Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00853
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: October 21, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00853
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text






















D I ST'R I BUT E D I I M A E A D B O A D ( .l T E O V R 8

Volume 87 Number 8 IMIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


--Phaml Times pnoto/ Sandra J. Charity
Weeks before the City of Miami mayoral election, Miami
Commissioner Joe Sanchez speaks to The Miami Times
about his campaign.

Sanchez: I'm

seeking change

for Miami

By Sandra J. Charise
scharire @miammmesonhne.com
New leadership will emerge in the City of Miami in less
than two weeks as to two candidates vie for the mayoral
seat. Candidate Commissioner Joe Sanchez believes that he
is the man for the job.
"I am focusing on the needs of the community," he said.
A Cuban native, Sanchez traveled to Miami at the age of
Sve. He later graduated from Miami Senior High School and
enrolled in Miami Dade College.
Sanchez joined the Florida Highway Patrol in 1987 and
spent 11 years as a State Trooper then enlisted in the Unit-
ed ateseArmy Re ne. sdareer mapubil s rvice dmhim
mission seat in 1998. After ten years on the dais. Sanchez
wants to take Miami to the next level.
Yet, Sanchez has had to make decisions on the daas that
weren't too pleasing to the community.
Earlier this year, Sanchez supported the building of the
Martins ballpark staditun which he says will "provide jobs
Please turn to SANCHEZ TA


R M W M
O COSSIO8 10 Cl'8881H g


d a a .
m0 SlC V10 0 HCO
By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com
According to Dr. David McGriff, CEO of the Advocate program,
a program that monitors and provides treatment for domestic
violence, stress caused by the poor economy has increased do-
mestic violence cases by 40 percent. This startling announce-
ment was made on Saturday, Oct. 17, at The Commission on
the Status of Women's Domestic Violence Resource Fair. The
fair was held partially to draw attention to the fact that October
is Domestic Violence Month.
"It's been said to me that [Miami) Dade County has domestic
violence fatigue," said McGriff. "Well, we might be tired of hear-
ing about it, but we're not tired of committing it," he said.
The Resource Fair, held at Legion Park, was hosted by Rodney
.Baltimore, of HOT 105 FM-WHQT, and-drew around 25 spec-
tators, most of whom were children. Constance Gilbert, who
chairs the City of Miami Commission on the Status of Women,
attributed the low turnout among adults to the topic itself. .
"I think that because it's such a sensitive topic, people tend to
shy away from it," she said. But she was also glad that the chil-
dren were able to hear the information available.
Please turn to VIOLENCE 4A


326,,


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


SEE ARTICLE -



FIr st La visits M xaml

Obama urges young, old to
become "volunteers for life "
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


Making the decision to leave her corporate
job for a public service position was truly a sac-
rifice for First Lady Michelle Obama.
"My family and my friends started to worry
about my sanity," laughed Obama. "And my
friends thought I was throwing away a prom-
ising career and a lucrative paycheck. They
thought I was nuts."
But Obama did not Wallow in guilt. She knew
that serving others was her ultimate duty.
"It felt really good. It didn't matter how much
money I was making, it didn't matter how pres-
tigious my job seemed to others -- I knew I
was making an impact in the community that
Please turn to OBAMA 15B


--Miamirimes photos sandra J. charite


League (NFL) came to an end
for the former Miami Edison
Senior High School football
star early Sunday morning.
Howard, 20, was stabbed to
death after a fight broke out
following a school sponsored
dance at the University of Con-
necticut.
Please tur to HOWARD 6A


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
Antonio Gibson remembers
speaking to his cousin, Jasper
Howard, shortly after the Uni-
versity of Connecticut game in
which they defeated Louisville
38-25. Gibson, 28, recalls his
cousin was upset about the


game. .
"Being a cornerback, he was
upset because the ball was not
being thrown in the right direc-
tion," said Gibson. "I told him
he played a good game."
That would be Gibson's last
time speaking to his cousin.
The dream of someday play-
ing in the National Football


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


SUNDAY


TUESDAY


MONDAY


Obama finds ways
to create jobs
The political battle over a rising
JObless rate that has now hit 9.8
percent a 26-year-high is
largely an argument over the Obama
administration's $787 billion stimulus bill


Medical
expertswask
Wily,
Medical experts know Black
women die of breast cancer at
a much higher rate than white
women, but they don't know
exactly why.


~Q~i;me~e'


BREST ANCR URVVOR:TAE


FOrmer Ealson football star killed ;


as s om


8 90158 001) o


















I.


(liSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
"i:'nis""&:mmami. Florica 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Ementus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


II


--~C~-----lr--- ---------1 liirr~


1) I


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30 00 Foreign $60 00
7 percent sales tax for Flonda residents
Periodicals Postage PaId at Miami, Florida
Postmaster Send address changes to The Miami Times, PO. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person regardless of race, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Hating no person. fearing no person, the
Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief ther all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back


Candidates: We would like

to hear from all of you
ere was general disappointment when Tomas Re
galado and Michelle Spence-Jones --running for City
of Miami Mayor and IQistrict 5 commissioner respec-
tively-- missed an October 5 debate at the Mt. Sinai Mission-
ary Baptist Church. But many of those complaining seemed
to miss the larger point.
This debate was the only one scheduled to take place in
the Black community. There are no plans for another.
If the candidates do not meet here in the next twelve days,
many of Miami's Blacks will be asked to decide who deserves
their vote for both mayor and commissioner withorit hav-
ing properly heard from all of the candidates. Perhaps more
importantly, a candidate could be elected without having
heard from the Black community.
An administration that starts that way does not Ipode well,
for the Black community.
Have some of our candidates even dropped the pretense of
listening to us?
There is no guarantee that our plea will be heard. What
Spence-Jones and Regalado have in common (other than
busy schedules apparently) is that they are far the fundrais-
ing frontrunners in their respective campaigns. Frontrunner
status allows them to take risks; such as missing debates.
Regalado holds a fundraising lead of roughly $200,000
according to the City Clerk's office. Much of this funding has
goixe to Billboard advertising and other signage.
Sperice-Jones has raised more than $180,000. By con-
trast, her opponents have raised less than $27,000 com-
bined. One needs only to drive through district 5 to under-
stand the visibility advantage this confers.
In any election, a debate carries risks for the more visible
candidate.
A debate confers media exposure on you, but the media
cannot help but see your opponent as well. They will hear
your ideas; but they will also hear those of your opponent.
Minimizing this risk can be a winning strategy-for a can-
didate.
But it cannot be a winning strategy fof- the Black commu-
nity.
Does Miami's Black community not have the right to hear
conflicting ideas on how their city & Astrid shoiild 1 run?
The candidates should meet and exchange ideas as often as
possible. The advantage in this is twofold. Not only will dis-
trict 5's voters get an opportunity to weigh their options and
make an informed decision; but the winning candidate may
even implement the good ideas of their opponents.
Election day draws near, and we still have no way of know-
ing which candidate has the besides for the city. Before
November, commissioners, we would like the chance to de-
cide for ourselves.
Perhaps your next two weeks are already scheduled, and
the Black community should have asked you sooner.
But then again, perhaps we shouldn't have to ask.


tl


IW


1~li


. I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action . ."
Malcolm X


OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-21, 2009


S- ----


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How do you feel about juveniles being tried as adults?


$ 0 0 ( Eff
The Miam. Times welcomes and encourages leners on its editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback makes for a healthy dialogue among
ou. readersh, and the community letters must, however, be 150 words or less, brief and to the point, and may be edated For grammar, style and clarity. All letters must be st ned and
must mdude he name, address and telephone number of the writer for pur ones of confirming ourhorship Send letlers to- Letters to the Editor, The Miam. Times. 900 NW 5 b Street,
Miams, FL 33127, or 10< rhem to 305494-6211 Email. miameteditorial@ ellsoulb.nel


a fair system, that would at least
be decided on a case-by-case ba-
sis, with more leniencies toward
juveniles.
HENRY SPIVEY, 56
Retired, Liberty City

I think they
should be
treated as
adults. Maybe
they'll stop
messing with
people then. It
that means go-
ing to an adult
facility, then that's fine too. Pve
been robbed three times by juve-
niles, so my feeling is; it wouldn't
happen again if they'd kept them

a


LOCA OMNAY U OMNITYVNTS


BLACKS MUST CONi`ROL THEIR OW:N DESTINY


'I!


f


excitement regarding the City elections?
thusiasm about any of the can- point, all I see is fried fish din- friends or permanent enemies,
didates. The so-called frontrun- ners Tor the seniors, the Quid only permanent interest." I pray
ners.of the mayoral and City of pro quo arrangements with spe- that one day it will the "inter-
Miami Commission race seem cial interest who raise money, ests of the people" in Miami-
to offer the same type of cam- and the appeals to the public Dade County that will be served.
paign promises associated with that this time will be different. I
improving government. Well, guess the quote is accurate, "In Dr. Robert Malone Jr.
good luckI From my vantage politics there are no permanent .Miami


Local veterans protest against Spence-Jones
Dear Editor, Jones so I stayed a little longer attacked her character like at the M
to see what the problem was.. that. I do understand that this in this c
As I was driving down 62nd Having heard what the veter- is campaign season but no one protest,
Street last week, I saw olk local ans' story, the protest was un- deserves to be treated like that. time and
veterans were having a protest necessary and Michelle Spence- While I do support our lo- blame o
so I parked my car to see what Jones had "nothing to do" with cal veterans, Michelle Spence- an emba
was going on. The veterans were their issues. I am not a big fan Jones and the protest was not
protesting for the resignation of of Michelle Spence-Jones but called for. She had nothing to
Commissioner Michelle Spence- the veterans should not have do with them not paying rent


___


I)KEDC. If anyone else
ity decides to throw a
please don't waste my
make sure you put the
n the right people. What
rrassmentl.

Rashida Moseley,
Little Haiti


The Public Health Trust board of Jackson Health System
have egg on their faces after unanimously approving spending
up to $1.8 million to pay a consulting firm to lead a massive

firm Qorval, after news broke.that the firm had brought in a
contractor who was linked to fraud allegations at his former
companyinIllinals. .........

A lot of people are losing their homes due to foreclosure af-
ter being laid off from their jobs during the current recession.
One group of first-time homeowners who have surprisingly
one of the lowest foreclosure rates in the Habitat for Human-
ity. Habitat's local foreclosure rate is less than one percent,
compared to nearly one in four homeowners in the area who
are either in, foreclosure or behind on payments. Over the
years, volunteers and homeowners have built more than 700
homes in Miami-Dade. Two Habitat chapters have built more
than 50 homes in the Florida Keys. Nationally, the organize~
tion's foreclosure rate is less than two percent.
********
Miamians who had experienced two straight of weeks of
weather in the upper 90 degree-range were-happy to see tem-
peratures dip about 20 degrees between Saturday and Sun-
day afternoon,
winess
President Barack Obama will be in Miami Monday night
to help the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in
the coming election. Obama is slated to headline an Oct. 26
fundraiser in Miami for House and Senate candidates that
will be organized by U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz of
Weston and other Florida Democrats.
The trip would be Obama's second to Florida since he was
elected president. His first and only visit so far was on Feb.
10, when he held a town hall meeting in Fort Myers to pro- -
mote his economic stimulus plan.
********
Miami-Dade Commissioners are caught in a bind since the
Herald published the fact that all the members had money
in their Surplus Office funds ranging from $59,000 to $1.15
million. The paper says: Commissioners can't delay the inevi-
table any loilger. Salary cuts are long overdue, and any left
over money in those county offices should be approved by the
entire commission for needed programs instead of used as .a
patronage pot disguised as a rainy day fund.


should be charged as adults. Es-
pecially if they're 16, or 17 years
old. They should know the law by
then. But we should probably be
lenient with younger people and
lesser offenses. If they're around
elementary school age and com-
mitting crimes, they're probably
just doing what they saw on TV.
DARRYL WIGFALL, 34
Unemployed, Liberty City
I think if .
they do an .
adult thing, ,
they need to do
adult time. So .
if the crime fits -
then yes. Even
if it means they
end up getting '.
put in with
adult rneans I'd .
sixpport that. They did the crime,
they can do the time. .
.
WICKENSON AUGUSTIN, 19
Student, Miami

Yes; because the kids should.
know better. The law is the same
for everybody. There's really too


JACKIE MENARD, 21


many excuses
being put out
there, but the
truth is they
didn't have
to do what-
evers they did.
There's always
someone you
can go to if you
really need help, like family. So
when you. do commit an adult
crime, you have to expect to be
treated like an adult. If you live
your life that way; you'll pay for


I think if they have the nerve
to do the crime,
then they can
do the time.
For example;
taking some-
one's life away
is murder no
matter what
the victim's
age. That person lost their life, so
the killer should face the same
consequences regardless of age
as well. The victim is just as
dead. I think they should be tried
as adults in murder cases at
least. Nowadays, kids in middle
school are stabbing each other
and bringing weapons to school.


LEWIS WILLIAMS, 61


No, I think
it's wrong. If
you're a ju-
venile, you
should go
through the ju-
venile system.
Some juveniles
might have committed some bad
crimes, but many get caught up
in bad situations. Just like the
people on death row for rapes be-
fore there was DNA evidence. In


KEVIN RAINES, 36
Student, Miami
0
Sure; with-
in reason. If
it's murder or
a sexual of-
fense or some-
thing serious
like that, they I


5 A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


\~ )~( T It


CopyrighteAMetMMI- -




Syndicatedfoidenf~



Available from Commercial News Providers


Where is the
Dear Editor,

As I ride through Liberty City
and see all the campaign signs
I ponder the question, "Where
is the excitement?" Two major
races will be decided in Novem-
ber and there is very little 6n-










, , --I--- --


BV Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimesonline.com
Miami resident Bernice Shorter Meares has been
affected by cancer.
Two years ago while caring for her son, Kevin
Meares, who was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma, a
form of bone cancer, Shorter Meares found a lump
on her breast. After a trip to the doctor, she found
out that she had breast cancer.
Shorter Meares, 54, lost her son in 2007 but was
determined to be a survivor. She is a two-year sur-
vivor.
"It wasn't easy but I knew I had to fight this thing,"
said Shorter Meares, as she joined hundreds of
other supporters at the annual Susan G. Komen
Race for the Cure Walk held at Bayfront Park on
SaO survivors shared similar sentiments with
Shorter- Meares.
Kelly Robertson, 33 and a mother of two, found
Out she had breast cancer after a routine checkup.
"I was scared because I lost so many friends and
family members to breast cancer and I didn't want
to become another victim," she said.
Also a two-year survivor, Robertson is grateful to
have made it. She said without the love of her fam-
ily and knowing that she didn't want her kids to live
their life without her, she had to fight the cancer.
"I am so in love with life than I ever was before,"
said an emotional Robertson. "This disease can re-
ally take a toll on you if you allow it. There were so
many times that I wanted to give up and quit but
those four eyes [her children's'] helped me to press
on."
Breast cancer is the most common type of
cancer among women in the United States, ac-
cording to the University of Miami, Sylvester
Comprehensive-Cancer Center. Breast cancer
diagnosis is higher for young Black women un-
der 40 rather than Black women over the age of
40, according to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure
Circle of Promise. Black women are more likely to
die from breast cancer than White women.
nThe disparity existtsolaregel because Bleaccokn
status, and a fear of diagnosis.
Helen Forbes who traveled with her friend, Sha-
H it domth t ul eB a etfor t &to
the doctor after discovering a lump on her breast.
Fo" thou t it would eventually go away," said
'
But it didn't. Forbes was diagnosed last Febru-
"Y'
For Blacks, attending routine doctor appoint-
ments does not guarantee detection of breast can-
cer.


ggy


M 8 HOW


f t OS06f U


Ihk


VIOLENCE
continued from 1A

"I'm appreciative of those
who did turn out, and I'm
pleased that the focus was on
the children," she said.
Kim Sands, Legion Park
Manager, said much the same.
"It's important that they hear
this early in life," she said. It
is indeed important, -as more
than eight million .children
witness domestic violence
each year, but many grow up
viewing the behavior as nor-
mal according to information
released by the Girls .Advo-
cacy Project, one of the many
organizations in attendance.
Constance Johnson, Vice
Chair of the Commission on
the Status of Women said
much the same. "Children
don't know what domestic vio-
lence is. They see it every day.
They're involved in it directly
every day. The purpose of this
fair is to bring that awareness

toBthem,"tshens Its are in-
formed about domestic vio-
len ithe
B thore admitted 1as
much. I don't know a ot

o o m ee eb ta
can help you are right in this
room," he said.
McGriff explained the high
incidence of domestic violence
in Miami-Dade.
"Miami-Dade County hats


i


BLACKS MUST CONTRC)L THEIR OWN DESTINY


-IVliamiTimes photo/Tariq Osborne
.
Constance Gilbert, chairwoman of the City of MiamI Com-
. mission on the Status of Women, stands before posters on
domestic violence made by children at the Dorothy M. Wal-
lace COPE Center.


"Current screening guidelines are not
sufficient in detecting breast cancer in
African-American patients because the
disease has already developed in over
10 percent of these women by age
40," said Leonidas G. Koniaris,
M.D., associate professor in
the DeWitttDauS try Fa2
su cal oncol s th Syl-
gi ogi

,of nill'o rehensive Cancer Center, part
However, even with earlier diagnosis, our anal-
sw tcmvered s o nwo b r t
cancer from receiving the latest, most specific treat-
.
ments.
Still, Shorter Meares advises women the best
way to prevent breast cancer is to "stay on top of
their health, exercise, and pray." Most important-
ly, she said, "You have to take care of yourself."


two county-run shelters for
domestic violence victims
and one that is independent
but receives county funds "
he- said. "In other places, tl e
shelters are not connected to
government, and thus can
speak up more about these
issues. That is where the ad-
places." Events like the re-
d eth rso eof mmm itto
here, he explained.
While none present stepped
forward as domestic violence
victims, Valerie Stallworth,
who brought her 11-year-old


daughter Nicole as part of her
Girl Scout training still be-
lieved the event was worth-
while. "It was very informa-
tive she said. "They gave out
a lot of resources, not only for
people who are victims, but so
you can help someone else as
we} cipating organizations
were; Safe Space, The Lodge,
T Gd osca e Rcoagram
link, and the Girl Scouts of
America. Each group was
awarded a certificate for its
sustained efforts in the com-
munity.


