Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00854
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: October 28, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00854
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text


















DISTRIBUTED I IM A EA D B O A D C U TE O V R 8 E R


ANOTHER OVERTOWN SH 6~TING


JEFF TORAIN


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LIBRARY OF FLA. HI
205 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


Two gunned down



in broad daylight

By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


Almost four months after an Overtown
birthday bash that resulted in a deadly
shooting killing two teens, police return
to another Overtown shooting scene with
yellow tape and a list of answered ques-
tions.
"We are losing too many young people
in our community," said community ac-
tivist and radio-talk host QueenBrown.
Jeremy Lowe, 21, and his cousin, Den-
nis Hill, 20, along with several others
were standing outside of Northwest Fifth
Avenue and Eighth Street on Wednesday
afternoon when at least two men jumped


~. .


out of a black SUV fired shots from an


""EedMeetn eess probably the hardest stance. If
elected, he plans to look at the federal and local
enforcement entity to receive resources to Miami's
most "unserved" community.
"Assault weapons are weapons of mass destruc-
tion," he said. Chiverton has suggested that those
who commit crimes with these weapons will be
charged on a federal level. "Too many [young] people
are dying with these assault weapons in our com-
munity," he said.
Torain did not suggest federal charges, but would
take a long look at how 1qcal police perform their
duties.
"The police department needs to police our commu-
nity in a different way. You can't just patrol our com-
munity like as pecupying force. You've got to stop,
walk, and talk, you've got to engage it," he said.
Spence-Jones takes the most nuanced approach.
"As commissioners; we cannot basicAlly direct the
police chief to do anything. What we can do is direct
the city manager to work along with the chief, she
said."
"From a government standpoint we can provide re-
sources," Spence Jones continued. "So that kids and
families know there is another outlet." "It is going to
take churches, community people stepping up to the
plate, and schools stepping up."
ON EXPERIENCE
As the incumbent, Spence-Jones has selected
Please turn to LEADER 7A


Ke


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


SMUROAY n~i


MO~3NDCY


TUESLDAY


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MICHELLE SPENCE-JONES


DAVID CHIVERTON


V~~ho wil ledDstit


Will the incumbent lose
L 71 *
IT& TL OMMISSlon seat.
By Tariq Osborne and Sandra Jean Charite
Tosborne@miamitimesonline.com
Scharite@miamitimesonline.com
Each of City of Miami's District 5 Commission
candidates presented their case to The Miami Times.
Each has a list of priorities best summed up by
David Chiverton. They include; housing, economic
development, making sure that ex-felons are given
opportunities, senior citizens and the youth. There
are strong similarities-but also subtle differences
between the aims and methods of each. The follow-
ing is a summary of each candidate's key positions.
PRESSING CONCERNS
Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones and com
mission hopeful Jeff Torain both identify joblessness
as district 5's most pressing concern. Both identify
the high crime rate as a by-product of joblessness.
Chiverton identifies housing and development as
his top concern. "I want to look at the land available
in District 5 and see if it is usable instead building
all these high rises," he said.
ON VIOLENCE
The candidates share a commitment to fighting vi-
01ent crime in District 5, but their approaches have


b d "
ama mner bags. $1.5 milhon
President Barack Obama made a
two-day visit to Florida this week
and helped raise $1.5 million to-
ward helping the Democratic ma-
jority in Congress.
Ag Obama began his visit to FloridA
at a rally with 3500 service person-
nel at the sprawling Naval Air Sta-
tiori in Jacksonville and ended it at
the famous Fontainebleau Hotel on
Miami Beach where deep-pocket
guests paid anywhere from $500 to
as much as $100,000 to have .din-
ner with the popular leader.
Democratic heavyweights on
hand to greet the President when
he disembarked from Air Force
One were Sen. Bill Nelson, Rep.
Kendrick Meek, Chief Financial Of-
-AP Photo/Gerald Herbert 1cer Alex Sink, the leading Demo-
critic candidate to replace Crist as
resident Barack Obama is greeted by Rep
governor; State Sen. Dan Gelber of
ndrick Meek, D-Fla., as he arrives in Mi- Miami Beach, a candidate for at-
i, Monday. tourney general.


a 158010) o




















_


.
Reconunendations

Tomas Regalado for Mayor


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


SMueb pt ees e eo4c OS30.00 Foreign 560 00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Pald at Miamr, Flonda
Postmaster. Send address changes to The Miami Times. PO. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press belies that America can best lead the world from racial and national amagonism when II accords to
every person, regardless of race, creed or color his or her human and legal rights Hahng no person leaning no person he
Black Press striveS 10 help every person in the firm behef that all persons are hurt as long as ar yone is held back


After careful deliberation, The Mi-
ami Times recommends Tomas
Regalado for Mayor of the City
of Miami-

While his opponent, Joe Sanchez, is
a respected public servant in his own
right, we believe that Regalado is the
best man for the position. *


4 11111111


'TOMAS REGALADO'


Tomas Regalado has served as a com-
missioner for the City of Miami since September of 1996. In
that time, he has developed a reputation for standing up to
developers something sorely needed in Miami's halls of
power.

Regalado has taken political heat for prioritizing infrastruc-
ture and services over development, but we share Regalado's
vision of a clean and pleasant Miami. We want a Miami where
the construction of ever taller skyscrapers and condos by out-
side developers and speculators is not as important as the
quality of life of year-round residents.
Perhaps had his hand been at the reigns sooner, the housing
bubble would not have crippled our city's finances so severely.
On a commission highly influenced by developers, Regalado
often found himself as the lone voice of dissent.

It was this same independent streak that drove him to reject
a stadium deal that became a financial liability for the city al-
most as soon as it was inked. The stadium deal was no deal at
all for the Black community. We feel safe in hoping then, that
Tomas Regalado will be a mayor for all the people, Hispanics,
whites, and Blacks.

We further admire Tomas Regalado's staunch opposition of
the two-minute rule; which limits how long an average citizen
may speak before the commission. Regalado is a leader who
wants to hear our concerns. Th suggests to us that he can
be trusted to address them.

For City of Miami Mayor, The Miami nies recommends'
Tomas Regalado.


Jeff Torain for Commissioner
hile there were no bad

Candidates in Miami's .
District 5 commission race,
one candidate is uniquely qualified to
lead th6 district forward for the next
four years.

That candidate is Jeff Torain.

District 5 is ridden with violence. JEFF TORAIN

Jeff Torain seeks to implement a comprehensive public
safety program. As a former Opa-Locka Deputy Police Chief,
we believe he has the experience to do so.

District 5 is rife with poverty.

Train has correctly identified joblessness as District 5's
most pressing issue. Jeff Torain would prefer to see local
businesses grow than outside businesses move in. He would
like to take advantage of interest in Haitian culture by
developing a tourism zone in Little Haiti. Train has noted
that while Miami is a city that thrives on tourism, very little of
that ends up in District 5.

The City of Miami is a financial mess.

As an executive director, Jeff Torain has had to make and
defend budgets before the city of Lauderhill. He even seeks
to add transparency to the process by mandating that the
city budget come before the commission 90 days earlier. This
would allow commissioners and citizens time to view the city's
budget and ask questions before it becomes official.
Jeff Torain has said that he would have voted against the
stadium deal. We at the Miami Times would have done the
same.

Perhaps most importantly, Jeff Torain takes 4 consensus-
building approach to getting these things accomplished.
He understands the importance of convincing four other
commissioners, representing wealthier districts, that aiding
District 5 is in their best interests as well. Train has said that
he would "go irl with a plan" and have the business community
behind him before making his proposals. This is the way city
matters should be conducted.

The Miami Times recommends Jeff Torain for commissioner
of District 5.

. I for one beheve that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action . ."
Malcolm X


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2009 1


(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station Miami, Flanda 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


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WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER


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$1)@ famf Efmed


"8


What did you think of the Louisiana couple denied a wedding license

because they were inter racial (He was Black, she was white)?


I,.OC''AL.,~5 THE~lM E 1`M MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBERII~f[ 28-NVEMBR 5,200


BLACKs MUST CONTROL THEIR O\WN DESTINY


Dear Editor,


to be able to stay in Miami. '
Why do you think they are
called illegals? It is because .
they should not. have ever
entered the U.S. That type
of behavior shows no respect


for U.S. laws or its people.
They really have the nerve to
complain when illegals are
breaking ,the law? Let them
protest in Haiti for better
conditions for their people.


Again; I think the protesters
have no respect for President
Obama.

Linda Simmons
Miami


How rude it is for the Hai-


Dear Editor,

Two more bodies have fallen
in the streets of Miami., As I
watched IVIiami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones pour
her heart out at the press con-
ference on Wednesday after-
noon, I wondered, "What else
can the city do te stop these


crimes?" I mean they have in-
creased security, initiated a
Hot Spots Campaign and ba-
sically opened their doors to
community but nothing seems
to work. I no longer blame the
elected officials, the "White"
man or former President
George W. Bush but I blame
us. "Our" kids are killing each


other. "Our" kids are purchas-
ing the assault weapons and
doing the drive-bys. Michelle
Coleman, Brandon Mills, Der-
rick Gloster and Anthony
Smith's blood is on our hands.
We have failed our community
in harboring these fugitives
who seem to care more about
themselves than anyone. Now


I don't know what these young
men were doing on the streets
of Overtown moments before
death, but they were human
beings that had.a family who
is.askirig, "Where is the com-
munity?"

Constance Berd,
Overtown


development. We want county
dollars for job training pro-
grams to prepare people for
the opportunities that will
arise with this new develop-
ment.
The proposed Transit Vil-
lage could stimulate both im-
mediate and long -term jobs,
revitalize our local small busi-
ness sector, provide housing
for low-income residents and
improve our transportation
infrastructure. Allin which we
can surely agree are essential
and beneficial elements for
the growth and sustenance of
our community.


In order for this vision to
be realized, however, the
project's leaders, especially
Edmonson, have to make
real commitments to the
community and be held ac-
countable if they are not de-
livered.
To our elected officials, I
say give us something we can
sink our teeth into! Give us
what we want and what we
need: real jobs for the com-
munity and real opportunity
for our small businesses.

Hashim Yeomans-Benford,
Miami


Dear Edi~tor,


tors for the project.
Well, I got news for the poli-
ticians: People are hungry
for justice ..and you can't eat
promises. .
We've had our fill of empty
promises in Liberty City. We
want signed guarantees that
contractors and businesses
will be required to hire di-
rectly from the community.
We want guarantees that our
beloved and essential busi-
nesses, like Green's Dream
Shoe Repair and Mop City
Barber Shop that are already
on the site, will survive and
flourish within this new de-


There were a lot of promis-
es of economic revival in last
week's article "Transit Village
Project: Changing the Face of
Liberty City" (10/21-10/97)
which discussed the revived
project on Northwest Sev-
enth Avenue on 62nd Street,
Miami-Dade Commissioner
Edmonson and Mayor Carlos
Alvarez seem content with
putting out general promises
while residents distinctly in-
sist on jobs, housing and a
clear mandate for hiring mi-
nority owned local contrac-


real information of what's going
on? Anything less is a.disgrace
to the leaders of the church and
the Pastor. If no answers come
soon, all leaders and the Pastor
should resign or be voted out by
the church members.

Ruth Jackson
Miami


Dear Editor,

I went to a meeting on Sept.
28 at the Friendship Mission-
ary Baptist Church. There were
many other church members
there concerned about the fi-
nances of the church and the
procedures for handling church
money. When we got there, we


found we were locked out and a
guard was placed there by Pas-
tor Gaston Smith. Can you be-
lieve it-- locked out of your own
church where you have been
there longer than the Pastbr?'If
has been a long-time since the
arrest of Pastor Smith (around
Feb. 2008). And we the church
have yet to receive real infor-


motion about the churches' fi-
nances. Eventually, we finally
got into the parking lot and had
the meeting there. We wanted a
meeting with Pastor Smith but
he was not available. We have
been told the church funds were
at high six figure amount and
now at about $15,000. Where is
the money and when will we get


The Miami-Dade County Corrections Department is under
fire for discrimination. Complainants are saying Director
Timothy Ryan is guilty of EEOC violations and gross
mismanagement.
Stay tuned.
********
The situation at one of Liberty City's oldest and most
promment churches seems to be getting out of hand. Some
members claim that the church recently employed armed
guards and locked out members who wanted to hold a
meeting to discuss the future of its pastor. Stay tuned.

********
Budget cuts at many schools have taken their toll on a
lot of employees lately and many feel that some of the cuts
have been unfair. Miami-Dade College North Campus gave
pink slips to 119 people recently; some with as many as 29
years of service there. Some feel that Blacks are being let go
in favor of Hispanics. Stay tuned.

******
Republicans are having a hard time finding Blacks to
campaign against President Barack Obama, so they have
recruited some misguided Haitians to do the job. A few
showed up Monday outside the Fontainebleau Hotel and
drew sneers.

********
Former Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre who launclied a long-
shot campaign three weeks ago against U.S. Rep. Kendrick
Meek, of Miami, the front-runner for the Democratic Senate
nomination, might have to resign his seat to the Miami-Dade
Expressway Authority to prevent a conflict of interest.


Because of existing denominational split, don't look for
a large movement by conservative Anglicans opposed to
their church's liberal.stance on same-sex blessings and
the ordination of woman priests and gay bishops, Pope
Benedict XVI gave his approval'I'uesday to a formablethod
of bringing Anglicans .into the Roman Catholic Church
while allowing them to keep some religious traditions, such
as worship rituals. .

********
Gov. Charlie Crist will lose a lot of support in this
community ifhe doesn't come through with the money the
Florida Parole Commission wants to reduce an.extensive
backlog of former felons seeking to regain their civil
rights.


timely up to the individuals. For
a man sitting on the bench to
ever think that he can make
that decision for the couple is
ridiculous. The judge seems lost
in time. We have many races in
this country, so any kids would
grow up just fine. People are go-
ing to love kids regardless. That
has no bearing at all. Children
don't care about race; it's the
adults that are prejudiced and
racist. .

CLASSY RAMSEY, 20 .
Student, Miami

I. Clon't think
that was right
at all. It's sil-
ly really. The
world is full
of interracial
relationships.
It's a free
country. You _
have a right to
marry whomever you want. You
have a lot of interracial kids to-
day. They don't have any prob-
lems. It's just plain silliness.
How are you going to tell grown
people they can't marry?


in love; and they should've been
able to get married. I think the
Justice is racist really. It's sad
that someone with those kinds
of ideas can also hold that type
. of authority. The kids would
not have a problem growing up
these days. It was just his ex-
cuse.


JOHNNY SULLIVAN, 61 .
Tractor Railer Driver, Liberty City

That's just
racist to me.
This isn't the
1930's. You
can marry a
whomeveryou "
want. Person- .
ally, I think
bringing any
kids into it
was just an excuse. The Judge
is just a racist. My son has bi-
racial kids. I love them and I re-
spect him and them. There are
no problems. I think they need
to fire that judge. I bet they will
too.He?1beoutof there. -


MURIEL WALKER, 68
Retired, Liberty City

I don't think
it's right. That
judge should
have married
them. This
is the United
States. If those .
two want to
be with each
other; they should. The kids
would be accepted, I don't think
that's a problem. I know plenty
of multi-racial people, and they
get on just fine. Also, things
will be different by the time any
children they have grow up. Life
willbedifferent.Itwillbeabet-
ter place.

DWIGHT WALKER, 58
Entrepreneur, Liberty City

That jus- .
tice of the .,,
peace should .
be locked up
somewhere.
Who is he to ,,,-
deny them? -,
That's en- .


MARIE MILES, 39
Student, Liberty City

It's wrong;
totally inap-
propriate..The
judge was just
using the kids
as an excuse.
It was really '
about his own
pre j udices .
For someone
in his posi-
tion; that's very inappropriate.
There are so many different cul-
tures of kids and different races
in America that the kids prob-
ably wouldn't even be noticed.
I think that judge or justice
of the peace should be doing
something else,
.
LATER MOORE, 26
Student, Liberty City

I don't think
it was fair. I .
think that's ir-
relevant. This
worldhasalot
of bigger prob-
lems. They're ,


OPINION


Lo CAL


, C'pyrig hted aeil


Overtown shooting puts community on the "hot spot"


