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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00856
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla
Creation Date: November 11, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
lccn - sn 83004231
issn - 0739-0319
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: UF00028321:00856

Full Text






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TIqnpora Mutantur Et Nos Mutarnmur In Illis


DISTRIBUTED IN M IAMI D ADE AND BROWARD COU NTIES FOR OVER 87 YEARS

Volume 87 Number 11 MIAMI, F-RCIDA., NOVEMBER 1 1-17, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)



LOCAL EVENTS HIGHLIGHT BLACK MIAMI


RANGE GALA


CARIBBEAN CATWALK


WILSON FUNDRAISER


Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson was Hundreds gathered at the Little Haiti Cultural State Sen. Frederica Wilson surrounded by supporters at her
honored last Sunday evening by the M.Athalie Range Cultural Arts Arts Center on Friday for the first Caribbean Cat- Fundraising Extravaganza held at the Karu & Y Ultra Nightclub in
Foundation. Left to right: Dr. Barbara Carey-Shuler, Edmonson, walk. A dancer walks down the runaway to Haitian Overtown Tuesday night.
Patrick Range II and G. Eric Knowles, board chairman, music.





Virginia Key Beach.Museum plan halted


Trust failure imperils $15 million bond money

By Oscar Pedro Musibay tory. ers and triggering the recent geted to cut their finding gap
omusibay@bijgournals.com But, the museum isn't the departure of David Shorter, its for the 200910 fiscal year.


It may take a public-private
partnership to revive ambitious
plans to create a museum at
Virginia Key Beach Park, which
was Miami's black-only beach
from 1945 until the 1960s.
City Commissioners Michelle
Spence-Jones and Marc Sar-
noff have suggested partnering
with entertainers from boxing
promoter Don King to rapper
and music impresario Jay-Z.
The partnership's goal would
be to fund operations for a
museum commemorating the
beach's ties to local Black his-


only nonprofit in need of cash.
At the same time it's seeking
ways to fund museum opera-
tions the Virginia Key Beach
Park Trust is working to keep
itself alive. The city, in working
to fill its budget shortfall, cut
the trust's funding for 2009-
10. Instead of about $1 mil-
lion a year from the city, the
trust got nothing. It has about
$400,000 to continue.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR DONE
The financial reality of the
cuts hit the trust hard, forcing
it to lay off a handful of staff-


$150,000-a year executive di-
rector.
Sarnoff said the trust's finan-
cial predicament is of its own
making. He said the trust had
repeatedly received funding for
more than a dozen employees
over several years, but had
only hired a handful of people.
The unspent money rolled over
each year, eventually allowing
the trust to have $1.8 million
in its coffers. Its annual budget
was about $1.2 million.
It is common for government
to have "funded vacancies"
- to budget for personnel,


DAVID SHORTER
Former Executive Director
but not hire them, said Larry
Spring, the city's CFO. In fact,
it's an area city budgeters tar-


NO BUSINESS MODEL
"In one sense, you can look at
it as being victims of our own
success in trying to keep costs
down and not hiring people:'
said Gene Tinnie, the trust's
chairman. "There were delays
in the museum process, and
we didn't want to hire people
unnecessarily."
Spring said the trust has
failed to come up with a busi-
ness model that will allow it to
receive about $15 million in
bond money, but it should be
Please turn to BEACH 1A


Doves express Liberty Square's


efforts to change violent image


New sign and statue reflects
Liberty Square's desire for change


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Hands on Miami contin-
ued its efforts in the Liberty
Square Housing complex last
week, where more than 200
volunteers painted and plant-
ed trees last Saturday.


"It's a great day for the peo-
ple of this neighborhood," said
Eric Thompson, who volun-
teers at the Liberty Square
Community Center, "this will
revitalize and improve the
community."
It has been said that Hands
on Miami has unofficially


adopted the Liberty Square
Housing complex, due to the
organization's persistent ef-
forts there. Stefanie Cole, the
organization's Youth Program
Director, confirms this.
"We don't want to come in
here and then just leave," said
Cole. "We want to make a sus-
tained change. According to
Cole, the re-painting of Liberty
Square is part of a larger plan
that includes projects in Lib-


erty City, Overtown, and Little
Havana.
On Saturday, a new sign
welcoming visitors to Liberty
Square was unveiled on the
corner of 62nd Street and 12th
Avenue. In addition, a monu-
ment to peace and unity was
unveiled directly across from
the Community Center. The
monument, which shows the
images of two doves, was the
Please turn to CHANGE 4A


kIiVH 1STORIC
HAMPTON
HOUSEE COMMUNITY TRUST, INC.


Restoration has

funding in place

Pinkney remains committed to
reconstruction project
By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimnesonline.com

The stabilization of the Historic Hampton House contin-
ues, according to Dr. Enid Pinkney, founding President and
CEO of the Historic Hampton House Community Trust.
"The Hampton house is moving along. We're in the pro-
cess of stabilizing the building,"
said Pinkney. "It was such a der-
ilict building for so long, that we
can't move forward until the sta-
bilization is complete. Then the
architects can see what needs to
be done," she said.
"We hope to complete that by
the end of this year."
The stabilization work Pinkney
references began in March of this
year. The work has included re-
placing rotted wood and clearing
weeds and plants that had tak- DR. ENID PINKNEY
en over the building's crumbling
walls.
The budget crunch has not slowed plans any.
"With the budget being cut; if we weren't committed to
this project, it would just fall by the wayside, but we are
committed. We're gonna hang in here," said Pinkney.
Pinkney moved to allay concerns about the timeliness of
the project.
"Right now the building has been gutted, and people
Please turn to RESTORATION 4A


7D ay
Wea her
Forecast
W alli er.corn


WEDNESDAY


83 67
ST-SUOWRS


THURSDAYY


80 600
PARILY CLOUDY


FRIDAY


790 660
PARTLY CLOUDY


SATURDAY


82 700
PARTLY CLOUDY


SUNDAY

>.0<

840 71
PARTLY CLOUDY


MONDAY


84 710
SCAITIRED SHOWERS


TUESDAY


83 71.
ISOLAOD T STORMS


I- 90158 I00100 0


















OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Stop the bleeding

he blood of Miami-Dade County had been slowly leak-
ing from the veins of the community for a number of
years, but the elected leaders and public officials have
been slow to notice or unwilling to deal with the problems to
stem the flow.

But now that the paradise in which we live has lost its glit-
ter, we are faced with a troubling real-estate meltdown that
forces us into a reality check. We are in big trouble if we con-
tinue on this path.

Faced with a budget shortfall of $444 million, recently-
elected Mayor Tomas Regalado has his work but out for him.
he must deal with a 10.2 percent unemployment rate and
shrinking tax revenues. But the most serious problem he will
face will be the pensions.

Over the years, the County has been far too generous in
dealing with the police and firefighter's unions when it came
to pension benefits. We hope Regalado will have the courage
to convince them of the seriousness of the situation.

President Barack Obama and the Congress are in a battle
today over health care reform, but the problem in Miami-Dade
in financial reform. Our financial affairs are so out of control
that it will take a serious revamping to get them back in line.

If this problem is not approached in a business like man-
ner, we can look for the state to step in and impose financial
reality--just as they did in the 1900s.

The serious condition of County finances has been evi-
denced by the recent resignation of former Police Director
Robert Parker, who left the department two weeks ago with a
retirement check of more than $400,000. This is no criticism
of. Parker, who was a fine officer and served us well for 33
years, but the generous County policy entitled Mr. Parker to
58 weeks of sick leave paid at his hourly rate of $108.79 or
$250,548. He also collects $87,360 for 803 hours of holiday
leave.

Now we understand why a 56-year-old healthy man would
leave an annual salary of $226,000 for early retirement.

The longtime director submitted his retirement papers Oct.
30, the same day County Mayor Carlos Alvarez announced a
five percent pay cut for most non-union employees.

Mayor Regalado, who was endorsed by the police and fire-
fighters unions, plans a Nov. 16 pubic forum to push for
needed reform in the City of Miami.

We are still waiting to hear what County Mayor Alvarez has
in mind.



CORNER


Ule Miami ima

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami. Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210 I
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, under, 1923-1968|
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Ed tor. 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES. SR., Pu*lisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Earlier this year, major cor-
porations like General Motors,
Bank of America and Citigroup
received federal dollars tax-
payer money to keep their op-
erations afloat. Despite public
outcries of corporate excess and
financial mismanagement lead-
ing the entities to the mess they
were in, the government followed
through with these bailouts be-
cause it was the right thing to
do for the nation's economy. In
the midst of all this, we've heard
very little about small business-
es, which are the backbone of
the American economy. This re-
cession has affected them, too.
And it's time we turn our atten-
tion in their direction.


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates. One Year $45.00 Six Months $30 00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210


CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless of race, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no per.on. the
Black Press strives to help every person In the firm belief that all poisons are hurt as long as anyone Is held back.j


Ap The Mea Audi t


BY MARC H. MORIAL, NNPA


Time to declare
If you're reading, this in your
local urban newspaper, you
probably encountered at least
one story about youth violence
in your community before find-
ing your way to this column. But
wading through reports of vio-
lence in the news pales beside
the daily real life experiences of
many young people across this
nation. According to a recently
released Justice Department
report, "More than 60 percent
of the nation's youth have been
exposed to violence within the
last year. Nearly one in two was
physically assaulted at least
once, with more than 1 in 10 in-
jured in an assault."
While incidents like the 1999
Columbine massacre which
caused the deaths of 13 people
or the 2007 Virginia Tech ram-
page which took the lives of 32
make international headlines,
we are in the grips of a largely
silent epidemic of youth violence
that is endangering the lives of
hundreds of thousands of chil-


"peace" on youth violence
dren across this country every major cities. As Attorney Gener-
year. al Holder said during his recent
A few weeks ago, the nation visit to Chicago to address this
was riveted by a YouTube video issue, "Youth violence is not a
of the senseless beating death of Chicago problem any more than
Derrion Albert, a Chicago high it is a black problem, a white
school honor student. Derrion problem or a Hispanic problem.


While incidents like the 1999 Columbine massacre which caused the
deaths of 13 people or the 2007 Virginia Tech rampage which took
the lives of 32 make international headlines, we are in the grips of a
largely silent epidemic of youth violence that is endangering the lives of hundreds of
thousands of children across this country every year.


was attacked on his way home
from school as he innocently
walked through a crowd of rival
gang members. According to the
New York Times, "Close to 70
students have been murdered
[in Chicago] 'since the beginning
of the 2007 school year."
This level of violence is excep-
tional by any standard, but sad-
ly, it is replicated at equally un-
acceptable levels in many of our


It is an American problem."
A problem this big calls all of
us to action. In recent years,
we declared "war" on drugs and
"war" on terrorism. Today, I
think it's time we declare "peace"
on youth violence. I was pleased
that Holder and Education
Secretary, Arne Duncan went
to Chicago to begin what they
called "a sustained national con-
versation" about youth violence


in response to the
Derrion Albert
murder. Holder also announced
a request for $24 million in next
year's budget for community-
based prevention programs such
as Ceasefire and Project Safe
Neighborhoods. But stopping
and preventing youth violence
will take more than money. And
it is about more than violence.
While young people who com-
mit violent acts must ultimately
be held accountable for their
crimes, we cannot ignore the
role that poverty, parenting,
poor schools, guns, drugs, gangs
and the lack of opportunity play
in this on-going tragedy. We
must invest both more money
and more of ourselves in solving
these problems if we want to dig
out the roots of youth violence.
As someone said to me recently,
if we can find the votes and the
money for a $700 billion bailout
of Wall Street, we ought to be
able to summon the will and the
resources to save our kids.


BY REV. AL'SHA IPTON. NNPA '" a ,-) i .,, .,',o.' o :f'.-5i .: ~


Will these people and corporations stop at nothing?


Freedom of the press unequivo-
cally stands at the core of funda-
mentals in the United States of
America. It is a form of checks
and balances towards the govern-
ment, business and other entities
in our society. But when pro-
ducers, editors, journalists, ex-
ecutives and media conglomerates
themselves begin fabricating news
and openly spreading half-truths
and lies, it's time for someone else
to start checking them.
Last week, news outlets began
reporting on the case of Meagan
Williams, the young woman in
West Virginia who had claimed
in 2007 that she was kidnapped,
beaten, sexually assaulted, forced
to eat human feces and doused
with hot water all the while racial
epithets were being slurred to-
ward her. Seven individuals were
convicted in the ease all of whom
confessed in some form or fashion
to the crime. The prosecution
only pressed hate crime charges
against one of the seven, despite
his belief in the heinous nature of
the event. Many including my-
self stepped in to support the
troubled woman and her mother,
who was deemed a victim even by
the mainstream media. Meagan
has now recanted her story.
Reputable news outlets such
as the NY Times, The Charleston


Gazette and the Associated Press
objectively reported on the turn
of events. The AP quoted me in
its piece as stating: "The Rev. Al
Sharpton and Black Lawyers for
Justice urged prosecutors to pur-
sue hate-crime charges. The law-
yers organized a march on her be-
half. Sharpton addressed a rally


sent a letter to the current Logan
County prosecutor, John Bennett,
asking him to look in to Ms. Wil-
liams' new statement."
Even those news outlets that
perceived that I may have pushed
for hate crime charges, did not
fabricate lies or spin this latest de-
velopment in the Megan Williams'


ast week, news outlets began reporting on the case of Meagan Williams,
the young woman in West Virginia who had claimed in 2007 that she was
kidnapped, beaten, sexually assaulted, forced to eat human feces and
doused with hot water all the while racial epithets were being slurred toward her


in Charleston and donated $1,000
to Williams' family as a Christmas
gift ... Sharpton has asked the
prosecutor to vindicate anyone
wrongfully convicted."
The Charleston Gazette said in
its piece: "Sharpton told the Ga-
zette that he came down for the
rally but wasn't involved in any
marches and did not represent
the Williams family. He said he
was involved only as a supporter
of Williams."
And the NY Times reported on
October 22: "The Rev. Al Sharp-
ton addressed a 2007 rally against
hate crimes in Charleston and
gave $1,000 to Ms. Williams' fam-
ily as a Christmas gift. Mr. Sharp-
ton said Wednesday that he had


case. It was only on the right,
from publications like the NY Post,
where those attempting to vilify
and discredit my history of civil
rights work began freely spread-
ing outright mistruths. A dis-
service to the field of journalism,
the NY Post attempted to pass off
judgments and their own biased
beliefs as if they were facts.
. "A troubled young woman whom
the Rev. Al Sharpton championed
as a victim of a horrific, racially
motivated sexual assault now says
she fabricated the incident ..." the
piece begins. This sorry excuse for
reporting went on to say: "Sharp-
ton who now wants a new in-
vestigation already has a record
tarnished by his drumbeating for


Tawana Brawley's 1WR- U
discredited 1987
claim that she was gang-raped by
white cops."
Instead of highlighting the no-
tion that all I did was support a
distraught woman and her family,
and that I was not directly ever
involved in handling her case, the
Post has once again taken the lib-
erty of printing whatever it feels
like without 'proper research to
support its biased claims. And
unlike other publications that ac-
curately reported my desire for
the prosecution to reopen this
case to ensure due justice for the
seven white individuals who were
accused of the crime, the Post at-
tempted to juxtapose this incident
with another one where once again
all I did was believe a victim not
create a hoax.
As the Republican Party strug-
gles for a clear voice and more and
more begin to leave the contingent
for its increasingly fanatic fringe
rhetoric, it seems that those on
the right are facing a new era of
desperation. And desperation of
course leads to a plethora of last
resorts. When no one will listen
to you, take your newspapers, TV
outlets or conservative spin ma-
chines as legitimate news sourc-
es, you simply begin conjuring up
whatever you want.



-a



bringing them to
life.
This is a start. Other elected
officials must take an active
role and support both plans.
But they must also create sup-
port networks for those small
businesses just starting out.
And they should encourage,
even in these economic times,
more Americans to pursue en-
trepreneurship. From providing
financial assistance to fund-
ing classes that help business
owners learn all they need to
make their venture a success,
the government should support
small business. After all, it has
a vested interest in making sure
they succeed.


Small businesses keep Amer-
ica strong, financially. During
good economic times, these
businesses are responsible for
more than 70 percent of all
new jobs created. Additionally,
a larger percentage of Ameri-
cans work for small or mid-size
businesses than major corpora-
tions. Yet, during tough finan-
cial times, such as the one we
are currently in, these busi-
nesses can be hit so hard that
they are forced to shut down.
For decades, Democrats and
Republicans have sung the
praises of small businesses.
After all, what says "American
Values" more than an entre-


preneur working and saving so
that they can open their own
company? Singing the praises
of these businesses and valu-
ing them enough to make sure
they are supported are two
very different things. Finally,
our elected officials are step-
ping up and working to assist
and protect small businesses.
President Obama would like to
increase the amount of Small
Business Administration loans.
Sen. Mark Warner, a Democrat
from -Virginia, Warner wants to
create a $50 billion loan fund
for small businesses. Both men
are working within their parties
to build support for the initia-
tives and to create a strategy for


BY JUDGE MATHIS


Help for small businesses


SOe Uiami Tiutf
The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on. its editorial commen-
taries as well as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback makes for
a healthy dialogue among our readership and the community. Letters must,
however, be 150 words or less, brief and to the point, and may be edited
for grammar, style and clarity. All letters must be signed and must include the
name, address and telephone number of the writer for purposes of confirming
authorship: Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W.
54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-694-6211; Email: miamite-
ditorial@bellsouth.net.


w .....


1--


-- m


















LOCAL


BI.\CK.S MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


LOC)(AL ('(MM\N IARY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


BY REGINALD CLYNE, ESQ


Congressional race


gets more interesting


Shakespeare wrote a phrase
that I have always loved, "much
ado about nothing". In the case
of the furor raised over the stat-
utes of Haitian soldiers having a
likeness to Dr. Rudolph Moise,
Esq. and Daniel Fils-Aime,
Shakespeare's phrase rings
true. Fils-Aime, a Haitian, led
the charge for ten years to get
the statues built, and Moise put
his money where his mouth is
and donated $120,000 to pro-
vide the financing. To their de-
tractors, I ask, "What the hell
did you do to get the statutes
built?"
Like I said, "much ado about
nothing." Unless, you are run-
ning for 17th Congressional dis-
trict in the U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives, were counting on


Afghanistan,
unfair immi-
gration poli-
cies, rising
crime, fund-
ing for public schools, etc.
In the meantime, two of the
contenders for Kendrick Meek's
seat are out doing what needs
to be done in a tough congres-
sional race raising money and
meeting voters. Rod Vereen,
Esq. had his opening fundraiser
at Mahogany Grille on Tuesday,
and Frederica Wilson also had
her fundraiser at Karu and Y
on the same night. In this race,
money is important, so don't sit
on the sidelines and then won-
der why your candidate lost.
Go out and support, even if it is
only $20.00.


the Haitian vote, and just got
stung when the U.S. Air Force
Pilot, medical doctor and lawyer
all rolled into the good-looking
and charming personage of
Moise stated that he is entering
the race for Congress. (I take
the "good-looking" part from my
wife, who like many women in
South Florida is an admirer.) I
think in this race with so many
talented people running for office
that the Haitian vote contenders
should focus on more important
issues like health care, unem-
ployment, the war in Iraq and


Many people in the Black
community complain that our
politicians are not responsive
to. our needs. Perhaps, if we
supported our politicians finan-
cially then they would not have
to rely on funding from other
communities. In other words,
it is a crying shame that most
of the money for Black politi-
cians comes from the Anglo and
Cuban community. Why don't
we support our own? In other
words; take a lesson from Moise
and put your money where your
mouth is.


U BY QUEEN BROWN


Stop making excuses about the violence in our community


According to the Center for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC), Black males in the Unit-
ed States of America are more
likely to die from homicide than
any other cause. The CDC lists
homicide as the leading cause of
death for Black males between
the ages of 14-24 living in Amer-
ica.
Last year, in 2008, Miami-Dade
Corners Office classified 261 re-
corded deaths as homicides. To
start things off that year was the
murder of 11-year-old Joshua
Arolgia who was shot and killed
by another person. The 261 ho-
micides recorded in Miami-Dade
County in 2008 included victims
of all ages. Ninety-seven of these
victims were' adolescents aged
24 years and younger. Among
the ninety-seven adolescents, 26
of them were age 18 years and
younger. And of the 26 victims,
aged 18 years and younger, 18
of them were minors. One vic-
tim was 10-month-old Derrick
Days, Jr.
It is appalling that we have lost
and continue to lose so many
children from this community to
homicides. And the fact that our
children our dying at the hands
of our own children is even more
disturbing. It is time for us to
stop making excuses and blam-
ing others for what is happening
to our children and our commu-
nity. Our children continue to
die in this community because
we have not accepted responsi-
bility and we continue to blame
everything and everyone for this
problem.
In some instances we are even
blaming God for our children
early demise. To my dismay, I
have sat at many funerals and
memorial services and listened
to ministers tell the congregation


this awful tragedy has happened
because God needed an angel or
a flower. I really do not want to
get into religion; however, some
of us are blaming God for our
problem. In our own pessimistic
way of thinking we blame God
for our children being murdered
and left in the streets to die like
animals.
As I sat in a waiting room at
an Auto Dealership, a news sto-
ry came on the television about
an incident of youth violence in
our community. A Minster who


have become so violent. I have
heard everything from the vic-
tims are the community trouble
makers and thugs. This I find
to be very disturbing and I am
sure the parents of 10-month-
old Derrick would be willing to
prove you wrong. I've also been
told that they are all criminals,
the victims and the perpetrators;
we search to find out if the vic-
tims have criminal records (even
when the charges were dropped
or not filed). We are some how
hoping this will explain why they


t is time for Us to stop making excuses and blaming others for what is hap-
pening to our children and our community Our children continue to die in this
community because we have not accepted responsibility and we continue to
blame everything and everyone for this problem.


was also in the waiting room
that day began a conversation
about the issue of violence and
the destruction of our young
people. Not knowing that I had
lost a son to violence, the minis-
ter began to speak of our young
people rebellion as the cause for
their early demise. He stated it
is the wrath of God on our chil-
dren. It is this type of thinking
that has us where we are today
on the issue of violence. And if
it is so that God is not pleased
with our youth and is allowing
them to murder each other, than
where are the spiritual leaders
petitioning God on behalf of our
youth. God is not the problem.
We are the problem. Nor is God
the reason for our problems. We
create our own problems. We
must denounce the violence in
our community and see God as
the answer to our problem.
Over the past three years,' I
think I have heard every excuse
there is as to why our children


were murdered. What we are do-
ing is finding a way to justify the
homicide and differentiate our-
selves arnd our children from the
victims. Somehow we seem to
find a sense of safety in knowing
I am not like them. Therefore,
it is not my problem. I really
find this excuse to be paradoxi-
cal because when the two planes
crashed into the twin towers on
911, no one in the media tried to
discredit the victims' innocence
by releasing their criminal re-
cords. What we knew was, thou-
sands of innocent Americans
died on that horrible day and
we knew it could have very well
been in any town in America.
We somehow felt connected to
the victims of 9/11. They were
fellow Americans. My question
is, why is their a double stan-
dard for victims? Local terror-
ists are terrorizing our commu-
nity everyday. The victims in
some of our homicides are just
as innocent as the victims that


died in the twin
towers on 9/11.
Where is the outrage from the
community?
Violence can be prevented.
However, in order to change the
situation we must change our
thinking. And we must address
the problem, which is our chil-
dren are murdering our children.
Therefore we must address our
children. We must be willing to
go back to the basics and teach
our children how to live respon-
sible lives. We must return to
the days when it was our par-
ents that instilled values and
morals in us. We must teach our
children personal responsibility.
Our children must be willing to
accept that they are accountable
for the results of their choices.
Our children must own up to
the consequences of their be-
havior. And most importantly,
we as parents, teachers, minis-
ters, coaches and the commu-
nity must model the life we want
our children to live. Under no
circumstance should we tolerate
violent and aggressive behavior
from our children. We must be-
gin teaching our children alter-
natives to fighting and shooting
each other. We must become
our children emotional coaches
and teach them emotional in-
telligence. We must establish
standards for living in our com-
munity and hold each other ac-
countable for the actions. The
community must hold those
individuals that commit violent
crimes responsible for what they
are doing to the community, even
if it is our own child. As caregiv-
ers, we must be responsible and
seek professional help for our
children when they are in need
of help. Personal responsibility
means no more excuses.


Is their racial discrimination in County Corrections?


Dear Editor:

I am writing this letter be-
cause I am appalled at the fact
that no one seems interested
in investigating the EEOC vio-
lations in Miami-Dade County
Correction (MDCR). Is the lack
of interest in Corrections, be-
cause the Director is a lily white
non-Hispanic male?
The DirectorofMDCR planned,
developed and implemented a
system of racial discrimination
that systematic sort to limit the


number of African-American
Professional Correction Officers
in the department.
Miami-Dade County Correc-
tions was found guilty on all
counts of racism and had to pay
restitution on 14 counts of dis-
crimination. The victims are in
the COT Class that graduated
Nov. 5.
The most outrageous element
of this situation is this year,
a department of government
can retain an employee found
guilty of racial discrimination.


My most ardent fear is that
this man is still at the helm of
MDCR. Many employees have
been fired for far lesser infrac-
tions. If this information is not
made public the County Manag-
er may seek to rehire him. His
contract is schedule for renewal
on Dec. 6,
For specific information re-
garding this issue, please con-
tact Valarie Ephriam-Kelly,
County Corrections EEOC Co-
ordinator at 786-263-6099 and
County Attorney Lee Kraftchick
at 786-375-1324.
The plan was instituted to


lighten the complexion of rank
and file officers.
To that end, Director Timo-
thy Ryan instructed, Chamona
Wynn, Personnel Coordinator,
786-263-6217 to place the Af-
rican-American application at
the bottom of the list and push
all non-Latin whites and His-
panic applications to the top. If
this do not grab you in the gut
and encourage your interest in
MDCR, then, nothing will.

Tangela Sears
Miami


Did the candidates you supported in the Mayoral and

District 5 Commission races win?


MORRIS SANDS, 66
Retired, Liberty City

I personally
didn't vote.pesnly
I didn't feel
that I knew
enough about
either of the
Mayoral can-
didates to
make an informed decision.
It's difficult to do that when
you don't really know either
of the guys or even who they
are. I don't live in District 5
and wasn't eligible to vote. I
live over in Edmonson's dis-
trict.

GLORIA MCMILLIAN, 57
Retired, Miami

I was out of town for the
vote unfortu- a --
nately. I was
attending a
funeral. But
I would have
voted for Re-.
galado, so I
was glad that
he won. I live .


in the downtown area and
not in District 5, so I couldn't
have voted in the District 5
race and didn't really have a
strong opinion.

RONNIE PARAMORE, 55
Retired, LIberty City

One of my
candidates
won and one
didn't. I voted
for Sanchez
for mayor.
Regalado '
made some
comments I don't like about
Obama; so I voted for San-
chez.
I did vote for Spence-Jones.
It was because of her integri-
ty. She is out there doing her
job. When she says she going
to do it, she does it. That's
what this community needs.

KATIANA GUE, 19
Student, Miami Shores

I voted for Spence-Jones.
I feel like I know her. She
comes and talks to my school.


I think she's
good for the
job.
I left the
Mayoral -
candidates
blank. I re-
ally didn't
know that
much about either of them
so it wasn't really fair to vote
against one of them.

LASHAUMBE RANDOLPH, 33
Student, Liberty City

Well one
of my can-
didates won
and one
didn't. I voted -
for Sanchez,
but didn't

him all that
strongly; so I wasn't too up-
set when he didn't win.
I did vote for Spence-Jones.
She came out here to Miami-
Dade college. I was very im-
pressed with her answers to
some of my questions and
questions from other audi-


ence members. She was a
very well-informed candi-
date.

LILY DUNCAN, 42
Student, Liberty City,

Both of my
candidates
won. I sup-
ported Spen-
ce-Jones and
Regalado. ,
I like her
and what she
does for the
community. She does all that
she can to help us.
I voted for Regalado be-
cause of his ideas on the bud-
get. I thought he had better
ways to fix it. Now; of course,
well just see whether what
he promised is what he does
once he's in the chair.




Subscribe


Is it true a lot of Miami-Dade County employees decided
to take early retirement and quit before the five percent
pay cut took effect?


We hear a lot of changes are underway at Jackson Hos-
pital Health Services with job losses and unit closings.
And is there a little battle brewing between the doctors at
Jackson and those at Cedars?


Come on, man. A lot of people are becoming concerned
about the changing climatic conditions and global warn-
ing. They are really not accustomed to hurricanes in No-
vember and the delay of cool weather. Stay tuned.


A lot of folk got very interested when State Sen. Dan
Gelber says the proposed anticorruption package he un-
veiled earlier this week is more vital than ever in light of
the Securities and Exchange Commission's investigation
of possible fraud by the board that oversees the state pen-
sion fund. Stay tuned.


Scott Rothstein, the Fort Lauderdale Bernice Madoff,
is running true to form. This week, the FBI minded his $6
million mansion and confiscated yachts, expensive autos
and anything that wasn't nailed down. Rothstein, ousted
by his Fort Lauderdale law firm last week after hundreds
of millions disappeared from investor accounts, hung a
cheesy portrait of Al Pacino as the Godfather on his office
wall.


OPINION


M any people in the Black community complain that our politi-
cians are not responsive to our needs. Perhaps, if we sup-
ported our politicians financially then they would not have to
rely on funding from other communities.


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER


mbe ftiami m imeo


... . ..


OUR! 1, ( N C', I Y V










BLACKS MUST CONTROL T1tnIR OWN ).STIJNY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


Spence-Jones, Regalado clinch election wins


By Sandra J. Charite
schalrite@fniamitif'mesonlilne'.coI

City of Miami residents opted
to keep Commissioner Michelle
Spence-Jones in office and elect
Tomas Regalado as the City's
new mayor.
Close to 70,000 ballots (23
percent) were cast.
Victory meant time for change,
according to Regalado. After 13
years as District 4 commission-
er, he believed that it was time
to make the bid for the mayoral
seat. Regalado raised more than
$400,000 toward his campaign
and gained favor from resi-
dents.
"We're going to recover our
city and the confidence of our
residents," he said to a crowd
following the results. "And we
will do it by not wasting mon-
ey.".
Regalado, Who is succeeding
outgoing mayor Manny Diaz,
hopes to prevent the City from
having excessive debt.
Spence-Jones; who has been


MICHELLE SPENCE-JONES TOMAS REGALADO


the District 5 Commissioner
since 2005, defeated her op-
ponents, David Chiverton and
Jeff Torain, by more than 4000
votes. She admits that she was
surprised by the support of the
community.
"I feel overwhelmed," said
Spence-Jones. "It is really great
to know that you have the full
trust and the support of the
community to be their leader for


the next four years. Clearly, it
means that they approve of the
direction the District is heading
in and I want to continue in that
direction."
Had one of her opponents
claimed victory in the elec-
tion, Spence-Jones believes she
would have been "disappointed
because it would have meant
the voters did not approve of the
direction we have been heading


over the past four years. "
The almost 83 percent gap
between her opponents showed
"the voters of District 5 were
resounding in saying that they
agreed with the direction we are
heading despite the distractions
endured during the campaign,"
said Spence-Jones.
Her focus now is continue to
help build District 5 to become a
prosperous community by cre-
ating jobs, affordable housing
for the elderly and homeless and
initiating community policing
and prevention tactics to reduce
crime in the neighborhoods.
The swearing-in of the candi-
dates will be as followed: Regala-
do will be sworn at the Miami
City Hall Commission Cham-
bers, 3500 Pan American Drive,
as mayor at 12 p.m., Wednes-
day, Nov. 11. A reception will
follow the official ceremony.
Spence-Jones' swearing in cere-
mony will be held at the Charles
Hadley Park at 12 p.m., Thurs-
day, Nov. 12 with also a recep-
tion to follow.


Financial crisis has not slowed restoration; repairs


RESTORATION
continued from 1A

are telling me that it looks
worse than it did before," said
Pinkney. But they don't under-
stand that it has to look worse
before it can look better. They
have to take out the asbestos,
the termite boards, the rotten
roof. As far as the community
is concerned, they still don't see
what we're doing. It looks like
nothing is going on, but some-


thing is," she said.
The stabilization work is be-
ing done by OAC Construction.
Upon completion, the Hampton
House Community Trust will
begin taking bids for contractors
to do the reconstruction phase.
The contractors will be working
with Gurri Matute Architectural
firm.
"We'd prefer a company ex-
perienced in historic preserva-
tion," said Pinkney.
The Hampt6n House was a


popular venue for Black en-
tertainers during segregation,
when they were not allowed to
stay hotels with Whites. Over
the years, guests have included
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mal-
colm X, Muhammad Ali, and
Sammy Davis Jr.
Upon completion, the build-
ing will include a jazz archive
and learning center for tal-
ented young musicians who
wish to learn how to play jazz
from experienced players. The


Hampton House stage, part of
its banquet/social hall facility,
will provide a low-cost venue for
aspiring young musicians to get
public exposure and experience
performing according to Hamp-
ton House committee literature.
The project is partially coun-
ty-funded, and is funded in part
by donations.
For information on how to
contribute, contact the Historic
Hampton House community
trust at 305-638-5800.


LEST WE FORGET


-The Miami Times photo/Sandra J. Charite
Kari Roots performs live on stage at the Little Haiti Cultural
Arts Center.

