buy them more gifts and
things if times were better, but
Thanksgiving is really about
spending that time together.

WILLIE COVINGTON, 57
Baker, Opa-locka

My plans are -
really to relax
and eat. I'll
be with fam-
ily. I probably
would do the
same no mat-
ter how the
times were.
There might
be a little more food on the ta-
ble in better times--but no; I'd
be doing the same thing.



Subscribe









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN )DESTINY


Caretaker: It's been getting worse in the last year or so


ROBBERS
continued from 1A


which is located at Northwest
41 Street and 30th Avenue, is
particularly vulnerable to the
practice because the concrete
sleeves surrounding the cof-
fins are above ground, leaving
them exposed to the elements-
and to thieves.
On several occasions, Vernon
has seen two Hispanic women
in the graveyard after dusk,
but is careful not to make any
accusations, or to guess at the
thieves' intent.
Often grave-robbers are look-
ing for valuables, such as met-
als or marble. But suggestions
that the thieves could be attrib-
uted to marauding teens, and


even occultists have all been
made. "I don't know about
that," he said. "But heads have
been missing.
Evergreen Cemetery's owner,
Garth Reeves, says that the
vandalism is not new. "We've
been repairing that cemetery
ever since we bought it," he
said.
Police reports from as far as
1997 validate his claim. Oc-
casionally, chicken feathers
or chicken bones have been
found in the areas, causing po-
lice to suspect the vandalisms
may be some sort of religious
practice.
Sadly, even the graves of
children are not immune. At
Evergreen Cemetery, the tiny
coffins are as likely to be van-


At Evergreen Memorial Park Cemetery, Many of the graves show
signs of vandalism consistent with the use of a sledgehammer.


dalized as the larger ones.
Evergreen Cemetery's own-
er, Garth Reeves, bought the
cemetery from the bankruptcy
court in 1994. The Cemetery
had been a neglected and
abandoned property for many
years prior. No one has been
interred there since, and ac-
cording to records, the prop-
erty has never been profitable.
Reeves however, put up a fence
and hired caretakers to restore
the property, so that families
might visit the graves of their
loved ones.
The history of the Evergreen
memorial Park Cemetery began
in 1932, when Benjamin and
Capitola Solomon purchased
five lots from white real estate
developers. The parcel was col-


lectively referred to as Happy
Acres.
Solomon's wife sold the prop-
erty to Tropical Home Builders
after his death in 1955.
Since then, the cemetery has
changed hands four times. Ev-
ergreen Cemetery was donat-
ed to the Greater Tabernacle
Baptist Church, 151 NW 60th
Street, in 1976. The church
eventually sold the cemetery
to John Wagoner of Maquoke-
la, Iowa, in 1989. In January
of 1990, Molly and Bernard
Zaminsky of Pembroke Pines
were the highest bidders for
a tax certificate on the prop-
erty. Reeves bought the prop-
erty from the bankruptcy court
after the Zaminskys filed for
bankruptcy.


S.** .'U .


q!"' I

'4^0 S


ACTIONN










-Photo/ Miami-Dade County Commission


Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson on stage with Laverne Holliday
and Lavern Elie from the Curley's House on Sunday.

Booker T. Washington defeats Norland


For the Booker T. Washing-
ton Tornadoes have taken a
step closer to the class 3A state
championship in their defeat of
Norland. On Friday night, the
Tornadoes (10-1), overcame
a momentum-shifting touch-
down to seize a 24-13 victory at
Curtis Park.
On Friday, they will play
either Belen or District


rival Jackson.
Tornadoes Quarterback Bi-
dler Dorlean was 11 of 18 for
212 yards and three touch-
downs. Jayvon Wrentz, caught
four passes for 90 yards and
two touchdowns. Ernest Tynes
finished with three receptions
for 58 yards. Late in the third
quarter, Tynes made a 56-yard
touchdown reception to give the


Tornadoes a 24-7 lead.
Booker T. Washington was
holding a 17-0 lead at that point
in the game, on the strength of
a 25-yard field goal by Oscar
Diaz and the two touchdowns
scored by Wrentz.
Norland scored early in the
fourth quarter when Duke
Johnson made a 29-yard touch-
down reception.


Moss seeks federal funds for transit


PLANS
continued from 1A

Gardens, who asked whether
the rapid transit buses would
be feasible, due to the
area's urban density.
Mayor Alvarez hedged,
"we are constrained by
the economics of to-
day. We know some of
the promises we made
were virtually impos-
sible to keep, and we
will never make that
mistake again." MI
County Manager
George Burgess said much the
same. "We need to live within
our means and be fiscally re-
sponsible," he said.
The transit authority plans
to keep at least the spirit
of the promises; but by us-
ing buses rather than heavy
rail. According to transit fig-


ures, running buses instead
of building rail is cheaper by
30 percent. To this end, the
county has purchased 12
right-of-way parcels, at a cost
of $4.3 million.
Moss also
played up a
federal com-
mitment that
the county
seeks.
"When met-
ro-rail was
built, 80 per-
0SS cent of the JOR
funding came
from the gov-
ernment. Today it's almost
the opposite. The government
needs to step in and help not
just build systems, but op-
erate and maintain them,"
he has said. "What we've got
to get is dedicated source of
funding for the Tri-Rail and


Sun-Rail," he said. Moss be-
lieves that this will attract the
federal funds necessary for
the North Corridor project,
and also other additions like
a high-speed rail con-
necting Miami to Or-
lando.
Miami-Dade Transit
has been running a.
deficit for years. Some
of the PTP helped to
resolve some of the
deficit. We're trying to
bring it to where it's
RDAN not such a loss. We've
got to bring more rev-
enue in, at the same
time reducing our costs,"
Moss has said.
Jordan said she views the
buses as a stopgap measure
for difficult times, and hopes
to build incrementally when
the financial times allow for
it.


Date of Thanksgiving was briefly contended


THANKFUL
continued from 1A

neighborhood. He is the first
and the last," Greene said.
Greene's wife, Paulette, said
much the same. "I thank God
for life, and for his gracious
mercy," she said.
Lanita Dixon, a 20-year-old
dental student at Miami Dade
College had a simple expres-
sion of gratitude. "I'm thank-
ful for life itself; for waking up
every morning," she said.
Joe Sims, 71, is thankful
for his 50-year career in con-
struction, which the economy
brought to a recent end.
"I worked for Valiant Con-
struction, he said. They told
me yesterday." Despite the
grim news, Sims remains
grateful. "In this economy, I'm
surprised I lasted as long as I
did. I thank the Lord for that,"
he said.
Though Americans began
celebrating Thanksgiving
shortly after the revolution-


ary war, it did not become
an official holiday until Abra-
ham Lincoln declared the last
Thursday in November would
be Thanksgiving in 1863. Ev-
ery president since Lincoln
has declared Thanksgiving a
national holiday.
Congress, in 1941, declared
again that the fourth Thurs-
day in November would be
Thanksgiving. This was nec-
essary because it reversed
a decision by Roosevelt to
celebrate the holiday on the
third Thursday of November,
to give people more time in
between to shop for Christ-
mas.
Since then, Thanksgiving
has been celebrated on the
fourth Thursday of the month-
-but not in every home.
Charlie Beau, a Broward
County transit bus driver,
was in town visiting Leon Cus-
tom Tailor does not celebrate
the traditional Thanksgiving.
"Thanksgiving is a holiday
for people who had nothing


to do with me," he said. "My
day of thanks would be Ju-
neteenth. That's the holiday
for my people." he said.
When pressed, however,
Beau was able to think of
several things for which he
is thankful, which suggests
that one need not celebrate
the official holiday to share
the spirit of. gratitude. "I'm
thankful for having a job in
this economy, the way things
are on the job market," he
said. "I'm also thankful for
reality; for being here right at
this moment.
In the end--everyone has
something for which to be
thankful. Percy Williams
summed up his feelings on
the matter.
While waiting his turn in
the Mop City Barbershop,
Williams said he was most
thankful for the health of his
family. "I"m going to spend
the holiday with them," he
said. "I'm also thankful to
have God in my life."


I


MALONE TORAIN


DUNN


CHIVERTON


Malone: New direction and character needed in District 5


vow
continued from ;A

by her attorney,family and
friends. "It's about making
sure we complete what we
started."
With supporters holding up
signs, Spence-Jones main-
tained her innocence.
"Spence-Jones is running
for District 5," she said, refer-
ring to herself. "When you're
not guilty, when you're not
afraid, when you know you've
done nothing wrong, you just
corisider it a stumble in the
road."
Shortly after an 83 percent
victory in the District 5 race,
Spence-Jones was arrested on
one count of second-degree
grand theft. According to the
State Attorney Office, Spence-
Jones alledgely submitted a let-
ter in Carey-Shuler's name in-
structing Metro-Miami Action
Plan Trust (MMAP) to transfer
the two grants to Karym Ven-
tures, a company then owned
by Spence-Jones and her fam-
ily. The funds were to be allo-


cated to help improve District
5.
Spence-Jones previously
said, "This charge is about re-
moving me from office."
Gov. Charlie Crist suspend-
ed Spence-Jones from her Dis-
trict 5 seat following her arrest
which has led to the vacant
seat.
In addition to Spence-Jones
rerunning, District 5 candi-
date Jeff Torain will also rerun
for the seat.
"I am hoping that residents
will focus on the issues that
are, affecting District 5 rather
than the personality," said To-
rain in a phone interview Tues-
day.
This special election will cost
the City over $200,000 which
Torain believes could have
been avoided if an individual
was appointed to the seat then
hold an election in the next
municipal.
Since the commission did not
have a quorum and the time
expired to appoint someone,
the City was left with no choice
but to have a special election.


Jones faces 2010 challenge


JONES
continued from 1A

seat when it comes up for
election next November. If he
does so, he will face at least
three Democratic challeng-
ers.
Former Ft. Lauderdale
Commissioner Carlton Moore,
Lauderhill Commissioner
Margaret Bates, and Pastor


Allen Jackson have all an-
nounced bids for the seat.
Jones won his first elected
position to the Dania Beach
City Commission in 1993, but
lost it in 1997. In 1998, he
changed parties, becoming a
Republican and was appoint-
ed the next year to the South
Broward Hospital District by
Gov. Jeb Bush. He still re-
tains this position.


A third contender for the
District 5 seat is Dr. Robert
Malone Jr.
Malone, 41, is a community
coordinator/ University re-
cruiter who previously ran for
the State Representative Dis-
trict 109 seat in 2008.
"We need a new direction and
character in the District," said
Malone to The Miami Times on
Tuesday. "I think I and others
are fed up with the things that
are going on in District 5. Peo-
ple are tired of the condition
and corruption in the commu-
nity. The community is starv-
ing for leadership that they can
trust, depend and believe in."
Pierre E. Rutledge, a. Miami-
Dade County Schools admin-
istrator, told The Times, "no
decision has been made as of
yet."
District 5 runner-up in the
November election, David
Chiverton, and the notable
community activist Rev. Rich-
ard P. Dunn are also rumored
to be running for the seat. Nei-
ther could be reached for com-
ment.


UNITED TEACHERS OF DADE
The Education Experts
www.UTD.org


K 0aren Aronowitzm President
E^^rt5 .9 *0 ^n Firt Igram Secretary- Treasurer


Media Specialist
Carol City Elementary
* Masters Degree in Reading
* National Board Certified Teacher
* Certified in Reading K-12, Media
Specialist K-12, Varying
Exceptionalities K-12, Mental
Retardation K-12, ESOL Endorsement
* Member of District Special Student
Education (SPED) Task Force
* Educational Research & Dissemination
District and State Trainer Strategies
for Student Success I course
* Past Teacher of the Year for Carol City
Elementary
* Member, United Teachers of Dade


'b.. 4A1


I


FREE


THE


Liberty
coty
i Seven


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25- DECEMBER 1, 2009


'fI
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II'
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* . .-- -

K


Years of development good or bad for Miami?


By Damien Cave

The office of Mayor Manny
Diaz smelled of fresh paint and
departure. He had only a few
hours left before term limits
pushed him out, but when the
city's planning director men-
tioned a development by a large
Spanish bank, the mayor's eyes
lit up.
"I'd love to see it," Diaz said.
"Will you call me?"
It was a telling exchange for
a mayor who oversaw one of
Miami's most extensive physi-
cal transformations. The city
he served for eight years now
has cafes where prostitutes
used to strut. There are more
trees and art offerings, too,
but mostly there are buildings.
More than 100 million square
feet of residential and commer-
cial space has been added since
2001 -- mostly towers and not
just downtown, but also across
neighborhoods with one-story
homes.
And in assessing these ad-
ditions, which range from dia-
monds to rhinestones, Miami
has come to exemplify a deep,
national ambivalence about the
boom's lasting impact.
This month's mayoral elec-
tion was in many ways a refer-
endum on the idea that more
construction means progress.
And as was the case in Se-
attle, where the incumbent
lost in a primary, and in New
York, where Mayor Michael R.
Bloomberg won, but not by
much, the results pointed to
retrenchment: Tomas Regala-
do, after campaigning against
grand plans, beat a protege of
Diaz's, Joe Sanchez, winning
72 percent of the vote.
"It was wild," Regalado said,
describing the Diaz era. "And
many times, irresponsible."

COMPLICATED COURSE
The causes, of course, are
complicated. In a time of easy
credit, experts said, Diaz in-
herited a laissez-faire zoning
code that let developers rule.
By legal right, they could build
a 40-story building beside a re-
tiree's 1950s ranch-style home.
In terms of design, the city
could only request alterations.
"It's a little like the Ten Com-
mandments," said Arva Moore
Parks, a historian and member
of the Miami Planning Adviso-
ry Board from 2002 until this
year. "It's just suggestions."
Still, there is no doubt that
Diaz, a registered indepen-
dent, welcomed development.
He said he came into office in
2001 with a sense of urgency
because Miami had yet to ex-


perience a revival like New York
City's or Miami Beach's. This
was a city with a $140 million
surplus where rusted-out cars
filled empty lots and thunder-
storms caused flooding, and
politicians talked more about
Havana than Tallahassee.
"We were something of a
laughingstock," Diaz said, add-
ing, "I wanted to turn that im-
age around, and I think I did."
Those who saw his adminis-
tration up close generally agree.
Several former officials said
Diaz, 55, a lawyer, modernized
city government. His office did
not even have a computer when
he arrived; now Miami's police
officers have laptops with voice
recognition software in their
cruisers.

INTERNATIONAL CITY
For some residents, the good
outweighs the bad. "I'm thrilled
that Miami has become a ma-
jor international city," said Bert
Silvestre, 51, a resident of the
Roads neighborhood and a se-
nior manager for IBM. "Devel-
opment is the price we pay."
But for now at least, Silvestre
appears to be in the minority.
With record unemployment,
foreclosures and budget cuts
-- in an area with one of the na-
tion's largest gaps between rich
and poor residents -- anger is
the norm.
Like many others, John
Thomas, 76, had one question:
"Where did all the money go?"
Though he lives on a street with
new storm drains, near a park
overhauled under Diaz, he crit-
icized politicians as expecting
bailouts after "they spent them-
selves into the grave."
Just as common are the views
of Miriam Galliana, 63, who
said she voted for Diaz but now
believes "this is not New York
City, and it shouldn't be."
Galliana lives in Silvestre's
neighborhood, in a simple
home just off Coral Way. And
her opinion has been shaped
by what she sees from her front
door: a new 13-story apartment
building.

NEIGHBORHOOD CAMPAIGN
"This was a quiet, nice, beau-
tiful neighborhood, and it's not
like that anymore," she said.
"It's horrible."
Elvis Cruz, an activist with
Miami Neighborhoods United,
said the building exemplified
the Diaz era. He said that be-
cause it was in a designated
"special district," which allows
for more oversight, the city
should have insisted that the
design "respond to the physical,
contextual environment," as the


Some bigger police forces feel left out


By Kevin Johnson

WASHINGTON The Justice
Department gave more than $77
million in stimulus funds this
year to 200 police agencies be-
cause of their locations rather
than economic or crime-fight-
ing needs, department records
show.
That's because the program to
help law enforcement agencies
hire more officers is required un-
der a 1994 rule by Congress to
distribute money to every state
where police or sheriff depart-
ments apply for aid, regardless
of how urgent their need. Some
of the largest police agencies
complain that they got short-
changed despite more severe
crime problems and economic
troubles than many recipients.
The Justice Department set
up a ranking system that scored
agencies -based on economic
need, crime levels and crime-
reduction strategies. However,
the congressional requirement
to distribute money broadly has
prompted the National Sher-
iffs' Association to call for a


"re-examination" of the criteria
because it contends the rule
funded just 6.4% of sheriff ap-
plicants, compared with 16.7%
of police agencies, says Ann
Yom, the association's director
of government affairs.
In Houston, where increas-
ing assaults nudged up vio-
lent crime in 2008, Police Chief
Harold Hurtt says the city was
"overlooked." The agency re-
quested money for 260 officers
but got nothing despite a Jus-
tice Department score of 90.4.
That was well above many of the
agencies that qualified because
they were the only applicants
in their state, including Boise,
which scored 58.5; Cheyenne,
Wyo., 46.8; Honolulu, 81.3; and
Omaha, 84.7.
"It's hard for me to say that
Boise deserved or had a greater
need than some of our competi-
tors," Boise Deputy Police Chief
Pat Braddock says. The depart-
ment got more than $2 million
to hire nine officers, even though
it had not had to layoff anyone
and had seen crime decline for
three years, he says.


zoning ordinance requires.
"This is an illegal building,"
Cruz said. "But the city allowed
it."'
Parks, who was chairwoman
during her last four years on
the planning board, said the
problem of loose enforcement
preceded Diaz, though during
the building boom, the mech-
anisms of government were
overwhelmed. The planning
board sometimes met until 2
a.m., Parks said, and lawyers
for developers held more sway
than critics. Developers, after
all, were major campaign con-
tributors who could drag the
city into expensive lawsuits.
Even in the case of the large,
controversial projects that did
come before Miami's five-mem-


ber commission and the may-
or, "yes" votes carried the day.
Diaz could have stepped in, for
instance, to veto the commis-
sion's approval in 2007 of three
condominium towers near Viz-
caya, the historic museum in
Coconut Grove. But he did
not. Instead, the development
died in the courts last year af-
ter preservationists (including
Parks) sued to stop it.

STADIUM DIVISIVE
Other divisive projects, like
the new stadium under con-
struction for the Florida Mar-
lins on the site of the Orange
Bowl, also received the Diaz
signature. In eight years, he
said, he did not veto anything.
He said he preferred trans-


formation. It took four years,
but in October, the City Com-
mission approved his ambi-
tious urban blueprint, Miami
21, which will encourage more
mixed use and bring stricter
height restrictions to residen-
tial areas. It also gives the plan-
ning board the power to reject
projects based on their design
and other criteria.
But for many, Miami 21 has
come too late, leaving open
whether Diaz will be remem-
bered as a visionary or by the
nickname he picked up along
the way, Money Diaz.
He was, by his own admis-
sion, "a deal man." At times, he
said, he wondered if he did too
much deciding and not enough
explaining. His friends said he


hated public relations and pre-
ferred sharing Scotch in his of-
fice with fellow insiders.
It is that culture that has left
Miami with a bitter aftertaste.
Two commissioners who were
often Diaz allies have left of-
fice since the election because
of corruption scandals, and the
city today faces a fiscal night-
mare -- partly because of pen-
sion obligations, partly because
of declining revenue from prop-
erty taxes. Both are now part of
the Diaz legacy.
"In the time of the boom, you
could do everything and any-
thing, and no one would no-
tice," Regalado said. Now, he
added, it is time to emphasize
different values: accountability
and caution.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


Sen. Burris rebuked by Senate Ethics Committee, but no penalty


By Carl Hulse

WASHINGTON The Sen-
ate Ethics Committee issued a
sternly worded rebuke on Fri-
day to Senator Roland W. Bur-
ris, Democrat of Illinois, saying
he had made misleading and
inaccurate statements about
the circumstances surrounding
his appointment by Gov. Rod R.
Blagojevich. But it made no rec-
ommendation for further pun-
ishment.
Concluding an investigation
into whether Mr. Burris lied
about contacts with associates
of the governor, who was later
impeached and forced from of-
fice, the panel issued Mr. Bur-
ris a letter of admonishment and
said he had been less than can-
did in his statements and had
had an inappropriate telephone


call with the governor's brother,
Robert.
"While the committee did not
find that the evidence before it
supported any actionable viola-
tions of law, senators must meet
a much higher standard of con-
duct," said the letter from the
panel, which also found that Mr.
Burris's actions and statements
"reflected unfavorably on the
Senate."
In his own statement, Mr. Bur-
ris, 72, a former Illinois attorney
general who has announced he
will not seek election to the seat
next year, said that he was grat-
ified the investigation was over
and that he looked forward to
finishing his term.
"I am pleased that after numer-
ous investigations, this matter
has finally come to a close," Mr.
Burris said. "I thank the mem-


bers of the Senate Ethics Com-
mittee for their fair and thor-
ough review of this matter, and
now look forward to continuing
the important work ahead on
behalf of the people of Illinois."
Issued before the release of
the Ethics Committee findings,


the statement from the sena-
tor's office carried a headline
stating that Mr, Burris had been
"cleared of legal wrongdoing" by
the panel. But the tone of the
panel's admonishment 'demon-
strated that his colleagues were
disturbed by conduct related to
his appointment in January to
the Senate seat vacated by Ba-
rack Obama before he assumed
the presidency.
"The committee found that
you should have known that
you were providing incorrect,
inconsistent, misleading or in-
complete information to the
public, the Senate and those
conducting legitimate inquiries
into your appointment to the
Senate," the letter said.
Saying that Mr. Blagojevich
was essentially auctioning the
Senate seat that was his to fill,


federal prosecutors last De-
cember disclosed secretly re-
corded phone calls that they
said showed the governor plot-
ting how to get the most reward
for the seat. The revelations led
Senate Democratic leaders to
declare immediately that they
would not seat anyone appoint-
ed by Mr. Blagojevich.
But the governor went ahead
and in late December appointed
Mr. Burris, defying the leader-
ship. After an embarrassing
standoff that at one point had
Mr. Burris standing outside
the Capitol in the rain, Demo-
crats relented and said he could
be seated, provided he could
demonstrate to a state legisla-
tive committee considering im-
peaching Mr. Blagojevich that
no bargains had been struck to
win the seat.


Mr. Burris testified before the
impeachment panel on Jan.
8 and did not disclose that he
had spoken by phone with Mr.
Blagojevich's brother in Novem-
ber and suggested he might
raise money for the governor
and was interested in the Senate
appointment. He disclosed that
call after he had been seated in
the Senate, sparking the eth-
ics investigation and a'separate
perjury inquiry in Illinois that
found no grounds for a criminal
charge.
But the ethics panel noted
that Mr. Burris's initial testi-
mony omitting the talk with the
governor's brother was "one of
the factors the Senate l9ader-
ship said they would consider
in your seating, and its truth-
fulness was important and rel-
evant."


Valerie Ward, principal of Scott Lake Elementary School.

Scott Lake Elementary principal wins $10K


Special to the Times

Valerie Ward, principal of
Scott Lake Elementary School,
was the top Miami-Dade school
principal winners of the seventh
annual Leonard Miller Prin-
cipal Leadership Award from
the Council for Educational
Change at a special event held
Sunday. Gilberto Bonce, princi-
pal of South Miami Senior High
School was named one of two
Gold Medallion winners, along
with Dr. Christi Chandler-Buell


of Tampa.
The three winners were cho-
sen from among a selection of
statewide applicants who dem-
onstrated extraordinary leader-
ship in three areas: raising stu-
dent achievement, empowering
staff leadership, and forming
meaningful partnerships with
businesses and community.
Ward, who has raised Scott
Lake Elementary's grade from
a C to an A, won the $10,000
prize. She was surprised with a
congratulatory video and poem


from Scott Lake's students and
staff. The event was held at the
Star Island home of Sue Miller,
Council Board Member and
Chair of its Educational Ad-
vancement Committee. Bonce
and Chandler-Buell each re-
ceived $5,000.
The award is named for Leon-
ard Miller, the late chair of the
South Florida Annenberg Chal-
lenge, who firmly believed that
principal leadership was the
catalyst to increasing student
achievement.


FBI report shows more hate-motivated crime


By Marisol Bello


The number of crimes against
Black people and members of re-
ligious groups increased in 2008,
making up a growing share of
incidents motivated by bias, the
FBI reported Monday.
Those categories accounted
for 56% of the 7,783 hate crimes
reported in 2008. Overall, .hate
crimes increased 2% from 2007.
The election of the first Black
president and hot-button issues
such as abortion and gay mar-
riage contributed to the spikes,
anti-bias groups say.
"There is this kind of ex-
tremism going .on," says Hilary
Shelton, director of the NAACP
Washington bureau. He says
Obama's election and the reces-
sion led to a backlash against
Blacks as some people look for
someone to blame for hard eco-,
nomic times.
The number of attacks on
Blacks increased 8% to 2,876,
accounting for seven of every 10
race-motivated crimes.
Brian Levin, director of the
Center for the Study of Hate &
Extremism at California State
University-San Bernardino,
says it is hard to draw conclu-
sions from the FBI data because
the number of agencies report-
ing varies each year and some
do better than others at classify-
ing hate crimes.
Most hate crimes, almost four
in 10, involved property damage
and vandalism. Almost three in
10 involve intimidation of a per-
son. Three in 10 are assaults.
Hate crimes based on sexual
orientation increased 3% to
1,297, although the number of
people victimized went up 13%,
to 1,706.
Geo Vaughn, 23, of Queens,


N.Y., reported to police that he
was beaten in August 2008 in
Manhattan by a gang of young
men shouting anti-gay epithets.
He says lesbians, gay men, bi-
sexuals and transgender people
are more vulnerable now because
they are increasingly in the pub-
lic eye in the debate over equal
rights, including a California vote
that overturned a new law allow-


ing same-sex marriage. "It gives
our attackers more drive to hurt
us," he says.
Two men have been charged
with a hate crime against
Vaughn.
Hate crimes based on religion
rose 9% to 1,519. Most, 67%,
were against Jews. Incidents in-
volving Catholics increased 23%
to 75.


SEC: Theodule defrauded fellow Haitians


Miami Times Special Report

George Theodule, charged
with scamming $23.4 million
from his fellow Haitian-Amer-
icans, has reached a settle-
ment with federal securities
regulators.
The self-styled "investment
guru, has agreed to an injunc-
tion, but has not admitted or
denied the allegations. The
court will now decide what civ-


il penalties Theodule will pay.
The charges stem from last
December, when the Securities
and Exchange Commission
(SEC) alleged that Theodule
was running a Ponzi scheme
that involved thousands of
Haitian Americans across the
country. Creative Capital Con-
sortium and A Creative Capital
Concept$, Theodule's compa-
nies, had their assets frozen.
In 2007, Theodule began


creating investment clubs
across the country, claiming
that the money would be used
to fund business ventures in
Haiti, Sierra Leone, and in the
United States. He promised
returns of 100 percent within
90 days.
The SEC alleges that the
ventures were not legitimate,
but rather that he paid the
older investors with the in-
vestments of newer recruits.


Governor looks into wasteful spending


Miami Times Special Report

This week, Governor Char-
lie Crist ordered an inves-
tigation of Juvenile Justice
Secretary Frank Peterman's
extensive taxpayer-funded
travel. A citizen has lodged
an ethics complaint on the
same topic. Peterman often
travelled between Tallahassee
and Tampa, which is near his


family home.
Crist ordered Melinda
Miguel, his inspector general,
based on a report that says
Peterman has spent $44,000
in less than two years. Accord-
ing to a Crist spokesperson,
Miguel's mission is to root out
exactly this sort of waste.
Peterman intends to cooper-
ate with the investigation.
Twenty thousand dollars (of


the$44,000 total) was spent
on trips between the .capital
and Tampa, and many of the
trips allowed Peterson to spend
weekends with his family.
Peterman, a senior pastor at
the Rock of Jesus Missiona-y
Baptist Church in St. Peters-
burg, drew a $29,000 salary
from the church last year. In
addition, his state position
pays him $120,000 per year.