Politicians: You must remember your promises


Friendship Church members demand answers







~~~~~~~~~ _ ____~_


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 4 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 5, 2009


B


Ilr,


AFSCME 79 Joe Simmons


M1iami Genertal Employees Association (Local 1907)


Miami Police Union
(Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge #20)
The Honorable Joe Martinez
Miami-Dade County Commissioner
The Honorable Natacha Seljas
Miami-Dade County Commissioner
The Honorable Rebeca Soss
Miami-Dade County Commisioner
The Honorable Javier Souto
Miami-Dade County Commissioner
The Honorable Carlos Gimenez
Miami-Dade County Commissioner
New Providence Baptist Church


The Honorable Audrey Edmonson
Miaml-Dade County Commissioner
United Teachers of Dade
Reverend Johnny Barber
Mount Sinai Baptist Church
Reverend W.E. Carpenter
Emmanuel Baptist Church
Reverend Vinson Davis
New Providence Baptist Church
Reverend Richard P Dunn II
Faith Community Baptist Church
Reverend George E McRae
Mount Tabor Baptist Church


Reverend Greg~ory Thompson, President


Reverend ~Dr. R Joaquin Willis


MaEyor Jullo Robainaa


Mayor Yloset De SLa Cruz


The HXonorable Alix Delsulme


&


*


A


~1~13


L'i


L'1


L'i


"I promise that I will have an open door policy for every


3V 3


VCIOTE j


Join the List of Community Leaders & Organizations who Support Tomas for Mayor


IMWR)~


Pon~) ~5a, 'LtEj PER(0)










S5A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 5, 2009


LIBIERT ITY SEVEN


~


I


1 EPA est. MPG hwy.: Impala LT (with 3.5L VS) 29, Avalon 28.
2 Only on 20% of vehicles available to dealers as of 9/21/09. Includes Auto Show Bonus Cash. Residency restrictions apply. See dealer for detalls.Take delivery by 11/2/09.
3 Monthly payment is $13.89 for every $1,000 financed. Example down payment is 9.4%. Some customers will not qualify. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Take delivery by 11/2/09.
4 Based on GM Mid-Utility Crossover segment and Traverse FWO with an EPA est.17 MPG city, 24 hwy. Excludes other GM vehicles.
5 includes all offers. includes Auto Show Bonus Cash. Residency restrictiods apply. See dealer for details. Take delivery by 11/2/09.
6 Monthly payment is $16.67 for every $1,000 financed. Average example down payment Is 10.7%. Some customers will not qualify. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Take delivery by ll/2/09.
7 Example based on survey. Each dealer sets its own price. Your payments may vary. Payments are for a 2010 Ehevy Malibu LS with an MSRP of $22,545. 39 monthly payments total $8,929. Option to purchase at lease end for an amount to be determined at
lease signing. GMAC must approve lease. Take delivery by 11/2/09. Mileage charge of $.15lmile over $9,000 miles. Lessee pays for excess wear. Not available with other offers. Residency restrictions apply.
8 Retum between 30 and 60 days with less than 4,000 miles. Not available with some other offers.0ther restrictions apply. Take delivery by 11/30/09.
9 Visit onstar.com for details and system limitations.
The names, emblems, slogans, vehicle body designs, and other marks appearing in this document are the trademarks and/or service marks of General Motors, its subsidiaries, affiliates, orikensors.
@2009 General Motors. Buckle up, Americal l-800-950-2458 or chevy.com


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWiN DESTINY


freeze their flex benefits and
premium pay for almost two
years.
Now the unions must meet
with employees to see which of-
fer they will accept then nego-
tiations will be made between
the unions and the County
Manager.
The decision has settled
nothing according to comments
heard at the meeting. Nobody
seemed to be satisfied with the
results.
After two attempts to balance
the budget without anymore


The Miami Times Staff Report

Miami-Dade County Com-
missioners seem to be taking
a lackadaisical attitude while
seeking a solution to the $444
million budget deficit.
In a 6 to 5 vote, the coriamis-
sioners voted to present three
County employee unions on
Monday with the choice of a
five percent reduction in base
pay or an equivalent reduction
in holiday pay.
Either they take the five per-
cent or not get paid for the holi-
days, which is an estimated 13
holidays, that they don't work,
said Commissioner Barbara
Jordan. If they accept the holi-
day, then they will be paid their
straight time but not time and
a half. Those who don't work
will not be paid.
"There was a number of com-
missioners who did not want to
cut employee salaries. To meet
the deficit, the money has to

r to
cent then triple the layoff."

lay fesa ave e es 8
County. This actions prevents
any additional layoffs.
. The commission did not a set
a deadline for the decision by
the union rank-and-file, leav-
ing the meter running on the
employee pay clock. Without
the pay cuts the County bud-
get grows by $4 million every
week.
Every recommendation that
was made was turned down
said Jordan. On another note,
Solid Waste Union offered to


--Miami Times photos/Tariq Osborne


BARBARA JORDAN


layoffs, Jordan believes that
this best way to balance the
budget and prevent future lay-
offs in the County.
Commissioner Audrey Ed-
monson was out of the coun-
try and could not be reached.
Chairman Dennis Moss and
Commissioner Dorrin Rolle did
not return calls, left with their
Chief of Staff, seeking com-
ment.


I;C


2009 CHEVY IMPALA


EPA EST. 29 MPG HWY.


EPA EST. 24 MPG; HWY.


EPA EST. 30 MPG HWY.


es.....
See Your Local thevy Dealer.


*noadsidemis~taterata


Local veterans protest eviction

By Tariq Osborne
Tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Roughly 100 veterans and their families bore the
day's searing heat to stage a protest at 6102 North-
west Seventh Ave ort Wednesday, Oct. 14.
"We're, calling for the immediate resignations of r,
Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones and Billy b. 1
Hardemon," said Preston Hester, Operation's direc-
tor for Make a Wish Veterans, Inc/Vets United.
The protest stems from the controversy that SPENCE-JONES
erupted when Make a Wish Veterans, Inc. /Vets
United received a letter from Miltoria R. Fordham,
of the Martin Luther King Economic Development Corporation, denying
their request to lease the office space they occupied.
It is the position of Make a Wish Veterans, Inc. that this reversal was po-
litically motivated by the offices of Spence-Jones and Ha demon, a charge
that both camps deny.
Charles Buford, president of VetsUnited.org, has said that Spence-Jones
wanted the veterans to endorse her and they refused, essentially calling Lewis Williams and Kenneth Boyd are among the
their subsequent evictiori (or attempt at eviction), an act ofretribution. first arrivals to protest the possible eviction of Make
Spence-Jones denied any involvement. a Wish VeteransInc.from its Northwest Seventh Av-
Hardembn declined to comment. enue location on Wednesday, Oct.14.


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Brown: Get back to basics and reclam ou cilde


Crucial financial times call for Regalado's brand of leadership

REGALADO. city of Miami. Though they able housing" in the City? Have game ticket, parking fees or to just at a press conference to the.people throughout the City
continued from 1A have worked close hand with they seen the number of unem- buy your son a hot dog knowing give his 10 cents but someone have suffered enough.
the mayor, Regalado and San- played residents? that your rent is due tomorrow who is active and not biased in I strongly believe that Tomas
than one supermarkets on the chez have represented But wait, Sanchez, who and you don't have a dime. his approach. The time for the Regalado will be the man for the
colb k no dilapidated hous- districts that had a voted for the Marlins In an interview with The Mi- politics has come to an end as job.


. .


MIAM


2009 TAX ROLL
OPEN FOR COLLECTION
The 2009 tax roll of Miami-Dade County is now open for collection,
Property taxes as assessed from January 1 through December 31 become
payable on November 1.
Early Payment Discounts:
4% If paid by November 30, 2009
3% if paid by December 31, 2009
2% if paid by January 31, 2010
1% if paid by February 28, 2010
No discount if paid in March
pygpyy gaggy gygggyggygqgggy94April1.
Failure to pay property taxes will result in additional interest, fees,
and penalties and could result in loss of property.
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payments must be made in person to the Tax Collector's Office by the next
working day.

"':.:'.::"::::::t: www.miamidade.gow ,
* By Mail discounts on current taxes are determined by postmark date
* In PerSOn at GUT Office:
Tax Collector's Main Office
140 West Flagler Street, 1st Floor
Miami, FL 33130
Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. (excluding legal Holidays)


Sanchez says he would be mayor for all


SANCHEZ
continued from 1A


take a chance on Sanchez.
There are several positive in
dictators that Sanchez is willing
to engage the Black community.
He has been highly visible here.
Every commissioner attends
the grief-laden press confer-
ences that follow a shooting.

Eachdh esdo shdw how "tou
not need another mayor who
only visits District 5 when the
cameras are there. Last Janu-
ary, when the Black Police Pre-
cinct and Courthouse museum
opened, Joe Sanchez was there
to help Otis Davis, Charles Dix


I


UNITED ECESOFDAE~


BL^C:KS MUST' CONTROL. THEIR OwN DESTINY


areas. Several weeks later,
18-year-old Rodney LaShawn
Miller was arrested and charged
with second degree murder with
a deadly weapon.

GETTING THE
WEAPONS OFF THE STREET
Time after time, within the
past year, assault weapons
have appeared all over the City
and County leaving many very
fearful for their lives.
Overall, crime is done in the
city, according to Miami Police
Chief John Timoney. .
The Miami Police annual re-
port shows that Overtown's ho-
micide decreased from 18.60
percent in 2007 to 15.87 per-
cent in 2008. .
But Timoney insists that the
assault weapons are becoming
too easy to obtain off the streets.
"These are weapons of war," he
uttered at the press conference
as Miami becomes domain to
the street violence.

WHO'S RESPONSIBLE?
As two families prepare to
bury their children, the search


for the killers) continues but
police have very few leads.
However, Brown doesn't
place the responsibility of these
crimes on the hands of the po-
lice or any elected officials.
"Violence has been in our
community for years and no
one has accepted that this is
our problem. This is our com-
munity so I can't blame Timon-
ey," said Brown. "The ones that
look like us are the ones that
are killing our babies but we
are still pointing the finger."
Brown, who grew up in the
- Brownsville and Liberty City
community, knows first-hand
about losing a child to violence.
Her 24-year-old son, Eviton,
was shot and killed when the
car he was sitting in was rid-
d1ed with bullets in 2006.
In an interview with The Miami
Times ort Friday, she believed
that the community needed to
do a clean up.
"There are some people who
we will not be able to save. They
are lost. Those people we need
to identify and law enforcement
needs to identify. We need to


get them out of the community
before they hurt anyone else,"
said Brown.
Brown believes that with the
lack of jobs for some youth kill-
ing has become a profession
and more opportunities are
needed for the children in the
Miami's urban besides mentor-
ing programs because society
has changed. Family is needed
now more than ever to help
raise today's children.
She insists that we all have
to get back to basis where ev-
eryone "plays their roles" in the
game called life.
"We are playing musical
chairs and everyone seems to
be outside of their roles," said
Brown. "Parents need to be
parents, Commissioners need
to lead the community, teach-
ers need to teach and law en-
forcement need to enforce the
laws."
"We are going to see more of
these killings," she said.
What's important now, Brown
says, "We need to protect our
family, fight back and reclaim
our children."


to tell. You know, these are our
children and blood."
The Commissioner also raised
the point that Wednesday was
early release for the public
schools and had the students
been walking; there could have
been more casualties.
"When is it gonna stop? How
many more people have to die,
and when are we gonna get
these guns off the streets?" said
Spence-Jones fighting back
tears.

REPETITIVE CYCLE
As the Liberty City community
mourned the death of Brandon
Mills, 16, and Derrick Gloster'
18, who viere shot and killed on
Jan. 23 at Northwest 15 Avenue
and 70 Street, after one or more
gunmen fired an assault weap-
on at a crowd.of people, killing
two and injuring seven.
Just on the other side of town,
Miami's urban street was awak-
ened by a similar incident but
this time more victims.
Twelve people were shot at
a birthday party in Overtown
shortly after the Fourth of July


SHOOTING
continued from 1A

Last Friday, Hill would have
turned 21.
"He's not gonna celebrate
with life this birthday. Instead
our family is planning a fu-
neral," said his aunt Henrietta
Dickerson.
Hours after the shooting, po-
lice, elected officials and the
city's HotSpot Campaign called
a press conference in which an
emotional Miami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones could
barely put her words together.
She explained that she usually
drives in the area at the time
when the shooting took place.
On this particular day, her driv-
er was late btxt had her driver
been on time, Spence-Jones did
not believe she would be stand-
ing at the press conference,
"I have never in my life seen
a person shot and killed," she
said.
"Everybody's traumatized.
We've got to do something about
these guns on the streets and
if we see something, we've got


QUEEN BROWN
weekend and one victim was ran
over by a car while trying to flee
the scene. Michelle Coleman, a
21-year-old FAMU student and
Anthony Smith, a 17-year-old
football star at Booker T. Wash-
ington Senior High was killed;
leaving the community devas-
toted.
The shooting followed press
conferences, more police pres-
ences and canvassing of the


I~*~nlc~.~.r~s~i~;nn~a~ma~y~a~.~r~,~mf~


ami Times, Sanchez said that
his opponent was focused on
obtaining "Cuban votes." The
statement came after Regalado
failed to attend a community
debate for the mayoral candi-

daCalado's excuse for not at-
tending was that there was a
conflict in his schedule. wowl
Economists have predicted
that the country is slowly recov-
ering from the recession which
is still an empty bowl cereal for
Mrs. Daisy down the street.
Regalado was right this elec-
tion is crucial. We need a may-
or in office that will be fiscally
responsible in our budget and
wise in their decision-making
for the people of the City of Mi-
ami. We need a mayor who will
have a diverse administration
with which we can all identify.
A mayor who does not show up


majority of Hispan-
ics; but one of them
will have to add the
Black, community
to their decision
making.

d Can they do it? I
Besides going to
a press con-
ference af-
ter a shoot-
Ing occurs, a - e. *
have they
wal k ed
throu g h
the underprivileged areas to
understand the plight of the
communities? Have they spent
a day irr Liberty City andowit-
ness the number of homeless
people on the street? Have they
noticed the number of people
seeking affordable housing but
they can't the "so-called afford-


stadium which will be
built in Hialeah, be-
lives it will bring
A opportunities in our
community. Regalado
disagrees, and like
cmm u ty, aysBlack
a "bad deal" and there is
no room for Black busi-
nesses to benefit.
Anyway, the
< s, Black com-
munity has
always been
the last to
receive information that will
benefit them in the community
so are we going to receive a spe-
claJ newspaper on our doorstep
alatit the stadium when jobs
become available? I don't think
so.
And yes, everybody might love
baseball but can you afford the


,
ing, parks are safer, more cops
present in the school zones and
etc.
This is why I say Miami's new
mayor cannot just talk or give a
great speech about change but
achons mus foll s surely af-

fected a great number of people
throughout the country. Welfare
applicants have tripled. Many
have been laid off or have lost
their homes. Everyone seems to
be riding on the same boat.
But this community has been
in a recession for too long as
politicians come and out of our
neighborhoods making prom-
ises but unable to fulfill them.
The two mavoral candidates,
Tomas Regalado and Joe San.
chez, don't look like us. Both
are Cuban native who have sat
on the dais for over 10 years
making decisions aboixt the


in the Black community, but
Mr. Regalado had a "schedul-
ing conflict." What was more
important?
In January, Mr. Regalado said
"I welcome the opportunity to
have many debates in front of
every neighborhood of the City
of Miami. I think that's funda-
mental for the people to make
a choice." In all fairness to Mr.
Regalado; he didn't say which
pel r. Regalado is willing to ig-
nore the Black community as a
candidate, what can we expect
if he is elected?
It seems very clear to me that
if the Black community wants a
seat at the table, we need San-
chez at its head.


on, and others, celebrate their
accomplishment.
I know because I saw him.
I did not see Regalado.
When a Hands on 1VIiami beau-
tification project painted homes
in Liberty Square, and put
more than 3,000 plants
into the ground; Sanchez
got his hands dirty. He
worked without regard .
for which way the cam-
eras were facin I know -

I did not see Regala-
do.
To be certam,
Sanchez has
commit -
ted some
gaffes. He . "


voted for an unpopular and ex-
pensive stadium deal-but so did
District 5's commissioner,
His dubious claim made at
an October debate at Mount Si-
nai Missionary Baptist Church
that he can "relate" to the
Black community drew
the somewhat uncom-
portable silence such a
remark deserves. But we
must remember; his op-

pong adlWr. R
not deign to
attend the
debate at
all. It was
the only
to w n -
. hall held


Make checks payable to:


Miami-Dade County Tax Collector
140 West Flagler Street
Miami, FL 33130
(Payment must be in U.S. funds drawn
from a U.S. Bank)


TO VieW amoUnt due or make payment via E-checking,
. ViSit th6 COUnty'S Website at: www.miamidade.gov
For Property Tax information call: 305-270-4916 or visit
www.miamidade.gov/taxcellector
Fernando Casamayor
Tax 001160100
Miami-Dade ounty


~


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2009 )


\~l~an ~1~CYYI( ~ ~ ~lh~ IYILLI( II~L~)


Math Teacher
Doral Middle School
* Masters Degree in Educational
Computer Technology
* Certified in Middle Grades Mathematics
* Service Award recipient from
Miami-Dade Commissioner Dorrin Rolle
* Member, North Central Federation of
Homeowners Association
* Appointed Board Member Miami-Dade
County Housing Finance Authority
* President, Northshore Community
Association, Inc.
* Member, United Teachers of Dade


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t n youve go o ave eas
that make sense. You have to
get support from the business
community. You've got to go in
there with some help," he said.
According to Torain, the other
districts must see that helping
District 5 is in their own eco-
nomic interest as well. "If I live
in Cleveland, Ohio, I don't know
the difference between the city
of Miami and Miami beach. So
when I hear about these shoot-
ings, I might decide not to come.
We need to work in a cohesive
fashion. It's in everybody's in-
terest. We want them here
spending their dollars here," he
said.


L-


CAL Learning and Technology
Center, and holds various chair-
man positions.
Torain does not lack for expe-
rience either.
"I've served as executive offi-
cer with the City of Lauderhill
City government," he said.
I worked as a director of ad-
mmistration for the Miami-
Dade College campus. In that
capacity, I was responsible for
budgetary oversight for putting
the budgets together and mak-
ing sure we did not go over. The
process is the same no matter
where you're talking about, it's
just the numbers that change.
And you're providing govern-


Most people are upset about
the cui-rent leadership. They
don't see their leadership do-
ing anythmg for them," he said.
"They don't feel like anyone's
listening to them or fightmg for
their interests."
Chiverton, who is also a Miami
native, believes voters feel dis-
enfranchised as well, and cited
Michelle Spence-Jones's missing
a Liberty City debate last month
. is an example of why. "The com-
mumty is owed the opportunity
to hear from their leader," he
said. "When you are a leader in
. the community, you cannot leave
the community at bay when it
comes critical times as these."


Youll see me fighting on the
dais very hard," said Michelle
Spence-Jones. "The reputation
that I'm getting in the district is
that they call me a scrapper, a
fighter, because I'll do whatever
it takes to make sure that my
community and people win."
They want somebody who
knows how to maneuver
through the system. They want
less talk and more results. Peo-
ple are tired of hearing talk,"
she said,
Chiverton voiced similar sen-
timents, citing his 25 years of
service to the community.
"I have the experience and a
plan," he said.


COMMUNITY TIES
Michelle Spence-Jones was
born and raised in District 5.
"I do everything in my neigh-
borhood. From the dry cleaner
to the grocery store," she said.
"It's great to be a person com-
ing back to give to my commu-
nity. For so long in our neigh-
borhoods, we've had situations
where we've been out of touch
with our own people. That's
part of the reason you see de-
cay. We're so far removed from
the issue that we forget what
we're here for."
Train, who moved his family
to Miami in 1995, cites this dis-


"Leadership with proven re-
sults as her campaign slogan.
The idea is to keep her expert
ence-and her opponents' lack
thereof-in the minds of the
voter
"Experience is extremely im
portent she said in a recent
interview. "We can not be in a
situation where you have some-
one who's coming into the seat
and trying to learn on the job;
trying to establish new relation-
ships. You lose a lot of time do-
ing that," she said.
Chiverton rates Spence
Jones's leadership a two [of ten].
Chiverton is the CEO Miami/


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 5, 2009


Spence- Jones, Chiverton, Torain: Who will the voters .choose?
LEADER Miami-Dade Weed and Seed, ment services for whatever com- connect as part of the reason he Torain spoke more of conse
n
continued from 1A Founder/President of the FO- unity you're serving," he said. hopes to replace Spence-Jones. GOVERNING METHODS sus building than fighting.
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8A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 5, 2009 1


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DADE
. ER AND SE-WER m"E
DE PARTME NT By Ana Maria Monte Flores

In November, 2007, the Miami-Dade Water and
Sewer Department received a historic 20 -year
Water-Use Permit from the South Florida Water
Management District. The permit is a plan for
meeting the present and future water needs of the
County while protecting natural resources such as
the Everglades. The permit requires WASD to de-
velop alternative water supply sources and con-
tinue with its Water-Use Efficiency Program. It en-
sures water will be available for Miami-Dade
County's needs and lays the groundwork for very
ambitious capital improvements over the next two
decades.
Some of the alternative water supply sources.in-
clude reclaimed water projects for large-scale irri-
gation and groundwater replenishment, using the
Floridan Aquifer as an alternative water supply, a
comprehensive water-use efficiency program and
a water loss reduction program. For more informa-
tion about the Miami-Dade County Water Use
Permit, please visit our website at
www.miamidade.gov/wasd/wup/asp
















Transit VillagePro~ject rai~seconcerns


Liberty City honors Rev. Dr. Gilbert S. Smith "5

The Miami Times Staff Report took place on Tuesday at the the Northwest 15* Avenue