Caribbean Catwalk makes

its debut in Little Haiti


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimesonline.com

Foods, bags and music. The
combination drew a crowd of
hundreds to the Little Haiti
Cultural Arts Center on Fri-
day night. The event featured
the Haitian roots jazz by Kari
Roots and other local Haitian
artist.
The Caribbean American
Visual Cultural Preservation
(CAVCP) debuted the first an-
nual Caribbean Catwalk and a
collection of bags Phelicia Dell
of VeVe Collections.
"This is what it is all about.
I am having so much fun and
these bags are so cute," said
local resident Lillie T. Rose.
The bags, which received
rave reviews from attendees of
the Catwalk, were vivid, mul-
ticolored, desired waist bags,
hand-sewn sequin messenger
bags and oversize jean hand-
bags. The bags suited every
occasion or event.


"Phelicia's VeVe bags shine a
bright and positive light at our
culture," says Tamara Philip-
peaux, CAVCP board member
and executive producer at Is-
land TV.
Nelly Olbrice, 24, had trou-
ble deciding upon just one.
"I can go a lot of places with
these bags," she said picking
up each bag and laughing.
"I don't know which one to
choose."
The Veve Collection is a
unique brand represents a
blend of magic and wisdom
that promotes quality, authen-
ticity, value and inspiration
for the Haitian culture. Every-
thing in the collection mirrors
the Haitian culture.
Other collections included
a melange of beautiful, yogi-
esque Haitian sandals by Sa-
Ch6 Creations and a jewelry
display by Savannah Savary,
a combination of designs dis-
playing the Lebanese and Hai-
tian heritage.


T\"~~~~ ~ Hi^ ~ ^
*V ke4 *

Virginia Key Beach Trust to scale back plans


BEACH
continued from 1A

credited with reviving the park,
which is pristine and idyllic.
With the help of the city, the
park had its historic carrou-
sel, mini-train and dance floor
restored. All have become
money generators for the park
along with events held there.
Spring and Tinnie both ac-
knowledge the trust has now
been forced to become self-sus-
taining earlier than planned.


The nonprofit is down to one
full-time staffer and is focus-
ing on re-evaluating its mis-
sion, Tinnie said.

82 ACRE PROPERTY
The proposal to build a
20,000 to 30,000 square-foot
museum is being scaled back
for now, with trustees consid-
ering making the 82-acre prop-
erty the museum. One propos-
al would have signs detailing
the site's history along trails
throughout the property.


Tinnie said former staffers
like Shorter would probably
be brought back as consul-
tants on an as-needed basis.
"We are looking at it as an
opportunity, rather than a
setback:' Tinnie said. "We
can really take a hard look at
where are we going and how
we are going to get there. The
[city's] master plan called for
a museum on the site. Does
that have to be a big block of
concrete, or can it be some-
thing else?"


Tinnie said he was open to
private investment, but the
scale would have to fit the
park and be sensitive to the
environment.
If there is going to be any
consideration of private de-
velopment, it really has to be
in the context of not reducing
public access to public space.
We would ask, 'Is this really
necessary? Do the benefits
justify the costs?' We would
be concerned with environ-
mental impacts."


No. 6 Tar Heels spoil Isiah Thomas' debut with FIU


By Aaron Beard
Associated Press

Isiah Thomas knew his Florida
International team would struggle
to keep up with defending national
champion North Carolina, much less
beat the sixth-ranked Tar Heels.
He also heard the handful of
taunts from the home fans, includ-
ing one invoking the name of a fel-


low Hall of Fame player who spoke
negatively of Thomas in a recent
book.
And yet, Thomas was smiling af-
ter his college coaching debut ended
in a lopsided loss.
"Actually, it was great," Thomas
said after the 88-72 loss in the 2K
Sports Classic on Monday night.
"The college fans are great, the say-
ings they come up with. I was walk-


ing off one end and all I heard was
'Magic! Magical' You can't beat it,
right?
"I gave them a nice salute. I start-
ed to blow them a kiss, but I didn't
want to do that."
The Tar Heels were too big and
just too talented for the Golden
Panthers, serving a reminder that
Thomas could be in for a frustrating
debut season with the long-strug-


gling FIU program.
Deon Thompson scored 20 points
and was one of four players in dou-
ble-figures for North Carolina (1-0),
which shot 56 percent and dominat-
ed the boards after halftime to kick
off its centennial season against
Thomas the Hall of Fame player
and former NBA coach who inherits
a program with nine straight losing
seasons.


Sara Smith, President of the Liberty Square Resident Coun-
cil, helped to design the new sign welcoming people to Liberty
Square.The sign stands at the intersection of Northwest 62nd
Street and 12th Avenue.


Community is

CHANGE
continued from 1A

brainchild of Cheryl Parker.
Parker, a lifelong Liberty Square
resident, says she submitted the
idea to Hands on Miami between
three and four months ago. "It fi-
nally came into action," she said.
"I feel like I'm about to cry."
Donna Liverpool, who volun-
teered with Bank of America,
helped to paint the "segregation
wall," a roughly three-foot tall
wall that runs down 12th Avenue
from 62nd Street to 67th Street.
During segregation, the wall sep-
arated Liberty Square from the
surrounding "white" areas.
"it's just to do something posi-
tive for this community. And to
show my daughter that helping
others goes a long way," said Liv-
erpool.
Her. daughter Donnelle said
much the same. "i'm here to help
this community. I don't live here,
but a lot of my friends do, and a
lot of them' think we don't care
about them because of their sit-
uation. We want to change that,"
she said.
The community did not rely
solely on outside help. Keith
Baptiste, of I Love You Jesus
Ministries, along with a contin-
gent of 12 youth showed up un-
expectedly and lent a hand.


helping itself
I Love You Jesus Ministries
is located on the corner of 11th
Ave. and 62nd Street. The group
planted flowers near the inter-
section of 15th Ave. and 64th
Street.
"All of us are from around
here," said Baptiste. "The least
we can do is help them help us,"
he said.
Such efforts are appreciated
not only by the immediate com-
munity, but by the County as
well. "It's really win/win," said
Annette Molina, Public Infor-
mation Officer for the Miami-
Dade Housing. "Hands on Miami
hasn't come to us with anything
that wasn't already on our agen-
da. They get to do their commu-
nity service, and we save money
by using their manpower," she
said.
In sum, more than 50 trees
were planted, which were do-
nated by the county, which also
primed the homes to be painted
and bought the paint and sup-
plies.
Sara Smith, president of the
Liberty Square Resident Council,
summed up the purpose of the
day's activities. "I've lived here
for 14 years and am a grand-
mother of nine, many of whom
live in Liberty Square. I'm trying
to make it as safe as possible
for them."






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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


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61I.A( K.s MusT' (C'n

County grants historic designation


to Lemon City Colored C


By Tariq Osborne
toshorne@miamitime.online.omin

The cemetery discovered last
June when developers began
construction at 71 st Street and
the Florida East Coast Railroad
Tracks was granted historic
designation on Nov. 3. Thanks
largely to the efforts of Dr. Enid
Pinkney and the Lemon City
Cemetery Community Corpora-
tion in which she formed spe-
cifically for the purpose.
The designation came sooner,
and with less opposition, than
even Pinkney.-expected. Despite
the fact that the site had been
disturbed before, and that there
was no city record of it, Biscayne
Housing Corp. co-operated with
Pinkney and her associates at
every step.
"They've given us everything
we've asked for," said Pinkney.
The graveyard's rediscovery
did not begin with, the unearth-
ing of bones at the site, but with
the local YMCA, who owned title
to the land.
The YMCA had been there
since the 1980's, according to
Alfred Sanchez, President and
CEO of YMCA of Greater Miami.
The organization already host-
ed a full-facility YMCA which
boasted a child-care center, but
was looking at what to do with
the rest of its parcel. "We were
looking at what's needed here-
-and it was jobs and housing.
So we partnered with Biscayne
Housing group to bring afford-
able housing to the community.
We gave them a 55-year lease,"
he said.

THE FIRST
BODIES ARE FOUND
"My first reaction was that we
had discovered a crime scene,"
said Michael Cox, one of the
partners of Biscayne Housing
Corporation. The developers
had unearthed wrist bones, a
human skull, and the skeletons


of two small children. They
called the police department,
who in turn brought in their
medical examiner. When the
Medical Examiner determined
that the bones were more than
75 years old, the developers
called prominent Archaeologist
Bob Carr.
Eventually, Pinkney's re-
search team would discover his-
torical confirmation of the previ-
ously unknown cemetery's exis-
tence in a 1941 book published
by the Works Progress Admin-
istration. The Works Progress
Administration was a govern-
ment agency set up as part of
President Franklin Roosevelt's
response to the Great Depres-
sion of the 1930s. The book
cataloged the burial places of
American World War I veter-
ans and included a description
of the location of a Lemon City
- colored" cemetery in Miami
that precisely matched the site
of the newly discovered burial
ground. It even listed exact di-
rections from the courthouse to
the cemetery.

COMPROMISE
Despite the fact that they al-
ready had permission from the
city to build, and despite the
fact that the site had already
been previously disturbed, the
Biscayne Housing Corporation
paused in their project. "We
started a long process of ana-
lyzing the site. We were doing
our own research and working
with Dr. Pinkney and Dr. Mar-
vin Dunn," said Cox.
"We're trying to redesign the
project to still make the proj-
ect work," Cox continued. The
developers will move a row of
townhomes they had planned
along 71st street, as well as
redesigning two buildings and
a parking garage. "We're also
going to create a passive park
and a memorial," said Cox.
Sanchez finds the degree of


cooperation between The Lem-
on City Cemetery Community
Corporation and the Biscayne
Housing Corporation both re-
freshing and unusual. "They've
been the real heroes here," he
said of the developers. "But you
know, this is a very socially re-
sponsible company, which is
why we partnered with them.
They've done the right thing
from the moment those bones
were found to the moment we all
signed the agreement that this
place should be designated an
historical site. That is not your
typical for-profit company."
Cox is sanguine about his
company's exemplary behavior.
"Well, what were our alterna-
tives? The Lemon City Cemetery
Task Force is made of members
who are really good people from
a community that I have a lot of
respect for. I think the solution
was reasonable and appropri-
ate under the circumstances. I
feel like we did the right thing
here. I don't think there was a
rational alternative," he said.

PERSONAL REDISCOVERY


cemetery

In helping to unearth Miami's
history, Pinkney discovered a
bit of her own. Whilst search-
ing for the name of a friend's
relative buried there, Pinkney
discovered that her own grand-
father, John Clark, was buried
there in 1924. His wife, Melva-
nia Clark, raised Pinkney.
"It became personal for me,"
she said. "it's now like he's
come into my life through this
cemetery."
Pinkney hopes to have a cer-
emony in February for all who
helped with the project; and she
does not just mean the YMCA,
Biscayne Housing Corporation,
and Lemon City Cemetery Com-
munity Corporation. "A couple
lawyers worked for us pro bono.
Even the surveyor cut his price
because we didn't have the
money," she said.
"What's happened here
should be a model for the rest
of the country, said Sanchez.
You can have developers, non-
profits, and the community
working together to address the
needs of the future, while still
honoring the past."


EfR AN WER am

PDEPARTMENT ByAna Maria Monte Flores
A (4 A A ( A ( (4 (A A (A 1 (A A

Since April, 2006, when the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners ad-
opted the Miami-Dade Water-Use Efficiency Plan, the County has been actively In-
volved in improving management of traditional water supplies while encouraging the
development of alternatives and improving the efficiency of our current water use.
As a component of the Miami-Dade Water-Use Efficiency Plan, these programs are de-
signed to improve the efficient use of water by retrofitting older fixtures and encourag-
. Ing residents to be water wise.
These programs are available to residents of Miami-Dade County who meet the
established criteria:
Water-Efficient Landscape and Irrigation Evaluations
Showerhead Exchange and Retrofit Kit
High-Efficiency Toilet Rebate Program
Senior and Low-Income Retrofit Program
In-School Program
Green Lodging and Restaurant Program
To request an application and the list of approved High-Efficiency fixtures, please visit
our website at: www.miamidade.gov/conservation or call 311.
HIGH-EFFICIENCY SHOWERHEAD EXCHANGE AND RETROFIT KIT PROGRAM
The Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department will exchange your old showerhead for
a new, High-Efficiency model ABSOLUELY FREE and provide you with additional water-
saving retrofit Items for your faucets and toilet. Simply bring your old showerhead to
any of the following three WASD "Exchange Locations":
CALEB CENTER
5400 NW 22nd Avenue, 1st Floor
Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm
SOUTH DADE GOVERNMENT CENTER
10710 SW 211th Street, 1st Floor
Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm
DOUGLAS
3071 SW 38th Avenue, 1st Floor
Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm


;. A



'-- ". ,


Obama visits wounded soldiers


The day after a massacre at
Fort Hood, President Obama vis-
ited the Walter Reed Army Medi-
cal Center in Washington late Fri-
day. The visit was planned before
a shooting rampage left 13 peo-
ple killed and 30 wounded. Still,
the contrast is striking: soldiers
hurt while fighting two wars, and
those killed and hurt Thursday
at a Texas military post, where
the suspect is an Army major.


The visit was private and lasted
30 or 40 minutes longer than the
hour Obama had been expected
to spend visiting wounded sol-
diers. Deputy Press secretary
Tommy Vietor told the print pool,
"While at Walter Reed, the presi-
dent visited with 19 soldiers,
three families of soldiers in the
ICU, as well as hospital staff.
The President also awarded two
Purple Hearts."


Lawrence Taylor arrested


The Miami Times Special Report

Hall-of-fame linebacker Law-
rence Taylor was arrested Sun-
day night for leaving the scene
of an accident according to jail
records. Taylor, 50, was booked
just before 10 p.m. and then re-
leased on a $500 bond.
The crash occurred around
6:30 p.m. in the northbound
lanes of the Palmetto express-
way around 103rd Street. Ac-


cording to
authorities,
the crash tore
the front right
tire from Tay-
lor's Cadil-
lac Escalade.'
He drove two
TAYLOR miles before
stopping.
Taylor showed no signs of im-
pairment and was not given a
sobriety test.


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PUBLIC HEARING
The Governing Board of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the Miami
Urbanized Area will hold a public hearing on Thursday, December 17, 2009, at 2:00
p.m. in the County Commission Chambers, Stephen P Clark Center, 111 NW First
Street, Miami, Florida.
The Governing Board will consider the following amendments:
1. FY 2010 Transportation Improvement Program: Town of Golden Beach
Bridges
This amendment will include the Town of Golden Beach Bridge Projects In the FY
2010 Transportation Improvement Program Unfunded Section.
2. MPO Prospectus for Transportation Improvement: Section 7.5.2 Timely
Public Notice
This amendment to the MPO Prospectus for Transportation Improvement Section
7.5.2 (Timely Public Notice) will reduce the requirement of a thirty day (30) Public
Hearing Notice to fourteen (14) calendar days.
In addition to the above public hearing, the Florida Department of Transportation
(FDOT) District 6 Tentative Five-Year Work Program for Fiscal Year 2010/11 2014/15
will be presented to the MPO Governing Board for endorsement.
All interested parties are invited to attend. For further information,
please contact the MPO Secretariat, Stephen R Clark Center,
111 NW First Street, Suite 920, Miami, Florida 33128, phone:
(305) 375-4507; e-mail: mpoOmiamidade.gov ; website:
www.miamidade.gov/mpo
It is the policy of Miami Dade County to comply with all of the requirements of
the Americahs with Disabilities Act. The facility is accessible. For sign language
interpreters, assistive listening devices, or materials in accessible format, please call
305-375-4507 at least five business days in advance.


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009










THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


Three years later: Bryan Pata case still unsolved

Jeanette Patu pleas for killer to confess \ s -. ..... 1 '


By Sandra J. Charite
.'sc'h ritn'tmiutinitime'.ionliie.coim

When Jeanette Pata heard
about the death of former Edi-
son High football star Jasper
Howard in Connecticut last
month, the pain hit too close to
home.
"I couldn't believe that this
was happening again." she said.
"A young life taken so shortly."
Pata knew that no matter
what it took, she would comfort
the family by attending How-
ard's funeral. She traveled from
Palm Beach that Monday morn-
ing to attend Howard's funeral
at the New Birth Church in
Opa-locka. After all, she knew
she could understand Howard's
mother's grief.
Three years ago, Jeanette Pata
lost her youngest son Bryan af-
ter he was shot dead outside
his apartment complex on the
south side of the University of
Miami campus. Bryan, 22, was
also an all-star football player.
The suspect in Howard's case
was charged and arrested last
time. Sadly, Bryan's killer is yet
to be found and Jeannette Pata
is still awaiting for justice.
"The only thing that they [the
police] have told me is that
they are working on the inves-


tigation," said Pata in an ex-
clusive interview with The Mi-
ami Times. "That's not enough.
Those words do not bring my
son back. It's has been too long
when will I see justice for my
son."
Bryan's sister, Nelly Pierre,
that although it has been hard
on the family, all they can do is
wait. "The police are doing all
they can and following proto-
col."
The Miami Times tried con-
tacting the lead detective in the
case but one of the Homicide
Bureau Commanders declined
an interview at this time, ac-
cording to Miami-Dade Detec-
tive Rebecca Perez. She said
the detectives would soon be
working on re-releasing the re-
enactment in hopes of receiving
tips from the community.
The youngest of nine, Pata
had played three seasons at
North Miami Senior High School
then transferred to Miami Cen-
tral High School. He was once
rated as the nation's 26th-best
defensive lineman by the Su-
perPrep's All America team and
one of the top 100 players in the
South, according to the Atlanta
Journal Constitution.
Upon graduation, Bryan ma-
triculated to the University of


Miami to play football and pur-
sued a degree in Criminology.
The UM defensive lineman ap-
peared in 41 games and started
23. Prior to his death, Bryan
was in his senior year at UM
and was expected to be a pick
in the 2007 NFL Draft. Now, to-
day all Pata has are memories of
her son who had such a bright
future ahead of him.
"I didn't go to any of his away
games but I attended his home
games," said Jeanette. "When
I went to his games, I always
made sure that I sat somewhere
in the stands where he could
see me while on the field."


Pierre told The Times on
Thursday that the death has
been really hard on her mom.
Three years without a phone
call from her son or a visit to
the house or a request to make
his favorite meal or a simply
sound of his voice; has put
Pata in a state of depression.
She longs to wake up from this
dream that has turned into a
nightmare. Currently, Pata is
unemployed.
"Everyday I am hoping and
praying for answers for son.
Why is it taking so long," said
Pata. "I don't know what to do
anymore."


-family photo
Bryan Pata and mom, Jeanette, celebrate her birthday in
July 2006.


Gorley resigns from

Miami-Dade Public Housing
The Miami Times Report

Jeffrey C. Gorley has resigned as the Crime Reduction Co-
ordinator for Miami-Dade Public Housing Agency (MDPHA)
and as Chairman of the Regional Community Collaboration
on Violence (RCCV) effective Nov. 27. Gorley has accepted a
management position with a public housing agency out of
state in which he is slated to begin Nov. 30. He will attend
the last MDPHA/RCCV meeting on Nov. 12.
Gorley told The Miami Times on Thursday that he is leav-
ing for a "better opportunity at another public housing
agency in Virginia."


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II.i A'Ks M uNIsr t'ONI\ 1i l III 11, O \\ III SI'IN'











8A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


Bi ACK( MvIJl () NIll, '1llll.11? ()WN I)I.SIINY


Army gunman who killed 14 feared deployment


Officer knew horror of war, his own fear


By James Dao
and Michael Brick

KILLEEN, Tex. On Thurs-
day morning, Maj. Nidal Malik
Hasan went to his next door
neighbor at the rundown apart-
ment complex where he rented
a one-bedroom unit, and gave
her most of his belongings,
saying he would not need them
anymore.
Mr. Hasan told the neigh-
bor, Patricia Villa, that he was
leaving for Iraq or Afghanistan
and would not be back for six
months. Mr. Hasan brought
over an air mattress, a steamer
and men's clothing for her hus-
band, some still in dry clean-
ing bags marked "Hasan." He
offered her $60 to clean his
apartment on Friday morning.
The day before, he had brought
over a copy of the Koran and
bags of vegetables he said he
would not be able to eat.
"He said he was ready," Ms.
Villa said on Friday. "I said,


Hood.
Mr. Hasan, who is 39, re-
mained in the hospital on Fri-
day, unconscious and connect-
ed to a ventilator.
Those who saw him in the last
few hours before the shootings
did not notice anything unusu-
al about his behavior.
When Mr. Hasan gave her his
belongings, Ms. Villa said he
told her: 'You need them,' I was


traditional Muslim garb. The
store owner said that in his
stops Mr. Hasan would talk to
him about the military, about
attending prayer services and
about wanting a wife.
Mr. Hasan stopped in on
Thursday, a few hours before
the shootings.
"He looked normal," the own-
er told CNN. "Came in had his
hash browns and coffee as you
see in the surveillance video."
The owner told CNN he
was too busy to chat with
Mr. Hasan on Thursday, but
through conversations on oth-
er days learned the officer's
background was Jordanian,
though he didn't, speak Arabic
well.
Born and reared in Virginia,
the son of immigrant parents
from a small Palestinian town
near Jerusalem, Mr. Hasan
joined the Army right out of
high school, against his par-
ents' wishes. The Army, in
turn, put him through col-
lege and then medical school,
where he trained to be a psy-
chiatrist.


But Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, ,
began having second thoughts
about a military career a few
years ago after other soldiers
harassed him for being a Mus-
lim, he told relatives in Virgin-
ia.
He had also more recent-
ly expressed deep concerns
about being sent to Afghani-
stan, Having counseled scores


of returning soldiers with post-
traumatic stress disorder, first
at Walter Reed Army Medi-
cal Center in Washington and
more recently at Fort Hood, he
knew all too well the terrifying
realities of war, said a cousin,
Nader Hasan.
"He was mortified by the idea
of having to deploy," Mr. Hasan
said. "He had people telling him


on a daily basis the horrors they
saw over there."
The Federal Bureau of Inves-
tigation earlier became aware
of Internet postings by a man
calling himself Nidal Hasan, a
law enforcement official said.
The postings discussed suicide
bombings favorably, but the in-
vestigators were not clear wheth-
er the writer was Major Hasan.


-PRew Foto/Black AIDS Insbtute
(L to R) Center for Disease Control Education Specialist Dr. Maestro Evans; Black AIDS
Institute Training and Capacity Manager Raniyah Abdus-Samad; Institute COO Aron Myers;
Institute Director of Programs Charlie Baran; and Institute CEO and Founder Phill Wilson.


Black AIDS Institute receives


long-term funding from CDC


A serviceman from the 1st Cavalry mourns'the toss of the 13 killed in the Fort Hood mas-
sacre at a prayer service on base Sunday. -Rchards/Getty


LOS ANGELES, PRNews-
wire-USNewswire/ Leaders
from the Black AIDS Institute
and the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC)
met recently to finalize the de-
tails of a four and one-half year
grant to fund the Institute's Af-
rican American HIV University
(AAHU) Community Mobiliza-
tion College.
The AAHU Community Mo-
bilization College is a compre-
hensive training and intern-
ship fellowship program aimed
at strengthening organiza-
tional and individual capacity
to address the HIV/AIDS epi-
demic in Black communities.
The program is designed to de-
crease stigma and mispercep-


tion and increase the engage-
ment of the Black community
in HIV prevention and treat-
ment services. This is achieved
through leadership. develop-
ment and information transfer
among key stakeholders.
Using the AAHU Community
Mobilization Model as a foun-
dation, the CMC curriculum
prepares community-based
and AIDS service organizations
to engage traditional Black in-
stitutions such as churches,
civil rights and social organi-
zations, Black political lead-
ers,; sororities/fraternities,
academia and the Black media
in local strategies to fight HIV.
The CMC uses a unique meth-
od for exploring the complex is-


sues and barriers that prevent
many in the Black community
from using HIV prevention ser-
vices.
Since 2000, the Black AIDS
Institute has graduated more
than 50 AAHU Fellows from
around the United States and
Africa. The next class is ex-
pected to be enrolling in early
2010.
For more information on the
AAHU program, or for an ap-
plication for CMC, please visit
www.BlackAIDS.org and select
Projects and Programs.
Founded in May of 1999, the
Black AIDS Institute is the only
national HI-'/AIDS thikd 'tank
focused exclusively on Black
people.


'For real?' He said, 'I'm ready.'
I figured, he's with God. He's
ready to go fight."
A few hours later, Mr. Hasan
was shot down by two civilian
police officers and taken into
custody by the police after a
shooting rampage at Fort Hood
that left 13 people dead and at
least 30 others were wounded.
Mr. Hasan remains the only
suspect in the case.
As investigators continue to
comb through the evidence of
the massacre at the military in-
stallation where Mr. Hasan was
a psychiatrist, those who knew
him are trying to understand
why he might have turned fire
on his fellow soldiers at Fort


so grateful to him."
"You think you know a per-
son by seeing them, by how
they act, but sometimes you're
wrong," Ms. Villa said.
Later, Mr. Hasan went to a
7-11 near Fort Hood, a place
where he had stopped often
for snacks before he went to
reported to the military instal-
lation.
CNN clips of surveillance vid-
eo they said showed Mr. Hasan
chatting with the store owner.
Producers from CNN who in-
terviewed the store owner said
Mr. Hasan would come in quite
frequently, sometimes in mili-
tary fatigues, with his name
on the front, and sometimes in


Writer disputes notion that Obama


leads by incremen
By Mimi Hall

WASHINGTON President
Obama's 2008 campaign man-
ager says the conventional wis-
dom on Obama that he's gov-
erning as an incrementalist
rather than a visionary leader is
"ridiculous" and won't hold up
if Congress passes health care
and energy-saving legislation.
"There's nothing incremental
about that," says David Plouffe,
one of the masterminds behind
Obama's improbable election.
"This story line will go away."
Plouffe's new book, The Au-
dacity to Win, was released
Tuesday, nearly a year after
Obama was elected on a prom-
ise to bring sweeping change to
government on issues from the
war in Iraq to the environment.
His efforts have met with
mixed results: Health care leg-
islation is slowly making its way
through Congress. Legislation
to address energy costs and cli-
mate change faces stiff opposi-
tion.
Playing off the name of
Obama's own book, The Audac-
ity of Hope, Plouffe's 387-page
tome chronicles a campaign
that began with no money and a
candidate with little national ex-
perience and blossomed into a


high-tech, grass-roots operation
that raised $750 million and re-
cruited millions of volunteers.
He recounts how the cam-
paign handled surprises from
the controversy over fiery ser-
mons by Obama's pastor, Jer-
emiah Wright, to Republican
John McCain's choice of then-
Alaska governor Sarah Palin as
his running mate. It details how
Obama chose Sen. Joe Biden of
Delaware as his vice president
instead of campaign rival Hil-
lary Rodham Clinton and how
Obama muscled his way back
into the race after a devastating
loss in the New Hampshire pri-
mary.
In an interview, Plouffe ex-
pounded on Tuesday's elections,
the 2012 presidential campaign
and the White House's faceoff
with Fox News. He said:
Republican victories Tues-
day won't reflect poorly on
Obama or cause him heartburn
down the road. "I doubt in three
days many people will be talking
about the New Jersey and Vir-
ginia governor's races."
It's impossible to know now
how the 2012 presidential cam-
paign will look for Obama or
for the Republican Party. "Three
years is an absolute lifetime" in
modern politics.


Everybody reads


jje 0iami Cimes


South Florida's oldest and most popular weekly




One family serving this community for 87 consecutive years










The Miami Times





Faith


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


MIAMI TIMES


How tough times yield model children


By Anjali Athavaley
Natacha Andrews recently signed
up her 4-year-old daughter, Anaya,
with a modeling agency. Anaya says
she wants to be "like Tyra"-that
is, model-turned-media-personality
Tyra Banks.
Her mother, a 36-year-old Phoenix
attorney, has another motivation. "I
know people who successfully saved
money this way," she says. In a weak
economy, with five kids' college tu-
itions to plan for, Ms. Andrews says,
"I want to make the most out of what-
ever resources we have."
More parents are signing their
children up with modeling agencies
and talent classes, in search of fame
and, even better, a little extra mon-
ey in a weak economy. Agencies like
Wilhelmina International Inc.'s Wil-
helmina Kids and Teens and Funny-
face Today Inc. in New York City and
Peak Models & Talent in Los Angeles
say they have seen the numbers of
child applicants grow in the past few
years. Charlie Winfield, head booker
at Funnyface, estimates the agency's
children's division has seen a 50% in-
crease in applicants in the past three
years. Modeling Camp in Tyson's Cor-
ner, Va., saw a 30% increase in atten-


Cynthia Serra styles the hair of her

nine-year-old daughter, Arianna, before

she and her sister practice modeling.


Child model Anaya Andrews, 4,
poses at her home in Gilbert, Ariz.
-Photo by Michael Schennum
dance at its workshops last summer
from the year earlier and plans to
expand to New York and Florida next
year.
The economy is driving the trend,
says Funnyface's Mr. Winfield. The
agency is getting more calls from par-
ents who are out of work and now
have the time to take their children to
Please turn to MODELS 14B


The *rport sugetd htvoln c s aant Uo e
andten. irs w sice sin a atsthtfa xce
th t o eretI nceae in vrl iolneta h
Stu y ou d xs ted onTV bet ee 2 04-00 .


Theyoug wme, wo wre elcte byth irp incpas
wlnobetaii onal. ntrn....t.ibI uoedb~hi

metosI n veytin fomcaees.ndfian.a.lteac


'A.
'4,
7"..









The Miami Times





Heath


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


Rally supports local activist

ANDREA IVORY'S EFFORTS TO FIGHT BREAST CANCER
HAVE MADE HER A CANDIDATE FOR CNN'S HERO OF THE YEAR


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.comn
Hundreds of revelers hosted
a celebratory rally for local resi-
dent Andrea Ivory at Jackson
Memorial Hospital's Ira C. Clark
Diagnostic Treatment Center
Atrium on Wednesday.
Ivory is already one CNN's
top ten heroes, which carried
a $25,000 reward. The rally,
which drew the likes of District 1
County Commissioner Barbara
Jordan, and County Mayor Car-
los Alvarez, was held to encour-
age attendees to vote for Ivory
to win CNN's Hero of the year.
The award carries a $100,000
award, to be bestowed at a gala
in Hollywood, Calif.
Ivory was recognized for found-
ing Florida Breast Health Initia-
tive. Each weekend, Ivory and
her volunteers go to low-income
communities in South Florida
to spread the word about breast


cancer. Already the organization
has been responsible for provid-
ing more than 500 free mam-
mograms to eligible women and
visiting nearly 18,000 homes.
Of the more than 200 attend-
ees; the largest contingent was a
group of students from Everest
Institute.
"We're here to support An-
drea" said Jennifer Lorfils, 20,
an Everest student who had
hand-lettered a poster saying as
much.
Shantika Thomas, 23, went
into further detail. "Women who
can't afford health care don't
stop deserving it. She's going
door to door helping women get
mammograms; because if you
catch it early, you stand a much
better chance of surviving."
This was precisely the lesson
the students were supposed to
take from the rally, according
to Jean Phillipe, a patient care
instructor with Everest who en-


Patient care students from
Everest Institute turn out in
support of Andrea Ivory's bid
for CNN's Hero of the Year.
As health care practitioners,
they will deal with breast
cancer patients firsthand.
Left to right; Shantika Thom-
as, 23, Hurdixie Roque, 25,
and Jennifer Lorfils, 20.
courage students to attend.
"It was imperative that they be
present," he said. "These are the
things students will be dealing
with as health care profession-
als."
Commissioner Barbara Jor-
dan has been involved in the ef-
fort since very near its inception.
"Willie Ivory [Andrea's Husband]
spoke with me and asked me for
my support," she said. "How can
you not say yes to a cause like
that?"
When asked whether she will
vote for Ivory, Jordan was en-
thusiastic. "Not only do I plan to
vote for her, but right now I'm
going to campaign for her. I'm
going to the commission meet-
ing and handing out the infor-
mation to the 13 commissioners
to give out to their contacts,"
she said.
Ivory seemed flattered,
and slightly awed by all the
Please turn to RALLY 14B


CNN.Co
g o s e V O


19 ,Nr-


CNN.C


HERI


-Miami Times photo/ Tariq Osborne
Commissioner Barbara Jordan and Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Alvarez award Andrea
Ivory with a plaque officially commemorating Nov. 4 as Andrea Ivory Day for her tireless ef-
forts to fight breast canter in low-income communities.


