Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00852
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: October 14, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00852
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text



























Volume 87 Number 7 Nil!AMI, FI ORaoss3, ~.- M, ~:si-r~ 1 42-0, 2e009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Board as long as they paid a lease.
Buford was stunned then; to receive
a letter, dated Sept. 25, from the Milto-
ria R. Fordham, President/CEO of the
Martin Luther King Economic Develop-
ment Corporation (MLKEDC). The let-
ter stated: "Martin Luther King Board
of Director has denied your request
Please turn to WAR 6A FORDHAM


By Sandra J.. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

After they left the American Legion
Way, Make A Wish Veterans, Inc./
VetsUnited were searching for a place
to call home. They settled for three
months at 6102 Northwest Seventh.
Avenue, located in Martin Luther King


ff


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IJInI.I.11nnIInill.nills..Il...l...Ill...1,.J.II..I
zzzzenessessexe5CH 3-DIGIT 326
510 P1
LIBRARY OF FLA. HI
205 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117097
GAINES VILLE FL 3 26 11-7 0 07


Temporal Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


Make A Wish Vets argue lease agreement with Martin Luther King


Blvd., where they fed 20 to 50 veter-
ans daily and aided them in receiving
their benefits. Volunteers donate their
time to assist local veterans who are in
need.
Charles Buford, president of Vet-
sUnited.org, says that the agreement
for them to stay at 6102 Northwest
Seventh Avenue was made by the


SPENE-JNESCHIVERTON


HARDEMON


BV Tariq Osborne .


FireWorshipCenter.Theforumwasat-
tended by more than70 people.
The intent of the four-part study,
the first part of which was released
on Thursday, Oct. 8, is to determine
whether the American Recovery and
Investment Act is meeting its goals.
"It's not enough to just say e've cre-
ated three million jobs," said Benford.
"The important question is; jobs for
whom?"
The study, which took.place in four
major metropolitan areas in Florida in-
cluding Miami-Dade County, concluded
that there is a geographic link between
race and not only wealth, but the op-
portunity to succeed. The areas were;
Miami-Dade and Broward Counties,
The Orlando area, Tampa/St. Peters-
burg area, and the Jacksonville region.
The results are disturbing.
"If we look at the funding streams
as pipelines, we wouldn't say they are
broken," said Gihan Perefa, Executive
Director of the Miami Workers Center,
"We would say they are functioning
just ad they always have, with a race
bias. Providing funds for shovel ready
Please turn to CENTER 6A


According to Hashim Benford, of the
Miami Worker's Center, the recent fore-
closure has represented the biggest
loss of Black wealth ever. "The crisis hit
us first, and it hit us worst," he said.
Benford made this statement at the
Harvest Fire Worship center, 18291
Northwest 23rd Avenue. He was an-
nouncing the results of a study jointly
conducted by the Kirwan Institute for
the study of race and ethnicity, the Re-
search Institute for Social and Economic
policy, (RISEP) and the Miami Worker's
Center. The announcement was imme-
diately followed by a town-hall style fo-
rum. Participants included Radio per-
sonality Joy-Ann Reid; H. Leigh Toney,
Executive Director of Miami Dade Col-
lege, North Campus's Meek Entrepre-
neigrial Education Center, Shannon
Reaze, of the Power U Center for Social
Change, Subhash Kateel, of the Florida
Immigrant Coalition, Andre Williams,
Miami Gardens Councilman, Marleine
Bastien, of Haitian Women of Miami,
and Dr. Don Clark, Pastor of Harvest .


--MiamiTimes photo/Trarig


By John Lewis
As readers may know, Chair-
man Range} has been subject-
ed to repeated attacks based
on allegations that he commit-
ted errors in complex finan-
cial disclosure and tax filings.
What readers may not know
is that Chairman Rangel him-
self asked the Committee on
Standards of
Official Con-
duct, popu-
larly known
as the "ethics
committee,"
to conduct a
thorough re-
view of any
possible er- LEWIS
rors. Mr. Ran-
gel hired on his own initial.
tive ---- an accountant to thor-
oughly review his records and
file corrections.
The ethics committee is con-
ducting its review and will pres-
ent its findings to the House
when its review is completed.
This is the normal process -
no special treatment, no cor-
ners being cut. And that's how
it should be
Regrettably, Republican
members repeatedly attempt-


a
CHARLES RANGEL


ed to make an end run around
the non-partisan ethics com-
mittee. These Republican at-
tempts would short-circuit the
committee's review while pre-
suming Mr. Rangel is guilty of
ethical violations. This violates
the core American principle of
the presumption of innocence.
Mr. Rangel did the right thing
- responding to press reports
by reviewing his own reports.
When errors were found, he re-
acted not by hiding or covering
up, but by aggressively trying
to discover what went wrong.
The partisan howling for him
to step down by the opposition
makes for good headlines, but
sets a terrible precedent.
Members in the future will
think twice about correcting
mistakes, weary of enduring
Please turn to LEWIS GA