corner of Northwest 62nd Street corridor, establishing a men-
City of Miami Commissioner and 15th Avenue. tor and free tutoring program


Members of the community joined elected officials yesterday,0October 27 for a street


I I


Citi never sleeps'


BLACKS MUST' CONTROL THEIR OwiN DESTINY


Greene's wife, Paulette,
voiced similar sentiments. "I
think it's going to be unfair to
the community. It's one thing
to upgrade a community; but
quite another to displace the
people who built that commu-
nity to do it," she said.
Hashim Benford, a commu-
nity organizer with the Miami
Worker's Center, whose offices
are threatened by the project,
voiced similar concerns. "It'll
be a project in our community
that isn't for our community,"
he said. "The businesses are
going to be displaced. There71
be this big beautiful building
in the middle of Liberty City
that has nothing to do with the
residents. They won't own the
nesses that are inside," he

The Miami Worker's Center
has sent written requests to
both the County Commission
and the Transit Department,
asking that local businesses
be employed in the construc-
tion and allowed space in the
new building. The county has
refused to guarantee it.
Johnny Cheeley, who has
been the proprietor of Mop City
Barbershop for 37 years, still
holds out moderate hopes of re-
maining on the property. "It all
depends," he said. "You know
you're not going to be paying


Shoe Repair in 1961.
"If it isn't in writing, that
means the answer is no. If you
know you want to include lo-
cal businesses, you could put
it in writing. I've got too many
kids dependent upon me. Now
they're sitting there worrying
whether we're going to be all
right," he said.


Shoe repair, was dismayed. He
has run the store since his fa-
ther passed on in 2000.
"I take it as a slap in the face
that they can't put anything in
writing," said Greene, whose
father started Greene Dream


BV Tariq Osborne
tosborne@maimitintesonline.com

The town-hall meeting, hosted
by Miami-Dade County Com-
missioner Audrey M. Edmonson
and Mayor Carlos Alvarez at the
Joseph Caleb Center in Browns
ville, did little to assuage the
fears of some local residents. The
meeting, held on Wednesday,
Oct. 21, was held to present the
conceptual design of the Seventh
Avenue Transit Village Project.
According to the county, the
mixed-use development project
will include housing, house busi-
nesses and provide immediate
access to I-95. But the meeting
left some local residents dissat-
isfied. Several members of the
community wanted commitment
and assurance from the County
that.minority participation and
employment opportunity would
be aranteed
C unty leaders stated that the
process will be open and compet-
itive and that minority firms and
area residents would be under
consideration for contract and
employment possibilities, but
did not t the step o putting

Tyrone Gr ene, owner and
proprietor of Greene Dream


Greene saved much of his
criticism for Edmonson. I
asked her directly; "Commis-
sioner, could you tell me ver-
bally that the businesses will
be able to come back in for
sure." According to Greene, the
commissioner said no.
Commissioner Edmonson
will be out of the country until
next week and was unavailable
to comment.


the same amount of rent," but
I'd like to. "There are no guar-
antees to anything," he said.
Michael Berry, who as been a
Mop City Barbershop customer
since he first moved to Miami
20 years ago would not like to
see the barber relocate. "No, I
wouldn't care to see it move.
I only trust one person doing
my hair, so I'd follow him," he
said.


.
-MiamiTimesphoto/Tariq0sborne
Johnny Cheeley, owner and [proprietor of Mop City Barber
hopes to rent a space in the proposed project. Here he cutS
the hair of Michael Berry, who has been a customer for 20
yeafS.


Michelle Spence-Jones and Mi-
ami-Dade Commigsioner Dor-
rin D. Rolle held a street nam-
ing ceremony to co-designate
a portion of Northwest 15m .
Avenue as "Rev. Dr. Gilbert S.
Smith Avenue." The ceremony


Pastor of Apostolic Reviv-
al Center, Rey. Dr. Gilbert
S. Smith has been a pillar of
the Liberty City community
for more than 50 years. His
efforts have included help-
ing to improve conditions on


for children, feeding the poor
and homeless twice a 14reek.
Spence-Jones and Rolle spoh-
sored the co-designation,
which includes a portion of
NW 15* Avenue from NW 62nd
street to NW 71" street.


Neighborhood Housing Services of South Florida


Citl's Office of Homeownership Preservation


9A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 5, 2009


Will local businessmen be left out?


Tyrone Greene's father started Greene Dream Shoe Repair


Providing stability. Securing the future. Citi is committed to helping families keep their homes and acting

quickly to support communities that are experiencing the impact of foreclosures. Our Office of

Homeownership Preservation is proud to work closely with local community organizations to

provide education, resources and guidance to help stabilize and revitalize neighborhoods.



























REDEVELOPMENT PLAN
Wednesday, November 4, 2009 at 6:00 PM
NR./YET Center at Gwen Cherry Park
7090 NW 22nd Avenue, Rooms 2 & 3
PROPOSED 79TH STREET CORRIDOR
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AREA
The purpose of the meeting is to obtain Public and Community input on a
Redevelopment Plan for a proposed Community Redevelopment Area (CRA).
Presently, the proposed boundaries of the 79th Street Corridor Community
Redevelopment Area are generally described as, bounded on the North by NW
87th Street, bounded on the East by NW 7th Avenue, bounded on the South by
NW 62nd Street and bounded on the West by 37th Avenue.
The meeting will be hosted by redevelopment planning consultants and Miami-
Dade County. Please call (305) 375-5143, should you desire any additional
information about the meeting
allaml-Dade County provides equal access and equal opportunity in the employment and
services and does not discriminate on the basis of handicap. 81gn Language Interpreters are
avaHable upon request. Please call (305) 375-Si43 at least INe (5) days in advance.


10A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 5, 2009 ^CKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY

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Copyright 'at rial

Syndicate o nt

Available from Commercial News Providers



) are so sA stume wa *m em tilA .g
* Notice to Property Owners and Residents
a T. PUBLIC INPUT MEETING FOR


are US
HEALTH PLANS,1NC.
Keeping the health in health care.
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TTY: 1-877-245-7930


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


11A THE MIANITIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2009


Suspect arrested in Howard's death


40 investigators conducted
more than 200 interviews and
"have not stopped working,"
UConn police chief
Robert Hudd said.
Howard was stabbed
early Oct. 18 outside a
university-sanctioned
danc urs afte
homecoming game win
over Louisville.
M'ARD toAccord grto hr
man, Lomax, who is not a UConn
student and lives 30 miles from
capusPwastit present when
doesn't know what it was about.
He only tried to break it up.
"He was just partying," Freeman
said. "Often people from out of
town go to the UConn campus
to party."
Several players said Tuesday
they had never heard of Lomax,
and don't know how Lomax and
Howard crossed paths.


The Miami Times Staff Report


John William Lomax III, 21


acy to commit assault
in the murder of Jas-
per Howard, a Miami
nadvand n ve ty
ball player. The arrest
occurred Tuesday
me at m lond was


Two others also were charged
in the fight that led to the stab-
bi 11dceathofHeward,)20{arged
20-year-old Hakim Muham-
mad, of Bloomfield, with con-
spiracy to commit assault, and
21-year-old Jamal Todd with
pulling a fire alarm that emp-
tied the Oct. 18 dance, trigger-
ing the fight.
Police would not discuss evi-
dence or a motive during a news
conference Tuesday. More than


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Students from the future Class of 2013 march down in front the steps of the new Police College and Law Enforcement


the lives of our youth and serve as a model
of democracy to our neighbors across and
throughout the hemisphere. During these
times of strained budgets, it is imperative
that we collaborate and leverage our collec-
tive resources to make ambitious projects
like these feasible."
. The College is located at the Northwest
corner of Northwest Third Street and North-
west Second Avenue. The first of its kind in
the world, this project will embody a new
concept in international law enforcement
with a distinct identity, amid the context
of Downtown Miami. It was developed to
prominently inte ate an international law
enforcement training center with a public,
high school in a free-standing, four-story
112,264 square feet annex to the existing


Headquarters.
"Seeing everything finally come together
yesterday was truly inspiring. To see the
children actually on-sight, right alongside
our police recruits waq quite a sight," said
Miami Police Chief, John F. Timoney. "This
endeavor is the first of its kind not only in
the Nation, but in the World...and it's of-
ficially off and running; A very proud mo-
ment indeed."
The state-of-the art structure, will fea-
ture two separate entities, the Miami Po-
lice Academy and a senior high school. The
high school will focus on training students
in law studies, homeland security and fo-
rensic sciences. The Academy will feature
three schools: first, the School for Basic
Please turn to SCHOOL 13B


Special to the Times
City of Miami Mayor Manny Diaz, Miami
Police Chief John F. Timoney,.Miami-Dade
County Public Schools Superintendent Al-
berto Carvalho and guests celebrated Rib-
bon Cutting/Dedication of the new state-
of-the-art City of Miami Police College and
Law Enforcement Officers' Memorial High
School. Hundreds, from all branches of
criminal justice along with other distin-
guished guests, attended the joyous occa-
sion.
"Something that was all but a dream a
few years ago has become a reality," said
Mayor Manny Diaz. "This building will for-
ever stand as a testament to the faith in
the power of our community to improve


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S15B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2009


Bethune-Cookman University honors Handfield


Total cost of the project is $35,400,000


- ---- --- -- L


Tip: Secure your property


THEFTS
continued from 12B

that was on top of the safe.
A youth pastor told a deputy
he was at the church play-
ing basketball with the youth
group and left around 8 p.m.
Before playing ball, he told the
official, he was in the church's
office at 4:45 p.m. and did not
notice anything suspicious.
Deputies believe the suspect
or suspects may have entered
the building through the front
door, based on pry marks.
Officials say the burglar-
ies have normally occurred
after Sunday and Wednesday
church services, and that no
denominations have been
spared.
Previous instances show
entry has been made via win-
dow or door. Once inside, the
vandals take cash, equipment
and other items. Safes were
removed from church offices
m some cases.
Heather Yates, a spokes-
woman for the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, one of several
agencies working to solve the


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWiN DESTINY


also be the delivery of the evic-
tion or foreclosure papers. No
matter what the situation do
not fear! God did not give us a
spirit of fear. If you are afraid,
then know that is a feeling
brought to you by the devil, not
God. Do not even answer the
door to accept that gift from the
enemy No matter how it looks
or what anyone says, God will
never leave or forsake you and
it's not because of how good you
have been, but because of His
mercy. .
In verse 5, David tells his
readers that the Lord has pre-
pared a banqueting table for
him. And He didn't invite just
any guests but David's en-
emies. You might want to know
why anyone would delight in a
party that your enemies were
guests. The Lord wants your
enemies to see that you are
blessed by Him. He wants those
who have laughed at you, per -
secuted you, fired you, gossiped
about you and hurt you know
that you have been redeemed
and restored. It might not look
like right now, but God has
plans for your life. You might
not see them, or doubt if they
even exist, but keep in mind


that God can see the parade of
life from beginning to end. You
might be looking at the float
that has your pain and poverty
on it, but He can see the float
that is bringing your healing
and prosperity. Thank the Lord
that our God has 20/20 super-
natural vision!
Finally, in verse 6, we have a
promise. We are assured that
goodness and mercy will be
our constant, lifelong compan-
ions. David says that surely His
goodness, mercy and unfailing
love will follow us. Surely means
without a doubt; you can count
on this to be so; it will hap en!
You might think that a simple
psalm will not change the course
of your life, or bring beauty from
ashes. But we are admonished
to think of those things that are
pure, peaceable, kind and good.
And even more importantly,
when we read these things, it is
a reminder to us of what we can
expect from the Lord. We have
expectations of people all of the
time, and they disappoint and
hurt us. Start your day expect-
ing the Lord to do what He has
promised that He would do. Ex-
pect great things from a great
Godl


PREACHERS
continued from 12B

development at Union Theologi-
cal Seminary said.
Some denominations believe
that a woman's place is not in
the pulpit.
Reverend Lillian Allen remem-
bers being treated differently
when she served in a Baptist
church before coming to Metro-
lit A.M.E
po'A t of times we were not al-
owe os an pulp in the it "
Rev. Allen said. "If we had to
preach, we had to preach from
the ground floor. We couldn't
be in the pulpit with the men.
There were times when we were
able to preach, people would
get up and walk out as we were
preaching "
Roots in the anti-slavery
movement have led the A.M.E.
Church to take a more inclusive
approach to women in minis
try.

to::osh vinsdoms tmem nh
are always welcomed with open
arms
"Peo le think that now that
because there are a lot of
women, 'Oh you got what you
wanted "' Reverend Kimberly
Detheridge said. "'You're min-
isters now,' [they say]. When in
reality, we didn't even begin to
have the right to be ordained
elders in the African Method-
ist Episcopal Church until the
year 1960. That's not that long
ago.

m s a so e ms e
gle.

<;seq ch y fi
there's an old boys network "
Rev. Erika Crawford*, senior
of All n Te le A.M.E
pas or e mp
Church in Mt. Vernon, New


York said. "In my particular

r eum ave im1tnle7et
lowship. They get together and
they do things. But as a female,
you don't get the same level of
respect."
But some of the strongest
voices of opposition come, sur-
prisingly, not from the men.
"The woman of the church
challenged me," Rev. Crawford
said. "The church I pastor has
a significant number of West
Indians and their culture is
that women don't lead. Women
run the home and men run the
church. And so I really had
to prove myself, which meant
I had to avail myself to being
hurt and still being rejected.
Leading women pastors, like
Rev. Anderson, to set their own
boundaries.
"It was all deconstructing
what you grew up understand-
ing, and trying to fit into that
place, even as a female," Rev.

able ii ihat es la
because I'm so used to seeing a
male in this place."
But for some in Anderson's
congregation, a female pas-
tor offers something that male
counterparts don't.
"Her being female, she has
a more tender side in know-
ing how to use her motherly
instinct," Metropolitan A.M.E.
Church congregational mem-
ber Harrison Lewis said in re-
gards to Rev. Anderson. "So
she does that very well."
As acce tance for them
grows, femde preachers agree
that progress is being made.

theN skg ch
across America," Rev. Ander-
son said. "I think that there is
finally a season for us and we
are makmg a way,


I have shared in this column
previously insights on the well-
known psalm Psalm 23 by
King David. However, in these
times of high unemployment,
foreclosures numbers going
through the roof and economic
uncertainty, I believe that we
need a reminder of Who is the
ultimate provider for those who
call Jesus Lord, and God Fa-
then la verse 1 of this psalm,
David says that with the Lord
as his Shepherd, he has ev-
brything that he needs. That
a provision. In verse 2, David
writes that the Lord does not
just give him water because he
is thirsty, but leads him beside
still waters.
That is peace. At a time when
our lives may be especially in


turmoil, thank
God for those
peaceful times 1
spent with the .
Lord. .
He also
guides him along the right paths
to bring Him honor. This is ac-
cording to the Lord's purpose
in our lives. If we allow Him
to, He will show you the right
path to take. As David walks
through the valley of the shad-
ow of death, He is not fearful.
He knows that the Lord's pro-
tection and presence is there.
What is your valley? It might be
that doctor's report of cancer
that you received.
It might be the pink slip from
work, or the divorce papers that
you have been served. It might


the De Larry R. Handfield Mu-
sic Annex Building.
Handfield is the new chair-
man of the Bethune-Cookman
University Board of Trustees
and the first graduate to hold
that position. The nationally
known trial lawyer and Miami
native holds two doctorate de-
grees. He is a former federal
prosecutor and a former state
prosecutor. .
In November 2007, Governor
Charlie Christ appointed Larry
R. Handfield, Esq., to the State of
Florida Commission on Ethics.


the Miami Times StaffReport

Bethune-Cookman University
held a ground breaking ceremo-
riy for its new state of the art
Football and Athletic Training
Center on Saturday, October
24. The building will be called
the Dr. Larry R. Handfield Ath-
letic Center after local attorney
Dr. Larry Handfield.
Handfield is no stranger to
having buildings named in his
honor. In May of 2004, Bethune-
Cookman University named the
newly erected music building


.
The State of Flonda
Commission on Eth-
ics is a nine-member
Commission, with a
staff of approximately
twenty employees lo-
cated in Tallahassee,
that serves as the
guardian of the stan-
dards of conduct for HAN
officers and employ-
ees of Florida and its political
subdivisions and functions as
an independent commission re-
sponsible for investigating and
issuing public reports on com-


plaints of breaches
of the public trust by
public officers and em-
ployees.
The Commission also
renders legally bind-
ing advisory opinions
interpreting the ethics
laws and implements
FIELD the State's finan-
cial disclosure laws.
Attorney Handfield is also a
former Chairman of the Public
Health Trust, which oversees
the operation of Jackson Health
System.


School Bqard of Miami-Dade
County, Impact Fees and
Sunshine State Financing
Commission.

7.


SCHOOL Main spaces for the College
continued from 12B will consist of training and ad-
ministrative areas, dormito-
Law Enforcement for the train~ ries, locker rooms, an indoor
ing of police recruits; second, firing range, and classrooms.
the Achool ,fpr. Profespignaly.Additionallypthere will be a
Development and third; The flexible space designed as an
Institute for Democratic Polic- Emergency Operation Center
ing. The.Institute will provide for the Miami Fire Depart-
training for police managers ment. The high school compo-
with a special focus on Latin* nent will provide classrooms,
America and the Caribbean. labs, a dining area, a mock


courtroom and locker rooms
for 500 students, in addition
to administrative spaces for
staff. Both the Academy and
the High School will share a
200-seat auditorium, a grai-
nasium and a mkdia center.
The total cost of the project
is $35,400,000. The fund-
ing sources came from the
Homeland Defense Neigh-
borhood Improvement Bond,


At this point, authorities
do not know if they're deal-
ing with a single person or a
group.
Last month, officials re-
leased a video of man in-
side First United Method-
ist Church in Dunnellon. It
showed a white male wearing
a black hat, grey shirt, dark
shorts, gloves and some type
of mask over his face. The
man has not yet been identi-
fled.


cases, asks that church mem-
bers in the region immedi-
ately deposit funds received
from Sunday and Wednesday
services. Yates urges church
personnel to make sure doors,
windows and other points .of
entry are secured, and make
sure the church is well light-
ed.
"Anything you can do to
make your property more se-
cure, we encourage you to do
that," Yates said.


SMELL GAS? ACT FAST.
Natural gas is a colorless, odorless fuel, but for safety reasons,
a chemical odorant sometimes described as a "rotten egg" smell
is added, making the presence of gas detectable.

IF YOU 81WELL THIS ODOR:
* Alert others and leave the area immediately.
* Leave the door open as you exit.
* Do not operate electric lights, appliances or other equipment such as
telephones, cell phones, or flashlights.
* Go to a phone away from the area and call Florida City Gas.

Natural gas odors should be reported right away. Do not try
to locate the source of the smell.

If you smell natural gas, call Florida City Gas at 888-852-5885.



Florida City Gas~
An AGL Resources Company


Leadmng women pastors


In the midst of recession,


D


Tested Against

Transgressions
Wisdom and understanding
are gifts from God.
For it is in Him, who gra-
ciously bestows discernment
upon all mankind.
In everyone whose heart pro-
motes Him to serve with him
with dedication to His maker
in this wisdom, will transcend
one's life.
So when we cannot unload
life burden, we should stand
steadfast in God's divine love.
W. R. Williams











B 41 THE MIAMI TI ,


pggy
Senera( Cosn2elic, 37n2plan/ C/DenlidrV

Member: ADA, FDA, SFDDA, and AGB


___I


Incarnation celebrates annual all states tea


Thle patient cand nay other person responsible for payment has the righlt to nreuse to pay, cancel paylment or be twilmbursed for payment


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THI-EIR OWIN D~ESTIINY


org or visit www.faae.org
********
The fourth annual World
Salsa Championships will take
place at Hard Rock Live at the
Seminole Hard Rock Hotel &
Casino on Dec. 17-19 .
********
Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010
Reunion. Classmates are urged
to reconnect through the con-
tact mformation listed below,
providing your address, phone,.
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion6t5@cfl.
rr.com
********
Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is calling all former
cheerleaders, majorettes, drill
team, dance line, flagettes and
band members for their upcom-
ing Alumni Pep Rally. 305- 804-
5371 or 786-256-2609.
********
National Investment Devel-
opment (NID) Housing Coun-
seling Agency, a HUD approved
organization, is offering free
Housing and Legal Counseling
for Homeowners at the Experts
Resource Community Center,
9 a.m. 5 p.m., M-F. Call 305-
652-7616 or 786-512-7400 or
email: Igreen@expertsresources.
com or lougreen2@yahoo.com
for appointments.
********
Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is seeking Reunion
Organizing Committee Repre-
sentatives from the Classes of
1981 -2008 to call 305-904-
5371 or 786-256-2609.
********
The Florida Film Institute
presents Cinerama Saturdays at
the Little Haiti Cultural Center,
from 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.,
uhtil April 10, 2010. 305-891-
3456 or register at www.fifilm-
institute.org.
Note: Calendar items must be
submitted before 3:30 p.m. ort
Monday.


care & Human Needs" at Tem-
ple Israel, from 8:30 a.m. 1:30
p.m., Friday, Nov. 6. 305- 576-
5001.
********
Edul.t will host a "Creating
the ultimate thinker for the 21st
century" at the Long Key Natu-
ral Center in Davie, from 10
a.m. 12 p.m., Saturday, Nov.
7. 786-545-7010.
********
The eighth annual Grace Ja-
maican Jerk Festival, a musi-
cal and cultural feast, will take
place in the City of Sunrise,