To support Ivory as a candidate for
CNNI Fro O/thj Yedr i4 t www.
-, .. I ".', -,i *
CN com//haroes lttye ow'iad


Study: A third of Americans die in hospitals


WASHINGTON (Reuters) Nearly a
third of Americans who die are in the
hospital at the time and their last treat-
ments cost the U.S. economy $20 bil-
lion, according to a report released on
Wednesday.
The single biggest cause of hospital
death was septicemia, an overwhelm-
ing infection of the blood, which killed
15 percent of patients, the team at the
U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and
Quality found.
Eight percent died of respiratory fail-
ure, six percent died of stroke and five
percent had fatal heart attacks in the
hospital, according to the report.
"In 2007, it is estimated by the Centers
for Disease Control that 2,423,995 peo-
ple died in the United States. Of these, we
estimate that 765,651 died in the hospi-
tal," the agency's Yafu Zhao and William
Encinosa wrote.
"That is, 32 percent of all deaths in the
U.S. in 2007 occurred in the hospital."
Their analysis, using federal survey
data, found that the average cost of a
hospital stay that ended with the pa-


tient's death was $26,035, compared to
$9,447 for patients discharged alive.
Patients covered by Medicare, the fed-
eral health insurance plan for the elderly
and disabled, accounted for 67 percent
of in-hospital deaths and $12 billion in
hospital costs.
Private insurance covered 20 percent
of patients who died at a cost of $4 bil-
lion. Medicaid patients made up 2 per-
cent and uninsured patients accounted
for 3 percent and $630 million in costs.
"Overall, the costs of hospitalizations
ending in death were $20 billion, which
accounted for 5.2 percent of total in-pa-
tient hospital costs in the U.S. in 2007,"
they wrote.
Zhao and Encinosa used their survey
data, which covered 90 percent of U.S.
hospitals, along with CDC data to calcu-
late that 74 percent of infants who die
are being treated in the hospital at the
time.
"Among the elderly, 31 percent of
deaths occurred in the hospital, while 34
percent of non-elderly deaths,took place
in the hospital," they said.


The single biggest

cause of hospital

death was

septicemia, an

overwhelming

infection of the blood,

which killed 15

percent of patients ...


11


Low cholesterol


may prevent


prostate cancer

MILWAUKEE (AP) Men may protect more than
their hearts if they keep cholesterol in line: Their
chances of getting aggressive prostate cancer may be
lower, new research suggests.
One study found that men whose cholesterol was
in a healthy range below 200 had less than half
the risk of developing high-grade prostate tumors
compared to men with high cholesterol.
A second study found that men with lots of HDL, or
"good cholesterol," were a little less likely to develop
any form of prostate cancer than men with very low
HDL.
Both studies were published Tuesday in Cancer Ep-
idemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the
American Association for Cancer Research.
The two studies are not definitive and have some
weaknesses. Yet they fit with plenty of other science
suggesting that limiting fats in the bloodstream can
lessen cancer risk.
'There might be this added benefit to keeping cho-
lesterol low," said Elizabeth Platz of John Hopkins
University.
She led the first study, which looked at 5,586 men
aged 55 and older who were in the placebo group
of a big federal cancer prevention study done in the
1990s.
Cholesterol levels made no difference in the odds
of getting prostate cancer except for the 60 men who
developed high-grade tumors, the type that grow and
spread fast. The chance of developing one of these
aggressive tumors was 59 percent lower among men
with cholesterol under 200.
That's "a striking reduction in risk," Eric Jacobs and
Susan Gapstur, epidemiologists with the American
Cancer Society, write in an accompanying editorial.
Now for the caveats: Researchers do not know how
many men in the study were taking station drugs such
as Lipitor, Zocor or Crestor. That means some of the
reduced cancer risk could have come from these cho-
lesterol-lowering medicines instead of from low cho-
lesterol by itself.
Previous reports also suggest that stations can lower
cancer risk, but it's premature to take them for this
reason until better studies are done, doctors advise.
Statins have long been known to prevent heart dis-
ease, and nothing about the new research changes
that.


lr,










11B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


17,000 child deaths linked to lack of insurance


By Karen Pallarito

(Healthil)ay News) An es-
timated 17,000 children in the
United States might have died
unnecessarily over nearly two
decades because they didn't
have health insurance, accord-
ing to a report from research-
ers at Jolns Hopkins Children's
Center in Baltimore.
They found that kids who
lacked health insurance were
60 percent more likely to die in
the hospital than were kids who
had insurance. After adjusting
for such differences as race and
gender, uninsured kids were still
37.8 percent more likely to die
than kids with insurance cover-
age.
David C. Chang, co-director of


the pediatric surgery outcomes
research group at Hopkins and
a study co-author, said he could
not think of a medical treatment
that has such a dramatic impact
on health outcomes as health in-
surance seemingly does.
"This is actually something
we as a society ... can choose to
do something about," he said.
"It's literally with the stroke of
somebody's pen, this could be
changed."
The article was published on-
line Oct. 30 in the Journal of
Public Health.
Bruce Lesley, president of First
Focus, a bipartisan child and
family advocacy group, noted
that data from the U.S. Institute
of Medicine have shown that
people ,who are uninsured have


a higher mortality rate.
"You knew that it existed, you
knew that there were cases (of
child deaths related to lack of in-
surance], but I think this data is
pretty shocking and really points
to the need for national health
reform," Lesley said.
In one of his first acts after
taking office in January, Presi-
dent Barack Obama signed leg-
islation reauthorizing the Chil-
dren's Health Insurance Program
(CHIP). The measure also provid-
ed funding for states to add sev-
eral million more children to the
rolls though 2013.
"CHIP has really worked and
been very important and insures
about 7 million kids in the coun-
try," Lesley said. Still, he said,
roughly 6.5 million children who


are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP
remain uninsured -- for what-
ever reason.
Enrollment barriers are part
of the problem, explained Les-
ley, whose organization endorses
legislative proposals to move to-
ward a "default enrollment" sys-
tem. "The presumption should
be the kid's enrolled, and let's
figure out what program they're
in," he said.
The Johns Hopkins team
looked at the relationship be-
tween insurance status and
kids' mortality to better inform
the CHIP debate.
Using records from two large
databases, lead author Dr. Fizan
Abdullah, Chang and colleagues
examined more than 23 million
hospitalizations of people young-


er than 18.
Over an 18-year period though
2005, 117 million children were
hospitalized. Nearly 6 million
kids were uninsured at the time
of admission. In all, 38,649 chil-
dren died while hospitalized.
Uninsured kids were 1.6 times
more likely to die than children
who had insurance.
Assuming that the insured
and uninsured populations are
identical, the difference in risk
of mortality was 60 percent. The
authors' actual predicted mor-
tality is lower, however, because
factors such as age, race and
gender are associated with risks
that affect outcomes, Chang ex-
plained.
"The 60 percent is the theoret-
ical difference, and the 37 per-


cent is the actual difference that
you see in real life," he said. "Our
extrapolation is based on that
more conservative number."
The study includes some data
from the period before CHIP was
enacted in 1997. Though fewer
kids are uninsured today than
two decades ago, Chang said,
that would not skew the risk of
death from lack of insurance.
And though the study does
not prove that being uninsured
boosts a child's mortality risk, it
does suggest a strong associa-
tion between insurance status
and odds of dying.
"I think the message is insur-
ance is a choice we can make as
a society, and this is something
that we should consider," Chang
said.


Mentoring is First Lady's passion


Beer with extra buzz


on tap up to 16%


More states drafting higher alcohol limits


By Jessica Leving

A growing number of states
are moving to allow higher al-
cohol content in beer, despite
concerns from some substance-
abuse experts.
Alabama and West Virginia
have passed laws increasing
the legal alcohol-by-volume cap
for beer from 6'o to as high as
13.90 this year. Similar efforts
are underway in Iowa and Mis-
sissippi, two states with very
restrictive limits on the sale of
high-alcohol beer, said Sean
Wilson. former president of Pop
the Cap. North Carolina's suc-
cessful grass-roots effort that
raised the state's limit in 2005.
The average alcohol content
in beer is 4.65"o, and in wine
11.45%, according to a 2002
study by the Alcohol Research
Group in Emeryville, Calif.


alcohol in beer, Wilson said.
Paul Gatza. director of the
national Brewers Association
based in Boulder, Colo., said
limiting alcohol content restricts
flavors and styles because "you
can't put as much malt or other
sugars in your beer as you may
want to."
Some efforts to change beer
laws are led by consumers,
Gatza said. In Iowa, for exam-
ple, the Iowa Brewers Guild
and a consumer group called
Lift the Limit are working to
change the state's law on al-
cohol content in beer, Guild
President David Coy said.
David Rosenbloom, presi-
dent of the National Center
on Addiction and Substance
Abuse at Columbia University
in N.Y., said the more alcohol,
"the faster you get drunk and
the. longer you stay drunk. ...


Twenty statap.still place some ,There's no evidence that peo-
kind of limit on the amount of ple will drink less, or fewer


Beer is served at Sprecher Brew
beers."
Chuck Hurley, CEO of Moth-
ers Against Drunk Driving,
said, "Our chief concern is
that (higher-alcohol brews) be
properly labeled so people un-
derstand it takes fewer beers
to become intoxicated."
Gatza said consumers of spe-
cialty or microbrewed beers,
also known as craft beers,
"don't drink to get drunk.
They drink to appreciate the
flavors." Ohio was among the
first to raise beer alcohol-con-
tent rules when it pushed the
allowable alcohol-by-volume
to 12% in 2002, Gatza said.
Georgia followed in 2004, then
North Carolina in 2005 and
South Carolina in 2007.


Obesity linked to specific cancers


33% of Americans have
By Nanci Hellmich

About 100,500 new cases of
cancer are caused by obesity ev-
ery year, according to the most
comprehensive attempt ever to
estimate the cancers attributed
to extra weight.
The analysis, released today
by the American Institute for
Cancer Research, is based on
updated cancer data and a re-
port released earlier this year by
a panel of experts. Among the
types of cancer most strongly
linked to excess body fat:
Breast, 33,000 cases a year
caused by obesity.
Endometrial, 20,700 cases
a year..
Kidney, 13,900 cases.
Colorectal, 13,200 cases.
Pancreas, 11,900.
Esophagus, 5,800.
Gallbladder, 2,000.
"The list of cancers affected
by obesity will almost certainly
increase as more research is
completed," says Michael Thun,
emeritus vice president of epi-
demiological research at the


increased risk


American Cancer Society. "Sev-
eral other types of cancer liver,
multiple myeloma and certain
leukemias have been linked
to obesity in some studies, but
this needs confirmation."
Overall, about one-third of
U.S. adults are obese, rough-
ly 30 or more pounds over a
healthy weight. Obesity also
increases a person's risk of dia-
betes, heart disease and other
diseases.


Excess weight raises cancer
risk in different ways, says Tim
Byers, director of the Univer-
sity of Colorado Cancer Center
in Denver. For breast and en-
dometrial cancer, it seems to be
an estrogen problem, he says.
Women who are overweight
after menopause have more
estrogen circulating in their
blood, which increases cancer
risk. For esophageal cancer,
obesity leads to acid reflux,
which damages the lower part
of the esophagus.
Donna Ryan, an oncologist
and president of the Obesity
Society, says several hormones
and factors involved in obesity
may lead to cancer. "Insulin is a
prime suspect," she says. "Insu-
lin resistance and elevated in-
sulin levels frequently occur in
obese people. Insulin is a very
powerful cellular growth factor,
and it affects cancer cells."
To lower your risk for cancer:
Lose weight, increase physical
activity and eat healthier, says
Anne McTiernan, director of
the Prevention Center at Fred
Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center in Seattle.


People adjusting to higher stress levels


STRESS
continued from 9B

increased in the past year, vs.
47 percent in last year's sur-
vey. This year, 44 percent said
their stress remained about
the same as in 2008; 14 per-
cent said it decreased.
But 36 percent of kids sur-
veyed said they worried more
this summer than last; 30 per-
cent said they worried about
family financial difficulties. .
People are "probably adjust-
ing" to the higher stress they
have faced since the recession,
so fewer arc reporting increas-
ing stress, says psychologist
Katherine Nordal of lihe psy-
chological association. "I don't
think people liaive thl ineri rl
ible anxiety aiboult tIhe ('cono


my the same way they did last
year."
Still, 24 percent of adults
in the 2009 survey said they
had high levels of stress, and
51 percent reported moderate
stress.
Rosemarie Giovinazzo-Bar-
nickel, a CPA from Staten Is-
land, N.Y., who was among the
respondents, was one of those
who said her stress was high-
er this year. "I've got a lot of
things on my plate. I work for a
couple of accounting firms. I'm
involved in PTA and the state
society of CPAs. My general
day-lo-day life stress definitely
has increased."
In addition to feeling their
parents' stress, children have
their own worries, including
doing well in school (44 per-


cent). But just 34 percent of
parents thought their kids wor-
ried about school.
"Parents do want to perceive
things as being OK with kids,"
says Alan Hilfer, director of
psychology at New York's Mai-
monides Medical Center. "Par-
ents are feeling they're shield-
ing them from this stress, but
kids are struggling more than
parents are willing to acknowl-
edge."
The 1,568 adult respondents
include 235 who have children
8 to 17, but they are not the
parents of the young respon-
dents.
Giovinazzo-Barnickel says
stress today is "almost like a
fact of life. People are just jug-
gling more things than they
were 10, 15 or 20 years ago."


-AP photo/Morry Gash
very in Glendale, Wis.
Alabama passed the Gour-
met Beer Bill in May, state
Rep. Thomas Jackson said.
The bill increased the cap from
6% to 13.9%.
West Virginia upped its max-
imum legal alcohol content for
beer in April from 6% to 12%.
Vermont raised the cap to
16% and Montana to 14% last
year.
Craft beers, typically stron-
ger, tend to be more expensive.
An average case of Budweiser
costs $17.76, according to In-
formation Resources, a mar-
ket research group. Midrange
higher-alcohol beers cost $24-
$40 per case, Gatza said.


PROGRAM
continued from 9B

The germ of the idea was
planted in March when Obama
invited a star-studded array of
women, ranging from entertain-
ers to math geniuses, to fan
out across the area and share
their stories with students. At
the end of the day, the women
and a group of girls gathered at
the White House for dinner. The
first lady, in today's remarks,
recalled that evening saying
that "that was the best thing
we've done so far." She wanted
to replicate that experience on a
larger scale.
The young women, who were
selected by their principals, will
not be traditional interns but
will be tutored by their mentors
on everything from careers and
financial literacy to how to write


a college essay and health and
fitness.
Obama said she became inter-
ested in the power of mentoring
as a corporate lawyer in Chi-
cago. Her office, she said, was
on the 47th floor of a downtown
building and her windows faced
south towards her old neigh-
borhood. Kids who were just as
smart and capable as she was
missed out on opportunities and
successes "by a hair," she said.
And then she got a bit verk-
lempt. "We've got the most pow-
erful seat in the land to be a
bridge-builder," she told the
girls, her eyes tearing and voice
cracking. "And I'm so excited
and touched and moved to have
you all here.... I can get emo-
tional."
A young men's program, root-
-ed in the West Wing, will launch
soon.


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I .A K M SI ('ON (I.'IIII.I oWN l)I.SIINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


The American Legion Miami
Beach Post 85 & the Veterans
of Foreign Wars Post 3559 will
host a Miami Beach Veterans
Day Parade and Wreath Laying
Ceremony on Washington Ave.
& 17h" to 1I"' Street & west into
Flamingo Park at Jefferson Ave.,
starting at 9:30 a.m., Wednes-
day, Nov. 11. Christine Battles
at 305-865-5733/305-588-
1741 or Christine@m3events.
net


The City of North Miami An-
nual Veterans Day Ceremony
will take place at the North Mi-
ami Veterans Memorial at 10
a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 11. 305-
895- 9840 or visit: www.north-
miamifl.gov/parks.


The Miami-Dade County
Health Department will be
opening two vaccination sites:
Downtown Clinic and Fuchs Pa-
vilion in Coral Way, to offer free
H1N1 vaccine from 10 a.m. 6
p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 11. Call
305-324-2400 or visit: www.da-
dehealth.org


Gold Coast Jazz Society
presents South Florida Jazz Or-
chestra at the Broward Center
of the Performing Arts, Amaturo
Theater, at 7:45 p.m., Nov. 11.
www.browardcenter. org


Miami-Dade Schools will
hold an Attendance Boundary
Committee Meeting at Holmes
Elementary School, Media Cen-
ter at 6:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov.
12. John Schuster, 305-995-
1126.


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation invites the public to
the Soul Bowl Alumni Pep Rally
at Jackson High's Gymnasium.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. but
showtime begins at 7 p.m.,
Thursday, Nov. 12. 305-804-
5371 or 786-256-2609.


YoungArts, the core program
of the National Foundation for
Advancement in the Arts, will
start its annual adjudication
process which will run from
Nov. 12 21, selecting up to
150 of the most talented 17-
18 year old artists out of thou-
sands of applicants from across


the country, to participate in
YoungArts Week. The process
will take place in-house for the
first time this year, in Youn-
gArts' new office space at the
SunTrust building in downtown
Miami. Nicolle Ugarriza, nugar-
riza@youngarts.org 305-377-
1140 ext.1201, or Kate McPher-
son kmcpherson@youngarts.
org 305-377-1140 ext. 1203.


Miami-Dade County Health
Department cordially invites
you to Refugee Health Assess-
ment Program's ribbon cutting
ceremony to be held at 10 a.m.,
Nov. 13. RSVP, 786-336-1276.


Solymar Miamil will sponsor
a movie screening, If I Were Dic-
tator, at the Ten Museum, at 6
p.m., Friday, Nov. 13. RSVP by
Nov. 9: bcfssignup@gmail.com


ICABA's will host a Premier
Recognition and Networking
Event "South Florida's 100
Most Accomplished Blacks in
Healthcare and Law" at the
Nova Southeastern University
(Davie Campus), from 6-9 p.m.,
on Nov. 13.


"Alice in Wonderland" Chil-
dren Stage Play will debut at
the Actors' Playhouse, Miracle
Theatre in Coral Gables, now
through November 13, call.
305-444-9293 or visit: www.ac-
torsplayhouse.org


Heineken Red Star Soul
brings an all-star line-up to Mi-
ami Beach for the concert series
finale featuring performances
by N.E.R.D. and DJ Irie. The
two will perform live at the Fon-
tainebleau Miami Beach start-
ing at 11:45 p.m. on Nov. 13.
Kourtney Marquis, 212-468-
3677 or 215-630-4217.


Miami-Dade Arthritis
Walk will place in the Amuse-
ment Area at Crandon Park
in Key Biscayne, starting at
8 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 14.
www.2009awmiamiwnalk.kin-
tera.org


The brothers of Beta Beta
Lambda Chapter of the Alpha
Phi Alpha Fraternity will meet


Ic-h.. u.r- h -Note.s


The Universal Truth Cen-
ter invites you to join us for
a thought-provoking dialogue
about the spiritual heal-
ing practices of New Thought
Christianity. The 2009 Heal-
ing Symposium will take place
at, the Center from 7 10 p.m.,
Friday, November 13 and from
10 a.m. 3 p.m., Saturday, No-
vember 14. 305-624-4991.


New Fellowship Praise and
Worship Center family cor-
dially invite the community to
their "Youth Emphasis Day" on
Sunday, Nov. 8 and a Ministry
of Arts featuring music, dance
and drama at 7:30 p.m., Fri-
day, Nov. 13. 305-625-7246 or
Leola Adams, 305-624-6795.


House of Bethlehem A Place
of Bread Ministries is inviting
everyone to participate in their


tour bus trip to Holyland, from
Tues.- Thurs. Deacon Arthur
Robinson, 786-624-7979.


"I'll Fly Away: American
Gospel and Folk Music" will
debut at the St. Christopher's
by-the-Sea in Key Biscayne, at
7:30 p.m., Nov. 5; First Unit-
ed Methodist Church in Coral
Gables, 7:30 p.m., Nov. 6; Mi-
ami Beach Community Church
in Miami Beach, 7 p.m., Nov.
7 and All Saints Episcopal
Church in Fort Lauderdale, 4
p.m., Nov. 8.



New Life International
Church invites you to the
Women of Distinction's annual
Women's Conference from Nov.
12-14. 305-310-8891 or 305-
622-3123.


^^^^^^C^^^Qate


Older patients most likely to die from HIN1 influenza


By Rita Rubin

An analysis of more than
1,000 California patients hos-
pitalized with H1N 1 flu during
the first four months of the pan-
demic found that infants were
most likely to be admitted, and
patients 50 and older were most
likely to die once admitted.
In the first four months of the
pandemic, H1N1, like the sea-
sonal flu, was especially severe
.in older people, who are more
likely to have underlying health
conditions, says lead author
Janice Louie, a public-health


medical officer at the California
Department of Public Health.
However, Louie says, unlike
seasonal flu, older people are
far less likely than children and
young adults to contract the
H1N1 flu in the first place. For
that reason, the study won't
lead the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention to add
healthy older people to the list
of priority groups for HIN1 vac-
cine, director Thomas Frieden
told reporters Tuesday.
Of 1,088 patients hospitalized
with HIN1 flu in California,
11%, or 118 patients, died, and


30%, or 340 patients, were ad-
mitted to intensive-care units,
Louie and her co-authors report
in today's Journal of the Ameri-
can Medical Association. In pa-
tients.50 and older, the death
rate was up to 20%, compared
with about 2% in hospitalized
patients under age 18.
The study focuses on patients
who were hospitalized between
April 23 and Aug. 11. Whether
H1N1, or swine flu, will even-
tually mutate and cause more
severe illness is not yet known,
Louie says: "Influenza.is pretty
unpredictable."


at the North Miami Beach Police
Department at 9:06 a.m., Sat-
urday, Nov. 14. 305-372-3877.


Lamplighters Aglow, North
Dade Chapter, will host a
brunch in honor of Rev. Mar-
velle Cheever at Florida Memo-
rial University, 10 a.m., Nov. 14.
Velma Arnold, 305-625-4291
or Penny Emmanuel, 305-816-
6307/ 786-718-7076.



Kozyak Tropin & Throck-
morton, P.A. will host their
sixth annual ,Minority Mentor-
ing Picnic at the Amelia Earhart
Park in Hialeah at 12 p.m., Nov.
14. RSVP: http://www.kttlaw.
com/picnic/


The Sigma Alpha Chapter, a
local chapter of the Omega Psi
Phi Fraternity, Inc., will have
their annual Achievement Week
will be held at the Florida Me-
morial University Banquet Hall
on Nov. 15. Timothy Belcher,
Sr,, 786-255-5998 or email:
timbelcher@aol.com


Habitat for Humanity of
Greater Miami is holding its
annual Synagogue Sunday, a
build day set aside for Jewish
volunteers who are unable to
work on Saturdays. The event
will be held at 2341 Northwest
50th Street at 7:30 a.m., Nov.
15. Lilly Izaguirre, 305-323-
5325.


Miami-Dade County Agri-
cultural will host a Farmers
Market to celebrate Farm City
Week at the Stephen P. Clark
Center Lobby, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., Thursday, Nov. 19. 305-
971-5091 or visit: www.miami-
dade.gov/agriculture


Miami-Dade delegation, Mi-
ami-Dade County Council of
PTAs/PTSAs representing over
370 local units in Miami-Dade
County will host a community
discussion about Florida's fund-
ing for public education with
parents, students and leaders.
The meeting will be held at the
Miami-Dade County School
Board Administration Building
at 6 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 19.
Mindy Gould, President, Miami-
Dade County Council of PTAs/
PTSAs, 305-995-1102 or e-mail
MindyGouldPTA@aol.com


You are invited to Rick Del-
laRatta and Jazz For Peace on

Revelation Christian Acad-
emy will sponsor a Harvest
Baazar, from 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Nov 14. The Rev-
elation Christian Academy is
open for registration. After-care
is from 3-6 p.m. Call 305-758-
5656, 786-281-8098, 305-758-
5656 or 305-691-4572.


A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to come fellowship
at 11:15 a.m., on Sundays and
Bible class weekly at 7 p.m.,
Thursday.


Redemption M.B. Church
is sponsoring a fundraising
breakfast and yard sale on Fri-
day and Saturday. Redemp-
tion will also host a ministers
and deacons Union of the New
Life M.B. Association on Nov.
18-21. Rev. Silas Pinkney,
305-696-9964. Pastor Willie
McCrae, 305-793-7388 or 305-
836-1990.


Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before 3:30
p.m. on Monday.


Friday, Nov. 20. Maria War-
rington, 786-223-2554 or
email: marlaw(a}EventRhythm.
corn


The Greater Hollywood
YMCA Family Center is
pleased to announce their third
annual Turkey Trot at 7:30
a.m., Saturday, Nov. 21. www.
YMCABroward.org.


Iota Phi Lambda Sorority
Inc., Gamma Alpha Chapter
cordially invites the communi-
ty to their 23rd "Apple for the
Teacher" Luncheon honoring
outstanding school teachers at
the Rusty Pelican at 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Nov. 21. 786-356-
0992.


Miami-Dade Public Library
System is seeking budding
young artists for its annual
Make-a- Bookmark Contest.
Children, ages 6-12, are invited
to submit a drawing, of a fa-
vorite character or scene from
a book, to reflect the theme
"Readiscover Your Neighbor-
hood@ the Library." Contest
entry must be original work,
and will be judged on creativ-
ity and neatness. Entries must
be submitted by Nov. 21. Visit:
www.mdpls.org.


Miami Dade College Kendall
Campus present the Fall Fest
2009, from 10 a.m. 4:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Nov. 21. Call 305-
237-2321 or visit www.mdc.
edu/Kendall/


The founders of Vankara
School in Opa-locka will cel-
ebrate 30 years of Educational
Services at a Street Naming
Ceremony at 10 a.m., Satur-
day, Nov. 21. 305-681-6121.


Tairchild Tropical Botanic
Garden will host the Ramble-
A Garden Festival, from 9:30
a.m.- 4:30 p.m., Nov. 20-22.
Visit www.fairchildgarden.org
""" *


EPIC hotel is celebrating the
25"' anniversary of White Par-
ty Week in Miami, the world's
oldest and largest HIV/AIDS
fundraiser, and offering spe-
cial rates for those visiting Mi-
ami to enjoy White Party Week
events and festivities from Nov.
25-30. 305-424-5226 or visit
www.epichotel.com.


The Big Blue any You Foun-
dation presents Kids Ocean
Adventure Series at the New-
port Beachside Hotel and Re-
sort Sunny Isles Beach from 11
a.m. 4 p.m., Saturday, Nov.'
28. 954-558-9664.


University of Miami's Mau-
rice Gusman Concert Hall will
present Festival Miami now
through November 30. 305-
284-4940 or visit: www.festi-
valmiami.com


The community is invited
to get on the bus to the Florida
Classic on Saturday, Nov. 21.
For more information. Also,
come take a ride to the Holy
Land in Orlando, Fla. On Dec.
12. Call Phillip, 786-873-9498.


South Florida Super Bowl
Host Committee will host their
kickoff luncheon at the Land
Shark Stadium, from 11:30
a.m. 1:30 p.m., Monday, Dec.
7. 305-614-7555.


The Florida Alliance for
Arts Education (FAAE) is host-
ing a Florida symposia at the
Adrienne Arsht Center for the
Performing Arts, starting at 9
a.m., on Dec. 10. Email: info@
faae.org or visit www.faae.org


The fourth annual World
Salsa Championships will take
place at Hard Rock Live at the
Seminole Hard Rock Hotel &
Casino on Dec. 17-19 .


Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010


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Reunion. Classmates are urged
to reconnect through the con-
tact information listed below,
providing your address, phone,
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion6t5@cfl.
rr.com


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is calling all former
cheerleaders, majorettes, drill
team, dance line, flagettes and
band members for their up-
coming Alumni Pep Rally. 305-
804-5371 or 786-256-2609.


National Investment Devel-
opment (NID) Housing Coun-
seling Agency, a HUD approved
organization, is offering free
Housing and Legal Counseling
for Homeowners at the Experts
Resource Community Center,
9 a.m. 5 p.m., M-F. Call 305-
652-7616 or 786-512-7400 or
email: lgreen@expertsresourc-
es.com or lougreen2@yahoo.
com for appointments.


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is seeking Reunion
Organizing Committee Repre-
sentatives from the Classes of
1981 -2008 to call 305-904-
5371 or 786-256-2609.


The Florida Film Institute
presents Cinerama Saturdays
at the Little Haiti Cultural Cen-
ter, from 10:30 a.m. 12:30
p.m., until April 10, 2010. 305-
891-3456 or register at www.fl-
filminstitute.org


A&A Associates is currently
hiring approximately 1000 peo-
ple for the 2010 Super Bowl and
Pro Bowl football games which
will be held at Land Shark Sta-
dium in Miami Gardens. 561-
533-5303 or email Annette@
associatestaffing.com


Rendo -Goju-Ryu Karate
Academy will be offering free
Karate lessons at the Liberty
Square Community Center
from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesdays and
Thursday. 305-694-2757.









Il.\ K ,S MUn St l 'O NIRO I 1 1111I1 1 \\'N |l|:.S I .' l



The Embrace Girls Foundation hosts


tea party for international educators


Sprcialt to tif Miami i imess

The Miami Council for Inter-
national Visitors (MCIV) and
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion, Inc. hosted its "Interna-
tional Royal Princess Tea Par-
ty" at the Mahogany Grille
Restaurant in Miami Gar-
dens, on Thursday, Nov. 5 in
which Delegates were recog-
nized from 17 countries. The
visiting was part of the U.S.
Department of State's Inter-
national Visitor Leadership
Program (IVLP), the State De-
partments number one Public
Diplomacy tool. The Delegates
represented the countries of
Bahran, Bangladesh, Bulgaria,
India, Iraq, Jordan, Malaysia,
Nigeria, Panama, Peru, Philip-
pines, Russia, Serbia, Slovak
Republic, Suriname and Swa-
ziland were elected by the U.S.
Embassies in their countries
based on their recognition as
emerging leaders in their field
and work with young girls in
each of their respective com-
munities.
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion was selected by the Coun-
cil as a result of their work
with elementary and middle
school age girls throughout
South Florida.
"We've been monitoring
this organization and its activ-
ities and events for some time
now and their work empower-
ing young girls is simply out-
standing it was a unanimous
decision by all countries to
tour their program and learn
more about developing an In-
ternational model that per-


haps other countries can fol-
low," said Ayesha Quirke, Pro-
gram Director for the Miami
Council for International Visi-
tors Program the agency host-
ing the group of educators.
Organizers say their Miami
visit and the International
Royal Tea Party and Dinner far
exceeded all previous stops.
"I truly cannot put into
words the extraordinary detail
that went into to this event
by this organization, from the
patriotic decor to the prepara-
tion of the girls questions ev-
erything was absolutely Five
Star," said Tonija Hope Navas,
Senior Program Officer, Inter-
national Exchange Programs.
A sentiment echoed through-
out the night as the group of
girls all dressed in Princess
attire introduced themselves
in each Country's language
and followed in English, prior
seeking answers to questions
they'd personally researched
and prepared.
"It brought me to tears of
joy to see how well these very
little girls are being prepared
for the future, I am filled with
pride to be a part of such a
beautiful event said "Magajiya
Usman, Coordinator of Girl
Child Education, represent-
ing Kano State, Nigeria "we
will definitely be working in
the near future with this orga-
nization to model their work"
she added.
For more information about
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion, Inc., call 305-270-4099
or visit them on line at www.
embracegirlpower. org.


~I \,,.
I
) /


-Photo/ James Fortes
Back, Dominique Gutierrez, 12, and Nigeria Delegate, Maga-
jiya Usman along with Front, Myla Smith, 7,and Jeanette Daw-
son, 7, attend the International Royal Princess Tea Party at
the Mahogany Grille Restaurant on Thursday.


13B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009



North Miami Mayor


predicts bright future


The Miami Times Special Report

In North Miami Mayor An-
dre Pierre's State of the City
address, he highlighted his
city's accomplishments over
the last year; chief among
them being the balancing of
the budget without the fir-
ing of employees or cutting of
programs.
Pierre's speech was given
at the annual North Miami
Chamber of Commerce lun-
cheon.
He also said that the city's
Neighborhood Stabilization
Program expects to purchase
and rehabilitate foreclosed
homes and place families back
into them. He called the cur-
rent situation between resi-
dents and banks "no-win."
Pierre also touted a 12 per-
cent reduction in crime, a sta-
tistic he credits to the city's
policed department's efforts.
Pierre expects that Biscayne


ANDRE PIERRE
North Miami Mayor
Landing, a $2.5 billion resi-
dential project that was sup-
posed to bring millions in tax
revenue but was scuttled by
the collapse of the real estate
market, will move forward de-
spite foreclosure proceedings.
Some of the developers will
stand in as lenders, accord-
ing to Pierre.


More charges against former

Broward commissioner
The Miami Times Special Report pany's business came before
the Broward County Commis-
Former Broward County sion.
Commissioner Josephus Eg- On Thursday, Eggelletion
gelletion, who is already sus- surrendered to authorities;
pended, faces yet another quickly posting bond.
criminal charge--for receiving Eggelletion was not sur-
unlawful compensation. The prised by these charges, and
charge, leveled last Thursday thus turned himself in rather
by state prosecutors, is a sec- than having police disrupt his
ond degree felony, family, according to his attor-
Eggelletion allegedly ac- ney Johnny McCray Jr.
cepted a $3,200 golf member- Eggelletion, 60, faces ad-
ship at the Parkland Golf and ditional charges of involve-
Country Club that was paid ment in a $900,000 money-
for by Shawn Chait. Chait laundering scheme. The State
works for Prestige Homes of Attorney's office alleges that
South Florida. In exchange, he and three co-conspirators
Eggelletion is alleged to have laundered funds through the
granted three years of prefer- Bahamas and St Croix. The
ential treatment for Prestige charges carry a maximum
Homes wherever the cornm- sentence of 20 years.


Come learn about the Florida Department of Transportation District Six Annual Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan


MONROE COUNTY
Wednesday, December 2, 2009, 6-8 p.m.
Marathon Government Center
2798 Overseas Highway (Mile Marker 50)
Marathon


SOUTH MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 8-10 a.m.
University of Miami Bank United Center
Hurricane 100 Room, 1245 Dauer Drive
Coral Gables


NORTHEAST MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
Wednesday, December 9, 2008, 8-10 a.m.
Miami Shores Country Club
Village Room, 10000 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami Shores


Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MDX) project information will also be available.