A 4 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 21-27 9


Black women and breast cancer


"I promise that I will have an


rTII~


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Teachers overwhelmingly approve new contract


1 EPA est. MPG hwy.: Impala LT (with 3.SL VS) 29, Avalon 28,
2 Only on 20% of vehicles available to dealers as of 9/21/09. Includes Auto Show Bonus Cash. Residency restrictions apply. See dealer for details. Take delivery by 11/2/09.
3 Monthly payment is $13.89 for every $1,000 financed. Example down payment Is 9.4%. Some customers will not qualify. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Take delivery by 11/2/09.
4 Based on GM Mid-Utility Crossover segment and Traverse FWD with an EPA est.17 MPG city, 24 hwy. Excludes other GM vehicles.
5 includes all offers. Includes Auto Show Bonus lash. Residency restrictions apply. See dealer for details. Take delivery by 11/2/09.
6 Monthly payment is $16.67 for every $1,000 financed. Average example down payment 1510.7%. Some customers will not qualify. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for detaIls. Take delivery by 11/2/09.
7 Example based on survey. Each dealer sets its own price. Your payments may vary. Payments are for a 2010 Chevy Malibu LS with an MSRP of $22,545. 39 monthly payments total $8,929. Option to purchase at lease end for an amount to be determined at
lease signing. GMAC must approve lease. Take delivery by 11/2/09. Mileap charge (f $.15/mile over 39,000 miles. Lessee pays for excess wear. Not available with other offers. Residency restrictions apply.
8 Retum between 30 and 60 days with less than 4,000 miles. Not available with some other offers.0ther restrictions apply. Take delivery by 11/30/09.
9 Visit onstar.com for details and system Ilmitations.
The names, emblems, slogans, vehicle body designs, and other marks appearing in this document are the trademarks and/or service marks of General Motors, its subsidiaries, affiliates, or IIcensors.
@2009 General Motors. Buckle up, America!1-800-950-2438 or thevy.com


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWVN DESTINY


.


-


_ ~ Cc -


Available from Commercial NV


- -


The District's current in-
surer had asked for increases
of 28 percent over a one-year
period. Cost savings in opera-
tional and administrative ar-
eas identified by UTD provided
the necessary funding for the
agreement. .
This month, UTD members
will see repayment of wages
which were withheld to carry
the District through the bud-
get crunch. This will be fol-
lowed by a step increase in
December. The contract also
addresses the salary commit-
ment already made to early-
career teachers. Employer


paid healthcare will remain an
option for teachers as well.
All this week, UTD members
have been voting online on the
tentative agreement reached
with the district's negotiators
on October 5, voting conclud-
ed at the close of business to-
day. In the final tally, 14,247
UTD unit members voted, with
9,742 voting iti favor and 4,505
voting against ratification.
Now that employees in the
UTD bargaining unit have
voted, the school board is ex-
pected to approve the contract
at their regular meeting this
evening.


The Miami Times stajJreport

. Represented by United
'I'eachers of Dade (UTD), teach-
ers and other school employees
have approved a new contract
by a margin of 68 percent to
32 percent. The new contract
is a three-year agreement that
includes salary increases for
the 2009-10 school year. It
also includes a step increase.
Sahiries for the next two school
years will be renegotiated at a
later date. The agreement also
includes a 100 percent em-
ployer-funded option for em-
ployees' health insurance.


* *


*
*
"


- *


EPA E5T. 29 MPG HWY.
BETTER HWV. FUEL ECONOMY THAN
A COMPARABLE TOYOTA AVALON'



EPA EST. 24 MPG HWY.
BEST FUEL ECONOMY OF ANY
B-PASSENGER CROSSOVER'


EPA EST. 30 MPG HWY.


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END THE INCONVENIENCE OF EMPTY NEWSPAPER BOXES,
FIGHTING THE WEATHER AND HUNTING DOWN BACK COPIES




fkR AND EWER m@
;DE PART ME NT By Ana Maria Monte Rores


The Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department is pleased to wel-

formed about Miami-Dade's tap water, how to use it wisely and all the
services provided by the Department. Our goal is to serve the residents
and businesses of Miami-Dade County by providing high-quality drink-
ing water and wastewater services, by protecting public health and by
acting in the best interest of our environment.
We expect that these informative messages will pmvide much informa-
tion about our services, but if there is anything we can do to better
serve you, please let us know. You can stop by one of our offices, call
us, or visit our website at: www.miamidade.gov/wasd
Besides lending optimum services to the residents of Miami-Dade
County in all matters related to our water supply and our wastewater -
system, our goal is to protect the public health and to take favorable
measures for our environment,
The Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department (WASD), a de-
partment of Miami-Dade County, is one of the largest public utilities in
the United States, providing direct service to more than 420,000 cus-
tomers. In addition, the Department provides water and wastewater
services to the unincorporated areas of Miami-Dade County, wholesale
water service to 14 municipalities and wholesale wastewater service to
11 municipalities.
Our Department draws approximately 347 million gallons of water
every day from the Blscayne AquIfer for consumer use. The water is
then pumped to one of our water treatment facilities where it is made
potable and dispersed through a common distribution system. HIghly
trained microbiologists, chemists and water treatment specialists con-
duct or supervise more than 100,000 tests of water samples each year
and the County's water supply consistently exceeds both state and fed-
eral drinking water standards.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


with the study. The study
concluded that Medicare-age
Black men with breast cancer
were three times more likely to
die from the disease than white
men, but Koniaris contends
that there are too few cases to
draw such conclusions. "It's
one in 100 breast cance? pa-
tients," he said. I don't think
there is a demonstrable dis~
parity [between Black male
breast cancer cases and those
of whites]. But when it'sthat
uncommon it's hard to know.
It's a different entity," he said.
Male breast cancer is rare'
with about 1,900 cases ex-
pected to be diagnosed this
year nationwide. This yeat, it
is likely that 440 men will die
from the illness.


where male breast
cancer is concerned.
According to a study
conducted by a team
of researchers at Co-
lumbia University,
New York, NY, men
with breast cancer
show the same racial
disparities in survival
as do women' with the
disease. DR. LE
The study demon- KON
stated that overall,
Black women have less breast
cancer overall than other wom-
en. But when they get it, they
get it so young, in such a viru-
lent form, that they should start
mammograms and other diag-
nostic exams at .age 33 rather
than the usual age of 40.


. This roughly coin-
' cides with Koniaris's
view. "Overall it's less
, common," he said.
"African-Americans
(men and women)
are less likely to de-
yelop breast cancer,
but when they do it
happens at a younger
age."
When asked why
this should be, Ko-


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@rniarnitimesonline.com

When most men think of
breast cancer, their concern is
how to be effective caregivers
when it strikes a female loved
one. But men themselves can
be struck by this sometimes-
deadly affliction. :
According to Dr. Leonidas
Koniaris, roughly one in 100
breast cancer cases in the
United States occur in men.
Koniaris is an associate pro-
fessor in the DeWitt. Daughter
Family Department of Surgery,
and surgical oncologist at the
Sylvester Comprehensive Can-
cer Center, part of the Univer-
sity of Miami Health System.
There is still much dispute


HOWARD
continued from 1A

"His personality, smile and
always laughing, I am defi-
nitely going to miss him," said
Gibson, who considered How-
ard almost brother after How-
ard's mother took him at the
age of 12. Gibson admits that
he only missed three or four
of Howard's games in his life-
time
Howard made a tremendous
impact in the Little Haiti com-
.
mumty.
Howard, 20, a junior starting
cornerback for UConn, was the
first person in his family to go
to college. He was determined
to break barriers and make it

tol{ dN Bulluck, who tutored
at Edison Senior High, recalls
the ambitious youth. '
"One of the few kids who
showed up to the tutoring pro-
gram," she said. While the oth-
er athletes were chased down
to attend the tutoring session,
Howard came willingly and
became an example said Bul-
luck.
Known as Jazz by his friends,
Howard graduated Edison and
received a full scholarship to
UConn where he would perfect
his football skills to the next
level and escape the violence
plaguing the streets of Miami.
He hoped to someday return
home and take care of his
mother and two sisters.
Connecticut Police are inves-
tigating the stabbing. Another


niaris said that it is
uncertain. "It's either environ-
mental or genetic," he said.
"The functional thing is that
they do get it earlier; particu-
larly before the age of 40 or
45."
Where male breast cancer is
concerned, Koniaris disagreed


~~


-The Miami Times photo/ Sandra J. Charity

Antonio Gibson reflects on
his cousin, Jasper Howard,
Who was killed early Sunday
morning at the University of
Connecticut.
young man was also injured
in the incident. He was treated
and released.
Police have not made a full
arrest in Howard's death but a
man is being questioned about
the stabbing death.
Howard's mom, Joanglia,
was unavailable for comment
as she flew to Connecticut to
claim the body. She will not
fly back alone on Wednesday.
Howard's teammates will ac-
company his mother for the
trip back to Miami.
The funeral arrangements
are incomplete and the family
is currently accepting dona-
tions.


** *


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* * *
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* *


6A THE MIAMI TIMES. OCTOBER.21-27, 2009 1


Ongoing investigation


Men can also suffer breast cancer


.. .

"'///A \
ONIDAS
IARIS


Corr *AH *l6 It~ ~c r


Capyrighted Material


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. -










I I


SANCHEZ
continued from 1A

f or everyone in this commu-
nity including the Black com-
munity and opportunities for
everyone."
Sanchez says the City's in-
vestment in the project is
roughly $23.5 million but the
remaining funds for the project
were generated from tourism
tax. One of his main objectives
is to prevent the City from go-
ing bankrupt.
As mayor, Sanchez has some
changes that he wants to make
so that the City's operation win
be on a full course.
Onkof his orders of business .
is changing administration but
Sanchez says the changes will


littlee ,~c,~rRiver Farmas celebrates


:


___


Citi never sleeps"


_ Illlnaa~~~8n~uunm~il~urn~n~ua~w


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


not be drastic. .
Unlike his opponent, Tomas
Regalado, Sanchez will not
change the Chief of Police John
Timoney. "Timoney has helped
to improve that department,"
says Sanchez, "so I will not re-
move him but my pledge to the
community is my administra-
tion will represent the diversity
of the city."
Another change for Sanchez
as mayor is putting less in the
pension which is costing tax-
payers almost $100 million, he
says.
"Every dollar that comes into
the City of Miami, 80 percent
goes to pension, salary and ben-
efit," said Sanchez.. He argues
that the pensions contributed
to- a quarter of the recent bud-


get.
"We need to have a govern-
ment that will live within their
needs. We need a mayor that
will address these issues and
lead the City in a fiscally re-
sponsible financial track."
In addition to continue to pro-
mote sustainability within the
City, Sanchez wants to incor-
porate industries such as mu-
sic, film, medical marine, infor-
mational technology to promote
Miami as a more national and
international city.
At a recent debate held in Lib-
erty City, Sanchez admits that
he was baffled that his oppo-
rient, Regalado, did not attend.
He insists that his opponent is
focused on the "Cuban vote."
"I believe that we should


reach out to everyone in the
community, no matter the col-
or."
Truly, the Black community
has heard its share of prom-
ises, but so many have gone
unfulfilled. Where the plight of
the City, with the increase in
crime, poverty and unemploy-
ment is concerned; Sanchez
pledges he will be the mayor
that will "champion" for the city
in Washington D.C. to make
sure that we receive the avail-
able resources that will benefit
the community.
The time of leadership is need-
ed but Sanchez says he doesn't
bring promises.
"I will not make promises but I
will do the best I can to provide
opportunities," he said.


Special to the Entes
Little River Farms Neighborhood
Association held their annual
"Day of Fun and Togetherness"
at the Henry E. S. Reeves E1-
ementary School on Saturday.
Reeves Elementary has earned
a double "A" under the Gover-
nor's A Plus Assistance Plan
and is an "Academy of Applied
Technology" magnet school un-
der the leadership and guidance
of Principal Julian E. Gibbs.
The "Day of Fun" was a suc-
cess as many of the neighbor-
hood members came out to
enjoy the free food, music and
activities that were held on the
school grounds. The Day of Fun
and Togetherness was held to
celebrate the success of the
neighborhood and to also en-
courage others to become active
within the neighborhood asso-
ciation.
The Little River Farms Neigh-
borhood Association was estab-


listed in 1984 with a mission
to promote the safety and well
being of families in the Little
River Farms Community, which
extends from: North to 1196
Street; South to 103" Street;
between 22nd Avenue and 17m
Avenue. The association meets
at 7 p.m. on the last Tuesday
of each month with the excep-
tion of March, June, July and
December at Henry E. S. Reeves
Elementary School, which is lo-
cated at 2005 N.W. 111m Street
This is a prime location as.
many of the community mem-
bers have either attended or
currently have family members
that are enrolled in the school.
Present at the meetings are
representatives from the Metro-
Dade Police Department (Crime
Watch), the District 2 Commis-
sioner's Office and members
of the School's administrative
staff. Here all of the stakehold-
ers come together to voice their
concerns and render their sug-


II


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Citl's Olffice of Homerownership Preservation


Neighborhood Housing Services of Sourth Florida


S7A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


Sanchez: My opponent is only concerned about 'Hispanic votes


Provding stab lt S c rn h u u e iii o mte o h li g f mle e p t er h m s a d atn





SECTION B


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The Miami Timnes


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER' 21-27, 2009)


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OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


OITCES N B


I~i~~~


Of -,
W ;9:
Gwen S. Cherry Black Women Lawyers Association general
membership meeting last Thursday focused attention on Do-
mestic Violence.Pictured: County Court Judge RodneySmith
speaks with the attendees.


Round Up Day at St. Mark
Hee-hawl It's -that time again
to round 'em up at St. Mark Mis-
sionary Baptist Church October
25th at 11 a.m. service for our
Annual Round Up Day with Pas-
tor Joseph Williams preaching.
All old members and friends
are cordially invited to celebrate
with us. Theme: "Reunited and
it feels so goodl" Come in West-
ern or dress down attire and
worship again with us in the
name of Jesus.
Food will be served after ser-


St. John in Overltownn 18uth nului day celebration


~'Y~rrrr ~r*r* rlll~ *C *


Ilur


Presenters included Judge Rodney
Smith, a Miami native, who recounted how
helpless he feels as a judge when a victim
of domestic violence recants and refuses
to go forward although the medical re-
ports and pictures depict the violence that
person has endured.'
"It is frustrating," he said.
Roslyn Parker, from Safespace, spoke
of the shame that surrounds domestic
violence. A former victim of domestic vio-
lence, Parker said it took her 25 years to
be able to speak about the abuse she en-
dured. -
Other attendees included Judge Judith
Rubenstein; Administrative Law Judge
June McKinney; Public Defender Car-
los Martinez; Executive Board members,
Flora Jackson Holmes, President; Bo-


nita Jones-Peabody, First Vice President;
Cheryl Linton Barnes Robinson, Presi-
dent-Elect; Tanya Brinkley, Treasurer;
Tenikka Cunningham, Secretary; Marie
Jo Toussaint; Nikki Simon; and Patricia
Henrys. Members of the Miami-Dade Po-
lice Department, the State Attorney Office
and the Public Defenders Office were on
hand to.explain.the processing of domes-
tic violence offenders from arrest through
prosecution,
Gwen S. Cherry Black Women's Lawyers
Association was named in honor of Gwen
Sawyer Cherry, the first Black woman to
be elected to the Florida House of Repre-
sentatives and the first Black female prac-
tice law in Miami-Dade County. The mem-
bers of GSCBWLA practice law in a vast
variety of area and many are judges.


Special to the Times
One in every four women will experience
domestic violerice in her lifetime, accord-
ing to National Coalition Against Domestic
Violence. That was the topic of discussion
as members of the Gwen S. Cherry Black
Women's Lawyers Association (GSCBWLA)
held their general membership meeting at
the Thomas E. Lawson Courthouse Cen-
ter, in honor of Domestic Violence Aware-
ness Month.
"Domestic violence affects everyone the
victim, the offender, children, families and
society. We never had the luxury of look-
ing away, and certainly it is now even more
important that we don't turn our backs on
this issue," said 01anike Adebayo, board
member.and organizer of the event.


of Jacksonville, Fl., and the
President of the Florida Gen-
eral Baptist Convention, USA.
Everyone is invited to come
and here these men of God
bring a powerful message.
The colors for the day is red
white and blue.
Reverend Charles E. Upt-
grow, Sr., Assistant Pastor,
Deaconess Christine Thomp-
son, Unity Chairperson.


On Sunday, St. John will
observe it's 18th annual uni-
ty day celebration. The 7:30
a.m., speaker will be Minister
Nathaniel J. Wilcox, Chair-
man of PULSE and a member
of Apostolic Revival Center.
Minister Wilcox is a grand-
child of St. John. The 11
a.m.,. speaker is Rev. James
B. Sampson, Pastor of First
New Zion Missionary Baptist


REV.JAMS B.SAMSON


- .. . ............


vice-


The Miami Times


MIAMI TIE


~PFY


Black women lawyers address domestic violence


REV. JOSEPH WILLIAMS





BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


11lB THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


-


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* *


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* * ** *


*
**


* *


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-Co Atenal -



Syndicated Content -


Availabbe from Commercial.News Providers


purl clQI lrre











, ,


Reunion. Classmates are urged
to reconnect through the con-
tact information listed below,
providing your. address, phone,
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion6t5@cfl.
rr.com
********
Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is calling all former
cheerleaders, majorettes, drill
team, dance line, flagettes and
band members for their upcom-
ing Alumni Pep Rally. 305- 804-
5371 or 786-256-2609.
********
National Investment Devel-
opment (NID) Housing Coun-
seling Agency, a HUD approved
organization, is offering free
Housing and Legal Counseling
for Homeowners at the Experts
Resource Community Center,
9 a.m. 5 p.m., M-F. Call 305-
652-7616 or 786-512-7400 or
email:. 1green@expertsresources.
com or lougreen2@yahoo.com
for appointments.
********
Miami Jackson Alumni Asso-
clation is seeking Reunion Or-
ganizing Committee Representa-
tives from the Classes of 1981
-2008 to call 305-904-5371 or
786-256-2609.