Markham Park on Sunday, Nov.
8. Jamaican Jerk Festival, 305-
917-0252 or info@jerkfestival.
com
********
Miami-Dade HIV/AIDS Part-
nership is accepting applica-
tions for new members. There
will be a meeting at the Histori-
cal Museum, from 10 a.m. 12
p.m., Monday, Nov. 9. 305-445-
1076 or email: ktardalo@behav-
ioralscience.com
********
The next Democratic Party
(local chapter) will be held at
the American Legion at 7 p.m.,
Monday, Nov. 9.
********
BECON-TV will host a live, in-
teractive Distance Learning Out-
reach presentation for students
to participate through obser-
vation only, in a cervical spine
surgery at Memorial Healthcare
System, at 8:30 a.m., on Nov.
10. Joy Veasy, Distance Learn-
ing Outreach Specialist, at 754-
321-1109.
********
ICABA's will host a Premier
Recognition and Networking
Event "South Florida's 100
Most Accomplished Blacks in
Healthcare and Law" at the
Nova Southeastern University
(Davie Campus), from 6-9 p.m.,
on Nov. 13.

********
"Alice in Wonderland" Chil-


dren Stage Play will debut at
the Actors' Playhouse, Miracle
Theatre in Coral Gables, now
through November 13, call.
305-444-9293 or visit: www.ac-
torsplayhouse.org
********
Miami-Dade Arthritis
Walk will place in the Amuse-
ment Area at Crandon Park
in Key Biscayne, starting at
8 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 14.
www.2009awmiamiwalk.kin-
tera.org
********
You are invited to Rick Del-
laRatta and Jazz For Peace on
Friday, Nov. 20. Marla War-
rington, 786-223-2554 or email:
marlaw@EventRhythm.com
********
Miami Dade College Kendall
Campus present the Fall Fest
2009, from 10 a.m. 4:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Nov. 21. Call 305-
237-2321 or visit www.mdc.
edu/Kendall/
********
University of fliami's Mau-
rice Gusman Concert Hall
will present Festival Miami
now through November 30.
305-284-4940 or visit: www.fes-
tivalmiami.com
********
The community is invited
to get on the bus to the Flori-
da Classic on Saturday, Nov.
21. For more information. Also,
come take a ride to the Holy
Land in Orlando, Fla. On Dec.
12. Call Phillip, 786-8'73-9498.
********
South Florida Super Bowl
Host Committee will host their
kickoff luncheon -at the Land
Shark Stadium, from 11:30
a.m. 1:30 p.m., Monday, Dec.
7. 305-614-7555.
********
The Florida Alliance for Arts
Education (FAAE) is hosting a
Florida symposia at the Adri-
enne Arsht Center for the Per-
forming Arts, starting at 9 a.m.,
on Dec. 10. Email: info@faae.


p.m.-12 a.m., Saturday, Oct.
31.
********
"The Marvelous Wonderettes
Musical" will play at the Actors'
Playhouse, Miracle Theatre in
Coral Gables, now through No-
vember 1.
********
The Southeast Florida Chap-
ter of National Institute of Gov.
ernmental Purchasing (NIGP)
announces its 12th annual Re-
verse Trade Show which will
be held at the Broward County
Convention Center in Fort Lau-
derdale, from 9:30 a.m.- 3 p.m.,
on Wednesday, Nov. 4. Michal
Durden, 954-359- 1027 or e-
mail: mdurden@broward.org
********
Miami Northwestern senior
High School will hold their 10th
annual College Fair at the Lee
R. Perry Sports Complex, from
6 9:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nov.
4. 305-836-0991.
******** '
The Broward County Cham-
ber of Commerce is hosting
the Broward County and South
Florida Business-to-Business
Expo International Trade Show
at the Qdality Inn Sawgrass Ho-
tel & Conference Center, from
4- 9 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 5.
Broward County Chamber of
Commerce, 954-565 5750 or
log onto www.SouthFloridaEx-
po.com. ,
********
Sponsored by the National
Association for College Ad-
mission Counseling (NACAC)
and hosted by the Southern
Association for College Admis-
sion Counseling (SACAC), the
Greater Ft. Lauderciale National
College Fair will be held at the
Greater Ft. Lauderdale/Bro-
ward County Convention Cen-
ter in Fort Lauderdale, from 5
- 8:30 p.m., on Thursday, Nov.
5 and from 9 a.m. 1 p.m., Fri-
day, Nov. 6. visit www.national-
collegefairs.org.
********
The Embrace Girls Foun-
dation will host a Royal Inter-
national Tea Party recognizing
Delegates from 17 countries
visiting as part of the U.S. De-
partment of State's Internation-
al Visitor Leadership Program
(IVLP), the State Departments
number one Public Diplomacy
tool. The event will take place
at the Mahogany Grille in Miami
Gardens at 6 p.m., Thursday,
Nov. 5. 305-270-4099.
********
Miami-Dade's Human Ser-
vices Coalition will sponsor an
"Imagine Miami Changemaker
Conference III: Show Us the
Money -- for Education, Health-


~i1lIll~,~b~


Grove's Home Depot Shopping
Plaza at 8 p.m., Thursday, Oct.
29. 305-299-4595.
********
City of Miami Community
Redevelopment Agency (CRA)
will join city officials, adminis-
trators, local residents, busi-
ness owners and CRA staff to
celebrate the revitalization of
Overtown's Northwest Third Av-
enue Business Corridor; with
the grand opening of three new
businesses and a mini 'park.
The event will take place at the
Overtown Mini Park, 10 a.m. on
Friday, Oct. 30. Chelsa Arscott,
305-679-6811.
.
******** .
The Miami-Dade Consumer
Services Department and the
Dade County Bar Association
are hosting a special seminar
to inform people of their right
to end .harassment by debt col-
lectors on Friday, C)ct. 30. The
"Lunch n' Learn" event will be
held at the North Dade Justice
Center. Lunch will be provided
and served at 11:30 a.m. The
seminar begins promptly at
noon. 305-375-4199.
********
Miami-Dade Parks' EcoAd-
ventures Program is offering
residents a chance to can enjoy
a Spooky Sunset and Moonlight
Kayak Tour at Crandon Park
Visitor's and Nature Center for
their annual Halloween Family
Campfire and Night Hike. The
event will take place at Key Bis-
cayne, from 6 8:30 p.m., Oct.
30. 305-662-4125 or via email:
adnature@miamidade.gov.
********
The second annual "Reason
to Run, a 5K walk that raises
funds for Pediatric Cancer Re-
search, will take place at the
Deering Estates at 8 a.m., Sat-
urday, Oct. 31. 305-807-7079
or visit: www.reasoutorun.org
********
Applications are now being
accepted for the third annual
High School Black Male Bacca-
laureate Service. The first meet-
ing will be held at the African
American Research Library and
Cultural Center in Fort Ladder-
dale, from 10:30 a.m. 12:30
p.m., Saturday, Oct. 31. Friends
of Children, 954-578-8399.
********
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority and
the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity
invites you to a Greek Mas-
querade Party at the Hollywood
Beach Country Club, from 8.


Service Employees Interna-
tional Union (SEIU) Local 1991
will host a healthcare reform
forum, "Facts and Perspectives
from Health Care Providers in
the Field" at the Miami Dade
College-Medical Center Cam-
pus, from 11:30 a.m. 1:30
p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 28. RSVP
by calling 305-620-6555 or e-
mail: daniella@seiul991.org
********
"The skinny on your diet"
seminar will he held at the
North Broward Medical Center,
Conference Center, from 6-8
p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 28. 954-
759-7400 or visit: www.bro-
wardhealth.org/events
********
Keep Miami Gardens Beau-
tiful will be .presented with a
check at the Miami Gardens
City Council meeting at 7 p.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 28.
********
The League of Women Voters
of Miami-Dade County is host-
ing a luncheon and panel pre-
sentation entitled "Health Care
Reform: Making It Work" at the
946 Aero Squadron Restaurant,
12 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 28.
Lourdes Diaz, 305-798-2080.


********
Jackson Health System will
host its third annual Small
Business Vendor Day Workshop
at the Ira C. Clark Diagnostic
Treatment Center, from 8:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Thursday,
Oct. 29.


********
Minority Chamber of Com-
merce will be hosting a Holiday
Job Fair at the Double Tree Mi-
ami Mart, from 9 a.m. 4 p.m.,
Thursday, Oct. 29. 786-260-
19fi5.
********
Miami-Dade County Public
Schools Administration will
participate in a ribbon-cutting
ceremony dedicating the Autism
Intensive Communication Acad-
emy at Blue Lakes Elementary
School at 10:30 a.m., Thursday,
Oct. 29. Maria E. Garcia, 305-
271-7411 .or email: mariaegar-
cia@dadeschools.net
********
There will be a charter bus
going to Fort Valley, Ga. for the
Fort Valley State vs. Kentucky
State University Homecoming
football game on Oct. 31. The
bus will depart from 'Coconut


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knple



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Implantscanbeasedtoreplace
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Methodist Church in Coral
Gables, 7:30 p.m., Nov. 6; Miami
Beach Community Church in
Miami Beach, 7 p.m., Nov. 7 and
All Saints Episcopal Church in
Fort Lauderdale, 4 p.m., Nov. 8.

f*******
Richmond Heights Middle
School will be hosting its first
Harvest Bazaar, from 7:30 a.m.
-2:30 p.m., on Saturday, Nov.
7. P. Smith, 305-238-2316.
********
The Revelation Christian
Academyisopenforregistration,
After-care is from 3-6 p.m. Call
. 305-758-5656 or 786-281-.
8098.
********
A Mission With A New
Beginning Church invites the
. community to come fellowship
at 11:15 a.m., on Sundays and
Bible class. weekly at 7 path,
Thursday.


Redemption M.B. Church
is sponsoring a fundraising
breakfast and yard sale on
Friday and Saturday. Pastor
Willie McCrae, 305-793-7388 or
305-836-1990.


Worship Center family cordially
invite the community to celebrate
with them their 346 Church
Convocation in November
beginning with their "Rose in
the Garden" ceremony during
the 10 a.m. worship service
on Sunday, Nov. 1. There will
be a "Youth Emphasis Day" son
Sunday, Nov. 8 and a Ministry
of Arts featuring music, dance
and drama at 7:30 p.m., Friday,
Nov. 13. 305-625-7246 or Leola
Adams, 305-624-6795.
********
House of Bethlehem A Plape
of Bread Ministries is inviting
everyone to participate in their
tour bus trip to Holyland, from
Tues.- Thurs. Deacon Arthur
Robinson,786-624-7979.
********
"I'll Fly Away: American
Gospel and Folk Music" will
debut .at the St. Christopher's
by-the-Sea in Key Biscayne, at
7:30 p.m., Nov. 5; First United


New Life Family Worship
Center invites everyone to a .
special "Fruit of the Spirit"
service at 7 p.m., Wednesday,
Oct.28.305-623-0054.


********:
New Life Missionary Baptist
CongressofChristianEducation
will host teaching conference at
the New St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church at 5 p.m. until
Oct. 30. 305-770-7064. or 305-
793-7388.
********
New Jerusalem P. B. Church
willhavingafamilyfestivalfrom
4-8 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 31.
305- 693-8323 ext. 100 or 101.


******** ,
The Church of the
Incarnation will host its 53rd
annual All States Tea at 4 p.m.,
Sunday, Nov. 1. 305-633-2446.
********
Macedonia Church of God
In Christ will be having a Fall
Bazaar, from 7 a.m. 3 p.m., on
Oct. 31. Macedonia will also be
having their Family and Friends
Day Program at 4 p.m., on Nov.
8. Church secretary, 305-238-
4013.
********
New Fellowship Praise and


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Evening appointments Available


will participate in the roll call of
states and make presentations.
A reception will follow the
States Tea in the J. Kenneth
Major Hall. The Church of the
Incarnation is located at 1835
NW 54th Street. The public is
most cordially invited to attend


The Church of The Incarna-
tion will host its 53rd annual
All States Tea this Sunday, No-
vember 1st. The tea, which be-
gins at 4 p.m., will feature the
outstanding St. Cecilia's choir.
Between the beautiful selec-
tions from the choir, the women


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"~15B THEr MIAMI TIMESd QCTBE 28NOEME 5, 2009rc


**Available from Commercial News Providers



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One family serving this community for 87 consecutive years


BLACKS MUST` CONTROL THEIR OwVN DESTINY


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17B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 5, 2009


BLaCKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I


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PFIZER CANDII WEYETH ARE NOWa ON~E,











B 81 THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOB ,


Revival at Unity Tabernacle


REV. EDDIE B. ENGRAM

Memorial Service for
Rev. Eddie B. Engram

Dayspring M.B. Church, 2991
N.W. 62 St., will be holding a
memorial service for former
Pastor Rev. Eddie B. Engram on
October 30, at 7:30 p.m. Elder
Michael Roan is Pastor.


ParentS search
I am searching for my birth
parents, Zell Williams and
Corine Smith.
If you have information,
please contact Shirlejr Wil-
liams, 786-356-7513


MT. ZION A.M.E. (HUR(H


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Boptist (hurch
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.

Order of Services








St. Mark Missionary
Baptist (hurch
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services








Temple Missionary
Baptist (hurch


Apostolic
Revival (enter
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

0 de of Se vice








Ebenezer United
Methodist (hurch


Order of Servi e








St. John Baptist (hurch
1328 N.W.3rd Avenue

n r,- .


Hosanna Community
Boptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street

Order of Serv es








New Vision For (hrist
Mm stories
13650 N.E 10th Avenue

Order of Servi e








word of Faith
thristion (enter


Order of Services
,ands, seming so ..a
Sunday Whool 10a m
Wash.p Ser..Is 11 om
ice day B.Maindy Spm
rhursdor have ser


Liberty (ity Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street

Or Services








Antioch Missionary Boptist
(hurch of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street

Order of Services



Shiloh M.B.(h



New urt
1350 q thb5kat


Order of Services
ork Meming Woollip 00 am
Sun (hurrh School 9 30 em
Mommg Worship 110 in
luesday Bible0ad pm
lus before the la


New Birth Baptist Church, The (othedral of Faith Internaltional


m


BonvleitB rs pih le


93rdStret Comu it


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church


I BLACKS MUSTr CONTROL THEIR OwLN DE)ISTINY


DORETHA ELOISE PAYNE
Davis, and Gaylord H. Payne.
Viewing will be at 4 p.m. Fri-
day at Range Funeral Home
and a wake at 7 p.m. at 2020
Northwest 77* Street. The fu-
neral will be held at 11 a.m.
- Saturday at Mt. Tabor Baptist
Church.

,


.
Miami Times Staff Report

Funeral services for Doretha
Eloise Payne will be held Sat-
urday at Mt. Tabor Baptist
Church. She died Oct. 20 after
a long illness; three days before
her91sebirthday.
She taught in Dade County
Schools for 51 years and was
the leading vocalist in the Mt.
Tabor Baptist Senior Choir for
almost as long.
Born in Albany, Georgia on
October 23, 1918, she moved to
Homestead wither mother after
her father's death.
After graduation from Booker
T. Washington High School in
1936, she earned her bachelor's
degree from Spellman College
in Atlanta in 1942. She got her
master's degree from Columbia
University in 1951 and became
the first African-American in
Dade to teach visually impaired
students.

SiA n me Smem er eDeMa
was involved with the United
Negro College Fund, NAACP,
PCAA, PULSE, MOVERS and
After-School reading programs.
Samuel P. Payne, her hus-
band for 45 years, died in
1987. She is survived by three
children; Samuel III, Theresa P.


month convicted Damon Dar-
ling, 24, of manslaughter with
a deadly weapon as well as ag-
gravated assault with a firearm.
He now faces up to 50 years in
prison.
AccordingtoprosecutorsDar-
ling ambushed Leroy Larose with
a hail of assault rifle bullets in a
narrow courtyard of the Liberty
Square projects in July of 2006.
A stray bullet struck and killed
Sherdavia Jenkins as she played
with a doll on her porch.
Darling was tried for second-
degree murder and attempt-
ed murder for shooting and
wounding Larose. If there is a
new trial, Darling cannot legal-
ly be retried for either of those
charges charge, but wouki like-
ly face lesser manslaughter and
aggravated assault charges.
Both the state and the defense
have declined to comment.


Miami Times Staff Report

A defense attorney represent-
ing the man convicted in the
shooting death of 9-year-old
Sherdavia Jenkins of Liberty
City is claiming the trial was
tainted. A juror failed to dis
close he had been a crime vic-
tim.
Last week, Defense lawyer
Jonathan Meltz filed a motion
which included a copy of a jury
questionnaire in which juror
Jesse Glass checked "No" to a
question asking whether he had
ever been the victim of a crime.
A Nov. 13, 2008 police report
from Homestead however, con-
tends that Glass told police two
unknown men pulled a knife on
him and slashed his tires. Po-
lice classified the incident as an
aggravated assault with a dead-
ly weapon, simple battery and
criminal mischief, according to
the report. .

the m s A erse ea
ly prejudices the defendant,"
Meltz wrote in the motion.
Glass explained that the inci
dent slipped his mind.
Defense lawyer Jonathan
Meltz has asked Miami-Dade
Circuit Judge Marisa Tinkler


Jordon Grove Missionary


SHERDAVIA JENKINS
Mendez for permission to in-
terview the jurors and three al-
ternates. She will take up the.
matter during a rescheduled
hearing on Nov. 10.
A six-person jury earlier this


November 1 to November 11.
Services will begin Sunday
evening at 6;30 p.m. and nightly
at 7:30 p.m.
For further information con-
tact Pastor Errol P. Cooper Sr,
305-498-6300. Come out and be
blessedly


And be not conformed to this
world; but be ye transformed by
the renewing of you mind, that
ye may prove what is that good
and acceptable and perfect will
of God. Romans 12:2a
Unity Tabernacle, 5594 N.W.
17 Avenue, will be in revival from


Bethlehem (athedral Outreach (tr.


Zion Hope


hr~~-


Pembroke Park (hurch of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 e.m. Morning Wosship 10 e.
Evening Ordip 6 pm
0( 005d0y frenef 01 Bible Study 7-30 pm


Alpha Agape SDA (hurch
8400 N.W. 25th Ave.


Order of Services
Subboththeol9300 m ($oil
0am.e worship 11 am (500
hush Hour (Gery Solurday
I hour before Sand
Ad Wah Prayedense l30 Wed



ND HE 5AID UNTO THEM.
GO YE INTO ALL THE

GOSO E.

Join the Religious Elite
In Our Church Directory


Seed Time and Harvest Faith
Mmistry r tional


Order of Services
5midor Wor*,hip9om
Bible body Wednesday 7 30 pm
..seed..ma.e..maim DB


(ornerstone Bible


Logos Baptist (hurch
16305 NW 48th Ave.


Order oi5ervices
..do, unrm.ig wo,
lus, as as 11 am
,,,,,,,,ai0, 9 n o.
ur day Bibldiuds ? pr,
5mu de user vice


I


I ~_


Televi5100 Program SUre Found01100


I


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m,
11 a.m., 7 p m.
Sunday School 9 30 am
fuesday (Bible Study) 6 45p.m.
Wednesday Bible 51udy


I (800) 254-NBB(


Order of Services
sundaysthool 9:3Co.m.
Sunday Worship 11 e.m.
Flat sunday
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Ed Week Servke...7 p.m.
(holt Rehearsal Thursday


V new ma Jlrl.,


Ord iaer o, m rie


5R EBM 2009


Veteran teacher and gospel singer dies


Darhin s trial tainted y juror


C




























CARLA MOBLEY, 44, died Oc-
tober 24. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., .
Saturday in the
chapel.





EDWARD BROWN, 40, alc
technician, died
October 18,
Service was
held.





GUILLERMO TAYLOR, JR., 66,
security guard, died October 20 at
Gramercy Park Nursing Center.
Arrangements are incomplete.

OZZIE McGUIRE, 96, housewife
, died October 24. Arrangements
are incomplete.

ITA FARQUHARSON, 77, died
October 25. Arrangements are in-
complete.
p
E.A.Stevens
MARVIN MERRITT, 77, chef,
died October 15. Service was
held

MORRIS SERMON, 56, died,
October 21 in Memorial Regional
Hospital. Service 11 a.m., Satur-
day Ebenezer Baptist Hospital,
Hallandale Beach.

LILLIE O. WILCOX, 77, died
October ?4, Florida Medical Cen-
ter. Service 11 a.m., Monday*
Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hallan-
dale Beach-

FLORENCE BLAND, 94, died
October 24 at Memorial Regional
Hospital. Arrangements are in-
complete.
Alfonso M. Riphardson
ALMA SCOTT 91, retired do-
mestic worker,
died October
24. Survivors
include: sons,
Curtis, Lonnie,
Leon and Ed- a
ward; daugh-
ters, Lula Hep-
burn, Dorothy
Williams, Gloria Holland, Angela
Ragin and Edwina Miller; brother,
Leon Gray. Visitation 4 8 p.m.,
Friday, Alfonso M. Richardson
Funeral Chapel, 3790 N.W. 167
Street. Service 1 p.m., Saturday'

7o8u0nt NHerr n A.M.F. Church,

ANNIE LOIS BANKS, 63, re-
tired counselor,
d'
le cto er
25. Survivors in-
clude:sonsWil-
lie Walker, Jr., -
Patrick Walker
and Brain Walk-
er- daughter --
Vedra Walker.
sister, Dorothy Scott, Pollie Clark,
Margie Banks and Lucy Nelson,
Visitation 4 8 p.m. Service 11 .m.,
Saturday, Alfonso M. Richardson
Funeral Chapel, 3790 N.W. 167


ELLEN T. HAMPTON, 57, re-
t d didal
m dia, mVeter-
Ad st
ans mini ra-
tion Hospital,
died October
19. Survivors in-
clude: husband, .
David; daugh- "
ter, Lashawn;
grandchildren, Gregory McIntyre,
Jr., Andre Rollins, Jr. and Audrey
Rollins; sister, Beauty Harris; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Visitation 2-9 p.m., Friday. Service
1 p. m., SaturdayFriendship Mis-
sionary Baptist Church. Interment:
Graceland Memorial Park.

BRIDGET TURNER-SLOCUM,
48, surgical technician for Broward
Medical Center, died October 24.
Visitation 5-9 p.m., Friday. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Kingdom Hall of
Jehovah Witness, 2901 N. W.168
Terrace.

Maker
ENOCH WILLIAMS, JR., 78,
died October 21
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Wednesday (to-
day), Hurst Me- -
morial Chapel ..
-

MAREGERETTE J. ROYAL, 91,
died October 20
at Vista Hospice
Center, Service
11 a.m., Friday,
New St. Mark
M.B.Church-



IRVING FIELDS, 87, died Oc-
tober 25 at Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Sa-
die, daughters,
sons brothers
and sisters.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, New
Mount Calvary M.B.Church.

MURLYN D. JOHNSON, 70,
died October
21 at Mt. Sinai
Medi I iC er.

Saturday, Mt'
Calvary M.B.
Church.


JAMES WASHINGTON, 80,
died October 23 at Arch Plaza
Nursing Home. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


S19B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 5, 2009


BLACKS MUST. CONTROL THEIR OW~N DESTINY I


Poitier &
MARY SANFORD, 75, house-
keeping, died
October 20 at
home. Service
was held-






diJANOIE LOU MYERS, 15, student
at Miami Chil-
dren, Hospital.
Arrangements
are incomplete.




ROBERT HANK BRADLEY,
75, roofer, died
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospi-
tal. Survivors
include:wife,
Willie Brad-
le d ht
y, aug ers,
Victoria Rob-
Inson Tre-
nika Green and Constance
Smith; sons, Ronald Bradley,
Richard Bradley and Terrell Green;
brothers, Joe Bradley and Richard
Bradley; sisters, Barbara Brinson
Mamie Lee Poole and Hattie Mae
Garland; a host of grandchildren
and great grandchildren. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday, Antioch
M.B.Church, Liberty City.

RICHARD KEVIN BANKS, 53,
laborer, died October 22 at Mercy
.Hospital. Service 10 a.m., Satur-
day at Macedonia M.B.C.

Carey Royal Rarn'n
BERNARD TROTTER, 24, died
October 24.
Service 10 a.m.,

mub 7%
Community Bap-
tist Church.



CAROLINE GREGG, 28, Sec-
retary died October 21 at home.
Service 3 p.m., Thursday in the
chapel.

AMY BRETT, 64, retired, died
October 26 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.
In Memorial
In loving memory of,


a.kLAWERENCE GARNER, JR.

f50 G dpe r
Beverages, died
October 24 at
North Beach
Rehabilitation
Center. Survi-
vors include:
wife Patricia Garner; sons, Larry III,
Cedric and Kevin Garner; Visitation
4- 9 p.m., Friday. Service 12:30
p.m., Saturday, Antioch of Carol
City Church. Service entrusted to
Royal Funeral Home.

GLORIA FLASH, 80, home
health aide, died October 18. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday, St. Maximil-
lian Kolbe Catholic Church, Pem-
broke Pine.

CHARLOTTE M. BARTEE,
49, employed
for Tropical Fi-
nancial Credit
Union, died Oc-
tober 21. Sur-
vivors include:
mother, Sterlie
Bartee; daugh- *
ter, Tonya Holli-
mon; son, Corey Sanders; sisters,