These public hearings are being held in accordance with Section 339.135, Florida Statutes and to offer the public an oppor-
tunity to comment on all projects for the highway systems and public transportation within Florida Department of Trans-
portation District Six's Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan. District Six comprises Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties.
These hearings will also include consideration of proposed projects for Florida's Turnpike Enterprise corridors and
information on several projects in the District. The Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan covers the period from July 1,
2010 to June 30, 2015.
Send written comments (by mail or e-mail) to Maribel Lena, District Public Information Office, 1000 NW 111 Avenue, Room
6134, Miami, Florida 33172, telephone 305-470-5349 or email (Maribcl.Lena@dot.state.us) by December 18, 2009. The
comments will also be incorporated into the public document.
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. The proposed improvements have been developed in accordance with


the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Under Title VI and Title VIII of the United States Civil Rights Acts
any person or beneficiary who believes he or she has been subjected to discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, age,
national origin, disability, or familial status may file a written complaint with the Florida Department of Transportation's Equal
Opportunity Office in Tallahassee, 605 Suwannee Street, M.S. 65, Tallahassee, Florida 32399 0450, 866-374-FDOT or
contact Elizabeth Perez, District Six's Title VI and Title VIII Coordinator. 1000 N.W. 111 Avenue, Room 6111-A, Miami, Florida
33172, 305 470 5219.
Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation
services (free of charge) should contact the Public Information Office at 305-470-5277 at least seven days prior to the meeting,
The Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan can be viewed after November 27, 2009 at:
http://www.dot.state.fl.us/programdevelopmentoffice/


I For more i nformaBl t iise Pljomi o LM l[ S ky at 305-573-445i5olr ko] iom ovskyL conimui ka11


SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

END THE INCONVENIENCE OF EMPTY NEWSPAPER BOXES, FIGHTING THE WEATHER AND HUNTING DOWN BACK COPIES.
CALL 305-694-6214










14B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


I B.ACKS MUS'I, ('ON'I. TlillJK (OWN !)I,..S'i'INY


Be quiet: God will fight


your battles

I am sure that like me, you
have come into contact with
argumentative people. I know
people who treat arguing as if
it is a career choice. They will
argue about anything just for
the sake of arguing. If you are
for something, they are against
it, and if you are against some-
thing, they think that it's a
good idea. These people are
just contrary people, and they
can drive you crazy if you al-


low them to do
sol Take my
advice, and
let them take
that trip all by
themselves!
This isn't just my advice, but
the Bible contains quite a bit
of advice about arguing with
people.
In Proverbs 9, especially
verses 7-10, we are cautioned
not to even bother to contradict


or correct mockers. They will
not receive what you say, and
they will just insult and hurt
you. The bible says that this is
just a waste of time. However,
when you correct the wise, they
will love you. People who are
wise want to know the truth.
If they are in error, or misun-
derstand a situation, they want
to be corrected. The wise will
only become wiser when you
instruct them. A wise person
does not want'to go on a path
that is destructive, or not the
way of the Lord. When you give
counsel or a warning to a wise
person, they are appreciative.
An unwise or wicked person
will either scoff at the advice,
make fun of you because you
do not indulge in frivolous' or
foolish behavior, ignore you, or
as verse 7 reminds us mock
and insult you. Those who love
the Lord love righteousness and


truth, and desire to do what is
right.
Verse 10 is one that is well
known. Fearing the Lord (a r;v-
erent and respectful worship) is
the beginning of wisdom and the
knowledge of the Lord results
in good judgment. For many
years, I have seen people follow
the advice and counsel of those.
wvho led them straight to jail,,
Many people make very bad 4.-
cisions because they feat man
more than they fear God. They
believe in man who tells them
that they can get away with all
kinds of ungodly and unlaw-
ful behavior, and do not believe
what the Word of God says. In
Galatians 5: 19 -22, Paul is very
clear about the type of behav-
ior that if practiced, will pre-
vent you from entering Heaven,
Foolish people listen to those
who say that this behavior is
fine, and even if it's not, noth-


ing will happen to you. 1 have
even heard some say mockingly
that "if I'm going to go to hell,
then I'm going to have a good
time doing iti I would rather
party in hell than be bored in
Heavenly" Now, this type of talk
is enough to convince me that
they are fools, since there is no
instance in the Bible that there
will be a party in hell, or bore-
dom in Heaven.
The final verses in this prov-
erb contrasts Wisdom with folly.
Folly is not only ignorant, but
doesn't even realize that she is
ignorant. She spends her time
trying to entice those who are
minding their own business
to spend time with her. She
encourages them to partici-
pate in lustful behavior and to
steal. I especially like verse 16
because it says that she calls
out to those who are simple -
easily led astray. She calls out


to those who lack understand-
ing. I have seen time and time
again those who do not think
for themselves or stop to pray
or seek wise counsel get caught
in the snare of 'folly'. This is
why verse 10 is so important -
"knowledge of the Lord results
in good judgment." When we
do not take the time to study,
pray and meditate on the Word
of God, we easily succumb to
what others tell us, because we
have not filled our hearts and
spirit with instructions to the
contrary.
We are admonished to be
peaceful as doves do no harm
to people,-but we are also told
to be wise as serpents. Watch
and pray. If you aren't sure or
feel uncomfortable about some-
thing, stop and pray seek
Godly counsel, and of course,
ask the One who knows every-
thing.


Many children take up modeling as a way of saving for college


MODELS
continued from 9B

auditions. With kids' model-
ing wages typically about $100
to $125 an hour, he says, "it's
another way to subsidize their
income."
Also contributing to the grow-
ing number of mini-models are
reality-TV shows featuring chil-
dren, agencies say. Such shows
have transmitted the culture
of fame-seeking; some shows-
"Toddlers and Tiaras" and "Little
Miss Perfect"-even follow the
lives of child pageant contes-
tants. Page Parkes Corp., a tal-
ent agency in Houston, Texas,
is just one of the agencies see-
ing more interest from parents
who want their children to be on
television. Separately, modeling
and acting jobs have become
increasingly open to many eth-
nicities, encouraging a broader
swath of families, such as Lati-
nos and Asians, to pursue ca-
reers in entertainment.
There's just one problem: As
advertisers cut their budgets,
there are fewer modeling jobs
available. "The quality of jobs
and how many options are out
there is definitely lower this
year," says Jason Jeffords, own-
er of Puddletown Talent, a Port-
land, Ore., agency representing
300 kids ages 15 and under.
That means more competi-
tion-and, for the kids, more
rejection. Carol Stevenson, a
public-relations consultant,
signed her three kids up with
Peak Models & Talent because,
she wanted them to start saving
for college. But she has felt the
effects of the job market at au-


editions. Since June, they have
gone to about 12-fewer than
she expected. "It's been pain-
fully slow," says the 39-year-old
from Stevenson Ranch, Calif.
While Jacob, 9, and Annika, 8,
have landed a photo shoot for a
catalog, her 6-year-old daugh-
ter, Sabrina, has yet to get a
job.
Breaking the news to chil-
dren when they don't make the
cut can be tough. Sabrina is "a
little sad," Ms. Stevenson says.
"We've explained to her the best
way that we can that for differ-
ent reasons they are looking for
different looks."
Still, parents are flocking to
the business. TheCuteKid.com,
a site that lets parents submit
photos that are judged by cast-
ing agents, saw its membership
double to two million in the past
year. The site was launched by
Internet marketing company
Parent Media Group Inc. in
2006.

THE COST OF BREAKING IN
In the best of times, modeling
is a challenging business. Many
parents don't anticiate .~9 ini-
tial costs. Funnyface and'Peak
say parents spend between
$200 to $400 for a photo ses-
sion plus about $100 for com-
posite cards-resumes of sorts
that display models' height,
weight and photos. (Only some
parents of babies-who change
so quickly that photos are soon
out of date-can get away with
using their own snapshots.) But
photographers' charges vary
wildly, so some families pay far
more.
Ms. Stevenson paid about


$1,000 per kid for the photo
sessions, composite cards and
separate photo prints. What's
more, parents generally have to
spring for new photos as chil-
dren's looks change. "Getting
into this industry is so much
more expensive than I expect-
ed," says Ms. Stevenson. So far,
she's spent more than her kids
have earned.
Families also face costs for
things like travel and groom-
ing. Cynthia Serra, 42, of Lewis
Center, Ohio, registered her two
daughters, Jennelle, 7, and Ari-
anna, 9, for the Actors, Models
& Talent Competition, a conven-
tion that links participants with
casting directors and agencies,
in Orlando, Fla., next January.
She plans on looking for season-
al work to help pay for the travel
and hotel rooms for her family
of five. "I will be getting a second
job to pay for it all between now
and January," she says.
The opportunity, she says, is
worth the expenses. "I believe
they'll do a wonderful job with
it," she adds. "My girls are very
excited."
Consumer advocates caution
that parents who are new to the
business may be vulnel'bte to
schemes that seem to guaran-
tee fame and fortune but fail
to deliver. Last month, the New
York State Consumer Protection
Board urged parents to be care-
ful when signing contracts with
talent agencies that promise
stardom.
"Everyone wants to think that
their darling is the most talent-
ed," says Mindy Bockstein, the
agency's chairperson and exec-
utive director. "They get inflated


promises or ideas of grandeur.
Sometimes that gets the best of
them."
For instance, some outfits
pressure parents to leave a de-
posit or to purchase head shots
or acting lessons from the agen-
cy or an affiliate. The Consumer
Protection Board recommends
that parents ask for a list of its
successful client representa-
tions and request written refer-
ences about the company from
clients. They should be wary of
agencies that ask for money up
front.
Critics of the industry say that


how people look is not supposed
to be the most important thing,
and then saying, 'Oh put on
your pretty clothes and smile,'
it's a bit of a contradiction," Ms.
Andrews says.
But others say that they see
no harm. "It's something that I
think is fun, and it doesn't hurt
the child," says Jennifer Or-
mond, of Quincy, Mass, whose
two youngest children model.
"It's a way that they can have a
little money set aside, and if it's
not touched for 18 years, I think
that's a good chunk of change."


child modeling can do more than UNEXPECTED BENEFITS
just break the bank. Kids don't In fact, she says the indus-
know to anticipate potential-re- try gave her dn unanticipated
jection, which could hurt their benefit: She was able to get
self-esteem in the long run. some one-on-one time with her
4.ypear-old daughter, Julia, in
.'YOU MAY NOT BE WANTED' ""pril, when the .lrvas selected
"Children at a really young for an ad in an L.L. Bean catalog
age have no idea of what is that paid $600. Ms. Ormond left
conceptually involved in this,"
says Syd Brown, clinical and
neuropsychologist in Bethes-
da, Md. "They don't know that A lvarez suppI
if your body changes in the
wrong way, you may not be
wanted a~pypnre .
- Plus, he says, a few pa103
reasons for getting their s
involved may not be entirely al-. attention. Which included
truistic. "Is there some sort of a plaque from Mayor Alvarez,
narcissism involved on the part which designates Nov. 4 as An-
of the parents? That's probably drea Ivory day.
true in some cases." "It's overwhelming," she said.
Indeed, some parents worry She was quick to recognize the
about what they are teaching efforts of her volunteers. "This
their kids. Ms. Andrews, the award belongs to my volun-
mother of the 4-year-old who teers," she said.
aspires to be a supermodel, Mayor Alvarez begged to differ.
says she is concerned about "Regardless of the results of the
sending her daughter mixed CNN contest, you've already won
messages. "Teaching her that in our book," he said on behalf


her other kids with her husband
and traveled with Julia to Maine
for the shoot. "That was awe-
some, because it was three days
of me and my daughter."
Julie Dines, 42, reaped an-
other surprising gain: When
she took her two children to
meet with Funnyface's Mr. Win-
field, he asked if she had ever
considered modeling herself. "I
said, 'I think I'm way too old for
this stuff,'" Ms. Dines says. But
she tried anyway and became
the first one in the family to get
work through the agency. "Iron-
ically, I'm the first one that gets
an assignment for a print ad in
Oprah magazine," she says. "We
were cracking up."
Her kids' feelings are more
mixed. "I'm happy for my mom
because she got a job," says her
12-year-old daughter Lauren.
"But there was also a little jeal-
ousy."




ort Ivory's bid

of 2.4 million ,Miami-Dade resi-
dents. Alvarez then arched his
eyebrows quizzically. "Can any-
one explain the rules? Is it one
person; one vote?" The crowd
replied in the negative, causing
Alvarez to smile broadly, draw-
ing cheers and, applause from
the crowd. "Then vote early--and
vote often." he said.
To support Ivory as a candi-
date for CNN Hero of the Year,
visit www.CNN.com/heroes be-
tween now and Wednesday, Nov.
18.


Televised violence against women worries parents


VIOLENCE
continued from 9B

advertisers would stand up
against the trend.
"I hope the industry will look
at our data and be as shocked
as I was," PTC president Tim
Winter told reporters.
The report suggested that
violent acts against women
and teen girls was increasing
at rates that far exceed the
two percent increase in overall
violence that the study found
existed on TV between 2004-
2009.
The PTC compared prime-
time programing on networks
ABC, NBC, CBS and Fox in
February and May 2004 and
the same months in 2009. It
said every network except ABC
showed a dramatic increase in
stories that included beatings,


violent threats, shooting, rape,
stabbing and torture.
The PTC findings reflect a
sharp rise in the number of
crime series on TV, such as the
popular CBS franchise "CSI"
which is one of America's most-
watched drama series.
But the report singled out
Fox, saying the network al-
lowed violence against women
to be trivialized through punch
lines in its satirical animated
comedies "Family Guy" and
"American Dad." It cited one
May 2009 episode of "Family
Guy" in which a character gets
divorced under a fictional 18th
century procedure -- by shoot-
ing his wife dead.
The Parents Television
Council, founded in 1995 to
highlight children's exposure
to sex, violence and profanity
on television, said it was con-


cerned that U.S. television was
contributing to an atmosphere
in which violence directed at
women was viewed as normal.
"The fact is that children are
influenced by what they see on
TV and that certainly includes
media violence," said Melissa
Henson, the group's public ed-
ucation director.
A second TV pressure group,
TV Watch, accused the PTC
of seeking to expand govern-
ment control over TV output
and said. parents should have
the final say on what their chil-
dren watch.
"This so-called 'study' is...an
attempt to force all television
contents to conform to their
own beliefs. Parents have the
tools to enforce the decisions
about their children's viewing,"
Jim Dyke, executive director of
TV Watch said in a statement.


King daughter elected President of SCLC
The Associated Press I


The Rev. Bernice King has been
chosen as the first female presi-
dent of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference, the civil
rights organization co-founded
by her father, the Rev. Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. Ms. King's
father was the conference's first
president, serving from 1957
until his death in 1968. Ms.
King inherits an organization
and issues much changed from
the days of her father's leader-
ship. A former state director in
Florida accused several nation-
al leaders of financial misman-
agement, and the president of


the Los Angeles chapter clashed
with leadership last fall over his
support for same-sex marriage
in California. The conference
has about 10,000 members and
about 80 chapters in 17 states.


.f-- 3 -i. v.3 9 a ~E


BART MVI.WILLIAIVIS, JR.
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 109
nr-.. i l i i 2
J-"WNI IH ( W";.'AF .
IN rifl .i O lj 11 i A .-1














Blacks still drawn to Islam despite FBI raids


By Jesse Washington
The Associar'ed Press

By now, Sekou Jackson is
used to the questions: Why does
he need to leave a work meeting
to pray? Don't Black Muslims
convert to Islam in jail? Why
would you even want to be Mus-
lim?
"It's kind of a double whammy
to be Black and Muslim," said
Jackson, who studies the Navy
at the National Academy of Sci-
ence in Washington. "You're go-
ing to be judged."
Jackson's struggle may have
gotten harder when the FBI raid-
ed a Detroit mosque Wednesday,
saying its leader preached hate
against the government, traf-
ficked in stolen goods and be-
longed to a radical group that
wants to establish a Muslim
state in America. The mosque's
imam, a Black American named
Luqman Ameen Abdullah, was
killed in a shootout with agents.
Although the FBI was careful
to say those arrested in Detroit
were not mainstream Muslims,
it has accused other Black Mus-
lims of similar crimes, most re-
cently in May, when four men
were charged with plotting to
blow up New York synagogues
and shoot down a military
plane.
Yet the Muslim faith continues
to convert many average Blacks,


who say they are attracted by Is-
lam's emphasis on equality, dis-
cipline and family.
"The unique history Blacks
have faced, we're primed for ac-
cepting Islam," said Jackson, 31,
who grew up in a secular home
and converted to Islam when he
was about 18.
"When someone comes to you
with a message that everyone is
equal, that the only difference is
the deeds that they do, of course
people who have been oppressed
will embrace that message,"
Jackson said. "It's a message of
fairness."
It was a message of Black
pride in the face of dehumaniz-
ing prejudice that launched Is-
lam in America in the 1930s.
Created by a mysterious man
named Wallace Fard, the "Lost-
Found Nation of Islam" strayed
far from the teachings of the
Prophet Muhammad, but its
mixture of self-reliance, Black
supremacy and white demoniza-
tion resonated with many Blacks.
Some 30 years later, Malcolm X
began the Black movement to-
ward traditional Islam when he
left the Nation of Islam, went
on a pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia
and proclaimed that all whites
were not evil.
In 1975, the Nation split into
two factions: a larger group that
embraced orthodox Sunni prac-
tices, and another, led by Louis


Sekou Jackson poses next to a picture of Mecca in his home Washington.


Farrakhan, that maintained the
Nation's separatist ideology.
Today, it is difficult to deter-
mine the number of Muslims
in America. A 2007 Pew survey
estimated 2.35 million, of whom
35% were Black. Lawrence Ma-
miya, a Vassar College professor
of religion and Africana studies
and an expert on American Is-
lam, said Muslim organizations
count about 6 million members,
a third of them Black.


Most Black Muslims are or-
thodox Sunnis who worship in
about 300 mosques across the
country, Mamiya said. The sec-
ond-largest group follows Far-
rakhan's Nation of Islam, which
has about 100 mosques in
America, abroad and U.S. pris-
ons, Mamiya said.
He said the third-largest group
is the Ummah, founded by Jamil
Abdullah Al-Amin, the Black ac-
tivist formerly known as H. Rap


-By Alex Brandon, AP


Brown. The group has about
40 or 50 mosques. The Detroit
mosque raided Wednesday was
part of the Ummah, the FBI
said.
"The vast majority of Black
Muslims are using the religion
to strengthen their spiritual-
ity," said Mamiya, who has in-
terviewed many Black Muslim
leaders and congregants. He
said the number of Black Mus-
lims is growing, but not as fast


as before the 9/11 terrorist at-
tacks.
Few white Americans convert
to Islam "because the tendency
is to view Islam as foreign," he
said. "For Blacks, it's part of
their African heritage. There's
a long tradition (in Africa). ...
It moves them away from the
Christianity they saw as a slave
religion, as the religion that le-
gitimized their slavery."
Margari Hill was a California
teenager seeking an antidote for
nihilism and widespread disre-
spect of Black women when she
found Islam in 1993. A few years
ago she began covering her hair
with a hijab, or head scarf.
"I wanted to be thinking about
humility and modesty," said
Hill, a 34-year-old teacher in
Philadelphia. "I decided it would
help me be a better Muslim and
a better person."
She also is attracted to Islam's
family values and the egalitar-
ian message embodied by the
prophet Muhammad's "last
sermon," which according to
Muslim scriptures says that no
Arab, white or Black person is
superior or inferior to members
of another race.
Hill's husband, Marc Manley,
said that many Blacks who have
struggled with crime, drugs or
alcohol are drawn to Islam's reg-
imented lifestyle, which includes
prayers five times a day.


Putting the Negro Leagues in play


BOARD GAME BRINGS HARD-TO-REDISCOVER HISTORY TO LIFE


By Stuart Miller
The Strat-O-Matic Game
Company, an old warhorse
in an age of computer-driven
fantasy leagues and high-tech
video games, usually relies on
detailed statistics to create rat-
ings and tendencies for hitters
and pitchers. But in creating
a new 103-card Negro leagues
set for its board game, Strat-O-
Matic found that the data was
not easy to come by.
Coverage of Negro leagues
games was spotty, especially
because many black newspa-
pers were weeklies. Although
stories abound about Josh Gib-
son's prowess or Satchel Paige's
wizardry, much of what has
been handed down borders on
folklore.
Yet Hal Richman, who found-
ed Strat-O-Matic in 1961, was
determined.
"I've wanted to do this for a
long time," he said. "It's a part
of baseball history that has to
be represented."
He found an ally in Scott
Simkus, an aspiring baseball
writer and historian, and avid
Strat-O-Matic player since
age 11. Simkus, 39, grew up
in Chicago's suburbs hearing
that his grandmother had seen
Hack Wilson play and that his
grandfather had bribed a police
officer at Wrigley Field in 1947
so they could see Jackie Robin-
son's first game there.
When his grandfather died
in 1995, Simkus went to the
library seeking microfilm arti-
cles about his semipro baseball
days. He stumbled across some
Negro leagues box scores and
printed them out.
"I got interested and I slowly
built a collection," said Simkus,
who works nights as a limou-
sine dispatcher. "Then it be-
came an obsession."
He said he thought of writ-
ing a book with the material
(and still plans to), but he also

Tacolcy Raiders
On last Sunday morning in
the 80 Pounds Division of foot-
ball, The Tacolcy Raiders (6-0)
won the Sean Taylor Classic
Super Bowl game against The
Overtown Rattlers. In a heart
wrenching overtime game a
perfect pass was thrown by
Quarterback, Seth McGill #1
to Wide Receiver, Byron Grant
who made a brilliant catch
deep in the left corner of the
end zone. It was one of the
most thrilling finishes this
season.
A year of teamwork and
awesome coaching headed by
Coach Derrick Britt and staff
led these determined yet excit-
ed players to step up to make
big plays in a big game to a


After years of research and statistical interpretation, Strat-O-Matic has a new 103-card
Negro leagues set.


knew about Richman's desire
for a Negro leagues card set.
With more black newspaper ar-
chives becoming available on-
line, Simkus realized he could
make it happen. He, Richman
and Strat-O-Matic's computer
gurus took three years to inter-
pret the statistics and produce
the set. (The company makes
computer versions, but it sells
more cards-and-dice board
games.)
"It was a lot of hard work,"
said Simkus, who went beyond
Negro leagues box scores to
study games the stars played in
Cuba, against top semipro tal-
ent and against barnstorming
whites. He also read about 100
books on the subject.
"Hal is a perfectionist," Sim-
kus said. "I've gained a lot of
appreciation for what goes into
the game and why it feels so or-
ganic."
Several factors required care-

wins Super Bowl
grand victorious finish.
Congratulations Raiders!I!

Musical Program
Wimberly Sisters Outreach
Inc. is sponsoring a musical
program, 3 p.m., Sunday, No-
vember 22 at Holy Cross, 1555
N.W. 93rd Terrace.
Groups appearing will be
Unbelievers Gospel Brothers,
Pompano; The Ministry Gospel
Singers, Clewiston; The Free-
man Gospel Singers, Pahokee;
The Gospel Angels, Delray; UBH
Choir, Ft. Laudedale; South
Florida Singers, Ft. Lauder-
dale; Wimberly Sisters, Miami;
Soul Seekers, Miami; Southern
Echoes and many more.
No Admission


ful calibration to meet Rich-
man's goal of objectivity.
"We wanted to be mindful and
not make stuff up regardless of
players' reputations," Simkus
said.
Each player card is based on
his peak five to seven years, an
approach Strat-O-Matic used
with its Hall of Fame set.
For instance, in the 1930s,
the Eastern teams were far
stronger than those out west,
Simkus said, so Strat-O-Matic
devised a way to adjust each


player's statistics accordingly.
Negro league players commit-
ted far more errors, perhaps
because of field conditions or
because they had to entertain
the fans before each game in-
stead of taking infield practice
or because of different scoring
standards. Nearly every Negro
leaguer who went to the minors
or the majors after integration
made fewer errors, so Strat-
O-Matic used that to evaluate
their adjustments.
Each factor, including ros-


Inner-City High School Bands Battle


Brainstorm Entertainment
and Big Mo Promotions pres-
ent the Inner-City Battle of the
High School Bands Competition
on Saturday, December 12th
at Ted Hendricks Stadium at
Milander Park in Hialeah. En-
try fee $20. Proceeds from the
event will benefit each partici-
pating school's band program.
Find out which band will be
crowned the "Best of the Best":
Central, Northwestern, Edison,
Jackson, Booker T. Washing-
ton, Norland or Carol City Se-


nior High School Bands.
Students can earn up to 10
community hours by simply
purchasing a ticket and show-
ing up to the event. It does not
matter if your school band is
not in the competition.
Students who volunteer can
earn 25 community hours.
Tickets go on sale this week at
each participating school.
Vendors wanted. For more in-
formation to become a vendor
or earn community hours, con-
tact Big Mo 786-318-6020.


Iota's big 'Apple for the Teacher' luncheon
Iota Phi Lambda Sorority, Inc.
Gamma Alpha Chapter cordially
invites the community to their
23rd 'Apple for the Teacher'
luncheon, honoring outstanding
school teachers on Saturday, No-
vember 21, 11 a.m. Rusty Pel-
ican Restaurant, Key Biscayne,
FL. Kristin Anderson host of The
Morning Show on SFL_TV chan-
nel 39, is keynote speaker.
For ticket information call
786-356-0992.
KRISTIN ANDERSON


President Obama signs the Ryan White H.I.VJAIDS Treat-
ment Extension Act of 2009, which provides medical and sup-
port services for those with H.I.VJAIDS.

Obama lifts a ban on entry into

U.S. by HJ.V.-positive people
By Julia Preston

President Obama on Friday announced the end of a 22-year ban
on travel to the United States by people who had tested positive
for the virus that causes AIDS, fulfilling a promise he made to gay
advocates and acting to eliminate a restriction he said was "rooted
in fear rather than fact."
At a White House ceremony, Mr. Obama announced that a rule
canceling the ban would be published on Monday and would take
effect after a routine 60-day.waiting period. The president had
promised to end the ban before the end of the year.
"If we want to be a global leader in combating H.I.V./AIDS, we
need to act like it," Mr. Obama said. "Now, we talk about reducing
the stigma of this disease, yet we've treated a visitor living with it
as a threat."
The United States is one of only about a dozen countries that bar
people who have H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS.
President George W. Bush started the process last year when he
signed legislation, passed by Congress in July 2008, that repealed
the statute on which the ban was based. But the ban remained in
effect.

U


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Between the ages of 65 to 85 For a


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Participants who are enrolled will be


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BlI..\'KS MllSI' C'ONr-KOI I'llIK O\VN 1)1|,SIINY


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009










16B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


I 1'l.A( K', MN sI1 (' NIIk I. lJIIII ()WN )S lI Y


Celebs working on creating a world without hunger
By Edna Gundersen Rock's Universal C (iW.alk loca- with the sanctuary's founder, Imagine bracelet. The 14-track and consider that you're helping ity, Heard the World Fund, has
tion, says he was persuaded to Sam Okello, whose brother was Serve4 is available as a down- a child, how can it be bad? Peo- raised more than $200,000,
LOS ANGELES -- Sating appe- join the effort by Ono and shock- abducted and killed by rebels. "At load card at Hard Rock locations pie trying to tear down people mostly by donating shares of
tites is big business at Hard Rock ing statistics such as 16,000 chil- the mission in downtown L.A., and at hardrock.com and as a doing some good, those are the ticket sales. O.A.R. also gives
International's 127 cafes. Now it's dren dying every day from hun- $200 feeds 50 families, download with five bonus tracks ones on a soapbox." time and money to the Chil-
on the philanthropic menu as the ger-related causes. "A lot of organizations are at Amazon ($8.99 or 99 cents a The rock band's own char- dren's Scholarship Fund.


company teams with musicians
to feed the world's hungry.
Hard Rock's Imagine There's
No Hunger campaign kicks off
with the release of today's all-star
charity album and tonight's ben-
efit concert at its New York cafe.
Serve4 features live, rare or
previously unreleased tracks by
Starsailor, Elvis Costello & Al-
len Toussaint, Brett Dennen,
The Raveonettes, Uncle Kracker,
the Low Anthem, Toby Ligxm-
lan, Moe, Eric Hutchinson and
Earth, Wind & Fire with Chicago.
Yoko Ono donated John Lennon's
Gimme Some Truth.
"It's something John would
have liked to do," Ono says. "It's
terrible that there's still hunger
and violence in the world. Music
has a beautiful power on its own,
a healing power. It's something
John and I believed in. I wanted to
give that power to this particular
project. Once I decided, I sort of
visualized John jumping up and
down, saying, 'That's great.'"
Ringo Starr, taping a public
service announcement at Hard


RAISING VISIBILITY
"You get so many invites every
day to do stuff," he says. "When I
read the statistics of this, it just
blew me away. So I thought, why
not? How hard is it to do some-
thing?"
Raising visibility of a worthy
mission "is now part of the celeb-
rity way," Starr says. "Because it
is of some value, you give your
name to great causes."
Proceeds from the concert,
Serve4 and Imagine pins and
bracelets go to World Hunger
Year (WHY) and eight community-
based grass-roots organizations
in such countries as Thailand,
Haiti, Kenya and Uganda, site of
the 50-acre Hope North campus
to educate and nurture orphans,
former child soldiers and other
victims of civil war.
In Uganda, "if you give $10,
you're buying 30 meals," says
actor Forest Whitaker, who be-
came a Hope North spokesman
and supporter after co-starring
in 2006's Last King of Scotland


starting to work together ... to
eradicate the same basic prob-
lems: hunger, water, malaria,"
he says. "People have the oppor-
tunity to make an impact with
their donations and their deeds,
and you get a great feeling of
fulfillment. It nourishes your
heart."

PATRONS DONATE $1
Cafe patrons who add a $1 do-
nation to a meal tab receive an


track). The release includes Lay
Down by O.A.R. and Heartbreak
Monday by Arno Carstens, both
on tonight's bill.
In an era of deepening pover-
ty, there's no room for cynicism
about rock stars waving char-
ity banners, says O.A.R. singer
Marc Roberge.
"I honestly think people need
to get over it," he says. "I used
to be a little cynical about every-
thing. When you break it down


Vankara celebrates 30 years
On Saturday, November 21
at 10 a.m., Reverend and Mrs.
Taylor, the Founders of Van-
kara School, 13485 Alexanria
Drive, Opa-Locka, will celebrate
30 years of educational services
at a street naming ceremony,
sponsored by the Opa-locka
City Commission.
Vankara is inviting all former
students and staff to attend.
For additional information
call 305-681-6121 REV. JOHN H. and VICE
MAYOR MYRA L. TAYLOR


Q CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED 0 CHARGE MY CREDIT CAR


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Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe online at www.mymiamitimes.com


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order of Services
Wed. Intenessary Proyer
Sam.-l2pm
i Mrn.ng Ser,'e II am
Su .e WorjI.p 30 p m
lb% Prffti merfgl 30 p M
Fn Bible )ud, 7 0 pm




Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street

g Order of Services
Sunday Morning Servies
l4 O,'T. S1 1am
Sunday S(hool 9 4' am
S BJle Sd'v lue.dov
10 am &lpm
Pr ver Meev.ng lue 6 pm


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.

Order of Services
Von Ihru In Noon Doa Pa'er
B.ble ',rud, Thur,, pm
Sndry WorhIp 1 I a mI
Sndray Io4 30a om





St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sunday 7:30 oand I a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a.m SundaydSchool
Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study
8 p.m Prayer Meeting


Temple h
Baptist
1723 N.W.
1MMlilINN riB


I :t I


Missionary
t Church
3rd Avenue

Order of Services
',undoy, ihoh l s 9 oiAn
Sun Mouinnger. 11am
uesalO 0ible ;ruy
feeding A.n ,,r, IA o ,n
Wed Bille Sud Piofi. ) 6 pm
h.'u, Ouiieih M.ii,,ry i& pm


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a.m. Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday General Bible Study 7:30 p.m..
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS/Comcast 3 Saturday 7:30 a.m.
S ,- www.pembrokeparkchurchofthrist.com pembrokeparkcoc@bellsouth.net


I


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.

'- Order of Services
Early Wor*ip 7a.m.
SoWaySd9ool 9a |
N( C I1005 o a
.p 11 am. Wship 4 p.m.
Mission and Bibl
(inss Tueswda6:30 pm .




Bethlehem Cathedral
Outreach Ctr. Miami
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.





FrdA, B.Ue S'*imno, 5pm
Pastor I SinM 8a.m.


rr,daRL~e ',m~na, 5,p m


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
15250 N.W. 22ND AVENUE


- Order of Services
SINDAY: WnrsipServie
730 & 11a.m
Church Sdchm 930 o.m
WEDNESDAY
Feeding Maistry 12 noon
B .ble S 7 p r


Zion Hope
Missionary Baop
5129 N.W. 17thA
t lbJ[ X'l i I v)=[]'r


Hosann
Bap
2171 N.
mbiiImli


a Community
list Church
W. 56th Street

Order of Services
S Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
'I worship 11 a.m.
IBble Sru.&,. Thursday 7:30 p.m.
I outh hMinistry
Mon.-Wed. 6 p.m.