I


j


w W

age

d
20215 NW 2" Ave.
Suite #2* Miami, FL33169
www.dentistgrant.net


I I


The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payments or be reimbursed for payment for any


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWNN DESTINY


or as faithful as we should have
been. We return to the old and
familiar past relationships,
addictions, and mindsets. Why
in the world do we believe that
we will get some relief from
them, or these old things will
help us now when they didn't
work in the first place? I cer-
tainly didn't think clearly I
just returned to what was fa-
miliar.
When Jesus met the disci-
ples again at the Sea of Galilee
where they had gone fishing, He
asked them if they had caught
anything (similar to asking us
if the old ways worked for us
this time), and they replied
that they had not. He then told
them to try a different location
to cast their nets, and when
they obeyed Him, they were
extremely successful. They not


only caught fish, but an abun-
dance of fish! After they came
on shore, they saw that Jesus
had already prepared a meal
of fish for them. Is this not a
marvelous thing?! Though Je-
sus required them to put forth
an effort to help themselves, He
already had what they needed,
and what they were looking for.
Don't be discouraged, dear
saints. Just because Jesus is
requiring something of you that
you might think is too difficult,
know that He knows what you
are able to accomplish. The
older saints used to say that if
\ve made one step, He would
make two.' Step out in faith. He
already knows what you need,
and He has it ready for you. No
matter what the enemy might
say, our Lord is willing and
ready to bless us.


and Wednesdays, and going
your own way and doing your
own thing the rest of the week?
I am not being critical or
judgmental, so don't take of-
fense, dear readers! I just want
you to consider if this might
be what is happening in your
life. Or have you done what the
disciples did go back to what
they used to do because they
did not know the new thing
that they were supposed to be
doing? Have you done as I have
in the past (thank God it is the
past!), and gone back to my
own way of doing things and
making things work out when I
believed that God was just not
moving as quickly as I needed
Him to? Often we feel that we
are not worthy of the blessings
anyway because we know that
we have not been as obedient


after such a momentous occa-
sion took place (Jesus' resur-
rection); these men went back
to what they were familiar -
fishing. Jesus did want them
to fish, but instead of fishing in
the sea, He wanted them to fish
for men. These men were dis-
appointed. They felt that they
had failed Jesus. They believed
that when He needed them the
most, they fled and denied that
they even knew Him. They were
not disappointed in Him, but in
themselves. May I suggest that
you consider that some part of
. your disappointment in unan-
swered prayers could be your
disappointment in. yourself?
Could it possibly be that you
know that you have not bepn
sincere and devoted in your
worship?1Have you been wishy-
washy in church on Sundays


least does not
happen when
we want it to),
dis ap p oin t -
ment and dis-
couragement
lift up their
ugly heads. In
John 21, Je-
sus had been crucified, buried,
and raised. He has already ap-
peared to some of the disciples
on their 'Walk to Emmaus.'
It is important to note that


Last week, Ihopefully encour-
aged you to remember the past
blessings of the Lord. I do not
want you to just to bask in them
as some long ago memories,
but think of the past blessings
to remind you and to hope for
future blessings. As I was read-
ing a devotion this morning on
John 21: 1 -14, I thought what
happens many times when we
do forget the past blessings.
When we expect something
that does not happen (or at


a n a a &
W W

.
Serving the community since 1984 -


tents. The symposium will be
held in the Ira C. Clark Diagnos-
tic Treatment Center, Room 259,
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Satur-
day, Oct. 24. Dianah Hill at 305-
336-95.15.


********
Sunshine slopers' Ski Club
will have their 20* anniversary
dinner dance at the Polish Amer-
ican Club starting at 7 p.m., Sat-
urday, Oct. 24.
********
Lifting Young Lions Foun-
dation of Excellence (LYLFOE)
is hosting its Fourth Annual
Scholarship Awards Program for
scholarship recipients at Florida
Memorial University on Satur-
day, Oct. 24. Dr. George Davis,
Jr., 305-790-7196.
********
You are invited to take part
in a workshop to learn about in-
formative findings of the City of
Miami DrillDown: "Mianii Neigh-
borhoods Primed for Investment"
which will take place at the Mi-
ami City Hall in Coconut Grove,
at 2 p.m., MondAy, Oct. 26.

********
NAACP of Miami-Dade will
host a branch meeting at New
Birth. Cathedral in Opa-locka at
7 p.m., Oct. 26.
********
Jackson Health System will
host its third annual Small Busi-
ness Vendor Day Workshop at
theIraC.ClarkDiagnosticTreat-
ment Center, from 8:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 29.
********
There will be a charter bus
going to Fort Valley, Ga. for the
Fort Valley State vs. Kentucky
State University Homecoming
football game on Oct. 31. The
bus will depart from Coconut


Grove's Home Depot Shopping
Plaza at 8 p.m., Thursday, Oct.
29. 305-299-4595.
********
Applications are now being
accepted for the third annual
High School Black Male Bacca-
laureate Service. The first meet-
ing will be held at the African
American Research Library and
Cultural Center in Fort Lauder-
dale,. from 10:30 a.m. 12:30
p.m., Saturday, Oct. 31. Friends
of Children, 954-578-8399.
********
Miami Northwestern Senior
High School will hold their 106
annual College Fair at the Lee R.
Perry Sports Complex, from 6 -
9:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 4.
305-836-0991.
********
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion will host a Royal Interna-
tional Tea Party recognizing Del-
egates from 17 countries visiting
as part of the U.S. Department.
of State's International Visitor
Leadership Program (IVLP), the
State Departments number one
Public Diplomacy tool. The event
will take place at the Mahogany
Grille in Miami Gardens at 6
p.m., Thursday, Nov. 5. 305-
270-4099.


The eighth annual Grace Ja-
maican Jerk Festival, a musi-
cal and cultural feast, will take
place in the City of Sunrise,
Markham Park on Sunday, Nov.
8. Jamaican Jerk Festival, 305-
917-0252 or info@jerkfestival.
com
********
Miami-Dade Arthritis Walk
will place in the Amusement Area
at Crandon Parkin Key Biscayne,
starting at 8 a.m., Saturday, Nov.
14. www.2009awmiamiwalk.
kintera.0rg
********
South Florida Super Bowl
Host Committee will host their
kickoff luncheon at the Land
Shark Stadium, from 11:30 a.m.
- 1:30 p.m., Monday, Dec. 7.
305-614-7555.
.
********
The fourth annual World
Salsa Championships will take
place at Hard Rock Live at the
Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Ca-
sino on Dec. 17-19 .
********
Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010


and Workshops in the Media
Center, 6-8:30 p.m, Thurs-
day, Oct. 22. Bessie Legrant,
305.696.4161 ext. 2227 or
email: blegrant@dadeschools.
net
********
The community is invited to
attend Family Reading Night at
Carol City Middle School in the
Media Center at 6:30 p.m., Oct.
22. 305-624-2652,
********
The "Natural World, of Big
Cypress" exhibit opening and
premiere screening will be held
at the Deering Estate at Cutler
at 7 p.m., Friday, Oct. 23. South
Florida National Parks Trust,
305-665-4769 or info@south-
floridaparks.org.
********
South Dade residents are en-
couraged to attend a foreclosure
prevention workshop provided
by Miami-Dade County Com-
mission Chairman, Miami-Dade
County Housing Finance Au-
thority, Miami-Dade Affordable
Housing Foundation and Miami-
Dade Community Action Agency.
The event will take place at the
South Dade Government Center
in Cutler Bay, from 9 a.m. 1
p.m., Saturday, Oct. 24. 305-
234-4938.
.
.********
The Lupus Fund will host a
Global Health Symposium and
Lupus Walk. The symposium
will feature University of Mi-
amifJackson Memorial Mpdical
Center physicians who will be
discussing the effects of these
healthcare issues on Lupus pa-


The City of Hallandale Beach
invites you to the Dedication
of Sunrise Park at 5 p.m. on
Wednesday, Oct. 21. Depart-
ment of Parks and Recreation,
954 457-1452.
********
The Political, Social Action
and Economic Development
Ministry will host a Community
Empowerment Forum, "Identify-
ing Educational Solutions," at
the Mt. Hermon A.M.E. Church
in Miami Gardens, from 6:30 9
p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 21. Dr.
Ben Cowins, Sr., 305-624-7253
or Mt. Hermon, 305-621-5067.
********
The fourth annual South
Florida Theatre Festival will
take place Oct. 21-26. 954-765-
5831.
********
Miami-Dade County Com-
mission will join forceswith
the County Health Department
offer local residents and citi-
zens the opportunity to receive
free Flu Vaccines. The Flu and
Pneumonia Vaccines will be ad-
ministered on Thursday, Oct. 22
at the Phicol Williams Center in
Homestead, 10 a.Ift. to 2 p.m.
305-234-4938.
********
Miami-Dade State Attorney
Office will present their Seal-
ing and Expungement Program
at the Bethel Apostolic Church,
from 4- 7 p.m., Thursday, Oct.
22. Call 305-547-0724.
********
Miami Central Senior High
School will host a College Fair


Deaconesses Anniversary at 3
p.m., Oct. 25. 305-835-8316.
********
Redemption Missionary Bap-
tist Church will liave its Family
and Friend Service along with
out church anniversary celebra-
tion at 3 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 25.
305-836-1990.
********
Union Grove MBC invites you
to their second annual 7-Up
Conference at 3 p.m., Sunday,
Oct. 25. Rev. Smith, 786-326
5401.
********
St. John Missionary Baptist
Church annual Unity Day will
be held Oct. 25. 305-372-3877.
********
Minority Chamber of Com-
merce will be hosting a Holiday
Job Fair at the Double Tree Mi-
ami Mart, from 9 a.m. 4 p.m.,
Thursday, Oct. 29. 786-260-
1965.
********
The Revelation Christian
Academy is open for registra-
tion. After-care is from 3-6 p.m.
Call 305-758-5656 or 786-281-
8098. .
******** .
A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to come fellowship
at 11:15 a.m., on Sundays and
Bible class weekly at 7 p.m.,
Thursday.
********
Redemption M.B. Church is
sponsoring a fundraising break-
fast and yard sale on Friday and
Saturday. Pastor Willie Mccrae,
305-793-7388 or 305-836-
1990.
Note: Calendar items must be
submitted before 3:30 p.m. on
Monday.


-23. The climax~continue at 4
p.m., Sunday, Oct. 25. 786-541-
3687.
********
, Faith Christian Center will
celebrate 25 years of ministry
with a culmination service that
will take place at the Doubletree
Hotel at Miatni Airport, at 11
a.m., Saturday, Oct. 24. Church
office, 305-253-6814.
********
The Episcopal Church Wom-
en of thed Church of the Incar-
nation is sponsoring a Spec-
tacular Bazaar, from 10 a.m. 3
p.m., Saturday, Oct. 24.
********
The Women's Ministries of
WrohnWesleyMethodistchurch
invites the community to its an-
nual prayer breakfast which will
be held at the Arcola Lakes Park
Community Center, at 9 a.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 25. 305-633-
3806 or 305-297-7047.
********
The Antioch Missionary Bap-
tist Church of Brownsville cor-
diallyinvitesyoutothe l66annu-
al Senior Saints'Day Observance,
at 10 a.m., Sunday, Oct. 25.
********
New Canaan Missionary Bap-
tist Church invites everyone to
worship service, at 11 a.m., Oct.
25. 754-422-6722.
********


New Life Worship Center in-
vites to you to a two-night Spiri-
tual Teaching at 7 p.m., Oct. 21.
305-623-0054.
********
Peace M.B.C. will host "The
Power of Vision Conference:
Empowering the Saints While
Changing the World," at 7 p.m.
nightly, on Oct. 21-24. On
Wednesday night, National and
Grammy nominated Singer and
Preacher will provide services.
On Thursday night, Antioch Mis-
sionary Baptist Church of Carol
City will continue the bless-
ing. On Friday night, enjoy our
Gospel Concert with the music
of Second. Chapter and Peace
M.B.C. Mass Choir. On Satur-
day at .2 p.m., the culminating
activity will be our "Youth Expo"
exhibiting the talents of Gospel
Rap and Double Dutch.
********
St. -Matthews Missionary
Baptist Church observes an-
nual Youth Day, "Power in your
Praise," at 7:30 p.m., Friday,
Oct. 23. 305-635-5177 or email:
stmatthews6100@gmail.com
********
Soul Saving M.B.C. invites
you to attend their 7 Seals pro-
gram, at 7:30 p.m., Friday, Oct.
23. 76-918-7047.
********
Ziost Hope Missionary Bap-
tist Church will have their
fourth annual Pastors Anniver-
sary, 7 p.m. nightly, Oct. 21


COSMETIC DENTRISTY
* Teeth Whitening 1 hour
* Porcelain Crowns Bridges
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RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

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B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 21-2 9


Hold on to your blessings


I


Richard A. Grant, DDS, PA


"MIsin Teeth or centre


. . . . .
a TAKE s ElhEE V Vt
.g aa j"KEE A" I &
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Insurance Welcome
We offer Financial Arrangements
Lab On Premises Repairs While You Wait

Evening and Saturday Appointments










I _~~


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL TilEIR OwN DESTINY


apyrig hted Material




indicated Content



Commercial NeWs Providers
**** we. *


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-
*


.


From stafand wire reports

As Afghan officials wrangle
over their nation's disputed
election, the White House chief
of staff said Sunday that Presi-
dent Obama won't make a deci-
sion on sending more troops to
Afghanistan until that country
has a credible government.
Afghanistan's Aug. 20 presi-
dential election has been
plagued by allegations of fraud.
The United Nations-backed
panel investigating the voting
has finished its probe but has
delayed announcing its find-
mgs.
If the Electoral Complaints
Commission determines that
Afghan President Hamid Karzai
failed to win more than 50%
of the vote, he will face a run-
off with challenger Abdullah
Abdullah. Preliminary results
showed Karzai won 54% of the
vote.
Obama won't order more U.S.
troops to Afghanistan until it
forms a legitimate government,
Rahm Emanuel, the White

H s Sch fd h i said on
Emanuel said that it would
be "reckless to make a decision
.
on U.S. troop levels" without a
thorough analysis of Afghani-
stan's ability to govern itself.
John Kerry, chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, said Afghanistan must
prove to be a legitimate part-
ner in the war against rali-
ban insurgents before the U.S.
,,
sends more troops. It would
be entirely irresponsible for the
president of the United States
to commit more troops to this
country when we don't even
have an electioxi finished and
know who the president is and
what kind of government we're
working with," Kerry, D-Mass.,
told the CNN program during a
visit to Kabul.
It's unclear, however, wheth-
er Karzai will agree to a rull-
n
off election. We are worried
.. because it seems that not
everybody is ready to accept


*


*


. ..
1


CI


I


--rz~


-Photo by Chris Hondros, Getty Images
Army soldiers in the 1/501st of the 25th Infantry Division recently scoured the Afghan
COuntryside on a two-day mission in Paktika province, an area near the Pakistani border that
U.S.soldiers had not patrolled for more than three years.The troops were looking for Taliban
weapons and liide-outs.
the results," French Foreign week to Europe and Asia. NATO countries and other
Minister Bernard Kouchner About 68,000 U.S. service- allies have about 36,000 ser-
said. "They must accept the members are in Afghanistan. vicemembers there.
,,
results'
Abdullah's deputy campaign *
manager, Saleh Mohammad Like our newspaper .
Registani, accused Karzai of -
pressuring his supporters p. 44 p
on the separate Independent
-
la ofC dp bde ay SUBSCRIBET 19 AT
.
cause it will require a runoff. . .: ha
Karzai camfiaign spokes- 5
man Waheed Omar said the son us.monwa pon a
president had done nothing to suessenow sunscarr
influence the election commis- O CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED D CHARGE MY CREDIT CARD
sion. According to Afghan law,
the complaints commission is 9-
the final arbiter. ,a
.4 0 Exp
If a runoff is necessary, it
.
is supposed to be held with- O Exp
in two weeks. It would likely
have to occur before mid-No-
Authorized Signature
member, when winter weather
could hamper travel to polling
Name
Places ------
Emanuel said Obama con-
Address
tines to review his options on -
Afghanistan, and more meet-
city State Zip
ings are scheduled this week.
Defense Secretary Robert
Phone email
Gates, meanwhile, plans to
seek continued support from *Includes Florida sales tax
allies when he travels thiS Send to, The Maml Timei, 900 NW 54 St.* Mlaml, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe online at www.mymlamltimes.com


153B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


n Iv intationC<


increasing


among say meS




Available from



e *
* *


U.S. holding off on more -triop~s in Afghanistan








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY


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.




.


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


Students recognized with AP Scholar Awards


healthy dialogue in an effort to
tackle the problem and formu-
late solutions. The discussion
will focus on crime rate, edu-
cation, and self-improvement
in young Black males from
various sectors in South Mi-
ami-Dade.
In the effort to consider all
positions the committee wel-
comes all individuals of any
race, gender, profession, and
fraternal order to come par-
ticipate in offering various per-
spectives and methods to say-
ing the lives of South Miami
- Dade's at risk males.


The Miami Thes Special Report
State Rep. Dwight Bull-
ard will sponsor the State of
Black Men in South Miami-
Dade County at Second Bap-
tist Church, located at 11111
Pinkston Drive, at 8 p.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 21.
Several influential men from
South Miami-Dade will at-
tempt to reach consensus re-
garding The State of Black Men
in South Miami-Dade County
in this town hall meeting. The
meeting is a holistic approach
to redefining and empowering


young Black male in the com-
munity.
With the growing concern for
youth violence, lack of educa-
tional achievement and high
crime rates a group consist-
ing of Bullard, Second Bap-
tist Church founding Pastor
Emeritus Reverend John A.
Ferguson, Reverend Robert
Brooks Jr., Johnny L. King
Lodge #767 and moderator
Denzel D. Burnside III, felt
compelled to call commu-
nity together. Thei-efore, local
community and church lead-
ers have decided to engage in


CO ng ed Ma




Syrid" ed Co



from Commercial


..


M41ab


dents recognized as AP Scholars
increased by 12 percent from
1,187 in 2007-2008 to 1,333 in
2008-2009; the number of stu-
dents recognized as AP Schol-
ars with Honor increased by
13 percent from 348 in '2007-
'2008 fo 394 in 2008-2009.
AP courses are preparation for
students for college courses and
help to reduce costs. By taking
the test, students will be able to
qualify for college scholarships.
The College Board is a not-
for-profit membership associa-
tion whose purpose is to link
students to college success


and opportunity. The College
Board's AP program offers more .
than 30 courses and exams and
provides students with the op- .
opportunity to take college-level
courses and earn college credit .
or placement why still in h1igh .
school.
.


ports sent to colleges. The stu-
dents not only gain recognition
from various colleges, but also
win the admiration of their peers,
families, and community.
Miami-Dade County Public
Schools (M-DCPS) AP achieve-
ment restift tribWlde: The total
Miniber of senior high schoolss
receiving AP Scholar Awards in-
creased by 15 percent from 40 in
2007-2008 to 46 in 2008 2009;
the total number of students
receiving AP Scholar Awardq in-
creased by eight percent from
2,091 in 2007-2008 to 2,259 in
2008-2009; the number of stu-


The Miami Times StaffReport

Forty-six Miami-Dade senior
high schools and 2,259 students
received Advanced Placement
(AP) Scholar Awards for excelling
in the college-level achievement
through M corirses Ed exams.
The AP Scholar Award con-
sists of five categories includ-
ing AP Scholar, AP Scholar
with Honor, AP Scholar with
Distinction, AP State Schol-
ar, and National AP Scholar.
Recipients of the awardreceive a
certificate and their achievement
is acknowledged on AP Score Re-


* -


Copyagh nal

- Syndicated Content -

vailablMremtom'iffercial Ne& Providers


Musical program, Saturday,
October 24, 7:30 p.m. at Mt.
Claire Holiness Church, 7975
N.W. 22 Ave. Hosted by Wim-
berly Sisters. Appearing: Wim-
berly Sisters, Soul Seekers, Mt.
Moriah Unlimited Praise Team,
Jamie Burley Praise Dance and
others.