Janice Lawrence, Mary Quinn, Jill
Bartee and Ramona Bartee; grand-

a oon a enKd fa hnan
friends. Visitation 4- 9 p.m., Friday,
Royal Funeral Home, 17475 NW27
Aveixie. Service ist C rhday,

international, 4055 NW 183 Street.

VERNA MOORE, 75, housewife,
died October
20, Visitation 4-
9 p.m., Friday.
Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Mount
Hermon A.M.E.
Church.



FREDDIE BRONSON, 61, con-
s(pg;fjpp. Jabor-
er, died October 3. *
21. Visitation 4-
9 p m., Wednes-
day. Service 1
p.m., Thursday
in the chapel.



FRED O. SMITH, 80, custom
sheet metal
polisher, died *
October 20
Service 11 a.m.,
Wednesday, Tri-
angle Hope Min-
istries Church
Opa-Locka.


CHARLES MILLS, 88, artist, died
October 20. Service was held.

WILMOT DIXON, 67, merchant,
died October 23. Arrangements are
incomplete.

SANDRA JACKSON, 46, care-
giver, died October 23. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

DEACONESS LOUISE MAT.
THEWS, 88, maid, died October
20.Servicewasheld.,

INFANT REIGN SULLIVAN, 3
months old. died October 20. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

DORIS GRAVES, 49, teacher for
Broward County Charter Schools,
died October 19. Service was held.



Pax Villa (Broward)
JACKSON CHERAMY, 67,
maintenance worker, died October
16 at Fort Lauderdale Health and
Rehabilitation Center. Service 10



-jda ET5n Bca
ber 15 at JFK Medial Center. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.
p

Range (Homestead)
ELLEN LOVE, 84, homemaker,
died October 22 at Homestead


Hospital. Service 10 a.m., Satur-


woAMe Si IMOOL ION, 95, railroad ALTON PALMER, 49, laborer, EARLIER SANFORD, 80,
died October 15- homemak e r, "
t bere22 ateNd Service 1 p.m., died October
Thursday, New 24. Service 11
Center. Service Shiloh Baptist a.m Saturday
was held. Church. Faith Christian
Center.


FRANCES LOUISE WEST, 60,
homemaker, died October 25 at
home. Arrangements are incom-
plete -

LILLIE MAE HARRIS, 72,
homemaker, died October 16 at
Memorial West Hospital. Service
was held.

Spence
PAUL MARC ANTHONY
BROWN "Nook" 30, died Oc-
tober 17 Sur- =
vivors include:
wife Annisha
daughter, An-
nistacia; moth-
er, Sharmen;
sister, Tanya, '
Shakira and Tif-
fany; brothers,
Stephen and Kyle; father, Paul A.
Brown. Service 11 a.m., Saturday*
Mount Zion A.M.E. Church, 15250
NW 22 Avenue, Miami Gardens.

yStingerz, 6029 Miramar
"

Wright and Young
SHERRIETTA OADDAMS, 50,
bus aide, died
October 25. ,
Survivors in-
clude: mother,
Evelyn Oadd- -
ams; daughters,
Latochia Oadd-
ams Nashona
and Tiffan Bai-
ley; sons, Cornelius and Jamaal
Bailey. Service 11 a.m., Saturday
Dayspring MB Church. .

Range
DORETHA PAYNE, 90, retired
teach'effor Arco-
la Lake Elemen-
tary; 51years of
service in the
Dade County
School System,
died October

n lud Siu vor
Samuel Payne III (Linda) and Gay-
lord Payne; daughter, Theresa Da-
vis (Derek); brother, Ike Lawrence;
sister-in-laws, Lula Benton, .Mary
Wright, Gladys Braynon and Betty
Lawrence; seven grandchildren;
four great- grandchildren; a host
of other relatives and friends. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday, Mt. Tabor
M. B. Church.

MARY BAKER DAWKINS, 70,
retired interior
decorator, died
October 22.
Survivors in-
clude: dauDg ekr,

ins; husband,
Charles L.

Dr d h drefive Sheldon, Erian '
Eriel, Easter, and Jefton; compan-
ion, Ronald (Ronnie) Relaford;
Goddaughter, Donald Garris; sis-
ters, Dorothy Green and Bertha
Johnson; brothers, Clyde Baker,
and Elijah Baker; a host of other
relatives and friends. Service 2
p.m., Saturday, Peaceful Zion
M.B. Church.

ANN JOHNSON DYES, 77,
retired teacher, died October 21.
Service was held

Nakia Ingraham
NONA BELLE BARNES, 84,
housewife, died October 20 at Me-
morial Hospital. Service 11 a.m.,
Thursday, House of God Miracle



vonvORF e ds ONCOc h 3n
Broward General Medical Center.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, New
Life Fellowship Center.

Range (Coconut Grove)
DAVID LEE MATHIS, 64, died
October 21 at Aventura Hospital-
Service 11 a.m., Wednesday (to-
day), in the chapel.


WILLIE MAE COZART, 72, de-
livery, died Octo-
ber 22. service
10 a.m, Friday
in the chapel-





- THOMAS MARSHALL, 76, re-
tired, died Octo-
iber 25. Service
12 30 p.m.t, Sat-
u ay g-
nes Episcopal
Church .
.



ERIC McALISTER, 47, laborer,
died October
16. Service 1
p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.
4-
24



JEREMY LOWE, 21, laborer,
died October21,
Arrangements
are incomplete.






JASPER HOWARD, 20, student
, died October
18. Service was g 1
held.







RICKEY WHITE, 33, driver, died
October 3. Service was held.



Hall Ferguson Hewitt
MINNIE JONES, 64, child care
died October 20 '
at Jackson Me-
-
eHospit
held




DIANNE WASHINGTON, 54
cashier died '
October 21 at
Jackson Me-
I Ho ital
ce 1 m.,
Friday in the
ape .


DUCAINSON PETIT-FREitE '
26, student, died October 18 in
Thomasville, GA. Service 1p.m
Saturday, EvangetChurch Inte'
t al.
na ion

REGINA WILLIS, 66, housewife '
died October 26 at home Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

in Memorial
In loving memory of,


GEORGE REESE JR.


7 Twlo ears have assed sin
smile, your laugh, your ribs,
your words of wisdom, your
love and your kindness. There
hasn't beett one day that has
gone by without a memory or a
tear shed. All of our memories of
you are still vivid in our hearts,
but we know you are watching
us. You are forever loved.
Your loving wife, Sadie, daugh-
ter, Claretha, granddaughter,
Lamisha, great granddaughter,
Kimora, brother, William, sis-
ters, Clydie, Martha and your
entire family


ARLINGTON E. ROBERTS
10/23/70 11/14/08

We will -never stop loving
you.
From your mother, sisters
and family


TERRY D. DOUGLAS
09/02/56 10/26/08

It been one year since you
been gone. We love and miss
you.
The Family


. .9

.











~VY


*aapueaaeaasslaapsl~ilra~sgsl~~i~i~F~aaP


P


The Msam. Times
iS annOUnCing Our

EW CHURCH LISTINGS
By Church Denomination

Beginning January 2010
. For more informanon contact
our new church assistem.
rah Roker, 305-69-1-6210 ext. 102
I d Ne
space is imire w racine


Honor Your Loved One With an In

MemOriam In The Miami Times


CHECKS
continued from 12B

plan's most vocal opponents.
The Maryland Democrat has
been working to rein in rising
entitlement costs, which he sees
as a danger to the nation's fiscal
health,
Mr. Hoyer is among a growing
number of Democrats who ar-
e that measures to help those
hit by the economic downturn
should include the means to
pay for them without adding to
the deficit.
"Seniors at the beginning of
this year got a 5.8 percent [cost-
of-living] adjustment. They also
got a$250 paymentin the Recov-
ery and Reinvestment Act. So it
is not as if the Congress has for-
gotten seniors," Mr. Hoyer said
after the plan was announced.
Other fiscally conservative
Democrats privately agreed, but
expressed reluctance to voice
theii- views publicly, for fear of
angermg semors.
The White Hous Tiaid officials
are willing to work with law-
makers to find a way to offset
the plan's cost. Both Democrats
and Republicans have voiced
growing concern about the fed-
eral deficit, which totaled $1.4
trillion for the fiscal year ended
Sept. 30.
An aide to Mr. Hoyer said that
Democrats don't yet have the
votes necessary to defeat the
proposal.
Mr. Obama has said the $250
would be equivalent to a 2% in-
crease over 2009 for the average
retiree receiving Social Security
payments.


IN REMEMBRANCE OF THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF



WITH ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AND GRATITUDE FROM THE FAMILY

Joseph Bryans of Hollywood FIonda.a loyal.devoted and loving husband; cherished fa-
ther; beloved son; trustworthy friend* fearhful brother and bmther-in-law; caring uncle and nephew;
and a respected mentor, was turn in Charlone. North C.udina.the selenth child of clocn childwn.
to thelate Rev.Prank Bryant Sr..nnd Pearline Bryant on December 28. 1954.
Joseph'< family moved to Miams m 1959 His fornud education began ni the public
schools inDade County. He graduated Imm Palmetto Senior High School in 1071.He continued
mining at the Robert Morgan Voentionni Technical institure in Ahams, where he graduatedat
the top of his class, earmng cernfication us an Automobile Mechanioin 1981.
Driven by the American Spar und youthful pluriorism. Joseph serted in the United
StatesArmy and recelled an Honomble Discharge in 1975 He later met his best inend and lov-
ing wife. LilieIh Bailey.and was umled in Hol) Mammony on May 9, 1991. They havebeenblessed with
thive wonderful children: son, Andrew Joseph Briant: and daughlers..lada Bryantend Julianna Marcus.
Joseph's pmfessional career began twenty-nine y ears go with the Miatni-Dade County Transit Authority as a bus
mechanic and later unnskrred to Ihe Miami Dade TransiI People Moser. Toweph was a phenomenal individual who was known as
an icon of kindness, technical giant wilth expanded aputudes and exceptional Ialent. His conscientious work ethic assured that he
complesed all assigmnents with coal accumey. He became the ninst diversified nud hunted technician assigned to hi.-.disision.
Joseph completed rhe Supervisory Cemlication Pmgrnna dunng 2005. Has conunued quaht) of service and unselfish
dedicouon led to his pmmallon as Superansor of the Menommes Maintenance Facility Miami Dademands Autholity. His 29
years of scenic men Justinginshed by his integnty and demonun. II as almost impossible to speak of Joseph other than in superla-
tives for indeed he was a turless, pauent, selico. compassion..te.dediented. mymnsible wqrker.
Joseph was quies in demeanor, a deep thinker and lover of the arts, fle especially enjoyed playing the piano and listen-
ins to gospel music. He loved the solitude of fishing and pinying hilliani-a and chess. He was alsoaArmbelieverofChristand
committed himself at on cash age. fre4uently attending CMaury Chapel and listening to the ministering of Finton Bob Coy.
Joseph was an individunI of superlatively high standards which earned him numerqup awardlifor stellar performance
on the job. His portfolio has many Awards of Achsesement. Apprveinlion.and Commendation recorded.Heoftenteceivedrecog-
nition for "Employee of the Monih",'"Employee of the Quarter", and recently he was nominated -Menu-Dade Transit Employee
of the Year fos 2009" as well as "Employee of the County lor 2009".
Joseph's life was the epitome of courage, Vision, and deep faith. His sterling qualities will live on forever. He was a
tale humannianun it is only befuring that upon Joseph's demise that the Metmmover Maintenance Facility would be named the
Joseph Bryunt Menomover Mainsenance Faculty an his honor.
The family of the Ime Joseph Bryant extends profound gratitude and appreciation to all who found endless ways to ex-
press their friendship, love, and sympathy throughout.this difficult period. We are genuinely appreciative of the family and friends
who came from Ar and near to offer their condolence*, and to grieve with us. We am grateful for the sympathetic offerings of
floral In buses. cants, telephone calls, delicious food, prayers, words of encouragement, and monetary donations. Special apprecia-
tion is also extended to Pastor Dwight Allen and members of Cooper City Church of God; The Honomble Carlos Alvarez, Mayor;
all of the employees of Metro-Dade Transit; the Royal Funeral Home Staff; family, friends, and neighbors. The Joseph Bryant
Scholarship Memorial Fund has been established for those who desire to express their remembrances and support. Please contact
LiliethBryantat(954)-707-t764.
We are rich in love, full of hope, surrounded whh joy and humbled with gratitude because of you. We will continue to
ask God to fill your lives with a plethora of His multiple blessings, graceloveand good wilL
Gratefully submitted,
The Joseph Thynni Family


M. ..if iM
MAGNOLIA C. HOLMES,
58, Histo Technologist for
k M 1 Ho tal
Jac son emoria spi ,
died October 26 at University
of Miami Hospital.
Service 11 am, Saturday,
HFH chapel. Hall-Ferguson-
Hewitt Mortuary rendering
services.

FU
NOTICE

As a public service to
our common ity, The Mi-
ami Times prints weekly
obituary notices submit-
ted by area funeral homes
at no c arge. These no-
tices include name of the
deceased, age, place of
death, emplownent, and
date locatio/ and time
of services. Additional in-
for mat lon and photo may
be included for a nomi-
nal charge.The deadline is
Monday at 3:30 p.m.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIiR OlivN DESTINY


Card%~:~l""-ll~7'*! of~Li ~Thank ':: '


inlo~ng memory of,


In loving memory of,


MEALS
continued from 16B

and breads are whole-grain or
reduce sodium in meals over
the next 10 years. Currently a
high school lunch has about
1,600 milligrams of sodium.
Through incremental changes,
that amount should eventually
be lowered to about 740 milli-
grams.
The report says the cost for
breakfast might increase by
about 18 percent, largely be-
cause of the increase in fruit in-
take. Lunch costs might go up
by about four percent.
"There will be incremental
cost increases, but it is an in
vestment in children's health,"
Stalling says. She says the rec-
ommendations will go to Con-
gress to be used in creating
legislation for child nutrition
programs.
The guidelines could also be
used by the food industry to
help create new "healthy kid-
friendly products," says Hel-
en Jensen, who served on the
committee and is a professor of
economics at lowa State Uni-
versity.


In loving memory of,


E #:





MATTIE HAMILTON
01/30/33 10/29/08

Mom, it's been one year
without seeing you or hear-
ing your voice. We miss you
so very much. Our hearts
are still bleeding, as if it was
yesterday. We do know that
you are at rest, with the Lord.
A devoted and loving wife,
mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother.
Love, Gemma, Delores,
Charles Jr., Glassford and
Errica.

in Memorial
Inlovingmemoryof'


ORENTHAL SMITH SR. 'O.J.'
10/29/74 03/11/05

You remain in our thoughts,
and will always have a place
in our hearts. Anyone with in-
formation about the murder
of 'O.J.' please call Detectifre
Romagni 305-471-2400 or
Crime Stoppers Reward of-
fered at 305-471-8477. You
will remain anonymous. 'O.J."
you are not forgotten.
In God We Trust.
The family


EVITON ELIJAH BROWN
10/17/82 10/26/06

Your ultimate job is to give
them.the best. Prepare them for
the real world, before they leave
the nest. Bake the cookies, at
tend the football game, stand by
their side when they're inducted
Into the Hall of Fame. No matter
what, you give them your all.
So who is to blame?
When you get the call, I can
see it now, the tears in your eyes
as you look up to heaven to ask
God why? Why did it have to be
your son to be killed by a thug
with a semi automatic gun? He
had so much to live for but his
dreams died when he hit the
floor. The aspiring doctor and

fo'".clow at b buded afeet
was it all in vain? No mother
should have to go through this
paint This is sickening how this
violence has become a trend.
Don't tell me this is how this
dream was supposed to end,
where the boys are taking out
the men and the cycle just re-
peats itself over and over again.
We now let go of .all the pain
and loving memories forever re-
main in Jesus' name.
We love and miss you'
The Family


NERO A. TWEETING
'BIG PAPA'
03/05/58 10/24/08

I miss you and I look for-
ward to tomorrow because I
know that then, IT1 be one day
closer to seeing you again.
You're forever in our hearts.
Your loving wife Teddybear;
your sons Shaun, Raynon
and Andy; your brothers Zack
and Juan; your sister Judy
and Uncle Gerald.


DEACON


express our sincere thanks
to everyone for their support
during this time-
Special thanks to Temple
M.B. Church, 1st Timothy
MB. Church, Range Funeral
Home Staff and the neighbors
of 51 Street and 8 Avenue-
The Gaiter family

In Memorial
hx loving memory of,


Dru will face

uphill battle
HPV
continued from 16B

Whereas Cervarix does not
target genital warts.
HPV infects about six million
people in the U.S. each year,.
mainly through sexual contact'
It usually causes no symptoms
although rare cases can develop
into warts and cancer in both
men and women.
Gardasil became an early
success story for Merck after
its 2006 launch, achieving
blockbuster sales that are rare
for a vaccine.
But sales have been slowing
amid questions ab6ut the
longevity of the vaccine's effect
and its price tag of nearly $400.
Merck has tracked HPV
immunity out to five years in
women, and just three years
in boys and men. Public health
advocates have argued that .
Merckshouldhavebeenrequired
to show evidence of Gardasil's
long-term effectiveness.



Budget deficit

worries many


QUEENESTHER DENSON
BETHEL
11/23/47-10/25/08

One year has gone, and you
are greatly missed.
The Children

Death Notice


BISHOP JAMES R.


It's been four years since
God called you home.
Bishop James Collier is so
missed and we will be com-
memorating his legacy on
Saturday, October 31, 7:30
p.m. at The Church of The
Holy Ghost, 1781 N.W. 73rd
Street with a memorial service
of praise with love and memo-
ries.
Please come out and enjoy
Jesus.


EVA MAE BOONE SMITH,90,
retired church mother, educator
and co-founder of Macedonia
Church of God In Christ died
October 26.
Survivors include: children,
Curtis (Ocie), Norma Jean Wade,
Freeman (Theresa), John Thom-
as (Joce), Bertha, Samuel (Car-
olyn), James (Sandra), David
(Margo), Rose and Steven (Deb-
bie).; numerous grand, great-
d at at
gran s, gre gre -gran s an
a host of relatives and friends.
Family hour 6 to 8 pm, Fri-
day, Macedonia Church of God
in Christ. Service 11 am, Satur-
day, Second Baptist'
Arrangements entrusted to
San Jose Funeral Home Memo-
al Plan
ri .
Interment, Graceland Memo-
rial Park.


DELOIS RODGERS, 56,
died October 26 at Univer-
sity of Miami Hospital. Ser-
vice noon Saturday at Jordan
Grove M.B. Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Royal Funeral Home.


I


~BR 'd~P P r~UI ~kl d0~ d rBn~PR*P~BBI Trs~ HI~# Y~ r~rr s 9 1 s~y~L'II~TnZ~ ~r2'ugtl~


in Memorlam in ro ng memon or


Death Noti'ce


Ph.,


Death Notice





MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2009


THE MIAMI TIMES


SECTION C


IIIlr


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--- ~~~ CoyihtdM


M easinm crft64-6sses delar a


nrssened a ft r ( icreh Isense











,~ ,


THE M. ATHALIE RANGE CULTURAL ARTS FOUNDATION, INC.


,
- -


A & inf1 bi

EDE14 Roc RENAISSANCE BEACH RESORT AND SPA

4525 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
Ticket Prices: $150, $200 and $300
Woceeds benefit the M. Athalie Range Cultural Arts Foundation, Inc.,
a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.

Cocktail Reception, Dinner, Open Bar, Show

Information and Reservadons 305-893-5468
------------""" ,
R'd /**
BACARDIU.S.A.,INo. AMERICANAIRLINES AT&T FPL
EDEN Roc RENAISSANCE RESORT & SPA MIAMI MARRIOTT BISCAYNE BAY MACY'S
THE MIAMI TIMES
This event is made possible by famding fmm the Miami-Dade Count Florida, Cadtural Afairs
Department and the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners.


Hearty congratulations goes out to Maceo Brown and "PACU" catcher Jonathan .
Tuttle. Maceo went above and beyond as out charge nurse on a very busy day,
to facilitate the movement of patients safely through the unit. His efficient
focus allowed the hospital to maintain the heavy or flow while providing ex-
cellent care to North Broward Hospital patients. Maceo makes time for Saint
Anne's Episcopal Church where he is "Acolyte Master." Making the trip to
our nation's capital for the annual Acolyte Festival representing Saint Anne's
Episcopal Church in Hallandale Beach were: Everett Neely, John Saunders, Amari
Rainford, Paul Rainford, Kaitlin Neely, Chad Neely, Marcus Neely, Jestina Thomp-
son, Patrick Dorsett, David Daveaport, Peter Holland, Demetrius Jones, Paulette
Brown (Maceo's mom), Divina Brown (wife), Pat Tellis, Nena Floyd, Wendy Jones,
Angela Neely, Mary Sand-Williams, Charles Williams and Clovis Rainford; Church of
the Incarnation: Father and J. Kenneth Major and Bishop and Leo Frade; Kathy Lati-
more, Kathleen Walker, Ingrid Cheesborough, Andrea Walker, Catherine Minnis,
Marcia Adekambi, Cynthia Rafi-Burroughs, Dudley Parker, Wynton Anderson, Alani
Adekambi, Kyle Anthony, Dominic Anthony, Jonathan Major, Jordan PoweH, David
Cheesborough, Justin Cheesborough, Jordan Cheesborough, Tahvani Quarterman
and Andrew Walker. Church of the Resurrection: Deacon Ruby Cruz, Christian Norton,
Don Kennedy, 191arkel Maslin and Patricia Whyte.
**********
Get well wishes to Rev. Charles Uptgrow, Freddy "Jabbo" Joohnson, Claretha Grant-
Lewis, Margaret Flowers, Marie Kelly Devoe, Doris McK-Pittmast, Julie Clarke and
Rev. Shedeick E. Gilbert.
**********
Congratulations cousin Regina JoHivette Frazier on the contribution to Miami sto-
ries in the Neighbors section of The Miami Herald.
"Uncle Sigie" and all deceased family members would be as proud as all of us who are
still alive.
****^ *****
The former Overtown group known as "The 6 PAC" covering six place, six avenue and
six court celebrated their 20th RDniVersary, Oct. 16-18. The Fridays affair was held at
the Taco1cy Center. On Sunday, the group worshipped at First Baptist Church of Miami
Gardens and their "Brunch" at Piccadilly Restaurant in Hollywood. Greeting and remi-
niscence on their good times in days gone by were. Jaunita Madison, Clarence Clear,
Jacquelyn Anthony, Betty Nesbitt, Frank Hall, Eloise Cox, E1ry T. Sands, Antonio
George, Albert Ferguson, Gwen Clark, Archie McKay, Marian Dean, Oliver. Gross,
Fred Brown, Helen Austin, Helen McKoy, Claretha Hall-Marshall, Cassanda Hall,
Cathy Clarke, Donalyn Anthony, Sandra Powell, Almeta Young, Beatris Sturgess,
William and Eastling Hamilton and Blanche Gross, president. a
**********
The American Association of Retired People (AARP) enjoyed their trip to Las Vegas last
week where they enjoyed meeting other members, Helen McKoy, Helen Austin, Nancy
and Miller Dawkins, Fred Brown, E1ry Sands, Martha Day, Selma Ward, Blanche
Gross, Beatrice Sturgies, William and Jessie Pinder, Elston and Lillian Davis, Lillie
Williams (president of the group), Mary McCray, Dorothy Graham, Jaunita Lane,
Laura Manning, Eullen Mitchell, Irma Elliorie, Josephine Hall, Ernestine Kelly,
Gladys MitcheH and Judy Carroll. Maya Angelou and Norman Lear were featured at
the convention.
* * * * *
Those from Saint Agnes Episcopal Church who attended the Acolyte Festival in Wash-
ington D.C. included Charlee Arnold, Kelicia Brown, Jaquan Cannon, Jakarri Clark,
Charles J. Clear, Khambrel Dawkhis, Kayla Edwards, Keanna Edwards, Kristina
Edwards, Ryan Everett, James Gibson IV, Curtis Holland, Arthur J. Jones, Tywon
B, Jones, Raymondi Kaunda-Ager, Darryl Moses, Marcus Postell, Jabari Rambeau,
Sierra Rucker, Franklin Sands III, Laura Smith, Michael Smith, Delton Spencer,
Darius Albury-Williams, DaShaun Jackson and Demario Jackson-Smith. Chaper-
ones included Thomas L. Albury, Velma Arnold, Evalina Bestman, Harold Clark,
Shirley Clark, Charles Cleare, Karen Cleare, Yvonne Del Villa, Julie Edwards, Shir-
ley Funches, Tumai Kaunda-Mainor, Malvern Mathis, Harold Meadows, Margaret
Moncur, Robin Moncur, Darryl Moses, Sr., Gail Moises, Gwen Mike, Sr., Stephen New-
bold, Shronda Postell, Anna Pratt, Evangeline Rambeau, Fredra Rhodes, Sylvia Rolle,
Eddise Thomas, Apryl Montford, Shree Wheeler and Franklin Sands.


^ ~CKiS MUSTI CONTROL THE]IIR Ow'N DEST]INY


Westview Viewers, Wil-
liam Booze, Ohio War-
riors, Jeaziette Blocker,
Gratigny, Dr. Joy Davis,
Gladeview, Toby Gaston,
High Ridge, C. Brian Hart,
Northside, Carmel Jones,
West Little River, Leroy
Jones, Little River Farms,
Felicia Mayo, Northshore,
James Smith, Browns-
ville, and Dr. Leomia Kel-
ly, chaplain.
The program included
prayer by Dr. Kelly, wel-
come, Ruth RoHe, North-
side District Explorer #63,
Kionne McGhee, speaker,
Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney's Office, and remarks
by Commander Jeanniton,


anc
Stu
and
intr
The
tert
Help
turi
dire
McC
cro
end
Tho
It
All
whi
orfu
or r
ladi
MB
Get


e, followed by Leona
rrup, Joshua Miller,
Pastor Glenn Miller
oducing the speaker.
Singing Angels en-
ained with "Old Lord