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Bowl Host Committee would like to
commemorate the Lindsay Group, Inc.
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MIA MI-DADE
WATER ANSWER *
IDEPARTMENT By Ana Maria Monte Flores
SA ,* A A A AAA *

The Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department is pleased to welcome you to
this new feature. Through this column we will regularly report water news
and practical information that will keep you informed about Miami-Dade's
tap water, how to use It wisely and all the services provided by the Depart-
ment. Our goal is to serve the residents and businesses of Miami-Dade
County by providing high-quality drinking water and wastewater services, by
protecting public health and by acting in the best interest of our environ-
ment.

READING YOUR METER

The amount of water you use is measured and billed in hundreds of cubic
feet (ccfs). For your convenience, the number of gallons used is printed on
your bill as well. Tracking your water usage is as simple as tracking the mile-
age on your car. Just take a look at your water meter and read the numbers
on the white dials. To determine your water usage, subtract your previous
reading from your current reading.

HIGH BILLS, METER CHECKS AND REREADS

Usually, the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department will automatically in-
vestigate the occurrence of a high bill, to check for an improperly working
meter or leakage, but customers are welcome to call Customer Relations at
305-665-7477 and bring a high bill to our attention. An initial investigation
of the meter will be done at no cost to you. Please note that the investigator
will NOT check your Inside plumbing.
If your any reason you believe your water meter is giving incorrect readings,
call 305-665-7477. A Certified Meter Test request form will be mailed to you
and arrangements will be made to have your meter checked. If the meter is
found to be malfunctioning, you will not be charged for the test and your bill
will be adjusted to correct inaccurate readings. If the meter is found to be
working properly, the Department will charge $40.00 to your account to
cover the cost of the test.


I


n -






BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25- DECEMBER 1, 2009


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8A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


Army investigates soldier mom

Lawyer: Baby not being used to shrink duty f ,' /'


By Alan Gomez

An Army mother who refused
to go to Afghanistan because
she failed to get someone to care
for her son wants the military
to discharge her rather than
enforce a policy thousands of
single mothers have abided by.
Spc. Alexis Hutchinson, 21,
was to depart Nov. 5 with her
unit of the 3rd Infantry Division
from Fort Stewart in Georgia.
She refused after her mother
declined to care for Hutchin-
son's 10-month-old son, Ka-
mani.
Her lawyer insists that
Hutchinson is genuinely stuck
and not using her child to get
out of duty.
Under Army policy, soldiers
who cannot find a suitable
caregiver may be disciplined or
honorably discharged.
"These women are given a
choice which is a very bad one
to face: deploying and aban-
doning your children, or re-
fusing your orders and facing
charges," says Hutchinson's ci-
vilian lawyer Rai Sue Sussman.
"I think (the Army has) shown
... a lack of understanding for a
young soldier, a young mother,
in a difficult situation."
The Army says Hutchinson
may have acted improperly in
her handling of the situation
and is not entitled to be treated
differently from other women.
"There are thousands of sol-
diers that have similar cir-


cumstances," Fort Stewart
spokesman Kevin Larson said.
"They're single parents. They
do the right thing. They prepare
for their deployment. They ful-
fill their sworn duty."
More than 30,000 single
mothers have deployed to the
two most recent wars, accord-
ing to a study by Iraq and Af-
ghanistan Veterans of America.
An Army cook, Hutchinson
turned herself in to military po-
lice the day after she was sup-
posed to deploy.
Hutchinson was ordered
held, and her son was placed
in a protective service until
Hutchinson's mother could fly
from Oakland the next day to
care for him.
Hutchinson is confined to the
base, awaiting the result of an
Army investigation.
Larson said Hutchinson was
detained because her command
"became aware of additional in-
formation" and concluded that
there may have been "alleged
misconduct" on her part. He
would not elaborate.
The Army generally gives par-
ents enough time to formulate
a written plan for care of the
children prior to a deployment,
Army spokesman Wayne Hall
said.
Sussman says Hutchinson
has done all she can to find
a caregiver and wants a dis-
charge.
While not speaking directly
about Hutchinson's case, Hall


-Associated Press
An undated self-portrait shows Spc. Alexis Hutchinson
with her son, Kamani, 10 months. Hutchinson was sched-
uled to deploy to Afghanistan with her unit Nov. 5.

said a unit's commanding offi- now in Afghanistan, which
cer generally oversees a court- means she could end up there
martial. Hutchinson's unit is after all.


Senators have tough questions for Holder


NYC terror trial, fort hood shootings fodder for critics


By Kevin Johnson

WASHINGTON Attorney
General Eric Holder has said
his decision to bring self-pro-
claimed 9/11 mastermind Kha-
lid Sheikh Mohammed and four
alleged accomplices to New York
City to stand trial in civilian
court was the "toughest" call in
his short tenure as the nation's
top law enforcement officer.
Today, his job gets even more
difficult.
'In an appearance before the
Senate Judiciary Committee,
Holder most likely will face dif-
ficult questions not only about
his decision in the Mo- .
hammed case but also ,.j
about whether federal .
investigators mishan-
dled information about -
the Fort Hood shooting
suspect's contacts with
a radical cleric months
before the Nov. 5 mas-
sacre. HA
Three of Holder's
most vocal critics of
the decision to try Mohammed
in civilian court are members
of the panel: Republican Sens.
Jeff Sessions of Alabama, John
Cornyn of Texas and Jon Kyl of
Arizona.
"The attorney general is in the
middle of a host of major and
sensitive issues," said Sessions,
the panel's top Republican.
"There is a host of questions,
and the time will be short."
Holder's decision to try the
accused 9/11 planners in civil-
ian court "has monumental pol-


icy implications," Sessions said
in an interview. He has said the
transfer of Mohammed and his
alleged accomplices to civilian
court is an unnecessary secu-
rity risk.
Holder, a former federal pros-
ecutor; has said he is "confi-
dent" that the terrorism sus-
pects can be tried safely New
York.
Committee Chairman Patrick
Leahy, D-Vt., supports Hold-
er's decision to try Moham-
med in New York City. Leahy
said last week that the federal
courts are "capable" of dealing
with terrorism cases.
Leahy has said
Holder should expect
questions on Fort
Hood.
"A lot of the dots
S were not connected,"
the senator said Sun-
day on CBS' Face the
Nation.
SAN Leahy, who was not
available for com-
ment Tuesday, has
said questions remain about
whether information about
Army Maj. Nidal Hasan's con-
tacts with Anwar al-Awlaki
was properly shared prior to
the Fort Hood shooting ram-
page, which left 13 dead.
Hasan's contacts with Awla-
ki, now living in Yemen, were
first discovered in December
by investigators working with
an FBI-supervised Joint Ter-
rorism Task Force in Wash-
ington.
The task force, which includ-


McCain presses for ethics review

on defense work by retired brass
By Ken Dilanian and Tom Vanden Brook

WASHINGTON The Pentagon should rewrite ethics rules for re-
tired generals who work as advisers for the military while represent-
ing defense contractors, Arizona Sen. John McCain and other law-
makers said Wednesday.
"The important thing is that they avoid the appearance of conflict,"
McCain, the ranking Republican on the Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee, said in an interview.
McCain was among several members of Congress who called
for changes in the wake of a USA TODAY investigation published
Wednesday. The newspaper found that many retired officers collect
their annual pensions, work for defense firms and draw government
consulting fees as "senior mentors" to the military services. Of the
158 retired generals and admirals identified as senior mentors, 80%
had financial ties to defense contractors, including 29 who were full-
time executives of defense companies.
Hired as independent contractors, the retired officers working as
mentors are not subject to the ethics rules that would apply if they
were brought in as part-time federal employees. Nor do they have to
disclose, to the military or the public, their ties to defense contrac-
tors.
A spokesman for Marine Corps Commandant James Conway said
in a statement that the program offers a high return for a modest
investment. "We are comfortable that a clear line separates the work
our mentors do for us and any outside corporate interests they might
have, and to assume otherwise is unfair," Maj. David Nevers paid.


ed Pentagon investigators, did
not share information about
Hasan, an Army psychiatrist,
because it found his e-maiis
were "consistent with research"
being done by Hasan, who "was
not involved in terrorist activi-
ties or planning," the FBI said
in a statement last week.
"Ultimately, we should know
if mistakes were made ... for
the sole purpose of making


sure- those mistakes are not
made again," Leahy said.
Holder's visit to Capitol Hill
comes after President Obama
last week ordered a govern-
ment-wide inquiry into how
intelligence about Hasan was
handled in the months before
the rampage. The Defense De-
partment is launching its own
review of how the services deal
with troubled soldiers, the As-
sociated Press reported Tues-
day.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN.DESTINY


U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder testifies before the Sen-
ate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.

Obama predicts conviction

and execution in 9/11 case


By Kevin Johnson

WASHINGTON President
Obama and Attorney General
Eric Holder on Wednesday de-
fended the controversial deci-
sion to prosecute the accused
Sept. 11 conspirators in a New
York federal court. Obama pre-
dicted that self-professed mas-
termind Khalid Sheikh Moham-
med would be convicted and
executed.
Obama said he was not "pre-
judging" the trial's outcome but
had "complete confidence" in
the U.S criminal justice system.
"I don't think it (the decision)
will be offensive at all when
he's convicted and when the
death penalty is applied to him,"
Obama said in an interview with
NBC.
"Failure is not an option,"
Holder told the Senate Judicia-
ry Committee. "These are cases
that have to be won," he said.
"I'm not scared of what Khalid
Sheikh Mohammed would say
at trial, and no one else needs
to be afraid, either. We need not
cower in the face of the enemy."
Holder testified before the
committee, where lawmakers
sparred over his decision last
week to send Mohammed and
four alleged accomplices from
a military detention center in
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to New
York and a civilian court.
Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama,
the committee's top ranking Re-
publican, said time has "dulled"


administration officials' memory
that "we are at war."
About two dozen survivors and
relatives of Sept. 11 victims at-
tended the hearing to show their
own disapproval with prosecut-
ing the accused terrorists in the
shadow of the deadliest terrorist
attack on U.S. soil.
"This is a terrible mistake,"
said Tim Brown, 47, a retired
New York City firefighter who
survived the World Trade Cen-
ter's collapse. "It will be like
.Sept. 11 Part 2. We're going to
drag these families back through
this?"
Judiciary Charman Patrick
Leahy, D-Vt., backed Holder:
"Those who perpetrated the at-
tacks should be. tried here."
Leahy said, "Mary surviving
family members of those killed
that day have said, after years
of frustration, it is time to have
justice."
The most heated exchange in-
volved Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz.
"How could you be more like-
ly to get a conviction in federal
court when Khalid Sheikh Mo-
hammed has already asked to
plead guilty before a military
commission and be executed?"
Kyl asked, prompting brief ap-
plause from the Sept. 11 fami-
lies.
"My decision does not de-
pend on the wHims and desires
of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed,"
Holder answered. "He will not
select the prosecution venue. I
will."


Everybody reads


bee Uitamt imets


South Florida's oldest and most popular weekly




One family serving our community for 87 consecutive years










BLACKS MUST CONTROL [HEIR OWN DE\rlNv 9A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25- DECEMBER 1, 2009


NA -
Vt,


WNBA star Marie Ferdinand Harris
t i- ceive a proclamation from the City
-MiamiTimes photos/Sandra J. Charite North Miami Mayor Andre Pierre.
WNBA star Marie Ferdinand Harris teach students in the FANM after-school
program how to shoot a basketball.


WNBA star returns to


Edison High alumni shares her story


with local students
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Marie Ferdinand-Harris, a
Haitian-American, imagined her-
self becoming an entrepreneur
involved in different ventures or
even a non-profit organization
for kids but today she finds her-
self on the court wearing a num-
ber 24 jersey as a shooting guard
for the professional basketball
team, Los Angeles Sparks.
"It's funny how things work
out," she said to The Miami Times
in an exclusive interview outside
Haitian Women of Miami (FANM
Ayisyen Nan Miyami) building in
-*ss w


Little Haiti on Nov. 18.
Ferdinand Harris, 31, visited
several schools last week that in-
.clude Toussaint Louverture Ele-
mentary and Miami Edison High
(her alma mater), to share her
life story and motivate students.
Ferdinand Harris, who is 5 feet
9 inches tall, joined Marleine
Bastien, Executive Director of
Haitian Women of Miami (FANM
Ayisyen Nan Miyami), North Mi-
ami Mayor Andre Pierre, Haitian
poet/artist Mecca A.K.A. Gri-
mo and several students at the
FANM building in Little Haiti for
a game of basketball on Nov. 18.
At the age of 13, the Miami


Edison High recalls her first en-
counter with the sport.
"The first day, I could not put
the ball down," she said. "I fell in
love with the sport."
Ferdinand-Harris' best friend
saw her love for the sport and
encouraged her to pursue it.
That she did. In her senior year,
Ferdinand-Harris averaged 24.0
points, seven rebounds, 5.4 as-
sists, and 2 steals per game, and
was named the 1995 Player of
the Year in Florida. She contin-
ued her education at Louisiana
State University and she played
for the LSU Lady Tigers basket-
ball team.
She entered the WNBA in 2001
after being selected eighth over-
all by the Utah Starzz in the first
round WNBA draft. Ferdinand-


Miami
Harris is a two-time WNBA All-
Star.
In 2003, she joined the San
Antonio Silver Stars then finally
found home with 'the Los An-
geles Sparks in 2008. She took
some time off in 2006 to prepare
for her first born child. Today,
Ferdinand-Harris is married to
Cedrick Harris, former baseball
player for the LSU Tigers and
former baseball coach at Anto-
nian College Preparatory High
School.
With students from the FANM
after-school program in the au-
dience, Mayor Pierre presented
Ferdinand-Harris with a proc-
lamation from the City of North
Miami. He said, "It is a privilege
to have great talent within the
community."


New Haitian prime minister

approved by lawmakers


By Jonathan M. Katz
Associated Press


PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -
Lawmakers overwhelmingly
gave confirmation to Jean-Max
Bellerive as Haiti's new prime
minister Tuesday, making him
the sixth person to hold the
post since 2004 in this politi-
cally unstable nation.
The Chamber of Deputies
voted 70-2, with two absten-
tions, to back the appointment
of Bellerive, who in a question-
and-answer session with law-
makers earlier in the day prom-
ised to court investors and lift
people out of poverty in the
hemishere's poorest nation.
His credentials had already
been approved by both parlia-
mentary houses, and the Sen-
ate approved his Cabinet and
plan of government Monday.
Bellerive's inauguration was
expected Wednesday.
Bellerive was nominated by
President Rene Preval after the
Senate ousted Michele Pierre-
Louis on Oct. 30. She was re-
moved after a year in office be-
cause of alleged failures to ease
poverty in Haiti and help it re-
cover from storms last year that
killed hundreds and caused $1
billion in damages.
The size of Bellerive's task is
clear outside the rundown leg-
islative complex: Walls along
garbage-strewn streets are
covered with graffiti denounc-
ing the government and the
9,000 U.N. peacekeepers who
patrol Haiti's capital and coun-
tryside.
Bellerive has defended the
previous government's efforts
to build roads, install electric-
ity and attract investment. He
pledged to continue the work
he did as minister of planning
and external cooperation.
The change in leadership
comes at a critical time.
Pierre-Louis was in the midst
of courting investment efforts
spurred by Bill Clinton, the re-
cently appointed U.N. special


envoy to Haiti, that some con-
sider key to creating jobs in the
deeply impoverished country.
The effort to oust Pierre-Louis
was led by members of Preval's
own party, some of whom criti-
cized her for relying too much
on international development
plans.
Many in Haiti's business


JEAN-MAX BELLERIVE
New Haitian prime minister


community, which hopes to
take advantage of attempts to
foster a business climate in
the long-isolated co ntry, have
praised the ousted prime min-
ister and also welcomed her
apparent successor, who is
known for his work as a busi-
ness consultant.
"We definitely think he's go-
ing to do a good job because
we've had prior experiences
in dealing with him both in
private sector as an employee
and as a manager," said Youri
Mevs, president of the newly
formed Haitian Economic De-
velopment Foundation and
managing shareholder of a new
free-trade zone near the Cite
*Soleil slum.
Bellerive is an economist who
served in the administration of
President Jean-Bertrand Aris-
tide, who was forced from office
in a violent rebellion in 2004.
In recent years, he has played
a major role in coordinating
and attracting investment and
foreign aid.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


H1019-MK-P92-1109


S 9A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25- DECEMBER 1, 2009









The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


MIAMI TIMES


Methodist Church is on the decline


Pastors lose job security

(Eurweb) -Pastors affiliated with the
United Methodist Church could find them-
selves in the unemployment line.
According to The Tennessean.com, the
long-standing practice of guaranteed jobs
for pastors could come to an end.
Methodist bishops and two denomina-
tional committees want to -end job secu-
rity for ministers, known as guaranteed
appointment. And shrinking membership
and budgets may give Methodist leader-
ship what they want by default.


But as membership has dropped, so has
the number of churches able to afford pas-
tors. In 1960, United Methodists claimed
about 10.8 million members.
Today, membership is at 7.8 million. Av-
erage Sunday attendance is about 95 peo-
ple. And half of Methodist churches draw
50 or fewer people to Sunday services.
A church needs about 125 people to
support a full-time minister. In some cas-
es, elders serve two or more churches at a
time. Many churches are served by part-
time or local pastors who have no job se-
curity.


Atlanta cops, shaken community

trying desperately to make amends


By Greg Bluestein
Associated Press


ATLANTA After a 92-year-old grand-
mother was cut down in a hail of police bul-
lets during a botched raid three years ago,
her community seemed to trust officers
about as much as the drug dealers who
roam the blighted streets.
Neighbors complained that it was so dif-
ficult to get police attention for their crime-
ridden northwest Atlanta neighborhood that
they rarely bothered to dial 911. Atlanta
Police Chief Richard Pennington was jeered
when he attended a memorial for Kathryn
Johnston days after she was killed.
On Monday, Pennington came back and
was met with applause. It's been slow and
tedious, but Pennington and community
leaders said the department has worked to
Please turn to AMENDS 14B


Catholic bishops: Gay
BALTIMORE The nation's Roman Cath-
olic bishops have affirmed that the church
defines marriage between one man and one
woman, and sex is meant for procreation.
The pastoral letter was issued Tuesday in
Baltimore by the U.S. Conference of Catho-
lic Bishops.
The bishops say they are disturbed that a


- WI


-AP Photo/Courtesy of Johnston Family
This undated file photo released by the
family shows 92-year-old Kathryn John-
ston. Police and community members of her
Atlanta neighborhood are trying to rebuild
ties three years after Johnston was gunned
down by police in a botched drug raid.


marriage hurts society
growing number of people view marriage as
a private or individual matter, instead of an
issue critical to building a healthy society.
They say in the pastoral letter that rede-
fining marriage to allow same-sex unions
would damage the common good and would
ignore the proper role of husbands and
wives.


L.


-Photo by Miami-Dade County
(L-R) Santa Claus, Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson, Kathy Cole, New Jour-
neys Executive/Program Director, Quenika Boston, New Journeys Founder/CEO and Burnie, Miami
Heat mascot.


Edmonson raises funds for women


transitioning out of foster care


Special to the Times


County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson
drummed up some early holiday cheer for young
women aging out of the foster care system. Ed-
monson took part in the "Dreams Do Come True"
charity event- earlier this month that benefited
the New Journeys Transitional Home, a non-
profit organization that provides a nurturing en-
vironment to promote independence and self-suf-
ficiency among the young women it houses. New
Journeys focuses on women ages 18 to 24 that
are homeless or no longer in foster care.
The event, held at Dolly's Florist, featured a
silent auction with proceeds going toward New
Journeys, as well as kid-friendly activities, in-
cluding face painting, reading corner, arts and
crafts lesson, and a visit from Santa Claus. In
addition, Heat fans got to meet Heat player Dor-
rell Wright, the Miami Heat Dancers, and mascot
Burnie. Also in attendance was Deco Drive's Luis
Aguirre.


"The women at New Journeys learn the skills
they will need to not only survive, but thrive as
they pursue jobs, education and living on their
own," said Edmonson, an avid supporter of the
organization. "We must all do what we can, de-
spite tough economic times, to help New Jour-
neys nurture many more young women."
New Journeys Transitional Home's mission is
to decrease the rate of homelessness for young
adults transitioning out of the foster care system
by providing housing and teaching skills needed
for self-sufficiency. The majority of its residents
have come from the organization's partnerships
with the Community Partnership For the Home-
less (The HAC), The Charlee Program, The Miami
Rescue Mission, and Switchboard of Miami. The
facility consists of warmly furnished double bed-
rooms, a common living area for leisure time, and
office space for workshops and computer use.
Open for little more than two years, New Jour-
neys has already housed over thirty young women
and relies on donations to continue its operations.










BL~\cK~ NILAN I CON I ROL flILIR (9\\ N DES VINY liB THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


EPIC hotel is celebrating the
25th anniversary of White Par-
ty Week in Miami, the world's
oldest and largest HIV/AIDS
fundraiser, and offering spe-
cial rates for those visiting Mi-
ami to enjoy White Party Week
events and festivities from Nov.
25-30. 305-424-5226 or visit
www.epichotel.com.


The Blue Cross and Blue
Shield of Florida Turkey Trot
5K will take place at the Tropi-
cal Park, 7:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m.,
Thursday, Nov. 26. 305-278-
8668.


;City of Hallandale Beach
Human Services Department
presents their 2009 annual
Community Thanksgiving Lun-
cheon at the Austin Hepburn
Center, from 10 a.m. 12 p.m.,
Thursday, Nov. 26. 954-457-
1460.


The Big Blue any You Foun-
dation presetits Kids Ocean
Adventure Series at the New-
port Beachside Hotel and Re-
sort Sunny Isles Beach from 11
a.m. 4 p.m., Saturday, Nov.
28. 954-558-9664.


The Gamble Memorial
Church of God in Christ invites
the community to their annual
free Thanksgiving dinner and
serviced, from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.,
Nov. 26. 3-5-633-7235 or 305-
821-3692.


Greater St. James Mission-
ary Baptis International
Church will hold its 50th an-
nu'al' Men's Day at 11 a.m. -on
Sunday, Nov. 29. 305-693-
.2726.


New Christ Tabernacle
Church invites you to their an-
nual 100 Men in Black and 100


The Booker T. Washing-
ton (BTW) Class of 1961 wor-
ship service will be held at the
St. Paul A.M.E. Church at 10
a.m., Sunday, Nov. 29. 305-
688-7072.


University of Miami's Mau-
rice Gusman Concert Hall will
present Festival Miami now
through November 30. 305-
284-4940 or visit: www.festi-
valmiami.com


W.I.T. Transitional Training
Center will hold their Gradu-
ation Ceremony at the Greater
Bethel Fellowship Hall at 10
a.m., Thursday, Dec. 3. 305-
757-0715.


Booker T. Washington
(BTW) Class of 1965 is having
a holiday extravaganza, Touch
of Class Ball, at the Grand Pa-
risilen Ballroom; from 8 p.m. 1
a.m., Friday, Dec. 4. Barbara
Graham, 305-634-3887, Rich-
ard Williams, 305-621-5048 or
Gwendolyn Thomas, 786-715-
5662.


The Miami-Dade Chamber of
Commerce will host its fourth


Women in White service at 3:30
p.m., Sunday, Nov. 29. Virginia
Bostic, 305-621-8126.


The New Saint Mark family


-1-n- it-y- --a.le-.n,,d a,]


will be celebrating their assis-
tant pastor at 3:30 p.m., Sun- Redemption M.B. Church is
day, Nov. 29. sponsoring a fundraising break-
fast and yard sale on Friday
., ******* and Saturday. Redmpuon will
Ebenezer United Methodist also host a mini rs ani de'a
Church will have their sixth an- 6- ctHs Union of t& fe'wLife M.B.
nual HIV/AIDS Benefit Health Association on Nov. 18-21. Rev.
Fair and Concert starting at 2 Silas Pinkney, 305-696-9964.
p.m. on Dec. 5. 305-635-7413. Pastor Willie McCrae, 305-793-
7388 or 305-836-1990.
******** Note: Calendar items must
House of Bethlehem A Place be submitted before 3:30 p.m.
of Bread Ministries is inviting on Monday.


Conservative Christian leaders


issue declaration


Pledge opposition to abortion and gay marriage


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) More
than 150 Christian leaders,
most of them conservative
evangelicals and traditional-
ist Roman Cathorics, issued
a joint declaration Friday re-
affirming their opposition to
abortion and gay marriage and
pledging to protect religious
freedoms.
The 4,700-word document,
called "The Manhattan Dec-
laration: A Call of Christian
Conscience," sounds familiar
themes from political and so-
cial debates over the health
care overhaul and gay mar-
riage battles.
While acknowledging that
"Christians and our. institu-


tions have too often scandal-
ously failed to uphold the insti-
tution of marriage," the group
rejects same-sex marriage. The
declaration states that opening
a legal door for gay marriage
would do the same for "polyam-
orous partnerships, polyga-
mous households, even adult
brothers, sisters, or brothers
and sisters living in incestuous
relationships."
President .Barack Obama's
desire to reduce the need for
abortion is "a commendable
goal," but his proposals are
likely to increase the number
of elective abortions, the docu-
ment contends.
"The present administration
is led and staffed by those who
want to make abortions legal at


any stage of fetal development,
and who want to provide abor-
tions at taxpayer expense," it
says.
Obama has said he wants
to strike a balance on abor-
tion coverage in the health care
overhaul.
The declaration also cites
threats to health care work-
ers' conscience clauses and
anti-discrimination statutes
it argues impinge on religious
freedoms.
Signatories include 15 Roman
Catholic bishops, including
New York Archbishop Timothy
Dolan and Washington Arch-
bishop Donald Wuerl; Focus
on the Family founder James
Dobson; National Association
of Evangelicals president Leith
Anderson; seminary leaders,
professors and pastors.


Health care fight swells lobbying


By Fredreka Schouten


WASHINGTON Companies
and groups hiring lobbying firms
on health issues nearly doubled
this year as special interests
rushed to shape the massive re-
vamp of the nation's health care
system now in its final stretch
before Congress.
About 1,000 organizations
have hired lobbyists since Jan-
uary, compared with 505 during
the same period in 2008, accord-
ing to a USA TODAY analysis of
congressional records compiled
by the nonpartisan CQ Money-
Line.
Overall, health care lobbying
has increased, exceeding $422
million during the first ninth
months of the year, according to


the Center for Responsive Poli-
tics, which tracks money in poli-
tics. That's more than any other
industry and a nearly 10% jump
over the same period in 2008.
The center's Dave Levinthal said
the frenzy of new lobbying activ-
ity makes financial sense.
"If lobbying didn't work, peo-
ple wouldn't do it," he said.
The vast scope of the health
care legislation, which cleared
a major hurdle Saturday when
the Senate voted 60-39 to begin
debating it, has spurred some to
lobby for the first time. Gaylord
Hospital in Wallingford, Conn.,
a 137-bed long-term care facil-
ity, decided it needed profes-
sional help after scrambling last
year aided by state lawmak-
ers to avoid losing Medicare


payments, said Janine Epright,
hospital chief financial officer.
"It was an eye-opener," she
said of the Medicare fight. "We
realized that we didn't have
enough pull individually or as
an industry to drive the process"
in Washington. Epright said the
non-profit hospital will spend
about $50,000 on lobbying.
Others are beefing up their
lobbying presence. Language
Line Services, which has spent
$90,000 on federal lobbying
since 2007, hired a second firm
this year as it pushed to boost
federal funding for medical
translation services. The firm,
which employs 8,000 transla-
tors, says interpreters can re-
duce medical errors for patients
who don't speak English.


annual Holiday Gala, "Progress:
The New Currency," at the Hyatt
Regency in Downtown Miami
on Saturday, Dec. 5. Beverly
James, 305-751-8648 or visit
www.m-dcc.org


Miami-Dade County Public
Schools (M-DCPS), in partner-
ship with Miami Dade College
(MDC), will host the 2009-2010
Student and Adult Career Path-
ways EXPO, at Miami Jackson
Senior High School, from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m., on Saturday,
December 5, 2009. 305-693-
3015 or visit http://dcte.dade-
schools.net.