-
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Equal housing lender(~I


Issued by HSBC Mortgage Cotporation (USA)@0 HSBC Mortgage Corporation (USA) 2009


STT RP DIHTBLL


~)Y(I ~l\r (~C()~I~ tlr(r~Y


Ite rm~I


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Musical Program







First Indy inspires Miami audience


115B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


BLACS MUT COTROLTHEI OwNDESINY


1


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*;.


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Ir I -


waters try to radA ilkgal immitrants frma 2910 ('remes


MIkhrk( Ilrsnu: RebuiMing skc cannmunits frran within


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Available from Commercial News Providers


math wwres his a w all










I 1


Celebration at New Beginning Praise Tabernacle
You are invited to a spiritually inspiring
monologue and gospel singing event, featur-
ing, the anointed monologist Overseer Della
Williams, 89 years young and the renown Mi-
amian, 'the console, Brother Sullivan Pugh.
Also appearing will be The New Beginning
Youth Choir and outstanding soloists.
. This grand celebration will take place on a e.
Friday October 30, 7:30 p.m., at New Be-
ginning Praise Tabernacle, 2398 N.W. 119
street, Miami. Bishop John H. Taylor is
Pastor.

OVERSEER DELLA WILLIAMS


The Miami Times
/ 15 annOUncing Our
, ---- W CHURCH LISTINGS
Beginning January 2010
F ormation contact our new church assistant,
rah Roker, 305-69-1-6210 ext. 102
space is limited New Pricing


Hosonna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street

Order of Services
Sunday School 9 45 am
Worship 11 am
Bible Musly, Thursday 7.30 pm
Youlk Mar..stry
Mon Wed 6 pm

roamwmm

New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
Early Sunday Waship 130 em
Sundo) 5thool 9 30 om
inaday mammy Worship II am
Sunday being Serv.Is 6 pm
Tuesdor Prayer Meer.ng 1 30 pm
Wednesday Bible Stud, 130 pm



word of Faith
thristion Center
2370 N.W. 81th Street

Order of Services
Und0y 80ming $grlu65
sunds, 5 hool lo oa
ordit me 1 "
thunde erever ser
..e on



Seed Time and Harvest Faith
Ministry international


Order of Services
UDi0y OT\hip 9 om
8 ble Study Wedna day 130 pm
w neaneandareims,


Liberty (ity Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street

Order of Set vices
sur.day Morn.ng 8 nm
Sunday 5thwel 10 am
Sunday heavy 6 pm
Mon Enellence 130 pm
fue Bibles (lass 130 pm
Thus (ellowsh.p 10 om



Antioch Missionary Baptist
(hurch of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
WTimilwlEWaliminiEW
Order of Services
Chbitil Tuiddy $(11001 II 30 0 01
Sursday Worship Serene 10 em
M.4Week 5e.we wednesday <
Hour of Pa.edisse Day Prayer
12 pm 1 p .x
brd..ng Worh.p 1p m



New shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street
www.nshilohmbs.ers
MiliWiliWiWiliEWMiliWWWiM
Order of Services
EarlyMeming W0r.h.p 110 am
sun thod.school v su m
y b as pa a
1. "" '


(burch School 9:30s.m.
WEDIiESDAy
Feeding Ministry12noon
lible Study 7 p.m.



Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
milimmillmalannitilm
Order of Services
Sunday School 9:30 0.m.
ming Praise/Worship 11 0.m.
First and11sird Sunday
evening worship of 6 p.m.
Proyer Meeting & Billie Study
Tuesday 7 p.m.


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order of Set vices
ed Inrenesory Prover
9 0 m 12 pm
Morn.ag Seri.e II am
Sun.1we word..p 130 p'"
lues Prayer Meelic.g I30 p '"
(n B.ble 5tudy 1 30 pm
awmewomm

Ebenezer United
Methodist (hurch
2001 N.W. 35th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Moung Serveres
1.45 on II 15 um
Sunday School 9 45 am
B.M. Study luesday
10 am & 2 pm
Prayer Meer.r.g Tues apm



St. John Baptist (hurch
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


Logos Baptist Chdrch
16305 NW 48th Ave.


Order of Services
ibility M0ming WDr
ship as 8 & II am
anavishoolmeason,
[hursday Bible51udy lpa
sounder no serve




93rd stress community
Missionary Baptist (hurch
2330 N.W.93rd Street


cornerstonee Bible
Fellowship (hurth


Order of Services
EdidOf $1600 9 30 0 18
Sunday Wonhip II am
unusuada,
bening Wolshlp 6 pm
and war5 se ran in
0..an ishearsal thur du



Brownsville
(hurch of Christ
4561 N.W.33rd (ourt
n..l...s c....


Mt. (alvary Missionary


e Missionary


^I~CKS MUST CONTROL~ THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 61 THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


rr~Z~1#KIII


Bethlehem (athedrol 0utreach (tr.


St. Mark Missionary
Boptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sunday 130 and 11 am
Worth.p Serence
910 om Sunday School
funday 1p m B.hle Study
8 pm Prover Manag




Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue
gagiligggilligaggiliss Egg


hi~P~C~c~C~


I (800) 254 NBBC


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Order of Services
(abbelsh int..019 30 am (5ct)
0*,wine Worh.p II 0 us 15ct)
fourhHour(braryinfunity
I her before Sun:e]
ad week Prop, sure 130 wed


)r;


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street

Order of Ser vices
Hour of Proyer 6 30 om Early Morning Worship 7:30 a m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m Morning Worship 11 a.m.
Youth Ministry Sludy. Wed 7 p.m.Prayer, Bible Study. Wed 7 p.m.
Noonday Altar Prayer. (M F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday. 11 aml p.m
new fr.endh.umbam.o ora friendshineraver@llellsouth not


First Baptist Missionary


MT. ZION A.M.E. (HURCH


Order of Services
StiliDAY:Worship Semite
g g g


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.,
11 a.m., lp m.
Sunday School 9:30 o.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45a.m.


Alpha Agope SDA Church


Sunday: Bible Study Order of SMro ig Worship 10 a.m.
Evening Wor ship 6 p.m.
WednesdayGeneralBibleSludy 7:30pm
10 0%15100 Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBF5/(omcost 3 Solusday 7.30 a.m.
... pembrokeparirriturchoichrist rom pembrokeparkrot@be lsoulh net


.\ND HE 5.11D LINTO T HEM.
GO YE INTO AL L THE
\\ORLDqA D PREACH71-1E
GOSPEL T RE.
th
-. /.1
JOin the Religious Elite
in Our Church Directory

Karen Franklin at
Grid" ROA.RG1 A


IL Ln *hr prkr l


Po~ice killing


Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


Jordon Grov


New Birth Baptist Church, The (othetiral of Faith International


Pembroke Park (hurch of Christ


3707 S.W.




































































































































LUCILLE WALKER
10/20/1902 08/15/88

Your loving family, daughter
Bertha Glover; grand, Jack-
ie and Valeria; great grand,
Eric, Jawana, RuNaia and,
Star Muffin


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


ANGELA SHIVERS, 56, house
parent, died
October 13 at
Jackson North
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11a.m.'
Saturday in the
chapel. -




O FRODGER POOLE, 63, died
er
Franco Nursing
Home, Service
11 a.m.,,Satur-
day, St. Luke
Missionary Bap-
tist Church..


WILLIE E. BUTTON, 66, truck
driv died
Oct er 17 at
Jackson North
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m.'
Saturday in the
chapel.


ALDORA FREEMAN, 54, RN,
died October 14
at home. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, Friend-
ship Missionary
Baptistchurch.,



THELMA MONCUR, 86, Nurse
Assistant, died October 12 at Sinai
Nursing Home. Service was held.

JOE BRUNSON, died October
17 at Miami Jewish Home. Final
rites and burial entrusted to Sum-
merton Funeral Home; Summer-
ton, S.C.

Gregg L. IUlason
EDDIE BELLE HOLLIS 'aka"

ife, do
October 17.
Survivors in-
clude: daughter,
Eileen D. Shaw;
g rand children,
Michael McGee
and Keevin
Rolle; great grandchildren, Michael
Avant, Yo'lette McGee, Dreon
Hopkins and Malcolm McGee;
brothers, Eddie Steward (Cora
Lee), Winston Steward ( Tera Lee)
and Willie Steward(Valencia); and
a host of relatives and friends. Vis-
*Itation 2 -9 p.m., Friday. Service
1p.m., Saturday, Second Chance,
8730 NW 20th Avenue.

JOE L. WILLIS 73, died Octo-
ber 16. Arrangements are incom-
plete

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,
-


St. orts Erc SGeoRange 4


Hall Ferguson Hewitt Faith AB.4- Poitier &
ALFRED WILLIAMS, SR., 87
MAUD MACK, 102, domestic JAMES McDONALD, 68, died died October
engineer, died October 14 at 14. Service 10
October 14 at Jackson Me- a.m. Friday,
Jackson North thorial Hospital. Saint James
Hospital. Ser- Service 12 p.m., 1' AME Church.
vice 11 a.m., Saturday in the
Frid yaAp lic chapel.


LISE JEAN-PIERRE, 82, home-
maker, died Oc-
tober 6 at North .
Shore Medical
center. Service
was held.




RUBEN DARIO BUSTS, 33,
died October 12 in North Caroline.
. Service 5 p.m., Saturday in the
chapel.

MARIE THERESE GUIL-
LAUME, 65, died October 18 at
North Shore Hospital. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, First Hatian
Church of God.

Royal
LEONARD WALKER, 67, labor-
er, died October 14. Arrangements
are incomplete.

IDELL NEWTON, 86, house-
wife, died October 13. Final rites
and burial, entrusted to Butler's
Funeral Home, Nassau, Baha-
rnas.

JERMAINE WILLIAMS, 26, sol-
dier, Jamaica Army, died Septem-
ber 8. Final rites and burial, Kings-
ton, Jamaica.

RUTHA MORGAN, 81, caretak-
er, died September 29. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Hadley-Davis
LILLIE MAE HARRIS,72, borne-
maker, died Oc-
tober 16 at Me-
morial Hospital
Pembroke. Sur-
vivors include:
daughter, Amy
Mc Bride (Clar-
ence); grand-
daughter, Kiera; '
grandsons, Hajari and Markus.
Service 11:30 a.m., Saturday.
Highway Church of the Apostolic
Fastn.

ROBERT MASON, 73, respira-
tory therapist, died October 5 at
Jackson South Hospital. Service
was held

JORGE LUIS ARROYO, JR.,
22, laborer, died October 9. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Thursday in the cha-
pel. Service was held
a
Pax Villa (Broward)
MARIE IVIAUDE SAGESSE, 47,
seamstress, died October 15 at

Ho odsas H dp' h g ng 6i
Ministries, Deerfield Beach.

FENSON FERTILE, 22, stli-
dent, died October 11 at Imperial
Point Medical Center. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, Clement Catholic
Church, Wilton Manors-

YROSE ACCIUS AUGUSTIN,
51, CNA, died October 14 at Holy
Cross Hospital. Service 11 a.m,
Saturday, Haitian Evangelical
Baptist Church, Pompano.


LOCITA BEAUBRUM, 39, beau-
ticiah died Octo-
ber 8 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
First Interna-
tional Baptist
Church

RICKY LEE HALL, 38, roofer,
died October 11 at Miami Shores
Nursing and Re-
habilitation Cen-
ter. Service 11
a.m., Saturday
in the ch el





MASTER JAVON MARSHALL,
7 months old, died September 28
at Jackson Memorial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


In Memorial
In loving memory of,


HAROLD BENNETT, 65, died
October 13 at home. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Richardson
ERIC McALISTER, 47, laborer'
died OCtober
16. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.





JASPER HOWARD a.k.a. Jazz,
football player. ,
died October 18.
Arrangements
are incomplete.





RICKEY RICARDO WHITE, 33,
laborer, died October 15. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Carey Royal Ram'n
ALPHONSO L. COOPER, 47,
landscaper, died October 12 at Hi-
aleah Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.

SAMANTHA STANLEY,. 38,
hopper feeder, died September 16
at home. Service 3 p.m., Saturday,
New St. Paul Missionary Baptist
Church

H Birthday
In loavinpP10ry of,


WAYNE DOUTHETT II, 23, stu-
dent, died Octo-
ber 17 Jackson
North Medical
Center. Service
10 a.m., Oc-
t ber 24BaNtsw

Church.

MICHAEL SMITH, 53, died Oc-
tober 12. Service 5 p.m., Thursday
in the chapel.

FOREST HICKS, 55, custodian,
October 12. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urdayp Ebenezer M.B. Church,
Hallandale Beach.
M
Wright and Youn9
DEMAS JACKSON, 14, owner
of Jackson Soul
Food Restau-
rant in Over- .
town serving
.
our commune
since *
tober 1S9hor

Medical Center
-
Survivboers mca Dse s Jackson,

Jr. Tyrone, Edward C. Richard
D., Alonzo atid Dwight; daughters,
Steffenie Richardson, Shirlene
Ingraham, Mellonaise Jackson
and Cantise (Trese) Jackson; and
sister: Ella Mae Smith. Service 2

mr itySatu ayd3rdhStreet Com-

WINIFRED WILSON NESBITT,
86, a Found- .- .,
ing Member
of Mt. Hermon '
AME Church
and Nursing
Assistant, died
October 16 at
her home. Sur-
v lude-
h ndinSanford A. Nesbitt; one
brother, Bishop Arthur Wilson, Sr.;
two nieces, Angela G. Ford and
Tonia Grant; grand niece, Angel-
ique Hill; three nephews, Bishop
Arthur Wilson, Jr., Barry Wilson
and James Wilson; and othertw_
ing relatives and friends. Viewing,
9-5 p.m., Friday, in the chapel,
d 6 -8 Mt. H AME
urch. S ce 11 ae onSatur-
day, Mt. Hermon AME Church.


ZELDA OATES -JENKINS, 42,
bus driver and
aide for Miami
Dade County
School Public, -
died October

i lude"urvi rs ,
band, Michael
Leroy Jenkins;
sons, Michael L. Oates-Jenkins,
and Sylvester L. Jenkins; mother,
Onno Schocken; six brothers and
six sisters; a host of nieces, neph-
ews other relatives and friends.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday, in the
chapel.

SHIRLEY FLUKER, 79, home-
maker, died Oc.. .
tober 16. Sur..
vivors include:
daughter, Linda
Fluker; son, ,
Larry Fluker;
granddau g h -
ter, Monique 7,
Fluker sister
Elizabeth Walker; brothers, Frank
Walker and Taylor Walker. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Kingdom Hall
of Jehovah Witnesses, 1105 N.W.
1|20 Street.

DR. KENNETH MONROE
WHEELER, 46
administrative
director for Mi-
ami- Dade
County Public
School, died
Octob 16. S
er ur-
vivors include:
wife, Terry Y.
Wheeler; brother, Darryl Johnson
and Michael Johnson; sister, Misty
Wheeler; step sister, Vema Wheel-
er-Stafford (Vincent). Viewing 4-8
p.m., Friday, New Way Fellowship
Praise and Worship Center. Ser~
vice 12 p.m., Saturday the church.
in lieu of flowers, donations can
be made to the Juvenile Diabet-
ics Research Foundation (JDRF),
3411 N.W. 9TH Avenue, Suite 701,
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33309.


JOHN STEPHENS, 75,
of Johns Bar-
ber Shop, died
October 17 at
home. Service
10 a.m., Satur-
day, Mt. Calvary
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.


owner


TODD J. SMITH


ROXANNE ROBINSON, 49,
food services at
BJ'S, died Oc-
tober 18. Sur-
vivors include:
husband Wal-
ter Robinson
Sr.; son, Walter
Robinson Jr.;
daughter, Brit-
tany Robinson; step-daughter,
Rashika Irvin; one brother; four
sisters, two grandchildren; a host
of other relatives and friends. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


PAMELA ANN WILLIAMS
PACE, 51, clerk
fo M' '-Dad
CountiamScho
Board, died Oc-
tober 16. Sur-

b ndinclu
mie Pace; chil-

ar ia r ), 5ami (Dantley) and
Sonja Steward (Mark); sisters,
Melrose Gay and Winifred; broth-
ers, Tommy and Wayne \Nilliams;
grandsons, Adam King and Ja-
mar Merriweather; granddaughter,
Destiani Cline. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Spirit of Christ Church.

LOIS KATHERINE STEPHENS
ANDERSO N,
63, administra-
tor at Jackson
Memorial Hospi-
tal, die October


ROENA LIVINGSTON


hap9pur9family sh s you a
Your loving memories will
forever live in our hearts.
From your loving family,
The Johnson and Davis
Families-
---- -- ----- --- ----


ROSA LEE STROUD DELI-
FORD, 52, ad-
ministrative at
Jackson Me-
monal' Hospital'
died October
18. Survivor
include: daugh-
ter, Sonlececla
Jenkins; son'
Bnan McClendon; grand-daugh-
ter, Sonaje Jenkins; a host of oth-
er relatives and friends., Viewing
1-7p.m., Thursday in the chapel.

INEZ W. LINK, 90, homemaker,
died October 12. Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, First Baptist of Bunche
Park Church.

CALVIN McPHEARSON, 53
auto painter, died October 8. Ser _
vice 4 p.m., Saturday in the cha-
pel.
.
LOIS (LU) BERGSTRAND, 59,
purchasing manager, died October
13. Final rites and burial, Middle-
burg, Florida.

Paradise
EVA MAE HARDEN, 93, died
October 15 at home. Service
2p.m., Saturday, Bethel Full Gos-
pel Church, Richmond Heights.

LORINE JACKSON SIRMANS,
83, died October 10 at home. Ser-
vice was held.

ROOSEVELT PHILLIPS, died
October 13 at South Miami Hospi-
tal. Service was held.

CHRISTIAN SANTIAGO, 21,
died October 15 at North Shore
Medical Center. Arrangements are
incomplete.


ERNEST CUTLER

On this eighth year anniver-
sary, memories of a wonderful
husband, father, and grand-
father will be in in our hearts


ioin 4e ~Peiou~s EI As


forever.


Grace
GWENDOLYN
68, bus driver,
died October
16. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
Christ Episco~
pal Church, Co-
conut Grove.


14 at Jackson
THOMAS, Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: son,
LarMarc (Vanessa) Andefson;
daughters, Mellanese Anderson,
Edwina (Ronnie) Vincent and La-
trese (Gerald) Anderson-Moore;
brother, Robert Stephens. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Mt. Tabor MB
Church..


JEANNE PERVALUS LOUIDOR,
59, housekeeping, died October
14. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Notre Dame D'Haiti Church.

VIDA V. TEMPER, 87, RN, died
October 17. Final rites and buri~
al entrusted to Bentas Funeral
Home, New York, NY.