Me", "God Is" fea-
ng Mary Simmons,
actress, and Lonnie
artney bringing the
wd to their feet as she
ed with "How Great
u Art."
was beautiful picture.
of the ladies wore
te accented by a col-
l flower or a purple
ed handkerchief. The
es from Mt Olivette
C included Freddie
er, president, Juanita
Williams, district
president, Ber-
nice Brown, Sara
Collins, Seneose
Davis, Bessie
Flowers, Fred-
die Swaby, Lula
Smith, and Osie
Rogers, while the
ladies from Tem-
ple MBC were Wil-
nina Brown Vernell
n Christina Forbes,
e Lighthbourne, Al-
McKenzie, Bloneva
innings, Cheeria Oli-
Norma Perkins,
Marion Synder.
eryone left praising
speaker, a teach-
at Miami Norland
h, and a plate of pi-
n.peas and rice, fried
cken, liina beans and
e. Some of the angels
e Letitia Bowden,
mie Horne, Mamie
ry, Daphne John-
Mae Etta Lowery,
tie Murphy, Lonnie
Cartney, Mary Sim-
ns, directress, Till-
Stibbins, president,
ty Tolliver, Ramona
Varner, and Deacon
ry small.
iamians were sorry to learn
e death in Atlanta this week
loria 'Gigi" Braynon, a re-
teacher and member of a
ddrMiamifamily.


tives
clude
Cole
Charl
eby
Dani


in attendance in-
d Bernadette B.
man, Lake Worth,
es and Tracy Ben-
and daughter, Zen,
el Beneby, Doyle
y Jr., and Christine
y, Glen Mills, PA,
n Beneby, Emory
illie Beneby, Felix
y, Nassau, Anathia
y, Port Or-
Judith Ben-
inister Keith
laine Beneby,
la Beneby,
ta Beneby-Ab-
nd Guery Ab-
Beverly Bowe,
Bowe, Pamela
Ruth Collie, RO
via Cowart,
en Beneby
Corvette DeVeaux,
e DeVeaux, Mo-
Edwards, Inamae
son, Jevon and Ken-
ord, Dorothy Han-
odfrey and Wendy
on, Stone Moun-
GrA., Linville John-
Reginald Johnson,
s R. Johnson, Fran-
nes, Tata McLeod,
t Miller, Helen
, commander Dar-
rin Peterson, USM,
Delvin and Linda
Peterson, Lynette
Taylor, Regina
Trotter, Georgia
Tyler, Gloria Wil-
liams, and Nicola
Winder and chil-
dren.
* * * *
rding to Laurita
son, worship leader,
unday was Laity Day
nezer United Meth-
Church featuring
es Dunbar, keynote
er, T. Eilene Martin
, choir directness,
he Voices Of Praise
ing music from the


"good 01e' days". Songs se-
lected were "Kum Ba Ya",
"Every time I Feel the Spir-
it", "Have a little talk with
Jesus", "Holy, Holy Holy"
and "All Hail the Power."
Dunbar spoke on the
topic: "It's All About You"
and exonerated himself in
his opening statement by
informing the audience he
was not a minister,
speaker, orator, col-
lege graduate, or
author, but just a
/', plain person do-
ing what God has
destined him to do.
Gracelyn Thom-
as introduced the
SS s
peaker. Dunbar


a bit of history Beneb
regarding the Beneb
origination of Vernio
the Church of and L
God created by Beneb
Bishop Stanley Beneb
Ferguson and Bishop Al- ange,
vin Moss. The outer island eby, M
people were still primitive and E
and W. V. Eneas organized Presco
the "Eneas Jumper Corner" Roset
that is still prevalent today, solu a
while A. J. Tomlinson ex~ solu,
tended the name to The Dale
Church of God of Prophecy Bowe,
in .1952 and Prime Minister Latrai
Lyndon O. Pindling has Steph
ties to the church Dean,
in Hollywood, Fla. Eunic
. (Liberia), where the nique
fmal service was Fergu
held. dra F
Saturday night na, G
was buffet style Johns
and Fred Beneby tain,
EBY Jr. brought wel- son,
come and blessed Phylli
the food, while Gloria R. cis Jo
Chisem, daughter of Pet- Barret
tye Mae Hyler Reaves, Miller
broke the ice, followed by
representatives from
the Bahamas bring-
ing greetings and
Althen Duren power
pointing the Family .
Tree Website. Fred
Jr., then presented
Certificates of Rec-
ognition and E. Gar- DURDEN
net apprised every-
one of the 350 family Acco
(names in his data base in- Robin
clouding Farqixharson being last S
changed to Ferguson and at Ebe
family names added the odist
narnes of Davies, Dixon, Charl
Scavella, and Williams. E. speak
Garnet is still researching Major
over 300 acres of land on and t
Crooked Island 83 Watlings. provide
Some of the other rela-


Historians Althea Ben-
eby-Duran, daughter of
Luriel and Prescola Ben-
eby, Fred Beneby Jr., and
E. Garnet Beneby, sons of
Fred Sr. and Golden Ben-
eby, are commended for
planning the Beneby Fam-
ily Reunion, last Friday,
Saturday, and Sunday,
Oct. 9-11, at the Sheraton
Suites, Plantation, where
family members came in
on boats and planes from
Nassau, Crooked Island,
Acklins, and Cat Island, in
search of historical data.
The Friday eve-
ning reception in-
cluded the time for
fellowshipping and
showcasing the ac-
complishments of
the three histonans
in the family, such
as Althea whcise BED
education includes
five degrees. She has held
ten positions including an
Assistant Professorship at
Florida Memorial Univer-
sity. She has worked for
five publications, writing
13 grants, and teaching 15
courses. Fred is known for
his philanthropy in South
Florida. He built careers for
young people, been a main-
tenance worker for Bell
Systems Company, served
in Korea, and recruited stu-
dents for Bethune-Cook-
man U., Clark U., South-
ern U. and the Academy
at West Point in New York.
His most prestigious ac-
claim was spearheading a
committee to develop a mu-
seum in honor of President
Pope during his 15 years in
Murfreesboro, Tenn.
E. Garnet contributed


received copious while other speak-
applause from the ers included Captain
audience whenever he Saima Plasencia,
quoted the scriptures cor- Honorable Commis-
rectly. He would never sooner Audrey M.
mention it, but he worked Edmonson, District /
at WPLG Channel 10 as 3 Honorable Com-
technical assistant under missioner Dorrin
Dwight Lauderdale before D. Rolle, District 2
retiring after 30-years. He and State Rep. Yolly BENEBY
has now found God and Roberson, District
he will get closer with the 104, and Annie Ross clos- heo
word. ing out with remarks. Dea
The servitig of soul food Ros
* * * was why everyone showed ice
Kudos to Annie H. Ross, up. They took care of busi- Mu
Major Garry F. v ness, even taking ver
Jeanniton, North- -. some home. Ross and
side District Com- passed out gifts to Ev
meander and Crime the attendees, the
Watcher Chairper- er
sons for a success- * * * Hig
ful National Night The Singing An- geo
Out, last Tuesday, gels of Arcola Lakes chi
under the theme: MCGHEEE Park invited by cak
Citizens Stand Mother Nettie Mur- wer
Against Crime, "Cel- phy, vice president, Ma
ebrate Safe Communities", were the featured artists Ive
at Covenant Palms Cen- at the Annual Ministry son
ter. Ross has been under Appreciation Week, Bright Net
the doctor's care for a year Star Missionary Baptist Mc
and--despite her disabili- Church, last Sunday. mo
ty---she never shirked her Rev. Alphonso Livings- ie
responsibility to crime ton, Holy Temple MBC, Kit
watchers or meetings with delivered the sermon. Y.
Carmen Caldwell, execu- Pastor Glenn Miller and Hen
tive director, Citizen Crime Sister Julit Miller led the M
Watch general office. praise and worship, while ofth
She also supervises Val- the audience sang "This of G
erie Anderson, Arcola Is My Mission" in the tired
Lakes, Nathaniel Black tune of Bldshed"Assur- pidN


I ~ ~'


0 2 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 28-NOVE 9









13C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2009


MICHAEL IACKSON5

THIS IS IT


NOW PLAYING
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR TH E AT E RS AND SHOWTIMES
SORRY, NO PASSES ACCEPTED FOR THIS ENGAGEMENT
ALSO PLAYING IN IMAX* IN SELECT THEATERS (
I


THE WALWORTH FARCE
8 PM Camival Studio Theater (at the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $50

THE WALWORTH FARCE
8 PM Camival Studio Theater (at the Ziff Sallel Opera House) $50
Larry Rosen and Adrienne Arsht Center present
JAZZ ROOTS: THE BLUES
FEATURING BUDDY GUY AND DR. JOHN AND THE LOWER 911 BAND
Two generations.of blues stars on the Adrlenne Arsht Center staged
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $25, $45, $55, $85, $125


-


Available fra CommacciaLNews Providers




*

*




Run-DMC live on Bmadway








I


_


BLACKs MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWVN DESTINY


r5~tuul--r -


hYrR~llr~Wril~U-


L


i


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.
PRELUDE NOW OPEN
SINNIGHTSAWEEKI
FiflA4SilvICE DININS
ATTHECENTERI
Call305.949.6722


Adrienne Arsht Center and Broadway Across America present
THE COLOR PURPLE
"The Color Purple explodes onto the stage!" Contra costa Tirnes
2 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $30, $58, $68, $80, $85
7:30 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $25, $50, $60, $72, $77
A LINCOLN TOWN HALL:
LINCOLN, MIAMI AND THE AMERICAN DREAM ,
Enjoy the music of Lincoln's time by the New World School of the Arts.
Keynote presentation by author and scholar, Dr. Henry LoElis Gates.
4 PM Knight Concert Hall
FREE tickets must be reserved through box office.


SAGITTARIUS: NOV 21 DEC 20
You'd be happier about this if you
didn't feel like you were pushed into it.


ible will come from it. Lucky numbers
11, 16, 21, 18, 32
CAPRICORN: DEC 21 JAN 20
As things level off you've become
clearer about what you need to do to
cover yourself. Things look simpler now
that you understand where to keep the
emphasis. Let others cover themselves;
you've got work to do. Lucky numbers'
19, 21, 33, 38
AQUARIUS: JAN 21- FEB 20
The last time you were here it looked
a little different.The second time around
you're amazed at how much wiser you
are arid how stupid you were to get
sucked in. Thank God you know better
than to do it again. Lucky numbers 7, 10,
13, 19, 35
PIECES: FEB 21- MARCH 20
Whatever this is,.don't make the mis-
take of thinking that you didn't do the
right thing. The rightness or wrongness
of things is always relative and other
people's values rarely apply to any of
our choices. Lucky numbers 12, 15, 19,
25, 30


wdiennin Arhit "ateriuph ofsuspneadsgngeacdufogtbl!


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
Too much has come to light for you to
worry about who knows what. It wasn't
your intention to stir up trouble. This is
no time to get weak in the knees. Get
behind the idea that you came here to
change things. Lucky numbers 8, 12, 15,
16, 21
TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
No one expects you to do anything but
what you love. It's you who drives your-
self nuts with responsibility. Playing the
martyr has got to be getting old. Can you
picture yourself taking on a new role?
Lucky numbers 10, 13, 16, 21, 30
GEMINI: MAY 21 JUNE 20
What you didn't think would take off
is going over the top. Part of you is car-
ried away, but beware: being prone to
extremes, you'd be wise to ride the fine
line between the thrill of it all, and the.
reality of it. Lucky numbers 15, 19, 25,
28, 32
CANCER: JUNE 21 JULY 20
Maybe it's time for a reality check.
Whatever isn't working is due to brdak-
down; if you're aware of this, deal with
it sooner rather than later. Nothing will
grow until you stop long enough to nur-
ture it. Lucky numbers 16, 17, 21, 24, 32
LE0:JULY21-AUGUST20
Your need to keep the focus on your-
self would be easier to take if your ego
knew its place. Efforts to shine will suc-
ceed, but only to the extent that what
you have to share does as much for oth-
ers as it does for you. Lucky numbers11,


15, 19, 26, 32
VIRG0: AUGUST 21 SEP 20
Too many things are about to come
together for you to be getting cold feet.
What's in front of you wouldn't be there
if you couldn't deal with it. Right now that
means telling the truth and taking one
step at a time. Lucky numbers 15, 19, 25,
30, 35
LIBRA: SEPT 21- OCT 20
How did this get to be all about you?
The give and take factor is always an
issue with you. If your definition of fair
comes down to what's mine is mine and
what's yours is mine, it's time for a re-
view session. Lucky numbers 5, 12, 18,
25, 29
SCORPIO:0CT 21- NOV 20
Too many ifs, ands, or buts are screw-
ing up your ability to enter into this with
the same level of confidence that was
there a few months ago. Going forward
will require you to let go of every expec-
tation. Lucky numbers 12, 17, 19, 32, 40


A uncm rownns


Adrienne Arsht Center presents
PAWS ON THE PLAZA
Celebrate the box office opening of 101 Dalmatians with your furry
friends! Enter your dog in the Doggy Ambassadors contest for tickets
and other prizes!
10 AM Thomson Plaza for the Arts FREE
Adrienne Arsht Center presents
FREE FAMILY FEST
A FREE series featuring family-friendly performances and engaging
opportunities to introduce the performing arts.
11:30 AM Thomson Plaza for the Arts* FREE
Adrienne Arsht Center and Miami Music Project present
AROUND THE WORLD THROUGH MUSIC
The Miami Music Project brings forth a FREE musical adventure.
2 PM Knight Concert Hall
FREE tickets must be reserved through box office
THE WALWORTH FARCE
2 & 8 PM Carnival Studio Theater (at the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $50


The waiHwoth rarce


JeazRoots: Thesivues


WVeeks marries soulmate


Bisho


OOF

....s




The ColorPurple








__~~~~~~~~~~~ ______ _____ ___~_~


__~_~~~~~_~~~_~~~~~;_~__~____~_~__~~ .---_.~~~1.~.~1~-..~---------------


_____I______II~ Ill--~IXl-l-ll


Prices effective Thursday, October 29 through Wednesday, November 4, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beadh, Martin, St. Lucle,.Indian River, .. ..
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties. Any item carried by Publix GreenWise Market will be at the Publix advertised sale price. Quantity rights reserved,


^0 CKS MUIST CONTROL TH-ElR OWN DESTINY


0 4 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTO 2009


Br;


ntrhiir.rnml;rd


Florida Grown Tingerines............ ......... 88
At Peak of Season Flavor and Freshness, High in Vitamin C
and a Good Source of Fiber, 3-lb bag
SAVE UP TO 1.61


Decorated Cupcakes, 6-Count ......... 399
Assorted, Your Favorite Cupcakes and Icings,
Decorated for the Holidays, From the Publix Bakery, 12-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO 1.00
(12-Count, 24-oz pkg. ... 6.99)


12-Pack Assorted n99
Heineken Beer... .......
Or Amstel Light, 12-oz can or bot. or
Newcastle Brown Ale, 12-oz bot.
.SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


Publix 299
Spring Water................... J
24 tir 28-pk. 16.9-oz bot, or
Purified, 24-pk. 16.9-oz bot.
SAVE UP TO .50


12-Pack
Selected
Pepsi v
PTOductS ET
12-or can (Sale Price 3/12.00 With 1 Free,
That's 4/12.00 or 3.00 each
With the Purchase of 4.)
SAVE UP TO 7.16 ON 4


1l W.N


origtte Matrr


-Sy indicate Content


mercIafNews Providers


he";i~ il1a .e !fr~o~m


Cheez-It
Baked Snack
Crackers... ... TCL
Or Party Mix, Assorted Var ies,
11.5 to 14.5-oz box
Quaritity rights reserved-
SAVE UP TO 4.21





CI~P


THE MIAMIn TIMES


MilSdAM,blg FL.4'8~klawi. rOME~rl:pi 28S~r :'.T.BER 3, 2009


OITCES N D


:m


***


'I* *~*


/ft


Time running oat Ior

M-he home buy on
Copyrighted Material


**-lJ;* 2 - --II~*


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BlckI imminemers, nsumers simp)) "do~ng the right thing


US~Iness


S ndicated~ Content


Available~ frmCm eca Nw rvdr












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NOTICE OF OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE HACMB SECTION 8 HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER
SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS WAITNG LIST FOR VICTIMS OF HURRICANES K(ATRINA AND RIlA


Number of persons In 1 2 3 4 7 8


HACMB3 Pre-Application for Housing Assistance


_rr_____ _____ _______________ __~~_~~_ ~~ __ __


Household Information
How many persons will itve in the unit? Include yourself.


Are you married? Yes No

Gmss annual household income S
Indicate the approximate amount of your family's gross (before taxes) annual income. Intiude all sources of income for all the family members
who are 18 years of age or older. (Income includes child support contribution, Interest and dividends. wages, self employment, unemployment
benefits. SS, disability, workers comp, pension or retirement benefits, welfare income, veteran's income, alimony and any other income
sources.)


Preference Check the preference box that is applicable.
O A family who meently left or wlli leave FEMA temporary housing units, FEMA's Afternative Housing Pilot
Program. Including Katrina cottages (if vacated the unit on or after June 24, 2000)
D A family who has documented evidence from FEMA of displacement due to the effects of Hurricanes Katrina or
RIta
Gross annual household income a
Indicate the approximate amount of your family's gross (before taxes) annual income. Include ali sources of income for all the family members
who are 18 years of age or older. (Income includes chlid suppon contribution, intemst and dividends, wages, self employment, unemployment
benefits, SS, disability, workers comp, pension or retirement benefits, welfare income. veteran's income, alimony and any other income
sources.) .
Criminal Background
u or any family member ever been arstated or convicted of a crime? Yes No
Certification of Applicant Please read this statement very carefuliv. By stqning, you are agreeing to its terms.
FRAy certify that the information I have provided in this pre-application is true and accurate. I understand that:
any misrepresentation or false information wil result in the disqualification of my pre-application,
a this is a pre-application for waiting list placement and is not an offer of housing, and
additional Information will be mquired in accordance with federal housing regulations and the Section 8 Administrative Plan, and
a HACMB most always be advised in writing if my malilog address has changed, or my pre-application will be voided.


Signature of Head of Household Date

IIACMB does not discriminate on the basis of the Federally patected classes in the access to,,admissions procedum or
ematnyment of its housing wrearams and activities and amvides Equal Housing Oppostunity to alt


^.cles MusT` CONTROL TH-EIR OWN DESTINY


**


Starting Thursday, October 29. 2009, the Housing Authority of the City of Miami Beach (HACMB) will accept pre-applications, based on date and time
received, for 257 vouchers under the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Special Appropriations, which provides tws;ng assidare only to eligible,
families displaced by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. To apply, please read the instructions and coffiglete the pre-sppin:31.an form provided below.
Photocopies of the form may be used. The waiting list will close on Friday. October 29. 2010 or when all the vouchers are issued, whichever comes first
PRE-APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS (Please read darefully):
* Pre-applications must be completed and mailed to the following address: HACMB, ATTN: Pre-Applications, 200 Atton Road, Miami Beach, FL
33139.
Pre-applications must be postmarked no later than Friday, pc(ober 29, 2010 and received at the HACMB no later than Monday, November 8, 2010.
* Any pre-application that is not fully and accurately completed, is not signed, is postmarked after October 29. 2010, is received after November 8,
. 2010 andlor is received after all Special Appropriations vouchers have been issued will be void.
* Only one pre-applicallon per household will be considered throughout the entire process. Any household that submits more than one pre application
will be void.
* The following individuals are eligible for a super preference or a preference as follows:
0 A family who recently left or will leave FEMA temporary housing units. FEMA's Altemative Housing Pilot Program, including Katrina cottages (if
vacated the unit on or after June 24, 2009)
o A family who has documented.evidence from FEMA of displacement due to the effects of Hurricanes Katrina or Rita
Atthe time of the actual application process, family eligibility mus(be further established in accordance with 24 CFR.
Eligible income limits for program participation are as follows:


Mail completed form via US Postal Service regular or Certified mail only, to: HACMB, ATTN: Pre-Application, 200 Alton Road, Miami Beach,
FL 33139. It must be postmarked no later than Friday, October 29, 2010 and-received at HACMB no later than Monday,
November 8, 2010. Please print neatly in Ink. All fields must be completed. Submit this form only. Incomplete
applications will be disqualified. HAC gh the mail.


-e



we
.


**



- *


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2009


Wal-Mart announces


weekly hoHday price cuts










e
**
*


Rates climb, M s


--- t




i- t


Availa


--
















we *
.




.




MMMW all mm


P





MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2009


Thr 3620 IN.W.169nT bath.
Section 8 welcome
786-302-2004,305-751-3498
37 NW 47TERRACE
Back house for rent in Mid
Town Miami area. Two bed.
rooms, one bath. $800
monthly, water included.
305-915-9944
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi~
toned and cerarriic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
e at50r.00nly $75 p muon ,
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miarni, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.
586 N.W. 83rd Street #A
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly, $600 security.
786-488-2264
635 N.W. 49 Street
Three bedrooms. two baths,
central air. $1250 Monthly.
305-206-0721
6717 N.W. 6 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths
big yard, central air. Section 8
accepted. 786-326-2789
710 Sultan Ave
Two bedrooms one bath. Big
yard, good neighborhood.
305-458-3426, 305-299-2056
8373 NW 12 AVENUE
ARCOLA LAKES AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
askefr t500 ty.
8 Welcomed
' 305-621-3388, 305-607-1085
N.W. 13 t. an 18 Ave
Three bedr0o50 two baths.

Near Northwestern Hi
Fooom no r bSa air o$1050
monthly Fenced Section 8
OK 305-685-6795
NORTH DADE AREA
20521 NW 34 AVE
Ob om ct onne 8batt
786-985-8739,786262-0788
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two and three bdrms, $850-
$900. 305-688-6696
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Three bedrooms, two baths
good area. $2000 to move in.
786-399-5403
Rent with Option
MIRAMAR
Three bedrooms, two baths,
pool. $1400 monthly.
1-800-242-0363 ext.
3644



HOUSGS
3361 N.W. 207 STREET
Three bedrooms, remodeled,
air. Try $900 down FHA and
$799 monthly- .
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700
3718 N.W. 213 ST.
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Good Credit $99K.
305-479-3632
ATTENTION VETERANS
Three and four bedrooms.
$799-$1199 monthly. Zero
, down and $8000 rebate. Call
for detai .5N6D55Rie tors

*ATTENTION'
Now You Can own Your

""WITH""
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Anit Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
MITCHELL LAKES
BISCAYNE GARDENS
Three bedrooms, garage, to-
talidy rem909deledd690HOAdown
an NDm alt rs
305-655-1700



7900 N.Lw TS2 Court
Short sale, $25,500 or best

el uM zoon Id It
305-318-7878



TONY ROOFING
Shin les, re-roofing

310 4 e s.5Call


BROWARD ROUTE
DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
theen the hours of 6 am
and 1 p m. Must have rell-
able, insured vehicle and
current Dnver LIGenS8.
Apply in person al-
The Miams Times
900 N.W 541h StreeI

Community Out Reach
Worker
Helping Teenagers and
Pregnant Women
305-377-1952


JOB FAIR!!!
TOP LINE CONSTRUC-
TION WORKERS. Fri. and
Sat, Nov. 6 and 7 from 9
am to 5 pm. Ft. Lauderdale
Hilton, 1870 Griffin Road.
954-821-9107

Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retaiFand dining
establishments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682



BANQUET HALL
The Zion Church of God of
Florida City,1055 Redland
Road is opening a banquet
hall for rental. Call Sister
Fronda Fore at 305-238-7428
or 786-217-2425.
.BIG T's BBQ RIBS AND
CHICKEN
Best ribs in Miamil Sunday,
November 1, $8 dinner
includes: BBO ribs, chicken,
pigeon peas and nce,
maca6ons a eese.L10
eva Call 95 99-


Don't Throw Away Your Old
Re rds
1 Buy Old R ords! Albums
LP's, 45's, or 12" singles.
Soul, Jazz, Blues, Reggae,
Caribbean, Latin, Disco
Rap. Also DJ Collections! Tell
Your Friends!
786-301-4180.
. *

INS ANT ACTION!
LOVE! MONEY! Court cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234


BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