New Vision For Christ
list Ministries
Ave. 13650 N.E. 10th Avenue


- Order of Services
'' SurdOy d, l 3O) im
Mcm.ng Prne Wosish.p I1 a
fIr.1 and Thand5und 0
rening worh.p aofn pm
Prom Mecing 0& Bble u
S Iesda, 7 dypm


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International
2300 NW 135th Street


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.,
11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fox: 305-685-0705
www.newhbirthhbaptistmiami.org


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street

Order of Services
'lu ,dlv 'lAhool 4 Q30 a T.
.,rod W, j,,u[ 11 0m
h 1 r ,.nday
[ [if. g W0 ah.p 6 pr,
M sd W e L ,-,e o m
61,RA, .. 1. lItu..ud


Al in ailJrMnse


r


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street

Order of Services
Flour of Prayer 6 30 a m Early Momring Worship 1 30 o m
Sunday School 9 30 a m Morning Worship II a m
Youth Mini iry Sludy Wed 7 p m Prayer Bible Study Wed 7 p m
Noonday Allar Prayer (M F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday II am .1 pm
wowwfriefd~h Fino r rib f(.,a nth.,~,..',..ln~ z


93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street

Order of Services
Wl a i, d 1,ni r.' ,whi

,I ,,'d ',,,,idov b u |,
', Iur..doay Bble, rd, I p .,
1. 1 ,t ,,rib, ,',,g


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court

Sl Order of Ser
1L,, 'd U Id,,,,,i n
il ,,,t y Mu ,' q W ,',h,


vices
p II a n,


S uIJ ,'Iy M r.n t 1b.. In1' ,, I
S, ,,V ,i1.c lt iB -L ,ii p ,i..


Order of Services
tarly Sunds, worAhp 130 am
- Sunday Shool 4 30 am
- SunlatdMyom.nq Worhp II am
Swday e(w.ngSerne 6 pm
luesdoa Prry eM eenng 130 p n,
U (tWednrdaa BlI l WSW 130 pm


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
i Sunday Momng Sen ,e
sunday hor l 10 Om
Wor h.p W e IIr.f I m
le ay', l h Bible Sludr 8pi n
1 n.urao Pnryr a eSe
., e p.



Seed Time and Harvest Faith
Ministry International
21485 N.W. 27 Ave.

Order of Services
i '.'ijor Wpnihip 9 a T,
Bble nudy w dae day 1 301 pmn
S. id. i eedr e ndhoail iim org






First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue

Order of Sorvices


Th6,u ,) I I n, t nibl.
4 ,0d 'nOv.'r ,Un i I 1 U
,r.-,, IM before
I .rr Soi1 0rm


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Morning 8 a mn
Sunday School 10 am
t Suodo benng n6 pim
Mor,. Excelleone 30 p m
eBlue (IeU as730 pm
Thur Fellowship 10 am



Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street

S Order of Services
(bhurt, lundcrytoolw 8 30 a ran
I Sunday, Worship Serae 10 alam
M. Week SernenWednesday.
Hi.aourofPoaw.loonDoyPrayer
12pmpepm




New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street
www.nshilohmbc.org


Order of Services
Fort Mkomnng Wonh.p 30aom
Su'n (urh S, ool 30 am
Mcmi, orshi.p 11 a m
lueWa Bible (lOss 7pm
luen before t lm
; Sun Ipm


Alpha Agape SDA Church
8400 N.W. 25th Ave.


Order of Services
obbolh ,,i 4 31 Iam 1 (oI
Dte.,,eW r,h.p II am (Soil
S^ rJoith ou (, l.er tSaoudav
1I houw beo r ',el)
Sw-ee e, l i a,, r7re 3D Wed

Leonard Newton^^


Sunrise Missionar
3Q87 N.W.
smbcpastorji



-- R
I' ,[tI,$


ry Baptist Church
60 Street
ds@aool.com

Order of Services
Su day .,i.-'l IA) ,
Sundae Wnnh.p II a n,
Prve. Mi,qng fiblu.
'.d,n, W-d t 1 p
Md Wel Wortnp TlihrLdoal
/,lnm


'.e..u~


I .ihpVco Cur, .in. .D ei orPso.rTah7


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.


Order of Services
Sunday Moimnl o
46Y '.divaJo' ofliar 'nam
I..dovy I.hle iudy Ip m
Si lurdov NO.e, ,,e.


I


rR-evwCharles Lee Dink


II9IIIIIII1


Rev. Dr. W. Edwar


I


Rev. Dr. Glenroy Deveaux


. I


1 -7-1


W. Steve Hart/Senior Pastor/Teacher











l 'i ACMEMORIAM i&i Nlu r (,uN roI thuR OWN 178 THEMIAMI!TIMNO2

#ArW" 1"A 11I'll I kk."


Wright and Young
EFFIE LEE SIMS, 75, home-
maker, died No-
vember 6. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, Rob-
ert Sims, Sr.;
children, Dollar '. '
Simpkins, John-
ny Mae Simp-
kins, JoAnna
Kaplin, James Simpkins, Robert
Sims, Jr., Idella Sims-Falmer, An-
gela Sims-Johnson, Freddrick J.
Sims and Italia Sweeting; and a
host of grandchildren, great grand-
children and great great grandchil-
dren. Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
Jordan Grove MB Church.

DARRELL ANTHONY RAY, 44,
died November
3. Survivors in-
clude: mother,
Rudene Ray;
sister, Sabrina
Ra y Jones
(Lawrence);
brother, Eric
Shondell Ray;
girlfriend, Tracee Manning; grand-
mother: Willie Mae Walker. Ser-
vice was held.

JUANITA, BERNICE GARD-
NER, 77, died
November 1.
Survivors in-
clude: sister,
Sadie Young
(Jacksonville,
FL); nieces: Pa-
tricia, Cynthia,
Deborah and
Diane; son-in-law: Clifton Clarke.
Service was held.


Manker!-.
HENRY DUNN, 83, died Novem-
ber 2 at Vitas Health Care Center.
Service 3 p.m., Wednesday (to-
day), in the chapel.


Pinder_-k.
IRMA LEE SAINT VAL, 54, re-
tired, died Octo-
ber 31 at Aven-
twat. Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, New
Beginning Em-
bassy of Praise.




Paradise
SHIRLEY ANN BRUTON, 78,
custodian, died November 3 at
Jackson South Hospital. Service
was held.

JESHAWN HAWES, 3 died No-
vember 2 at home. Service was
held.


Eric S. George
MARY NELL JACKSON, 82,
homemaker, died October 25. Ser-
vice was held.

HATTIE B. NORRIS, 80, home-
maker, died November 8. Service
11 a.m, Saturday, Ebenezer Bap-
tist Church, Hallandale Beach.


Grace
WILMA WALDEN, 70, house-
wife, died No-
vember 6 at
Select Special-
ity Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Gam-
ble Memorial


MORLINE WILLIAMS, 48, died
November 3.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday in the






INEZ STEWART, 81, retired
nurse, died November 8. Final
rites and burial, entrusted to Bent's
Funeral Home.

RENEE DESILUS, 96, retired
teacher, died November 5 at Beth-


seda Memorial Hospital. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, St. Mark Catho-
lic Church.

FLORENCE NELLIE LEDER-
ER,81, housewife, died November
5. Service was held.


Carey Royal Rami'n
NAWZAD ALATTAR, 68, gen-
eral contractor, died November 6
at North Broward Medical Center.
Service was held.

YARAH YOUSSEF TAHA, in-
fant, died November 3 at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Service was
held.

HUSAM BALAA, 50, retired,
November 3 at Memorial Regional
Hospital. Service was held.

AMY ROSARIO, 56, died No-
vember 8 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.


Honor Your
Loved One With an
In Memoriam
In
The Miami Times


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
VALERIE ROBINSON, 43, man-
ager, Burger
King, died No-
vember 4 at Mt.
Sinai Medical
Center. Service
2 p.m., Wednes-
day (today),
New Providence
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

LLOYD CAMPBELL, 61, roofer,
died November
6 at Aventura
Hospital. View-
ing (only), 11-8
p.m., Thursday
in the chapel.



ROBERT DOLLAR, 77, died,
November 5 at
Jackson Memo-
rial North Hos-
pital. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
St. Paul AME
Church.


GEORGE LEONARD GOLD-
SMITH-CREN-
SHAW, 64, re-
tired electrician,
died November
1 at VA Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
daughter, Sabri-
na Golden; son,
Richard Crenshaw; sisters, Jac-
quelyn Goldsmith-Fils and Judy
Goldsmith-Walter.; brothers, John
Goldsmith, Jr., Frederick Wallace,
Willie Goldsmith Sr., and Bernard
Williams. Viewing and wake 4
p.m., Friday at Charles Gregory
Goldsmith (nephew) home, 18600
NW 22 Court, Miami Gardens.
Service 11:30 a.m., Saturday in
the chapel.

NATASHA BARFIELD-MURPH,
35, correctional
officer, died
November 5 at
Memorial West
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday at
93rd Community
Baptist Church.

MAGGIE HORNE, 72, CNA,
died November
9 at North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




THOMAS KING, 71, laborer,
died October
28 at Mt. Sinai
Medical Center.
Service was
held.





Richardso n-
MILLICENT B. HENDERSON,
70, teacher,
Died November
6. Service was
held.

As


BELINDA WATERS, 34, care-
taker, died No-
vember 5 at
Homestead
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, Morning
Star Missionary
Baptist Church.


Hadley-Davis-
BISHOP JIM T. HOLT, 72, retired
longshoreman,
died November
8 at Mount Siani
Medical Center.
Survivors in-
clude: children:
Teresa, Derrick,
Jayme, Latoya
and Arrington;
sisters, Emma and Johnnie Mae;
brother, James; two grand chil-
dren, Service 2 p.m., Saturday,
Shekkinah Glory Deliverance Min-
istries.

FRANCES LOUISE WEST, 61,
homemaker, died October 25 at
home. Service was held.


To be absent from the body
is to be present with the
Lord.
This word from God gives us
comfort.
We love you and miss you.
Mom, Beverly; Dad, Shel-
don Sr.; sister, Tia; brother,
Devante; and nieces and
nephews.

PUBLIC NOTICE

As a public service to our com-
munity, The Miami Times prints
weekly obituary notices submit-
ted by area funeral homes at no
charge. These notices include
name of the deceased, age, place
of death, employment, and date,
location, and time of services.
Additional information and pho-
to may be included for a nominal
charge.The deadline is Monday
at 3:30 p.m.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


Royal
CLIFFORD MURPH, JR., 36,
truck driver, died November 5.
Visitation 4-9
p.m., Thursday.
Service 1 p.m.,
Friday, Corner-
stone Christian
Center.



ASTON HAYE, 73, plumber,
died November 3. Visitation 4 -9-
p.m., Friday. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday, Norland United Methodist
Church,

ANNABELLA CARRINGTON,
88, housewife, died November 5.
Arrangements are incomplete.

HAROLD STANLEY, 58, detail-
er, died November 4. Service was
held.

RUDOLPH CHRISTIE, 73, parts
coordinator, died November 2.
Service was held.

DELOIS RODGERS, 56, resi-
dential manager, died October 26.
Service was held.

BERNICE SIMS, 79,housewife,
died November 8. Visitation 4 -9-
p.m., Friday. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday in the chapel.

LINDA RIGBY, 49, laborer, died
November 9. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Jay's -#
RANDOLPH WALKER, JR.,
57, mainte-
nance foreman,
died November
3. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Second Baptist
Church.


RICKY CARTER, 46, stockman,
died November
6. Service 1
p.m., Saturday
1p.m., Trium-
phant Church of
God of Proph-
ecy.


BETTY JEAN FARMER, 62,
died November
7 at Baptist Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Kerr Memorial
United Method-
ist Church.


RUDOLPH EDWARDS III, 55,
died November
8. Service 1
p.m., Saturday,
Martin Memorial
A.M.E. Church.


Range -
MOTHER RENA HAMPTON-
ALLEN, 88,
homemaker,
died November
7. Survivors
include: nieces,
Beverly Henry
of Tampa, FL.
and Durema
Coleman of Sa-
vanna, GA; sisters, Ruth Brown,
Ida Roberson, Josephine Ander-
son of Lakes Wales, FL, and Ro-
chelle Alexander of Tallahassee,
FL; brothers, Rueben Hampton of
Lake Wales, FL, Ralph Hampton of
Boca Raton, FL, Ulysses Hampton
of Greenville, FL, and Isaac (Jack)
Hampton Jr., of Knoxville, TN;
Goddaughter, Theresa Wade; a
host of nieces, nephews, other rel-
atives and friends. Service 1p.m.,
Saturday Christ Crusade Family
Center, 13720 N.W. 22 Avenue,
Opa-Locka, FL.

Poiter --
WILLIE JAMES BAILEY, 61,
exterminator, died November 5 at
North Shore Medical Center. Ser-
vice 2 p.m., Wednesday (today),
Jordan Grove Missionary Baptist
Church.

INFANT REGINAE SESSIONS,
14 days old, died November 4 at
home. Service 2 p.m., Saturday in
the chapel.

DOROTHY RANDOLPH, 68,
physical therapist, died November
6 at Jackson Memorial South Hos-
pital. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

Nakia Ingraham
ALICE CURRIE, 80, housewife,
died November 4 at Broward Gen-
eral Medical Center. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, First Church Of
The Open Bible.

VINCENT ANDERSON, 67, car-
penter, died October 25 at Hillcrest
Nursing Home. Final rites and
burial Montego Bay, Jamaica.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Frisco, two years passed by
so quickly, but the pain feels
like yesterday. We will always
cherish our memories- of life
with you, day by day.
Love always, Diana and
family.



Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


MARCELLA ELAINE
TILLMAN
would like to express our
sincere thanks to everyone
for their prayers and support
during the loss of our loved
one.
Special thanks to Rev. Wil-
fred Miller Jr., Elder Ber-
nard Edwards and the staff
of Manker Funeral Home for
services rendered.
May God Bless each of you.
The Family



by becoming a member of our
CALuta 305i.4ator
CALL 305-694-6210


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


It has been five years since
you went to sleep.
We continue to miss you,
but we know we will see you
in the morning.
Love always,
Your Family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


SHIRLEY ANN COCHRAN
HARPP
01/09/48- 11/11/07

Love always, Sherrianne,
Willie, Shirlenia, Willie, Jr.
and family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MOTHER EULA BRONSON
10/13/13 -11/12/05

Four years have passed and
you are sadly missed.
Your children and family.

Death Notice


REV. JURDAN FERGUSON,
85, died November 4.
Viewing 6 to 8 p.m., Friday
at Corinth Baptist Church,
1435 N.W. 54 Street. Funer-
al 11 a.m., Saturday at the
church. Services entrusted to
Mitchell Funeral Home.


GERALENE ROZIER LEON JAMES, JR.
11/15/56 11/11/08 01/06/50 11/12/04


It's been a year and we miss
you.
No words can say how much
we admired and appreciated
you for everything that you
have done for us.
You will remain in our hearts
and thoughts forever.
Love Always,
Sharhonda, Ronekqia and
Treyvon.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


r rflpiB~ iii


SHELDON WAYNE
ROKER, JR.
06/18/79- 11/12108


FRISCO GEORGE
BLACKWOOD
01/06/86 -11/12/07


DE WITT BABCOCK, 39, died
November 3.
Service 12 p.m.,
Saturday, Alfon-
so M. Richard-
son chapel.


BLACKS MUST CONI'ROl. I'liIR OWN IISINY


17B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17,2009










BI.ACKS Muv CI (ONTR( 1'IIlI OWN DIEINY


Alleged Ohio serial killer


rare among mass killers


By John Seewer And Andrew
Welsh-Huggins
Associated Press

CLEVELAND (AP) Au-
thorities say Anthony Sowell
lured women into his home in
a busy neighborhood, killed
them most by strangulation
- and scattered their remains
throughout the inside and bur-
ied some in the backyard.
Such brazenness defies logic,
but experts identify a narrow
subcategory of serial killers, in-
cluding the 1893 Chicago Fair
killer, Dr. H.H. Holmes, and
Milwaukee cannibal Jeffrey
Dahmer, who hunt from home.
"These types are so rare that
you can't make a summary es-
timation as to why or what went
wrong or anything," said Robert
Keppel, a national serial-killer
expert who investigated serial
killer Ted Bundy in Washington
state in the 1970s.
"There's just not a whole lot
of these folks running around
the world," he said.

SOWELL HAD
THE PERFECT LAIR
His home and backyard
a burial site for five victims
were shielded by an empty
home to the left and the win-
dowless brick wall of a sausage
company on the right.
Anytime the stench of decay-
ing bodies blew over the street,
neighbors blamed the meat
processing next door.
His house stood out only be-
cause it was one of the nicest
on a block dotted by homes
with peeling paint and broken
windows, some of them vacant.
It looked safe.
Sowell often sat on the front
steps, sipping beer out of a
bottle and greeting residents
passing by on their way to the
corner store that was just steps
away for alcohol, snacks and
cigarettes.
Neighbors say he'd offer a few
the chance to get high.
Sowell's alleged approach
reflects an obvious point, said
forensic psychologist N.G. Ber-
rill: the potential role of mental
illness in such unusual behav-
ior.
"The fact that they would
dirty their own nest, as it were,
is peculiar to me and suggests
a level of mental illness or sick-
ness," said Berrill, director of
the New York Center for Neu-
ropsychology and Forensic Be-
havioral Science.

VICTIM ESCAPED
Tanja Doss told The Associat-
ed Press that when she went up
to Sowell's third-floor bedroom
for a drink last April, he at-
tacked her. "I'm sitting on the



Corrections

officer slain

by husband

The Miami Times Special Report

An estranged Miami-Dade
couple are dead after a fight late
Thursday that ended in gunfire.
According to authorities, po-
lice answered a "woman in
distress" call at a home in the
19000 block of Northwest 57th
Avenue. The call came around
10 p.m.
When they arrived, they found
the bodies of Natasha Murph,
35, and Clifford Murph, 36.
Clifford Murph dead on the
scene. Natasha was taken to a
local hospital, where she died.
Natasha Murph was a correc-
tional officer with the Miami-
Dade Corrections and Rehabili-
tation Department.
No further information has
been released; the investigation
continues.


wiry *even


corner of the bed and he just.
leaped up and came over and
started choking me," she said.
She said she escaped the
next morning when he left for
the store.
When people think of serial
killers, they imagine predators
like Bundy, who stalked women
and killed women in Washing-
ton, Oregon, Utah, Idaho, Colo-
rado and finally Florida.
Or Gary Ridgway, dubbed the
Green River killer, who pleaded
guilty to the deaths of 48 wom-
en, many of them found in or
near Washington State's Green
River.
But some of history's most
notorious serial killers literally
worked close to home.
Holmes, born Herman Web-
ster Mudgett, built a "World's


ANTHONY SOWELL


Fair Hotel" he used to lure
women to their death during
the 1893 World's Fair, a series
of crimes recounted in the 2004
best-seller, "Devil in the White
City."
While Holmes confessed at
one point to killing 27 people,
the true number of victims is
unknown; some authorities
placed it as high as 200.
In Houston, Dean Corll, El-
mer Wayne Henley and David
Owen Brooks killed 27 boys and
young men in a torture-murder
ring in Houston from 1969 to
1971. Police found a plywood
"torture board" in Corll's home
used to torment many of his
victims before they were killed.
In Illinois, John Wayne Gacy,
a building contractor and ama-
teur clown, was convicted of
luring 33 young men and boys
to his Chicago area home for sex
and strangling them between
1972 and 1978. Most were bur-
ied in a crawl space under the
home; four others were dumped
in rivers. Gacy was executed in
1994.
In Milwaukee, Dahmer, a for-
mer candy factory worker, con-
fessed to killing and dismember-
ing 17 people since 1978, some


of whom he mutilated and can-
nibalized. His victims included
11 males whose remains were
found in his apartment.
Dahmer was serving a series
of life sentences when he was
killed by another inmate at a
Wisconsin prison in 1994.

SAME CATEGORY AS
GACYAND DAHMER
The crimes that Sowell is ac-
cused of put him in the same
category as Gacy and Dahmer,
said Jack Levin, a Northeastern
University criminologist.
At the same time, the Cleve-
land murders resemble the
more general portrait of a serial
killer who doesn't stray far from
his comfort zone.
"They never leave town. They
never travel to another state.
They stay close to home, where
they're familiar with the victims
and escape routes and dump
sites," Levin said.
Hunting from home may
have been easier because of
the marginal lives led by Sow-
ell's alleged victims. All four of
the Cleveland women identified
until now battled addiction in
their lives.
It wasn't unusual for some of
them to disappear for a week or
two and then return.

WHERE IS KIMBERLY SHARP
Naticia Duncan, who lives a
few houses away from Sowell,
fears that her friend, Kimberly
Sharp, may be one of the vic-
tims. Sharp would often stay at
Duncan's house, do her laun-
dry and then leave when she
met a new man.
"I'd see her a month later,
then she'd do it again," Duncan
said. 'Then I never saw her
again."
Police remain at Sowell's
house for now but investiga-
tors say they have no immedi-
ate plans to search for more
remains.
Sowell, 50, remained in jail
Saturday on a $5 million bond
on charges of rape and aggra-
vated murder.
Across the street Saturday,
the number of fliers on a make-
shift memorial wall with pic-
tures of missing women contin-
ued to grow.
Dale Hunter taped a piece of
paper with two photographs of
his sister, Amy Hunter, on the
missing person's board Satur-
day.
Hunter said she used to stay
with friends in the area and
knows that she drank beer with
Sowell in his house. He fears
the worst.
"She was real comfortable in
this neighborhood," said Hunt-
er. -I dropped her off here a few
times."


U.S. military deaths in


Iraq war reaches 4,362


The Associated Press

As of Monday, Nov. 9, at
least 4,362 members of the
U.S. military had died in the
-Iraq war since it began in
March 2003, according to an
Associated Press count.
The figure includes nine
military civilians killed in ac-
tion. At least 3,476 military
personnel died as a result of
hostile action, according to
the military's numbers.
The AP count is the same


as the Defense Department's
tally, last updated Monday at
10 a.m. EST.
The British military has
reported 179 deaths; Italy,
33; Ukraine, 18; Poland, 21;
Bulgaria, 13; Spain, J 1; Den-
mark, seven; El Salvador, five;
Slovakia, four; Latvia and
Georgia, three each; Estonia,
Netherlands, Thailand and
Romania, two each; and Aus-
tralia, Hungary, Kazakhstan
and South Korea, one death
each.


Death Notice Death Notice Death Notice


ANNIE KATE M. TUCKER,
63, typesetter, died November
8 in Tallahassee.
Viewing 4 to 9 p.m., Friday,
Mitchell Funeral Home.
For Service information call
Mitchell Funeral Home, 305-
638-0088 or Mrs. C. Manuel,
305-693-4852.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ARNOLD INGRAM
02/20/54 11/10/07


Arnold was more than just a
husband and father of two; he
was a friend that would cross
the depths of the frigid Bering
Sea if he thought that it would
put a smile on your face. He
will never be forgotten and will
always have a special place in
our hearts.
Your family loves you.


MARIO MANGHAM, 19,
died October 8 at Jackson
Hospital North.
Viewing 5 to 9 p.m., Friday.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
New Jerusalem Primitive Bap-
tist Church, 777 N.W. 85th
Street.
Arrangements entrusted to
Mitchell Funeral Home.


GENEVA "Edith" ADDER-
LEY, 90, died October 31
in Louisville, KY. Memorial
4 p.m., Sunday, Church of
God of Prophecy, Hallandale
Beach.


Death Notice


PARIS, died November 1 at
home. Survivors include: par-
ents, Heps and Sina; sisters,
Ciara and Damiana; broth-
ers, Damian, Damelle and
Cheeky.
Wake 7:30 p.m., Friday,
Palm Gardens Banquet Hall,
2700 N.W. 167th Street. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, Pet
Heaven Memorial Park, 10901
W. Flagler St.
Repast immediately follow-
ing service at Palm Gardens
Banquet Hall.


Davis convicted 16 years later


The Miami Times Special Report

Former Miami-Dade Judge
Phillip Davis was convicted
Wednesday of looting public
grant money intended to help
inner-city Miami residents. The
verdict came 16 years after an-
other jury cleared him in a no-
torious judicial bribery case.
After hearing Davis testify, the
jurors deliberated for five hours
over two days. He repeatedly
stated how important it was to
him to "empower" poor people.
At one point, an emotional Da-
vis teared up and asked to go
home.
Davis and administrative as-
sistant Joan Headley each were
convicted of nine fraud and
money-laundering charges, all
felonies. Each faces between
four and 30-plus years in pris-
on. Miami-Dade Circuit Judge
Beatrice Butchko set sentenc-
ing for Jan. 8.
Davis's prior arrest occurred
in 1991; the result of an FBI
sting known as Operation Court
Broom. Agents recorded Da-
vis arranging a $20,000 payoff
from.a lawyer.


DC sniper put to

death last night
RICHMOND, Va. -Virginia's
governor refused to spare the
life of John Allen Muhammad
and cleared the way for his ex-
ecution Tuesday night for the
sniper attacks in 2002 that left
10 dead and spread such fear
people were afraid to go shop-
ping, cut grass or pump gas.
The three-week killing spree
in Virginia, Maryland and
Washington, D.C., was carried
out with a teenage accomplice
who is serving life in prison
without parole. Muhammad,
48, was to die by injection at
9 p.m. after he exhausted his
court appeals and Gov. Tim
Kaine denied clemency.
Muhammad's attorneys had
asked Kaine to commute his
sentence to life in prison be-
cause they said he was severe-
ly mentally ill.


At trial in 1993, Davis ad-
mitted snorting cocaine in his
chambers he attributed the
bribes to his addiction. Jurors
acquitted him.
Davis was disbarred. In the
late '90s he helped establish
Miami-Dade Resident College, a
grant-funded program intended
to teach impoverished inner-
city residents job and life skills.
In closing arguments Tues-
day, Broward County prosecu-


tor Al Guttmann said Davis and
Headley inflated salaries and
submitted fake bills to steal
more than $80,000, some of
which was illegally used to start
a for-profit 'pretrial interven-
tion" program for young crimi-
nal defendants.
After the verdict, a represen-
tative for Davis said he was
"extremely disappointed and
that he expected to be found not
guilty.


The Miami Times
.s announcing our
CHURCH LISTINGS
S. '-Church Denomination
--- beginning January 2010
x- ar more inforniuton contact
> our new church .Isi.int.
Roker. 3 4 ( 2--4 2 10 \ 1)2
space is lihmied New PrILing


Remember to ask

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your discount coupon

to place your

Card of Thanks



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Memoriam


In The Miami


' Times


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009










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SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES



Miami Northwestern hosts College Fair


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

It's that time of the year.
Almost four months into a new
school year, high school seniors
across the country will begin to
narrow down their college choices.
Miami Northwestern Senior High
School wanted to assist seniors
and their parents in the selection
process so the school's College
Resource Center hosted their 10th
annual College Fair on Nov. 4 in
the Lee R. Perry Sports Complex
(Northwestern's gym).
The change of time brought a larger-
than-expected crowd of parents and
students from throughout Miami-
Dade County to speak to over 60
colleges and universities.
"This is the first time that the
College Fair was done at night,"
said CAP Advisor Lamarc Anderson.
"The event is usually held during the
day."
Anderson and College Resource
Center coordinator Irene
Wisenbacker-Clark were surprised
by the turnout but it was not an easy


task to bring the parties together
said Wisenbacker-Clark.
"It was a lot of hard work. We
invited a number of schools that
specialized in different areas such
as arts, business or technical,"
she said. "Another thing, parents,
who are also a part of a student's
college decision, were able to ask the
different schools questions with the
addition to the students."
Kemisha Daniels, whose daughter
Tracie is a senior, was one of those
parents.
"Times are hard right now. I want
to make sure that my child goes to
a school where they are receiving
the best quality of education and
they are able to obtain a job with the
skills they have acquired in those
four years," said Daniels with a list
of questions jotted down on a paper
for the various college representative.
She collected information from over
20 colleges that she and her daughter
will read over before making their
final decisions.
Another parent Carmita Goss, who
has always stressed the importance
Please turn to COLLEGE 4C


Pop star singer Rhianna and Chris Brown on stage performing together

Singer Rihanna speaks

out about being assaulted


R&B singer Rihanna says deal-
ing with the media attention af-
ter being assaulted in February
by ex-boyfriend Chris Brown was
humiliating. But she now hopes to
speak for young women who are
afraid to talk openly about domes-
tic violence.
The 21-year-old pop star told
Glamour magazine in an inter-
view posted online last week that
the police photo of her bruised
face that was leaked to reporters
added insult to injury.
After the assault, she awoke to
find helicopters circling her house
and reporters swarming her
street. "I felt like I went to sleep as
Rihanna and woke up as Britney
Spears," she said.
Rihanna said she felt disap-
pointed and taken advantage of,
especially when she heard that
the two officers under investiga-
tion for leaking her photo were
women.
"I felt like people were making it
into a fun topic on the Internet,
and it's my life," she said.


Rihanna said she didn't realize
how much her decisions affected
people she didn't know, like her
many fans. She feels stronger,
wiser and more aware now, she
added.
"Domestic violence is a big se-
cret," Rihanna said. "The positive
thing that has come out of my
situation is that people can learn
from that. I want to give as much
insight as I can to young women,
because I feel like I represent a
voice that really isn't heard. Now I
can help speak for those women."
Brown, 20, pleaded guilty to fel-
ony assault in June. He was sen-
tenced to five years' probation, six
months of community labor and a
year of domestic violence counsel-
ing for the attack, in which he was
accused of hitting, choking and
biting Rihanna in a rented sports
car.
TMZ published the photo of
Rihanna's bruised face less than
two weeks after the beating, and
the LAPD immediately launched an
internal investigation of the leak.


-Photo/ Sandra J.
A college representative helps a student fill out an informational card so that information can be mailed to the students
home about the college at the Miami Northwestern's College Fair.The Miami Times



Black Miamians headline annual book fair
Fields-Black advises young writers to travel more


By Sandra J. Charity
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


Edda L. Fields-Black never
thought of herself as an author.
For eight years, she struggled to
transform her dissertation into
the novel, Deep Roots: Rice Farm-
ers in West Africa and the African
Diaspora. Its 296 pages highlights
Fields-Black's journey in West Af-
rica since the early 90's and the ex-
periences that helped shaped her
views about the African Culture.
Fields-Black, a Miami native, will
be among the hundreds of authors
who will headline 26th annual Mi-
ami International Book Fair which
began on Sunday and is slated to
end until Nov. 15.
"I am so excited," said Fields-
Black. "I grew up going to the book
fairs."
Fields-Black, 37, is the daughter
of businessman Eddie Fields and'
historian Dorothy Jenkins Fields.
She graduated from Carrollton
School of the Sacred Heart then


HUNTER FIELDS-BLACK


furthered her education, receiving
a Bachelor's degree from Emory
University.
She later became a recipient of
Emory's Cuttino Prize, allowing her
to travel outside of Europe. Fields-
Black embarked on a journey to Si-
erra Leone then returned six times
to study in West Africa where she
built a career researching, writing
and teaching African history.
She obtained a Masters degree
from the University of Florida, be-


came a Teaching Assistant at Ober-
lin College (1999) and earned a
Ph.D. from the University of Penn-
sylvania.
Fields-Black is married to Samu-
el Black and has two children. She
is currently an associate professor
for the Department of History at
the Carnegie Mellon University in
Pittsburgh, PA.
Fields-Black says that teaching
has helped make her into a writer.
Please turn to BOOKS 3C


Michael Jackson hits no. i with film and album


Five months after his death, Mi-
chael Jackson is still a chart-top-
per.
The singer's This Is It concert
documentary and album of the
same name have both reached No.
1 in the U.S. and in 16 countries
worldwide, according to ratings re-
ports released Wednesday.
Directed by Jackson's tour cho-
reographer, Kenny Ortega, the
concert documentary -- which was
released Oct. 28 -- made movie


history as the highest-grossing
concert film of all time, besting Mi-
ley Cyrus' Hannah Montana: The
Movie. Its companion album now
tops Billboard's Top 200 charts
as well as the Soundtrack album
chart.
The disc, featuring Jackson's last
recorded single, is expected to top
album charts in Canada, Japan,
France, Italy, Holland, Belgium,
Turkey, New Zealand, Hong Kong,
Korea, Philippines, Singapore,


Taiwan, Thailand, the Middle East
and Colombia. It will likely rank
in the top three on charts in the
U.K., Australia, Argentina, Aus-
tria, Denmark, Norway, Portugal,
Switzerland and Spain.
Jackson is the first artist since
the Rolling Stones in 1971,to have
a No. 1 documentary and album
on the charts at the same time.
He died June 25 after suffering
cardiac arrest at his Holmby Hills,
Calif., home.