Nakia Ingraham
BASIL BLACK, 58, died Octo-
ber 12 at Broward General Medi-
cal Center. Service 3 p.m., Satur-
day, New Life Fellowship Center,
Lauderdale Lakes.

MAGILE CENATUS, 63, died
October 18 at Aventura Medical
Center. Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
Church of God, Miami.


SAM BANKERS FULLER, 69,
salesman, died
October 9 at
home. Survivors
include: wife:
Gale Hicks-Full-
er; two daugh- '
ters, Selena and
Sonya; one son,
Izea Fuller; two
stepchildren, Darryl C. Hicks II,
and Qiana (Chris) Terry; sisters,
Margaret (Jimmy) Dale and Sarah
McRae; brother, Robert (Gail) Full-
er. Service was held.


Spence A
PAUL MARC ANTHONY
BROWN, 30, died October 17. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


117B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


In Mtemoriam









^ICKS MUST' CONTROL~ THI-EIR OWN DESTINY


JOE L. WILLIS, 73, retired
installer for AT& T, died Octo-
ber 16.
Survivors include: wife,
Minnie; son, Attorney H. La-
mar Willis (Dr. Kamili Willis);
daughter, Jacquelyn Marshall
(Edward); grandchildren, Kay-
la, Henry, II, Brandon and
Megan; special young men;
Francisco, Tony and Andrew;
former wife, Gloria Willis; and
a host of other relatives and
friends.
Family hour Friday, from
6-8 p.m. Service Saturday, 1
p.m., in the chapel.
Arrangements entrusted
to Gregg L Mason Funeral
Home.
PUBLIC NOTICE
As a public service to our
community, The Miams Times
prints weedy obituary notic-
es submitted by area funeral
homes at no charge. These
notices include name of the
deceased, age, place of death.
employment, and date, loca-
tion, and time of services. Ad-
ditional information and photo
may be included for a nominal
charge.The deadline is Monday
at 3:30 p.m.


WITH APPRECIATION

THE FAMILY OF THE LATE


PASTOR JAMES ROBERT POOLE, JR.

acknowledges with deepest gratitude and appreciation the many comfort-
ing messages, floral arrangements, prayers and other expressions of kind-
HOSS.

Special thanks to True Believers in Christ Worship Center; Peaceful Zion
M.B. Church, Pastor C. P. Preston, Moderator; Moderator Brown of New
Bethel M.B. Church; Pastors, Ministers and churches of Dade County, Pas-
tor R. A. Frazier and the St. John M.B. Church family of Orlando, FL; Mr. : 1
Leon Bland and Royal Funeral Service staff, City of Miami Police Training
Unit, Motor's Unit and Background investigation Sec., Beckman Coulter,
Advantage Tours, Faculty and Staff of Miami Carol City SHS, Dr. Michael
Crop SHS, Brentwood Elem., and Norwood Elem., Aventura Hospital, Kindred
Hospital 2nd floor, U.S. Postal Services (Norland Branch), Vietnam Veterans
of Miami, Miami Northwestern SHS Alumni and staff, 196 Street neighbor-
hood, Lorna's Catering, Anthurium Gardens Florist, Shirley Ellison, Reverend
Willie Sims, and Reverend Joe Williams.
May God bless and continue to keep you is our prayer.
With love,
The Poole and Thomas Family


Happy Birthday


Happy IBirthday


Card of' Thanks


am
WILLAMAE JACKSON
-...
10/25/25 10/05/01

Words cannot express how
much we miss you. You will al-
ways be forever in our hearts.
Your loving family.

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of.


RICHARD J. EDWARDS
10/20/52-03/28/09

Death leaves a heartache
that no one can heal.
Love leaves memory that no
one can steal.
Happy Birthday
Love always, your wife,
Sabrina and Family .


ANDREW L. FOSTER
Mshes to thank and show
our appreciation to everyone
for their comforting messages,
prayers and visits during our
time of bereavement.
Special thanks to Pas-
tor Randy Hicks and Greater
Peace Church, Bishop Linell
Sanders and Calvary Holiness
Church of God, The Milton
Hotel and Carey Royal Ram'n
Mortuary for their service.
May God bless you all,
The Foster and Williams
Families

Death Notice


MICHAEL
BERNARD MAGWOOD
10/23/64 05/28/02

It's been seven years.
We laugh, we rejoice and shed
some tears.
We remember that we belong
to God.
Thinking of you make our
journey less hard.
We remember how you went
back to the dust.

Sotsweet, sotsad, but you did
Your presence is among us
still.
Someday we will join you on
that peaceful hill.
The Magwood Family
In Memorial
To innine momorrr of


ELEHUE SMITH, 78, air-
port sky cap, died October 19
at Memorial Regional Hospi-
tal. Service 1 p.m., Satur-
day Greater St. Luke Primitive
Baptist Church of West Park.
Arrangements entrusted
to Nakia Ingraham Funeral
Home.


H BirthdSPPY SY
In loymg memory of,


KATHLEEN A. SMITH


HOUSTON MARSHALL, JR.

Eight years has gone by and
nothing has changed. Memories
of you still remain the same.
You're in our hearts from day to
day, forever always, that's where
you'll stay. Missing you!
Love always, wife, Hattie Mar-
shallt daughter, Margaret; son,


We think of you always, but
especially today.
You will never be forgotten,
.although you are gone away.
Your memory is a keepsake
with which we never part.
God has you in His keepiilg;
we have you in our hearts.
Caron, Cheryl, Judy, Ken-
neth, Richard and family.


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


lumter ad am lasem-d late-s r sees

as famelk-a s ase I affewd twarsals

"""""*












Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


*


Death Notice


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The Miami Times
I es le
SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES
Re Color MIe
debts in Mis&


Coaseases is 'It's not bad'


Fergie tas hereeme part-owner
of the Miami 1)olphina
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__ __ ~__


PRE FE T .- Emack


The Biblical statement,
God is good, all the time
was rather evident for Phil-
lip Ingraham, founder and
owner of the Bahamian Con-
nection restaurant for over
20-years. The Bahamian con-
nection is where Bahamian
revelers meet to enjoy stewed,
boiled or fried fish and grits
w/johnnycake, and stewed
conch and okra, souse, and
conch fritters, His establish-
ment has expanded with the
times, remodeling to meet the
needs of the his ever-growing
customer base
Last Friday, Ingra-
ham had his grand
opening and Bahami-
uns from the various
islands converged to
satisfy their curiosity
and encourage him S. J
for a job well done O
in the community.
Among the dignitaries were
Consulate General Gladys
Johnson-Sands, who moved
from table to table greeting
many Bahamians for the first
time, followed by her cousin,
State Sen. Fredericka S.
Wilson, who is running for a
Congressional seat in Wash-
ington, D.C., Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones,
Maevis Kerr, newly elected
president, Bahamian-Ameri-
can Federation, Rev. Dr. Phil-
lip Clarke, chaplain, Frank-
lin Williams, and James
Moss, president emeritus.
When Leroy Jones an-
-
nounced food will be served,
everyone stopped talking
and prepared to partake of
the one-on-one pigeon peas
& rice, fried chicken, potato
salad and punch. Served
first were Anthony Simons '
president, Bahamian Culture
Club, Winston Simons, Fred
Brown, Helen McCoy, Bev-
erly Sheffield, Marion, and
Sbttie Adderly. -- --"
Other outstanding Baha-
mians present were Melvin
Miller, Michalette Russell,
daughter, and Anthony Boat-
wright, son, who announced
playing in the Northwestern


~fi-r~n~l-n~.~m~l I


its "gg
El CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED Cl CHARGE MY CREDR CARD
ED Emp
& D Emp
0 0 Exp

Authorized Signature
Name
Address
Cit State Zip
Phone email
'Includes FlorIda sales tax
Send to:111e Miamillmes, 900 NW 54 St.* Miami, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe onllno at www.mymiamitimes com


^ I-CKS MUSTI CONTIROL THEIR( OWN DESTINIRY


dent was effective and trib-
utes came from Sen. Larce-
nia Bullard, retired State
Rep. Edward Bullard, son,
Dwight Bullard, J. Mont-
gomery, flautist, Lonnie
Coleman, past president, Dr.
Ralph Ross, pastor and for-
mer student, George Bald-
win, Citizen Crime Watch,
James Marshall, Nathaniel
Wilcox, Executive Direc-
tor of PULSE. He was also
mentioned as a sportsman
who never missed a Super
Bowl game and will be in at-
tendance for 2010 with his
sportswoman, Margaree R.
Raiford.
Additionally, the organiza-
tion brought Black
educators together
and assisted them
with upward mobil-
ity, as well as pre-
paring them to pass
the awful State Test
to maintain employ-
ment. Let's not for-
LARD get presidents that
followed Dr. Jones:
Dr. Everett Abney, Dr.
Richard Strachan, Verne-
ka Silva, Dr. Harold Guin-
yard, Dr. George Koonce,
Jr., Sandra B. Powell, Dr.
John Johnson, Dr. Clar-
ence Jones and Dr. Loren-
zo Thomas. Indefatigable
workers included Winifred
Beacham, J. Carol Brown,
Rubye Howard, Vanessa W.
Byers, Dr. Art Woodard,
Cheryl Jackson, Senator
Frederica S. Wilson, Dr.
Roy Phillips, Dr. Gwen-
dolyn J. Kidney, Dr. Tee
S. Greer, Dr. Solomon C.
Stinson, Ransiom Hill, Jr.,
Horace IVfartin, Dr. Marzell
Smith, Dr. Barbara Carey,
Stephanie Pitts, Rosa S.
Harvey Pratt and Dr. Wil-
liam H. Turner.
Other historians includ-
ed Dr. E. Demeritte, Dr.
J. Fields, S. Gay, Dr. M.
Jackson, and Dr. Freddie.
Young.


when he was hired as a cor-
rection officer after com-
pleting the training. To cel-
ebrate his new life, he was
taken to Land Shark Stadi-
um last Saturday to watch
Marching Band the FAMU 10arching Band
at age, 9, and Kai and the football team play
Lambert, a fifth against the University of Mi-
grader at Hol- ami Hurricanes. Joining him
mes Elementary. was Robbie Dukes, a Lamp-
Suddenly, drums lighter friend from the
began to sound off. In came Omega Psi Phi Frater-
Langley and his Junkernoos; nity organization.
that steamed up the place It was a blessing for
with the native sounds. Edward when a friend
Following them in a circle of his from Miami Car- -
were Bernard Dorsee, Nate ol City allowed us pri-
Bronson, Edith Ingraham, ority to drive into the
Virginia Wright, Stella $25.00 parking sec-
Brown, Dadron Tillman, Pa- tion, just short of the S
A
trice Chung, Willie Freeny, entrance to the Club
Janet Jackson,
Section for seating. It was
Benedict Gomes, ve impressive to chat with
Lona Fountain, Cyn- ry
the early Tailgaters and men-
thia Perry, Ronaki Hon The Miami Times of which
- Sands, and the cooks they are readers. I found out
in the kitchen: Gale they were family members.
Ingraham, Alvin Eu- Some had loyalties to FAMU,

NES gene sherman and UM and Bethune-Cookman
Jorkels. U.* including Everalt Flow-
When the Junker- ers, Angela and Rudenik
noos left, the chandeliers Pasmore, Yolana Pickaring,
were still shaking and the Chris and Lashan Wuth, and
people were still gyrating, be-
Ashley Wilcox chomping
cause some had not moved down on ribs and chicken,
like that in a long time. Then Another group of
the founder/owner Tailgaters included
addressed the happy the families of Naan-
crowd and thanked an Butler, Mae Mill-
them for helping hina er Robin, Shanna,
with his grand open- Malcolm, Karen,
ing. Monique Curtis,
Areyoucomingback and Carmen Miller,
when you have to pay? Vanessa Brown, Ma-
He hollered. Yeal, they NEWBOLD roone Mitchell, Edna
hollered back. Many


Hubert, Jarod An-
derson, and Roger Thomas.
They were there to support
Lamar Miller (#27) on U of M
team and Shannon Miller, a
pduate of FAMU.
Tailgaters included FAMU
supporters from West Palm
Beach who were driven by
Cleveland Shuler in a stretch
limousine. They included
Jerome Taylor, Anthony
Paulk Thyra Exols-Starr,
. Patricia Dozier, Monika
* al BVrMe an a -
tricia Herring. Lynn Solo-
mon prepared her shrimp
Barack Obama for the gang
and plans to send a sainple
to the first lady for the Presi-
dent. From the taste of it, she


is going to be well known. Ant
As we found our seats, ami
there were some new white Th
folks sitting in them. Unlike sup
the white folks back in the salu
days who never sat in a seat by
assigned to anyone else. It aud
was always us. Fortunately, lute
we arranged for everyone to of
be seated since they came to no
see the FAMU Band. gue
The boys were sph
excited to sit in the nin
stadium with such mer
a panoramic view, nin
... unlike those of Traz for
Powell Stadium, FIU, tor
Tropical Park, Cur- com
tis Park, and North find
Miami. In addition, a It to
NDS person can stand up oth
and lift his seat back ing
and makes it easy for some-
one to pass in front of them.
Whenever you go a football M
game, there is somebody to
who knows about each play- O.
er and narrates through out ami
the game. .I sat in front of Sch
Barry Lawrence who kept cele
everyone well informed dur- "Ch
ing the action. When I turned birt
around to thank him for his at
information, I said hello to Wo
Bernadette Poitier, a good dan
friend of mine and
asked for the name
of the knowledgeable
fan. He impressed me
more after I met his
son, Barrington and
wife, Velma.
By half-time, U of
M and Jacory Harris
had the game out of HARRIS
reach for FAMU, who,
incidentally, scored first and and
lost 16 to 48 and was paid join
$600,000 for their services. ally
More importantly, the fans Chi
stayed in their seats to wit- Los
ness one of the best bands and
in the land, featuring Ah- nev
mad Newbold, head drum ber
major from Miami Jackson he
High, assistant band direc- the
tors Dr. Shelby Shipman, S
Miami Central, Diron Hol- peo
loway, Arnerican High, and Gra


hony Simons, Jr., Mi-
Norland.
e half-time show was
erb and FAMU band
ted Michael Jackson
testing messages to the
ience saying FAMU sa-
s CANES, while the U
M Band featured a Lati-
number with a trumpet
st soloing in the strato-
ere. It was also an eve-
g well spent for the for-
lamps, especially run-
g into Keith Hylor, a
mer. Lamplighters direc-
and his wife. It was easy
ing, but a bit difficult
ing my vehicle to leave.
ok '20-minutes, while 20
er people were do-
the same thing.

* * * * *
any, many thanks
Art and Hyacinth
Johnson and Mi-
Alliance of Black
ool Educators for
rating Charles BUL
uck" Gray's 90th
hday, last Saturday,
the Richmond Heights
men's Club. In atten-
ce were his son, Charles
D. Gray, Little Miss
Hannah Gray, grand-
daughter, and Lois
Searles, emcee.
Back in the day,
M-ABSE was the
sounding board for
Black educators and
becameinvolvedwith
the leadership from
Dr. Johnny L. Jones
his insistence upon
ing the linkage nation-
in Atlanta, Baltimore,
cago, Detroit, New York,
Angeles, Philadelphia
Washington D.C. He
er requested that mem-
s travel to the meetings;
threatened yoxi to be on
scene.
eagles informed the 2,00
ple in attendance how
y's leadership as Presi-


of them wanted take
out. Ingraham revamped his
kitchen to satisfy his loyal
customers. Check out the
new restaurant, Americans
at 4300 Northwest Second
Avenue.

a a a a a .
Edward Johnson, a mild-
mannered young man with
a high school diploma from
Carol City, spent two years
trying to find himself His life
i@adEwdehipletedhtthg@after
he followed his mother, Sha-
randa Johnson Strachan,
and joined Bethany Seventh-
Day Adventist Church. His
prayer to God to find a job
became a reality, last Friday,


O P A "i:


Iva Dell Miller-Hepburn was elated on Oct.
7 when her children, Shirley, Althea, Vin-
ia, Sharell, Angie and Lonnie surprised her
with a birthday party. Errol Rolle of Nassau
attended the fabulous party.
* * * * *
Adrian Davis, daughter of Maria Taylor-
Davis and niece of E1ry Taylor-Sands, who

liveew in Caldfornia ad ma red ionbArt will be
ist for cartoon drawings.
* * * * .
Anthony and Juanita Armbrister are elat-
ed to have her two sisters, Lucille Williams
and Nora, and Nora's hubby Eddie Nattiel of
Archer, Fl. in town for the football classic last
weekend; their son also joined the clan. Two
brothers also came down James and Robert
Williams of Williston, Fl. Everyone enjoyed
the University of Miami and Florida A & M
University game so much that they remained
over for the Dolphins and Jets football game
last Monday night.
*********
Happy wedding anniversary to the follow-
ing couples: Frank and Shirley D. Cooney,
Jr., Oct. 12, their 24th; H. MalCOlm and Di-
ane N. Davis, Oct. 12, their 18t\

* * * * *
A portion of FAMU band appeared last
Sunday morning at Christ Episcopal Church
last weekend. The entire congregation en-
joyed the performance.
* * * * *
Monica Bethel-Adderley celebrated her
birthday with her family and a few friends
at her 48th Street house. Among those who
joined in the happy celebration were Fred
Brown, Gwen Clark, Elrjr Sands, Francina
Robinson and Jaunita Lane.


Another fabulous birthday celebration took
place in Coconut Grove, Oct. 10-12, when
Melodic Mitchelle-Rolle enjoyed a three-day
celebration with he family, and friends with
breakfast, lunch and dinner each of the three
days. Melodic is daughter of the Frankie
and the late William "Billy" Rolle and sister
of coach, Billy RoHe of Miami Northwestern
Senior High.
* * * * *
Get well wishes to Earl Carroll, Doris McK-
inney-Pittinan, Freddie "Jabbo" Johnson,
Claretha Grant-Lewis, Joyce Gibson-John-
son, Marie Kelly-Devoe, Mack Barkley,
Rev. Charles Uptgrow, Margaret Flowers,
Ismae Prescott, Grace Heastie-Patterson
and Henry "Sanky" Newbold, Thelma Hy-
lor-Dames, Doreatha Payne, Roslyn Jack-
son, Minerva Bain and Renee Dozier.


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


WINFE Y


g




AB DWAY HIT
USA Today
It

TIME













I~l or Jey ne's rea ncle padond afer 4 year


ItaWe to taste it to believe it.
- lal seafood sauce included.