Animal Services invites you
to celebrate Home for Every Hol-
iday, Pet Adoption Event at the
Animal Services Shelter, from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m., on December
6. Visit: www.miamidade.gov/
animals


Haitian American Leader-
ship Organization (HALO) is
offering six scholarships of up
to $1,000 to high school seniors
of Haitian descent in good aca-
demic standing. Applications
are now being *accepted for
the 2010 scholarships and the
deadline is Dec. 11. The award
recipients will be invited to at-
tend HALO's annual gala and
award ceremony that will be
held at the JW Marriott Hotel
in Miami on January 16, 2010.
Call 888-759-0085 or visit:
www.halohaiti.org.


everyone to participate in their
tour bus trip to Holyland, from
Tues.- Thurs. Deacon Arthur
Robinson, 786-624-7979.


A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to come fellowship
at 11:15 a.m., on Sundays and
Bible class weekly at 7 p.m.,
Thursday.


305



652-3001

20215 N.W. 2nd Ave.

Suite #2
Miami, Fl 33169


1.95

E 2nd Ave
04 (41)


8 rrN


www.dentistgrant.net


The community is invited
to get on the bus to the Florida
Classic on Saturday, Nov. 21.
For more information. Also,
come take a ride to the Holy
Land in Orlando, Fla. On Dec.
12. Call Phillip, 786-873-9498.


South Florida Super Bowl
Host Committee will host their
kickoff luncheon at the Land
Shark Stadium, from 11:30
a.m. 1:30 p.m., Monday, Dec.
7. 305-614-7555.


The Mandarin Oriental Ho-
tel will host the celebration of
the Miami Music Festival on
Brickell Key, from 6-7:30 p.m.,
on Wednesday, Dec. 9. Email:
mkomfeld@intunepartners.com


The Florida Alliance for Arts
Education (FAAE) is hosting a
Florida symposia at the Adri-
enne Arsht Center for the Per-
forming Arts, starting at 9 a.m.,
on Dec. 10. Email: info@faae.
org or visit www.faae.org


M.W. Cypress Grand Lodge,
A.F. and A.M., is sponsoring its
annual Christmas festival and
toy-give-away at the Masonic
Temple, from 9 a.m. to.12 p.m.,
Saturday, Dec. 12. George E.
Pitts, 305-467-5609 or email:
gfitts@carolina.rr.com


The fourth annual World
Salsa Championships will take


place at Hard Rock Live at the
Seminole Hard Rock Hotel &
Casino on Dec. 17-19 .


Miami-Dade County is seek-
ing outstanding women nomi-
nees for the 22nd annual In the
Company of Women Awards
Ceremony which will be held in
March 2010. The deadline for
nominations is 5 p.m. on Fri-
day, Dec. 18. Lisa Fernandez,
305-480-1717 ext. 104.


Rainbow Ladies-Our Space,
an organization for women, is
having their second annual
Holiday Gala at the Fantasy
Ballroom at 9 p.m., Dec. 19.
Adrienne Lamb, 305-772-4712.


Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010
Reunion. Classmates are urged
to reconnect through the con-
tact information listed below,
providing your address, phone,
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion6t5@cfl.
rr.com


. Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is calling all former
cheerleaders, majorettes, drill
team, dance line, flagettes and
band members for their upcom-
ing Alumni Pep Rally. 305- 804-
5371 or 786-256-2609.


National Investment Devel-


Mom: Son in coma heard everything for 23 years


Associated Press

BRUSSELS A man who
emerged from what doctors
thought was a vegetative state
says he was fully conscious for
23 years but could not respond
because he was paralyzed, his
'mother said Monday.
Rom Houben, 46, had a
car crash in 1983 and doc-
tors thought he had sunk into
a coma. His family continued
to believe their son was con-
scious and sought further


medical advice.
Professor Steven Laureys of
Belgium's Coma Science Group
realized that the diagnosis was
wrong and taught Houben how
to communicate through a spe-
cial keyboard, said Dr. Audrey
Vanhaudenhuyse, who is on
Laureys' team.
Rom used the device to tell a re-
porter for the German magazine
Der Spiegel that: "I screamed but
there was nothing to hear."
I Belgian doctors who treated
him early on said that Rom had


gone from a coma into a vegeta-
tive condition.
Coma is a state of unconscious-
ness in which the eyes are closed
and the patient can't be roused,
as if simply asleep. A vegetative
state is a condition in which the
eyes are open and can move, and
the patient has periods of sleep
and periods of wakefulness, but
remains unconscious and un-
aware of him or herself or others.
The patient can't think, reason,
respond, do anything on pur-
pose, chew or swallow.
k,


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NOW ACCEPTING MOST MEDICARE PLANS


opment (NID) Housing Coun-
seling Agency, a HUD approved
organization, is offering, free
Housing and Legal Counseling
for Homeowners at the Experts
Resource Community Center,
9 a.m. 5 p.m., M-F. Call 305-
652-7616 or 786-512-7400 or
email: lgreen@expertsresourc-
es.com or lougreen2@yahoo.
com for appointments.


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is seeking Reunion
Organizing Committee Repre-
sentatives from the Classes of
1981 -2008 to call 305-904-
5371 or 786-256-2609.
*********
The Florida Film Institute
presents Cinerama Saturdays
at the Little Haiti Cultural Cen-
ter, from 10:30 a.m. 12:30
p.m., until April 10, 2010. 305-
891-3456 or register at www.
flfilminstitute.org


A&A Associates is currently
hiring approximately1000 peo-
ple for the 2010 Super Bowl and
Pro Bowl football games which
will be held at Land Shark Sta-
dium in Miami Gardens. 561-
533-5303 or email Annette@as-
sociatestaffing.com


Rendo -Goju-Ryu Karate
Academy will be offering free
Karate lessons at the Liberty
Square Community Center
from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesdays and
Thursday. 305-694-2757.


BLACKS MusT CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1. 2009


This photo taken
Nov.5,shows hip-

hop gospel artist
.- ....Trey Andale Wil-
liams, seated, Sean

S Simmonds, center,
j and Terverius Black,
right, in a studio in
Harvest, Ala. Black
and Simmonds
started Xist World-
wide Record Label,
a Christian-themed
entertainment com-

pany, three years ago.
Williams will appear
in a film that is being
produced by Sim-
monds and Black.
-AP Photo/Michael Mercier




Hip-Hop sees surge in fan sites


HOLY -
continued from 10B

500,000 CD and digital sales of
hip-hop gospel, according to the
Christian Music Trade Associa-
tion, which operates Christian
SoundScan.
Supporters also point to an
increasing number of hip-hop
gospel fan Web sites.
"I think holy hip-hop music is
starting to make a move," said
Danny Wilson, a former road
manager for rapper-actor LL
Cool J and the main organizer
of the Holy Hip Hop Awards in
Atlanta. "Look how long it took
regular hip hop to take. You're
talking about 25 to 30 years for
it to really make an impact to
the point that it's a driving cul-
ture that's known all over the
world."
Wilson said better air play of
hip-hop gospel would make it
a more effective tool in reach-
ing the unchurched. He cites
a syndicated two-hour radio
show sponsored by Holy Hip
Hop Awards that airs once a
week in about 100 cities.
"We get letters from prison
all the time," Wilson said. "One
man wrote, 'I wish I had this
music when I was out on the
street, it might have saved my
life.'"


Joey Elwood, president of
Gotee Records, a small inde-
pendent label, agrees hip-hop
gospel would benefit from more
air play on both gospel and
secular outlets, but he believes
"a lot of the 'outlets are afraid of
offending people."
"If there's any genre where I
think that would not be an is- -
sue, it would be in hip-hop,"
Elwood said. "I think hip-hop
listeners areless likely to com-
plain about a gospel message
in their song. The radio sta-
tions have got to get a little bit
braver."
Xist could create more aware-
ness and demand for its music
with its other ventures, said
Kymberlee Norsworthy, direc-
tor of publicity for Verity Gos-
pel Music Group, a subsidiary
of Sony.
"I think only time will tell,
but I have faith and confidence
that it will be successful," she
said of the company.
Xist's film, "Stand," and its
reality TV show focus on three
young hip-hop gospel artists
struggling in the industry who
refuse to trade their beliefs for
fame.
Black said the gospel cruise,
which allows fans to mingle
with their favorite artists, is
alsp an opportunity for people


to enjoy themselves "and not
... worry about compromising
what they believe in."
"We Christians, but we party,
too," he said.
The key will be staying true to
a Christian message, said Vassal
Benford, a top California-based
record and movie producer who
is working on his first gospel al-
bum. Xist needs to clearly dis-
tinguish the music from secu-
lar hip hop, whose reputation
and lyrics are often "centered
around a lot of darkness," such
as robbing and killing.
"Gospel music has a certain
wholesomeness to it,". he said.
"And whether it's a hip-hop beat
or whatever it is under it, the
underlying cause of it should
always be about God and ...
creating a positive influence."
Trey Williams, also known as
Andale,: is a Nashville gopiel-
rapper starring in Xist World-,
wide's film. He said his lyrics
focus on. humility and encour-
agement, rather than negativ-
ity.
On a track from his latest
CD, "White Flag," Williams
says: "I'm surrendering ... sick
of lying, sick of stealing ... I'm
taking my life back the devil he
don't really like that but Christ
glad I'm waving this here bright
white flag."


Williams said he believes the
movie will provide valuable ex-.
posure for hip-hop gospel.
"If people know we're here
and they know the level of qual-
ity we're presenting then they'll
pay attention to it, but the trick
is getting them to pay atten-
tion," said the 27-year-old Wil-
liams. "We have to get in their
face, and a lot of times they just
don't know we exist. I think this
film will help with that."
Hip-hop gospel pioneer Vicki
Mack-Lataillade, whose discov-
eries include gospel star Kirk
Franklin and a group called The
Gospel Gangstaz, said she un-
derstands the challenges of "do-
ing radical music" and applauds
companies like Xist Worldwide
for thinking outside the box.
"It's healthy for the industry
to have ... new visions," she
said. "It's the lifeblood."
On the Net:
Xist Worldwide: http://www.
xistworldwide.com
Xist Urban Gospel Cruise:
http://www.xistgospelcruise.
corn
Trey Williams (also known
as Andale): http://www.andal-
emuzik.com
Holy Hip-Hop Awards: http://
www.holyhiphop.com
Gotee Records: http://www.
gotee.com


Waste not, want not:. Companies find uses for leftover animal parts


By Greg Latshaw


A growing number of compa-
nies are turning their attention
to creating renewable products
- such as adhesives and plas-
tics from the animal parts
that can't be sold on supermar-
ket shelves.
From plastics made from
feather protein to diesel fuel
made from fat to organic fertil-
izer made from poultry litter,
the USA's top meat producers
are developing new uses and
markets for the animal parts
that humans won't eat, says
Tom Cook, president of the Na-
tional Renderers Association in
Alexandria, Va.
For years, those parts have
ended up in cosmetics, soap,
pet food and animal feed. Now,
meat companies are putting
more resources into sustain-
ability programs, says Paul
Rutledge of the American Meat
Institute's sustainability com-
mittee.
At Clemson University, such
products are being tested at the
South Carolina school's Animal
Co-Products Research & Edu-
cation Center, says center Di-
rector Annel Greene.
Greene says there are a num-
ber of uses for the leftover ma-
terials that have yet to be dis-
covered. "It's fascinating to see
everything that can be done,"
Greene says.
Kathy Guillermo, vice presi-
dent of laboratory investigations
for People for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals, says many
consumers would be surprised
to learn the number of prod-
ucts with animal ingredients in
them. She says rendered mate-


rials, which are fed to livestock
and pets, could spread diseas-
es.
"The last thing we need in this
country is another use for the
bodies of animals," she says.
Waste materials from meat
processing are treated with spe-
cial considerations at landfills,
because they produce strong
odors and methane gases when
decomposing, said Jeremy
O'Brien, director of applied re-
search for the Solid Waste As-
sociation of North America.
"Anytime you can reduce the
amount of waste going into one,
you're preserving a resource,"
O'Brien said.
Among the projects under-
way:
Tyson Foods of Springdale,
Ark., is developing plastics, ad-
hesives and non-woven mate-
rials from the keratin protein
found in feathers, says Jeff
Webster, the group vice presi-
dent of the renewable products
division. Someday disposable
diapers or hospital gowns could
be made from the materials, he
says.
Tyson Foods is also involved
in a joint venture with Syntro-
leum Corp. of Tulsa to build a
renewable fuels plant in Baton
Rouge. Webster says the plant,
expected to be at full production
next July, will convert beef tal-
low, -pork lard, chicken fat and
cooking grease into a synthetic
diesel fuel. Because of the fuel's
ultra-low emissions grade,, it
will be marketed to emission-
cap markets, underground min-
ing companies and the general
aviation market.
Perdue Farms collects poul-
try litter a blend of manure


and wood shavings and con-
verts it into organic fertilizer
pellets to be sold to wholesalers,
says Cathy Klein, vice president
for co-product sales.
Maple Leaf Foods of Toronto


operates its own biodiesel plant
near Montreal and uses a por-
tion of the fuel it produces in its
company trucks, says Todd Mo-
ser, vice president of alternative
fuels.


It found toddlers had a four times greater risk of second-
hand smoke exposure when compared with adolescents, de-
spite having similar reported home exposures


Secondhand smoke worst

for toddlers, obese kids
By Bill Berkrot and Ransdell Pierson

Toddlers and obese children suffer far greater blood-vessel dam-
age and other harm from secondhand smoke than other children,
which could put them on the path to heart disease later in life,
according to a new study.
The study, presented at the American Heart Association scien-
tific meeting in Orlando on Wednesday, found a link between the
amount of secondhand smoke exposure and a marker of vascular
injury in toddlers, defined as children ages 2 to 5. The link was
twice as great mn toddlers who were obese, researchers said.
"We think that the two factors together smoke exposure plus
obesity may interact to amplify the degree of inflammation or
vascular cell damage that occurs," said John Bauer, the study's
co-lead investigator from Nationwide Children's Hospital & Re-
search Institute at Ohio State University.
The study of American boys and girls exposed to smokers in-
cluded 52 toddlers and' 107 older childi-en ages 9 td 18. "
It found toddlers had a four times greater risk Af secondhand
smoke exposure when compared with adolescents, despite having
similar reported home exposures.
This may be because toddlers,tend to be in closer proximity to
their smoking parents for extended periods of time.
"Adolescents are less joined at the hip to their parents. Toddlers
don't have the same access to move in and out of the house," Bau-
er said.
Toddlers exposed to secondhand smoke were also found to have
a 30 percent reduction in circulating vascular endothelial progeni-
tor cells, a type of cell involved in the repair and maintenance of a
healthy blood vessel network, researchers said. '
"The changes we detected in these groups of children are simi-
lar to changes that are well recognized risks for heart disease in
adults," Bauer said.
"This suggests that some aspects of adult heart disease may be
initiated in early childhood, where prevention strategies may have
great long-term impact," Bauer said.
At least a quarter of children in the United States are exposed to
secondhand smoke, researchers said.
Bauer said the study did not differentiate between smoke expo-
sure at home and while in a car, which Bauer called "a real fish in
a fish bowl experience."









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


13B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


--IVamdllll I Imes photoU / SdllUld J. lClhalt

Masons turkey giveaway feeds hundreds
M.W. Cypress Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M. and Heavenly Palm Grand Chapter O.E.S. hosted a
Turkey Giveaway at the Masonic Temple, located at 11785 Northwest 17th Avenue, on Sat-
urday, Nov. 21. Over 200 hundred turkeys were given away to needey families within the com-
munity. Pictured: Grand Master Hon.Winston Branford gives a turkey to Eddie Fitts.


Tight state budgets mean less chow time for inmates


By John Tuohy

INDIANAPOLIS The inmates
at Plainfield Correctional Facil-
ity east of Indianapolis can't be
accused of getting a free lunch.
Or any lunch at all. At least on
some days.
The medium-security prison
has eliminated lunch on Fri-
days, Saturdays and Sundays
- part of a pilot program that
could go statewide. The Indiana
Department of Correction (DOC)
insists it's not about saving
money but what's in the best in-
terest of prisoners. The move is
being criticized by national civil
rights groups and lawmakers.
"Denying food or cutting back
on meals is beneath the dignity
of the state of Indiana and is not
in sync with our Hoosier values,"
said state Sen. Mike Delph, R-
Carmel. Delph is chairman of
the state Senate corrections


subcommittee.
Indiana Department of Cor-
rection spokesman Doug Garri-
son said the department has re-
ceived few complaints since roll-
ing out the changes last month.
Because of tight budgets, a
handful of other states have
cut meals to save money. Geor-
gia inmates don't get lunch on
the weekends, according to the
Associated Press, and Ohio is
considering ending its weekend
breakfasts. Other states have
thinned menus or limited items
such as milk and fresh fruit.
Indiana prison officials said
the driving force here was to
give prisoners more classroom
and recreational time.
"Serving meals is a time-con-
suming effort that takeshours,"
Garrison said. "By eliminating
one meal, we are able to operate
our programs more efficiently."
Elizabeth Alexander, director


of the American Civil Liberties
Union's National Prison Project,
said cutting lunch creates "a tre-
mendous gap between meals."
"Making prisoners go hungry
for long periods is not the way
to solve anything," she said.
"Food is not the place to make
cuts, especially since it is such
a small percentage of a prison's
budget."
Food service accounts for
about 5% of the Department of
Correction's $726 million bud-
get in 2010, according to the
House Ways and Means Com-
mittee.
The new meal plan in Indi-
ana combines breakfast and
lunch and is served beginning
at 6 a.m., said Kevin Mulroony,
Plainfield Correctional spokes-
man. Dinner is served 10 hours
later, at 4 p.m. Lunch is served
at 11:30 a.m. Monday through
Thursday.


4Charges dropped against FMU student


Mitchell fights to be readmitted to University
By Sandra J. Charite f" "S
scharite@miamitimesonline.com -. J


Emory Mitchell wants to clear
his name and get his life back
to normal.
On Oct. 19, Mitchell, 19, was
involved in a scuffle on the Flor-
ida Memorial University cam-
pus that resulted in his arrest
and suspension from school.
Charges against Mitchell were
dropped on Nov. 18, but Mitch-
ell has yet to be readmitted into
the University.
"I want to return to school
to finish out this semester but
Florida Memorial is still refus-
ing to allow me to come back
based on the allegations of
those officers," said Mitchell.
"My suspension was only until
the case was addressed how-
ever that's no longer the case,
obviously."
FMU released a statement
on Thursday stating, "'We have
just been informed that the
State Attorney's Office dis-
missed the case against Emory
Mitchell. We are unaware of
the circumstances that led to
this dismissal. Emory Mitchell
remains suspended pending in-
vestigation and adjudication of
possible violations of University
rules and regulations. These
possible violations relate to ac-
tions prior to October 19, 2009,
as well as the conduct that oc-
curred on October 19th. In or-
der not to jeopardize that inves-
tigation, we cannot comment
further at this time."
According to police reports,
officers responded to a fight be-
tween the University security
guards and a student who was
identified as Mitchell.
Mitchell recalls the incident.
"Officer Harry [Monestime]
walked up to me asking if I had
possession of marijuana and
expressing that he wanted to
search me. I informed him that
I did not have possession of any
substance and if he wished to
search me he would have to


EMORY MITCHELL
contact Miami-Dade County
Police because he did not have
the right to search me," said
Mitchell.
The security guard then
asked Mitchell for his student
identification but Mitchell in-
formed that the school admin-
istration was aware that he did
not have one.
The incident escalated leav-
ing Mitchell and the security
guards bai-ricaded in the bath-
room. Students outraged at the
actions of the security guards
began to bang on the bath-
room door. FMU junior Jeffrey
Y. Martin captured some of the
incident on tape.
"The altercation was going on
for at least fifteen minutes and
I only captured a little less than
five minutes on video," said
Martin in a statement released


to The Miami Times.
Outraged at the commotion
from students demanding an-
swers as to why Mitchell was
barricaded in the bathroom,
an Allied Barton security guard
pulled his handgun and flashed
it at the crowd of students.
Mitchell was later arrested
that night and charged for a as-
sault. He faced three counts of
battery on a security officer.
It was a surprise to Mitchell,
who felt he had to protect him-
self from the officers. He said
he was repeatedly beaten by
the officers while he was con-
fined in the bathroom.
"The officers grabbed me and
tried to turn me around and
force my hands behind my back.
I was backed into the left front
corner of the restroom. I was
afraid of being put in a helpless
situation and not being able
to prevent myself from being
beaten so I continued to move
around and make attempts to
keep the officer from handcuff-
ing me," he said. "The officers
were using excessive force such
as slamming my head against
the wall and pushing me for-
ward causing my head to hit
the sink."
Now that the charges have
been dropped, Mitchell says
this obstacle will not hinder
him from completing his edu-
cation.
"So now, I'm hoping to trans-
fer to [Florida International Uni-
versity] FIU, although I know I
may lose a lot of credits," he
said. "I cannot give up because
I faced this obstacle."


-Lrtwock & OLome LL2e,
P.6'n Artwork & Homestore


5.6 .
~ utlokpds-e 786-413-0IE


FOOT Project Managers -
will be on hand to hear a "VJ0RK .
your thoughts and answer POGRM.
your questions


Come learn about the Florida Department of Transportation District Six Annual Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan


MONROE COUNTY
Wednesday, December 2, 2009, 6-8 p.m.
Marathon Government Center
2798 Overseas Highway (Mile Marker 50)
Marathon


SOUTH MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 8-10 a.m.
University of Miami Bank United Center
Hurricane 100 Room, 1245 Dauer Drive
Coral Gables


NORTHEAST MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
Wednesday, December 9, 2008, 8-10 a.m.
Miami Shores Country Club
Village Room, 10000 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami Shores


Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MDX) project information will also be available.


These public hearings are being held in accordance with Section 339.135, Florida Statutes and tooffer the public an oppor-
tunity to comment on all projects for the highway systems and public transportation within Florida Department of Trans-
portation District Six's Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan. District Six comprises Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties.
These hearings will also include consideration of proposed projects for Florida's Turnpike Enterprise corridors and
information on several projects in the District. The Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan covers the period from July 1,
2010 to June 30, 2015.
Send written comments (by mail or e-mail) to Maribel Lena, District Public Information Office, 1000 NW 111 Avenue, Room
6134, Miami, Florida 33172, telephone 305-470-5349 or email (Maribel.Lena@dot.state.us) by December 18, 2009. The
comments will also be incorporated into the public document.
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. The proposed improvements have been developed in accordance with


the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Under Title VI and Title VIII of the United States Civil Rights Acts
any person or beneficiary who believes he or she has been subjected to discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, age,
national origin, disability, or familial status may file a written complaint with the Florida Department of Transportation's Equal
Opportunity Office in Tallahassee, 605 Suwannee Street, M.S. 65, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0450, 866-374-FDOT or
contact Elizabeth Perez, District Six's Title VI and Title VIII Coordinator, 1000 N.W. 111 Avenue, Room 6111-A, Miami, Florida
33172, 305-470-5219.
Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation
services (free of charge) should contact the Public Information Office at 305-470-5277 at least seven days prior to the meeting.
The Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan can be viewed after November 27, 2009 at:
http://www.dot.state.fl.us/programdevelopmentoffice/


Formoe ifom at]1. als ionPIEcontac mlt De U i se mPLjoK,] o] I yaat 305-573-4455 or Dd~XsjIi KS [5]s !k'A 4AgIo]mmuik l al ~oma










14B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009 Bi A('K~ Must CON tROL FHEIR OWN DESTINY


** *


Remember to give thanks daily


Tomorrow is Thanksgiving.
Most people are preparing for a
wonderful meal and fellowship
with friends and family. Even
shelters are offering hot meals
for those unfortunate enough
to not be able to provide their
own meal, or for their family.
As exciting and exhilarating as
the holiday may be, we need to


extend those
feelings to
the day after
Thanksgiving,
and the day
after, and the
day after and
...well, how
about every
single day?l


One Bible writer who never
ceased to thank God for every
situation was David. David's
many psalms thanked God for
good times as well as not so good
times. Besides David's exten-
sive repertoire, other psalmists
and Bible authors wrote words
of praise and thanksgiving to
our awesome God.
In Psalm 26:7, David sings a
song of thanksgiving, and tells
of all of God's wonders. We
should never be remiss in giv-
ing God daily thanks. Before
my feet touch the floor each
morning, I thank God because
if not for Him, my eyes would
not be open to begin another
day. I remember years ago


when I was employed by the
Postal Service, I often worked
with some angry, complaining
co-workers. They were quite
mocking concerning the things
of the Lord, and made a point
of letting anyone who would
listen know that God had
done nothing for them. They
told me on more than one oc-
casion that they had nothing
for which to thank God. I re-
sponded that if they could not
think of anything, then thank
God that I was not the same
Pat that I used to be. If I were,
their lives would not be pleas-
ant ones during our working
hours!
Another thing about this


verse is thank God first, and
then tell someone what you
thanked God for. It is not al-
ways necessary, or we might
not always be in a place where
we can share the testimony of
our salvation, and a momen-
tous miracle that took place
in our lives. But it is a simple
thing to say, "It's certainly a
beautiful day. Thank God that
it didn't rain." It's also easy to
say, "Thank God for the rain.
We certainly need it."
In Psalm 28:7, David says
that his heart is so full of joy
that he bursts out in songs of
thanksgiving. Sing songs of
praise while getting ready in
the morning, driving to work


or to run errands. We need not
limit singing songs of thanks-
giving to church services. And
of course, we can never forget
Psalm 100, known by many as
a song of thanksgiving. Praise
is due our Lord always, but also
do not neglect to offer thanks
to others. Thank the cashier
who gives you your morning
coffee, though I know that they
do not always respond in kind.
Thank your spouse for a chore
performed or dinner prepared,
and thank your kids for bring-
ing your remote or your house
slippers, even if you had to
ask for them. Keep words of
thanksgiving on your lips at all
times.


Rev. Jackson's historic runs

stand with us, even today


By DeWayne Wickham

In a little noticed, long over-
due act of acknowledgement,
12 members of the Congres-
sional Black Caucus stood be-
fore a nearly empty chamber of
the House of Representatives
last week to give the Rev. Jesse
Jackson the praise many would
deny him.
Jackson's campaigns for
the Democratic Party's presi-
dential nominations "forever
changed the political ... land-
scape of this country" and "laid
the foundation" for the election
of Barack Obama, Rep. Donna
Edwards, D-Md., said in a brief
floor speech.
That was the recurring theme
of the 12 black members of
Congress and Rep. Dennis Ku-
cinich, D-Ohio, the lone white
representative, who spoke in
tribute to the 25th anniversary
of Jackson's 1984 campaign
for the Democratic presidential
nomination. Back then, News-
week and the Village Voice
proclaimed Jackson the candi-
date of "transformations" and
"change."
In his presidential campaign
last year, Obama promised to
talk to America's enemies if he
became president. But in Jack-
son's trailblazing campaign,
he did just that when he per-
s. .S h President Hafkei
Asgad to free' Navy Lt .Robert
Goodman, a U.S. pilot shot
down over Lebanon by Syrian
anti-aircraft gunners a month
earlier.