- Photos Courtesy of FAMIJ Athletics/Vaughn Wilson


of 25 passes for 144 yards of the Rattlers'
262 total yards.
"I wouldn't call it a bad game at all," Pul-
ley said. "The game is over now. We've got
to put this game behind us. I think every-
body is excited about it. We've got a tough
game coming up next week against South
Carohna State and hopefully this game
prepared us and we'll come out and have
a better game.
. Pulley scored on a 26-yard run with just
under five minutes left in the third quar-
ter. That brought the Rattlers into double
digits against the Hurricanes for only the


fourth time in eight meetings, as the Rat-
t1ers trailed 38-13 after Trevor Scott's
PAT.
While Miami answered whatever con-
cerns there might have been about a let-
down following a win over Oklahoma last
week, Hurricanes coach Randy Shannon
was able to get many of his second-string
players into the game. Damien Berry made
his first appearance on offense and led the
Hurricanes' rushing game with 162 yards
on 14 carries.
The Hurricanes racked up 370 yards of
total offense.


WEDNESDAY


THURSABY


FiRIDAY


SATURDAY


SUNDAY


MONDAY


TUESDAY


THOUSANDS

CELEBRATE

CARNIVAL IN MIAMI

Haitian and Caribbean groups
unite to celebrate their
uniqueness


M A JOR PL AYERS


ki ".B~


Miami Workers Center: Stimulus distribution biased


BENFORD: FUNDS NOT GOING WHERE THEY ARE `MOST NEEDED


Rattlers


fall short

9
HV e

MIAMI 4 8 1 6 FAMU
MIAMI GARDENS The University of
Miami football team spotted FAMU a first-
quarter field goal, then turned on jets that
were just too much for the Rattlers.
FAMU was forced to chase from midway .
through the opening 15 minutes Saturday
and Miami only needed star quarterback
Jacory Harris for one half in a 48-16 vic-
tory at Land Shark Stadium.
The 32-point difference was the closest
that the Rattlers played Miami since their
third meeting in 1992.
"We've got speed," FAMU coach Joe Tay-
10r said. "They've got speed. They've got
a little bit more, but the bottom line was
their interior line on both sides."
Harris left after putting up 217 passing
yards, and his back-up A.J. Highsmith fin-
ished up for another 38 on 3-for-3 pass-
ing. Harris completed 16 of 24 passes to a
receiver corps that harassed the Rattlerst
secondary all night.
"I there were some times that we didn't
compete in the two-out routes," Taylor
said, "but of course, that's Miami doing an
outstanding job.
Quarterback Curtis Pulley scored the
Rattlers' only touchdown late in the third
quarter, but by then Miami had raced to a
six-touchdown lead. Pulley completed 10


John Lewis speaks up


S915801 00 0


7Day
Weather
DOrecast a
v.othencom
















- - -- ~-~I------- ------- I


I


BLCSMS OTO TERONDSIY


2A THF MII\MI TIMES. OCTOBER 14-20. 2009


Mm Nau aUM r ocP bhherAAs nation
Subscripuon Rales- One Year $45 00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign 560.00
7 percent sales tax lor Florida residents
Periodrcals Postage Pald at Miami. Florida
Postmaster Send address changes to The Miami Times P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vrsta Station. Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press belie1,as that America can best lead Ihe world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person regardless of race, creed or color his or her human and legal ngnts Hating no person fearing no person the
Black Press strives tonelp every person in the IIrm bellet Ihat all persons are hurl as long as anyone is held back
- -
*d


EI) fNiami Eimes
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street
Miami, FIDrida 33127-1818
PCMitnOtil Box 2702 ami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1988
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Ementus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


...Copyrig hteg Material -
annes aggillin.. am. ...e SAP Millam** =*** 1 15
aggap-..uggling ...=----=m..===* 411> aime-=ualital II> ===--=** Miltillill id it


. "S-yndicated Content




le 9pi Commercial News Providers


. I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action . "
Malcolm X


OPTNION


;ii;


"F


m..anen= ..=Iii ee 45511 ***

~






















I I


No petition signing for candidates


The Ahami 71mes welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback makes for a
healthy dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be bnef and to the point, and may be edited for grammar, style and clarity. All letters must be signed and must include the name,
address and telephone number of the writer for purposes of confirming authorship,
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770, Email: mlamiteditorialth
bellsouth.net.