954-559.3739


____


THE COLOR PURPLE
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $25, $45, $55, $67, $72


THE COLOR PURPLE
"I loved itl One of the most moving, exhilarating nights of theater in years.
A must see!" Dean Richards, WGN9 CW
8 PM ZIff Ballet Opera House $25, $45, $55, $67, $72


_


14C


A uncoln Town Hall


_I_


50C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


BLACS MUT COTROLTHEI OWNDESINY


MillEHERW


sILaml!MZ[[~I:$~


ElmEllim


rlieilliHWu~~


MERIEWlB


~S'fllBiE(r~,rllr'llP1S;T


there a few months ago. Going forward
will require you to let go of every expec-
tation. Lucky numbers 12, 17, 19, 32, 40

SAGITTARIUS: NOV 21- DEC 20
You'd be happier about this if you
didn't feel like you were pushed into it.
As much as you aren't sure why you're
here, you can trust the fact that whether
you see it or not, something incredible
will come from it. Lucky numbers 11, 16,
21, 18, 32

CAPRICORN: DEC 21 JAN 20
As things level off you've become
clearer about what you need to do to
cover yourself. Things look simpler now
that you understand where to keep the
emphasis. Let others cover themselves;
you've got work to do. Lucky numbers 15,
19, 21, 33, 38

AQUARIUS: JAN 21 FEB 20
The last time you were here it looked
a little different.The second time around
you're amazed at how much wiser you
are and how stupid you were to get
sucked in. Thank God you know better
than to do it again. Lucky numbers 7, 10,
13, 19, 35

PIECES: FEB 21- MARCH 20
Whatever this is, don't make the mis-
take of thinking that you didn't do the
right thing. The rightness or wrongness
of things is always relative and other
people's values rarely apply to any of our
choices. Lucky numbers 12, 15, 19, 25, 30


LE0:JULY 21- AUGUST 20
Your need to keep the focus on your-
self would be easier to take if your ego
knew its place. Efforts to shine will suc-
ceed, but only to the extent that what you
have to share does as much for others
as it does for you. Lucky numbers 11, 15,
19, 26, 32

VIRG0:AUGUST 21- SEP 20
Too many things ate about to come
together for you to be getting cold feet.
What's in front of you wouldn't be there
if you couldn't deal with it. Right now that
means telling the truth and taking one
step at a time. Lucky numbers 15, 19, 25,
30, 35

LIBRA: SEPT 21- OCT 20
How did this get to be all about you?
The give and take factor is always an
issue with you. If your definition of fair
comes down to what's mine is mine and

esos .isL mme, it'sbtime fol2a
25, 29

SCORPIO:0CT 21- NOV 20
Too many ifs, ands, or buts are screw-
ing up your ability to enter into this with
the same level of confidence that was


ARIES: MARCH 21- APRIL 20
Too much has come to light for you to
worry about who knows what. It wasn't
your intention to stir up trouble.This is no
time to get weak in the knees. Get behind
the idea that you came here to change
things. Lucky numbers 8, 12,15, 16, 21

TAURUS:APRIL 21- MAY 20
No one expects you to do anything but
what you love. It's you who drives your-
self nuts with responsibility. Playing the
martyr has got to be getting old. Can you
picture yourself taking on a new role?
Luckynumbersl0,13,16,21,30

GEMINI: MAY 21- JUNE 20
What you didn't think would take off is
going over the top. Part of you is carried
away, but beware: being prone to ex-
tremes, you'd be wise to ride the fine line
between the thrill of it all, and the reality
of it. Lucky numbers 15, 19, 25, 28, 32

CANCER:JUNE 21- JULY 20
Maybe it's time for a reality check.
Whatever isn't working is due to break-
down; if you're aware of this, deal with
it sooner rather than later. Nothing will
grow until you stop long enough to nur-
ture it. Lucky numbers 16, 17, 21, 24, 32


** """ *~


MIAMI CITY BALLET PROGRAM I
"Allegro Brillante seemed especially symbolic as the curtain rose on four
couples in media ms, whirling with acute energy in Balanchine's exultation
in the inherited lexicon." Dance Magazine
2 PM ZIff Ballet Opera House $19, $29, $59, $69, $85, $169
NEW WORLD SYMPHONY
AMERICA'S ORCHESTRAL ACADEMY
"BEETHOVEN'S ODE TO JOY"
Opening the Adrienne Arsht Center Tel Aviv at 100 Festival of the Arts.
2 PM Knight Concert Hall $10.25, $20.25, $43.25, $63.25, $83.25, $123.25


Miarni city Bellet


THE COLOR PURPLE
Oprah Winfrey presents The Color Purple a soul-stirring musical based on
the classic Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Alice Walker and the Oscar-
nominated film by Steven SpIelberg.
8 PM ZIff Ballet Opera House $25, $45, $55, $67, $72


The Color Puple


THE COLOR PURPLE


THE COLOR PURPLE


7770 Color Purpe


THE COLOR PURPLE
2 PM ZIff Ballet Opera House\* $30, $48, $58, $70, $75
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $25, $45, $55, $67, $72
A LINCOLN TOWN HALL:
LINCOLN, MIAMI AND THE AMERICAN DREAM
Enjoy the music of Lincoln's time in performances by the 57-member wind
ensemble frorn the New World School of the Arts and the 60-member
Ambassador Chorale of Florida Memorial University. They also will perform a
segment of Aaron Copland's "Uncoln PortraIt," with narration by Alonzo
Mouming. Hear a Socratic dialogue, reflecting on the lessons of Uncoln's life and
words and a keynote pmsentation by author and scholar, Dr. Henry Louis Gates.
4 PM Knight Concert Hall .
FREE tickets must be reserved through box office.


Free Adrienne Araht Center Toure: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.


,R -ilWADE PR ESH










I I


111 _--LI1 LI;-.CI~IIIIIIIIIIIll~-Y ly


12-Pack Selected
Coca-Cola 3 00
Products...............912
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 2 87 ON 3


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


mailisin a .... W "
..add.A.J my

Danish 299
Pecan Ring......................J-
Tender Danish Dough
WilkMorg hean Fdung,
T@ ~ .With Los of P= cans,
r NA BR r I, 15-oz size
. SAVE UP TO1.30


Publix Deli Cooked
Top Round 499
Roast Beef ... ....LI~~~~~ lb
Slow Roasted for Full Flavor,
/ Ideal for Sandwiches, Platters or Appetizers,
Sliced Fresh in the Publix Deli "
SAVE UP TO 2.00 LB


Medium 99
Cooked Shrirnp.......... as
Farm-Raise frqviously frozen*
41 to 50 per Pound
am . SAVE U TO 5.00


Georgia-Grown as 100
Sweet Corn............UFOR f,-
White, Yellow, or Bi-Color Varieties,
A Good Source of Vitamin C, each
SAVE UP TO 2.80 ON 8


~~j~51~-


(I


Pu li M lk ........................3 09


.99


Publix Print Paper Towels


18-Pack Assorted 1899
Budweiser Beer.........1L
12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO i.50
(6-Pack Blue Moon Seasonal or Blue Moon
Belgian White Ale, 12-oz bot.... 6.99)


Prices effective Thursday, October 22 through Wednesday, October 28, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucle, Indian River,


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


8 G ROLL


whole


General
Mills ~'
Cereal.... .......... 100
Honey Nut Cheerios, 17-o ox, Cinnamon
Toast Crunch, 24.9-oz box, Lucky Charms,
Cookie Crisp, or Reese's Puffs,
15.6 to 18-or box Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 5 27


Doritos
Tortilla '
Chips................ fiC
Assorted Varieties, 11.75 .5-oz bag
(Excluding Baked, Light & Natural Chips.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP 70 3,99


941 VISA"





Oir'~. RW 21-P 09


MWOIAMI, F:LOMDA~br,


THE MIAMI TIMES


SECTION D


Transit Village Project:
"Changing the Face
of Liberty City"
Special to the Times
Miami-Dade County Commis-
stoner Audrey M. Edmonson along
with Mavor Carlos Alvarez hosted a
town-hall meeting, last week at the
Joseph Caleb Center in Brownsville,
in order to present the conceptual
design of the Seventh Avenue Tran-
sit Village project.
In 2006, Edmonson vowed to re-
vive the project which was almost
dead. She first met with the princi-
pal stakeholders, (area merchants,
business owners) and other interest-
ed parties currently doing business
at the Southeast corner of North-
west Seventh Avenue and Martin
Luther King, Jr. Boulevard to hear
their ideas and seek their input.
More than a year ago, Edmonson
and Alvarez met with the commu-
nity at the Joseph Caleb Center to
present the different components of
the project and receive suggestions
"==1-=: ookplace
with County staff and as a demon-
stration of her commitment, Ed-
monson earmarked the total $10.5
million of her portion of the GOB
Preservation of Affordable Housing
funding toward the project.
Last Wednesday evening the pub-
he was presented wit.h a status
report on the project, showcasing
the conceptual design of the Sev-
enth Avenue Transit Village facil-
ity. County staff was also at hand
to explain the several components
of the project: land acquisition and
transportation matters which are
subject to regulations by the Fed-
eral Transportation Administra-
tion; low income housing and eco-
nomic development opportunities
under the County's Housing Com-
munity Development Department;
small business prospects under the
County's Small Business Affairs
Department.
As customary in these meetings
and given the current state of the
economy, business opportunity and
job creation were the primary topics
of discussion between the partici-
pants and County leaders. Several
members of the community wanted
commitment and assurance from
the County that minority participa-
tion and employment opportunity
would be guaranteed.
County leaders stated that the
process will be open and competi-
tive and that minority firms and
area residents would be under con-
sideration for contract and employ-
ment possibilities.


a e.. *e


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e.... ..


Tipsfor ha ~nd~ing a successful business venuture


The Miami Times


USInOSS


Mattel


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Bar bleDol is










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


M -


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60 THE MIAMI TIMES, OCOE 12,2


OK to p~y esvrsdr~s


Claks wMI


. Copyrighted Material


Available from Commercial News Providers


^'- -' -r Hl't,'------ ~'~- -' --- rrCIC,





1


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


SECTION D


*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
*"WITH"*
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty



PLUMBING SERVICE
Sewer and Drain Cleaning.
Heaters instl. 305-316-1889
TONY ROOFildG
Shingles, re-roofing,
and leak re airs. Call
305-49 -4515.



Quality Home Child Care
.
Where All Kids Are Special!
DCF Lic # Fil MDO78. Call
Mrs. Rhonda 786-217-2436

)


BROWARD ROUTE
DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and t p.m Must have reb-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License
Apply in person at:
The MiamI Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

COLLECTIONS
Two years experience
required with strong organi-
zational and communication
skills to coordinate collec-
tion process and cash flow.
Fax resume to
305-758-3617

Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682




Don'tThrow Away Your Old
Records -
I Buy Old Records! Albums,
SLP's, 45's, or le sR
Caribbean, Latin, Disco
Rap. Also DJ Collections! Tell
Your Friends!
786-301-4180.


BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
Renew $60 G and Con-
cealed.Traffic School, four
hours, $28.786-333-2084


En P Ea
plumbing; hanging doors,
aying tiles, bathroom
remodeling. 305-801-5690


2053 ALI BABA AVENUE
Newly renovated, one bdrm,
one bath, tiled floors, new
appliances, central air, $500,
first e3c0u5ity378464 5-

2131 NW 100 Street
One bedroom, stove, refrig-
erator, air, carpet, bars, water'
fenced. Call 305-948-6913.
2257 N.W. 82 ST
Two bedrooms, one bath'
$830.FreeWater
305-642-7080
234 N.W.50 STREET
Two bedroom one bath, cen-
tral air. $1000 monthly.
786-285-5859
2395 N.W.95 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 OK! 786-200-8833
2411 NW 140 STREET

$6 om r s,86ne5 5981
2429N.W.104 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1395 mthly. Section 8 OK.
305-751-6720
2442 N.W.82 STREET
Two bedrooms, $800 month-
ly. $1000 to move in,
786-357-8885
247 N. E.77 Street
One bedroom, one bath, re-
frigerator, stove, microwave,
water, parking. $695 monthly
plus security. Section 8 ok.
786-216-7533
2561 YORK STREET
Three bedrooms, two
baths, Section 8 accepted.
$1342 monthly, $1200 de-
posit. Alarm System includ-
ed.786-768-6950, 561-699-
9679
5235 N.W. 26 Ave
One bedroom, air $500 mth-
ly, $800 5m3o 66

Two5b dSo hnCou h, all
appliances, air, security bars,
$800 a rtionth, first and last.
305-979-3509 after 5:30 p.m.
594 N.W. 67 STREET
F bed tw bathour rooms, o s'
Section 8 OK! $1700 monthly'
$1200 Deposit. Alarm System
7n -6950, 561-699-9679
600 N.W.116TERR
Two bedrooms, two baths.
'8ce ral5 9, ca .
6250 NM(. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath
$800.Two bedrooms one
bath $1100. Appliances,
Free.WaterIElectric.
305-642-7080
68 NW 45 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $850. Four bed.
room also available,
786-431-5520
6922 N.W. 2nd Court
Hu two bedrooms, one
bathe central air. Section 8
welcome. 305-490-7033
7735 N.W. 6 AVE.
Two bedrooms, two baths,
tiled and appliances. Section
. 8 OK. 786-277-4395
305-624-4395
7749 NW 2 COURT
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700 monthly. All applianc-
es included. Central air, free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

7820 N.E.1 AVENUE
Two bdrms, one bath. $925.
Appliances,6ree7wdter.

8451 N.W. 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, water, new
kitchen, aira ate$7006N50t
mov n. Terry6D erson, Bro-

9626 N.W. 8 AVE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 OKI $1342 monthly.
$1200 Deposit. Alarm System
included.
786-768-6950U 561-609 9679

KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses-
s 90 t t
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bdrmis o ct h,8 first
HOPWA welcome.
305-244-6845
MIAMI AREA
Beautiful three bedrooms,
two baths, central air, fenced
yard, inside parking. $1200.
954-446-4971
NEAR 54 STREET 12 AVE
Three bedrooms, two baths
appliances. $1500 mons y.
Section 8 welcome.
Available November 1
305-251-3668
NORTHWEST MIAMI
Two bdrms, air, washer, dryer
hook up, bars, fenced Section
8 ok. 954-260-6227
NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one beith.
305-778-3214
Iwo bedrooms, air. $895
monthly. Call for others.
786-306-4839


uu~r





SEffiaciecis I








1140 N.W W79 Stret
Frluee water. Mr. Wale #109 t
360mnhy 05-62-7080 9






1165at eN.Wn. 1 Stret
dmmhohd 14y lbudtites i-
$120wieekl, private ktchen, fis
5h,4ast e8 5a 8














2915 N.W.1556t Street
Prvae entranceta fire cable
$165 wneekly $600 t moe ky

5223 N.W7 COUR Sre
Include water and electricity.
$600 monthly. 305-267-09449








i45 moly. Ia rn eo ne
year786-2836-25840

Spac qious, o withbth, o-
pleteliy furnshed pantr area

Lande aplances, secued doors










ande windrows, cneramctile
includedhl. $525 monthly.







1305-836-839 SRE

neighborhoods, includes
utiliCeties, $5 0 ntlirt


l.Dn305-793-70002


2141 N.W.91st Street
One and two bedrooms, one
bath, private driveway, air.
786-663-0234

Thr2 1b8eN 09r4sPnR Tath,
central air, bars. $1000
monthly, $2500 move-in. Not
Section 8 affiliated.
Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776
2441 N.W. 104 ST
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Call 404-861-1965
2478 NW 43 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, many upgrades
throughout. $1500 monthly.
Section 8 welcome
305-331-2431
2480 N.W. 140 STREET
Opa Locka, two bedrooms,
one bath. $900 monthly. Call
305-267-9449.
2485 N.W.55th TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath se-
30 t w flooren'g
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
305-663-9353
2540 NW 82 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1300 mthly. 954-274-6944
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yar hbnor ce d. ownsvide
tio d and c ami i nlo rs
throughout. Stove and refrig
orator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Offig
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami,9FL
33142, 305-638-3899.
4915 NW 182 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1360 mthly. 305-527-0702
600 NW 98 STREET
reem 6ba -
6821 NW 6 AVENUE
This one is ready for you! Two
bedrooms, one bath, fenced.
Utilities included. $950
monthly. 786-202-8382
8373 NW 12 AVENUE

ThAeRCOe o ESnAeREAth,
lakefront property, fenced
yard. $1500 monthly. Section
8 Welcomed
305-621-3388, 305-607-1085
936 NW 29 STREET
SECTION 8 SPECIAL!
mdrn ly o b
able, two bedrooms, one bath
$950. 786-262-7313
9405B NW 4 AVENUE.
Quaint one bedroom, cottage
style. Bars, central air, water,
appliances included. $795
mthly. 786-514-1771
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, tiled, fenced
yard. Section 8 OKI $1600
monthly. 305-388-7477
Miami Gardens Area
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, Section 8, HOPWA. 954-
392-0070
NORTH MIAMI AREA
oa 5th6r -6b6drms, $850-
NORTHWEST
CENTRAL AREA
$500 move in. Section 8
referred. Two or three bed-
Poom vouchers accepted.
954-444-6403

OPA LOCKA AREA
um I Iroorm ov tedbath
786-541-3 tion 8


B uurtifu a ddSapacious
877 NW 73rd Street
Miami, FL 33150

Open House
Saturday and Sunday

RAL 62

NORTH MIAMI AREA
private entrance,
utilities included.
$500 monthly, $300
deposit. 786-205-
6729





1745 N.W. 47 STREET
Two bedrooms, huge den, ca-
port, air. Try $1900 down FHA
and $575 monthly. O
NDI Realtors 305-655-170
2231 N.W.59 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
bars, air. Try $1900 down
FHA and $575 monthly.
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700

234 N.W. 45 STREET
Two bedrooms den, garage,
air. Try $1900 down FHA and
$621 monthly. 00
NDI Realtors 305-655-17

Th 1be o s7 SeTRoEdETed,
air. Try $900 down FHA and
$799 monthly
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700


ApartmentS




GREAT NEWSl!!

PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
3650 NW 36th St.
Miami, FI 33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: 5698 00
APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANNCDES,
CE U ONRSE !!

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET
FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING: JULY 7, 2009
(305) 635- 9505
,
Income restrictions apply,
rents are subject to
change



1212 N.W.1 Avenue

ed .VoEn baOh $500 -
slove, rSeratord0r.

1215 N.W.103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Call 305-696-7667
Ask For Specials!
1229 N.W.1 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroornbone batha$550,

305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

1245 N. W. 58 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
5495 per month, all apple
ances included. Free 19
inch LCD T.V Call Joel*
786-355-7578

1250 N.W.60 STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1261 N.W.59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath,
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1306 N.W. 61 Street
Two bdrms. renov, security
gate, $600, 954-638-2972
1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One bdrm.
one bath $425. Ms. Shorty
786-2901438
1348 N.W.1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080

$5251 OE .3T o d-
room, one bath $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-

140 S.W. 6 St.

Two bHOr TEoAD bath.