Renew $60 G agd Con-
cealed. Traffic School, four
hours, $28. Job Info. 786-
333-2084



BEST PRICES INTOWNIII
Handyman, carpet cleaning,

r d Oh30 0


Ne291 I NW 70 TER CsE in-
cluded, free cable connection.
$110 weekly. $400 to move
in. Call Lola at 786-877-7150
or Charles at
786-287-3872
4712 NW 16 AVENUE
$100-$150 weekly, utilities,
kitchen, bath, air.
786-260-3838
$50 RENT REWARD
Cable TV, air and more. $150
weekly. 786-290-0946
8275 N.W.18th Avenue
Clean rooms available. Call
305-754-7776.
MIAMI AREA
Three quarter way house'
Bed space in a shared room.
Hot meals, hot shower, all
for only $15 a day.
305-919-9253, 786-306-4186
Miami Gardens Area
Clean room, air, private
entrance. Call 305-454-9877
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Clean room, side entry, patio,
cable. 305-688-0187.
NORLAND-NW AREA
Rooms and efficiencies. Call
954-854-8154, 305-836-5848
NORTHWEST AREA
62 Street N.W. First Avenue
$450 monthly $650 move in
Call 305-989-8824
NORTHWEST AREA
Large clean furnished rooms.
Call 786-597-0871
NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.
OPA LOCKA AREA
$88 Weekly Pays AU!
954-515-2831
HOUSES
1370 NW 69 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air plus bonus room.
$1250 mthly. Not Section 8
affiliated. Call 305-829-5164
or 305-926-2235.
15331 NW 29 AVE
bTaese tl rcoeonmral robar
$1250 monthly, $3125 mpve
in. Not Section 8 affiliated.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776
1540 N.W. 63rd Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
$900. 305-235-9514 or
305-992-3653
1832 N.W. 49 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath-
$995. Central Air.
305-642-7080
1863 N.W. 91st Street
Beautiful one bedroom, total-
ly remodeled, all appliances.
$650 monthly, first and last.
305-746-4551
191 St N.W.11 Ave. Area
Four bdrms, two baths.
Section OK. 305-754-7776
1960 N.W. 167 St
Four bdrms, two baths, cen-
tral air, patio. Section 8 OK.
$1700 mthly. 305-332-4064
2130 Service Road
Two bedroom, one bath. Sec-
tion 8 ok. 305-624-4395 or
786-277-4395
2418 NW 94 STREET
Three bedrooms, new bath,
central air, bars. $1000
monthly, $2500 move-in. Not
Section 8 affiliated.
Arry3 11 sob7Broker
2441 N.W.104 ST
e 0 -e8d6r1o- 5 one bath.
2480 N.W.140 STREET
Opa Locka, two bedrooms,
one bath. $900 month.
ly. Call 305-267-9449.
2485 N.W.55thTERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath, se-
curity bars, new kitchen, new
bathroom, tiled floors. $975
monthly ec6tbon983 Icome.

2550 SUPERIOR STREET
Three bedrooms, bars, cen-
tral air. $950 monthly.

T t$2 o mo r r
rq305-891-6776


Tew e o 5 5 1 ces,

La lb r REHoT e
th fr ul o 0
in. Section 8 OK.
786-853-8313
288 N. W. 1st. Place

I e. 9 m trwo t
appliances included. Call
Joel 786-355-7578

3045 N.W. 68th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Ok. 954-704-0094
3480 N.W. 209TER
Four bedrooms, two baths,
air. Section 8. 305-751-6426,
305-624-9300


7001 NW 15 AVENUE




786-355-7578


Call 305-2035-1665



pakn.Section 8. HOPWA
OK$0.Call 305-669-4320,









On d monebthl. Rn-
vate d, new appli ancs pr-




$600, plussecunt. Cl 0




to8.305-754-7776








9535- N.Wit. 26 ve nue

Lare satud, tild, yard, ir




SPECIAL

waewndo bars aind on
Cal305-638-3699















Movein, withfrst motsrea nt
Remodle one bt, two, and ly



thre bedrooms, ar, bappli-

3075-mnhl.374 5-44-12-


SECTION D



%%al 9 9
1

.

GREAT NEWSill

PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
3650 NW 36th St
Meams, FI 33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE.
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: $698 00
APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MOREFI!
PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET
FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING: JULY 7,52009
(305) 635- 95
rictIncome rest sons apply,
rents are subject to
change



1031 NW 197 TERR
One bedroom, one bath-
Call Linton at 786-222-6764
1212N.W.1 Avenue
$550 MOVE IN. One .
bedroom, one bath, $500,
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080
1215 N.W.103 Lane
Two bedrooms $700.
A For Spe s!

1229 N.W.1 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

1245 N. W. 58 Street
One Dedroom, one bath,
$495 per month, all appil-
ances included. Free 14,
Inch LCD T V. Call Joel.
786-355-7578

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath-
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1277 N.W.58th Street #1
Two bdrms, one bath, appli.
included. Section 8 Wel-
come.
786-277-9925, 305-494-8884
1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725. One Free
Month.305-747-4552
1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One bdrm,
e bath $425. Ms. Shorty
-786-2901438

Onel348dN.W.1 Avenuebath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080
140 N.W.13 Street
$525 MOVE IN. Two bed-
room, one balh $525
786-286-1144/305-642-
7080
140 S.W. 6 St.
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$450 monthly
Call:305-267-9449
1450 N.W.1 AVENUE
e bed)ro ne bath $b4a2

$525. 305-642-7080


e h rs

moveC -458-3977 ,

Two 1b4e9d0o ,69TERbath,
$550 monthly. Call after 4.
305-439-4880, 954-485-1065
1525 N.W. 1 Place
MOVE IN SPECIAL! First
month moves you in. 5695
m tl pp ncees in-9


786-355-7578

1525 N.W.1st Place
One bedroom. one bath,
$395 monthly. Newly
renovated. AII appliances
included. Free 19 inch LCD
TV Call Joel 786-355-7578.


305-694-6210, Ext.109

One Family Serving Since 1923
THE LARust MailatTY
OWNED NEWSPAPER
IN THE soUTHEAST


1540 N.W.1st Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL
1st Month Moves You int
One bdrm, one bath,
$525 mthly,
Two bdrms, one bath,
$625 mthl
Three bdrms, tw baths,
$725 mthly

Allr pl o'en D
Call Joel 786-355-7578
156 N.E.82nd Street
One bdrm $650, Two bdrm
$800. No deposit.
786-325-7383
1803 N. W. 1st Court
Move-in-Special, two bdrm,
one bath, $600 monthly,
5900 to move-an. AII ap.
pliances included. Free
19 Inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1955 N.W. 2 Court
$450 MOVE IN! One bed-
room, one bath, $450. 305-
642-7080
1969 N. W. 2 Court
$550 MOVE INI One
bedroom, one bath, 5550'
stove, refrigerator, air, free
water.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

2040 N.E.168th Street
One and two bedroom, water
included. Section 8 Wel-
come. 786-277-9925
210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
475. Call 305-642-7080
220 N.W. 16 STREET
.Two bedrooms, one bath.
$600. Appliances-
305-642-7080
2365 N. W. 97 Street, Rear-B
One bdrm., $620 monthly, first
and last to move in. 305-
691-2703, 786-515-3020
2701 N.W.1 Ave
MOVE IN SPECIAL. One
bedroom, one bath. $500
month. $750 to move in. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel.
786-355-7578

2804 N.W.1 AVE
MOVE IN SPECIAL' Two
bedrooms, one bath $600
mthly, $900 to move an All
appliances included Free
19 ancre LCD TV, Call Joel
786-356-7578

2945 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$595, Two bedrooms, one
bath, $750. Section 8 OK.
786-412-9343
2972 N.W. 61 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, $550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
3186 N.W.135th Street
One bdrm, one bath, $650
monthly, call 954-704-0094.
3669Thokas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedrooms $650, stove, re-
irigerator, air. 305-642-7080
411 N.W.37 STREET
Stualos. $395 monthly AII
appliances included. Call
Joel

42738 .59 S5tmet
One bedroom, one bath.
$450 monthly, $600 move
in special. Free Wi-Fi, Easy .
qualifying. 786-339-4106
48 N.W.77th Street
Beautiful one bedroom, $550
monthly. Call after 6 p.m.
305-753-7738
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
b re dm oO 4a9n0 w80
Smonthl a263 5 9h9


aoeto A kE UeS -
cials. 786 663-8862


a 0000 h-
ly plus security. Section 8
welcome. 786-277-0632
5755 N.W.7th Avenue

9$6 ern oo Op kt-o
move in. Call 954-394-7562.

60200 N.LWF13th Avenue
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free w eNand gasdp y at:
or Call 305-638-3699


2405 N.W. 135t Street
1/2 Meront FE, one band

two bedrooms, cnena batr
Appiace an water 305n- 36






2lude Sectio 82 wecoe


TOn bedroom., $5monthlyt.
305-94270-121

2409 N.W. 6 STREET
F wou bdrms townhue, two
mthly 305-6 762-53505




Tow0nhous. 1Two avnd hee
O bedrooms, Setwon baths.
Coe all 9054-442-8198or







850-321-3798mve i. $5











1023 N.W. 47 STREET
Thre bedroms, one bath.
$1300l. Studfor onhe bat


786-315-48491


782 tre NE. 1 AVENU Ae
Two bedroms, one bth.n $95

305-65-12-'08 ~



















71032 N.W. 12 out Plc

fenfcd entra avirlaundr.
305-389-40135-632-3387





8451 N.W.1 AVENUE
Oncue bdom water nne w trciy
kitchen, itle. $02700, Not

Setonthy 358 afiiaed $550
mlove in. Terry Dellerson, Bo
kequre. 305-89 5-6776










Twoa berooms. Section 8 y
Wecm.Call 305-4754-7776
93 St N.W. 11 Avre.
Two drm. Selcation 8 KI




ances include. Section 8
welome 305-688-71559




Two 5 bdmsonebthy duplex
loctedin ocnutGroe.


PLACE YOURR AD MERE TODAY










/ RI.cKS MuIST CONTROL. THEiR( OWlN DEST.INY


$425 for 17
weeks in pnnt
Call: 305-694-6210
FRX: 305-694-6211


UET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290AliBaba
(west of 27th Ave.) Lirno Rental
305-796-9558
law


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Health* Bad Luck Business Problems Marriage Love
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Open every day
Call now for an appointment Miami FL 33127 7 am 10 pm
"" .0"' 305-759-4126 so Nw syst.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the
following:
IFB NO. 178149 INVITATION FOR BID FOR LASERFICHE SOFTWARE,
HARDWARE, AND SERVICES

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 12:00 P.M. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2009

Detailed scope of work and specifications for this bid are available at the
City of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at www.miamiqov.com/
procurement Telephone No. 305-416-1958.
Deadline for Request foi Clarification: Monday, November 2, 2009 at 5:00
P.M.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74.ORDINANCE
NO.12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager

" AD NO. 002166


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administratibn Building,
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the |Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County,' Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C.
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings.,,


COCONUT GROVE VILLAGE COUNCIL MEMBERS
WEMBR D CONCEJO NCIPAL
MANM KONSEY MINISIPAL COCONUT GROVE
PRECINCTS
REC(NTOS
BMo vbT
532, 540, 546, 581, 582, 583, 584, 585, 586, 587, 998

(Vote for no more than Nine)
(Vote por no m&s de nueve)
(Pa vote pou plis ke n6f)
a Heather Bettner 100
0 Kate Callahan 101
0 David B. Collins 102
O Liliana Dones 103
0 Felice Dubin 104
0 Rose Fountain 105
0 William Fury 106
a Javier Gonzalez 107
o Scott Janowitz 108
a Glana M. Leyva 109
0 Stephen P. Murray 110
0 Michelle Niemeyer 111
0 Sylvia Quinn 112
0 Renita Ross Samuels-Dixon 113
0 Patrick Sessions 114
0 Adam Weirich 115
0 David Eric Wells 116


OMAL* NERTTOYOURCHOICE.
W apmvidedtomyowba0ot.
PARA VOTAR, t..LENE COMPI..ETAMENTE
EL6VALO JUNTOASU SEL.ECCON.
W equ lu que

POU VOTE, RANPLI ANDEDAN OVAL LAN
NET S AKOTESAWCHWAZIAN.
SIw Myon essawlaeasidkeyon yosou
kouman pou kofile bllion vbt we

MAYOR
ALOALDE
MAJISTRA
(Vote for one)
b eeppor un
0 Tombs P. Regalado 80
a Joe sanchez 81

COMMISSIONER-DISTRICT3
COMISIONADO-DISTRITO3
KOMISYONA DISTRIK 3
(Vote for One)
(Vote por uno)
(Vote pou youn)
o Frank Carollo 82
0 Guillermo "Willie" Chacon 83
o Antonio*Mico*Colmenares 84
0 Pedro R. Diaz 85
0 Mavel Lopez 86
O Luis Morse 87
0 Beba Sardirla-Mann 88

COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 4
COMISIONADO DISTRITO 4
KOMISYONE DISTRIK 4
(Vote for One)
(Vote por uno)
(Vote pou youn)


COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5
COMISIONADO DISTRITO 5
KOMISYONG DISTRIK 5
(Vote for One)
(Vote por uno).
(Vote pou youn)
a David Chiverton 94
a Michelle Spence-Jonee 95
o Jeff Torain 96


A pre-bid conference has been scheduled
for Tuesday, November 3, 2009 at 9:00 AM
in the Maintenance Operations Training
Roorn at 12525 N.W. 28 Avenue, Miami
016-KKil 11/24/2009 Security Systems Services Contract Florida 33167. All participating vendors are
encouraged to attend.
001-KKO8 11/17/2009 Pianos *

Apre-bid conference has been scheduled
for Thursday, October 29, 2009 at 10:00
015-KKO6 11/10/2009 Chiller Service Contracts AM in the North Training Room at 12525
N.W. 28 Avenue, Miami Florida 33167.
All participating vendors are encouraged
to attend.

110-JJO2 11/10/2009 Custodial Floor Care Products
A pre-bid conference will be held on Octo.
ber 29, 2009, at 2 p.m. in the Department
of Food and Nutrition Training Center
013-KKO3 11/6/2009 A-LA-CARTE PlZZA at 7042 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL
33144. For directions to the pre-bid con-
ference site, please call (786) 275-0400.
All comments or questions regarding this
solicitation must be faxed or e-'mailed no
later than NOON on October 28, 2009 as
stated in the special conditions of the bid
documents.

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


o Manolo Reyes


a Oscar Rodriguez-Fonts


Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC


(#003308)


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 5, 2009


Copyrighted Material


NOTICE OF GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION
IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
TOBEHELDON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2009
PURSUANT TO RESOLUTIONS NOS. 09-09-0177, R-09-0391,
AND 09-09-0376
FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTING THE OFFICES
OF THE MAYOR AND
THREE CITY COMMISSIONERS WHO ARE TO BE ELECTED
FROM SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICTS 3, 4 AND 5

.A general municipal election will be held on Tuesday, November 3, 2009, from 7:00 A.M, until 7:00 P.M, in the
City of Miami, Florida, at the polling places in the several election precincts designated by the Board of County
Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida, at which election the qualified electors participating therein will
vote for the following municipal officers: The Mayor and three District Commissioners who are to be elected
from single member Districts 3, 4 and 5. A runoff election, if required, is to be held on Tuesday, November 17,
2009.

OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT
BOLETA OFFICIAL DE MUESTRA
ECHANTIYON BILTEN V6T OFISYAL
GENERAL MUNICIPAL BOLETA OFFICIAL DE LAS BILTEN V6T OFISYEL ELEKSYON
ELECTION ELECCIONES GENERALS MINISIPAL GENERAL
MIAMI, FLORIDA MUNICIPALES MIAMI, FLORID
NOVEMBER 3, 2009 MIAMI FLORIDA 3 NOVANM 2009
3 PE NOVIEMBRE DEL 2009


felinfty rcal cfatak a fsh


latt~ Sitl











~ 191) THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28I-NOVEMBER 5, 2009


= *
PROFESSIONAL CARE HRS CERTIFIED.
Low cost senvice. seRvicE UP TO 10 WEEKS, $175
pp hn r* atments upto 12 weeks.



Lejune Plaza Shopping Center 305-887-3002
697 East9thSt or
Hialeah, FI. 33010 786-346-2141
BluNo TIns AD!


* Accidents Arrests
* DUI 8 Tickets Bankruptcy
* Criminal Defense Wills/Probate
* Personal Injury Divorce/Custody
100's of Lawyers Statewide




Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P

1;. INFANTS. CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS

WEBSITE
war.:.:aw.ane..v.:r.v.v.e..:"
NORTHSIDE PI.AZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900NW27AveSte50 660N.StateRd7,Ste3A
MIami FL 33147 Phone 305-758-0591 Plantation FL 33317 Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
rNy PaAkway Medical Plaza
N Miaml Beach FL 33169* 305-652-6095


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


: Termination Up to 22 Weeks
. Individual Counseling Services
BOard Certified OB G YN's
CO lete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP

305-621-1399
...' _ _1._ ..


M IAM14RADE B


be limited to two (2) representatives per firm. No other Site inspections will be provided by the Miami-
Dade Aviation Department. It is the policy of Miami-DadeCounty to comply with all the requirements of
the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). For sign language, interpreter services, material in accessible
format, other special accommodations, or airport-related ADA concerns, please contact the MDAD Office
of ADA Coordination at (305) 876-7024.

cOMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM

Contract Measures for this Project is (are): 29%

COMMUNITY WORKFORCE PROGRAM

The Community Workforce Goal for this Project is: 11.5%

BID GUARANTY: Each Bid must be accompanied by a Bid Guaranty of not less than five percent (5%)
of the Total Bid in a manner required by the Instructions to Bidders. No Bid may be withdrawn after the
scheduled closing time for the receipt of Bids for a period of one-hundred and eighty (180) days. The
County reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, to reject all bids,
or to re-advertise for Bids.

BID IS SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS AMONG OTHERS:

1) The Miami-Dade County Responsible Wages Ordinance.

2) The Provisions in reference to the timetables for minority and female employment participation, ex-
pressed as a percentage, for the Contractor's aggregate work force in each trade on all construction work
in the covered area, as follows:


.
PROJECT NAME: North Terminal A-B Apron Completion

PROJECT NO.: B732M ("Project")

Sealed Bids for the Project designated above will be received for and in behalf of Miami-Dade County, by
the Office of the Clerk, in the Stephen P. Clark CenterSuite 17-202, 111 N.W. Ist. Street, Miami, Florida,
33128 until 2:00 P.M. November 30, 2009 or as modified by addendum, at which time all Bids will be
taken to a room to be designated by the Clerk of the Board in said Stephen P. Clark Center. Bids are to be
submitted in two envelopes. Bids received after the time and date specified will not be considered. Enve-
lopes Aof Bids, containing only the Schedule of intent Affidavit(s) will be publicly opened and the neimes
of the Bidders read aloud. Upon notification by the Department of Small Business Development, bidders
may correct defects on the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s) within forty-eight (48) hours after bid submis-
sion. Envelopes B of Bids, containing all of the remaining bidding documents, from Bidders that have not
been rejected as not responsive will be opened publicly and read aloud forty-eight (48) hours after the bid
submission date and non-responsive bids will not be opened. Bidders are invited to be present at each
opening. The County reserves the right to postpone or cancel the bid opening at any time prior to the
scheduled opening of bids.

IN GENERAL THE WORK COMPRISES: Completion of the pavement in the A-B Apron area of the North
Terminal Development Project. Work generally consists of concrete apron pavement, passenger loading
bridge foundations, sidewalks, guardrails, pavement markings, and three trash compactor foundations and
utilities within the North Terminal area footprint.

BID DOCUMENTS: The Miami-Dade Aviation Department will make the Bid Documents available, on
October 26, 2009, for inspection by individuals by appointment only, on business days during the hours
of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at Miami international Airport, Building 3030, Central Wing, Conference Room
4. Interested parties are to schedule an appointment to review the B.id Documents through Maria Fer-
nandez at 305-869-3343. The duration of each appointment will not exceed two (2) hours. However, the
Department may schedule additional time slots (not to run consecutively with the original appointment), if
available. At the time of the appointment, and prior to any Bid Doculment review, interested parties will be
required to present current, government issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License, United States
Passport), documentation that they are licensed architect, engineer, or contractor who may perform work
on, or related to, the Project, and sign and notarize a Confidentiality Affidavit certifying that the company
and each authorized employee agrees, that in accordance with Florida Statutes $ 119.071(3)(b) and one
or more of the following Florida Statutes, 6 281.301 and $ 331.22, to maintain the information contained in
the Bid Documents as being exempt from the provision of Florida Statute 9 119.07(1) and g 24(a), Article I
of the State Constitution. In addition, interested parties are advised that individuals will be monitored while
reviewing these documents. Interested parties may take notes, however, no photographs and/or copying
of the documents will be allowed,

The Bid Documents can be purchased for $1175.00. Payment shall consist of:


Timetables


Goal for minority


Goals for female


As used in this Notice, and in the Contract resulting from this solicitation, the "covered area" is Miami-
Dade County, Florida. These goals are applicable to all Contractor's construction work (whether or not it is
Federal or Federally assisted) per formed in the covered area.

3) The "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Construc-
tion Contract Specifications" as set forth in the Contract Documents.

The Contractor's compliance with the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4 shall be
based on its implementation of the Equal Opportunity Clause, specific affirmative action obligations re-
quired by the specifications set forth in 41CFR 60-4.3(a), and its efforts to meet the goals established for
the geographical grea where the Contract resulting from this solicitation is to be performed. The hours of
minority and female.employ ment and training must be substantially uniform throughout the length of the
Contract, and in each trade, and the Contractor shall make a good faith effort to employ minorities and
women evenly on each of its projects. The transfer of a minority or female employee or trainee from Con-
tractor to contractor or from project to project for the sole purpose of meeting the Contractor's goals shall
be a violation of the Contract, the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4. Compliance
.
with the goals will be measured against the total work hours performed.

The Contractor shall provide written notification to the Director of the Office of Federal Contract Com-
pliance Programs within ten (10) working days of award of any construction subcon tract in excess of
$10,000 at any tier for construction work under the Contract resulting from this solicitation. The notification
shall list the name, address and telephone number of the Subcon tractor; employer identification number
of the Subcontractor; estimated dollar amount of the subcontract; estimated starting and completion dates
of the subcontract; and the geographical area in which the Contract is to be performed,

4) Miami-Dade County has enacted an ordinance governing utilization of certified Community Small Busi-
ness Enterprise (CSBE) Subcontractors. Requirements for compliance with this ordinance are contained in
the Contract Documents.

5) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t), a "pone of Silence" is imposed upon RFPs,
.
RFQs or bids after advertisement and terminates at the time thh County Manager issues a written rec-
ommendation to the Board of County Commissioners or a Notice of Contract Award Recommendation,
whichever comes first. The Cone of Silence prohibits communications regarding RFPs, RFQs or bids be-
.
tween potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyIsts, or consultants and the County's professional
staff, including but not limited to the County Manager and the County Manager's staff. A Cone of Silence
is also imposed between the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member of
the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Managerand the County Manager's
staff*

The provisions of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t) do not apply to oral communications at pre-