O"
.0


Ci









2C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


A special recognition to
Minnie Mickens-Jones,
who really knows how to or-
chestrate events. She has
taken charge of the St. John
Foundation "Overtown Is
Cooking Out" and now The
Eleventh Anniversary of Jef-
ferson Reaves Sr. Health
Center Gala Celebration,
last Thursday, at the Rusty
Pelican of Key Biscayne.
It was and elegant evening
beginning with the cock-
tail hour in the lobby, fol-
lowed by the seating of the
guests. the Psi Phi
Band played in the
background. Support
came from Governor
Charlie Crist, Con-
gressman Kendrick
Meek, State Senator
Fredrica S. Wilson,
Mayor Carlos Alva- FERGU
rez, Mayor Shirley
Gibson, Miami Gardens, The
Hon. Dorothy. Bendross-
Mindingall, Commissioner
Audrey M. Edmonson, and
Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mor-
tuary, PA.
After everyone was seat-
ed, Ms. Jones introduced
Rodney Baltimore from
the Tom Joyner Morning
Show as the moderator for
the evening. He welcomed
the guests and brought on
Rev. George Dickens, St.
Paul AME for the invoca-
tion. Next up were Dr. Rob-
ert Schwartz, M.D., for
the greetings, and Gregory
Gay, President of the Board,
for the occasion. He said
that the Jefferson Reaves
Sr. Health Center contin-
ues to provide comprehen-
sive primary healthcare for
thousands of residents in
Overtown, East Little Ha-
vana, Allapattah, Wynwood
and beyond. He went on to
say that some people origi-
nally considered their mis-


sion a waste of
time, but they
grew from 5,000
to 25,000 visits
annually in the
last decade.
During the meal, the band
provided dinner music of
the "oldie goldies".
Ms. Minnie Jones was
introduced to recognize
the honorees selected by
the board. She began with
James E. Fayson Sr., an
outstanding FAMU offi-
cial, community worker,
King Of Clubs B &
W Gala chairman,
and a member of St.
Paul AME. Emanuel
Washington, Sr. was
recognized for being
a teacher and track
and field coach as
JSON well as Park manager
at Gibson and Miami
Parks and a retired fireman
and Optimist Coach for sev-
eral years.
Also honored were
Tony E. Ferguson,
a graduate of Miami
Northwestern, Eck-
els College of Mortu-
ary Science, who fur-
ther studied at FIU,
St. Thomas, and is
a 55-year member FAYT
of Mr. Sinai Baptist
Church and Leonard Cur-
tel, a co-founder of the The
Jefferson Reaves Center
and enviable worker in the
Overtown community. Bob-
bie Mumford, daughter of
Rep. Reaves, read the proc-
lamations of each honoree,
while Baltimore introduced
keynote speaker, Dr. Nel-
son Adams who captivated
everyone with his statistics
on health.
Dr. Adams alluded to the
prevention of poor health,
obesity, and the ill health in
-Blacks and women- It was _


gratifying to hear Black
women health habits have
improve, but their longev-
ity is shorter than white
women. He suggested
more visits to the doc-
tor. His remarks received
a standing ovation. Ms.
Jones was given the mic for
closure with Mr. Gay, while
the band struck up and the
electric slide dancers
dominated.

********** w
The Host Commit-
tee to elect Frederica
Wilson to Congress
invites you to a Blast-
Off Extravaganza, J
Tuesday, November
10, beginning at 5
PM 8 PM, at Karu &,Y Ul-
tra Nightclub, 71 NW 14th
Street. The night will feature
The Tempting Temptations,
Bahamas Junkanoo Revue,
The Psi Phi Band, Miami
Gardens super Soul Step-
pers, and you joining the
longest Electric Slide Line
in the world. Additionally,
there will be a buffet, heavy
hors d'oeuvres, and
"Happy Hour" cash
bar.
Kudos go out to
the host commit-
tees, such as the
100 Black Men, 100
Black Women, Gam-
ma Zeta Omega and
SON Pi Delta of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Soror-
ity, All Bahamians, Bethune
Cookman University, Black
Lawyers, Black Minority
Contractors, Bulls for Life,
Charmettes, Daughters of
Isis, Dade Co. and Miami
alumnae of Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority, FAMU Alum-
ni, Jack & Jill Kappa Alpha
Psi, Links, Dade Democratic
Party, Morehouse College,
NAACP, Miami Northwest-
ern, Omega Psi Phi, PULSE,
State Attorney, Red Hatters
& Female Lawyer, Univer-
sity Women, and Tri-County
High School Alumni.


Senator Wilson began the
meeting by introducing new
committee members and in-
forming the group how im-
portant E-mails are to reach
people. Currently, 500-E-
mails have been sent out
which resulted in receiving
over $100,000. By contrast,
Congressman Kendrick
Meek's committee has raised
$4 million. Adrian
Jones, a graduate
of TSU and IT com-
pany owner spoke to
the importance of an
interrelationship of
fan and event pages
that should facilitate
using the Facebook
NES 'and Fan Pages oper-
ated by Sheila Hyl-
ton.
Other indefatigable work-
ers are Bobbie Mumford,
Barbara Dent, Melody
Delancey, Pamela Jones,
Consul General Gladys
Johnson, Betsy Kaplan,
former school board mem-
ber, Dr. Marvin Dunn,
Emma Curry, Al Dotson,
and Paul Wilson. Tune in
to Chatter next week for the
who, what, where, when,
and how.


Congratulations to
Marian Harris Shan-
non for celebrat-
ing Ninety Years of
Perfected Royalty,
last Saturday, at the
Church of the Open REA
Door with Keith La- *
variety, Esquire providing
the ambience and her friends
providing the content. The
program began with Olga
Van Beverhoudt, mistress
of ceremony, and included:
Venita Timpson, invoca-
tion, Euphemia Ferguson,
musical selection, Lille
Harris, video presentation
and Alberta Godfrey and
Dorothy P. Lee toasting
her accomplishments from


Booker T. Washington to the terson,
present. eyela I
Shannon is known as a Smith,
strong educator who collab- derson
orated with the late Jennie Sandra
Reaves to organize The Re- Carby,
tired Black Teachers Asso- chief,
ciation with the Afro-Amer- speaker
ican Methodist Churches She v
and is vital to the history of message
Black teachers in the State eyes w
of Florida. words.
Her enviable legacy was re- by Kan
ported by Roberta Daniels, McDow
president, BTW Alumni, day as
Sara F. Bullard, Dr. Doro- "Bless t
thy Fields, Gwen Welters, & "Mar
Brenda Williams, Sue Da-
vis, and Jason A. Moody, *
while Max The One Man A ma


Band provided the
music and 'Queen'
Marian Shannon
tearfully poured her
heart out to those
who honored her and
sang Happy Birthday,
the old fashion way.


Dr. R. Joaquin Wil-
lis, Pastor, and the wv
of The Church of the
Door initiated The Se
Annual women's We

October 17,
the theme: "W
of God, Harne
the Healing Pov
Forgiveness".
The comr
members so
Cynthia L. Th
VES son, a multi-tal
entrepreneur, 1
er, speaker, life coach
ference facilitator and
ken word author to d
her inspirational and ir
ing speech anointed b
to chasten, correct, co
and conceptualize.
Leading up to her me
included words of m
wisdom from Deacon
Otey, Chris Tomlin,
Galbreath, Dr. Gwen
H. Robinson, Dorothy


, Helen Baylor, Ad-
Bennett, Gwendolyn
Deacon Lisa S. An-
, Danielle Geathers,
H. Butler, Patricia
and Shirley L. Ar-
who introduced the
r.
was brilliant with her
;e and opened many
ith her inspirational
She was followed
rol Brant. Patsy G.
yell summed up the
the ensemble tolled
:he Lord, Oh My Soul"
ching to Zion".


in of all seasons is


Reverend Abraham
Thomas, because he
is always assisting
people, especially
with the 5000 Role
Models of Excellence
where he sings "If
.' I could Help Some-
body" at each meet-
WILSON ing, forum or unity
breakfast.
vomen However, his forte is writ-
Open ing. He writes so well that
wventh the names of his charac-
ekend ters merit mention here.
urday, His first book exuded the
under saga of the political world
Vomen in South Florida as a Grape-
essing fruit Republic, followed by
wer of "Weezie", "Skeeter", "Dr.
John 0. Brown" biography,
mittee "Ransom Hill" biography,
elicited and "Murderer" which is
iomp- available presently.
lented He has written many
teach- books and published many
, con- of them himself. Currently
i spo- he has changed his hat to
deliver composing and publish-
nspir- ing songs. His latest CD is
y God "Shout", where he manifest
>nvict, "So Much to Shout About"
and "My Faith Looks Up To
Message Thee" produced by C. H.
musical Thomas. You can find him
Annie at St. James AME Church
, Dan or-at a 5000 Role Models of
dolyn Excellence program.
y Pat-


By Ann Grac Swet


Marian Harris-Shannon ce
90th birthday on Oct. 17 with
Beta Sorority sisters and friend,
hall at the Church of the Open
non, all of your former student
who did not get a chance to be
join the Booker T. Washington
gang in wishing you a happy, I
birthday. May you live a long ti
grow old.


Thomas "Nick" Marshall wa
on Saturday, Oct. 31. Nick wi
membered by his school mate
friends. Not only was he a form
ami Police Officer, but Nick was
worker of any committee that h
Whether it was the community,
of Booker T. Washington or w
gave his all.
So sorry the United States of P
not secure the 2016 Olympics
be hosted in Chicago. Chicag
thought to be front-runner, was
the first round. The bid went
neiro, Brazil.


Wedding anniversary greetin
and Maliney, Clarke, Sr., Nov.
Rashford (Sonny) and Wilhelm
Jennings, Nov. 7, their 58th.
Our First Lady Michelle 0
the cover of "Glamour" magaz
first time a President's wife ha
the magazine's 70-year history.


Michael Jack,


Joe Jackson, 81, says he
has living expenses exceeding
$20,000 a month. His attorney
says the family patriarch doesn't
have a regular income and was
dependent on his son's money.
Joe Jackson says his monthly
expenses include $5,000 for ho-
tels and air travel, $2,500 for
eating out and $1,500 for rent
on his home in Las Vegas.Mi-
chael Jackson leads 12 newcom-
ers onto the top of the tally
Michael Jackson's father
wants the late singer's estate to


*lebrated her
her Zeta Phi
s in the social
Door. Shan-


honoring our "First Lady" for her
dedication to mentoring young
women.


its and those
taught by you Hearty congratulations to my buddy,
High School Oscar J. Braynon, Sr., who was honored
happy belated and recognized for his outstanding accom-
me and never plishments during the Diaspora Arts Co-
alition's Awards Gala and Benefit. Honor-
ees in this category are selected based on
leadership, support and assistance with
is laid to rest the preservation and promotion of art and
11 long be re- culture throughout Miami-Dade County.
s, family and
ler City of Mi- ***
also a diligent Are you ready for some football? Our
Ie worked on. Florida Classic 30th anniversary game be-
church, class tween Bethune-Cookman University and
whatever, Nick Florida A& M University in Orlando on
Nov. 21.
America could ** * * ***
Games would Deval Patrick was elected Massachusetts
-o, who were first Black governor and is only the second
eliminated in elected Black state governor in the United
to Rio de Ja- States history. Have our young generation
and older generation thought about what
are we going to do when the "fad" of tattoos
gs to Harold goes out and it is no longer in style?
3, their 36th; ** * * ****
enia (Franks) Norma Culmer-Mims children treated
their mother to a beautiful repast at her
bama graces daughter, Ronda, home on Sunday, Nov.
,ine. It is the 1. The family and friends joined in the happy
is done so in celebration. Norma's birthday was on Nov.
"Glamour" is 3.


son's father seeks support

help him cover living expenses according to court papers filed
that exceed $20,000 a month, Friday.




SoNC TER MADE FRESH



ou have to taste It to believe It.
cial seafood sauco included.

954-559-3739
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Women of Precious movie undertake transformational roles


By Susan Wloszczyna

Lee Daniels is the anti-Pyg-
malion. He loves to knock a diva
off her pedestal and bring her
down to earth.
Hand the filmmaker a gor-
geous specimen like Halle Berry
and he will strip away all evi-
dence of airbrushed Hollywood
artifice to reveal the talent that
lies beneath. And, as in Berry's
case when she played a dirt-
poor widow of a death row con-
vict in 2001's Monster's Ball,
her efforts just might lead to an
Oscar.
Daniels, who produced Ball,
also assumes the mantle of di-
rector with Precious: Based on
the Novel Push by Sapphire,
one of the year's most talked-
about dramas even before it
opens Friday.
And what are they are talk-
ing about, besides how Oprah
Winfrey and Tyler Perry have
thrown their clout behind the
festival-circuit favorite about a
horribly abused Harlem teen,
who is obese, illiterate and
pregnant with her second child
by her father, as she struggles
to escape from her hellish life?
Mostly, it's the heartbreak-


ingly honest performances by
the film's four main actresses -
and that Daniels dared to give
Mariah Carey a mustache.
As he says of his cast, "They
gave me a miracle, they gave
me my truth." Here is the truth
behind how each actress defied
expectations as a victimized
daughter (Gabourey Sidibe), a
monstrous mother (Mo'Nique),
a selfless teacher (Paula Pat-
ton) and a weary social worker
(Carey).
Lee Daniels says: "She speaks
like a white girl from the Val-
ley. Very chirpy and giggly. She
is a special girl and, I think,
unaware of it. She is either in
denial about her physicality or
she's from another planet. She
is evolved. She is so secure
about who she is."
Precious sits in the last row
of a classroom, her hulking
350-pound form barely fitting
behind her desk. Sullen and si-
lent, she is locked in her own
private prison. But in the fanta-
sies that unreel in her 16-year-
old mind, she gaily walks the
red carpet and flirtatiously pos-
es for a music video.
Then reality interrupts, and
she briefly comes out of her


shell to violently slug another
student for mouthing off to the
teacher.
Gabourey Sidibe, 26, is no
Precious. As she enters the
room, she is fiercely working
a clingy hot-pink dress and
wearing a smile so bright, it's
as if she has swallowed the
sun. The daughter of an R&B
singer, Alice Tan Ridley, and a
Senegalese cabdriver who left
when she was young, Sidibe
(pronounced SIH-deh-bay)
more than lives up to her nick-
name of Gabby.
The Brooklyn-born, Harlem-
raised customer-service rep
was working on a psychology
degree when she was chosen


by Daniels, who saw at least
500 hopefuls in his quest for
the perfect Precious.
Sidibe never aspired to star-
dom. Her only previous acting
experience was in college pro-
ductions such as The Wiz (she
was Glinda the Good Witch)
and Peter Pan. "I did them be-
cause I was bored," she says. "I
never wanted to be an actress.
Never. I never thought even
when I was doing it, 'Oh, I can
make a career out of this.' "
She heard about the audi-
tions from a friend at school -
"He told me they were looking
for a plus-size girl age 18 to 25"
- and tried out. Shortly thereaf-
ter she met with Daniels.


I fn I ,I I I I

I MICHAEL JACKSON'S

THIS IS IT


-Photo/Todd Plitt
Paula Patton plays the teacher to Gabourey Sidibe's student. Patton
says that when she read the script,'" cried and I was scared." Sidibe
says, "I am still in awe."


Local author inspired by Africa


BOOKS
continued from 1C


During the Fair, Fields-
Black and fellow Miamian
Tera Hunter will take part
in a African Diaspora Pan-
el of Black women scholars,
which will be moderated by
Carole Boyce Davies, for-
mer professor at Florida In-
ternational University and
director of the African-New
World Studies Program, at
the Miami Dade College,
Wolfson Campus, at 5 p.m.,
Nov. 14.
Fields-Black, who helped


spearhead the event, says
that she will discuss in
the panel, "why I wrote the
book and discuss some
of the challenges that we
construct as well as many
parts of the diaspora."
Hunter says she is also
excited.
A graduate of Miami Edi-
son Senior High, Hunter
earned a Bachelor's degree
from Duke University and
a PhD from Yale Univer-
sity. She is a professor of
history and African-Amer-'
ican studies at Princeton
University and the author


of To 'Joy My Freedom:
Southern Black Women's
Lives and Labors After the
Civil War.
Fields-Black plans on re-
turning to Africa to work
on her second novel.
Her advice for upcoming
writers is to keep writing
and travel.
"Writing is a difficult pro-
cess," said Fields-Black.
"Get out there and get your
work out there in front as
much people as possible.
Most importantly; travel.
Traveling broadens your
perspective in many ways."


NOW PLAYING
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES


MIAMI DADE COLLEGE'S CULTURAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT


CULTURfl DEL LOBO
PERFORMANCE SERIES































Fri. and Sat., Nov. 20-21, 2009


8 p.m.

Byron Carlyle Theater

500 71 St., Miami Beach

TICKETS
General admission: $22 Students and seniors: $18

INFORMATION
For detailed venue information and secure online tickets:
www.mdc.edu/culture 305-237-3010

TicketMaster: Miami 305-358-5885
Ft. Lauderdale 954-523-3309
www.ticketmaster.com

JPMiami Dade
College


Adrienne Arsht Center presents
HOT PEAS 'N BUTTER
Winner of the 2006, 2008, and 2009 "Parent's Choice Awards," Hot Peas 'N
Butter is a unique children's musical group that incorporates elements of
traditional Latin music, Afro-Caribbean rhythms, jazz, folk, and rock.
11 AM, 2 PM and 5 PM
Carnival Studio Theater (at the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $15
Florida Grand Opera presents
SUOR ANGELICA & PAGLIACCI
2 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$13.75, $22.75, $27.75, $ 62.75, $81.75, $99.75, $132.75, $178.75
Adrienne Arsht Center and Ghetto Youths International presents
THE AWAKE TOUR: JULIAN MARLEY
FEATURING STEPHEN AND DAMIAN "JR. GONG" MARLEY
Julian Marley and the Uprising featuring Stephen Marley and Damian "Jr.
Gong" Marley will perform with soulful vocals inspired by life and spirituality.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $24.50, $34.50, $44.50


SUOR ANGELICA & PAGLIACCI
7 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$13.75, $22.75, $27.75, $ 62.75, $81.75, $99.75, $132.75, $178.75

SUOR ANGELICA & PAGLIACCI
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$27.75, $52.75, $81.75, $ 99.75, $132.75, $178.75, $228.75, $253.75
-.1iJ=E114 1 I 11_M- 1 r_
Adrienne Arsht Center and Larry Rosen presents
JAZZ ROOTS: AN EVENING WITH DAVE GRUSIN
Featuring: Jon Secede, Arturo Sandoval, Nestor Torres, Sammy
Flgueroa, and the Mancini Institute Orchestra.Featuring Grusin's classic
jazz arrangement of West Side Story, plus many of his acclaimed film
scores, including Heaven Can Waft, The Milagro Beanfleld War,
Havana, and many more.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $25, $45, $55, $85, $125


Adrienne Arsht Center presents Masterworks Sanford and Dolores Ziff Dance Series
BATSHEVA ENSEMBLE
Batsheva Is one of the most influential, fresh and exciting dance companies
on the planet, and one of Israel's leading cultural ambassadors.
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $25, $35, $45, $60, $75, $90


BATSHEVA ENSEMBLE
2 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $25, $35, $45, $60, $75, $90
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAYS:
FEATURING RICHARD SMALLWOOD
Grammy and Stellar award-winning gospel legend Richard Smallwood is
the featured guest on this Free Gospel Sundays holiday program.
4 PM Knight Concert Hall FREE


Hot Peas W uter










7The Awae Tour.
Jabn MrM y


Jau noors:
An Evening with
Oeve Grusin


Batshev Ensemble


Free Adrienne Armht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby,
No reservations necessary.

**1 *I .. . MII x fl E


F


Bl.AC.KS MNUS' CONIROI l IIIFIR \\N IISI'IN


SUBSCRIBEIX

TODAY!n ,,+








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3C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009










BL.ACKSS MUST (CONrNTOI. IIIO (O)WN 1)1S'IINY


Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 :


Creativity and controversy


By Mike Snider

After gaining a reputation
for its immersive first-person
Call of Duty action video games
based in World War II, game
developer Infinity Ward wanted
to stretch its creative muscles
with an original, contemporary
game.
The result, Call of Duty 4:
Modern Warfare, won numer-
ous awards as 2007's best game
and has sold more than 14 mil-
lion units worldwide.
With the sequel, Call of Duty:
Modern Warfare 2 (out today,
Xbox 360, PS3 and PC, rated
M for ages 17-up, prices start
at $60), Infinity Ward looks to
test the boundaries of what is
considered acceptable in video
games. Players can choose to
take part in a terrorist attack
against civilians, and they de-
fend a bombed-out nation's
capital.
"The coolest thing is you .don't
exactly know who is going to
win," says creative director Ja-


son West. "It's actually scary. (A
near-future setting) allows it to
be more real and, I hope, reso-
nate with people more than the
rah-rah good vs. evil stuff of the
past."
In the first Modern Warfare,
players hunted down power-
hungry ultranationalist Rus-
sian leader Imran Zakhaev. Five
years later, a new leader named
Vladimir Makarov has risen to
power, and an elite internation-
al task force (the player includ-
ed) must pursue him.
Think 24 with terrorists
threatening the USA and Jack
Bauer forced to use any means
necessary. Or Tom Clancy's
1994 book Debt of Honor, in
which the U.S. Capitol is de-
stroyed during a joint session of
Congress, killing the president
and other officials.
To help pull off its thriller, In-
finity Ward enlisted Hollywood
hands including film composer
Hans Zimmer and NCIS writer/
executive producer Jesse Stern,
both of whom were impressed.


-Photo/Infinity Ward
Tough choices: Players can decide whether to attack civilians in Call
of Duty: Modern Warfare 2.


Oprah Winfrey removes Winans from show


Oprah Winfrey is remov-
ing gospel singer BeBe Win-
ans from her show's "kara-
oke challenge" until charges
against him for allegedly
pushing, his ex-wife to the
ground., are resolved.
Winans appeared on The
Oprah Winfrey Show last
week and was seen in pro-
mos for future appearanc-
es. Now he'll be cut out of
the segment, said Winfrey
spokesman Don Halcombe
on Thursday.
Winfrey was criticized by
some bloggers this week for
including Winans after she
had taken a strong stand


against domestic violence
earlier this year. She did a
show on the topic when sing-
er Chris Brown assaulted his
then-girlfriend Rihanna.
The daytime TV leader
said at the time: "Domestic
violence is something that I
wouldn't tolerate. Period."
Halcombe would only say
that the decision to eliminate
Winans was made this week.
It was not clear if Winfrey
had been aware that Winans
was charged with misde- BEBE WINANS
meanor domestic assault in Gospel Singer
the Feb. 13 incident, where
Winansz aid -his ex-wif .-ahu their- children.
Debra W. _dly argue .W.u- ans.has a. t date set


for Jan. 20.
Winans' manager did not
immediately return a tele-
phone call for comment.
"Let's just not have a double
standard on domestic violence
or even accusations of domes-
tic violence," said Joni Reyn-
olds, a woman from the Balti-
more area and author of a blog
called Ebony Mom Politics.
She had called attention
to Winans' participation and
wondered if Winfrey had over-
looked the charges because the
Winans were friends or because
there were no photos that had
become public as in Rihanna's
case.


-Photo/ Sandra J. Charite
Dominique Roy, a high school senior, receives information
from a representative at the at the Miami Northwestern's
College Fair.The Miami Times

Students concerned about college cost

COLLEGE
continued from 1C

of education to her children felt it was crucial
to meet with the college representative. Her son,
Herman Bain, is currently a junior who desires a
career in Business or Education.
"All I need is for him to attend an institution that
offers him the best so he can succeed in the real
world," said Goss.
Students also found the College Fair informative.
Dominique Roy, a high school senior, already has
a scholarship to Florida A&M University but her
dream is to attend Florida State University. She still
awaits their reply. Dominique, 17, attended the Fair
hoping to find a college that has her major and an
affordable tuition.
"I don't want to be stuck in college," said Dominique,
who plans on majoring in Psychology but she doesn't
want to be away from home and strapped for cash.
That was one concern in talking to students prior
to the College Fair, Wisenbacker-Clark said a lot of
seniors were considering college after graduation but
they worried about not having the funds to go.
"It is important that the students talk to their
advisor about financial aid opportunities are available
to them," she said. "During these tough times, there
is money available for all students."


publix.com/ad


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SAVE UP TO 1.00


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or Apple Jacks, 11.2 to 16.5-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.21


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SAVE UP 10.1.50
(12-Pack Assorted Yuengling Beer or Lager,
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Prices effective Thursday, November 12 through Wednesday, November 18, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River,
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties. Any item carried by Publix GreenWise Market will be at the Publix advertised sale price. Quantity. rights reserved.


12-Pack
Selected
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(Sale Price 3/12.00 With 1 Free,
That's 4/12.00 or 3.00 each
With the Purchase of 4.)
SAVE UP TO 7.16 ON 4


-f Ow VISA visA


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 20091











The Miami Times



us ness


SECTION D


Fannie Mae to start
renting out homes
instead of foreclosing
Thousands of borrowers on the verge
of foreclosure will soon have the option
of renting their homes from Fannie Mae,
under a policy announced Thursday.
The government-controlled company,
through its "Deed for Lease" program,
will allow borrowers to transfer owner-
ship to Fannie Mae and sign a one-year
lease, with month-to-month extensions
after that.
The program will "eliminate some of the
uncertainty of foreclosure, keeps fami-
lies and tenants in their homes during
a transitional period, and helps to sta-
bilize neighborhoods and communities,"
Jay Ryan, a Fannie Mae vice president,
said in a statement.
But the effort is likely to affect a rela-
tively small number of homeowners. In
the first half of the year, Fannie Mae took
back about 1,200 properties through
this process, known as a deed-in-lieu of
foreclosure. That pales in comparison
to the 57,000 foreclosed properties the
company repossessed in the period.
While neither option is particularly at-
tractive for the homeowner, a deed-in-
lieu does less harm to the borrower's
credit record.
The rental program is designed to help
homeowners who don't qualify for a loan
modification under the Obama adminis-
tration's plan, but still want to remain in
their homes. Fannie Mae is not planning
to market the homes for sale during the
one-year rental period.


Holidays: Retailers cut
prices on hot DVDs
Wal-Mart Stores is upping the ante
heading into the holiday season, cutting
online preorder prices of some upcoming
DVDs following last month's price cut on
books.
The move prompted rivals Amazon.
com and Target to slash prices of some
online pre-order DVDs, which pushed
Wal-Mart to take a few more cents off.
The world's biggest retailer said late
Thursday that it would lower online
prices of new DVDs such as "Harry
Potter and the Half Blood Prince" and
"Star Trek" to $10.
When Amazon reduced some of its DVD
prices to $9.99, Wal-Mart shpt back by
lowering its DVDs to $9.98 as of Friday
morning.
The retailer, which generated more
than $400 billion in sales last year, was
embroiled in a book price war with Target
and Amazon.com last month that saw
the companies lower online pre-order
prices on titles such as "Under the Dome"
by Stephen King and "Ford County" by
John Grisham. Prices dropped as low as
$8.98.


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER I1 -17, :2009


Recession: A silent


depression for Blacks


By Kathy Bergen

The cold fact, however, is that this
deep recession is hitting Blacks more
severely than the overall population,
due largely to the staggering levels of
unemployment for this segment of the
population.
When October unemployment data
came out Friday, the nation's sea-
sonally adjusted rate was expected to
nudge upward, close to 10 percent.
But among Black, the jobless rate
was 15.5 percent in September. In Il-
linois, the Black unemployment rate
was closer to 18.6 percent in the third
quarter, according to estimates by the
Economic Policy Institute.
For Black teens nationwide, the rate
was 40.8 percent in September.
The United States historically has
seen higher unemployment rates for
minorities, but the gap has widened
in this recession, in part because of
job losses in the manufacturing and
auto sectors. And the jobless growth,
coupled with the predatory lending
that flourished in segregated neigh-
borhoods during the real estate boom,


HI Hi MIAMI TIMES


have led to dramatic spikes in mort-
gage foreclosures, .sending home
values into a downward spiral. The
bottom line: A silent depression for
Black.
"The untold story is that between
unemployment, a significant drop in
property values, the wave of foreclo-
sures and a lack of credit, there is a
whole generation of African-American
wealth that is disappearing," said
Jean Pogge, executive vice president of
ShoreBank, which operates in many
minority communities across the city
and is under financial pressure itself
due to loan losses.
"The traditional way Americans have
acquired wealth and gotten into the
middle class is through buying a home
and building equity in that home," she
said, "and a lot of that has been wiped
out by the recession."
Robert Williams, a 38-year-old who
made more than $50,000 a year train-
ing travel agents, is among those who
have come perilously close to losing a
home due to a layoff.
The South Shore condo owner had
Please. turn to BLACKS 5D


Jobless claims fall to to-month low


The number of workers filing new
claims for jobless insurance fell more
than expected last kveek to a 10-month
low, government data showed Thurs-
day, pointing to a gradual improvement
in the labor market.
Initial claims for state unemployment
benefits dropped 20,000 to a seasonal-
ly adjusted 512,000 in the week ended
Oct. 31, the lowest since early January,
the Labor Department said. New job-
less claims had bounced around the
520,000-532,000 range over the previ-
ous four weeks.
RETAIL: October sales offer relief to
merchants
Analysts polled by Reuters had fore-
cast new claims slipping to 523,000
last week from a previously reported
530,000.
Separately, the Labor Department
reported that non-farm productivity in
the third quarter rose at its fastest pace
in six years as companies squeezed


more output from a smaller pool of labor
and cut costs to deal with a slump in de-
mand.
While new applications for unemploy-
ment insurance have substantially fallen
from March's high levels, they remain el-
evated and analysts say they need to drop
below 400,000 to signal that the economy
is creating jobs.
The four-week moving average for new
claims slipped 3,000 to 523,750 last
week, also the lowest in almost 10 months
and a decline for the ninth week in a row,
indicating the labor market continues to
edge toward stability.
The four-week moving average is consid-
ered a better gauge of underlying trends
as it irons out week-to-week volatility.
The Labor Department is expected to
report on Friday that the decline in em-
ployment is slowing. Analysts have fore-
cast that payrolls fell 175,000 in October,
compared with a decline of 263,000 in
September.


Obama signs bill to extend homebuyer credit, jobless benefits


By Brian Faler

President Barack Obama is set to
sign into law a bill that extends $8,000
tax credits for first- time homebuyers
and unemployment benefits.
The measure also provides tax re-
funds to money-losing companies.
The House approved the legislation
yesterday on a 403-12 vote; the Sen-
ate passed it 98-0 on Nov. 4. Obama
signed the bill on Friday, the same
day the Labor Department releases
an update on the nation's jobless
rate.
The measure extends until April 30


the homebuyers tax credit that would
otherwise expire at the end of this
month.
"The homebuyers' credit has helped
pave the way for stabilization in the
housing market and contributed to
three consecutive months of rising
home prices," said Representative
Jim McDermott, a Washington Dem-
ocrat. "Its extension will continue to
make homeownership more afford-
able and bring confidence to a hous-
ing market and economy that remain
fragile."
The jobless will get as many as .20
Please turn to CREDIT 8D


The business of empowering Black America


By Harry C. Alford
NNPA Columnist

The eupho- -
ria and ex-
citement over
our first Black
President was
tremendous
and it shook
the world for
the better. Now that one
year has gone by after the
election it is time to get back
to business. The business of
empowering Black America
and the rest of the Diaspora
should be our paramount


priority. Yet, it appears that
many opinion molders and
political operators, White
and Black, want to put that
kind of business on the
"back burner" or even out of
our minds. There is a very
elitist view that it is OK now.
We can forget about all that
poverty, low achieving edu-
cation standards, skyrocket-
ing unemployment, etc. Oh!
How soon do we forget?
The new change in leader-
ship is anything but respect-
ful of the efforts and achieve-
ments of the past. It really
hit me hard when someone


from this new administra-
tion suggested to the Nation-
al Black Chamber of Com-
merce Board of Directors
that we consider changing
our name. "The term Black


attitude coming from the
"Young Turks" who want to
close the book on the move-
ment for civil rights and eco-
nomic equity. Oh yes, there
are more than a few who


The new change in leadership is anything but respectful of the efforts
and achievements of the past. It really hit me hard when someone
from this new administration suggested to the National Black Cham-
ber of Commerce Board of Directors that we consider changing our name.


seems out of place now".
We looked at the person
as if they had just landed
from Mars. It was insulting
but it also indicated a new


think we, Black folks, have
arrived and it is now time for
new initiatives. New initia-
tives that are broad in scope
and not specific to the Black


community of this nation.
It is as if victory has final-
ly been won. Or even bet-
ter, I got mine now you get
yours.
Consider this; the Nation-
al Office of the NAACP has
been encouraged to have
a new focus. There are re-
sources now being diverted
to the state of Maine to as-
sist and empower white
prison inmates. Yes, they
want to register white male
inmates to vote and educate
them on the issues. In es-
sence, it is to increase the
Democratic voting roles and


knock off the two Republi-
can senators there.
We have record unemploy-
ment, skyrocketing high
school dropout rates, more
males in jail than in college
and family breakups that
are historical. Yet, the old-
est civil rights organization
has been persuaded to con-
centrate on Maine. The most
shocking part of this is that
it has taken the "bait". In
the name of Dr. Martin Lu-
ther King Jr. and the many
other giants please snap out
of it. It is a trick bag and you
are becoming too naive.


*"4










BIAC( KS M UJST CONTROL Tl'If iR OWN I )I-s .INY


Unemployment rate climbs to 10.2 percent


By Neil Irwin

More than one in 10 members
of the American workforce were
unable to get a job in October,
the Labor Department said
Friday, the first time in nearly
three decades that the unem-
ployment rate has soared into
double digits.
The unemployment rate rose
to 10.2 percent, department
said, up from 9.8 percent in
September, the highest level
since 1983. Employers also con-
tinued slashing jobs, though at
a slower rate than September,
showing that even though the
economy is expanding, the job
market remains dismal.
The crossing of that symbolic
10 percent barrier is likely to
weigh on both the psychology
of American consumers and the
urgency of efforts in Washing-
ton to prop up the job market.