14C2a5 6 h 4 et
Nice one bdrm, one bath,
$600 mthly. Includes refrig.
erator, stove, central air water
$725 to move in.
786-290-5498

Onel Or onAVb hUE425.
Two bedrooms one bath.
$525. 305-642-7080
1500 N.W.69Terrace
Beautiful one or two bdrms.
Section 8 Welcome. 305-546-
6533
1525 N.W. 1 PLACE
Move-in special First
month moves you in. $725

cmu d. taappal n in-9
inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1540 N.W.1st Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL
1st Mnth Moves You Ini
One bdrm, one bath,
$525 mthly.
Two bdrms, one bath,
5625 mthly.
Three bdrms, two balhs,
5725 minly
All appliances included
Free 19 inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1545 NW 8 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one Dath,
ceramic tile, central air.
carpet, balcony. new
kitchen, appliances, laundry
machine, quiel, parking
FREE WATER
Move in today!
786-506-3067


RALPH MANRESA
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext.109

c. e F, v..r, er., 3 n :e 1923
THE LARGEST MINORITY
OWNED NEWSPAPER
IN THE SOUTHEAST


~LL


SS


BEAUTIFUL
5120 N.W. 23 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, wa.
ter included. $600 monthly.
George 305-283-6804
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7000
Overtown, Liberty City-
Ope-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses.OneTwoand
Three Bedrooms. Same
day approval. For more
Informationispecials.
www.capitairentalagency
- com
DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bdrm, one bath, safe,
clean, new kitchen, new tile,
fresh paint, secured parking'
$595-$650. 305-528-7766
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in
special.One bedroom, one
bath, $495, two bedrooms,
one bath, 5595. Free
water
Leonard 786-236-1144
-
L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
LAKEFRONT
APARTMENTS
One and two bedrooms.
Two months free rent.
Now accepting Section 8.
305-757-4663

One L Et eSd oUoAmREtiled.
786-267-3199
MIAMI AREA
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Newly remodeled two bdrms.'
one bath, one bedroom one
bath, central air. $735 to
$1050. 305-206-1566
MIAMI-LITTLE RIVER
One bdrm, one bath, $650.
Remodeled, gated, parking.
N.E.78 St. 305-776-7863.
MOVE IN SPECIAL
750 N.W. 56 Street. Nice one
and two bedrooms. Starting
at $650 Gas and water in-
cluded. 786-262-6958
N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225

N. MIAMI AREA
One, two and three bdrms
available. 786-316-8373,
305-456-6883,786-234-6382,
305-316-3282
N.W. 2 Ave. and 63 St-
Clean, secure area, one
bdrm, one bath, $550 monthly.
786-393-4764
NORTH MIAMI AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
Section 8 welcome $800
monthly. Call 954-303-3368
or 954-432-3198
OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cl dedoSectionN8 welcome




00ndos/TownhouseS

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bedroomscentral air,
washer and dryer in unit.
$1500 move in special.
Section 8 welcome Call
Morris 305-525-3540

To Miami Giardweons7Artehaee
bedrooms, two baths.
3817 N.W. 213 Terrace.
Call 954-442-8198 or .
850-321-3798.
NEAR DOLPHIN STADIUM
(N.W. 196 Street) Three
bedrooms, one bath. $1300
monthly. 954-663-3123

Duplexe5
1023 N.W. 47 STREET
Three bdrms, one bath.
$1300. Studio one bath
$700. Appliances, free wa-
ter/electric. 305-642-7080
1173 N.W. 51 Ter.
Five bdms, two. baths, brand
new. $1956. $2400 to move
in. Section 8. 954-624-5906
1456 N.W.60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800. Stove, refrigerator, air..
305-642-7080
1590 N.W. 47 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air.
$650. Voucher accepted
305-638-5946 or 759-2280
1612 N.W.55 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, appliances.
Section 8 Welcome.
305-720-7067
1812 N.W.50 Street
two bdrms, one bath, $1100
monthly, Section 8 OK. 305-


751-6720, 305-525-0619


156 N.E.82nd Street
One bdrm $650, Two bdrm
$800. No deposit.
786-325-7383
1745 N.W.1 Place b
it art s. On arb us
room $400 monthly. $800
to move in. Efficiency $375
monthly, $750 to move in.
Call 305-696-2825.
1803 N.W. 1st Court
Move-in-Special, two bdrm,
b o ._
.
pliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1955 N. W. 2 Court
$450 MOVE IN! One bed-
room, one bath, $450. 305-
642-7080
1969 N. W. 2 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, 5550,
stove, refrigerator, air, free
water.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475. Call 305-642-7080
220 N.W.16 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$600. Appliances.
305-642-7080
2701 N.W. 1 Ave
MOVE IN SPECIAL. One
bedroom, one bath. 5500
month. 5750 to move in AII
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

2804 N.W.1 AVE
MOVE IN SPECIAL Two
bedrooms, one balh. 5600
mthly, 5900 to move in AII
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV, Call Joel
786-355-7578

2945 NW 46 Street

0625, b ob drooonres, batnh
bath, $775. Section 8 OK
786-412-9343
2972 N.W. 61 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, $550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
301 N.W. 177 STREET
Oversized one bedroom, one
bath, tiled floors, central air
and heat. Section 8 welcome.
$825 monthly. First and secu-
rity required. Call:
305-652-9343
3669Thomas Avenue
One bedroom 5550, two
bedrooms $650, stove, re-
fngerator, air. 305-642-7080
411 N.W. 37 STREET
Stualos, $425 monthly. All
appliances included. Call
Joel
.786-355-7578
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doprs. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
Smr t a21 5 9h9

Tw b0e0dNoo 26 A NRUeE,
orator, stove, air. Ask for Spe-
cials. 786-663-8862 '
5520 S.W. 32nd Street


b n b o omns
washer and dryer connection,
$850 monthly, $1450 move
in. 786-370-0832
585 NE 139 STREET
One bedroom. $680 mthly.
Firstdast7and3%cOurity.

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly One
wr rnan4d8 orn ydo
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699
7001 NW 15 AVENUE
Move-in special! One bed-
room, one bath. $399 per
month, 5600 to move in. AII
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD T.V. Call Joel:
786-355-7578

7523 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appliances. and
parking. Section 8. HOPWA
OK.$650. Call305-669-4320,
9 a.m.-7 p.m.
7525 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appliances, park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
$650, plus security. Call 305-
669-4320. 9 a.m. to 7 p.m-
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE

One andlNtw b Lms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron


gate doors. Apply at:









. ^CKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY


Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A.. F.A.A.P


JACKSON IVIEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway Medical Plaza
16800 NW 2 Ave. Ste 203
N. Miami Beach FL 33169* 305-652-6095



* Accidents Arresta
* DUI 8 Tickets Bankruptcy
* Criminal Defense WWs/Probate
* Personal Injury Blverce/Custody
100's of Lawyers Statewide



ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Snoc am1 and office visit after 14 days
A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St.. Italeah. FL.
(same as 103 St.)
(Please menuon ad)
305-824-8816
305-362-4611


Lejune Shoppi Center 305-887-3002
Hia eah, Fi. 33010 786-346-2141
BRING THIS Ao!

TiWiincliffGyritWrfic
Professional, Safe & ConfidentIal Services
Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYNs
Complete GYN Services 1
ABORTION START 5180 AND UP
305-621-1399



I I


II


Brownsville Affordable Housing Development Corporation
Request For Qualifications and Letters of Interest
For Design Build Services
Brownsville Affordable Housing Development Corporation is inviting the sub-
mission, of sealed Qualifications and Letters of Interest for DESIGN BUILD
SERVICES FOR FOUR NEW SlNGLE FAMILY HOMES TO BE BUILT ON
SCATTERED SITES IN BROWNSVILLE COMMUNITY OF UNINCORPORAT-
ED DADE COUNTY., Specifications will be available f9r pick up in the office of
Brownsville Development Corporation located at 2613 NW 54th Street Miami,
FL 33142 ( 305-636-2046 ext. 102 ) on October 26, 2009. All Qualifications
and Letters of Interest will be received until 2 p.m. November 13, 2009 at the
same address above. Late submittals will not be considered. AII submittals will
be reviewed by Brownsville Affordable Housing Development Corporation and
notification of selection will be completed by November 19, 2009. Brownsville
Affordable Housing Development Corporation reserves the right to reject any
and all submittals, to waive any and all irregularities in any submittal, and to
make awards in the best interest of Brownsville Affordable Housing
DevelopmentCorporation.


MIAIVil
Communill 4
Redevol011MORt Agencs

SOUTHEAST OVERTOWNIPARK WEST, OMNI
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES
PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE that the CRA Boards of Commissioners Meeting
of the Southeast Overtown/Park West and Omni Community Redevelopment
Agencies will take place on Monday, October 26, 2009 at 5:00 PM, at the Ice
Palace (at Big Time Productions), 59 N.W. 14m Street, Miami, FL 33136.
All interested persons are invited to attend. For more information please contact
the CRA offices at (305) 679-6800.
James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Southeast Overtown/Park West,
Omni & Midtown Community Redevelopment
Agencies
(#003307)





0D THE MIlAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


'~Y' ~- ~'J".


PROFESSIONAL CARE HRS CERTIFIED.
Low cOST SERVICE. SERVICE UP TO 10 WEEKS, $175
* Daily appointments Treatments upto l2 weeks.
* Abortion without sur
gery


Copyrighted _Material


Retail sales, ex-autos, better












~_


NOTICE OF GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION
IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
TO BE HELD ON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2009
PURSUANT TO RESOLUTIONS NOS. 09-09-0177, R-09-0391, AND 09-09-0376
FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTING THE OFFICES OF THE MAYOR AND
THREE CITY COMMISSIONERS WHO ARE TO BE ELECTED
FROM SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICTS 3, 4 AND 5

General municipal election will be held on Tuesday, November 3, 2009, from 7:00 A.M. until 7:00 P.M, in the
City of Miami, Florida, at the polling places in the several election precincts designated by the Board of County
Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida, at which election the qualified electors participating therein will
vote for the following municipal officers: The Mayor and three District Commissioners who are to be elected
from single member Districts 3, 4 and 5. A runoff election, if required, is to be held on Tuesday, November 17,
2009.

EARLY VOTING SITES AND SCHEDULE
CITY OF MIAMI GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 3, 2009

The City of Miami has established the following five EARLY VOTING sites for the November 3, 2009 General
Municipal Election.

FRIY VOTING SITFS '


MIAMI-DAD
M!M
LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF SOLICITATIONS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of solicitations for
contract opportunities, which can be obtained through the Department of
Procurement Management (DPM), from our Website: www.miamidade.gov/
dum. Vendors may choose to download the solicitation packagess, Mf
ghargg, from our Website under "Solicitations Online". Internet access is
available at all branches of the Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended
that vendors visit our Website on a daily basis to view newly posted solicitations,
addendum, revised bid opening dates and other information that may be
subject to change.

Interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management.
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1" Street, 13th floor,
Miami,. FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a norYiinal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an additional
$5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper copy of the
bid package through the United States Postal Service.

These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.
Miami-Dade County has streamlined the process for accepting bids
and proposals by requiring vendor affidavits only once at the time of
vendor registration.

Starting June 1, 2008, vendors will be able to provide required affidavitS
. .
one time, instead of each time they submit a bid or proposal. SolicitationS
advertised after June 1st will require that all vendors complete the new Vendor
Registration Package before they can be awarded a new County contract.
Obtain the Vendor Registration Package on-line from the DPM website.


I


Lemon City
Branch Library
430 NE 61st
t eertS


Allapattah
Branch Library
1799 NW 35th
ta nt


et _.. r

EARlY VOTING SCHEDULE I
Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fl. Sat-
10126 10127 10/28 10129 10130 10/31
7am-7pm 7am-7pm 7am-7pm 7am-7pm pm 9am-1pm
lill
9am-1pm

All City of Miami registered voters may complete early Voting at either one of these sites. Additionally, registered
voters who requested and received absentee ballots may drop off their QW.M ballot at these early voting sites.

TEMPORARY AND PERMANENT POLLING PLACE CHANGES
MIAMI GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 3 2009

Notice .is hereby given of the following polling place changes. These changes have been made by the
Supervisorof Elections pursuant to Section 101.71, Florida Statutes.


cSupervisor ot Elections, Miamt-Dac Count


summent to F.s. soo7sm, notice is hereby ghen to #to votens listed below. PTa be W that your eligibility to vote is in question based on information provided by the
State of Florida. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections in Miami-Dade County, Florida, no later than thirty days after the date of this Notice in order to receive
infounation regarding the basis for the potential ineligibility and the procedure in resolve the matter. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor
of Elections and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. If you have any questions pertaining to this matter, please contact the Supervisor of
Elections at 2700 NW 87' Avenue, Miami, Florida or call 305.499-8363.
AVISO LEGAl.
conform a F.S. 98.075(7), per el presented so notified a los electores enumerados a continuaci6n que segon informaci6n provista por el Estado do la Florkla, ae cuestiona su
elegibilidad para volar. Usted debe comunicerse con of Supervisor de Elecciones del Condedo de Miami-Dade. Florida, dentro do los treinia dias, a mda tarder, desda la feche de
este Aviso, can el fin de que ae le informed sobre el fundamento de la possible fate de idoneided y sobre el procedimiento para resolved el asunto. Si usted no crumple can so
obligaci6n de responder, as emitirk una declaracidn de falta do idoneklad, par parte del Supervisor de Elecciones, y su nombre so eliminar6 del aistema do inscripd6n de electores
do todo el estado. Si tions alguna duda aceIta do este toma, por favor, communiques con el Supervisor de Eleociones, en 2700 NW 87"' Avenue. Miami, Florida, o por tel@fono, al
305-499-8361
AVI LEGAL
Depre two Florld F.S.98.076(7), yap avize voth yo ki sou lis pl be la-a. Nap avize w ke baze sou enf6masyon nou reseywa nan men Eta Florid, nou doute si w elijib pou vote.
Yap mande nou kontakte Sip&viz@ Eleksyon Konte Miami-Dade, Florid. pa pita ke trant jou apre resepsyon Avi saw pou nou kapab reseywa enf6masyon sou kisa ye baze kestyon
ke w pa elilb la ept pou nou w6 kouman pou nou rezoud pwobl6m la. Si w pa royap ept w pa reponn a 16t sa-a, a gen dwa mennen Sip6viz6 Elek9yon an decide ke w pa elijib epi
yo va retire non w nan sist6m enskripsyon vot6 Eta-a. Si w genyon ankenn kestyon sou koze sa-a. tanpri kontakie Sip6viz6 Eleksyon yo nan 2700 NW 87" Avenue, Miami, Florid
**


TEMPORARY
Pdling Plan ChangaS
Precinct
New Location
Crown Plaza Hotel
509.0 950 Le Je Road
Urowne Plaza Hotel
510.0
553.0
7827 W Angler Strant


PERMANENT
Poll ng Place Changes
.
Preemct # New Location
Jesse J Mccra Jr
501.0
Elementary School
580.0 514 NW TP Street
4
551.0 155 n Ae


Po e~l presennt~dvteP: as&av aft OBftima Wood6 n conocida


I


Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk
(#003305)




NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT'
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive inforrrialities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. AII provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


009-KKO7 11/10/2009 Rebuilt Alternators and Starters fractured

004-KKO8 11/3/2009 Music Furniture and Equipment

002-KKO8 11/3/2009 Cosmetology Supplies, Equipment and Specialty
Furniture Catalog Discount
007-KKO6 10/27/2009 Sprinklers, Lawn and Turf

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools



CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Richard Falson







ne. .

R n una .
."._ __j
a F
an 0
908 FOLIS LM B 7 99

NC
2-
ounson.
',"v.'."
** s m'*
:-------ag ---5
' GARPETSALE
sun was son
EE if.
(""

," 0 '
I 51/0 Urr gg
C PET -
*- ---
LAMINATE 799
'TILE 697
BAMBOOmare $19

DON BAILEY FLOORS
83008isc.Blvd.,Miami
14831NW7thAve.,Miami
2208SouUsStateRd.7,Miramar
3422W.8rowanlBlad.,R.Laud.
12asnwas ave.,alent
Tr so


City of Miami City
Hall
3500 Pan American
D ive


Stephen P. Clark West Flagler
Center Branch Library
Lobby 111 NW 1st 5050 West Flagler
ertS at strant


yg,:~~Nobe s eeb gve o:: 3nLasC~~:t knoownadrs:


IFB NO. 189144


MOTOROLA RADIO PARTS AND ACCESSORIES


Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at
www.miamiqov.com/procurement Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE.WITH CITY
OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE NO.12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager

AD NO. 002076


S90 THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009












__ __ _


FOR THE WEEK OF OcTosen 20 26, 2009


1. SOUTH CAROLINA STATE (5-1) Takes top spot after subduing Florida
A&M, 35-20. NEXT: At Hampton's homecoming.
2. PRAIRIE VIEW A&M (4-1) Shut out Miss. Valley State, 38-0. NExt IIn
Baton Rouge to face Southem:
3. GRAMBLING STATE (4-3) Beat Alabama State, 23-12. NEXt Idle-
4. FLORIDA A&M (4-2) Fell to SC State, 35-20. NEXT: Hosts Norfolk
State
5. ALBANY STATE {7-0) Barely got past Clark Atlanta, 32-29 in OT. NEXT:
Hosting Tuskegee:
6. MORGAN STATE (5-1) Beat Howard 14.7. NEXT: At Delaware State.
7. SOUTHERN (4-2) Dominated Fort Valley State, 55-20, NEXt Hosting
-
Praine View.
8. FAYETTEVILLE STATE (5-3) -Beat JC Smith, 30-12. NEXT Plays for
CIAA West Div. title vs. St. Augustine's.
9. BOWIE STATE (6-2).- Beat St. Paul's 14-0. NEXT: Plays for CIAA East
Div. tale at Virginia Union,
10. TUSKEGEE (5-2) Idle. NEXT: SIAC showdown at Albany State.
(TIE) ALCORN- STATE (2-3) Beat Alabama A&M, 34-16 to take SWAc
East lead. NEXT' At Alabama State.




UN DERTHE BAN NER
...... ........ -
WHATS GOING ON IN AND AROUND BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


SIAC HOOPS TOURNEY TO ATL:
The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
has selected Atlanta,
Georgia as the host city
for its 2010 SIAC Men's
and Women's Basketball
Tournament. The event
will be held March 1-6
and games will be played
at Frank L. Forbes
Arena on the campus of
SIACTourney Logo MOTellOUSe College at
NEW HOME: SIAC Basketball the Atlanta University
Tourney relocating from
Bimiingham to Atlanta at Center.
Morehouse ,, One of the over-
arching priorities of the
conference office involves working every day to maximize
the championship experiences of both our student-athletes
and fans. Moving the tolarnament back to Atlanta, one of
the greatest destination cities in the country, will be a posi-
tive step forward in that regard," said SIAC Commissioner,
Gregory Moore.
,, -
We have also decided to move the championship
finals from Sunday afternoon to Saturday evening, which
we believe will enhance the exposure enjoyed by our stu-
dent-athletes, and generate more excitement for our fans.
In addition, during championship week there will be a host
of entertainment, social and community engagement events
within the Atlanta Unitensity Center and throughout the
City of Atlanta."
The 2()10 tournament will mark the 77th year for this
post season classic making it the oldest HBCU basketball
tournament in America, which began in 1934.