Qle ;tf)C #$(1# EitWC


LO3C:AL, COM~MENT'ARY -- OU~.R C~OnlMMUINITY VE~N'TS


BLACKS M~UST CONTROL ~THEIR OWN DESTINY


Candidates excuses for

missing debate unacceptable


Yes I would.
Jackson is a
community
hospital, It's
needed. We've
still got a lot of
homeless peo-
ple and poor
people who
need medi-
cal coverage. Jackson needs to
be there---for another hundred
years. I personally will go to
Jackson before I'll go anywhere
else. It needs to stay. And if nec-
essary; we need to support it.


a


Adults dropped the ball where big game was concerned (


Pnucipal. For 30 minutes, he
railed how the Principal took
the concessions away from his
Alumni Association and how
he has revoked other privileges
as well. In the Principal's de-
fense, I was told by someone
very close to the situation that
there was no accountability to
the funds that were generated
by the Northwestern Alumni
Association and all they were
concerned about was football,
as compared to Central's Alum-
ni Association, who gave their
graduating seniors 50 Laptops
Computers to take to college
last year.
While l kept trying to convince
Northwestern Alumni President
the concept of "The 'Commis-
sioner's Cup" was greater than
the personal conflict he had
with his Principal and would
eventually pay huge dividends
to both communities, he even-
tually said he could not back
it. Not only did he not back it,
he and others tried to stop the
award from being given at all by
urging members of the School
Board to stop it. All I could say
was: "Damn Black People."


even further, ESPN was slated
to televise the game across the
country. Without a doubt, the
game between these two long-
standing rivals have now been
elevated to national promi-
fience. It was because of this
fact that I, as Central's Alumni
President, reached out to the
Northwestern Alumni Presi-


(The Soul Bowly, m recent years
it has lost its luster. (Jackson
has improved greatly this year,
and might have something to
say about this in the near fu-
ture.) We also respect the Tor-
nadoes from Booker T. Wash-
ington, who has proven that it
also should be recognized na-
tionally. The idea behind the


Those of you who follow this
article knows my heart. I'm a
product of Black Miami, born
in Overtown, raised in Scott
Projects, and now residing in
North Miami. When I look at
the enclaves that make up the
Black communities here in
South .Florida, I still see the
possibility of what can be, in-
stead of the missed opportuni-
ties that our communities failed
to capitalize on in years past. I
graduated from Miami Central
and came back from college to
coach at, among other schools,
Northwestern in the early 90's.
I stopped only because I had to
attend to my wife's and I busi-
ness, Afro-In Books & Things,
which we owned for 13 years,
I am Miami as far as .I'm con-
cerned, and I want nothing but
the best for our communities,
which is an adequate backdrop
for which I'm about to discuss,
Recently, all of Black Miami
was caught up in the hype sur-
rounding the big game between
Miami Northwestern vs. Miami
Central. To add to the hype,
both were ranked numbers 1 &
2 in the state. To take the hype


This is an open letter to the
City of Miami Residents and
District 5 Constituents. As you
know, on Oct. 5, The African
American Grassroots Com-
mittee, The African American
Christian Council of Clergy
and Miami Community Police
Benevolent Association Foun-
dation sponsored/presented,
The City of Miami candidate
debate. The purpose of the
debate was to, provide a ven-
ue wherein the City of Miami
Residents/District 5 constitu-
ents could hear the agendas of
the candidates for the offices
of Mayor and Commissioner
of District 5. The two "front
runners" thought it robbery to
appear in the Black commu-
nity; therefore, they were no
shows.
During the debate a ru-
mor surfaced that Commis-
sioner Michelle Spence-Jones
appeared in the parking lot
switching cars with a cam-
paign worker, but chose not to
come in, Also, Commissioner
Spence Jones's response to the
many inquiries as to why she


answer any questions regard-
ing concerns of this segment
of the city's population. Both
of the aforementioned candi-
dates have chosen to ignore
the Black community. In my
opinion, Spence-Jones feels
that she's going to win because
she is still holding on to former
Commissioner Barbara Carey-
Shuler's popularity in District
5 and Mayor Manny Diaz will
raise all the money she needs
to put in the Black community
to secure the votes.
However, Commissioner
Tomas Regalado may feel that
he can avoid the Black com-
munity because of his years of
supporting the late Commis-
sioner Arthur Teele.
Both these seats are crucial
to the socioeconomic condi-
tions in the Black community,
without sensitive and compe-
tent leadership in the Mayors
office, the Black community
is going to get screwed again-
In these difficult times Black
folks need to be keenly aware
in this election. We need to
know what individuals are go-


he idea of "The Commissioner's Cup" was born out of the real-


dent. I wanted to cement what
was already a reality: to elevate
this rivalry amongst the elite ri-
valries in the county. We would
call it: "The Commissioner's
Cup."
The idea of "The Commis-
sioner's Cup" was born. out of
the reality that two neighbor-
ing communities, that sat only
a mere 24 blocks apart, was
producing perhaps some of the
best football in the country.
While we respect the rivalry
between The West us. Jackson