bid conferences, oral presentations before selection committees, oral communications with the Contracting
' Officer, as published by the Department of Small Business Development in their weekly Cone of Silence
Project Information Report, for administering the procurement process, Contract negotiations during any
.
duly noticed public meetings, public presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any
.
duly noticed public meeting or communications in writing at any time unless specifically prohibited by the
applicable RFP, RFQ, or bid document. Bidders or proposers must file a copy of any written communica-
tion with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request. The County
shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any
person upon request.

in addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t)
by any bidder or proposer shall render any RFP award, RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any person
having personal knowledge of a violation of this Ordinance shall report such violation to the State Attorney
and/or may file a complaint with the-Ethics Commission. Bidders or Proposers should reference the actual
Ordinance for further clarification.

6) The County shall not be responsible for any modifications or alterations made to the Bid Documents
or to the Contract Documents other than those made by Addendum, Change Order, or Work Order. Any
purchase of partial sets of documents shall be at the purchaser's risk.

7) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2.8-1 (d), a Bidder shall have 6n file, prior to contract
award a duly executed Uniform County Affidavit with the Miami-Dade County Department of Procurement
Management (DPM), to be maintained with the bidders vendors registration file. The Bidder is responsible
for obtaining the Vendor Registration Package, including all affidavits by downloading from the DPM web-
site at www.miamidade.qov or from the Vendor Assistance Unit at 111 N.W. 1st Street, 13th Floor, Miami,
Florida 33128, (305) 375-5773.


Non-refundable Payment of $175.00 for each set of Bid Documents


The non-refundable payment shall be by any type of check, or money order, only, and made payable to
the Miami Dade Aviation Department. The refundable deposit must be by Cashier's or Certified check
only, and made payable to the Miami Dade Aviation Department. Each interested Bidder shall furnish an
address, telephone and fax numbers, and email address for the purpose of contact during the bidding
process. A business card with all of this information will suffice.

Bid Documents may be purchased in person or by mail. To purchase a set of the Bid Documents in per-
son, each purchaser must present a current
.
A. copy of government issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License)
B. copy of the architect, engineer, or contractor qualifier's license issued by the Florida Department
of Business and Profes signal Regulation for the Bidder making the purchase
C. an original, notarized Confidentiality Affidavit signed by the licensed architect, engineer, or con-
tractor.

Confidentiality Affidavits may be obtained in advance by downloading from www.miami-airport.com/html/
bids.html. Bid Documents may also be purchased by mail by sending a copy of the requisite identification'
license, original notarized Confidentiality Affidavit, contact information, and checks along with a FedEx or
UPS billing account number to the place of purchase indicated below.

The Confidentiality Affidavit, non-refundable payment and refundable deposit shall be delivered to Maria
Fernandez or designee, at Miami international Airport, Building 3030, Central Wing, 2nd Floor, Miami,
Florida 33122. For purchases.being made in person, the required documents shall be delivered between
the hours of 9:00AM 4:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Upon payment and verification of the required
.
identification documents, the verified individual will be authorized to pick up the number of sets of the Bid
Documents for which payment has been made. Only full sets of the Bid Documents will be authorized for
pickup.
All Bid Documents, including any copies made, shall be returned to the same location where they were
purchased. All Bidders that timely return the Bid Document will have their deposit returned. Those Bid-
ders that purchase Bid Documents, but elect not to participate in the bidding process are also required to
return all copies of the Bid Documents to the location of purchase. Failure to return the Bid Documents
and copies made to the location of purchase within five (5) working days after the Bid Due Date may be re-
ported to a Law Enforcement Investigating Authority and will forfeit the deposit. Furthermore, Bidders that
fail to return Bid Documents shall not be allowed to participate in future Confidential solicitations until such
.
time that the firm has taken corrective actions that are satisfactory toMiami Dade County. The purchaser
of the Bid Documents shall be required to certify that they have returned all original Bid Documents plus
.
any copies and they have not retained any copies.

All bids must be submitted as set forth in the Bid Documents. The County reserves the right to reject any
or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, or to re-advertise the Project. The County, by choosing
to exercise its right of rejection, does so without the imposition of any liability against the County by any
and all bidders.
PRE-BID CONFERENCE: The Miami-Dade Aviation Department will hold a Pre-Bid Conference and Site
Inspection on November 6, from 1:30 am to 4:00 pm at Miami International Airport, Building 3030, Central
Wing, 4331 N.W. 22 Street, Second Floor, Conference Room 1, for all interested parties. Attendance will


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Advanced Gyn Clinic












I


FOR THE WEE OF OCTOBER27 OVMER2 20


I SECOND TEAM IN CIAA TITLE GAME TO BE
DECIDED; HAMPTON STAR PLAYER KILLED


Title pictures clearing up


0-
NC A&T 30, Howard 19
Ohio Dominican SS, Central State 35
Od Dominion 38, Savannah State 17
Panhandle State 31, Texas College 26
SC State 21, Hampton 9
Shaw 54, Livingstone 3
Shepherd 55, West Virginia State 14
Stillman 42. Lape 20
- Tuskegee 21 Albany State 19
Virginia State 34, Lincoln (PA) 14 .
Virginia Union 17, Bowie State 16
W-Salem State 16, Bethune-Cookman 10


UNDER THE BANNER
WHAT'S GOING ON IN AND AROUND BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


HAMPTON STAR FELLED:
Hampton University basketball captain Theo
Smelling, a 22-year-old senior
front Tampa, Fla., was accident-
ly shot just after midnight on
Saturday morning in Hampton
and died Monday night.
An announcement released
by Humplan University Director
of Relations, Yuri Rogers
Milligan, said Smalling died at
Hampton sports Photo approximately 8:40 p.m.
According to The Hampton
SMELLING: Hampton
senior center shot early Free Press newspaper, Paula
Saturday morning, dies Ensley, spokeswoman for the
Monday. Hampton Police Department,
said Smalling was wounded in
an accidental shooting just after midnight Saturday morti-
ing in the parking lot of Fusions Nightclub on West
Mercury Boulevard in the city. He was with 21-year-old
Dominique Devon Smith when Smith, according to Ensley,
"mishandled a firearm and accidentally shot" Smalling in
the abdomen. Smelling and Smith knew each other, Ensley
said.
A call was made to the police after the shooting,
Ensley said, and Smalling was picked up by ambulance
in a parking lot off Power Plant Parkway. It's unclear why
they were not in the location where the shooting occurred,
Ensley said. There was a third person in the car wh6 was
the driver at the time of the shooting. .
Smelling was transported to Riverside Regional
Medical Center in Newport News (Va.) where he died
Monday night. His parents, Carl Smalling and Shelley
George had come from Florida and were at the hospital at
thetimeofhispassing.
Smelling had turned 22 on Friday.
Smith has been charged with reckless handling of a
firearm, a misdemeanor. Smith is being cooperative with
police, Ensley said. Since Smailing did not.survive his
injuries, the Commonwealth's Attorney's Office will deter-
mine whether to pursue additional charges.
"Theo was the model for the term student athlete. He
was a terrific student and an all-star athlete, in addition, he
was actively intolled in a great deal of community service.
I and the Hainpton University family will truly miss him,"
said HU President Dr. William R. Harvey.
"This is a devastating loss for our community," said
HU men's basketball head coach Ed Joyner "He was a
great young man who was an asset to Hampton University
on and off the court. Not only was he the caplain and leader
of our team, but the backbone of our team. He will be with
us in our hearts and minds when we step on the court."
Lonza Hardy Jr., athletic director added, "We are all
deeply saddened to hear of the loss ofTheo, a student ath-
.
lete we saw grow and mature into an individual who made
us all proud."
Smelling was part of former Hamplan head coach
Kevin Nickelberry's heralded first recruiting class that
included then fellow freshmen forwards Matthew Pilgrim
and Michael Freeman and was rated one of the top 50
classes in the nation. Smelling gained a reputation as a hard
worker, tough defender and rebounder during his time on
the court. He played in 91 games for the Pirates in three
seasons starting in -76 and averaging 3.3 points and 5.2
rebounds for his caree
According to the release, a tribute to Smalling was to
be held Tuesday during the HU men's and women's basket-
ball radio show aired live on WHOV 88.1 FM.


BLACKS 1VUST' CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY


IA SOUTHERN INTEACOLLEGIATE
118 ATHI.EncCONFERENCE
CONF AU.
W L W L
Tuskegee 6 1 8 2
Albany State 6 1 7 1
Morehouse 5 2 6 2
Fort Valley State 4 3 5 4
Benedlet 4 3 6 3
KentuckySlate 3 4 5 4
Miles 3 5 3 6
ClarkAtlanta 3 5 2 5
Sillman 2 5 3 4
Lane 0 7 0 8
EIAC PLAYERS DF THE WEEK
...FFErliE Quinn Porter Gr RS SC Rushed
Inc ?.s yest or, 7.10arnes wain 2 TE< VS. Lane.
Alm ir..ew a 5? ?ara llm pai,
DEFENSE Junior Gallate Sr DL SC 13 tacit-
les 1115:0s LL .4.1l arlurnewe Lang
NEACOMEA Wililarnhallis Jr.LB.CAU-10
ten a sales, 1 sack, I intercepoon, 1 annue
(Mys, Morehouse,
Edward0tmaWW, DB, KSU- totackles,7sola
2tic.Itsas Must
EPECIALTEAMS fanMulleJr.,PloPMHC
* Averag ] 39Fe y3vis on 7 punts, made 2&yard
fleklgoal ks CAtl
OFFENSIVE UNE Jeremiah Anbraba, So., 4
BC-3Imockdowns,2pancake.97%grade


O SOUTHWESTERN
*** ATHLETICCONFERENCE
DIV ALL
E. DIVISION W L W L
Alcom State 2 2 2 4
Jackson State 2 2 2 5
AlabamaA&M 1 2 4 3
Alabama State 1 3 4 3
ML9s. Valley St 1 3 2 5
W.DMSION
PaineW-wAAM 4 0 5 1
AmFlaeBluti 2 1 4 2
GramblingState 2 1 4 3
Texas Southern 1 1 2 4
Southem 1 2 4 3
S PLA'ERS OF THE WF.EK
OFFENSE Donard BAers. Jr RB PV ASM
. Rar.vI I, Ill pirt er.Nearr..f. witn....a il'
C' I '^?'3' '9 0- 're 63 yar.h.i==d
anoher to149prostr, war Mr Sc.uir**"I
DEFENSE Ryan Run Jr. LB. JSU -
ense.,we., 2 passes.na recover.s a me=
part ai the ena:w er am as MVEU
NEWCOMER KauanFbicy.Fr SS ALABAMA
BTATE Had a casuar.rrigr..'I.3Cal.a e. i.A'H
wasignlaroupsesAlcorr*i'i's
'-IAL TEAMS Andiew Lyona, 50, PIGR
ALABAMA STATE In his collegiate debut.
averaged 41.5 yards on 4 punts, 3 inside the
24yardine


I


MEA C ~sEN


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor ,
Black college football crowned its first 2009
champion Saturday.
One more will be crowned this week.



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30
Miles vs. Concordia in Fairfield, AL 6

Chowan vs. Saint u e in BeEsR NC 12n

2",:::,"'" nqPAO
Virginia Union vs. Elizabeth City State in Richmond, VA 1
en es w. ne I T 1:30
tenestone W. Fayeteville State in Salisbury.NC 1:30
Albany State vs. Morehouse in Albany, GA 2
Bacone vs. Langston in Muskogee, OK 2
Clark Atlanta vs. North Greenville in Atlanta, GA 2
Stillman vs. Benedict in Tuscaloosa, AL 2

A n u nP r AR 2:30
Morgan State vs. Florida A&M in Baltimore, MD 4
Lane vs. Tuskegee in Jackson, TN 6
Shaw vs. Johnson c. Smth in Raleigh, NC 6
HOMECOMINGS
Grambling State vs, Miss Valley State In Grambling, LA 1
Fort Valley State vs. Kentucky State in Fost Valley, GA 1
Norfolk State vs. Howard in Norfolk. VA 1
Saint Paul's vs. Lincoln (PA) in Lawrenceville, VA 1
NC A&T vs. Bethune-Cookman in Greensboro, NC 1:30
NC central vs. central State in Durham, Nc 1:30
SC State vs. Delaware State in Orangeburg, SC 1:30
Virginia State vs. Bowie State in Ettrick, VA 1:30
Savannah State vs. Edward Waters in Savannah, GA 2
Texas Southem vs. Alcom State in Houston, TX 2
W-Salem State vs. Hampton in Winston-Salem. NC 2
CLASSICS
68th Magic City Classic
Alabama State vs. Alabama A&M in Bimlingham. AL 2:30


MA@a m pg @fEgygh
10wlmf5mRwimili7
W L
Langston 7 2
Concordia 5 3
TenneSSee State 3 4
WVaState 2 8
Savannah State 1 5
N. C. Central 1 6
CentralState 1 7
Uncoln(Mo.) 0 7
EdwardWaters 0 8
TexasCollege 0 8
Cheyney 0 9
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Cedrick Hickman, RB, WSSU
* RUShad 10f 97 yardS On 9 CARIOS and
scored go-ahead TD on 12-yard an as
Rams got first 0. Datrion Lewis, So.,
QB, LANGSTON Completed 20 of 32
pu,.el. U.1,a.man.12iDost..annerr.
was as U.com...-ress so...,.: m.grs
CSFLtitle.
DEFENSE Dominique Harnet, So., DI.,
LANGSTON-8tacklesAforlosses,$sacks
foriossaf20yardsysSNU.
SPECIAL TEAMS London Theyor, PK,
WSSU Kicked 3&yard field goal and was
1-of-2 on PATs as Rams beat Bethune-
cosmal&10


.
*

1.SOUTH CAROLINA STATE (6-1) Handled Hampton, 21-
9. NEXT: SCSU homecoming vs. Delaware State
2. PRAIRIE VIEW A&M (5-1) Nipped Southem. 16-14.
NEXt Idle.
3. GRAMBLING STATE (4-3) Idle. NEXT: Homecoming vs.
Miss. Valley State'
4. FLORIDA A&M (4-2) Beat Norfolk State, 34-202 NEXT:
At Morgan State'
5. FAYETTEVILLE STATE (6-3) Subdued St. Augustine's
56-6 to clinch CIAA West title and spot in Nov.7 title game.
NEXt At Livingstone'
6. TUSKEGEE (6-2) Knocked Albany State from unbeaten
unks, 21-19. NEXT: At Lane.
7. SOUTHERN (4-3) Defeated by Prairie View, 16-14.
NEXT: At Arkansas-Pine Bluff.
8. ALBANY STATE (7-0) Lost to Tuskegee, 21-19 NEXT*
Hosting Morehouse.
9. VIRGINIA UNION (5-3) Knocked off Bowie State, 17-16.
NEXT:PlaysforCIAAEast.titlehostingElizabetitCitystate'
110. SHAW (6-2) Beat Livlngstone, 54-3, NEiXT: Hosts
Johnson 0. Smith.
(TIE) BOWIE STATE (6-3) Lost to Virginia Union, 17-16.
NExT: At virginia state


CONF
W L
4 0
3 1
3 1
3 2
2 3
2 3
2 3
1 8
0 4
0 0


CIAA CENTRAL INfERCOLLEGIATE
ATHLETicAssoclArroN
DIV ALL
E.1DMSION W L W L
Bowle State 5 1 6 3
Wginia Union 5 1 6 3
Eliz.CityState 4 2 6 3
9 ,State 3 3 5
Lincoin (PA) 0 0 3 8
W.Divisl0N
FayettevilleState 5 1 6 3
Shaw 4 2 7 2
St.Aujustine's 3 3 3 6
J. G. Smth 2 4 3 6
Chowan 2 4 2 7
lJvingstone 0 6 0 9
CIAAPLAYERSOF THE WEEK
OFF LINEMAN Larry McDonald. 5o DG, FBU
ECEIVE A KavIrs Modlic4 50, CHOWAN 8
:4.1.>. 123 enals I TE> us .ic inuit,
:FF BAD RICnaldMem1.1 Jr, RB FSU 8
's 87,><., mus sa.:
DEF LINEMAN Dailus Powell Jr. DE FSU -7
,a.sus a rn. 3,aus assewatumes, am
-8 EnriqueCox VUU. Fumbrerelu.r. 1*,.5yar.]
"s.00,ETwwili'"
DEF BAD Gregeny himr.erville Sr. CB FSLI
- '0
RO E Mervin Pape. Jr. Fr OB. JCSU 3 TD
no'-""*' ***
SPECIAL TE-MS 5tepnen Velasquee, PK, VUU
His PAT was difference in 17-16 win over BSU


SC State
Morgan State
FloridaA&M
NC A&T State
Norfolk State
Hampton
DelawareState
Bethune-Cookman
Howard
# W-Salem State
# Not eligible for title


MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
i.1FFENSE Curtife Pulley 400*7tulated lM
vaau d icial airee- l ?) passing y)..1 ;uroples
.ng 13.11 22 phis,; lor TD. area nd.erJ Ic.. Its.)
.3,riewant TE.
EEFEnsE AveryGrandr DBDSU-7180s,
a ss 1 enmen neurnea is want re, to
Vs Morgan State
no.:+iE Donclvious Payne Fr, RB NC AaT
-11) yesison21..are:v.itti2 TD- es Hongo
EPECIALTEAM2 KernarScariettJr.PAMSU
-la 8.10 is yard IIE10 godG I idit 10 Odlilage
The 55-yarder ties an MEAC facord.
LINEMAN Robert Okeafor, St., RT, FAMU*94%
oradespaocakes


FStJ Sports Photos
ALREADY IN: Head coach
Kenny Phillips of Fayetteville
State awaits CEAA title game
opponent.


Yw 1 Southemi4
West Chester 59, Cheyney 0

OCTOBER 24
Alabama State 24, Alcom State 17
Arkansas-Pine Bluff38, Edward Waters 12
Benedict 28, Fort Valley State 20
Chowan 33, Johnson C. Smith 22
Delaware State 35, Morgan State 22
Elizabeth City State 38, Saint Paul's 12
Fayetteville State 56, Saint Auggistine's 6
Florida A&M 34, Norfolk State 20 .
Jackson State 25, Miss Valley State 16
Kentucky State 21, Miles 8


.s, I
Photos by Joe Daniels
STILL ALIVE?: Elizabeth City State head coach
Waverly Tillar (1) could spoil things for Virginia

isa k oa n t I ans
title with a win Saturday vs. the Panthers in
Richmond. Damon Wilson's Bowie State squad
eams a tie with a win over Virginia State and a
VUU Ioss. The East Division winner would then
be determined by a three-way coin toss.

Going into play this weekend, Albany State
is third in the NCAA's Div. 11 Super Region II,
Morehouse is sixth, Benedict (6-3, 5-3) is sev-
enth and Fort Valley State is tenth.
FVSU hosts Kentucky State (5-4, 3-4) for
homecoming Saturday (1 p.m.). Benedict is at
Stillman.

SWAC
Prairie View A&M's 16-14 victory at
Southern Thursday puts Henry Frazier's
Panthers (5-1, 4-0) closer to playing for its fi rst
SWAC title in 45 years. With Thursday's win, the
Panthers now have wins over West Division rivals
Southern (4-3, 1-2) and Grambling State (4-3, 2-
1). in the same year for the first time in Frazier's
six-year tenure and lead the West Division by a
half-game over Grambling and Arkansas-Pine
Bluff. The Panthers are off this week.
StilllurkingareheadcoachMonteColeman's
Golden Lions of Arkansas-Pine Bluff (4-2, 2-1)
who host Southern in a key West Division battle
Saturday (2:30 p.m.).
In the East, Jackson State (2-5, 2-2). Alcorn
State (2-4, 2-2) and Alabama A&M (4-3, 1-2)
are tied atop the division with two losses each
headed into this weekend.
A&M and Alabama State (4-3, 1-3) hook
Up this weekend in the 68th Ala.eir City* Classic in
Birmingham (2:30 p.m.). Alcorn State travels to
Houston for Texas Southern's (2-4, 1-1) home-
coming (2 p.m.). Jackson State is off

MEAG
MEAC leader and defending champion
South Carolina State (6-1,4-0), coming off a 21-
9 win over Hampton last week, has homecoming
inOrangeburg.S.C.Saturdayvs.DelawanState
(2-5, 2-3). The Hornets handed Morgan State its
fit t MEAC loss of the season Saturday, 35-22.
MSUhostsFloridaA&M(5-2.3-l a Saturday
(4 p.m.) in a battle for second place in the MEAC.
N. C. A&T (5-3, 3-2) has its homecoming
in Greensboro, N.C. (1:30 p.m,) vs. Bethune-
Cookman (2-5, 1-3) while Norfolk State (3-4,
2-3) has its homecoming vs. Howard (2-5, 0-4).


CIAA
Kenny Phillips' Fayetteville State (6-3, 5-
1) squad thrashed St Augustine's 56-6 Saturday
to claim the CIAA West Division title and a spot
in Nov. 7 league championship game in Durham,
N. C.
After closing out the season Saturday (l:30
p.m.) at Livingstone (0-9. 0-6), Phillips will be
taking his team to the championship game for
the fourth time since the game was reinstituted in
2000. The Broncos claimed championship game
wins unmasatd i ion race, Bowie State (6-

3, 5-1), who could have booked a date opposite
FSU in the title game with a win Saturday over
1'h*gha lUAnt cold not Ht done, suffermg a

VUU (6-3, S-1) is now in the driver's seat and
needs a win Saturday (1 p.m.) over Elizabeth
City State (6-3, 4-2) in Richmond, (Va.) to claim
the division title and a date in Durham.
Here are the scenarios.
If Virginia Union defeats Elizabeth City State
Saturday and Bowie State prevails over Virginia
State, VUU and BSU will have identical 6-1 divi-
sion records but VUU will win the East by virtue
of its head-to-head win over BSU and represent
the East vs. Fayetteville State in next Saturday's
CIAA title game.
Should ECSU defeat VUU and Bowie State
get by Virginia State on the road Saturday in
Ettrick, Pa., Bowie State wins the outright East
Division title by virtue of a better divisional record
.(6-1).
If both VUU and BSU lose Saturday, it would
create a three-way tie for the East Division title
between ECSU, BSU and VUU with identical 5-2
division marks.
Anticipating the possibility of this three-way
tie, the CIAA released its tie-breaking procedures
a week ago and confirmed that the winner would
be determined by a coin toss after the first two
procedures (head-to-head and common division
opponents) still resulted in the three-way tie. The
coin toss would be administered by an indepdn-
dent accounting firm on Sunday, Nov. 1.

SIAC
In the SIAC, Thskegee (6-2, 6-1) took a big
step towards winning its fourth straight league title
with a big 21-19 victoly Saturday at Albany State
which knocked the Golden Rams (7-1, 6-1) from
the unbeaten-ranks and from atop the conference
standings.
Head coach Willie Slater's Golden Tigers
now need wins ovei reams at the bottom of the
league standings, this Saturday at winless Lane
(0-8, 0-7) and next Saturday at home vs. Stillman
(3-4, 2-5) to claim another title.
AlbanyStatewhoisatillaliveforanNCAA
Div. 11 playoff berth, has tough dates left against
Morehouse (6-2, 5-2) at home Saturday (2 p.m.)
and in Columbus, Ga. vs. Fort Valley State (5-4,
4-3) on Nov. 7 to close out the regular season,


championship opponunities, officiating services, and award recognition
throtigh.our player of the week and all-star programs."
UMES will continue to be a member of the MEAC, as the ECAC is
considered a secondary membership.
Established in 1938, the ECAC, a non-profit service organization,
sponsors.nearly 100 championships in 37 men's and women's sports and
assigns more than 4,400 officials in 12sports. It also administers nine affili-
ate sports organizations and six playing leagues.

Cheyney hires two track coaches
Cheyney University has elevated its'cross country and track and field
Programs with the full-time hiring of Mare Harrison and James Williams.
Harrison will direct the women's cross country and track and field squads
while Williams will coach the men's cross country and track and field pro-
gram.
"In today's culture of the NCAA stressing work/life balance, Cheyney
hired two mdividuals to lead the six NCAA sponsored sports (cross country,
indoor track and outdoor track)," stated China Jude Cheyney University's
Director of Athletics.
Most recently, Harrison served as the head of the University of the
District of Columbia Cross County and track and field program. Williams
served as the men's and women's cross country and track and field coach at
Cabrini College. He has guided the Cavalier men since the 2007-08 season
and was given the additional responsibilities of the women in 2009.


Make room for Prairie VieW
Southwestern Athletic Conference upstart Prairie View A&M has
joined defending MEAC champion South Carolina State in the Sports
Network Football Championship Subdivision Top 25.
Henry Frazier's Panthers of Prairie View (5-1), the No. 2 team in
the BCSP ratikings, received 269 votes to take the 25th spot in the poll
released Monday evening. It's the first time ever for the Panthers in the
regular season poll. The team finished 9-1 a season ago and was ranked
.
25th in the final poll.
South Carolina State (6-1), who has been ranked in the Sports
Network poll since the beginning of the season, is up to 10th in the latest
poll. The Bulldogs are the No. 1 BCSP team.

UMES joins the ECAC .
The University of Maryland Eastern Shore has joined the
Eastern College Athletic Conference. The announcement was made by
Commissioner Rudy Keeling and President Dan Mara.
The ECAC is the nation's largest athletic and the only multi-divisional
conference in the country with approximately 300 Division I. II, and III
college and universities. The ECAC membership covers 16 states and
stretches from Maine to North Carolina and westerly to Illinois.
"We are excited we are still expanding, and that colleges and univer-
sities see the value of our services," said Commissioner Keeling. "The
ECAC continues to deliver an enormous return to its members providing


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 28I-NOVEMBER 3, 2009 1


FINAL


IBCSP Notes




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