DRIVER IN-THE DRIVER'S SEAT:
.
Formei^Alcorn State wide receiver Donald Driver
etched his name.in the Green Bay Packers' record book on
Smiday against Detroit when he became the NFL team's all-
time leading receiver with 596 catches.
"It feels good," Dritter said of getting the team record.
"Pm happy. It's a long time coming. You never expect it to
happen. But it couldn't have come at a better place, at home
in front of your home crowd. It feels good."
After showing big play ability in college as a Brave
averaging 19.7 yards per catch on 88 career receptions,
Driver was selected in the 7th round of the 1993 NFL draft.
Once in the NFL, Driver worked relentlessly, eating the
notice and respect of his teammates and coaches. And, when
he got his chance, Driver never looked back. Since 2004'
Driver has never had fewer than 74 catches in a season.


r~o~ltl~.lh~:rrl~rrI3rr.l;~~ll;mn~c


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22
ESPNU- Live
Southern vs. Prairie w A&Mdn Ba nRRouge, LA 6:30
DAY,
Stillman vs. Lane in Tuscaloosa, AL 7
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
Ohio Dominican vs. Central State in Columbus, OH 12:30
Alabama State vs. Alcorn State in Montgomery, AL 1

Va e t vs c soFNaSnt a Bena, MS 1
Cheyney vs. West Chester in Cheyney, PA 1
Lincoln (PA) vs. Virginia State in West Grove, PA 1
Saint Paufs vs. Elizabeth City State in Lawrenceville, VA 1
Shepherd vs. West Virginia State in Shepherdstown, WV 1
Langston vs. Southem Nazarene in Langston, OK 2
Albany State vs Tuskegee in Albany, GA 2
Savannah State vs. Old Dominion in Savannah, GA 5
HOMECOMINGS
Texas college vs. Panhandle state in Tyler, TX 1
Delaware State vs. Morgan State in Dover, DE 1
Howard vs. NC A&T in Washington, DC 1

e ISt a sets 8dycetteville, No 2
Hampton vs. SC State in Hampton, VA 2
Morehousevs.ClarkAtlantainAtlantaGA 2
Arkansas-Pine Blufivs. Edward Waters in Pine Bluff, AR 2:30
Florida A&M vs. Norfolk State in Tallahassee, FL 3
B.-Cookman vs. W-Salem State in Daytona Beach, FL 4
Shaw vs. Uvingstone in Raleigh, NC 4
Chowan vs. Johnson C. Smith in Murfreesboro, NC 6
TV GAMES

rgni Uo Bowie State in Richmond, VA (HC) 1

SIAQ
Either Albany State or Tuskegee has won
every SIAC grid title since 2000 so its no wonder
this year's title could come down to Saturday's
game.
ASU got a big scare and was almost knocked
fromtheunbeatenranksSaturdaybyClarkAtlanta
and its new coach Keith Higdon, escaping with a
32-29 overtime win. Now the Golden Rams will
try to end a three-game losing streak to the Golden
Tigers, who've won the last three SIAC champion-
ships.
Running back Demetrice Johnson (84.7 rush-
ing ypg., 11 TDs) and QB AJ. McKenna (176.9
passing ypg., 14 TDs, 1 int.) are the top offensive
threats for the Golden Rams,
ASU comes into the game ranked 8th nation-
ally and second in the NCAA Div. II Super Region
II. Tuskegee is ranked 18th.
The outcome will alstibreak atie in the series.
Both teams have won 18 games with one game
ending in a tie,

MEAC
After its big win over Florida A&M Saturday,
South Carolina State hopes to keep its drive alive
for a second straight MEAC title as it travels to
Hampton (3-3, 2-2) for the Pirates' homecoming
(2 p.m.). Hampton will be trying to recover from
Inst week's 46-6 drubbing at the hands of cross-Bay
rival Norfolk State.
Morgan State (5-1, 3-0), currently tied with
.
SCSU for the MEAC lead, will try to keep pace
with the Bulldogs as they travel to play Delaware
State in its homecoming (1 p.m.) in Dover, Del.


'^~CKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


CIAA 0 syn ngAER EGWE
DIV ALL
DIVISION W L W L
Bowle State 5 0 6 2
Virginia IUnion 4 1 5 3
ElizCityState 3 2 5 3
VirniaState 2 3 4 4
n A) 0 0 3 4
W.Divisl0N
FayettevilleState 4 1 5 3
Shaw 3 2 6 2
St.Augustines 3 2 3 5
J. C. Smith 2 3 3 5
Chowan 1 4 1 7
Livillgstone 0 5 0 8
CIAA PLAYERSOF THE WEEK
OFE UNEMAN Paul Murphy, Jr., DT, FSU
RECEIVER Robert Hollard, Fr. CHOWAN 18
221 d"* MS
OFF BACK C J. Western, Sr, QB, CHOWAN *32
so or rardeTos a
recov tor To u s....-- . 0 ri, .: 1.0
LB HaUd.,SAC-10tackles,2E.,1sack
DEF BACK 0uIntez Smith, Sr., CB, SHAW *1
recov for TD. 74-yard int. ret. 10< TD. 6 I vs CU.
BOOKIE Tony Goodman, S/KR, CHOWAN 3
Solos,4ast.2PRfof41yds.,2KOratfor71.
SPECIALTEAMS TyroneBoldenSo.,TE, SHAW
- Blocked two punts in win over Chowan.


SIAC "a '8:::::?
CONF ALL
W L W L
Albany State 6 0 7 0
Tuskegee 5 1 5 2
FortValleyState 4 2 5 3
Morehouse 4 2 5 2
Benedict 3 3 5 3
Miles 3 4 3 5
ClarkAtlanta 3 4 2 4
KentuckyState 2 4 4 4
Stillman 1 5 2 4
Lane 0 6 0 7
SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Demetrice Johnson, Sr., RB, ASU
- Bushed for 106 yards on 18 carries and scored 3
TDs vs CAU. Also had 4 receptions for 51 yards
DEFENSE Charlie Wilson, Jr, LB, MHC Had 12
tackles. 8 solos, 3 sakes, 1 recovery for TD and a
break-up vs. Land
1 @os 2 Tm .a taf
Dadd Carter, RB, ME 18 carries, 125 yards,
1 1 aMS Juan Bongarra, Sr., K, ASU
"3 d..,:1...?.1.....=:.1 ,al.,r....].) p..>.,
-
OFFENSIVE LINE Jeremiah Anbraba, So., OL,
BC-2knockdowns.2pancakes.92%grade


SWAC ATH O NCE
DIV ALL
E.DIVISION W L W L
Alcorn State 2 1 2 3
Alabama A&M 1 2 4 3
MissValleySt. 1 2 2 4
JacksonState 1 2 1 5
Alabama State 0 3 3 3
*DIVISION
PrairieViewA&M 3 0 4 1
Ark.PineBluI 2 1 3 2
GramblingState 2 1 4 3
Southem 1 1 4 2
Texas Southem 1 1 2 4
SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE K. J. Black, Jr., QB, PV A&M -
Third straight POW award after completing 17 of
2 passes for 235 yards and 3 TDS vs. MVSU.
OFFENSE Gill Exma, So., LB. GSU 15
tackles, 9 solos, 1.5 sacks, 2.5 TFLys. Alabama
acouse Tim serry, so. DB, su 4
tackles, 2 interceptionsvs. Ft Valley St
E BIAo ed nnt II t
va.MVSU.


MEAC,,s,"g;;:,ase,
CONF ALL
W L W L
SC State 3 0 5 1
Morgan State 3 0 5 1
FloidaA&M 2 1 4 2
NCA&TState 2 2 4 3
Norfolk State 2 2 3 3
Hampton 2 2 3 3
Bethune-Cookman 1 3 2 4
DelawareState 1 3 1 5
Howard 0 3 2 4
# W-Salem State 0 0 0 5
,

MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Dennis 8town, Sr., QB, NSU 18
of 21 for 229 yards, 2 TDs, 7 carries, 30 yards 3
TDs vs. Hampton,
DEFENSE Jayson Ayals, Jr., DE, SCSU 6
tackles, 4 solos, 1 sack. 3 tackles for losses, 2
ownisms, Ps, as.HowAno-29
carries for 94 yards in less to Morgan State
S IA 3 ya 1A i d
vs. Howard
UNEMAN Jerome Johnson, Sr., LB, NSU 89%
grade, 3 pancakes vs Hampion.


INDEPENDENTS
W L
Langston 6 2
Concordia 5 3
Tennessee State 3 4
WVa.State 2 5
SavannahState 1 4
N. C. Central 1 8
CentralState 1 6
Uncoln(Mo.) 0 7
EdwardWaters 0 7
TexasCollege 0 7
Cheyney 0 8
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Michael Johnson, QB, NCCU
. 1-- I .... I. ..1 .11 pl :0.:.. .18 s..3, a.ni
2"0 *** E = air 1.19 *** at I'.6 vb." *:
Central Methodist
DEFENSE O'Hara Fluellen, DB, UNCOLN
(MO) 3 interceptions, 2 tackles, 1 assist in
Acent a terrankle Cardelle, PIC
NCCU Made 3 held goals, kicked 5 PATS
p nts a 2-pt, conversion for 16


GramblingState23.AlabamaStatel2

Michigan 63, Delaware State 6
Morehouse 35, Lane 33 -
Murray State 9, Tennessee State 6
NC Central 52, Central Methodist 7
Norfolk State 46, Hampton 6
Prairie ViewA&M 38, Miss Valley State 0
SC State 35, Flonda ALM 20
Saint Augustine's 31, Livingstone 7
Shaw 53, Chowan 20
Southem 55, Fort Valley State 23
Stillman 20, Miles a
Texas Southem 19, Jacksort State 17
UC Davis 45, Winston-Salem State 14


ig a4Hward7
Virginia Union 31. Virginia State 3
OCTOBER 17
Albany State 32, Clark Atlanta 29, OT -
Alcom State 34, Alabama A&M 16
Benedict 28, Kentucky State 14
Bethune-Cookman 34, Savannah State 24
Bloomsburg 28, Cheyney 6
Bowie State 14. Saint Paul's 0
Central State 22, Lincoln (MO) 0
Concordia 20, Edward Waters 12
Elizabeth City State 54, Lincoln (PA) 18
Fayetteyllie State 30. Johnson C. Smith 12
Glenville State 35, West Virginia State 17


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
With one showdown out of the way South
Carolina .State's 35-20 handling of Florida
A&M in last week's big MEAC match-up it's
time this week for a few more-
This Saturday, surprise CIAA East Division
leader Bowie State (6-2, 5-0) plays tq clinch the
division crown and a spot in the league's Nov. 7
championship game when it travels to Richmond'
Va. (1 p.m.) to take on second-place Virginia
Union (5-3, 4-1) in the Panthers' homecoming
game. Fayetteville State (5-3, 4-1) also plays to
clinch the CIAA West Division title and its spot
.
in the Nov.7 title game when it plays in its home-
coming (2 p.m.) Saturday vs. St. Augustine's
(3-5, 3-2). .
in a game Thursday in Baton Rouge, La., to
be carried live on ESPNU, West Division leader
Prairie View A&M (4-1, 3-0) is at Southern
(4-2, 1-1) in a big SWAC divisional contest (6
P .m.).
Saturday in Albany, Ga., Albany State (7-
0, 6-0), the only undefeated team in black col-
lege football, has its SIAC showdown (2 p.m.)
with Jongtime nemesis and perennial conference
kingpin Taskegee (5-2, 5-1). The game will be
carried live on ESPN 360 and re-aired Sunday on
ESPNU at 12:30 p.m.
These are the top games this iveek as the
2009 season swings towards home.

CIAA
The East Division showdown features two
teams with new coaches.
Bowie State was picked by league coaches
to finish fourth in the East Division but, under
new head man Damon Wilson, the Bulldogs
have prospered. Two keys have been the running
of Rodney Webb (87.9 ypg., 10 TDs) and the
quarterback play of Tyrae Reid and Emmanuel
Yeager. '
BSU's only CIAA loss was to Fayetteville
State (30-20 on Sept. 12) when they were vic-
timized by five interceptions. The Bulldogs got
critical wins beating two-time defending champ
Shaw 31-24 in overtime on Sept. 26 and surviv-
ing a 37-33 shootout with Elizabeth City State
two weeks ago.
Virginia Union, also playing under a new
coach in Michael Bailey, suffered its only CIAA
loss in a 13-9 decision to St. Paul's on Oct. 3.
VUU currently leads the CIAA in scoring defense
(16:4 ppg.) and rushing offense (212.4 ypg.), a
lethal combination. The Panthers have rushed
for 788 yards in their last two games, wins over
Lincolu (298) and Virginia State (490).
In the West, Fayetteville State lost two non-
conference games to start the season and his since
won five of six. It's only CIAA blemish was a 25-
20 loss to Virginia State where the Broncos gave
up two long scores on turnovers. Among head
coach Kenny Phillips' weapons is placekicker
Austin Turner, who has converted 16 of 25 field
goal attempts.
The Broncos' opponent, Saint Augustine's
under head coach Michael Costa, has gained


Photos by Joe Daniels
NEW COACHES BATTLE: New Bowie State
hisad coach DamonWilson goes into Richmond,
Va. looking to clinch CIAA East title vs. Virginia
Union and new head coach Michael Bailey.


over 300 yards of total offense and scored 27
points or better in five straight games, all against
CIAA opponents. Two of those games how-
ever have been close losses to Shaw (42-32) and
Elizabeth City State (29-27). The Falcons have
. .
hated opponents to minus net rushing yards in
two consecutive games.

SWAC
Henry Frazier's Prairie View squad is rid-
ing high atop the SWAC West Division coming
off its first win over Grambling in 22 meetings
two weeks ago and last week's 38-0 shutout of
Mississippi Valley State.
The Southern game will match perhaps the
two best quarterbacks in the conference.
Prairie View quarterback and Western
Kentucky transfer K. J. Black is perhaps the hot-
test player in the league and the early favorite for
the league's offensive player of the year award.
Not only did his sterling play help produce
the landmark win over Grambling, but Black has
gone 3-1 in his four starts, completing 72.9% (70
of 96) of his passes for.861 yards and 7 TDs with
just one interception. He's also rushed for 124
yards and 4 TDs. He is averaging 215.2 passing
yards per game, second best in the SWAC, and
leads the league in passing efficiency (170.2),
Southern QB Bryant Lee, the 2008 SWAC
offensive POY, is just ahead of Black in passing
stats and just behind him in efficiency, averaging
a league-best 229 passing yards thru six games
with 14 TDs and 6 interceptions. Lee is complet-
ing 58.7% of his passes (108 or I8-11 and has as
efficiency rating of 140.1.
But the QB comparison is not the only inter-
esting match-up in this game. Southern leads the
league in scoring (37.5 ppg.) while Prairie View
has the stingiest defense (14.0 ppg.). The Panthers
will have to accotuit for Southern W11 Junmorris
Stewart, the SWAC receiving leader (47 recep-
tions, 8 TDs). Prairie View also has weapons
in RB Donald Babers and wideout Anthony
Weeden.
. Also in the SWAC, Alcorn State (2-3, 2-1),
coming off a big 34-16 win over Alabama A&M
Saturday and playing well behind hot QB Tim
Buckley, puts its newfound East Division lead on
the line when it travels to Montgomery, Ala., to
face Alabama State (3-3, 0-3).


EAST MEN
Virginia Union
Elizabeth City State
Bowie State
Virginia State
St. Paul's


WOMEN


1. MoMg State
2. South Carolina State
3. Norfolk State
4. Hampton
5. Bethune-Cookman
6. North Carolina A&T
7. Copping State
8. Florida A&M
9. Delaware State
10. Howard
11. Maryland Eastern Shore

ALL- MEAC FIRST TEAM
Michael Deloach, NSU (POY)

ggieFHekn sS
Neal Pitt, UMES
Sam coleman, CSU
ALL- MEAC SECOND TEAM
Vincent Simpson, Hampton
Paul Kirk trick Howard

Michael Harper, CSU
Kevin Thompson, MSU


17CM T
2. Maryland Eastern Shore
3. Coppin State
4. Delaware State
5. Morgan State
6. Hampton
7. Florida A&M
8. Howard
9. Bethune-Cookman
10. South Carolina State
11, Norfolk State
ALL- MEAC FIRST TEAM
Corin Adams, MSU (POY)
m OmakNNC &TT
April McBride, UMES
Sarah Bolden, B-CU
ALL- MEAC SECOND TEAM
Zykia Brown. Howard
Deidra Jones, FAMU
D metriBe U
Lamona Smalley, NCA&T
na anaarn


WEST
JC Smith
Fayetteville St.
Shaw
St. Augustine's
Livingstone
Chowan


WEST
JC Smith
St.Augustine's
Shaw
Fayetteville St.
Livingstone
Chowan


EAST
Bowle State
Virginia State
St. Paul's
Virginia Union
Elizabeth City St.


ALL-CIAA
Duke Crew, BSU
Trent Bivens, ECSU
Ariel Roblnson, FSU
Jerry HollisJOSU
Calvin Gunning, LC
Hayward Fain, SAC
Chris Jordan. SAC
Ibn Saed RasouII, SPC
Raheem Smith, Shaw
Brandon ByersonVUU
Braxton Byerson, VUU


ALL-CIAA
Teanusha Robinson, BSU
Bianca Lee, BSU
Erica Gilley, FSU
L'Oreal Price, FSU
Demetria Bell, JCSU
Brittany Wright, LC
Keyona Bryant, SAC
Allison Sikes, SAC
Juantale Cooke. SPC
Tatiana Ellis, SPC
Angela Brown, VSU
Tonyae Smith. VUU


100 THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 21-27, 2009


;M. =111AkalillF 215 '\.4
RAG ING m s--
TOP QBs: Prairie View's Black
BAT TL ES (top.) and Southem's Lee (bot-
tom) cany teams into SWAC
LOOM West Division showdown.

SHOW DOWNS IN CIA A, SIAC AND SWAC; CIAA &
MEAC HOOPS PICKS; SIAC TOURNEY MOVES


Title clinching time in CIAA?


BCSP Pre season Hoops Notes ----- Selections by league head coaches and SI)s ----


MEAC PICKS


CIAA PICKS




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