INITIAL SETBACKS
Although his campaigns were
far from flawless Jackson's
use of the pejorative "Hymi-
etown" to describe New York,
Jews dealt his 1984 ambition
a serious blow his two presi-
dential runs did more to change
the face of American politics
than anything else in the past
100 years. While the 1965 Vot-
ing Rights Act opened the way
for more blacks to vote, Jack-
son was the political Pied Piper
who drew them to the polls in
record numbers.
Marjorie Fields Harris, a for-
mer executive director of Al
Sharpton's National Action
Network, said of Jackson: "His
voter registration effort in pre-
viously overlooked and disen-
franchised communities was
historic" and helped lift "Afri-
can-American governors, sena-
tors, judges and other elected
officials into office. His run
was iconic and love him, or
hate him no student of his-
tory could ever argue that his
campaign wasn't our first real
glimpse of what an African-
American president would look
like."

ACCOLADES DESERVED
That's no idle praise.
"Jackson brought about sig-
nificant increases in black vot-
er rei, I i" ,$4 88.
And 0tthocrats ilde1ection
gains that were very much tied
to the turnout of these black
voters," said David Bositis, a ;
senior research associate at
the Joint Center for Political


and Economic Studies.
In fact, Democrats regained
control of the Senate in 1986
due in large part to that surge
in black voter registration, the
Joint Center has reported. And
that wasn't the only ripple ef-
fect from Jackson's campaigns.
Since 1984, the number of
blacks in Congress has grown
from 21 to 42 members. Many
blacks who rose to prominent
positions in the Democratic
Party also had close ties to his
candidacy.
Among them are Ron Brown
and Alexis Herman, who served
as the secretaries of Commerce
and Labor in the Clinton ad-
ministration. Brown also did
a stint as Democratic Party
chairman after serving as an
adviser to Jackson. Donna
Brazile, a manager of Al Gore's
2000 presidential campaign,
also had close ties to Jackson's
White House campaigns.
Those whoj gechange -
domn beneri it. The
that- Jackso ened ma
possible for Obama to achieve
Jackson's dream. And that's
something those who write the
history of these times shouldn't
forget.


Obama to unveil plan to add troops in Afghanistan


By Anne Gearan
Associated Press

WASHINGTON War-weary
Americans will support more
fighting in Afghanistan once they
understand the perils of losing,
President Barack Obama de-
clared Tuesday, announcing he
was ready to spell out war plans
virtually sure to include tens of
thousands more U.S. troops.
He is expected to make his case
to the nation in a Tuesday night
speech, even as the military com-
pletes plans to begin sending in
reinforcements in the spring.
Eight years after the Sept. 11
attacks led the U.S. into Afghani-
stan, Obama said it is still in
America's vital national interest
to "dismantle and destroy" al-
Qaida terrorists and extremist
allies. "I intend to finish the job,"
he said.
Obama said he would an-
nounce after Thanksgiving his
decision on additional troops,
and military, congressional and
other sources said the occasion
would be a Tuesday night tele-
vised speech laying out his plans
for expanding the Afghan con-
flict and then ultimately end-
ing America's military role.
Republican critics have been
pressing him for months to de-
cide on a next step in Afghani-
stan, but Obama has said re-
peatedly he was more concerned
with making a decision that was
right rather than quick.
Neither he nor his advisers
has detailed an exit plan, but
the strategy he is expected to
describe next week would include


Gospel Program
There will be a big gospel
program featuring Smiling Ju-
bilees, Ft. Lauderdale; Faithful
Few, Shining Stars and others,
3 p.m., Sunday at Holy Cross
Church, 1555 N.W. 93rd Ter-
race.
Call Lil' Rev. 305-693-9336.


specific dates that deployments
could be slowed or stopped if nec-
essary, a senior military official
said. The official and others spoke
on condition of anonymity because
the decision was not final.
With U.S. combat deaths
climbing on Obama's watch and
more than half the American
public opposed to escalation, the
president seemed to acknowl-


edge Tuesday that he has a lot
to explain.
"I feel very confident that when
the American people hear a clear
rationale for what we're do-
ing there and how we intend to
achieve our goals, that they will
be supportive," he said, speaking
at a White House news confer-
ence with Indian Prime Minister
Manmohan Singh.


Ex-cops sentenced to prison for shooting


AMENDS
continued from 10B

rebuild ties with the neighbor-
hood.
"It was through her trag-
ic death that attention was
brought to our community,
about the problems we have
and the challenges we face,"
said the Rev. Anthony Motley,
who called Johnston the neigh-
borhood's "patron saint."
There's still mistrust.
Some residents at a town
hall meeting Monday night to
honor the third anniversary of
Johnston's death say officers
still respond too slowly to calls.
Others signaled that a differ-
ent police approach is gradu-
ally improving the relationship
between the community and its
protectors.
Officers are pounding the
pavement to try to connect,
Pennington said.
"You have to go out and meet
with residents and let them
know we hear their concerns,"
said Pennington, who got an
earful at the meeting. "We think
we've done a lot to change the
culture."
The community is still shaken
over the death of Johnston, who
was killed on Nov. 21, 2006, af-
ter plainclothes narcotics offi-


cers burst into her home using
a special "no-knock" warrant
to search for drugs. She fired a
single bullet at the invaders, and
they responded with 39 bullets
through her wooden door.
Investigators originally said
they had gone to the wom-
an's house after an informant
bought drugs there from a deal-
er. In the weeks after the killing,.
a probe revealed that officers
tried to cover up the mistake
after searching her home and
finding no drugs.
Prosecutors said an officer
handcuffed the dying woman
and planted three baggies of
marijuana in her basement. He
then called an informant and
told him to pretend he bought
crack cocaine there, they said.
Three ex-cops were sentenced
to prison for their roles in the
shooting death, and the botched
raid led to an investigation
of the Atlanta Police Depart-
ment. It forced the department
to tighten its warrant require-
ments, ordered new training for
officers and reorganized its nar-
cotics unit.
The city also created a citi-
zen review board to investigate
police misconduct months af-
ter Johnston's death, although
frustrated critics contend the
panel doesn't have enough au-


thority or funding. Both can-
didates for Atlanta mayor, who
attended the town hall meeting,
promised the board would play
a more muscular role in their
administrations.
The neighborhood, where res-
idents fortify their windows with
bars, still suffers from crime
and blight. Its City Councilman
Ivory Young said it seems for ev-
ery drug dealer arrested, a hun-
gry recruit is willing to step in.
And some said, even after the
department's efforts, it will be
hard to trust the police again.
Community activist "Able"
Mable Thomas stood up in front
of about 100 people at a com-
munity church and pointed
at the chief, telling him "this
community has never forgiven
you."
Pennington slowly walked to
the microphone.
"I'd like to take this moment
to personally apologize. You
can't have an ongoing healing
process unless someone steps
up and says they were wrong,"
he said. "I think we're a much
better police department and
we have much better officers.
And we're working hard to earn
back your respect."
Instead of jeers,', his words
were met with a standing va-
ton.-


, ..J.. in.


RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS


NEEDED FOR A


PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH


STUDY TESTING AN


INVESTIGATIONAL DRUG


You may qualify to participate if

you are: a healthy male or

female between the ages

of 65 and 80

Participants who are enrolled

will be compensated for their

time in the research study


For more information call:


SEA VIEW RESEARCH


305-646-6785


SSEAVIEW
RESEARCH


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


.. 1. '-" ..


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009










The Miami Times





health


SECTION B


. MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


CDC: Teen girls at high risk for STDs

Black females aged 15 to 19 had the highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea Centers for Disease Control and


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@niamitimesonline. comr
A shock for many parents when a
2008 study revealed one in four teen-
aged girls had a Sexually Transmitted
Disease (STD). A year later, the num-
bers have not declined.
An STD, also known as sexually
transmitted infection (STI) or venereal
disease (VD), is an illness that can be
transmitted by sexual contact, includ-
ing vaginal intercourse, oral sex, and
anal sex. Common STDs include syphi-
lis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, hep-
atitis and genital warts.
Centers for Disease Control and Pre-
vention reports young girls aged 15-19
years continue to have the highest num-


ber of chlamydia and gonorrhea cases
(409,531) when compared to any other
age group.
The report, a 2008 Sexually Trans-
mitted Disease Surveillance that tracks
cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and
syphilis in the United States, found that
more than 1.5 million cases of chlamyd-
ia and gonorrhea were reported in 2008.
Also, Black teenaged girls continue to
be disproportionately affected by STDs.
They have a higher percentage than any
other age group.
"This is nothing new. This is a con-
tinuing trend," said Dr. Toye Brewer,
State of Florida STD/HIV Medical Epi-
demiologist.
Although there are better screenings
to detect the STDs in young women,


Brewer faults the lack of funding to
public health. Under the guidelines,
young women under the age of 25 are to
be screened once a year for STDs says
Brewer but unfortunately, that becomes
an issue to those who do not have ac-
cess to healthcare in underprivileged
areas.
She goes on to say that adjusting
the cost of screening is not possible in
Miami-Dade due to budget constraints,
but the fact is that sexually active ad-
olescents need to be screened once a
year.
While access to healthcare is sig-
nificant, Kalenthia Nunnally-Bain, ex-
ecutive director of the Teen Pregnancy
Prevention Center in Allapattah, says
Please turn to STD'S 18B


U.S. southern counties


By Mike Stobbe
ATLANTA The first county-
by-county survey of obesity re-
flects past studies that show
the rate of obesity is highest in
the Southeast and Appalachia.
High rates of obesity and diabe-
tes were reported in more than
80 percent of counties in the Ap-
palachian region that includes
Kentucky, Tennessee and West
Virginia, according to the new
research from the U.S. Centers
for Disease Control and Preven-
tion.
The same problem was seen in
about 75 percent of counties in
Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana,
Georgia and South Carolina.
The five counties with the


highest rates were Greene and
Dallas counties in Alabama and
Holmes, Humphreys and Jeffer-
son counties in Mississippi. All
are small, rural counties in the
west central areas of each state,
and each reported obesity rates
of around 44 or 43 percent. The
national adult obesity rate is
roughly 26 percent.
The statistics are estimates for
the year 2007 based on sur-
veys, census figures and other
information for that and other
years and include a margin of
error. The obesity rates in many
counties were about the same,
so it's difficult to say any county
or counties was clearly the single
most obese county, CDC officials
said.


most obese
The CDC also released Thurs-
day county-specific data for dia-
betes Type 2 is closely tied to
obesity. Counties with the low-
est rates of both obesity and dia-
betes were out west Boulder
County, Colo., Santa Fe County,
N.M., and Summit County, Utah,
were at the top of each list.
Just under 13 percent of peo-
ple in those counties were obese,
and only about 4 percent report-
ed diabetes, the CDC found.
There are a range of possible
explanations for counties in the
South and Appalachia have the
highest rates of obesity and dia-
betes, experts said. A culture that
embraces fatty, unhealthy foods
and shuns exercise may be one.
Genetics may be another.


-.. ... -

iM ovie"" "thea-t-,,er:W ';

pocr ilmk o a


Poll: Americans worry over health overhaul costs


By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
and Trevor Tompson
Associated Press
WASHINGTON It's the
cost, Mr. President. Americans
are worried about hidden costs
in the fine print of health care
overhaul legislation, an Associ-
ated Press poll says. That's cre-
ating new challenges for Presi-
dent Barack Obama as he tries
to close the deal with a handful


of Democratic doubters in the
Senate.
Although Americans share
a conviction that major health
care changes are needed, Dem-
ocratic bills that extend cover-
age to the uninsured and try to
hold down medical costs get no
better than a lukewarm recep-
tion.
The poll found that 43 percent
oppose the health care plans
being discussed in Congress,


while 41 percent are in sup-
port. An additional 15 percent
remain neutral or undecided.
"Well, for one, I know nobody
wants to pay taxes for anybody
else to go to the doctor I
don't," said Kate Kuhn, 20, of
Acworth, Ga. "I don't want to
pay for somebody to use my
money that I could be using for
myself."
There's been little change in
Please turn to COSTS 18B


HEALTH FIRST

MEDICAL CENTER

Services


Complimentary Dental
Services with No Co-Pay
Primary Care Physician
Laboratory
Gynecology
Diagnostic Ultrasound
EKG Electrocardiogram
ECHO- Echocardiogram
X-Rays
A Comprehensive Chiropractic
Service Center
Pain Management
Massage Therapy


6405 NW 27th Avenue
Miami, Florida

For information or appointments,

call:305-403-4003
Monday Fridayv R8: am 5:no npm


* Free Concierge-Style
Transportation with
Private Vehicle
* Activity Center
* Education
* Exercise Program
* Nutrition
* Osteoporosis screenings


q


Health First Medical Center
Maximum Quality Medical Care for our Community


Ooclors ond St^^^^^^^^^^^^^iff with over ,>5 yeurs ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^fE^^^vperience^^^^^^^

"reaccept Modicareand Medicaid.^^^^^^


".-


11 -


Al










16B THE MIAMt TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Troubled V.A. Agency will get a new chief


By James Dao

WASHINGTON The official
responsible for the problem-
plagued disability compensa-
tion system at the Department
of Veterans Affairs will resign
early next year, the department
announced Friday.
The official, Under Secretary
Patrick W. Dunne, has run
the Veterans Benefits Admin-
istration since 2006, a period
in which the agency has been
swamped by claims not only
from wounded Iraq and Af-
ghanistan veterans but also ag-
ing Vietnam veterans. The rise
in the backlog of unprocessed
claims has fueled bitter com-
plaints from members of Con-
gress and veterans' advocates.
The. benefits administration
also came under fire this year
when it was late issuing pay-
ments to colleges and students
under the new G.I. Bill. In re-
sponse, Eric Shinseki, the sec-
retary of veterans affairs, or-
dered offices to open on a Sat-
urday to make emergency pay-
ments to students.
In announcing Mr. Dunne's
resignation, Mr. Shinseki said:
"Pat Dunne has guided the Vet-
erans Benefits Administration
through a number of challenges


during his tenure as under sec-
retary. I applaud his service and
loyalty to our team and thank
him for his unfailing commit-
ment to our nation's veterans."
A spokeswoman for Mr. Shin-
seki, Katie Roberts, denied sug-
gestions by veterans' advocates
that Mr. Dunne, a retired Navy
rear admiral, had been forced
out. "He served the department
well," Ms. Roberts said.
Veterans' advocates say the
benefits administration has
been slow to modernize. Re-
vamping the department's out-
dated computer technology,
along with reducing the claims
backlog, is one of Mr. Shinse-
ki's top priorities.
"Veterans wait an average of
six months for an initial an-
swer on a disability claim and
another four to five years while
they wait for appeals," said
Paul Sullivan, executive direc-
tor of Veterans for Common
Sense.
Mr. Sullivan's group esti-
mates that the backlog is close
to one million claims, though
the department says a more
accurate measure places it at
closer to half a million.

The benefits administration
has separate headquarters


from the Department of Veter-
ans Affairs, and Mr. Sullivan
said Mr. Shinseki should require
the new under secretary to have
offices under the same roof so


they can work more closely.
"They need a battle plan to
overhaul the V.B.A. and bring
them out of 19th-century paper
processes," Mr. Sullivan said.


Men's Day Sunday at Greater St. James


The Reverend Dr. James Bush
III will be the morning speaker
at the 50th Annual Men's Day
at the 11 a.m. Worship Service,
Nov. 29.
The Male Chorus of St. Mark
M.B. Church will render music.
Deacon Willie Mosley is chair-
person; Deacon Jerome Coo-
per and Bro. James Parks, co-
chairpersons.
The church is located at 4875
N.W. 2nd Ave. Dr. William H.
Washington is pastor.


The
Sis ar

,.hu
-- eginn
For mor
oyr ne
SpaRo
spaceI


* Miami Times
announcing our
IURCH LISTINGS
rch Denomination
ling January 2010
e information contact
e.w church assistant.
ker. 305. _9-1.6210 ex[ 102
is limited Ne% Pricing|


Volunteer sign-up Saturday


Student volunteers are needed
for the Battle of the High School
Bands, Saturday, December 12
at Ted Hendricks Stadium.
Volunteer sign-up will take
place from 2 p.m. until 5 p.m.,
Saturday, November 28th at
Tacolcy Park, 6161 N.W. 9th


Avenue.
Volunteers will receive 25
community hours.
Non-volunteers will receive 10
community hours.
Tickets are $10.
For info, Contact Big Mo at
786-318-6020.


Exp_____


Authorized Signature
Name


Address


City


State Zip


Phone email
*Includes Florida sales tax
Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW54 St.* Miami, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe online at www.mymlamltlmes.com


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order of Services
1 Wed Inier(ue ry Praeer
H j^ 1 Morning Seri e 11 a m
S"Ua 1. Ive Wuo:hip 130 p m
r|Iue, %Prayer eliln^i IL 3 p m
1^111X F ri Bible Slud' 7 30 pm.



Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Morning Services
S7:45 a.m.-s11:15 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Sludy Tuesday
I a.m. & 7 p.m.
Irayer Moeeing -Tues. 6 p.m.
Rev. Dr. Joreatha M Capers^^^^^^^^


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


nrlar n carvrieat.


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
[li l a i miSlin m e _


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
t Sunday i 3Oand1lam
SWorlp Serrie
inhq3 i 4u am undyl Srhoil
luedAy 1 p m Bible Suidy
8 Hpm PrvyereMeern


Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723N.W. 3rd Avenue
I ltllll,,I~l. s.I .;'


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.


F L SundaySduiool 9am

It M.iion and Bible
(I alosluesday 6 30 p m



Bethlehem Cathedral
Outreach Ctr. Miami
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.

Order of Services
Sunday Bible Seminar 8 u m
Sunday Worship l9a m
Sunday ow i pi p m prayer
and pa uraral ionuse ilng
Fr,dday hble Seminar 6 a in
* u I


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
15250 N.W. 22ND AVENUE


I *: ii


Order of Services
SUNDAY: Worship Service
7:30& 11 a.m.
Church School 9:30 a.m.
WIONFScAV


i I FeedingMlt2 noon




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.

Order of Services
Sunday School 9 30 a mn
orring Pra.Cev'Wrshrp IIarnM
i ef, arnd Third Sundiie
evening oW.p aon 6 p m.
Prayer Meenng & Bible Sr,1dy
,N .: letd .


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Stree
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.,
11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiumi.org


B Iso VictrT.Cr d* I y l n Ul i iSienii or!Pastor/Teacher


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a.m. Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday General Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS/Comcast 3 Saturday- 7:30 a.m.
www.pembrokeparkchurchofchrist.com pembrokeparkcoc@bellsouth.net


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street


I


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.


0Order of Services

rSunday Sdlnol a, 9 45 a m
ursda y Bib, Sudy I i
Solurdav NoSea


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street

Order of Services
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship 11 a.m.
First Sunday
Evening Wnrship 6p.m.
Mid Week Service ... 7p.m.
Ihoir Rehearsal ihursday


93rd Street Community Brownsville
Missionary Baptist Church Church of Christ
2330 N.W. 93rd Street 4561 N.W. 33rd Court
(rOi Pr mI,, ( rI I -


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street



New Vision Forship stam
Y'illYo Mih mifrV
Mon.-ad 6pim




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
SEad Sunday Worshp 130 a m
Sundr, iySchool 9 30 aIn
SSunday l morning Worhip II a rn
I Sunday [eningSemie 6pm
luu',diiea.rayoer Mei,,lg130 p ,n
i ledndmidy Bible Sludy 7 30 p I-



Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Mo r.r.g Ser ies
i SundayShooal lo om
S na Worship Servile 11 am
Tuesday Bible Sidy 8 ppm
|, uHOy Prayei Sor
vi e p in



Seed Time and Harvest Faith
Ministry International
21485 N.W. 27 Ave.

Order of Services
f Suiday Worship 9a ion
SBible Sludy Wednedl o 130 p m
|n 9 seedr9im urndharvedfin org





First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
* ll.ll i ,:l ii *lll_


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
lilll[ : .


I .~e I *


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street
www.nshilohmbc.org
Wlll 1111 llM Ili'M M1 ll,211 ll


Alpha Agape SDA Church
8400 N.W. 25th Ave.

J*h5~ I S~t


Sunrise Missionary Baptist Church
3087 N.W. 60 Street
smbcpastorids@aol.com
I 1iI -iI


mI


I BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


II


1 I-=


Lit


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 20091


I


I










BLCSMMCOIO lFRONDdN 17 HIIM IENVME 5DCME ,20


MARIE KELLY DEVOE, 93, re-
tired custodian
for Miami Dade
Public Schools,
died November
22. Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Wilfred Devoe;
son, Joseph
Deveaux; sis-
ters, Irma K. Sweeting, Josephine
Curry Kelly, Clara Kelly McCoy,
and Mildred K. McKinney; many
nieces, nephews, cousins, other
relatives and friends. Viewing
6:30-9 p.m., Friday, Church of the
Transfiguration. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Church of the Transfigu-
ration.

JIM M. GLOVER, 84, cook at
Cye's River-
gate, died No-
vember 20. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Aretha
Glover; daugh-
ter, Elaine L.
Bryd-Ponder
(Kency); son,
Barry Byrd; six grandchildren;
nine great-grandchildren; a host
of nieces, nephews other relatives
ahnd friends. Service 12 p.m., Sat-
urday, Mt. Calvary M.B. Church.

LEROY E. WHILE SR., 58,
presser at
Instant Dry
Cleaners, died
November 19.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Ju-
lia Whiley; son,
Leroy Whiley
Jr.; daughters,
Latasha Whiley and Aliscia Whi-
ley; stepdaughter, Ayana Sand-
ers; brothers, James McKenzie,
William Miller and Ronald Whiley;
sisters, Beverly Whiley and Rosa-
lie Whiley; two grandchildren, a
host of nieces, nephews, other rel-
atives and friends. Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt. Olive Fire Baptized
Holiness Church of God located at
8400 N.W. 22 Avenue.

Richardson
E'AdES BOWE SILCOTT,
76, former Mi-
amian died
November 9 in
Columbia S.C.
She was con-
firmed at st.
Agnes Episco-
pal Church in .
1945 and was a
Bopker T Washington High School
Alumna, Class of 1951. Dolores
resided in Somerset, New Jersey.
Survivors include: husband of 44
years, Joseph. Local survivors:
uncle, Lloyd B. Johnson (Juanita);
cousins, Cynthia Garvin Clark,
Erica V. Williams, Lloyd Deryk
Johnson and Linda J. Johnson. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

BETTE GRAHAM, 73, retired
principal, died
November 17.
Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Church of the
Open Door.



-BENNY LYNTHROPE
O'BERRY, 93,
entrepreneur,
died November
21. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.



EARL JAMES STAFFORD III,
48, laborer, died
November 23.
Arrangement
are incomplete.





Carey Royal Ram-n
HORACE ROSS, 92, died Novem-
ber 19 at home. Service was held.

BETTY THOMPSON, 56, accoun-
tant, died November 19 at Cleveland
Clinic Hospital. Service 10 a.m., Sat-
urday in the chapel.

Grace


MARCELIN PAUL, 74, died No-
vember 20 at North Shore Medical
Center. Service 12 p.m., Saturday,
St. James Catholic Church.


PEARLIE MAE JOHNSON, ERNEST ADAMS, 63, televi-
66, custodian, sion technician,
died November died November
19. Survivors 14 at Aventura
include: son, Hospice. Ar-
Johnnie Mor- rangements are
ris; sister, Faye incomplete.
Burgess; aunt,
Marie Coleman; -


stepmother,
Mary Morris; best friend, Naomi
Tucker; goddaughter, Leslie Bar-
thell-Ward; four grandchildren,
one great grandchild and a host
of sisters-in-law, brothers-in-law,
nieces, nephews, relatives and
friends. Service 1 p.m, Saturday,
Peaceful Zion MB Church.

GLADINE VONICA JOHNSON,
80, retired clerk
for Miami-Dade
County Public
Schools, died
November 18 at
Regional Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: hus-
band, Thoams;
sons, Ernie and Harold Johnson;
daughters, Santhia Johnson,
Debra Johnson, Terri Wiwo, Har-
riet Johnson, Sislynn Powell and
Thomasena Hudson (David Sr.).
Service 12 noon, Saturday, Koi-
nonia Worship Center.

BRITTEYOLANDOMACHELLE
SMITH, 45, as-
sistant office
manager, died
November 22
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: mother,
Dorothy B.
Smith; father, Luther B. Smith;
sister, Shirley Walker. Service 12
p.m., Saturday, Soul Saving Sta-
tion Church.

ANN MARIE WILSON, 56, ca-
shier, died No-
vember 18. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, Ru-
dolph Wilson,
Sr.; daughter,
Annette 'Wil-
son; son, Ru-
dolph Wilson,
Jr.; grandchildren, Randel Pino,
Rudolph III, Anntyresha Wiggins,
Arnnitra Wiggins and Joseph Gib-
son. Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
(5th), New St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church.

MARYANN MARTIN-FORCER,
65, pediatrician,
died November
22 at Kindred
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
daughter, De-
nise Forcer;
sister, Patri-
cia Anderson;
brothers, Rickey Forcer and Alex-
ander Martin, Jr. Arrangements
are incomplete.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
WILLIS O'BRIEN, 76, retired
USPS carrier,
died November
12 in Roswell,
GA, Service
was held.




GERALDINE A. COLLIER, 80,
died November
20 at Aventura
Medial Center.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Claudette Far-
rington, Jospe-
hine Small,
Gwendolyn
Banks and Norman Bentley. Lin-
da Williams (deceased). Service
11 a.m., Saturday, St. Paul AME
Church.

BARBARA ANN HITCHENS,
58, property appraisal clerk, died
November 17 at Memorial West.
Service was held.

COREY McNEAL, 38, laborer,
died November 14. Service was
held.

WILMORE ROLLE, 70, chef,
died November 23 at home. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


ANNETTE MARIE FIELDER,
30, cashier,
died Novem-
ber 17 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, New Jeru-
salem PBC. .

CORRINE E. ROLLE-McNEAL,
91, custodian,
died November
20. Service 11
a.m., Wednes-
day (today),
Holy Redeem-
er Catholic
Church.

RAYNATHAN RAY, 14, student,
died November
14. Service 2
p.m., Saturday,
Christian Fel-
lowship Wor-
ship Center.



BETTY JEAN DAVIS, 65,
homemaker,
died November
22 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m, Saturday
in the chapel.


CHRISTOPHER E. BETHEL,
JR, 66, cook, died November 18
at Miami Gardens Care Centre.
Service 11 a.m., Tuesday(lst), in
the chapel.

FREDELL LEE, 61,truck driver,
died November 16. Arrangements
are incomplete.
Manker -
SGT. WILLARD JAMES
MYLES, 76,
police officer,
died November
21 at home. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.



Hadley-Davis
TRACY McDONALD, 32, died
November 18.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.





BARBARA ANN ELLIS, 53,
homemaker, died November 13 at
University of Miami Hospital. Ser-
vice was held.

FERNANDO A. BRITO, 66,
mechanic, died November 13 at
Jackson Medical Center. Service
was held.
Royal "
DEACON CLEVELAND BELL,
JR, 85. truck
driver, died No-
vember 17. Ser-
vice was held.





WILLIAM SMITH III, 49, library
clerk, died No-
vember 17. Ser-
vice was held.


Jay's -~~
JAMES WILLIAM, 77, died No-
vember 19 at
Gramercy Park
Nursing Center.
Service was
held.




CRYSTAL FELTON, 26, died
November 22.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Pleasant Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.



JACQUELYN LAWSON, 62,
died November 21. Service 1:30
p.m., Saturday, Sweet Home Mis-
sionary Baptist Church.

NAIMOON HOSEIN, 69, home-
maker, died November 21. Service
was held.

JAMES DELEVEAUX, 59, died
November 23. Arrangements are
incomplete.

ERMA BOULER, 61, died No-
vember 21. Service 11 a.m., Satur-
day, New Mt. Zion Baptist Church.

ANTHONY HOUSTON, 42, died
November 23 at Homestead Hos-
pital. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

E. A. Stevens
ANVEL T. WIDEMAN, 53,
homemaker, died November 16 at
home. Service 11a.m., Saturday,
The Pentecostal's of Cooper City.