Friday, President Barack
Obama intends to sign a bill to
extend unemployment insur-
ance benefits longer, reflecting
the rise of long-term jobless-
ness. The bill also extends a
first-time home-buyer tax credit
and expands it so current ho-
meowners are eligible, and the
administration and congressio-
nal leaders ,are both weighing
other steps they could take to
bolster the job market.
The employment report in-
dicated that employers cut a
net 190,000 jobs. Those losses
were broadly in line with ana-
lysts' forecasts, and economists
generally view that number as
a more reliable indicator of the
job market's changes month-to-
month than the unemployment
rate. That 'number shows an
employment situation that con-
tinues to get worse, though at
a rate more typical of a normal


recession than the severe reces-
sion evident earlier in the year.
The results nonetheless show
that even as companies began
increasing their output in the
past few months -- gross do-
mestic product rose at a 3.5
percent rate in the third quarter
and likely has continued to rise
in the fourth -- they have man-
aged to do so without adding to
their payrolls, instead squeez-
ing more production out of their
existing workforce.
There were some positive
signs in the report. Job loss fig-
ures for August and September
were revised to show less severe
declines than first thought. The
average manufacturing work-
week rose 0.1 hour to 40 hours,
suggesting that employers be-
gan to bring production work-
ers back for more hours after
cutting their hours over most of
the past year.


S60,000



i jobs lost in



a single day


Small businesses struggling as unemployment goes up higher


By Paul Davidson

Small businesses often lead
the nation out of recession.
Not this time.
The unemployment rate
jumped to 10.2% in October
from 9.8% in September, and
economists say a big reason is
small businesses. With sales
weak, they're still slashing
jobs and faring worse than
their larger rivals.
"Small business tends to
lead the way out, and that's
just not happening here," says
Mark Zandi of Moody's Econo-
my.com.
Nineteen percent of small-
business owners cut jobs by
a seasonally adjusted average
of 4.2 workers per firm in the
third quarter, according to a
late-October survey by the Na-
tional Federation of Indepen-


dent Business (NFIB). Just 8%
boosted employment by an av-
erage 3.5 workers per firm.
That's better than the pre-
vious month, but "the job-
generating machine is still in
reverse," says NFIB economist
William Dunkelberg.
The struggles of small busi-
nesses help explain why the
jobless rate soared even while
the Labor Department's sepa-
rate payroll survey showed
employers shed 190,000 jobs
in October, down sharply from
an average 357,000 from May
through July. The payroll sur-
vey is skewed toward larger
companies, Zandi says.
Businesses with fewer than
20 employees account for 25%
of all jobs but generated 40%
of job growth in the last recov-
ery, the Small Business Ad-
ministration says. With no ex-


cess workers, many must hire
in a rebound to meet surging
demand.
Reasons they're struggling:
*Credit. Small firms are find-
ing it tough to secure credit,
with 14% in a recent NFIB
survey saying loans are hard
to get. That's largely because
they don't have bricks-and-
mortar assets that can serve as
collateral, says Molly Brogan,
vice president of the National
Small Business Association.
*Limited exports. They're
less likely to export their prod-
ucts, so unlike large compa-
nies, are not benefiting from
nascent recoveries overseas,
Zandi says.
*Health care costs. They're
worried about costs that are
rising more sharply- than for
large firms, and uncertainty
about reform, Brogan says.


Invitation to Bid No. 9200-011
ITB Title: Vehicle Logic Units

Miami-Dade County is soliciting bids to purchase
vehicle logic equipment manufactured by Digital
Recorders Inc. It is anticipated the County will
issue an agreement for twelve months. Federal
Transit Administration (FTA) funds are being used
for this purchase. All FTA requirements apply to
this solicitation.

The solicitation package, which will be available
starting November 5. 2009. can be obtained
at no cost on-line at www.miamidade.gov/dpm.
The package can also be obtained through the
County's Vendor Assistance Unit (305) 375-5773,
Department of Procurement Management, 111 NW
1" Street, Suite 1300, Miami, FL 33128-1974 at
a cost of $10.00 for each solicitation package and
an additional $5.00 fee for a request to receive
the solicitation package through the United States
Postal Service.

Deadline for submission of proposals is December
2. 2009 at 2:00 p.m. (local time), at Miami-
Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor,
Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. This
solicitation is subject to the County's Cone. of
Silence Ordinance 98-106.


CITY OF MIAMI
SUNSHINE MEETING NOTICE





A workshop for presentation of government
procedures, public meetings, public records, ethics,
sunshine law, conflicts of interest, City of Miami form
of government, and related topics will be at Miami
City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida
at 9:00 AM on Friday November 13, 2009. The
Mayor and Miami City Commissioners and their staff
members, City Attorney's Office, and City Clerk's
Office, have been invited to attend this workshop.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk
(#003322)


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
PROPOSED INSTALLATION OF A TRAFFIC CIRCLE IN COCONUT
GROVE, AT THE INTERSECTION OF MATILDA ST. AND DAY AVE.

City Hall 3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Nov 19, 2009
beginning at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the public's best interest that
the City Commission approve the installation of a traffic circle in Coconut Grove
at the intersection of Matilda St. and Day Ave., requesting the Miami-Dade
County Traffic Engineering Division approve implementation of the project.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City
Commission meeting of Nov 19, 2009 at:
MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with respect
to the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the
City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting,
that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based
(F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.


Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003317) ,


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 191150 TREE AND PALM RELOCATIONS

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2009

A MANDATORY pre-bid conference and site visit will be held on Thursday, No-
vember 12, 2009 at 10:00 am at the Miami Riverside Center Building, 444 SW
2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida (Meet on the 8th floor conference room).,
The purpose of this conference is to allow potential Bidders an opportunity to
present questions to staff and obtain clarification of the requirements of the Bid
documents. It is mandatory that a representative (s) of the bidder attend in
order to qualify to bid. Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City
of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement
Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE NO.
12271.

Pete Hernandez, "*',
City Manager""
AD NO. 009504


CITY OF MIAMI. FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED TO
REGISTERS LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO ENGAGING IN
LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS AND COMMITTEES
OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE APPLICABLE ORDINANCE
IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL),
LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON NOVEMBER 19, 2009, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, THE MIAMI
CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED TO
THE REGULAR AGENDA:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH
ATTACHMENTS, RESCINDING RESOLUTION NO. R-07-
0485 WHICH ACCEPTED THE PLAT ENTITLED JACKSON
SOUL, A REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public Works
Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction Division,
located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 41 Floor, during regular working hours. Phone
305-416-1248.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views.

Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY)'no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.


Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(#003314)


YOU DON'T NEED

A HURRICANE
TO CALL ME

$$$ GET CASH $$$

Bathroom Kitchen Plumbing A.ak;#
Ceiling Damage, Fire Damrng
Broken Pipes?
sL 0.-61L25


I4


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


















SECTION D




Apartments




GREAT NEWSItI

PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
3650 NW 36th St.
Miami, Fl 33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY.

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: $698.00

APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MORE!!!

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET

FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING: JULY 7, 2009
(305) 635- 9505

*Income restrictions apply,
rents are subject to
change


101 N.E. 78 Street
Three bdrms Special $875,
two bdrms $815 and 1 bdrm,
$700. nice and clean, park-
ing. Section 8 OK!
786-326-7424
1140 N.W. 79 ST.
One bedroom, one bath
$550. Free Water. Mr. Willie
#109. 305-642-7080 .

1212 N.W. 1 Avenue
$500 MOVE IN. One
bedroom, one bath, $500,
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080
1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bdrms, gated security,
tile. $700 mthly, $1000 to
move in. 305-696-7667
1229 N.W. 1 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080,
786-236-1144

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725. One Free
Month. 305-747-4552
1306 N.W. 61 Street
Two bdrms. renov, security
gate, $600, 954-638-2972
1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One bdrm,
one bath $425. Ms. Shorty
#1
786-290-1438
13202 NE 6 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, cen-
tral air, tile. $750 monthly.
786-260-3838
1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080

140 N.W. 13 Street
$525 MOVE IN. Two bed-
room, one bath $525.
786-236-1144/305-642,
7080
140 S.W. 6 St.
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$450 monthly
Call:305-267-9449
1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bdrm, one bath.
$600 mthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$725 to move in.
786-290-5498
1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath
$425. Two bedrooms one
bath. $525. 305-642-7080

1545 NW 8 AVENUE
One and Two bedrooms,
one bath, ceramic tile, cen-
tral air, carpet, balcony, new
kitchen, appliances, laundry
machine, quiet, parking.
Starting at $650.
FREE WATER
Move in today!
786-506-3067

1969 N. W. 2 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air, free
water.


305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475. Call 305-642-7080


SS


U


e


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Appliances, free
water. 305-642-7080,

220 N.W. 16 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$600. Appliances.
305-642-7080
2239 N.W. 87 Street
Spacious, clean one
bedroom, one bath. $590
monthly. New appliances,
air and hot water included.
954-410-2863
2416 N.W. 22 Court
One bedroom one bath
$600
Two bedrooms two bath
$725
Air, Free Water. 305-642-
7080

2515 N.W. 52 Street #2
Nice one bedroom, tiled, air,
appliances. $500 monthly.
$1000 to move in.
954-522-4645
2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849
2945 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$575, Two bedrooms, one
bath, $725. Section 8 OK.
786-412-9343
2972 N.W. 61 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, $550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

3669 Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedrooms $650, stove, re-
frigerator, air. 305-642-7080
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699
5520 S.W. 32nd Street
Hallandale FLORIDA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
with living room and washer
and dryer connection, $850
monthly, $1450 move in.
786-370-0832
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699
6832 N.W. 5th Place
Studio, $105 weekly, $450 to
move in. 786-286-2540
6900 NW 2 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 o.k. 786-295-9961
6950 N.W. 8th Avenue
Newly remodeled studio apt.,
$450-$500, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-675-1740.
7601 N.E. 3 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath. Re-
modeled kitchen new floors,
appliances. $750 monthly,
security negotiable.
Call 305-525-0338
7625 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$600. Stove, refrigerator,
free water. 305-642-7080
912 NW 55 TERRACE #2
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$675 monthly. Contact
Rastee, 678-575-0940
924 NW 29 STREET
SECTION 8 SPECIAL. Two
bedrooms, one bath. No
Water Bill. 786-262-7313

97th Street Area
Large apartment, separate
living room, $625 mthly. 786-
286-2540
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, laundry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. For more informa-
tion/specials.
www.capitalrentalagency.
com
Carver Ranches
Two bedrooms one bath.
$650 monthly, includes water
garbage and sewer.
954-885-9641

Close to Miami Avenue
on N.E. 84th Street
One bedroom and efficiency
for rent. Call 305-970-5574


COCONUT GROVE AREA
One bedroom, good condi-
tion, beautiful tiled floors. Low
rent. Section 8 Welcome.
305-448-2742
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in
speclal.One bedroom, one
bath, $495, two bedrooms,
one bath, $595. Free water
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
Located Near 90th Street
and 27 Avenue
One unfurnished apt. and one
furnished one bedroom, one
bath, lights, water, and air in-
cluded. Call 305-693-9486.
MIDTOWN MIAMI
One bdrm, one bath. $750
monthly. 305-244-4671
N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
786-521-7151
305-769-0146


Condos/Townhouses
2871 NW 195 STREET
Four bdrms, two baths. Sec-
tion 8 ok. $1600. 786-346-,
5918
3 AVE. N.W. 177 ST.
Across from Walmart.Two
bedrooms, one bath, jacuzzi,
newly remodeled, surround
system, gated security, cen-
tral air, tiled. $1200 mthly, first
and last to move in, water in-
cluded. Pets allowed. Section
8 Accepted. 786-348-4230
HIALEAH
Two bedrooms two baths.
$1000 monthly.
305-749-6749, 305-510-6465
OPA-LOCKA AREA
Three bdrms, two and a half
bath. Upstairs and down-
stairs, new appliances, wash-
er, dryer and air. $1350 nego-
tiable. Section 8 OK!.
Call 305-926-8019
Duplexes
10070 N.W. 12 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. 786-277-8287
1023 N.W. 47 ST
Newly Remodeled three
bedroom one bath, one
bedroom one bath. Appli-
ances. Free electric, water.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

1081 N.W. 100th Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, fenced, $900 mthly, first,
last and sec. to move in. Call
305-986-8395.
11053 NE 12 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths,
washer, dryer, fenced yard,
security bars, central air,
heat, water included. Tiled
throughout. $1150 mthly,
$400 security. Close to
KMart, Home Depot, parks,
schools and shopping.
786-709-7436

12400 N.E. 11 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
three bedrooms two baths
$1000-$1100), two baths.
Appliances, central air.
305-642-7080
1274 N.W. 55 Street
One bedroom, free water,
stove, refrigerator and air.
$525 monthly. 305-642-7080
1401 NW 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$600 mthly, $1300 move in.
786-873-2694
1441 N.E. 153 TERR.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
under $800 and Three bed-
rooms, one bath, under $900.
Efficiencies also available un-
der $600. Section 8 ok.
305-456-4961

1456 N.W. 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800. Stove, refrigerator,
air.
305-642-7080
172 NW 58th Street
Large three bdrms, two baths,
central air and tiled. $1200
monthly! Section 8 Welcome!
Rick 305-409-8113
1920 N.W. 31 STREET
One and two bdrms. Appli-
ances included. Section 8
Welcome. 305-688-7559
2120 NW 50 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1350. Section 8 ok.
305-331-6303,305-893-2276
21301 N.W. 37 AVE.
Two bedrooms, air. $895.
786-306-4839


2257 N.W. 82 ST
Two bedrooms, one bath
$850. Free Water.
305-642-7080
2370 N.W. 61 Street
Newly remodeled two bdrm.,
one bath, appl., water, air,
$1000 mthly, Sec. 8 welcome.
Contact 561-294-0044.
2401 NW 95 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath, wash-
er, dryer, central air. Section
8 OK. $1,175 mthly.
Matthew 954-818-9112
2416 N.W. 22 CT
One bedroom one bath
$600. Two bedrooms one
bath $725. Air Free Water.
305-642-7080

2632 N.E. 212 TER
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$950 Appliances; 305-642-
7080
3190 N.W. 135th Street
One bedroom, one bath, air,
stove, refrigerator, water in-
cluded. Section 8 Welcome.
Call Marie 305-763-5092.
42 N.W. 57th Street
Two bedrooms, new kitchen,
central air, bars, water, $900
monthly, 305-310-7366.
490 N.W. 97 Street
One bedroom, one bath, ap-
pliances/unit air. $750 mth-
ly.954-430-0849.
4902 N.W. 33rd Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, bars, $750, call
Rod 786-290-4625.
6250 N.W. 1 Ave
Newly Remodeled. Two
bedrooms one bath, one
bedroom one bath. Ap-
ploances, Free electric,
water. 305-642-7080, 786-
236-1144

68 NW 45 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $650. Four bed-
room also available.
786-431-5520
6937 N.W. 6th Court
One bdrm, one bath, central
air, bars, Section 8 ok! $800
mthly. 305-751-5533
745 N.W. 107 ST.
Two bedrooms. Air. $895.
786-306-4839
7735 NW 6 AVENUE
Two bdrms, two baths, Sec-
tion 8 OK. $875 monthly. 786-
277-4395,305-624-4395
7820 N.E. 1 AVENUE
Two bdrms, one bath. $925.
Appliances, free water.
305-642-7080

8451 N.W. 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, water, new
kitchen, air, tile. $650
monthly, $1500 to move
in. Not Section 8 affiliated.
Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776

CENTRAL DADE AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 or regular. $1300
monthly. Ashmore 305-757-
8596
COCONUT GROVE
3345 Percival AVE.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
New paint, shiny terrazzo,
gated, clean and quiet, all ap-
pliances. $975. Drive by then
call 305-336-3099.
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737. Charles Terrace
COCONUT ROVE AREA
Large Duplex, two bedrooms,
excellent condition, beautiful
tiled floors. Low rent. Section
8 Welcome. 305-448-2742
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bdrms one bath, first,
and security. Section 8 and
HOPWA welcome.
305-244-6845
NEWl SW 264 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths. Sec-
tion 8 ok. 305-258-6626
NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$1000 monthly, first and last.
786-879-0775
Efficiencies
100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO; BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232
1845 NW 50 STREET
$200 wkly, $600 move in. Air,
cable, free utilities.
786-286-7455, 305-720-4049
1863-B NW 42 Street
Beautiful! $600 monthly, utili-
ties included. 786-356-1457
5422 N.W. 7 COURT
Includes water and electricity.
$600 monthly. 305-267-9449
5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN),from
$185 wkly to $650 monthly.
305-751-6232.


monthly. Section 8 welcome.
305-663-9353


NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance cable, air.
Call 305-758-6013.
Furnished Rooms
1010 N.W. 180TERR
Free cable, air and use of
kitchen. 305-835-2728
13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486
1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
1845 N.W. 50th Street
$100 weekly with air, $200 to
move in. 786-286-7455, 305-
720-4049
1887 N.W. 44th Street
$450 monthly. $650 moves
you in. 305-303-0156.
1899 N.W. 83 TER.
Nice and clean, air, $125
weekly, $250 to move in.
786-426-6263
1935 N.W. 76th Street
Large furnished room, air, ca-
ble, kitchen privilege, parking,
no security, $485 a month,
786-955-4703.
$199 DEPOSIT!!!
2169 N.W. 49 Street, Free Air
Direct TV, only $108 weekly.
Call NOW! 786-234-5683.
2106 N.W. 70 STREET
Room for One Person. $135
Weekly. Private Bath.
305-836-8262
2831 N.W. 159th Street
Clean, quiet, neighborhood.
Call 305-628-3029 or
954-245-8064
4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486
4712 NW 16 AVENUE
$100-$150 weekly, utilities,
kitchen, bath, air.
786-260-3838
74 STREET NW 7 AVENUE
$125 weekly, cable and utili-
ties included. $200 moves
you in. 786-306-2349
7749 N.W. 15th Avenue
One room, $480, air. No. dep.
786-597-3624
CHRISTIAN HOME
Rooms for rent, call 10 a.m.
to 10 p.m. 305-759-2889
MIAMI AREA
Shared rooms, meals, central
air. $15 daily. 786-306-4186
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Large room, private entrance,
air, cable and use of pool.
305-343-2732
NICELY FURNISHED
Air, cable, TV, utilities. $150
wkly. 786-290-0946
NORTH MIAMI AREA
$120 weekly, $240 to move
in, includes cable, central air.
786-277-7150
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Furnished, electric and water
included. $600 monthly.
954-605-1360
NORTHWEST AREA
Large clean furnished rooms.
Call 786-597-0871
NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.
.Houses
13140 NW18AVE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
786-344-9560, 305-688-0600
1370 NW 69 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air plus bonus room.
$1250 mthly. Not Section 8
affiliated. Call 305-829-5164
or 305-926-2245.
14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
$999 security deposit.
954-826-4013
1430 N.E. 71 ST.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$925, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080
1490 NW 114 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath
plus efficiency. 305-962-1514
or 305-758-6133
1510 NE 151 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly 305-944-0588
1619 N.W. 38th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
air, $850 mthly, 305-642-
7080
1802 N.W. 1 AVE.
Spacious three bedrooms,
two baths. 305-300-2796
1832 N.W. 49 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$995. Central Air, appli-
ances, ceiling fans. 305-
642-7080
19473 N.W. 28th Court
Cherry Bay, beautiful four
bedrooms, Fla. room. 786-
267-5859,404-296-5365.
20700 NW 25 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
newly renovated, central air,
huge, fenced yard. Easy com-
mute. $1250 monthly Section
8 preferred.
305-479-3221
2485 N.W. 55th TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath, se-
curity bars, new kitchen, new
bathroom, tiled floors. $975


COMPLETE HOME
REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, stove,
washer, dryer. 786-273-1130
TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing,
and leak repairs. Call
305-491-4515.
Business Opportunity
GREAT OPPORTUNITY
Have a product or Service?
Overview 1-800-374-4025,
1-800-242-0363 ext. 4484


2920 NW 161 TERRACE
Three bedrooms. Move-in
special. $1400 monthly.
305-896-3976
3035 NW 55 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled. $900 monthly.
786-797-6417
3330 NW 214 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths,
huge den. $1395.
786-306-4839
3361 NW 166 STREET
Three bedrooms, air. $1195.
786-306-4839
3900 NW 170 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths,
$1400 mthly. Section 8 ok.
305-299-3142
470 NW 126 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
washer and dryer included.
Section 8 OK. $1500 mthly.
954-638-8842
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.
4915 NW 182 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1250 mthly. 305-527-0702
FLORIDA CITY AREA
Nice, two bedrooms, one
bath, fenced, air, tile, clean.
$825 monthly, To Move in
$825 Only. 305-528-6889
MIAMI GARDENS
Three bedrooms, two baths.
N.W. 213 Terrace.
Call 786-326-7755
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Remodeled three bedrooms,
one bath on water. $1200.
Section 8 okay. Call:
305-600-6277
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 welcome. 954-605-
1360
NORTHWEST
CENTRAL AREA
$500 move in. Section 8
preferred. Two or three bed-
room vouchers accepted.
954-444-6403

RUTLAND STREET
Opa Locka Area Three
bedrooms, one bath. $750
monthly.
Call Matthew 954-818-9112

Office Space
Prime Golden Glades
Office Space for rent, from
$300 to $500 monthly.
305-681-9600.



Houses
1065 N.W. 131 ST.
Three bedrooms, two baths.
All New! Impact windows,
central air, carport, immacu-
late condition. $159,000.
305-793-0002
2889 N.W. 197 Terrace
Beautiful three bdrms, one
bath. $79K. 305-675-1740
3361 N.W. 207 STREET
Three bedrooms, remodeled,
air. Try $900 down FHA and
$799 monthly. We have oth-
ers. Pick up list.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700
290 N.W. 183 Street
5601 N.W. 10 AVE.
Corner lot, three bdrms, two
baths. Large living room,
wooden plus tile floors, wash
room, security bars. $120K
negotiable. 305-693-8886,
954-205-6685
*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
*'*WITH***
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty


Childcare
Quality Home Child Care
MIAMI GARDENS
Where All Kids Are Special!
DCF Lic # F11MD078. Call
Mrs. Rhonda 786-217-2436




BROWARD ROUTE
DRIVERS
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deliver newspaper to retail
outlets In the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, Insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

CASHIER AND SALES
PERSON
Wanted Full Time. Must be
Honest, Trustworthy and
Responsible. Excellent
Customer Service Skills
and Positive Personality.
Only Serious Minded Need
Apply!
305-757-5283

COLLECTIONS
Two years experience
required with strong organi-
zational and communication
skills to coordinate collec-
tion process and cash flow.
Fax resume to
305-758-3617

Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
I not required.
Call 877-471-5682

PAIN MANAGEMENT
DOCTOR
Needed in Tampa, Florida.
$200. an hour Malpractice
paid Fax Resume to:
813.879.7406


Residential Care Giver
LIVE-IN POSITION
Mike 786-237-9001
TEACHER NEEDED
with CDA to work in child-
care center. 305-836-1178



CEMETERY PLOTS
FOR SALE
Two double depth cemetery
plots with liners, located at
Dade Memorial Park, Opa
Locka. Asking price, $5000
for each plot. Price can be
negotiated. For more infor-
mation, call Gina at 954-432-
9894.
Don't Throw Away
Your Old Records!
I Buy Old Records! Albums,
LP's, 45's, or 12" singles.
Soul, Jazz, Blues, Reggae,
Caribbean, Latin, Disco,
Rap. Also DJ Collections! Tell
Your Friends!
786-301-4180.




BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
$60. Be prepared for Super
Bowl employment. Traffic
School, four hours, $28. 786-
333-2084


BEST PRICES IN TOWNIII
Handyman, carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
laying tiles, bathroom
remodeling. 305-801-5690
CLEAN AS HEAVEN
Homes, offices, and floors.
Call Sherry, 786-306-2086


Fictitious Name


FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to en-
gage in business under the
fictitious name of:
YESTERYEAR'S
TREASURES
5701 Biscayne Blvd. #801
Miami, FL 33137
in the city of Miami, FL
NOTICE UNDER
Owner: Michelle Miittelman
intends to register the said
name with the Division
of Corporation of State,
Tallahassee, FL. Dated
this 11th day of November,
2009.


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pmp-


THE LARGEST MINORlI Y OWNED
NEWSPAPER IN THE SOUTHEAST


RALPH MANRESA
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 109

fJ ItRami imRt
One Family Serving Since 1923
THE LARGEST vIhR TY
OvMime hE i iSP;, E?
IN TE SOUTHE ST











BD THE MIAMI TIMES~ NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009 lILA CKS Must CONTROl. 'I'JILIR OWN l)I:S'IINY
I -. .- ---- -- --- --- --..---.--


Unemployment extensions go directly into economy


CREDIT
continued from 5D

additional weeks of
unemployment as-
sistance, depending
on where they live.
Companies will
be given expanded
ability to apply loss-
es to previous years'
income, allowing
them to qualify this
year for $33 bil-
lion in tax refunds,
according to Con-
gress's Joint Com-
mittee on Taxation.
The legislation also
includes a tax break
to help victims of
Bernard Madoff's
multibillion-dollar
Ponzi scheme.
The bill, the first


major expansion of
provisions in Febru-
ary's stimulus pack-
age, is estimated to
funnel $45 billion
into the economy
in the 2010 fiscal
year.
Other Extensions
With unemploy-
ment projected to
average 9.85 percent
next year, according
to a Bloomberg sur-
vey of economists,
lawmakers are
considering spend-
ing billions more to
extend other ele-
ments of the stimu-
lus package. Among
them are subsidies
to help the unem-
ployed buy health
insurance.


McDermott said
lawmakers will
probably move to
approve additional
extensions of job-
less benefits to help
the unemployed
through much of
next year, at a cost
he predicted could
reach $80 billion,.
More than 1.4 mil-
lion Americans have
claimed the home-
buyer credit at a
cost so far of about
$10 billion, accord-
ing to the Treasury
Department.
Under the new
bill, couples earn-
ing up to $225,000
a year and individu-
als earning up to
$125,000 will be el-


igible for the credit.
That's up from the
current $75,000
limit for individuals
and $150,000 for
couples.
Current Home-
owners
The bill also will
allow homebuyers
who have owned
their prior resi-
dence for at least
five years to receive
a $6,500 credit, an
expansion of the
program. Those who
sell their new home
or no longer use it
as their main resi-
dence within three
years would have
to repay the credit.
Homes worth more
than $800,000


wouldn't be eligible.
Economic Boost
House Majority
Leader Steny Hoyer;
a Maryland Demo-
crat, called the job-
less provision "an
investment that
pays off for all of
us" because "money
provided by unem-
ployment insurance
quickly goes into ne-
cessities and boosts
local economies."
The legislation
would provide 14
additional weeks of
unemployment ben-
efits in all states,
plus another six
weeks in states with
jobless rates top-
ping 8.5 percent.
More than one-


White House program is already saving homes


BLACKS
continued from 8D

sought a modifica-
tion of his mortgage
terms earlier this
year after his em-


ployer had cut sala-
ries and hours. And
then he was laid off
altogether in May,
derailing his mort-
gage negotiations
with ShoreBank.


A Hialeah Women Center Family Planning
AAA Attorney Referral Service
Adrienne Arsht Center
Advanced GYN Clinic
CarePlus
City of Miami City Clerk
City of Miami Purchasing Department
Dept. of Procurement, Miami-Dade County
Dr. Rozalyn Paschal M.D.
Family Dentist
Florida Dept. of Transportation
Florida Lottery
Florida PCI
General Motors
Miami Dade College
Miami-Dade County GovernmentInformation Center
Miami-Dade Water & Sewer
North Shore Medical Center
Public Works City of Miami
Publix
Seaview Research
Sony Pictures
SunTrust
Toys R Us
Wright Young Funeral Home



PROFESSIONAL CARE HRS CERTIFIED.
LOW COST SERVICE. SERVICE UP TO10 WEEKS. $175
Daily appointments Treatments upto 12 weeks.
Abortion without surgery.



Lejune Plaza Shopping Center 305-887-3002
Hialeah, Fl. 33010 786-379-0415
BaumN THIS Ai!






DUI 8 Tickets Bankruptcy
Criminal Defense Wills/Probate
Personal Injury Divorce/Custody
100's of Lawyers Statewide




Advanced Gyn Clinic
-"k. Professolanal, Sale & Confidential Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
i ABORTION START $180 AND UP

-621-1399


Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
Established Since 1953 One of the oldest pediatric Practices
In Dade County Over 50 years of Child Care
S I WEBSITE
www.rozalynhpaschalmd.com
NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. State Rd 7, Ste 3A
Miami FL 33147 Phone 305-758-0591 Plantation FL 33317 Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway Medical Plaza
16800 NW/2 Ave. Ste 203
N. Miami Beach FL 33169 305-652-6095


"I was preparing
myself mentally
that there was a 90
percent chance I'd
lose my place ... and
I'd be out searching
for someplace to
live," Williams said.
"It stresses you out.
You don't want to
spend 50 cents on a
pack of gum, it got
to be that bad."
ShoreBank was
able to get him a
modified mortgage
through the Obama
administration pro-
gram launched in
March, reducing
his monthly pay-
ment to $468 from
the original $1,150.


The disparity in
the unemployment
rates for whites and
Blacks has grown
since the reces-
sion started in the
fourth quarter of
2007, according to
a study by Alger-
non Austin, direc-
tor of the Program
on Race, Ethnicity
and the Economy at
the Economic Policy
Institute.
The national white
rate increased by
3.8 percentage
points, to 7.8 per-
cent in the second
quarter of this year,
while the Black rate
rose by 6.1 percent-


age points, to 14.7
percent, the highest
of any major racial
or ethnic group.
Black workers
"have a relatively
high representation
in manufacturing
and the auto indus-
try, and those in-
dustries have been
hit pretty hard,"
Austin said.
As well, "black
workers tend to be
younger and lower-
ranked in organiza-
tions," he said. "And
both factors make
it more likely that
when layoffs come,
you're going to be
laid off."


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


A public hearing .will be held by the City Commis-
sion of the City of Miami, Florida on November 19, 2009, at
9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for
the purpose of granting the following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE A GRANT OF EASEMENT TO MIAMI-DADE
COUNTY WATER AND SEWER DEPARTMENT, A FLORIDA CORPORATION,
OF AN APPROXIMATELY 29' x 12' FOOT WIDE STRIP OF CITY-OWNED
PROPERTY LOCATED AT 400 NW 2 AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, (ALSO
KNOWN AS COLLEGE OF POLICING), FOR THE CONSTRUCTION, OPER-
ATION AND MAINTENANCE OF WATER AND FIRE LINE FACILITIES, WITH
THE RIGHT TO RECONSTRUCT, IMPROVE, CHANGE AND REMOVE ALL.
OR ANY OF THE FACILITIES WITHIN THE EASEMENT.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning these
items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003318)


third of the nation's
unemployed have
been out of work for
at least six months,
according to the
Labor Department.
About 1.9 million
Americans will ex-
haust their. bene-
fits, which average
$300 per week, by
the end of this year
without the bill, the
agency said.


sB~uI 11H8 LIj T SI
fflUSfINES SE~iaRVfICEf


$425 for 13
weeks in print
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 All Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Umo Rental
305-796-9558
iiima


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami, Florida
on November 19, 2009 at 9:00a.m., in the City Commission Chambers at City
Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of waiving the
requirements of obtaining sealed competitive bids to dispose waste collection,
on an as needed, when basis, at Sun Recycling.
Inquiries from other service providers who feel they might be able to satisfy
the City's requirement for these services may contact Barbara Pruitt, Acting
Director, Department of Solid Waste at (305) 960-2802.
The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views. Should any
person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and evidence upon
which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may
contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later
than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472
(TTY) no later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003321)


CITY OF MIAMI. FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED TO
REGISTERASA LOBBYISTWITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO ENGAGING IN
LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS AND COMMITTEES
OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE APPLICABLE ORDINANCE
IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL),
LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON NOVEMBER 19, 2009, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN. DRIVE, THE MIAMI
CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED TO
THE REGULAR AGENDA:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACHMENTS,
ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED MARKO ESTATES, A REPLAT IN THE
CITY OF MIAMI, SUBJECT TO ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT
AND STREET COMMITTEE AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN CITY
CODE SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING THE DEDICATIONS SHOWN
ON SAID PLAT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE CITY MANAGER
AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT; AND PROVIDING FOR THE
RECORDATION OF SAID PLAT IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public Works
Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction Division,
located at 444 SW 2m" Avenue, 4t' Floor, during regular working hours. Phone
305-416-1248.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views.

Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A.-Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003315)


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 140111 INVITATION FOR BID FOR ROAD SERVICE TIRE
REPAIRS CITYWIDE

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009

Deadline forReouest forAdditional Information/Clarification 11/16/2009 at
3:00P.M

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/orocurement Telephone No.
(305)416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez City of Miami

City Manager

AD NO. 10459


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on November 19, 2009, at 9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO ACCEPT FROM THE MIAMI WOMAN'S CLUB ("CLUB"),
IN PERPETUITY, APPROXIMATELY TWENTY-THREE (23) FOOT WIDE
BAYWALK EASEMENT OF THE PROPERTY LOCATED AT 1737 NORTH
BAYSHORE DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF
THE BAYWALK TO BE USED AS A PERMANENT PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE
WATERFRONT.
All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard conceding these
items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003316)


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THF.IR OWN DI-ISTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009











Bl .C'kS Mi l (ONI'RO I'IIFIR \\OW N I1'NIA'INY


Fon in: WI:.EK oF NovitMHitR 10 16, 2009


NEARING

THE

FINISH

LINE


aCuuu Sports rPoto
IN STRIDE: Burly SC
State QB Malcolm Long
looks to lead Bulldogs to
second straight MEAC
title Saturday vs. Morgan
State.


FSU, ALBANY ST. IN D2 PLAYOFFS; SC STATE,
PRAIRIE VIEW CAN CLINCH; STAT LEADERS


SI9D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


209B A COsE OOTBLL(Rsuts -an-nga Weky.onrs


CIAA AOAniAt. Ilit;,)l .OIOL
A'f~r AL u- I Ie, Ab aociAi iont


E. DIVISION
'Bowie State
Virginia Union
Elz. City State
Virginia State
Sl Paul's
Lincoln (PA)
W. DIVISION
Fayettevllle State
Shaw
St Augustine's
J C Smith
Chowan
Uvingsltone


ALL
W L
6 5
6 4
7 3
6 4
3 6
3 7
8 3
8 2
4 6
3 7
2 8
0 10


CHAMPIONSHIP GAME MVPs
FAYETTEVILLE STATE Benjamin Willamsa, Jr.,
QB Came offl dtie benchI to lead Broncos Io Iwo
second-hall scores, completing 6 of 14 passes for
87 yards and 1 TO.
BOWIE STATE Delano Johnponr So., LB Had
noi tackles to lead Bowe State
PLAYERS OF THE YEAR
OFFENSE C. J. Weer, Jr., BS, CHOWAN
- Led CIAA in passing (285.6 ypg.). and l. otff.
(3096 ypg)
DEFENSE Quintez Smidh, Sr., DB, SHAW Led
CIAA and Div. II w1mlh 9 its, 4 relumed tor TOs.
SPECIAL TEAMS Austin Turer, So., PK, FSU
- Made 34 of 37 PATs, 17 of 29 field goals for 85
total poitls


M EA C n MIC E^'OMi.FIL:
/IEIIhI ArII Il; (loNl'[rirlr',.
CONF ALL
W L W L
SC State 6 0 8 1
Florida A&M 5 1 7 2
Norfolk State 4 3 5 4
Morgan State 3 3 5 4'
Belhune-Cookman 3 3 4 5
NCA&T State 3 4 4 5
Hampton 2 4 4 5
Delaware State 2 4 3 5
Howard 0 6 2 7
# W-Salem State 0 0 1 8
# Not eligible for title
MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE DeAngelo Branche, Jr., RB, NSU
- Rustled for season-high 145 yards on 19 carries
and 1 TO, also caught 1 pass for 16 yards and a
TO vs. Morgan Stale.
DEFENSE Jerome Strums, Sr., DB, OSU -
Returned a fumble 21 yards for a TD, also had an
interception and 1 solo tackle vs. WSSU.
ROOKIE Lewis Kindle, Fr., QB, NC A&T. 16 of
30 or 206 yards and 2 TDs in firs start vs. FAMU
Also hadI carries lor 54 yards and a TO
SPECIAL TEAMS LeRoy Vann, Sr, DB/KR,
FAMU 4 punt returns for 81 yards including
51yarder for a TO, his fiflh o1 the season tying
FCS record.
LINEMAN Mike Maloney, Sr. 7, DSU 98%
grade, 11 pancakes vs. WSSU.


S| A f o lU l fIJ IG { C(l)I 1 I IA'ir
SIAC <1: A IIr(.;1;W1::I; (
CONF ALL
W L W L
Tuskegee 8 1 8 2
Albany State 7 2 8 2
Morehouse 6 3 7 3
Fort Valley State 6 3 7 4
Benedict 6 3 8 3
Kentucky State 4 5 6 5
Miles 3 6 4 7
Clark Atlanta 3 6 2 7
Stillman 2 7 3 6
Lane 0 9 0 10
SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Nathaniel Sname, Sr., QB, FVSU -16
ol 26 for 281 passing yards and 2 TDs in win over
Albany Slate. Pat Riley, Sr,, 08, BC Rushed
or 148 yards and a TD, Ithew for 3 TDs and 175
passing yards in win over CAU.
DEFENSE DaJuan Williams, So., 08, FVSU 3
inlerceptions, 2 break-ups. 4 tadckes vs Albany St.
Jonathan Hall, St., LB, TU 12 tacddes, 7 solos,
25 lor losses vs. Stdi.an.
NEWCOMER David Carter, Fr., RB, MHC 27
carries lor 130 yards, 2 TDs vs. (des
SPECIAL TEAMS Marquette King, So., P, FVSU
- Averaged 427 yards on 9 punts.
OFFENSIVE LINE Collin Cordeli, Sr., 01 FVSU
- 98% grade vs. Albany Slate


SW AC A iJ"'rA4t i F...
DIV ALL
E. DIVISION W L W L
Jackson State 3 2 3 5
AlabamaA&M 2 3 5 4
Alcorn State 2 3 2 5
Alabarna State 1 5 4 5
Miss. Valley St 1 5 2 7
W. DIVISION
Prairie ViewA&M 5 0 6 1
Texas Southern 3 1 4 4
Ark. Pine Bluff 3 2 5 3
Gramwning State 3 2 5 4
Southern 2 2 5 3

SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Mickey Dean, Sr., RB, UAPB
- Rushed 20 times for 81 yards and 2 TDs (10.
22), and trew a TO pass In win oer GSU.
DEFENSE Faihed Hunt, Jr., DL TSU. 4
taddkes, 2 sacks. 2 forced tmbles, 1 break-up
vs. MVSU
NEWCOMER K. J. Black, Jr., QB, PV A&M
- Completed 14 ot 27 passesfor 224 yards and 3
TDs (21, 72. 21) n win over Alabama A&M.
SPECIAL TEAMS Mareo Howard, So., KPt/RB,
UAPB Averaged 555 yards on 2 kckoff
returns, inning a 95-yard TO return to open
he$econdhalt


INDEPENDENTS
W L
Langston 8 2
Concordia 5 4
Tennessee State 3 6
W Va. State 3 7
Savannah State 2 5
N. C. Central 2 7
Central State 1 9
Uncoln (Mo) 0 9
Edward Waters 0 10
Texas College 0 10
Cheyney 0 11

PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Kevin O'Brtn, Sr, QB. WVSU
- Completed 8 o to passes for 107 yards
and caught l ferst TO pass from WR
Jermain Kng (10 yards) in in er Fmon
State, MiclWl 11Joon. So., (, NCCU
- Complete 26 of 42 passes or 249 yards
and 2 TDs vs. Old Domir on,
DEFENSE Piere Chalman, Jr., DE, WV8U
- Returned an in rception 17 yards for TD
vs. FaMnon Stte. Also had 2 solo tackles
and an aast.
SPECIAL TEAMS Frade Cardee, PK,
NCCU Was good on4 PATsvs OOU


SCORES
NOVEMBER 7
Ark.-Pine Bluff 49, Grambling State 42
Benedict 49, Clark Atlanta 25
Bethune-Cookman 27, Hampton 24
Clarion 32. Cheyney 12
Delaware State 24, W-Salem State 21
Fayetteville State 21. Bowie State 10
Florida A&M 31, NC A&T 27
Fort Valley State 35. Albany State 13
Jackson State 19, Alabama State 7
Kentucky State 26, Lane 7
Kentucky Wesleyan 21, Lincoln (MO) 6


Morehouse 30, Miles 14
NW Okla. State 71, Texas Colle
k lofroN State 31 Morgan State


Old Dominion 42. NC Central 28
Prairie View A&M 33, Alabama A&M 27
SC State 43, Howard 13
St Joseph's (IN) 31, Central State 20
Tennessee-Martin 28, Tennessee State 7
Texas Southern 30, Miss Valley State 7
Tuskegee 41, Stillman 14
Valdosta State 70, Edward Waters 6
West Virginia State 27, Fairmont State 19


BLACK COLLEGE FOOTBALL
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICAL LEADERS


RUSHING YARDS
PORTER, Quinn-STILL
THOMPSON,Winston-CAU
ROSS, Carlos-LANGST
COKERLaMarcus-HAM
FRIESON,Shannon-KSU
RILEYPat-BENEDICT
PULLEYCurtis-FAMU
BANKS.Ulysses-AAMU
BOYKINS,Anthony-KSU

PASSING YARDS ct
WESTLER, C.-CU SR
LEEBryant-SU Sf
BUCKLEY. Tim-ALCN SR
BLACK. KJ-PVAM JF
NELSON, Arvell-TEXS JF
PULLEYCurtis-FAMU SF
LONG. Malcolm-SCSU JF
BROWN. Dennis-NSU SF
MCKENNA,A.J -ALBN SF
POWELL.C-ECSU FF

RECEPTIONS CL
HOLLAND. R -CU FR
STEWART.Juamorr-SU SR
HAITH, Brian-TXSO SR
FRANKLIN,J-JCSU JR
KING, Jermaine-WVSU
YOUNG.Tre-SCSU SR
HODRICK, K CU SO
HARRIS,Thomas-AAM SR
ANDREWS,Nich.-ALST SO
SINGLETON. R.-ALCN JR

RECEIVING YARDS CL
HOLLAND, R.-CU FR
STEWART,Juamorr-SU SR
BELL,Chris-NSU JR
ANDREWS,Nich.-ALST SC
HAITH, Brian-TXSO SR
HARRIS,Thomas-AAM SR
MANLEYD.-ECSU JR
WEST.Isaac-FAMU JR
KING, JERMAIN-WVSU
FRANKLIN,J.-JCSU JR
YOUNG,Tre-SCSU SR

TOTAL OFFENSE CL
WESTLER, C.-CU SF
PULLEY.Curtis-FAMU SF
LEE,Bryant-SU SF
BUCKLEY, Tim-ALCN SF
BROWN,Dennis-NSU SF
NELSON, Arvell-TXSO JR
BLACK, K J.-PVAM JR
MCKENNAAJ.-ALBN SF
MITCHELL,Chris-ALST SF
LONG, Malcolm-SCSU JR
DILLON, Greg-GSU JR
SAMAS, Nathaniel-FVS SF

ALL PURPOSE CL
PORTER, Quinn-STIL SR
BANKS.UIys.-AAMU SR
ROSS, Carlos-LNGS
FRANKLIN,J.-JCS JR
COKER,LaMarcus-HAM SR
VANN,LeRoy-FAMU SR
JOHNSON,D.-ALBST SR
THOMPSON,W.-CAU SC
YOUNG.Tre-SCSU SR
LEWIS, Terrance-ALCN FR
ANDREW, Nichol-ALST SC


SCORING CL
JOHNSON,Dem.-ALBN SR
TURNER, Austin-FSU SO
JOHNSON, Ari-GSU FR
WVILLIAMS,R.-SHAW FR
SCOTT, Trevor-FAMU SO
MULLENIar-MHC JR
ERICKSON, Blake-SCS SO
POR i cR, Quinn-STIL SR
STEWART,Juamonrr-SU SR
McNEILL.D.-F(SU FR
PUNT RETURNS CL
VANN,Leroy-FAMU SR
THOMPSOr;,:,iare-GS3U JR
SMITH, Reggie-ECSU SR
HARRIS, nrthon-FVSU JR
BUDD,Cliir BaU SO
BUTLER, 0, icd;-LNGS
GLASPER. Darrell-TX3 JR
CHARLES, P-CU SO
ADDISON,E-SPC JR

KICKOFF REiTURNS CL
HOWARD, Mareo-UAPB SO
PROCTOR,James-BSU SO
NGAUJA, A VSU SO
SMITH, Reggie-ECSU SR
YOUNG,Tre-SCSU SR
TARPLEY,T-DSU FR
FRANKLIN,Jer,-JCS JR
BANKS,Ulys.-AAMU SR
ANDREWS,Nich-ALST SO
WILLIAMS, Byron-SU SO


CL G CAR YDS AVG TDS AVGtG
SR 8. 173 1069 6.2 7 133.6
SO 9 235 1077 4.6 6 119.7
SO 9 167 984 5.9 9 109.3
SR 9 176 919 52 6 102.1
SO 10 198 1011 5.1 7 101.1
JR 11 162 1088 6.7 12 98.9
SR 9 119 889 7.5 6 98.8
SR 8 151 754 5.0 6 94.2
JR 11 202 1031 5.1 5 937


o CO ATT rT
R 10 234-432-16
R 8 145-237-6
R 7 113-221-10
R 6 97-145-3
R 8 150-258-5
R 9 132-219-6
R 9 150-225-4
R 9 127-218-8
R 10 139-260-7
R 10 112-240-9


YDS
1078
799
559
610
692
614
612
680
728
259

YDS
1078
799
734
728
559
680
584
623
692
610
614

I PASS
2856
1802
1875
1472
1694
1633
1250
1874
1436
1763
506
1997

R"c
9 36
214
388
610
116
0
429
' 148
614
271
728

FGS
0
17
15
0
12
14
9
0
0
0
Yo8
540
347
303
318
284
162
74
77
76

YD8o
291
567
241
535
464
409
628
414
293
242


PCT YDS TOrS
54.2 2856 25
61.2 1875 17
51.1 1472 13
66.9 1250 11
58.1 1633 8
60.3 1802 12
66.7 1763 14
58.3 1694 15
53.5 1874 18
46.7 1823 10


To YPC YDSMG
7 125 107.8
9 13.1 99.1
2 14.7 79.9
5 12.7 67.8
7 13.1 69.2
5 13.3 68.2
10 12.5 61.2
6 15.5 75.6
5 17.3 80.9
3 8.1 37.0

TO YPC YDOSB
7 12.5 107.8
9 13.1 999
10 19.8 81.6
5 17.3 80.9
2 14.7 79.9
6 15.5 75.6
5 23.4 73.0
2 18.3 69.2
7 13.1 69.2
5 17.9 67.8
5 13.3 68.2

PLAYS YDS AVGwG
576 3096 309.6
538 12691 299.0
292 1997 249.6
315 1703 243.3
323 2055 228.3
341 1789 223.6
180 1330 221.7
340 2094 209.4
283 1627 203.4
263 1821 202.3
339 1760 195.6
345 2091 190.1


SAVOG
285.6
234.4
210.3
208.3
204.1
200.2
195.9
188.2
187.4
182.3

RECiG
8.8
7.6
5.4
5.3
5-.3
5.1
4.9
4.9
4.7
4.6


YDS
1462
1382
1400
1382
1334
1324
1446
1225
1180
732 ,
1090


ge 24 SCSU, PV in clinching mode
23


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
With titles now decided in the CIAA
(Fayetteville State) and SIAC ('Tuskegee), atten-
tion can now be focused on the yet unresolved
battles in the MEAC and the SWAC.

MEAC
South Carolina State (8-1, 6-0) enters
Saturday's 1:30 p.m. home game vs. Morgan
State (5-4, 3-3) in position to clinch its second
straight MEAC title.
The Bulldogs need a win either Saturday
vs. MSU or on Nov. 21 at home vs. North
Carolina A&T to take the crown and earn its
second straight automatic bid to the Football
Championship Subdivision (FCS) playoffs.




THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12


ESPNU Live
Grambling State vs.Texas Southern in Grambling, LA
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14
Alabama A&M vs. Jackson State in Huntsville, AL
Delaware State vs. Norfolk State in Dover, DE
Hampton vs. Florida A&M in Hampton, VA
Howard vs Bethune-Cookman in Washington, DC
Winston-Salem State vs. NC Central in Winston-Salem. NC
Central State vs. Urbana in Wilberforce, OH
SC State vs. Morgan State in Orangeburg, SC
Texas College vs. Southern Nazarene in Tyler, TX
Miss Valley State vs Lincoln (MO) in Itta Bena, MS
Alcom State vs. Prairie View A&M in Alcorn State, MS
Austin Peay vs. Tennessee State in Clarksville. TN
Edward Waters vs. New Orleans in Jacksonville, FL
Savannah State vs. Webber International in Savannah. GA
Azusa Pacific vs. Langston in Pasadena, CA
HOMECOMING
Stillman vs. Concordia in Tuscaloosa, AL
CLASSICS
36th Gulf Coast Classic
Alabama Stale vs Southern in Mobile, AL
PLAYOFF GAMES
NCAA Div II First Round
West Georgia vs. Albany State in Albany. GA
NCAA Div II First Round
California University vs. Fayetteville State in California, PA


1:30
2
3
4
4
4
5
6


SCSU, ranked ninth with one first place vote
in this week's Sports Network FCS poll, enters
Saturday's contest on a five-game winning streak
where it has outscored opponents by a 37-12
score. The Bulldogs have won 16 straight confer-
ence games.
Junior quarterback Malcolm Long has also
been on a roll in this stretch completing 70.4%
(88 of 125) of his passes for 1.100 yards (220
ypg.) and 12 TDs with just 2 interceptions.
Long's sterling play has put him in place for
MEAC offensive player of the year consideration
along with FAMU quarterback Curtis Pulley.
Long does not have Pulley's gaudy numbers,
but he is not asked to do as much in the SCSU
offense as Pulley does at FAMU. Pulley leads the
league in passing (200.2 ypg.) and total offense
(299 ypg.) and is third in rushing (889 yards.
98.8 ypg.). Long is second to Pulley in passing
(195.2 ypg.) and has better passing efficiency
numbers than the FAMU star (149.5 to 142.0).
For the year. Long is completing 66.2% of his
passes for 14 TDs and only four interceptions.
Pulley is completing passes at a 60.3% rate (132
of 219) with 12 TDs and six picks.
And in their head-to-head duel, Long was
deftly efficient in leading his team to a 35-20
win.
SCSU head coach Buddy Pough will need
another strong effort by Long to subdue Morgan
State Saturday. Donald Hill-Eley's Bears were
in contention for the MEAC title before losing
their last three games.
Florida A&M (7-2.5-1), meanwhile, moved
up from 24th to 22nd in this week's FCS poll, and


appears in excellent position to also grab an FCS
1:30 playoff berth if it can win out. The Rattlers play
at Hampton (4-5, 2-4) Saturday (1 p.m.) and
close out the season on Nov. 21 in Orlando vs.
230 in-state rival Bethune-Cookman at their annual
season-ending Florida Classic.
1 Saturday's game has second-year FAMU
head coach Joe Taylor playing against the pro-
1 gram he formerly led for 16 years.


MAN WITH THE
HOT HAND:
SC State QB
Malcolm Long
has led the
Bulldogs to five
straight wins,
competing 70.4%
of his throws for
12 TDs and only
2 interceptions
over that span.


Hampton has lost three of its last four
games under first-year coach Donovan Rose.

SWAC
Henry Frazier's Panthers of Prairie View
A&M (6-1, 5-0), 21st in the latest FCS poll and
winners of five games in a row, need a win in
one of its final two games to claim the West
Division title and a spot in the Dec. 12 SWAC
Championship Game in Birmingham.
They can clinch with a win Saturday (4
p.m.) at Alcorn State (2-5, 2-3) or the following
Saturday at home vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff.
If Prairie View wins the division crown. it
would be only the second time a team other than
Southern or Grambling (UAPB in '06) advanced
to the title game since the championship game
was re-introduced in 1999.
Surprising Texas Southern (4-4. 3-1) under
second-year coach Johnnie Cole is currently
second in the West and has a critical show-me
date vs. defending league champion Grambling
State (5-+, 3-2) Thursday live on ESPNU (8
p.m.).
In the Easi, current leader Jackson State
(3-5.3- 2). Alabama A&M (5-4,2-3) and Alcorn
State arc stili :jive for the division crown.
JSU and A&M hook up this week in
Huntsville. Al / I p.m.). JSU closes with Alcorn
State the following week. A&M closes with
Mississippi Valley State on Nov. 21.


FSU takes CIAA title, advances to playoffs


Joe Daniela Photo
GAME MVP: Fayetteville State
QB Benjamin Williams came off
the bench to lead the Broncos to
CIAA title.


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
Fayetteville State scored 21 unanswered points in
the second half. 14 in the final three minutes of the game,
to come back from a 10-0 halftime deficit and knock off
Bowie State 21-10 in the CIAA Championship Game
Saturday in Durham, N.C.
The Broncos (8-3) were led by back-up quarterback
Benjamin Williams who threw a TD pass on his first play
from scrimmage early in the third quarter and led FSU on
a 12-play, 88-yard drive late in the fourth quarter when it
t(x)k the lead. Running back Richard Medlin capped that
drive with a 3-yard TD run with 2:29 left.
Ten seconds later, after BSU (6-5) returned the ensu-
ing kickoff to their own 21. BSU bacl-up quarterback
Tyrae Reid's attempt at a first-down screen pass was
picked off by FSU lineman lineman Jamal Dixon at the
BSU 22 who rumbled untouched in the end zone to put the
game out of reach.
Williams finished 6 of 14 passing for 87 yards with
the one TD. He was named the Broncos' most valuable
player.
The championship was the Broncos third of the


1. SOUTH CAROLINA STATE (8-1) Subdued Howard, 43-13. NEXT:
Hosts Morgan State.
2. PRAIRIE VIEW A&M (6-1) Got by Alabama A&M, 33-27 NEXT: At
Alcorn State.
3. FLORIDA A&M (7-2) Narrowly got by NC A&T, 31-27. NEXT: At
Hampton..
4. SOUTHERN (5-3) Idle. NEXT: Alabama State in Mobile (Al.).
5. ARKANSAS-PINE BLUFF (5-3) Upended Grambling State, 49-42,
NEXT: Idle.
6. GRAMBLING STATE (5-4) Outscored by Arkansas-Pine Bluff, 49-
42. NEXT: Hosting Texas Southern
7. NORFOLK STATE (5-4) Handled Morgan State, 31-23. NEXT: At
Delaware State.
8. FAYETTEVILLE STATE (8-3) Beat Bowie State, 211-10 for CIAA
Championship. NEXT: On the road at Cal (Pa.) In Div. II playoffs.
9. TUSKEGEE (8-2) Beat Stillman 41-14 to claim SIAC championship.
NEXT: Idle,
10. ALBANY STATE (8-2) Downed by Fort Valley State, 35-13. NEXT:
Home for first round Div. II playoff game vs. West Georgia.


decade under head coach Kenny Phillips. They also won
championships in 2002 and 2003.
The Broncos entered Saturday's game ranked tenth in
the NCAA Div. II Super Region II and needed a win and
to get up to eighth to secure a playoff berth. With the win,
the Broncos were seeded sixth in the region and named
Sunday to the 24-team Div. II playoff field. They travel to
third-seeded California University of Pa. (8-3) Saturday
for a 1 p.m. first round game.
Cal is the runner-up in the Pennsylvania State Athletic
Conference after losing in Saturday's league championship
game to Shippensburg, 42-35. The winner of the FSUL/Cal
game will play top seed Shippensburg on Nov. 21.



SIAC runner-up Albany State lost its final regular
season game, 35-13 to Fort Valley State but still was
selected to the Div. II playoff field from Super Region I.
The Golden Rams (8-2), seeded third, will host sixth-
seed West Georgia (7-4) Saturday at 1 p.m. West Georgia
knocked off Region and national top seed North Alabama
on Saturday. The winner will play at second-seed Carson-
Newman on Nov. 21.


BCSP Notes -----

UAPB takes SWAC soccer title
The University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff was crowned the 2009 SWAC Soccer
champions with a 1-0 win over Prairie View A&M on Sunday.
Jade West. who had two goals during the tournament including the game-win-
ning goal in the semifinals, was named the tournament's MVP. With the win the Lady
Lions get an automatic bid in the 2009 NCAA Tournament, and will play at SEC
runner-up. fourth-seeded LSU Friday. Nov. 13 at 7 p.m. in a first round game.


Chowan comes away with first CIAA crown
Chowan captured the first CIAA championship in school history when their
volleyball team defeated Fayetteville State in five sets (17-25. 25-19. 21-25, 25-15.
15-11) Sunday afternoon at the lBoo Williams Sportsplex. This is Chowan's first year
as a full-fledged member of the CIAA in all sports. The Hawks will now receive an
automatic bid to the NCAA Div. 11 playoffs.
The Hawks (29-8) took three of the final four sets to close out the win.
Antoinette McCollough topped Chowan with a team high 21 kills, Karina Monroe
was tabbed for tournament MVP honors with 15 kills and 8 assisted blocks.











10D THE MIAMI TIMES NOVEMBER 11-17, 20091


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Companies cutting back on holiday gift giving


By Laura Petrecca

Chocolate-, cheese-
and wine-loving work-
ers be warned: Ex-
pect a dearth of holi-
day gift baskets and
other goodies next
month, as the tough
economy forces com-
panies to cut back on
holiday gift giving.
One-third of small-
business owners say
they'll give employee
gifts this year vs. 46%
in 2008, according to
an American Express
Open Small Busi-
ness Holiday Monitor
survey released Mon-
day. And 47% plan
to dole out customer
presents during the
holidays, down from


George Abbott, own-
er of Omaha-based
Aras Enterprises, a
management con-
sulting company
that specializes in
materials handling.


. 52% last year.
Nearly 60% of en-
trepreneurs say the
downturn has af-
fected their holiday
gift-giving habits.
Many have ended
year-end raises and
bonuses, as well as
significantly slashed,
or outright halted,
bestowing gifts such
as sterling silver key
chains and high-
priced bottles of
wine on customers
and employees.
"We normally
send out holiday
cards and some
gifts to our more
important cli-
ents. This year
we will be do-
ing neither," says


JPMorgan Chase to hire 1,200 mortgage officers


JPMorgan Chase
said Tuesday it will
hire 1,200 mortgage
loan officers by the
end of next year, a
60% increase in its
sales force.
The workers are
needed as the compa-
ny aggressively goes
after new home mort-


gage business and
customers refinanc-
ing their home loans.
Through organization-
al changes and ad-
ditional systems, the
company has boosted
its loan capacity, said
Dave Lowman, head
of home lending at
Chase (JPM).


New loan officers
will work at bank
branches in 23 states
including California,
Florida and Texas,
and key cities such
as New York, Chicago,
Boston, St. Louis and
Washington.
The loan officers will
work with personal


bankers and refer-
ral sources, such as
real estate agents and
builders, as well as
with their own net-
work of homeowners.
Chase originated
$37.1 billion in mort-
gages in the last quar-
ter, the company said
in a statement.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


IFB NO. 92062


INVITATION FOR BID FOR DECONTAMINATION, DISINFECTION AND
DISPOSAL OF ALL BIOHAZARDOUS WASTE, HYDROCARBON OR
CHEMICAL HAZARDOUS SPILLS CITYWIDE


CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009

Deadline for Reauest for Additional Information/Clarification 11/23/2009 at 3:OOP.M


Detailed specifications for this hid are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at
www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No. (305) 416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY
OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE NO. 12271.


Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 003574


CITYOF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS




Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 for the following:

PROJECT NAME: "Coral Way Medians Landscaping Project (Second Bidding) M-0057"

BID NO: 09-10-002

Scope of Work: The project consists of complete landscaping and electrical maintenance services for
the existing medians along Coral Way (excluding trimming of Banyan trees). The scope of work includes
raking, leaf removal and litter pick up, mowing, trimming foliage, mulching as per plan, reinstalling root
guards, planting shrubbery (1 and 3 gal.), and watering the landscaped areas on a bi-weekly basis. The
maintenance also calls for the installation of all electric appurtenances to maintain a working up-lighting
system consisting of 423 light fixtures along Coral Way between SW 37 Avenue and SW 12 Avenue on a
monthly basis. The median is approximately 13,000 linear feet (2.46 miles) in length and this project would
cover approximately 130,000 square feet (2.96 acres) of median surface area. The contract term is for a
two (2) year period with the option to renew for three additional one (1) year periods.

Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor
from the State of Florida or a Miami-Dade County Business Occupational License in the appropriate trade.
An Electrical contractor must be used for the electrical maintenance of the work and a minimum of three
(3) years experience is required for the electrical portion of the project. Proof of experience for landscaping
and electrical projects may be required for three (3) separate projects of similar size, scope, and complexity,
supported by references within the past three (3) years.

A performance Bond is required for this project

Location of Work: The project is located along SW 22 Street Coral Way Median from SW 12 Avenue to
SW 37 Avenue. The medians are approximately 130,000 square feet (2.96 acres) of maintenance median
surface area.

Receiving Date & Time: Tuesday, December 1, 2009 @ 11:00 a.m.

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request, after November 9, 2009, at the City of Miami,
Department of Public Works, 444 S.W. 2nd Avenue, 8th Floor, Miami, FL 33130. Telephone No (305) 416-
1200. There are no construction plans for this maintenance project. Bid packages will be available in hard
copy form and a non-refundable fee of $20.00 will be required. A bid package can also be mailed to bidders
upon written request to the Department, and shall include the appropriate non-refundable fee plus $10 for
shipping and handling using regular U.S. Mail.

All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in
duplicate originals in the envelope provided with the bid package. At the time, date, and place above, bids
will be publicly opened. Any bids or proposals received after time and date specified will be returned
to the bidder unopened. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date
is solely and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/proposer. The City is not responsible for delays caused
by mail, courier service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH
SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY OF MIAMI ORDINANCE No. 12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.
City Manager


ADD. No DP-007621


Instead, he'll make
a small donation to
the Salvation Army
in the name of his
clients: "It has been
a very slow year."
Even flush com-


panies will likely cut
back, says luxury
marketing expert
Pam Danziger. "The
culture has changed,"
she says, and excess
is out.


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida, on November 19, 2009 at 9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of considering the following
resolution:

RESOLUTION OFTHE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACHMENTSS,
BY A FOUR-FIFTHS (4/5THS) AFFIRMATIVE VOTE, AFTER AN ADVER-
TISED PUBLIC HEARING, RATIFYING, APPROVING, AND CONFIRMING
THE CITY MANAGER'S FINDING, PURSUANT TO SECTION 18-85 OF THE
CODE OF THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA, AS AMENDED, WAIVING THE
REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPETITIVE BIDDING PROCEDURES FOR THE
PROCUREMENT OF SERVICES; AUTHORIZING THE CITY MANAGER TO
EXECUTE AN AMENDMENT TO THE AGREEMENT WITH GLOBAL SPEC-
TRUM LIMITED PARTNERSHIP FOR THE EXPANDED MANAGEMENT AND
OPERATION OF APPROXIMATLEY 35,000 ADDITIONAL SQUARE FEET
OF MEETING AND CONFERENCE SPACE AT THE MIAMI CONVENTION
CENTER/JAMES L. KNIGHT INTERNATIONAL CENTER LOCATED AT 400
SE 2 AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA; FURTHER APPROPRIATING A TOTAL OF
$277,559 FOR THE OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE OF SAID AREA, AS
CALCULATED ON A SQUARE FOOT BASIS PER THE EXISTING AGREE-
MENT, EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2010.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning this
item. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305)250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305)250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003311)


NOTICE OF MUNICIPAL RUNOFF ELECTION
IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
TO BE HELD ON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2009
PURSUANT TO RESOLUTION NO. R-09-0391
FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTING
ONE CITY COMMISSIONER WHO IS TO BE ELECTED
FROM SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICT 4

A municipal runoff election will be held on Tuesday, November 17, 2009, from 7:00 A.M. until 7:00
P.M, in the City of Miami, Florida, at the polling places in the several election precincts designated
by the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida, at which election the
qualified electors participating therein will vote for the following municipal officers: one District
Commissioner who is to be elected from single member District 4.



TEMPORARY AND PERMANENT POLLING PLACE CHANGES
MIAMI RUNOFF ELECTION NOVEMBER 17, 2009

Notice is hereby given of the following polling place changes. These changes have been made by
the Supervisor of Elections pursuant to Section 101.71, Florida Statutes.

TEMPORARY
Polling Place Changes
Precinct
Precinct New Location

510.0 Crowne Plaza Hotel
950 Le Jeune Road
Mall of The Americas
553.0 7827 W Flager Street



OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT
BOLETA OFFICIAL DE MUESTRA
ECHANTIYON BILTEN V6T OFISYOL
oFFICIAL RUN-OFF BOLETA OFICIALDE LA BILTEN V~Fosi
ELECTION BALLOT ELECCI6N DE SEGUNDA VUELTA DEZYEM TOU ELEKSYON
MIAMI, FLORIDA MIAMI FLORIDA MIAMI, FLORID
NOVEMBER 17, 2009 17 DE NOVIEMBRE DEL 2009 17 NOVANM 2009
TO VOTE. cOWMiju"vY nu. M ns
OVALMl4 NMXTO YOURKCHOM.
I ,you m,,kb a *ttaMke, ovthw t,
PARAVOTAN. U.Me COMPUOITAMNT
UL 6V^LO -W JUMN1AJSU LUCJIXN.

NT oW AKOa fAWirCHWAcIN.
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kcmMi pou karP blwn vut w





COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 4
COMISIONADO DISTRITO 4
KOMISYONt DISTRIK 4
(Vote for One)
(Vote por uno)
(Vote pou youn
a Manolo Reyes 90
o Francis Suarez 93



(#003323) Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!
















305-694-6214