TRAVIS TYRONE JEFFER-
SON, 24, laborer, died November
17 at Memorial Regional Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.

ROBERT RUMPHREY, 79, la-
borer, died November 19 at Plan-
tation General Hospital. Service
12:30 p.m., Saturday in the cha-
pel.



Gregg L. Mason
MELVIN DOUGLAS, 51, re-
pairman, Air-
line Container
Leasing, died
November 14.
Survivors in-
clude: wife,
Carrie; daugh-
ter, Tiffany;
parents, Sam
and Dimple Douglas; brothers, Mi-
chael and Marion Douglas; sister,
Marilyn Tyre; and a host of other
relatives and friends. Service 12
p.m., Saturday in the chapel.

LOUISE HENRY PERKINS, 56,
housekeeper,
died November
16. Survivors
include: hus-
band, Ronnie;
son, Steven
Henry; daugh-
ters, Rosevella
and Shontavia
Henry; mother, Elizabeth Logan;
step-daughter, Sabrina Wright;
brothers, Charles Smith; sisters,
Dorothy Mitchell, Betty Sands and
Janice Ricketts; and a host of oth-
er relatives and friends. Service
was held.

Death Notice

BERNICE E. HUMES TUCK-
ER, 87, housekeeper, died
November 17 at Hollywood

Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Mitchell Funeral Home Cha-
pel.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


In loving memory of,


SHIRLEY ANN DAVIS SGT. JOHNICE CANDICE
11/21/44 07/14/91 ADDERLY CANADY
02/06/80 11130/07


I think of you always, but
especially today.
You will never be forgotten
although you are gone away.
Your memory is a keepsake
with which I will never part.
God has you in His keeping;
I have you in my heart.
Love always, Crick

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,

LENARD ANDERSON
BKA 'NODDIE'
11/27/55 06/06/09

We remember when you
graduated from Miami Central
Senior High in 1974 and went
on to to,take the field with the
FAMU Marching 100, playing
the tenor drum.
We felt so proud when we
marched along with you in
the Classic Parade.
We love and miss you,
Your father, Edward J. Peo-
ples; brothers, Kenneth and
Howard Anderson, Samuel,
Lloyd and Nathan Peoples;
play sister, Inez Harris; god
sister, Antoinette Williams.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


COLLIER BERTRAM ISAACS
08/14/1972 11/23/02

Seven years ago, God called
home this son, brother, grand-
son, uncle, nephew, cousin
and friend.
You are sorely missed by all
mother, Mamie Isaacs; broth-
er, Van Isaacs; grandmother,
Dessie Butts; aunts, Runette
Butts and Gleniese Toutant;
cousin, Willie Frazier

E. S. George
CURTIS L. SOLOMAN, 54, avi-
onie technical, died November 19
at Florida Medical Center. Final
rites and burial, Trinidad and To-
bago.

LIZZIE MAE MILLINER, 95,
homemaker, died November 20
at Hospice by the Sea. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Mt. Zion AME
Church, West Park.

JOANNE SPENCER, 64, sales-
person, died November 21 at Vitas
Hospice. Service 1 p.m., Friday,
Northwest Dade Church of Christ.


It's been two years since
you've gone to your heavenly
home to stay. We know within
our minds that God would
call you to come back to him
one day. Our hearts are filled
with love for you. A love that
will never fade away. We hold
sweet memories of you that we
will always treasure. There's
nothing like holding you in
our arms, where you gave us
so much pleasure. My dearest
Lady you're resting in God's
arms, safe and secure from
all harm. We will be with you
in just a little while and see
your smile. So when the sun-
shine down from heaven each
day, we will say "just a little
while" Johnice, wait "just a
little while."
Love, Mom, Janice Chain
and family
Memorial 5 p.m., Monday,
St. Agnes Episcopal Church.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


JOSEPH A. YOUNG, JR.
05/22/59 11/29/08

Lil Joe, one year passed so
quickly. We miss you so very
much. You will remain in our
hearts and thoughts forever.
Love always, mother, Shirley;
father, Joseph A. Sr.(Wylene);
sister, Shari Young-Hawkins;
family and friends.

Bain-Range (Coconut Grove)
ROSIE HAMILTON, 74, home-
maker, died
November 19 '
at home. Sur- : .
vivors include: -.' "'.f
husband, Dea-
con Gentle

daughter, Caro-
lyn Hamilton;
son, Gentle Hamilton, Jr. (Pris-
cilla); grandson, Gentle Hamilton
III; three brothers and two sisters;
and a host of other relatives and
friends. Viewing 6-8 p.m., Friday,
St. James Baptist Church, Coco-
nut Grove. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday, Greater St. Paul A.M.E.
Church.

EMORY BERRY, SR., 58, ac-
countant, died Nov. 19 at home.
Service was held.


BABY BRYANNA EDWARDS,
infant, died November 18. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

LORRAINE McCATTY, 62,
housewife, died November 20.
Viewing 4-9 p.m., Friday. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

DORRETT DIAS, 57, house-
wife, died November 21. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


17B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009










18B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Most youths won't visit clinics


STD'S
continued from 15B
young people are lacking educa-
tion on STDs.
"It is important to raise aware-
ness about STDs to our young
people," said Nunnally-Bain.
"Teens receiving information
from so many different sources
but are they accurate?"
However, eliminating services
or resources in the community
also plays a factor. For example,
due to budget woes Juanita
Mann, which has served resi-
dents in the Brownsville and
Liberty City community, is
among the many clinics that will
be closing its doors by January.
"Most of the youth do not go
to clinics but they go to a place
where they feel safe," said Nun-
nally-Bain.


Miami-Dade had 10,796 STD
cases in 2008, according to the
Florida Department of Health.
More than 2000 cases con-
sisted of young women aged 15-
19.
"When you take into account
the severe health consequenc-
es of STDs and the millions of
Americans 'infected every year,
it is clear that much more work
needs to be done to prevent un-
intended long-term health is-
sues," said Kevin Fenton, M.D.,
director of CDC's National Cen-
ter for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepa-
titis, STD, and TB Prevention.
"We know adolescent girls and
minorities are most impacted
by STDs. So it is up to us as
a nation, to reach out to them
and ensure we are providing the
necessary prevention, testing
and treatment services."


Public supports Obama's goals


COSTS
continued from 15B

broad public sentiment about
the overhaul plan from a 40-40
split in an AP poll last month,
but not everyone's opinion is at
the same intensity. Opponents
have stronger feelings than do
supporters. Seniors remain
more skeptical than younger
generations.
The latest survey was con-
ducted by Stanford University
with the nonprofit Robert Wood
Johnson Foundation.
When poll questions were
framed broadly, the answers
seemed to indicate ample sup-
port for Obama's goals. When
required trade-offs were brought
into the equation, opinions shift-
ed sometimes dramatically.
In one striking finding, the poll
indicated that public support
for banning insurance practices
that discriminate against those
in poor health may not be as
solid as it seems.
In the AP poll, when told that
such a ban would probably
cause most people to pay more
for health insurance, 43 percent
said they would still support do-
ing away with pre-existing con-
dition denials, but 31 percent
said they would oppose it.
Costs for those with coverage
could go up because people in
poor health who'd been shut out
of the insurance pool would now
be included, and they would get
medical care they could not ac-
cess before.
More than four in five Ameri-



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In


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. ..,,-


cans now have health insur-
ance, and their perceptions
about costs are key as Obama
tries to rally his party's congres-
sional majority. In the House,
Democrats came together to
pass their bill. In the Sen-
ate, Democratic liberals and a
smaller group of moderates dis-
agree on core questions even
as Majority Leader Harry Reid,
D-Nev., prepares to take legisla-
tion to the floor.
The poll suggests the public is
becoming more attuned to the
fact that in health care, details
can make all the difference.
The poll found a similar opin-
ion shift on employer require-
ments: 73 percent agreed that
all companies should be re-
quired to give their employees at
least some health insurance.
Yet when asked if fines should
be used to enforce such a re-
quirement on medium and large
companies, support dropped to
52 percent. Uninsured workers
are concentrated in small com-
panies.
The poll was based on land
line and cell phone interviews
with 1,502 adults from Oct. 29
to Nov. 8. It has a margin of er-
ror of plus or minus 2.5 per-
centage points. The interviews
were conducted by GfK Roper
Public Affairs and Media. Stan-
ford University's participation
was made possible by a grant
from the Robert Wood John-
son Foundation, a nonpartisan
organization that conducts re-
search on the health care sys-
tem.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


LEO ADOLPHUS
WILLIAMS I
06/13/40 11/29/89


They say there is a reason,
they say that time will heal,
but neither time nor reason,
will change the way we feel.
For no one knows the heart-
ache that lies. behind our
smiles, no one know how
many times we have broken
down and cried.
We want to tell you some-
thing so there won't be any
doubt, you're so wonderful
to think of but so hard to be
without.
We cannot bring the old
days back, when we were all
together, the family chain is
broken now, but memories
live forever.
Love always, Terilyn, Lance,
Lemuel, Leo II and off springs


Nakia Ingrakii
IOLANDO FALK, 71, store man-
ager, died November 19 at home.
Service 3 p.m., Wednesday (today),
St. Joseph's Catholic Church.


MOTHER WILLIE BROTHER LONNIE THOMAS
MAE SCOTT'


11/25/20 03/23/05

There is not a day that goes
by that I don't think of you.
Every time I. wake up, I
wake up praying, but If I don't
wake up, just know that I've
gone where the other half of
my heart is.
Mom, we were inseparable
and I'm missing you like cra-
zy.
I can't help but feel so
blessed and thankful for hav-
ing had you in my life.
Love, Trish and family

Death Notice


- .


wishes to express our sincere
thanks to. Rev. Johnny Barber
and members of Mt. Sinai Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, Elder
Marc and Mrs. Joy Cooper of
Cooper Temple Church of God
In Christ, Range Funeral Home
and Staff, the Hodge-Wright-
Harris and Haynes families of
Omaha, Nebraska, the Floyd,
Sanders, Robinson, Hartley,
Brown, White, Carroll, Thomas,
Garcia families, the neighbors
of 52nd Street, Miami, Fl, the
Scott family of Madison, FL.,
Rev and Mrs. Ed Scott of Tal-
lahassee, Fl., the Blakely family
of Chicago, IL., the Lee family of
Pensacola, FL., and the family
and friends that attended the
graveside service at Oak Ridge
.Cemetery in Madison, FL.
We would like to thank you
for your visits, cards, telephone
calls and floral sprays and the
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority of
Madison, FL., for a beautiful re-
past.
Thanks again The family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of our
brother,


GARY ALLEN WILLIAMS,
53, shipper, died November
23 at home.
Survivors include: wife,
Louella; mother, Margaret; fa-
ther, Nathaniel; six children;
seven siblings.
Viewing 6 to 9 p.m., Friday,
Royal Funeral Home.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Greater New Bethel Mission-
ary Baptist Church, 17025
N.W. 22nd Avenue, Dr. G. Da-
vid Horton, Pastor.

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


J = The Joy you brought to
me.
A = Allowing me to be your big
sister.
M = Missing you so, so much
A = Admiring your swag
A = Affection that I feel for
you.
L = Loving you for ever.
Love always, Leartis, Chatisha,
and Miss Eunice.
Death Notice


Mother you have been my
friend, my comforter and my
strength. You watched me
grow from a tender child to an
independent adult. You have
always been there to pick me
up when I have fallen. You
taught me everything that I
know. We shared a bond that
can never be broken by time.
You have been called by many
names Jackson, Laughlin,
Jones and Zula. But the name
that fit you best are Mother
and Grandmother. Happy
Birthday!
Love, Dianne, Freddy, Mar-
cel and Family.


WILLIAM DAVID PAULK
11/29/40 04/1/06

For yesterday's memories,
today's love and tomorrow
dreams. We love you,
Marilyn (wife), Mamie
(mother), children and grand-
children.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MICHAEL JOHNSON JR.
07/13/89- 11/24/08

We think of you always, but
especially today.
You will never be forgotten
although you are gone away.
Your memory is a keepsake
with which we never part.
God has you in His keeping;
we have you in our heart.
Your father and family.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


LILLIAN S. LONGLEY
"Tootsie"
08/17/45 -11/29/08


It's been a year since you've
left us. Your memories are
in our heart forever. We love
you!


JAMAAL GAINER
11/23/81 10/14/07

To my only son, you will be
forever in our hearts. You are
unforgettable and well loved.
We truly miss you, in this
life. We must let go and let
God do the rest.
R.I.P. The Ole Boy (Slim)
and Mama Syl. Uncles, aunts,
cousins, nieces, nephews and
frineds.


Death Notice


4


FREDDIE 'LIL DADDY'
LAWRENCE, 73, retired, died
November 18 in Panama City,
FL at Bay Memorial Hospital.
Cremation and private buri-
al was held in Ocala, FL.


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


CATHERINE ABERCROMBIE

wishes to thank all of you
for your cards, letters, love,
support and heartfelt sym-
pathy during our time of be-
reavement.
Special thanks to Pastor
Samuel Boone, Liberty United
Church and the Royal Funer-
al Home staff.
May God bless each of you.
The Abercrombie Family


' "'y




BARBARA STACEY, 60, meat
cutter, died November 18 at Mt.
Sinai Hospital. Viewing Friday
4 to 9 p.m. Service Saturday
4 p.m., in the chapel. Services
entrusted to Genesis Funeral
Home.


10936 NORTHEAST 6TH AVENUE 305-757-
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11/26/29 09/02/08


I l.J


IRHJ jTlr'










The Miami Times



Li f sty


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* *, ,'


S- N ,


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 25- DECEMBER 1, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES






"Irreconcilable Bon dage"



Loving him almost to death I


Local activist debuts movie "God, Me...HIV?"


Robinson:

this is a ch

By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.co

Having traveled all over
Lauderdale native DevinI
still on a mission.
Robinson, 26, has appi
series Apollo twice, BET
MTV, UPN, NBC, Nation
and been featured in s
including Seventeen, HIF
magazines--all in an effort
nation about HIV/AIDS.
Statistics show that ev
utes, someone in the Un
comes infected by HIV. I
nationally acclaimed acto
and motivational speaker
educate the world about
now become part of his li
Robinson, also known a
ing his craft to a new lev
World AIDS Day at the C
Movie Theater in Miam
dale on Dec. 1. The movie


This is more than a movie;

ance to save lives

Partnering with Cinema Paradiso Movie
9m Theater, Robinson will premiere his mov-
ie, "God, Me...HIV?" which an alteration
r the world, Fort of his 2005 one-man show "God Did Not
T. Robinson X is Give Me HIV" showcasing seven confes-
sional narratives about -the pandemic
eared on the TV HIV.
's 106 & Park, Using comedy, poetry and motivational,
al Public Radio Robinson, also known as Egypt, will at-
iuch magazines tempt to entertain, educate and yet em-
V Plus and POZ power the audience.
rt to educate the "Although it will be entertaining, you
will be receiving so much information
'ery 9 1/2 min- that you can go out and inform people
united States be- about HIV/AIDS," said Robinson in an
For Robinson, a interview with The Miami Times on Fri-
Dr, poet, dancer, day.
r, the mission to In addition to the movie premiere, there
t HIV/AIDS has will be testing available to those who are
festyle. curious about knowing their HIV/AIDS
as Egypt, is tak- status at no cost.
vel this year for "For the first time, you have. a movie
inema Paradiso that can directly change your life," he
ii/Fort Lauder- said. "This is more than a movie; this is a
is rated PG 13. chance to save lives."


Oprah Winfrey announces end to her show in 2010


By Caryn Rousseau
Associated Press

"The Oprah Winfrey Show," an iconic
broadcast that grew over two decades into
a daytime television powerhouse and the
foundation of a multibillion-dollar media
empire, will end its run in 2011 after 25
seasons on the air, Winfrey's production
company said Thursday night.
Winfrey plans to announce the final date
for her show during a live broadcast on Fri-
day, Harpo Productions Inc. said, bringing
an end to what has been television's top-
rated talk show for more than two decades,
airing in 145 countries worldwide and
watched by an estimated 42 million view-
ers a week in the U.S. alone.
A Harpo spokeswoman declined to com-
ment Thursday on Winfrey's future plans


OPRAH WINFREY
Talk Show Host


except to say that "The Oprah Winfrey Show"
will not move to cable television.
Winfrey, 55, is widely expected to start up
a new talk show on OWN: The Oprah Win-
frey Network, a much-delayed joint venture
with Discovery Communications Inc. that is
expected to debut in 2011. OWN is to re-
place the Discovery Health Channel and will
debut in some 74 million homes. An OWN
spokeswoman 'declined comment Thurs-
day.
CBS Television Distribution, which dis-
tributes "The Oprah Winfrey Show" to more
than 200 markets blanketing the United
States, held out hope that it could continue
doing business with Winfrey, perhaps pro-
ducing a new show out of its studios in Los
Angeles.
"We know that anything she turns her
Please turn to SHOW 2C


'- *' ;- '. '
. :. ', .A , 7., I -
- rt '. *"* ,n ,, ,, , : 1


Jackson's doctor
returns to work


By Juan A.. Lozano
Associated Press


Michael Jackson's doctor returned
to work at his Houston medical clinic
on Monday for the first time since the
pop star's death.
Dr. Conrad Murray arrived at the
Armstrong Medical Clinic and was
greeted by a couple patients and
the pastor of his church. He didn't
speak with reporters before entering
the clinic, but a spokeswoman for
his attorney said Murray was looking
forward to getting back to work and
seeing patients.
Murray, a cardiologist licensed
in Nevada, Texas and California,
was hired to be Jackson's personal
physician during a world tour. He
was with Jackson when the 50-year-
old singer died June 25.
The doctor has been the focus
of a Los Angeles police homicide
investigation since telling
investigators he administered
propofol, a powerful operating room
anesthetic, to Jackson to help the
pop star sleep.
Murray, who lives in Las Vegas, has
not been charged with a crime.
Patients outside the Houston clinic
on Monday praised Murray's work
as a physician and called him a
community role model.
"He's a good doctor, he's a kind
man," said Ransom Craddock, 81.
"We all in this community welcome
him back.










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State Sen. Frederica S.
Wilson, the visionary found-
er of the 5000 Role Models
of Excellence, approaches
issues in a unique way. She
makes certain her Role Mod-
els have new experiences.
They have been to the Signa-
ture Gardens, Parrot Jungle,
The Fountainbleau Hotel &
Spa, Westview Country Club,
Arsht Performing Center, and
recently, The Blast Off with
Wilson for Congress Gala..
Assisting her at the gala were
Bobbie Mumford, PR. and
Maude Newbold, who helped,
escort special guests to the


proper stage includ-
ing Ed O'Dell, emcee.
Her history is still
being written.She has
gone from the class-
room to principal,
school board, Senate
seat, and now Con-
gresswoman for the
United States-. They


all showed up to support her
Fundraising Extravaganza
including President Patricia
Garrett, Angela Belemy, Al-
ice Bryant, Mabel Claring-
ton, Karen Cook, Melinda
Davis, Barbara Dent, Wini-
fred Fountain, Tylanny W.
Gilmore, Dr. Alice Johnson,
Tony McDuffie, and Ernes-
tine Perkins (deceased), rep-
resenting The Elite Jewels.
The huge crowd came
to life when O'Dell brought
on the Miami Gardens Su-
per Soul Steppers. They hit
the stage dressed in jeans,


boots, and co\v-%.%
boy hats led b',
Linda Holloway, /-
president/cho-
reographer, and
Dorothy Wells,
assistant, followed by Akua
Scott, Agnes Crane, Alpha
Fluitt, Arleace Carrion,
Bettye Phinazee-Williams,
Cerina Bass, Daniel Sey-
more, Elizabeth W. Wells,
Josetta Lindsey, Kathy
Johnson, Lynn A Williams,
Mildred Casmay, Ramona
Varner, Shirley Clark, and
Wanda Francis. They elec-
trified the guests with 4-line
routines.
Senator Wilson
was brought to the
stage to introduced
her special politi-
cians, such as Sena-
tor Chris Smith,
Senator Gwen Margo-
ON lis, Rep. Perry Thur-
ston, Rep. Annie Be-
tancourt. Commissioners
Audrey Edmonson, Barbara
Jordan, Dorothy Johnson,
Marta Perez, Betsy Kaplan,
Dr. Larry Handfield, Joe
Mathis, former Superinten-
dent Rodger Quevas, Pame-
la Jones, Melody Delancy.
Jai Ingraham and Ronald
and Betty Major who flew in
from Lakeland to support Dr.
Wilsbn.'s gala.
As promised, the biggest
electric line was formed and
everyone had a chance to
profile their outfits and shake
their derriere for five minutes


Berthine Pamela Dean-Mason, daughter of
the late Bertram Dean, Sr., and Marian McIn-
tosh Dean was in Orlando attending a Nurses
Conference.- Berthife also visited her fanm- '
ily in Miami: Alexander and Christina Dean,
niece Alexis and brother Bertram, Jr.. Berthine lives in
Spring, Texas near Houston and is the Director of Associ-
ate Nursing Program. Her Zeta Sorors were also glad to
see Berthine. She is also working on her Ph. D.


Willis "Shorty" O'Brien died in Georgia last Thursday.
Shorty was a former Booker T. Washington field goal kick-
er for the "Tornadoes" and finished in the Class of 1953.
Wedding anniversary greetings to Paul and Karen
Brown, Nov. 15, their 12th; William C. and Cathy Wan-
za, Nov. 19, their 32nd and Alfred R. and Edith Barr,
Nov. 20, their 38th.


Florida A & M University was shut out for the first time
since a 62-0 loss to Virginia Tech in 2004 and for the first
time in MEAC play since a 25-0 loss to Bethune Cookman
in 1988.
As most Floridians travel to Orlando to witness the
"Classic" of Bethune Cookman and FAMU May we all
enjoy our trip there, have a joyous time and return home
safe.


Saint Agnes Episcopal Church held their annual sea-
sonal Calendar Tea on Sunday, Nov. 15 for the first place
winners for the months of Sept., Oct. and Nov. Captain
for Sept. included Sheila Rolle, Velma Arnold, Aundra
Goodmond, Elizabeth Mackey, Evangeline Rambaeu,
Kendra Clarke and Sandra Barry-Williams. Oct. Capt:
Bryley Wilson, Angelita Browne and Calvina Parks.
Nov. Capt: Sylvia Rolle, Helen Bennett, Chauncey
Edgecombe, Hughie Nairn, Michelle Roper and Wil-
helmina Welch.


Rev. Bernice King, the youngest child of the late Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. embraced the legacy and lead-
ership of her parents as she became the first woman to
head the civil rights organization co-founded by her fa-
ther. She is the first female leader of the Southern Chris-
tian Leadership Conference.


Rev. Joseph Lowery, known as the "Dean of the Civil
Rights Movement" celebrated his 88th birthday with his
wife, Evelyn, Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin during a
tribute at Morehouse College in Atlanta. The Morehouse
and Spelman College glee clubs all sang to the honoree,
"Amazing Grace, Mary Don't You Weep, Old Landmark
and Precious Memories."


The first Black president of the American Dental Asso-
ciation (ADA) named its first Black president during the
organization's recent meeting in Honolulu. He is Dr. Ray-
mond F. Gist, who practices general dentistry in Flint, MI
and was voted president-elect of the more than 157,000
member organization by the ADA House of Delegates.


as the Psi Phi Band pro- early arrivals.
vided the music including Some of the early arrivals
Lee Johnson singing "Ain't included A.D. Moore, found-
Know Stop Us Now" and er of CORE, Bertha Carswell,
Lady "Gee" singing "Rock former secretary to Dr. Solo-
Steady" from the Tyler Perry mon C. Stinson, Dr. Carlton
movie, "I Can Do Bad All By Fisher, President, Alumni
Myself'. Coalition, Prescola Beneby,
Emcee Ed O'Dell brought Dr. Lorraine F. Strachan,
Paul Wilson, son, to intro- James and Ruth Copeland,
duce his mother, the senator. electricians, Barbara King,
It was a proud moment for former Singing Angels Presi-
him to articulate brilliantly dent, Rep. James Bush III,
on how he has been emulat- candidate for Congressman,
ing her since he graduated who came loaded with evi-
from high school. And, of dence of his enviable record
course, it was a proud in politics that shows
moment to hear a son accountability and
elaborated the way he transparency in his
did. It was almost a 4-page brochure,
hard act for her to fol- |", Daphne Johnson,
low, but she was ex- and Ceola Adams.
tremely proud. She Finally, the food
used that time to thank was ready to be
everyone for their sup- served and everyone
port and to continue MEEK lined up to be served.


raising money for her
campaign. It's badly needed
in a tough race.
Then, Nassau came to
Karu & Y Club VIA Langley
and the Bahamas Junkanoo
Revue led by Senator Wilson
and Consulate Gladys John-
son-Sands. Everyone got
into the act and reggae their
style for 15 minutes. And,
before the music cool down
itself, O'Dell brought on the
Miami Jackson High Tempt-
ing Temptations. The group
reminisce on the Tempta-
tion popular tunes and en-
tertained the crowd over-
whelmingly. And, course,
the Junkanoo Revue closed
out the evening and everyone
left feeling good, feeling full
and started getting ready for
Blast Off 2.


Kudos to Slyvia Williams
Garner for her benevolence
of putting a smile on the
faces of senior citizens and
food in their stomachs at her
annual picnics in selected
restaurants and, recently, at
Amelia Earhart Park, where
she started alone preparing
the ribs, chicken, beans and
salad for the awaited feast,
while "Tree Top", the one-
man band entertained the


Some of the others in
line included Robert Badger,
Joyce Bandoo, Elizabeth
Bouie, Beverly Chin, Geor-
gia Duncan, Joyce Edwards,
Harold Ferguson, former
vice president, Dorsey High
Alumni, Jenesta A. Flem-


ing, Irene Hayes,
Fernando Lennon,
Joe and Shelia Mack,
Geletera Johnson,
Manuel Jones, Joel
L. Williams, Pepper,
Ward Towers and
Williams Home for the
aged.


existence, October 24, 2009,
with Samuel Jackson at the
helm and other persons in
the leadership role, such as
Stephen Thompson, Glenn
Holcomb, Charles Golphin,
Eunice Martin, and Bill
Simmons and visiting dig-
nitaries Ray Camp-
bell, director Easter
Region and president,
Onyx Ski Club.
Twenty years of
existence was sup-
ported by Gov. Char-
lie Christ, Sen. Bill
Nelson, Congressman DES
Kendrick B. Meek,
Michelle Spence-
Jones, Barbara Jordan,
and Mayor Shirley Gibson,
according to Darlene Gay-
Anniversary, Chair., Linda
S. Taylor, Linda C. Taylor,
Anita McGruder, Jacque-
line Givens, Pecola Broad-
nax, Rhonda Acklin, Dr.
Cathia Darling, Charles
Sargent, Howard Dupree,
Karen Bankston, Thomp-
son., Cynthia and Larry
Handfield. Can you imagine
them skiing down a slope at
50 miles an hour? They can


HANDFIELD


In January of 1989, Al-
len Jones asked Stephen
Thompson if he would be in-
terested in taking a ski trip.
The reason being he saw an
event featured on Black En-
tertainment Television on
skiing by the National Broth-
erhood of Skiers in Steam-
boat, Colorado. Thompson
inquired and received docu-
mentation on how to orga-
nize. Then on June 28 1989,
Sunshine Slopers Inc. was
born at the North Dade Re-
gional Library and became
incorporated, Oct. 2, 1989.
Congratulations to Sun-
shine Slopers Ski Club, Inc.
for celebrating 20-years of


do'it.
A special be-
lated Happy Birthday
to one of my former
students at Norland
Middle-- Melodie
Delancey. She is con-
sidered a bad Scorpio
as her birthday was
October 28. It came


as a surprise by her daugh-
ter, Tameka Johnson, and
special friend, Patrick Mur-
phree with a bang of a party
at Miami Prime Grill. Her
special guest was Senator.
Frederica Wilson, her boss
of 13-years for whom she is
working tireless to help her
win a seat in Congress, along
with Alix Desulme, City of
North Miami Clerk.
Others in attendance
included William Delanc-
ey, father, Thelma Walker,
mother, siblings Cynthia
and Gregory; Lakesha Wil-
son-Rochelle, Doretha Den-
nis, Barbara Duncan, Bar-
bara Drummond Katrina
Wilson-Davis, Mr. and Mrs.


Quel Ferguson, Mr. and
Mrs. Marquiese Williams,
Brandy Williams, Raylin
and Rachel Wiggins, Neysa
Williams, Lenny Delancey,
Destinie Delancy, Quin-
cy Corley, and Michael
Brown.
Also, Tonya Bain,
Viragie Jackson, Ar-
netta Anderson, Pa-
trice Palmer, Keisha
Kerr, Valencia Wil-
liams, Eric Accime,
George Ray, Ed-
ddie Manson, Willie
ULME Mae Inniss, Ekeisha
White, Lori Delhom-
me, Willie Curry,
Karen John, Charles (CJ),
Patrick Murphree, Patter-
son Murphree, June Mur-
phree, Pat and Patrice Mur-
phree, Moises Hernandez,
Sandy Lacy, and Jessica
Gullien.
Near the end of the party,
Melodie took to the mic and
thanked everyone for sur-
prising her and making her
birthday one to remember,
while her family members
gave her a special hug. Melo-
die also commended Debbie
Taylor and Band, as well as
photographer Donnie Douce
and cake maker, Nancy Bar-
rigais.

******** **
Baljean Smith, presi-
dent, and Harcourt Clark,
chairman, retired brothers of
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity an-
nounced the turkey basket
for the citizens of Miami Gar-
den in conjunction with the
Miami Garden Police Depart-
ment and the Mayor's office.
Please contact the Mayor's
office for the day, time, and
venue.
Clark also indicated that
the give-away-baskets will
be for the needy and not
the greedy. Furthermore,
this our 15m-year donating
thanksgiving baskets and it
is one of our projects to the
community. The other proj-
ect is to entertain the se-
niors at the Frat House each
Christmas with a full-course
dinner. For more info. please
call 305-620-5533


Oprah Winfrey show began as the underdog


SHOW
continued from 1C

hand to will be a great suc-
cess," the unit of CBS Corp.
said in a statement. "We look
forward to working with her
for the next several years, and
hopefully afterwards as well."
Winfrey's 24th season
opened earlier this year with a
bang, as she drew more than
20,000 fans to Chicago's Mag-
nificent Mile on Michigan Av-
enue for a block party with the
Black Eyed Peas.
She followed up with a series
of blockbuster interviews -


Mike Tyson and Evander Ho-
lyfield, exclusives with singer
Whitney Houston and ESPN's
Erin Andrews, and just this
week, former Alaska governor,
GOP vice presidential candi-
date and best-selling author
Sarah Palin.
Over the years, "The Oprah
Winfrey Show" grew from a
newcomer that chipped away
at talk king Phil Donahue's
dominance into a program
that turned inspirational. The
show covered a gamut that
ranged from interviews with
the world's most famous celeb-
rities to an honest discussion


about her weight struggles.
In 1986, pianist-showman
Liberace gave his final TV inter-
view to Winfrey, just six weeks
before he died. In a widely
viewed prime-time special
aired in 1993, Michael Jack-
son revealed he suffered from
a skin condition that produc-
es depigmentation.
The show also became a
launching pad for Oprah's
Book Club, and authors
whose books were selected
became best-sellers. The ti-
tles ranged from "Song of Sol-
omon" and "Paradise" by Toni
Morrison to Wally Lamb's


Knowing the signs could


AUTHOR
continued from 1C

"My dad had left me when
I was 13 because my mom
didn't want him anymore. I
turned to men for comfort. I
resented my dad for leaving
me because I was close to
him as a child," said John-
son.
The youngest of her three
sisters, Johnson was raised
by her grandmother who also
raised 14 other kids. At the
age of nine, she moved into
the projects with her mother
but at 18, she was deter-
mined to leave the projects
because she wanted better
for herself.
Johnson admits that she
stayed in an abusive rela-
tionship with spouse be-
cause of the financial secu-
rity.
"Because he was a bread
winner and I had low self-es-
teem, I stayed with him out
of spite because I hated his


mom so much," she laughs.
Sadly, Johnson encourag-
es every woman to know the
signs and be aware of the red
flags for domestic violence.
"Knowing the signs will be
the difference between life
and death," she says.
The 57-page book is a
journey through a woman's
fight to find her place in this
world.
Today, Johnson is a qual-
ity control technician and a
counselor. She advices wom-
en to: "don't drag the abuse,"
thinking that he is going to
change; "go to counseling,"
if you find yourself having
trouble leaving an abusive
mate; "don't be a nurturer,"
don't babysit your mate to
get him to change and lastly,
"don't go back," walk out the
door with the intention of not
returning.
If you wish to contact Geral-
dine Johnson, you can email
her at irreconciblebondage@
gmail.com


save


"She's Come Undone" and
Elie Wiesel's "Night."
For others, the selection
backfired. "A Million Little
Pieces" exploded in sales af-
ter Winfrey chose the James
Frey memoir in fall 2005.
Soon after, it was revealed
as a fabricated tale of addic-
tion and recovery, and Winfrey
later chewed out Frey on her
show.
"She's been a great inspira-
tion, a great support for all
the shifts in politics and social
consciousness and conscious-
ness in general," said hip-
hop mogul Russell Simmons.


your life


I BLACKS MUST CONTROL THE-IR OWN DESTINY


WI S

WILS


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


Jay-Z, Will Smith co-produce Broadway show "Fela!"


By Monica Herrera

Jay-Z, Will Smith and Jada
Pinkett Smith have officially
signed on as co-producers of
"Fela!," a musical about Nige-
rian Afrobeat pioneer Fela Ani-
kulapo-Kuti that opens Monday
(November 23) on Broadway.
The news confirms weeks of
speculation that the three would
back the show.
A representative for "Felal"
did not specify the amount of
the celebrities' investment, but
their endorsement alone gives
the musical's profile a signifi-
cant boost just a week before its
premiere.
"There's going to be an enor-
mous incentive for people to in-
vestigate Fela when they know
that Jay-Z and Will Smith are
all rabid fans," Rikki Stein,
Kuti's former co-manager and
executor of his estate, recently
told Billboard. "It's a sign that
the underground is moving
overground."


JAY-Z
Ceo / Mogul
"Felal" will help find a larger
audience for the music of Kuti,
who pioneered Afrobeat from
the sounds of James Brown
and West African high-life mu-
sic, became a political icon in
his native Nigeria and earned
the admiration of everyone from


JADA PINKETT
Actress
Paul McCartney to the Brazilian
singer Gilberto Gil before his
death in 1997.
MCA reissued Kuti's catalog
in 2001, but Bernstein, who
helped market that series, said
its potential wasn't fully realized.
"MCA was a major label, and no


i, -N i "w
WILL SMITH
Actor / Director
matter how much they said they
loved Fela and how important
he was, he was definitely lost in
the shuffle," he said.
Stein is all too familiar with
labels' conflicted admiration for
Kuti. In the mid-'80s, he said he
met with every major about a


potential deal. "They all received
me respectfully and saw Fela as
akin to Miles Davis or any of the
jazz greats," Stein recalls. "But
they'd ask: 'Rikki, which three
minutes of this 18-minute song
do you want me to put on the
radio?'"
"I'd ask Fela to write me a
small tune," Stein added. "He
used to say, 'I'm writing African
classical music. Don't mess with
Tchaikovsky.'"
A deal nearly came to fruition
in 1993, when then-Motown Re-
cords president Jheryl Busby of-
fered Kuti a five-album deal un-
der his new Africa-oriented la-
bel, with a $1.3 million advance
for each album and another $1
million for full ownership of Ku-


ti's catalog, Stein said. But af-
ter talking to his spirit advisers,
Kuti refused to sign until April
1995. Busby left Motown the
week of the scheduled signing,
and Andre Harrell's first action
as Motown's new president was
to ax the African label.
"Felal" re-creates the Shrine
-- the Lagos, Nigeria, nightclub
where Kuti played multiple
nights each week with his band,
Africa 70. Singers, dancers and
musicians perform Kuti songs
including "Shakara," "Zombie"
and "Teacher Don't Teach Me
Nonsense" behind lead actor
Sahr Ngaujah, who has won an
Obie Award for his spot-on por-
trayal of Kuti in the show's Off
Broadway run last year.


Laurence Fishburne and 'CSI': The evidence is weak


By Robert Bianco


Sadly, good actors and good
shows don't always turn out to be
good matches.
There's no question that Lau-
rence Fishburne is a fine actor, as
anyone who has seen his best film
work can attest, or that CSI (CBS,
tonight, 9 ET/PT) remains a fine
TV show. Yet fresh on the heels
of last week's reasonably well-
watched but creatively disastrous
CSI/Miami/NY triple crossover, it
may be time to. admit that Fish-
burne's stint on CSI isn't work-
ing, at least not to the extent CSI
needs.
Considering the relative strength
of the series, Fishburne's perfor-
mance might be good enough and
the character strong enough to
function as a member of the en-
semble. 'But what CSI needs in


the still-roiling wake of William
Petersen's departure is a lead
character and a charismatic star
turn, and Fishburne's Ray Langs-
ton is not filling either bill.
It didn't help, of course, that
the trilogy was a ridiculous mish-
mash of disjointed plots that failed
to serve any of the shows well. A
girl gets caught in a credit card
scam in Miami, shipped for her
body parts to New York, and then
forced into prostitution in Las Ve-
gas? Even by TV standards, that's
a remarkable run of bad luck.
Still, badly plotted or not, the
point of the Fishburne-driven
trilogy was to bolster his star
status, and at that, it failed dis-
mally. Indeed, the episodes were
actually better when he wasn't on
screen, if only because for those
few moments, the writers weren't
aggressively pushing "Dr. Ray"


LAURENCE FISHBURNE
Actor / Director
upon us.
The 2007 crossover between
CSI and Without a Trace was no


great prize-winner either, but it
held your interest because the two
main characters were so distinct-
ly different: Petersen's wry, odd,
observant Gil Grissom clashing
with Anthony LaPaglia's more
aggressive, emotional and pro-
active Jack Malone. Ray seems
to have no distinctive traits or
quirks at all, and having the
Miami and New York characters
fuss over him like he was some
forensics rock star did nothing
to lend him one.
We do know one unusual fact
about Langston:.He was raised
in Korea. But so far, that seems
to be no more than the kind of
back story actors invent to help
them latch on to a character.
The show has yet to use it in any
significant or even vaguely enter-
taining way that viewers can.
appreciate.


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Janet Jackson confirms break-up with Jermaine Dupri


By Cristina Everett


That's the way love goes.
Despite reports that Janet
Jackson and Jermaine Dupri
are still a couple, the singer
confirmed breakup rumors when
she recently referred to him as
her "ex."
During a radio interview with
Atlanta's "Bert Show," Jackson
reveals that she has a very short
list of ex-boyfriends with whom
she still communicates.
"I'm not the type of girl that


stays in touch with your ex like
that," the singer, 43, said.
However, Jackson said that
Dupri, 37, is an exception.
"Jermaine is one of my best
friends," she said. "I love him to
death. We're still connected. We're
still good friends. We still talk."
Following the tragic death of
her brother Michael in June,
Jackson and Dupri broke off
their seven-year relationship.
According to Usmagazine.com,
the couple temporarily reunited
in September to celebrate Dupri's


_ i


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
At a point where you're taking a gi-
ant step forward, others are taking two
steps back. Any conflicts you have stem
from not being on the same page. If
there's no harmony here now, it'll return
in a month or so. Lucky numbers 8, 12,
24, 26, 31

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
You can pretty much do what you
want. Much to your surprise, whoever
you thought would interfere with your
plans has backed off. Now that you have
all the control, what are you going to do
with it? Lucky numbers 10, 13, 15, 25,
298

GEMINI: MAY 21 JUNE 20
Differences of opinion about how
things should be have stirred up trouble
in paradise. If you can keep a sense
of humor this won't turn into a scene.
Everything will improve if you can just
agree to disagree. Lucky numbers 6, 9,
10, 15, 19

CANCER: JUNE 21 -JULY 20
Things haven't settled down enough
for you to think that you've made peace
with this. Whatever you're fine with, oth-
ers are having a hard time forgiving you
for things that came about because you
copped out. Lucky numbers 15, 18, 21,
23, 26

LEO: JULY 21 -AUGUST 20
You've seen this too many times to get
upset about it. Loving someone through
something one more time is one of those
Karmic things. This may be tiresome but


lessons in compassion underscore the
need for patience. Lucky numbers 13,
18, 21, 35, 38

VIRGO: AUGUST 21 SEPT 20
Something got triggered a while back
and you've been flying high ever since.
Holding your own in the midst of diffi-
culty is easier when your heart knows
how to see the light even in the worst-
case scenario. Lucky numbers 7, 14, 26,
28,30

LIBRA: SEPT 21 OCT 20
You've gotten so right about whatever
you're doing there's no room for anyone
who doesn't see it your way. Don't close
,yourself off. The mark of an evolved per-
son is their ability to tolerate others.
Lucky numbers 9, 12, 15, 25, 29

SCORPIO: OCT 21 NOV 20
Obsess less and play a little more.
Don't drive yourself nuts wondering why
life isn't going the way it's supposed to.
You won't get anywhere if you keep push-
ing the river. Lighten up and go with the .
flow. Lucky numbers 14, 16, 18, 26, 31


birthday in Lake Como, Italy.
When asked if the singer would
ever marry again, Jackson who
has been married twice, as a teen
to James DeBarge and in her 20s
to choreographer Rene Elizondo -
is skeptical.
"I don't know if I'll get married
again," she told Harper's Bazaar.
"I'll put it like this: If God wants
me to, then I will. I've had people
ask me out. I haven't entertained
any offers thus far, but I'm
locking myself in my work right
now."


SAGITTARIUS: NOV 21 DEC 20
Old friends and the old track have
become a bit of a drain. You're so done
with this. At this point in your develop-
ment you'd do better to hang with peo-
ple who know where you're going and
who you're becoming. Lucky numbers
14, 19, 24, 31, 35

CAPRICORN: DEC 21 JAN 20
You'd love it if things would settle
down. Guess again! Finding the joy in
this craziness will require you to be open
to the idea that there's a purpose to it
and you're just here to find out what that
is. Lucky numbers 12, 16, 19, 25, 28

AQUARIUS: JAN 21 FEB 20
Your attitude has changed about a
lot of things. The old way of seeing it
doesn't work anymore. Opening your
mind has allowed some unusual people
to enter your life. Make no mistake; they
will teach you a lot. Lucky numbers 6, 9,
13, 15, 19

PISCES: FEB 21 MARCH 20
Don't be in a rush to move forward.
What's left of the past is still there and
you have no clue about what's next. As
you clean up the remains of the day, be
grateful for unseen blessings already on
their way. Lucky numbers 15, 21, 23, 25,
28


- R DCM1E41


Adrienne Arsht Center and Larry Rosen presents
JAZZ ROOTS: AN EVENING WITH DAVE GRUSIN
Featuring Jon Secada, Pattj Austin, Gary Burton, Arturo Sandoval,
Nestor Torres and Sammy Figueroa.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $25, $45, $55, $85, $125


Adrienne Arsht Center presents
BATSHEVA ENSEMBLE
Israel's Top Dance Company! "This is not dancing you will see anywhere
else!" The New York Times
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $25, $35, $45, $60, $75, $90

BATSHEVA ENSEMBLE
"The'dancers are remarkable!" village voice
Batsheva is one of the most influential and exciting dance companies on
the planet!
2 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $25, $35,'$45, $60, $75, $90
Adrienne Arsht Center presents
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAYS: FEATURING RICHARD SMALLWOOD
Grammy winning legend Richard Smallwood is the featured guest on this
Free Gospel Sundays holiday program.
4 PM Knight Concert Hall FREE


Adrienne Arsht Center and Broadway Across America presents
BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50
ilib]=mfe:i :il


BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50


BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50
Adrienne Arsht Center presents
SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCK
This African-American all-female vocal ensemble brings to Miami a holiday
concert fusing the many warm and wonderful traditions that mark the end
of the year.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50


BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50
Adrienne Arsht Center presents
BRIAN STOKES MITCHELL
Brian Stokes Mitchell won a Tony Award for his role in Kiss Me Kate, and received
Tony nominations for Man of La Mancha, Ragtime, and King Hedley II. Join
him for a spectacular evening of show tunes, ballads and classic love songs!
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $45, $60, $75


BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
3 PM Knight Concert Hall $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50


FORTHEPERFO GARTSOMAMDAD

KNGTCOCR HL CRI ALSTUIOTEAER*ZIF ALE OEA OSE


Israels
Batsheva Ensemble


Free Gospel Sundays:
Richard Smallwood


~fl


Billy uysmW


Sweet Honey in the Rocke


TER MADE FRESH


es have to taste It to believe it.
i nl seafood sauce included.

S. 954-559-3739


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.

PRELER oNOo

305.9496722 *arshtcnter.oCaEly30b.940.6722IC


CWEDlDECMBERi9


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4C THE MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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ercad 0


Too Broadway for 'Idol,'perfect for 'Dreamgirls'


By Kristin McGrath '


On American Idol, being "too
Broadway" has become syn-
onymous with a ticket home.
-But for Season 7's third-place
finisher, Syesha Mercado, be-
ing Broadway is a good thing.
She's taking the stage as
Deena Jones in the national
tour of Dreamgirls, a musical
about a girl group that en-
counters fame, fortune and
heartache, which opens Sun-
day at the Apollo Theater in
New York and wraps up July
25 in Kansas City.
"(The judges) say a lot of
things about Broadway, but
it's OK," says Mercado, 22.
"Broadway is a good thing. I
love Broadway."
Mercado has sizable shoes to
fill: Dreamgirls fans associate
the role with Beyonce, who
played Deena in the 2006 film
version. (The show originated
as a Broadway hit in the '80s,
with Sheryl Lee Ralph and
Jennifer Holliday.)
"I definitely pay homage to
Beyonc6," says Mercado. "But
I try to focus on what the
character is to me. We both
grew up in a very poor back-
ground. I lived in the proj-
ects when I was younger, so
I know what it's like to come
from nothing."
After the Idols Live tour in
2008, Mercado joined hun-
dreds of other hopefuls in a
"rigorous" six-month audi-
tion process. During her last
callback, she says, "I felt like
Deena Jones."
She was in front of Radio City


Music Hall with friends when
she got the call offering her
the role.
"Everybody was looking at
me like I was crazy because
I was jumping up and down,
screaming," Mercado says.
"It was like a fairy-tale movie
ending."
She's enthused about the
venue because "the energy at
the Apollo is amazing. Just
knowing that Ella Fitzgerald,
Michael Jackson and Sammy
Davis Jr. have been on the
exact same stage."
Her wedding plans are on
hold while the show is on the
road. (She got engaged to col-


lege classmate Hess Wesley
during her Idol run.) "I have
people who love me in life,"
Mercado says. "E-mail is my
best friend. It's tough, but
the Dreamgirls cast are my
family."
After the tour, she'll contin-
ue recording her pop/R&B
debut album with a cast of
writers and producers, in-
cluding REO, who produced
Beyonc6's Hello. She could
see herself in New York. Or
L.A. Or Miami. She plans to
do Broadway, film and TV,
start a charity and, of course,
sing.
"There's a line Deena has,"


Mercado says. "She says, 'I
want to be more. I want to be
an artist, I want to act.' I want
to be so much more than just
one thing."
Idol will always be a part of
her identity, she says. She
just had a sleepover with fel-
low finalist Ramiele Malubay,
lunched with Carly Smithson
and Brooke White, and saw
David Cook's L.A. show.
"No matter where I go in my
career, someone is going to
remember me as the girl from
American Idol," Mercado
says. "And that's OK. Every-
one will remember me for dif-
ferent things." *


Dream tour: Syesha Mercado stars as
played by Beyonce's in the 2006 film.


-Photo/Toky Photography
Deena, the role


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breuary 17, 201

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Prices effective Friday, November 27 through Wednesday, December 2, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River,
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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4C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009













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B us iness


TH; MIAMI TIMES


SECTION


By Mike Krumboltz


Attention, class. Here's a logic
question for you: If it's true that
everyone loves a deal, and Black
Friday offers the best deals of the
year, then is it safe to assume
that folks will go into a state of
high-grade hysteria the day after
Thanksgiving? The answer is: duh,
of course.
Though over a week away, Black
Friday is already igniting the
Search box. Shoppers have pushed


up searches on "black friday 2009"
and "black friday ads" to dizzying
heights. One might think that re-
tailers would keep the deals a se-
cret until the big day, but nothing
could be further from the truth.
In an effort to get spend-happy
shoppers to their stores, retailers
have "leaked" many of their most
drool-worthy de.eas. Offers from
Walrart, Best Bui, and Tiarget
are all garnering a ton of lookups.
And, interestingly, many of the
deals are quite similar.


CNN Money explains what shop-
pers can expect find at Walmart on
November 27. According to sourc-
es, there will be HDTVs, laptops,
toys, and Blu-ray players for the
grabbing. Confirmed products in-
clude a 50-inch Sanyo 720p plas-
ma TV for $598, a Magnavox Blu-
ray player for $78, and a GPS from
TomTom for $59. .
And across the-u rban sprawl at
Target? A lot of the same, actu-
ally. There, you can get a 32-inch
LCD HDTV from Westinghouse for


$246, some toys for 50 percent off,
and toasters and coffeemakers for
just $3. Best Buy will reportedly
offer shoppers a 50-inch Samsung
plasma TV for $898, "huge dis-
counts" on GPS units, and a Play-
Station 3 Slim with two games for
$300.
It's worth noting that none of
these deals are "official," as the
-'ttes hav .e'to cor rm thIth* ,'
But odds are, they're the real.deal.
Set your alarms and sharpen your
claws it's gonna be a long day.


Many compete

for seasonal Jobs

By Laura Petrecca

Seasonal job interviewees, it's time
to play up your best guest-greeting
and gift-wrapping skills: The battle
for holiday employment is brutal.
With the national unemployment
rate above 10%, and employed folks
looking to bolster budgets by taking
second jobs, the competition for re-
tail, movie theater, package-delivery
and other holiday posts is fierce.
"There are a lot more people look-
ing for jobs this year," says Jennifer
Grasz, a spokeswoman folr online job
site CareerBuilder.com. For instance,
laid-off employees are competing with
those who want to pad income af-
ter being hit with furloughs and pay
cuts, she says.
About 1 -in-8 employed workers plan
to take on a seasonal job, according
to a CareerBuilder.com survey.
More than half of employers expect
to get, more applications than last
year, according to a separate sea-
sonal hiring survey by SnagAJob.
com. At the same time, those manag-
ers expect to hire 16% fewer hourly
workers.
CareerBuilder.com is more optimis-
tic in its hiring outlook. It expects it
to be on par with last year. However,
2008's hiring levels were dramatical-
ly lower than the previous five years,
according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
Yet, many big firms are cutting
back. For instance, retail behemoth
Target hopes to glean some savings
by reducing its number of untrained
new hires in favor of asking existing
employees to work more shifts.
Video-game retailer GameStop,
which has filled about 15,000 posi-
6M~oi.eceived "significantly more ap-
- plSl3tons than in past years," spokes-
man Charles Hodges says.


New and used car prices jump


By Ken Thomas
Associated Press


The government's 'cash for
clunkers' program offered a lot
of Americans great deals on new
cars. Now those falling prices
have shifted into reverse.
Prices for new and used cars
rose sharply in October, partially
reflecting a whiplash from the
government trade-in program
that winnowed inventories at
dealership lots. The price spike
also has to do with car compa-
nies delivering more expensive
2010 models to the showroom.
The Labor Department reported
Wednesday that consumer prices
for new cars rose 1.6 percent, the
largest monthly increase since
May 1981. Used cars also saw a
price hike of 3.4 percent in Octo-
ber -- their largest increase since
September 1980.
All of this came against the


backdrop of a sluggish economy
-- consumer prices are lower than
a year ago and the higher car
prices accounted for 90 percent
of the overall 0.3 percent con-
sumer price gains last month.
Economists and analysts said
the steeper prices reflected a
combination of factors in the new
and used car markets. The tight-
er inventories came as the new
2010 model year vehicles arrived
en masse, and many dealerships
and manufacturers were less in-
clined to offer incentives.
"'The 'cash for clunkers' pro-
gram may have wiped out the
'09 models that have been sit-
ting there, but the brand-new
2010 models come and they can
command a higher price," said
James Brock, an economist
at Miami University in Oxford,
Ohio.
Clunkers reduced the invento-
ry of used cars because the gov-


ernment required the traded-in
cars and trucks to be scrapped.
"A lot of [used cars] were tak-
en off the road in the 'cash for
clunkers' program so a lot of
those trade-ins were scrapped
instead of being available,"
said David Wyss, Standard
and Poor's chief economist in
New York. "On top of
that you had a
pretty healthy
demand for
used cars
because
people
aren't buy-
ing new."
T o m
Webb, chief.
economist
at Manheim
Consulting,
which produc-
es an index of the used
car market, said lower new car


sales in 2009 have reduced the
number of vehicles traded-in to
dealerships, reducing inven-
tories and allowing
used car dealers
to charge a
higher
price.


Business mentoring increases productivity, retains workers


By Farrah Gray
NNPA Columnist

Business
mentoring is
the collabora-
tion of transfer-
ring the experi-
ence, skill and
knowledge from
a proven specialist to a less
experienced learner. For the
purpose of business, mentor-
ing supports the development
of a worker's skills, career,
and personal growth. Often
it is structured informally al-
though most Fortune 500 and


even small home-based com-
panies offer some form of men-
toring programs. Mentoring
also enables the rapid transfer
of legacy business advantages
or cultural aspects cementing
professional collaboration that
foster greater productivity re-
sults.
Successful mentoring com-
pliments Human Resources
by improving management
through personal career growth
development that retains valu-
able employees. It offers great-
er access to established in-
ternal and external networks,
broader personal and profes-


sional skills. The novice work-
er gains advice, and dynamic
perspectives from the mentor's
years of experience. This often
informal arrangement is cost
effective and yields bottom line
financial results.


experienced worker under their
wing for career and personal
development. This method is
cost effective particularly for
small businesses.
Situational mentoring oc-
curs for a specific circum-


successful mentoring compliments Human Resources by improving manage-
ment through personal career growth development that retains valuable em-
ployees. It offers greater access to established internal and external networks,
broader personal and professional skills.


Many types of mentoring ex-
ist. They include:
Informal or natural men-
toring, which occurs when a
senior decides to take the less


stance or project goal. These
arrangements tend to be short-
er-term focused on immediate
solutions but can lead to more
permanent career counseling


measures.
Positional is a formal pro-
vision involving a supervisor
mentoring a novice worker.
Most managers use this
technique in team building
efforts to enhance produc-
tivity. However, other team
members (ex. sales/market-
ing) may criticize or perceive
favoritism if one learner ad-
vances more rapidly than
others.
Formal mentoring pro-
grams are often used in large
companies such as Intel, Du-
Pont, Microsoft, Federal Ex-
press, AT&T, among others.


This formal program is de-
signed to promote and mea-
sure the career development
of the learner for greater bot-
tom line productivity results.
Mentors also benefit from
these professional relation-
ships strengthening their in-
terpersonal skills, increasing
awareness and insight into the
business operations. Overall,
the business benefits through
better recruitment, orientation,
and retention improving staff
communications with faster
learning across the board
i.e. stronger organizational
knowledge management.


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Higher. gas prices greet



Thanksgiving travelers

Thanksgiving travel provides an opportunity to gauge the mood of U.S. consumers


By Julie Schmit

Thanksgiving travelers
will find gasoline prices
much higher than last year
with little hope for respite
heading into the rest of the
holiday season, oil and gas
analysts say.
The national average for
a gallon of regular gas -was
$2.64 on Monday, slightly
less than a month ago but
up 72 cents a gallon from a
year ago, the auto club AAA
says.
Oil prices ended the day
Monday, up 9 cents, closing
at.$77.56 a barrel, indicat-
ing little change ahead for
gasoline prices. "It's a fairly
stable pricing environment,"
says Jim Ritterbusch, pres-
ident of oil trading adviser
firm Ritterbusch and Asso-
ciates.
Thanksgiving travel pro-
vides an opportunity to
gauge the Mnood of U.S. con-
sumers, AAA says.
The auto club expects 2%
more travelers on roadways


this year than last, for a to-
tal of 33.2 million people.
The expected increase re-
flects improved consumer
confidence, a rising stock
market and growing sense
among many consumers
that the worst of the global
economic crisis is behind
us, AAA says.
Last year, Thanksgiving
travel tanked 25% from the
previous year in the wake of
the housing and financial
meltdown.
Now, gas prices could
emerge as a drag on con-
sumer spending with the
nation's unemployment rate
hitting 10.2% last month,
says Tom Kloza, chief oil
analyst for the Oil Price In-
formation Service.
"When we dipped into the
recession, cheaper energy
was a silver lining," Kloza
says. "That silver lining has
disappeared and that will
test this recovery."
In the next month, he says,
he expects crude oil prices
to be twice the level of last


year, a situation that rarely
occurs. Oil has traded be-
tween $76 and $82 a barrel
for more than a month. Ini-
tially, it was driven higher
on expectations of an eco-
nomic recovery and a weak
dollar. Because oil is priced
in dollars, a falling dollar
drives oil prices up.
Countering those factors
are big inventories of gaso-
line, heating oil, natural gas
and diesel fuel in the U.S.,
Ritterbusch says. "As long
as we have unemployment
above 10%, that'll keep a
lid on rising gas prices or
changes in people's driving
habits," he adds.
The Energy Information
Administration, the re-
search arm of the U.S. De-
partment of Energy, expects
higher crude oil prices to
drive gas near $3 a gallon
during next year's summer
driving season. Crude oil
prices account for 64% of
the cost of gas, the Energy
Information Administration
says.


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF NOVEMBER 25, 2009 SPECIAL
COMMISSION MEETING





SPursuant to Section 2-33 (I) of the Code of the City

D. Sarnoff has called a special meeting of theA
Miami City Commission on November 25, 2009
at 1:00 PM, at Miami City Hall located at 3500
Pan American Drive. The purpose of this meeting
is to address filling the current vacancy on the City
Commission in the District 1 commission seat, to
set an election pursuant to the City Charter to fill
the current vacancy in the District 5 commission
seat and to discuss and set the next City Commis-
sion meeting for December 10th, 2009 at 9 AM. No
other business shall be conducted outside of that
indicated above.

All interested persons may appear at the meeting
with respect to these matters. Should any person
desire to appeal any decision of the City Commis-
sion with respect to any matter to be considered ato
this meeting, that person shall ensure that a ver-
batim record of the proceedings is made including
all testimony and evidence upon which any appealeting
may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons needing special accommo-
dations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360
(Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to
the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later
than three ,(3) busi'erss days prior to the proceed-
ing.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk
(#003326)


A Gyn Diagnostic
AAA Attorney Referral
Adrienne Arsht Center
Alba Medical Center
Boss Group Ministries
CarePlus
City of Miami
Dept. of Procurement
Dr. Rozalyn Paschal
Family Dentist
Florida Department
Florida Dept.
Florida PCI
General Motors
Gregg Mason Funeral
Health First/Humana
Just Black Goods
Liberty City Community
Miami-Dade Water & Sewer
Publix
Rasools Mens
Seaview Research
Superbowl Host Committee
SunTrust
Toys R Us
United Teachers of Dade

ABORTIONS
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Study shows U.S. lags


in paid work benefits


The United States lags far behind
other nations in offering paid sick
days, paid parental leave and other
workplace benefits that proponents
consider vital to public health' and
workers rights, according to research
released Tuesday.
The eight-year study found the
most economically competitive
nations offer forms of paid leave
to workers that the United States
does not, according to researchers
at Harvard University and Canada's
McGill University.
Of the world's 15 most competitive
nations, 14 mandate paid sick leave,
13 guarantee paid maternal leave
and 12 provide paid paternal leave
by law, they said. Eleven provide
paid leave to care for children's
health and eight provide paid leave
for adult family care.
The issue of paid employee leave
in the United States has heated up.
Advocates argue paid leave allows
sick workers to stay home without
financial hardship and helps prevent
workers from spreading such
diseases as the H1Nl flu.
Advocates for women's rights
argue paid family leave is essential


for women, who tend to care more
for family members than do men,
to compete and advance in the job
market.
Opponents argue that mandating
such leave policies would cost
jobs and be a financial burden on
businesses.
The 15 nations are Australia,
Austria, Britain, Canada, Denmark,
Finland, Germany, Iceland, Japan,
Netherlands, Norway, Singapore,
Sweden, Switzerland and the United
States, all of which have been
ranked most competitive over the
last decade by the World Economic
Forum.
Co-authored by Alison Earle, who
was a research scientist at Harvard's
School of Public Health, the book is
published by Stanford University
Press.
Looking more widely at 190
countries, the researchers found 163
guarantee paid sick leave and 164
guarantee paid annual leave.
Also, 177 nations guarantee paid
leave for new mothers, 74 nations
guarantee paid leave for new fathers
and 157 nations guarantee workers a
day of rest each week, they said.


CALL PATRICIA TO AY!
305-651-2 1^


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS


Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida
33133 on the receiving dates referenced below for the following five projects (separate bids):

PROJECT NAME BID NO. RECEIVING DATE RECEIVING TIME

District 1 Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-038 Monday, January 4, 2010 10:00 AM
Improvements
District 2 Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-039 Monday, January 4, 2010 11:00 AM
Improvements
District 3 Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-040 Tuesday, January 5, 2010 10:00 AM
Improvements
District 4 Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-041 Tuesday, January 5, 2010 11:00 AM
Improvements
District 5 Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-042 Wednesday, January 6, 10:00 AM
Improvements 2010

Scope of Work: The projects include the removal of deteriorated, damaged, .or unsafe concrete sidewalks and construction of new
concrete sidewalks and handicap ramps for the City's ADA program, upgrade, replacement and repair of concrete curbs and curbs
and gutters, and reinstallation of water meter boxes or similar utility structures located in the sidewalk area, 2-ft of asphalt pavement
restoration for the c&g restoration, and trimming and removal of tree roots, as necessary, in order to prevent future damage to the new
concrete sidewalk, driveway or access ramps, concrete curb and gutter.

Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor from the State of Florida
or a Miami-Dade County Business Occupational License in the appropriate trade (Paving/Concrete Specialty). Proof of experience for
the work may be required for three (3) separate projects of similar size, scope, and complexity, and supported by references within the
past three (3) years. The Prospective Bidder must self-perform at least thirty percent (30%) of the work.

THIS PROJECT IS BEING FUNDED UNDER THE AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009. THE CONTRAC-
TOR MUST ABIDE BY THE PROVISIONS REQUIRED FOR FEDERAL AID CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS.

A 100% Performance Bond and 5% Bid Bond are required for this project.

The Bids can only be obtained by visiting the Public Works Department's Website:

http://www.miamigov.com/Public_Works/Pages/Solicitations/

All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in duplicate originals in a sealed
manila envelope with the project name and bid number legibly marked on the outside. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be
publicly opened. Any bids or proposals received after tine and date specified will be returned to the bidder unopened. The responsibil-
ity for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date is solely and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/proposer. The City
is not responsible for delays caused by mail, courier service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.

YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE
WITH CITY OF MIAMI ORDINANCE NO. 12271.


Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.
Ad N'oD' City Manager
Add. No. DP-007622


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009
















SS


SECTION D


GREAT NEWSIll

PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
3650 NW 36th St.
Miami, FI 33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: $698.00
APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MORE!!!

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET
FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING: JULY 7, 2009
(305) 635- 9505

*Income restrictions apply,
rents are subject to
change



101-A CIVIC CENTER
AREA
FREE 32-INCH LCD HD
TV. One bedroom $650,
Two bedrooms $760.
Central air, free water, ap-
pliances, parking, laundry.
Quiet Area
1545 N.W. 8 Ave.
786-506-3067
*Umited Time Offer!

1031 NW 197 TERR
One bedroom, one bath.
Rooms also available.
Call Linton at 786-222-6764
1140 N.W. 79 ST.
One bdrm, one bath $550.
Free Water. Mr. Willie #109
305-642-7080

1212 N. W. 1 Avenue.
$500 MOVE IN One -
bedrqom, one bathi,$5Q0,.
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bdrms, gated security,
tile. $700 mthly, $1000 to
move in. 305-696-7667
1229 N.W. 1 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080,
786-236-1144

1245 NW 58 STREET
Move in special. One
bedroom, one bath. $495
monthly, $750 to move in.
All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV. Call
Joel
786-355-7578

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bath
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1302 NW 1 PLACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly. All appliances
included. Section 8 OK. Call
305-255-6330
1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One bdrm,
one bath $425. Ms. Shorty
#1
786-290-1438

1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $450.
Two bdrms one bath $525.
305-642-7080

13880 NE 6 Avenue
One bedroom, $680 mthly.
Efficiency, $500 mthly. First,
last and security. References
Required. 305-769-3740


140 N.W. 13 Street
$525 MOVE IN.
Two bdrms, one bath $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-
7080

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bdrm, one bath.
$600 mthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$725 to move in.
786-290-5498
1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Two bdrms, one bath. $525.
305-642-7080

1459 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances, tiled
floors, $600 monthly.
One month moves you in.
Call 305-458-3977
1525 N.W. 1 Place
MOVE IN SPECIAL! First
month moves you in. Three
bdrms., two baths, $695
monthly. All appliances
included. Central ai. Free
19 Inch LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1525 N.W. 1st Place
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
One bedroom, one bath.
$395 monthly, $600 to
move in. Newly renovated.
All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1969 N. W. 2 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air, free
water..
305-642-7080, 786-236-,
1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475. Call 305-642-7080

2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Appliances, free
water. 305-642-7080.
2131 NW 100 STREET
One bedroom, stove, refrig-
erator, air, bars, water, fenced
and more.
305-948-6913
220 N.W. 16 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$600. Appliances.
305-642-7080

2416 N.W. 22 Court
One bedroom one bath
$600
Two bedrooms two bath
$725
Air, Free Water.
305-642-7080

2701 N.W. 1 Ave
MOVE IN SPECIAL. One
bedroom, one bath. $500
month. $750 to move in. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

2972 N.W. 61 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, $550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

3186 N.W. 135th Street
One bdrm, one bath, $650
monthly. Call 954-704-009
3301 N.W. 51 Street
One bedroom, one bath. $600
moves you in. Appliances in-
cluded. 786-389-1686
361 N.W. 7th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly, $200 deposit.
305-861-4683.
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedrooms $650, stove, re-
frigerator, air. 305-642-7080
3900 N.W. 165 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, tiled floors. $950
monthly. 786-223-3353
411 N.W. 37 STREET
Studios, $395 monthly. All
appliances included. Call
Joel
786-355-7578

423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$450 monthly, $700 move
in special. Easy qualifying.
786-339-4106
786-985-8097


$500 OFF FIRST MONTH
Extra large one and two
bdrms. Call 786-262-5661.
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699
5520 S.W. 32nd Street
Hallandale FLORIDA
Two bedrooms, one bath, with
living room, washer and dryer
connection, $850 monthly,
$1450 move in.
786-370-0832
5755 N.W. 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, park-
ing. $625 monthly. $1000 to
move in. Call 954-394-7562:
60 and 61 STREET
One and two bdrms. renovat-
ed, security gate, $595 and
$695. 954-638-2972
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699
6900 NW 2 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 o.k. 786-295-9961
6950 N.W. 8th Avenue
Newly remodeled studio apt.,
$450-$500, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-675-1740.
7001 NW 15 AVENUE
Move-in special One bed-
room, one bath. $399 per
month, $600 to move in. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD T.V. Call Joel:
786-355-7578

7601 N.E. 3 Court
Two bedrooms,,one bath. Re-
modeled kitchen new floors,
appliances. $750 monthly,
security negotiable.
Call 305-525-0338
7625 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$600. Stove, refrigerator,
free water. 305-642-7080
800 N.W. 67 Street
One bedroom, utilities includ-
ed. $800 moves you in.
786-389-1686
8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bdom apts.
Section 8. 305-754-7776
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply.at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699
ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one and two bdrms.
Section 8 Welcome!
Call 786-355-5665
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, laundry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.
BEAUTIFUL
5120 N.W. 23 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, wa-
ter included. $600 monthly.
George 305-283-6804
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. For more informa-
tion/specials.
www.capitalrentalagency.
com

DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bdrm, one bath, safe,
clean, new kitchen, new tile,
fresh paint, secured parking,
$595-$650. 305-528-7766
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in
special.One bedroom, one
bath, $495, two bedrooms,
one bath, $595. Free water!
Leonard 786-236-1144


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 18-24, 2009


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084
LIBERTY SQUARE
One and two bedrooms, tiled.
786-267-3199
MIAMI SHORES AREA
Starting at $850 a month,
gated community, Call for
Move in Special!
Jessica 305-751-4747
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Corner of N.W. 103 St. Beau-
tiful two bedrooms. $700
monthly. $1000 to move in.
Gated, security, tiled floors,
central air. 786-402-0672
N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Studio $522+, One bdrm
$671+, Two bdrns $852+
305-947-0045
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms., 'one bath, cen-
tral air, $1050. One bdrm,
one bath, remodeled, $700.
12108 N.E. 5 Avenue.
305-206-1566
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$775 monthly. 305-754-1100
OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
786-521-7151
305-769-0146
OPA LOCKA AREA
Special! One bdrm, one bath.
$425 monthly.
305-717-6084
OVERTOWN AREA
One bdrm, one bath, $475
monthly. Call 786-262-4536.
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
NOW AVAILABLE
One month free rent, free
-water. Two bedrooms, one
bath $695, one bedroom,
one bath $495. Tiled, air,
recently remodeled, Private.
1761 ALI BABAAVE
786-439-8044, 786-236-
0214

Condos/Townhouses
13480 NE 6 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths,
corner unit, two balconies,
central air. $900 monthly.
Section 8 OK. Call:
305-255-6330
DOWNTOWN MIAMI
Two bedrooms, two baths,
penthouse, ocean view.
$1100 monthly. 1000
square feet.
Section 8 Welcome
786-260-5708 Cell
305-652-2257 Office
www.themiamicondo.-com

Duplexe

1023 N.W. 47 ST
Newly Remodeled three
bedroom one bath, one
bedroom one bath. Appli-
ances. Free electric, water.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144
103 STREET NW 9 AVE
Large, two bedrooms, one
bath, $875 monthly.
305-836-1899
1066 NW 55 STREET
Two bdrm, one bath $825
Special. 305-758-7022
Frank Cooper Real Estate
12400 N.E. 11 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
three bedrooms two baths
$1000-$1100), two baths.
Appliances, central air.
305-642-7080

1245 N.E. 111th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$850 monthly. Section 8 OK.
786-357-8885, 786-290-0768
1456 N.W. 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800. Stove, refrigerator,
air.
305-642-7080


1461 NW 59 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths. Sec-
tion 8 OK. $1450 mthly. 954-
624-5906
1477 NW 2 AVENUE
FLORIDA CITY
Two, bedrooms, two baths,
townhouse style, central air,
gated. $750 monthly. Section
8 OK. 305-255-6330
1737 N.W. 47 TERR.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 mthly. Section 8 OK.
305-751-6720, 305-331-3899
1812 N. W. 50 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, $900
mthly, Section 8 OK.
.305-751-6720, 305-331-3899
1875 NW 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, tiled floors. $900
mntly. Section 8 welcome.
305-331-2431
2035 NW 69 TERRACE
Two bdrms, air, appliances
and free utilities.
786-426-6263
2257 N.W. 82 ST
Two bedrooms, one bath
$850. Free Water.
305-642-7080

2370 N.W. 61 Street
Newly remodeled, two
bdrms., one bath, appliances,
water, central air, $800 mthly,
Section 8 okay.
561-294-0044
2416 N.W. 22 CT
One bedroom one bath
$600. Two bedrooms one
bath $725. Air Free Water.
305-642-7080

2561 YORK STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 OK! $1342 monthly,
$1200 deposit. Alarm System
included. 305-757-3709
2632 N.E. 212 TER
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$950 Appliances. 305-642-
7080
3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-
7776.
3190 N.W. 135 STREET
One bdrms, one bath.
305-763-5092, 305-975-0711
42 N.W. 57th Street
Two bedrooms, new kitchen,
central air, bars, water. $900
monthly. Call:
305-310-7366.
449 N.W. 82 Street
Two bdrms. $1050 mthly.
Section 8 OK. 305-751-3381
5600 N.W. 4 AVE.
One and two bdrms, one
bath, central air,: Starting
from $750 to $950. Section 8
OKI 786-930-0582
594 N.W. 67 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 OK! $1700 monthly,
$1200 Deposit. Alarm System
included. 305-757-3709
6250 .N.W. 1 Ave
Newly Remodeled. Two
bedrooms one bath, one
bedroom one bath. Ap-
ploances, Free electric,
water. 305-642-7080, 786-
236-1144
747 N.W. 69 STREET
Four bedrooms two baths.
$1702 mthly. $1200 Deposit.
Section 8 OK. 305-757-3709
7521 NW 1 AVENUE
Huge three bedrooms, two
baths. ALL NEWI Impact
Windows, central air. $1275
monthly. 305-793-0002
7820 N.E. 1 AVENUE
Two bdrms, one bath. $925.
Appliances, free water.
305-642-7080

8451 N.W. 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, water, new
kitchen, air, tile. $650
monthly, $1500 to move in.
Not Section 8 affiliated.
Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776
86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776
9357 NW 31 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two
baths, air, tiled floor, washer
and dryer hook up. $1150
monthly, first and last. Not
Section 8 approved.
305-625-4515
93rd St. NW 18th Avenue
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.


THE LARGEST MINORITY OWNED
NEWSPAPER IN THE SOUTHEAST


.9626 N.W. 8 AVE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 OK! $1342 monthly.
$1200 Ddposit. Alarm System
included. 305-757-3709
, 9900 N.W.10th Avenue
One bdrm,'one bath, $750
mthly, 786-277-4395 or
305-624-4395
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bdrms. one bath, first,
and security. Section 8 and
HOPWA Welcome. One
Month Free! 305-244-6645
NORTH ALLAPATTH
One and two bdrms. Section
8 welcome. 305-836-3612
PERRINE AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, $650 monthly.
Call 305-896-3976
Efficience
100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN). 24 hour
security camera, $185 wkly,
$650 mthly.
305-751-6232
18201 N.W. 9th Avenue
Efficiency, $600 monthly,
$1200 moves you in.
Call 305-467-4651
2245 NW 92 STREET
One bdrm, furnished, one per-
son only.. Paid Utilities. $500
monthly, Move in $1000. 305-
835-7681
3153 N.W. 53rd Street
Starting at $450 monthly.
First, last and security.
305-751-6232
Close to Miami Avenue
on N.E. 84th Street
Laundry room, water includ-
ed, new ceramic tile floors.
$525 monthly. Call 305-970-
5574
MIAMI AREA
Nice rental for $600, water,
electricity. Section 8 okay.
Call: 305-469-5062
NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance cable, air.
Call 305-758-6013.
OVERTOWN AREA
Furnished effici=ecy, $115,.
weekly, $680 to move in.
Call 786-897-9090.
Furnished Rooms
13377 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486
1368 N.W. 70th Street
$500 mthly, washer and
dryer, kitchen access, air,
cable available.
Call 305-691-0458

1525 NE 158 STREET
Rooms available.
305-693-1017, 305-298-0388
1935 N.W. 76th Street
Large furnished room, air, ca-
ble, kitchen privilege, parking,
no security, $485 monthly,
786-955-4703.
2170 Washington Avenue
OPA LOCKA AREA
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly. 786-277-
3434,786-298-4383
3185 N.W. 75th Street
Roommate needed. Access
to entire house. Near Tri-Rail.
$100 weekly.
305-439-2906
8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776.
MIAMI AREA
Three quarter way house.
Nice Area. Bed space in a
shared room. Hot meals, hot
shower, all for only $15 a
day.
305-919-9253, 786-704-5143
Miramar Area
Near Miami. $125 wkly. 954-
305-4713 or 305-299-6421.
NICELY FURNISHED
Air, cable, TV, utilities. $150
wkly. 786-290-0946
NORLAND AREA
$400 monthly. First and last to
move in. Background check.
Call Pam.
305-332-3133


stole


NORLAND AREA
Nice quiet room, near bus ter-
minal. Call 305-766-2055
NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.
Houses
13140 NW 18 AVE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
786-344-9560
14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
$999 security deposit.
954-826-4013
1430 N.E. 71 ST.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$925, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

1490 NW 46 STREET
Three bedrooms; one bath,,
recently renovated. Move in
Special, Section 8 Welcomel
305-318-8197
16000 N.W. 21 Avenue
Three bdrtns, family room,
huge yard. Section 8 OK!
954-993-5426
1720 N.W. 68th Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, game
room, refrigerator, security
bars, fenced, central air/heat
$750 monthly. Section 8 OK!
Call 305-215-8125
1785 N.W. 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly. 305-267-9449
1832 N.W. 49 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$995 Central Air, appli-
ances, ceiling fans. 305-
642-7080
191 St N.W. 11 Ave. Area
Four bdrms, two baths.
Section OK! 305-754-7776
20027 N.W. 32nd Place
Three bdrms, one and half
bath, $1366 security deposit
required. Section 8 preferred.
Call 954-547-9011.
20061 NW 14 PLACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
appliances. 786-356-1686
20922 NW 39 AVENUE
MIAMI GARDENS
Large, three bedrooms, one
bath, central air. Pets OK.
$925 monthly. Call:
305-975-0840
2436 N.W. 66.STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1350 mthly. 786-399-8557
2441 N.W. 104 ST
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Call 786-238-3071
2531 N.W. 131 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1700 mthly. 954-704-0094
25872 S.W. 133rd Place
Three bdrms, two baths, one
car garage, air, tiled, Section
8 welcome.
786-443-5367
288 N. W. 51st. Street
Three bedrooms, two bath
house. $900 monthly. All '
appliances included. Call
Joel
786-355-7578

2902 N.W. 162 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1500 monthly. Section 8
OK.
305-510-2841
3030 NW 163 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
fully tiled, central air. $1300,
first, last and security. Section
8, HOPWA, New Norizon.
Ms. Johnson 786-506-1245
3850 NW 174 STREET.
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Newly renovated, brand new
* appliances, alarm system,
large fenced yard. Near 826.
Close to schools and bus.
$1600 monthly. $1200 to
move in. Call:
786-277-7310 .
4021 NW 203 LANE
Three bedrooms, one and a
half bath. $1400 monthly, first
and last. 305-623-8422, 305-
773-7445
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.


iGRvW'










NOW
STERLING SAUNDERS
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 103


One Family -Serving Since 1923
THE LARGEST MINORITY
OWNED NEWSPAPER
IN-THE SOUTHEAST



S IB


Tee fiami times

AFFORDABLE NEWS ADVERTISING THAT WORKS



Bart Williams
Adwrtising Coordinator



CALL 305-693-7093 TODAYII

advertising@miamitimesonline.com


5158 NW 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, air.
$700 monthly. Call:
305-322-3912
6717 N.W. 6 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard, central air. Section 8
accepted. 786-326-2789
83rd Street N. Miami Ave.
Two bedrooms, two baths.
$800 monthly. Section 8 OK.
Call 305-255-6330
ALLAPPATTAH AREA
Small two bedrooms. $800
mthly, first, last and security.
Not sanctioned for Section 8.
305-836-7306
N.W. 133 St. and 18 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Chil 305-754-7776
NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
appliances. 786-286-2540


Prime Golden Glades
Office Space for rent, from
$300 to $500 monthly.
305-681-9600.
Unfurnished Rooms
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Rooms starting at $550 to
$600 monthly. 305-319-9830
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
$400 Monthly, Free Utilities.
Dave 786-253-0005
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI GARDENS
Also Miami and Miramar
305-300-7783


GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, plastering and addi-
tions. Call 954-980-4231 or
305-892-0315.
TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing, and leak
repairs. Call 305-491-4515.




BROWARD ROUTE
DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only
You must be available be-
tween the hours ol 6 a m.
and 1 p.m Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street


Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
deroover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required. 877-471-5682



BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
$60. Be prepared for Super
Bowl employment. Traffic
School, four hours, $28.
786-333-2084


GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3,65.









I BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 20091


Attn Miami Gardens

Residents only:
If you had issues with the building
dept join our class action suit. Send
name, address and phone # to
Penned by Gece, PO Box 170032,
Hialeah, FL 33017-0032.





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MIAMI- 3


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF SOLICITATIONS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of solicitations for
contract opportunities, which can be obtained through the Department of Pro-
curement Management (DPM), from our Website: www.miamidade.gov/dom.
Vendors may choose to download the solicitation packagess, free of charge,
from our Website under "Solicitations Online". Internet access is available at
all branches of the Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that vendors
visit our Website on a daily basis to view newly posted solicitations, adden-
dums, revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to
change.

Interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an additional
$5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper copy of the
bid package through the United States Postal Service.

These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.

Miami-Dade County has streamlined the process for accepting bids and
proposals by requiring vendor affidavits only once at the time of
vendor registration.

Starting June 1, 2008, vendors will be able to provide required affidavits one
time, instead of each time they submit a bid or proposal. Solicitations adver-
tised after June 1st will require that all vendors complete the new Vendor Reg-
istration Package before they can be awarded a new County contract. Obtain
the Vendor Registration Package on-line from the DPM website.

CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the
following:


IFB NO. 145119


INVITATION FOR BID FOR PRINTER AND
SCANNER REPAIR SERVICES, CITYWIDE


CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2009

Detailed scope of work and specifications for this bid are available at the
City of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/
procurement Telephone No. 305-416-1958.
Deadline for Request for Clarification: Monday. December 7. 2009 at 5:00
P.M.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager

AD NO. 008107 $


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


RFP Workers Compensation and Third Party Liability
RFP 006-KK10 1/26/2010 Claims Administration Services
Commercial Leasing of Paved Parking Facilities at
021-KK10 12/15/2009 Fienberg/Fisher K-8 Center
RFP State Legislative Consultant
RFP 019-KK10 12/8/2009

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


TRUST



LIBERTY CITY COMMUNITY REVITALIZATION TRUST

"Working Together to Serve You Better"

PUBLIC NOTICE OF MEETING

A meeting of the Board of Directors of the Liberty City Community
Revitalization Trust will be held:

CHARLES HADLEY PARK
Carrie P. Meek Senior Citizen and Cultural Center
1350 NW 50th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
********* Monday, November 30, 2009 at 6:00 p.m.**********


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE FOR CONSTRUCTION BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, for the projects listed herein, until 2:00 P.M. local time,
Tuesday, the ."1_ day of December 2009 at 1450 N.E. Second Avenue, Room 351, Miami, Florida, following which time and place,
or as soon thereafter as the Board can attend to same, the said bids will be publicly opened, read and tabulated in the Board Auditorium,
Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building, by an authorized representative of the Board. Award of the contract will be
made to the lowest, pre-qualified responsible bidder for the actual amount bid considering base bid as listed in the bidding documents.
The Board will award the contract based upon the result of the tabulations as covered by applicable laws and regulations.

PROJECT NO. 00390000
CONTRACTS RTB09-C1 & RTB09-C2
ROOFING TERM BID
VARIOUS FACILITIES
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

DAVIS-BACON ACT LABOR STANDARDS:

This Project may be funded in whole or in part under the provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 or other
Federal funding program. Therefore, the Bidder shall comply with all applicable, provisions of 40. U.S.C. 276a-276a-7, the Davis-
Bacon-Act, as supplemented by the Department of Labor regulations (29 C.F.R., part 5 "Labor Standards Provisions Applicable to Con-
tracts Governing Federally Financed and Assisted Construction"). Accordingly, the Base Bid and Alternate Bids for this Project shall be
in full compliance with the aforementioned provisions as further described in the Contract Documents and all bids shall be calculated
in compliance with the Davis-Bacon Act wage determination applicable to this Project. Under the Davis-Bacon Act, contractors are
required to pay laborers and mechanics not less than the minimum wages specified in a wage determination made by the Secretary of
Labor, which wage determination will be attached to and incorporated into the Construction Bid documents. The award of a construction
contract is conditioned upon the Bidder accepting the wage determination.

CONE OF SILENCE:

Pursuant to Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted beginning with issuance of the Legal Advertisement and end-
ing at such time as the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to award or approve a contract, to reject all bids
or responses, or otherwise takes action which ends the solicitation and review process. Any violation of the Cone of Silence may be
punishable as provided for under Board Rule-6Gx13- 8C-1.212, in addition to any other penalty provided by law. All written communica-
tions must be sent to the Project Architect/Engineer, -- Landera Associates, PA 7500 S Red Road, Suite D, Miami, Florida 33143, and
a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 268, Miami, Florida 33132.

NOTICE & PROTEST PROCEDURES:

Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11, and in accordance with
120.57(3), Fla. Stat. (2002), shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes. Any person who is adversely
affected by the agency decision or intended decision shall file with the agency a notice of protest in writing within 72 hours after the
posting of the notice of decision or intended decision. Failure to file a notice of protest or failure to file a formal written protest within the
time permitted shall constitute a waiver of proceedings. With respect to a protest of the terms, conditions, and specifications contained
in a solicitation, including any provisions governing the methods of ranking bids, bids, or replies, awarding contracts, reserving rights of
further negotiation, or modifying or amending any contract, the notice of protest shall be filed in writing within 72 hours after the posting
of the solicitation. In either event, the protest must include a bond in accordance with the provisions of F.S. 255.0516 and Board Rule
6Gx13- 3C-1.11. The formal written protest shall be filed within 10 days after the date the notice of protest is filed. The formal written
protest shall state with particularity the facts and law upon which the protest is based. Saturday, Sundays, and state holidays shall be
excluded in the computation of the 72-hour time periods established herein.

JESSICA LUNSFORD ACT

The successful Bidder shall fully comply with the AJessica Lunsford Act@ and all related Board Rules and procedures as applicable.

The Pre-Bid Conference has been scheduled for Wednesday, December 2nd at 10:00 AM at MDCPS Div. of Roofing, 12525 NW
28th Avenue, Opa-Locka, Florida

PRE-BID CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR ITS QUALIFIED REPRESENTATIVE IS HIGHLY ENCOURAGED


THIS PROJECT IS OPEN ONLY TO THOSE BIDDERS WHICH HAVE BEEN PRE-QUALIFIED BY THE SCHOOL BOARD OF
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. PRIOR TO BIDDING


The advertisement is for the award of two (2) Term Bid Contracts' (hereinafter called "Term Bid"). A Term Bid is a competitively bid,
unit price indefinite quantity contract. It includes a collection of detailed repair and replacement tasks with specifications that require
unit prices. It is placed with Contractor for the accomplishment of repairs and replacement of various roofing systems throughout the
District. Ordering is accomplished by means of issuance of individual Work Orders against the contract.

The Term Bid awarded under this solicitation will have a minimum value of $50,000 and a maximum initial value of $1,500,000, with
three (3) possible extension of $1,500,000 within each term. The term of the contract will be twelve (12) months and may include two
(2) renewal options for one (1) additional year each. It is the current intention of the Board to award two (2) Term Bid Contracts under
this solicitation. However, the Board reserves the right to make additional awards under this solicitation for a period of one hundred
and eighty (180) days after the opening of bids.

These contracts are only open to those bidders which have been pre-qualified for the maximum potential value of the Term Bid Contract
by the School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida.

Pre-qualified bidders may obtain one (1) or two (2) sets of bid and contract documents from the office of MDCPS DIVISION OF
ROOFING. 12525 NW 28 Avenue. Miami. FL 33167 (305) 995-7955 on and after November 23. 2009, with deposit of $75.00 Non
Refundable per set, (Cashier's Check or Money Order, Payable to The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida). Deposits will
be retained by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida.

The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Alberto M Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


x 10










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


FOR THE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 24 30, 2009


WILL FORD: SC State
RB, who ran for 117
yards and a TD in last
year's playoff loss to App
State, looks for better
results this year.


I SC STATE LOOKS FOR WIN, RESPECT IN FCS
PLAYOFFS; PIONEER BOWL MATCH-UP SET


SCORES
NOVEMBER 19 Morgan State 16, Hampton 13
Tennessee State 21, Eastern Illinois 10 NC Central 35, Savannah State 14
NOVEMBER 21 Norfolk State 28, Winston-Salem State 21
Alabama A&M 17, Miss Valley State 12 Prairie View 49, Arkansas-Pine Bluff 17
Alcom State 14, Jackson State 7 SC State 28, NC A&T 10
Delaware State 30, Howard 20 NAIA PLAYOFFS FIRST ROUND
Florida A&M 42, Bethune-Cookman 6 Lindenwood 42, Langston 14




UNDER THE BANNER
WHATS GOING ON IN AND AROUND BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS

FALLOUT BEGINS: TSU'S WEBSTER?
Two coaches fell victim to results from the 2009 foot-
ball season soon after the season finished last weekend.
James Webster, Jr., tendered
his resignation as Tennessee
State University's head football
:- coach effective November 19,
2009, the date of the final game
of the regular season.
Webster, who was hired in
January 2005, will end his ten-
ure as head coach of the Tiger
football program with a five-
TSU Sports Photo
WEBSTER: Resigns year record of 25-31. Webster
as Tenn. State coach made the announcement of his
after 25-31 record in resignation to his team follow-
five seasons. TSU was ing TSU's 21-10 win against
Eastern Illinois University on

Thursday, November 19. EIU won this year's Ohio Valley
Conference title and earned a bid to the FCS playoffs.
The Blue Tigers finished Webster's final season at 4-7
overall, 3-4 in the Ohio Valley Conference, sixth overall in
the nine-team OVC. A national search for his'replacement
will begin immediately.
"We want to express our appreciation to Coach Webster
for the work he has done while guiding the Tennessee
State University football program," said Athletics Director
Teresa Phillips. "He instilled discipline and an ethic
of hard work in the student athletes under his charge."
Phillips continued, however, "We feel it is best to move in
another direction with the TSU football program."

THEN BLOUNT?
Winston-Salem State University announced last
week that Kermit Blount, the head football coach since
1993, was stepping down from
his position following the foot-
ball game Saturday at Norfolk
S State. Blount will remain at
WSSU and will be reassigned
other duties within the univer-
sity.
"Over the years, Coach
Blount has done a great job of
leading our football program and
WSSU Sports Photo building an academic foundation
BLOUNT: Veteran 17- for our student athletes," said
year coach steps down
at WSSU following 1-9 Chancellor Donald J. Reaves.
campaign. "We truly appreciate the con-
tributions Kermit has made to
Winston-Salem State as an athlete, a coach, an alum and a
leader."
"Having known Kermit for so many years, I have
tremendous respect for him," said Bill Hayes, who will
become the new athletic director for WSSU in January.
"However, I support a change in leadership for the foot-
ball program in order to improve our recruiting efforts, to
create more excitement and enthusiasm for the program
among the students, and to build support among the
alumni and within the community."
Blount, a 1980 graduate and former quarterback for
the Rams, completed his 17th season as coach and has
posted a 91-86-3 record. He led his teams to two CIAA
titles and two Pioneer Bowl appearances. The Rams fin-
ished 1-10 this season under Blount, who found out at
mid-season that the school was giving up its pursuit of
NCAA Div. I status and returning to Div. II.
A native of Richmond, Va., Blount began his college
coaching career as an assistant at East Carolina University
in 1983. He was offensive coordinator for Howard from
1984 until 1989 and was on the coaching staff at South
Carolina State for the next four years.


20 9 L C C LLG0 F OT AL (eslt, tadigsan Weky onrs


ClAA CE NTERCOI. EGIATE
C A t AiHLEiIC ASSOCIATION


E DIVISION V
'Bowie State
Virginia Union
Eliz. City State
Virginia State
St Paul's
Uncoln (PA) (
W. DIVISION
Fayetteville State
Shaw
St Augustine's
J. C. Smith 2
Chowan
Uvingstone (
'Won coin loss lor Div. ile
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE NA
DEFENSE NA


M AC MID EASTEIIN
M EA C ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CONF ALL
W L W L
SC Slate 8 0 10 1
FloridaA&M 6 2 8 3
Norfolk State 5 3 7 4
Bethune-Cookman 4 4 5 6
Morgan State 4 4 6 5
NCA&TState 3 5 4 6
Hampton 3 5 5 6
Delaware State 3 5 4 6
Howard 0 8 2 9
# W-Salem State 0 0 1 10
I# Not eligible for title
MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Will Ford, Sr., RB, SC STATE 23
carries for 156 yards vs. NCA&Tinduding 18-yard
TD run as Ford became MEAC's all-time leading
rusner (4,650 yards):
DEFENSE Terrell Whitehead, Sr., S, NSU 4
taddes, 1 solo, 1 forced tumble, 1 recovery. 1 inter-
ceptIon returned 58 yards for TD vs. WSSU
NEWCOMER Chris Bell, Jr, WR, NSU 4 recep-
tions for 124 yards induding 67-yard TOD reception
vs. WSSU.
SPECIAL TEAMS R RFlckinger, PK, OSU Field
goals ol 35. 30 and 29 yards, 2 PATs vs 11 pts.
LINEMAN NA


IAC SOUTHERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
SIA A ATHLETIC CONFERENCE


'Tuskegee 8 1
Albany State 7 2
Morehouse 6 3
Fort Valley State 6 3
Benedict 6 3
Kentucky State 4
Miles 3 (
Clark Atlanta 3 6
Stillman 2 7
Lane 0 S
* Clinched conference hue
SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE NA
DEFENSE NA


ASWAC i SOUTHWESTERN
SW ATHLETIC CONFFrE NCE
DIV ALL
E. DIVISION W L W L
Alabama A&M 4 3 7 4
Jackson State 3 4 3 7
Alcon State 3 4 3 6
Alabama State 1 6 4 6
Miss. Valley St. 1 6 3 8
W. DIVISION
Prairie View A&M 7 0 8 1
Grambling State 4 2 6 4
Texas Southern 3 2 4 5
Ark Pine Bluff 3 3 5 4
Soutrem 3 2 6 3
SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Donald Babers, So., RB, PV A&M
- 12 carries lor 133 yards and 2 TOs of 1 and 76
yards vs. UAPB Gabriel Osae-Ediae, WR, PV
A&M .4 receptions. 66 yards, 3 TDs vs UAPB.
DEFENSE Korey Morrison, AAM 2 ladies
and interception return tfor 30 yards and TO
vs. MVSU.
NEWCOMER K. J. Black, Jr., OB, PV A&M
- Comnpleled 23 of 27 passes for 312 yards and
5 TDs as Panthers completed perfect SWAC
season with win over UAPB.
SPECIAL TEAMS Brady Faggard, PK, PV
A&M Converted 7 PATs in win over UAPB.


INDEPENDENTS
W L
Langston 8 4
Concordia 5 4
N C. Central 4 7
Tennessee State 4 7
W Va. State 3 7
Savannah State 2 6
Central State 1 9
Edward Waters 1 10
Lincoln (Mo) 0 10
Texas College 0 11
Cheyney 0 11
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Will Scott Sr., WR, NCCU
- Caughl 7 passes tor 120 yards and 3 TDs
(12. 56 and 24 yards) vs Savannah State
DEFENSE Derek Harvey, Sr., &S NCCU
- Had a career-tigti 15 tackles in his final
game vs Savannah State.
SPECIAL TEAMS NA


SC State heads to App State, again


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
South Carolina State head coach Oliver
"Buddy" Pough has said his MEAC champion
Bulldogs may have given Appalachian State too
much credit when they faced the Mountaineers in the
first round of last year's FCS playoffs.
He and the 'Dawgs will have a chance to correct
that this time around.
Pough's two-time MEAC championship squad
(10-1) was chosen Sunday to travel to Boone, N.C.
for the second year in a row to face Southern
Conference champ App State (9-2) Saturday at 12
noon in a first round NCAA FCS playoff game.
Last year, SC State played the then three-time
defending FCS champion Mountaineers to a near
standstill. The Bulldogs trailed 24-21 with 7:21 left
before ASU scored the games final 13 points for a
37-21 win.

: "We've got more
confidence about
ourselves."
SC State head coach
Buddy Pough on facing
Appalachian State in
the FCS playoffs for the
second straight season.

Pough told The State newspaper in Columbia,
S.C. Sunday that he was "a little disappointed" in his
team's draw this year. SC State was ranked seventh
in the final FCS national poll and was the only team



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26
86th Turkey Day Classic ESPNU Live
Alabama State vs. Tuskegee in 'Montgomery, AL 3
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28
Dallas Lone Star Classic
Texas Southern vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff in Dallas, TX 1
Bayou Classic XXXVI NBC
Southern vs. Grambling State in New Orleans, LA 1
NCAA FCS Playoffs First Round ESPNU Live
South Carolina State vs. Appalachian State in Boone, NC 12n


LOOKING FOR WIN
IN FCS PLAYOFFS


among the top eight in the 16-team field that did not
get a home game.
But the coach understands why. The MEAC has
not won a game in the playoffs since 1999 when both
Florida A&M and North Carolina A&T got first
round wins. The league has lost 10 straight games
over the past nine seasons,
"It's a situation we've got to go up and do
something about," Pough told The State. "Until we
win a (playoff) game, we're not going to get any
respect."
To get a win, SC State will need a supreme
effort out of its offensive stars and an equally great
effort from its defense.
A year ago, prolific App State quarterback
Armanti Edwards riddled the Bulldog secondary
for a school-record 433 passing yards. Pough feels
his team is better situated this year to perhaps come
out with a win.
"We've got more confidence about ourselves,"
Pough told The State. "We've had some experiences
this season that will give us a chance to go into a
place like that and survive."
Leading the charge for the Bulldogs will be
junior quarterback Malcolm Long, who set school
passing records this year and is one of the favorites
for the MEAC offensive player of the year award.
Long has passed for 2,314 yards, the first Bulldog
passer to ever top the 2,000-yard mark, and. has
thrown 20 TD passes and only 7 interceptions. Long
leads the MEAC in passing yards (210.8 ypg.) and
passing efficiency (152.0).
Senior RB Will Ford ran for 156 yards Saturday
against NC A&T to become the MEAC's all-time
leading rusher with 4,650 yards. Saturday's total also
gave Ford his third 1,000-yard season with 1,010
rushing yards on the year.
Fellow senior WR Oliver "Tre" Young caught
six passes for 123 yards against A&T and has set
new school career records for receptions with 128
and receiving yards with 2,064. Young topped the'


THE MAN TO
STOP: App State
Si QB Armanti Ed-
Sr wards has led the
Mountaineers to
four straight So-
c Su Con titles and two
FCS national titles
a in three years. The
2008 Payton Award
.winner threw for
o 433 yards in last
year's win over SC
State.
MEAC in receptions per game (5.3) and was second
in receiving yards (82.1 ypg.). Young scored 9 TDs
and doubles as a dangerous kick returned.
The Bulldog defense will have its hands full
containing Edwards, who has led App State to four
consecutive Southern Conference titles and was
thrust into national prominence when he led ASU to
a 34-32 upset win at Michigan in 2007.
Last year Edwards won the prestigious Walter
Payton Award given to the best FCS offensive
player. He is the first player in Div. I history to pass
for over 9,000 yards and rush for over 3.000 yards.
This season the 6-0. 184-pound senior left-
hander from Greenville, S.C., has completed 72.4%
of his passes (189 of 261) for 2.504 yards and 10
TDs with 3 interceptions. He has also rushed for
575 yards and 16 TDs. Edwards leads the SoCon in
passing. passing efficiency, total offense and scoring
Sbut he is not the Mountaineers' only weapon.
S Junior running back Devon Moore has rushed
for 1,054 yards and 15 TDs averaging 5.5 yards per
carry. ASU's three top receivers Matt Cline (66
rec., 1 TD), Brian Quick (43 rec., 3 TDs) and Coco
Hillary (37 rec., 4 TDs) have combined for 146
receptions and 8 TDs.
Other than the playoff game, traditional season-
ending games are set for Montgomery, Al., Thursday
when Tuskegee meets Alabama State in the 86th
Turkey Day Classic and Saturday when Grambling
and Southern tangle in the 36th Bayou Classic from
New Orleans. Texas Southern faces Arkansas-Pine
Bluff in the first Dallas Lone Star Classic.


BCSP Notes


Pioneer Bowl XI match-up set,
Elizabeth City State to face Tuskegee
The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) and the
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) have announced
that Elizabeth City State and Tuskegee have been selected to participate
in the llth Pioneer Bowl. The game will take
place on Saturday, December 5, 2009 at the
Charlie W. Johnson Stadium in Columbia, S. C.
at 2 p.m.
The ECSU Vikings, led by Head Coach
Waverly Tillar, finished the season with a 7-3 i
overall record and found themselves in the midst
of a three-way tie-breaker for a chance at the
CIAA Eastern Divisional title at 5-2. They lost a
coin flip to Bowie State.
The Tuskegee Golden Tigers, led by Head Coach Willie Slater, won
their fourth consecutive SIAC Championship, with an 8-2 overall record
with one regular season game remaining. They finished 8-1 in SIAC play.
TU is currently ranked #14 in the American Football Coaches Association
(AFCA) Div. II poll and #3 in the latest Sheridan Broadcasting Network
(SBN) poll.
This will mark Tuskegee's eighth Pioneer Bowl appearance while
Elizabeth City State will be making its first. Tuskegee is 6-1 in those
appearances.
In the last Pioneer Bowl following the 2007 season, Tuskegee
defeated Virginia Union, 58-51.
The Pioneer Bowl is the only NCAA sanctioned bowl game involv-
ing HBCU athletic conferences. The game features teams from the SIAC
and the CIAA. For ticket information, please contact the CIAA Office at
(757) 865-0071; www.TheCIAA.com or the SIAC Office at (770) 908-
0482; www.TheSIAC.com.


2009-10 SIAC hoops picks j7
All-SIAC first teamer Ernest Sinkfeld and his a.
Claflin Panthers are predicted to finish first in 2009-
10 men's basketball according to league coaches.
after last season's impressive 25-4 record (22-2 in the
conference).
Sinkfield averaged 13.1 points per game during
the Panthers' 2008-09 campaign last season. Sinkfield
led the league in 3 pointers made (68, 2.3 pg.). He
looks to lead the Panthers to another conference title
and a deep run into the NCAA tournament.
SINKFIELD


Martrez Scott of Fort Valley State is the SIAC's leading returning
scorer averaging 14.3 ppg. last season. Scott also led the conference in
steals with 2.3 per game. Joining Scott and Sinkfield on the first team is
Najee Lane of Clark Atlanta (13.8 ppg.). junior Maurice Mickens of
LeMoyne-Owen and Julian English of Paine.
Claflin was followed by Benedict amd Lane in the predicted order of
finish.
2009-10 MEN'S BASKETBALL ALL-CONFERENCE TEAMS
First Team Second Team
Ernest Sinkfield, Sr., Claflin Andrae Nelson, Jr., Tuskegee
Matrez Scott, Sr., FVSU Sean Glenn, Sr., Albany State
Najee Lane, Jr., Clark Atlanta Eric Salley, Jr., Claflin
Maurice Mickens. Sr., LOC Gerard Devaughn, Sr., Stillman
Julian English. Sr., Paine Darrell Aiken, Sr., FVSU

PREDICTED ORDER OF FINISH
1. Claflin 2. Benedict 3. Lane 4. Clark Atlanta 5. Albany State 6.
LeMoyne-Owen, Paine & Tuskegee 7. Morehouse 8. Fort Valley State &
Kentucky State 9. Miles 10. Stillman

Takesha Riggs and Kendra Evens of Fort
Valley State lead the way for the Lady Wildcats as
they are predicted to finish first in the SIAC.
Riggs, a senior, is the SIAC's leading return-
ing scorer averaging 19.0 points/game last season.
Evans, averaged 12 points and 7.3 rebounds last
season. The newcomer to the first team is Shonice
Sprouse of LeMoyne-Owen, who led the con- *. ..'
ference in three-point field goals made (95) and
averaged 16.3 points per game last season. Junior
Ashley Orphey of Miles and senior Ashley Price of Benedict round out
the first team.
Kentucky State is predicted to finish second followed by
Tuskegee.

2009-10 WOMEN'S BASKETBALL ALL-CONFERENCE TEAM
First Team Second Team
Ashley Price, Sr., Benedict Ashley Sorrell, Sr., Claflin
Takesha Riggs, Sr., FVSU Latrice Watkins, Sr., KSU
Kendra Evans, So., FVSU Cyntonia Jones, Sr., Miles
Ashley Orphey, Jr., Miles Jamila McKinnis, So., Stillman
Shonice Sprouse, Jr., LOC Keyonnia Cook, Sr., Tuskegee

PREDICTED ORDER OF FINISH
1. Fort Valley State 2. Kentucky State 3. Tuskegee 4. Claflin 5. Albany
State 6. Miles 7. Benedict 8. Clark Atlanta 9. Stillman 10. LeMoyne-
Owen 11. Paine 12. Lane


0


INTO THE

PLAYOFF

FIRE










10D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2001


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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Tight budgets mean some prisoners go light on meals


By John Tuohy

The inmates at Plainfield Correc-
tional Facility east of Indianapolis
can't be accused of getting a free
lunch. Or any lunch at all. At least
on some days.
The medium-security prison has
eliminated lunch on Fridays, Satur-
days and Sundays part of a pilot
program that could go statewide.
The Indiana Department of Cor-
rection (DOC) insists it's not about
saving money but what's in the best
interest of prisoners. The move is be-
ing criticized by national civil rights
groups and lawmakers.
"Denying food or cutting back on
meals is beneath the dignity of the
state of Indiana and is not in sync
with our Hoosier values," said state
Sen. Mike Delph, R-Carmel. Delph is
chairman of the state Senate correc-
tions subcommittee.
Indiana Department of Correction
spokesman Doug Garrison said the
department has received few com-
plaints since rolling out the changes
last month.
Because of tight budgets, a hand-
ful of other states have cut meals to
save money. Georgia inmates don't
get lunch on the weekends, ac-
cording to the Associated Press,
and Ohio is considering ending
its weekend breakfasts. Other
states have thinned menus or lim-
ited items such as milk and fresh
fruit.
Indiana prison officials said the
driving force here was to give pris-
oners more cl asroom and recre-
ational time.
"Serving meals is a time-con-
suming effort that takes hours,"
Garrison said. "By eliminating one
meal, we are able to operate our
programs more efficiently."
Elizabeth Alexander, director
of the American Civil Liberties
Union's National Prison Project,
said cutting lunch creates "a tre-
mendous gap between meals."
"Making prisoners go hungry for
long periods is not the way to solve
anything," she said. "Food is not
the place to make cuts, especially
since it is such a small percentage


of a prison's budget."
Food service accounts for about
5% of the Department of Correc-
tion's $726 million budget in 2010,
according to the House Ways and
Means Committee.
The new meal plan in Indiana
combines breakfast and lunch
and is served beginning at 6
a.m., said Kevin Mulroony, Plain-
field Correctional spokesman. Din-
ner is served 10 hours later, at 4
p.m. Lunch is served at 11:30 a.m.
Monday through Thursdays.
Gil Holmes, executive director of
the American Civil Liberties Union
of Indiana, said the organization
was aware of the change but had
not received any complaints from
prisoners.
Until it does, the ACLU of Indi-
ana probably won't take any ac-
tion, Holmes said.
The DOC said the pilot program
would last an indefinite length of
time and is being reviewed to deter-
mine other prisons where it might
work. Eventually, all 30 prisons in
the system could switch to the new
eating schedule, Garrison said.
DOC officials said inmates can
always get chips, cookies and Ra-
men noodles in the commissary
to tide them over between meals.


,



Prisoners have to pay for those.
"You'd be amazed at what prison-
ers can do with a bag of Ramen,"
Mulroony said. "It's as good as any-
thing served in a restaurant."


cA.... "


October sales gains lift

hopes for housing market


By Alan Zibel
Associated Press


First-time buyers seized on a
tax credit, combined with low
mortgage rates and falling prices,
to boost home sales in October to
their highest level in 2 1/2 years.
Home sales are now nearly 37
percent above their bottom in
January, though still 16 percent
below their peak in 2005. At the
current sales pace, there's a mod-
est seven-month supply for sale.
Bidding wars are occurring in
some areas.
Analysts, though, said the gains
mainly reflected ,the homebuyer
tax credit, which had been due
to expire on Nov. 30. Earlier this
month, Congress voted to extend
it until spring and expanded it
to more buyers.
The report Monday from the
National Association of Realtors
pleased investors on Wall Street.
Analysts said the homebuyer tax
credit will help sustain the hous-
ing market next year.
Yet the overall economy is likely
to benefit only slightly from high-
er home sales.
Too many factors are weighing
on the fledgling recovery. Home
construction is weak. Foreclo-
sures are rising. Job creation is
slow. And consumers remain re-
luctant to spend.
Though housing is contribut-
ing to growth, other parts of the.
economy must turn around if the
recovery is to gain strength, ana-
lysts said.
Residential spending has gone
from being a drag on the overall
economy to a positive force, but
"I wouldn't want to bet the house
on housing, really, in terms of the
strength of the U.S. economy go-
ing forward," said Diane Swonk,
chief economist at Mesirow Fi-
nancial in Chicago.
The Realtors group said resales
rose 10.1 percent to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of 6.1 mil-
lion in October, from a downward-
ly revised pace of 5.54 million in


September. It was the biggest
monthly increase in a decade, and
far above the 5.65 million pace
economists expected, according
to Thomson Reuters.
"People who are looking, they are
serious," said Harrison Tulloss,
an agent with ZipRealty Inc.
in the Raleigh-Durham area of
North Carolina. "They're not rid-
ing around with me if they need to
go shopping or buy a turkey."
Investors seized on the better-
than-expected home sales, along
with a falling dollar, to snap up
stocks. The Dow Jones industrial
average and other stock indexes
rose more than 1 percent in mid-
afternoon trading.
The strength in home sales
helped ease the market's pessi-
mism that followed weaker data
on housing starts, employment
and consumer confidence over
the past few weeks. The falling
dollar contributed to the rally, on
the expectation that a low dollar
will keep interest rates low. Low
rates make it cheaper for compa-
nies to borrow and investors to
finance purchases of stocks and
commodities.
Stocks also were helped by mo-
mentum buying, with investors
buying stocks simply because
the market is rising and no one
wants to miss out on the rally.
The recovery in the housing
market is being driven by re-
duced prices, combined with fed-
eral programs to lower mortgage
rates and bring more buyers into
the market. The median sales
price was $173,100. That's down
7 percent from a year earlier and
off roughly 2 percent from Sep-
tember.
Many experts, though, predict
prices will hit a new low next
spring, perhaps falling another 5
to 10 percent, as more foreclosures
get pushed onto the market. The
government has tried to counter
that trend by offering a tax incen-
tive for first-time buyers and by
keeping mortgage rates around 5
percent since the spring.


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