Commissioner's Cup also came
about because, although most
of the students that attend
both schools live within the
boundaries of District 2 (Coun-
ty Commissioner Dorrin Rolle),
some also reside in District 3
(County Commissioner Audrey
M. Edmonson).
Therefore I reached out to the
Northwestern Alumni Presi-
dent, to share my views on
this venture. He proceeded to
express to me his discontent .
for the current Northwestern


Uixited Teachers of Dade (UTD)
reached a tentative agreement
on a three-year contract.
Thetentativeagreementpro-
vides a step advance for eli-
gible instructional personnel)
and other UTD employees. It
also provides salary increases
for educational personnel and
raises the starting salary for
teachers to $38,500, -putting
Miami-Dade's starting salaries
on a par with our neighboring
counties. This will help Mi-
ami-Dade attract and retain a
professional teaching force for


and it's good for our students,
and keeping people employed
benefits our community as a
whole.
In the next payroll period, we
will make good on that prom-
ise. Payments .will be made to
the employees who sacrificed
to help the District as we move
through the worst economic
situation that we have experi-
enced in our lifetimes. We are
doing this because we made
a promise, and honoring that
promise is the right and moral
thing to do.


reserve many
although at
he pay scale,
to providing
students. The
our workers


ing to do to improve our quality
of life, regardless of who their
friends are. This recession and
the lack of jobs have devastat-
ed the small economic gains
that we made during the late
90s and the early part of 2000.
Failure to be an informed voter
will assure that we will remain
in this no-growth posture for
at least the next four years-
On another note, I want to
clear up the rumor that I am
supporting Commissioner Joe
Sanchez for Mayor To date I
am not involved officially or
unofficially in any City of Mi-
ami campaign. ?


cuts over two years, we asked
our employees earlier this year
to support a plan that pre-
serves jobs by deferring some
work days from last fiscal
year to the present fiscal year.
This plan, which received the
overwhelming support of our


are voted into office are pro-
vided with, by virtue of their
elected status, the privilege to
"sit at the table" where eco-
nomic and social policies are
decided. Here is a simple re-
quest, take a drive through
Liberty City, Over town, Wyn-
wood, Brownsville, Allapattah
or Little Haiti... Is this leader-
ship? .
Have the people been ade-
quately sefred? Are the people
better off? The answer is a re-
sounding, Hell Noll Whenever
you encounter someone who
' wants you to sign a candidate
petition ask them or the can-
didate to articulate their vi-
sion, plan, and strategy for the
community. Let that be your
criteria for a vote. Until then I
refuse to sign any petition and
I suggest you do the same.

Dr. Robert Malone Jr.
Miami


Dear Editor,

I attended the Brownsville
Homeowners Asdociation
meeting last week. I was enjoy-
ingthemeetinguntiltherewas
an attempt to collect names for
a candidate petition. As a can-
didate for office, a person can
qualify through petition or pay
the filing fee. My argument is
not with the process but with
the leadership. Particularly
"leadership" that has been re-
cycled over and over again in
Miami Dade County. Last year,
when I ran for office for District
109, I would say repeatedly to
the people "the community is a
reflection of the leadership".
What did I mean by that?
Well if the community lacks
jobs, good schools, a produc-
tive middle claims, and safe
communities then ostensi-
bly the leadership is severely
lacking. The politicians that


and not just parts. I understand
that there's a recession going
on, but even during a recession,
I don't mind an extra tax when
it's for something like that.

DAISY GOLDEN, 45
Retired, Libertg City

I think Jack-
son is good for
people who
don't have in-
surance, and
we should be
helping them
if at all pos-
sible. Health
care is very
important. Yes, I'd support a
tax is the money was going to
them. You can't do anything
if. your health is messed up. I
wouldn't mind that tax if it hap-
pened. I'd support it.

JOHN BETHEL, 42
Clerk, Liberty City

I think Jackson is the best
hospital; not only in the state,
but ire the world. It helps so
many uninsured and poor.peo-


ple get the ser-
vicestheyneed
and deserve. If '
Jackson asked
us for a tax,
I'd support it.
It would help
the hospital
offer poor peo-
ple like us the .
best health care possible.


people--like me.


ROWTINAFRECKELTON, 72
RetiredMiami

Yes; because that's my hos-
pital. I un-
derstand that
we're in hard
times right
now, but Jack-
son is impor- a
tant enough
that we need . .,
to overlook -
that. If you don't have your fi-
nances in order, they still go to
great lengths to help you. If we
had the chance to help thern, in
return, through a tax, I'd defi-
nitely support it. .

JANYEL COX, 25
Student, Liberty City

Yes; because
wouldn't be
a pointless
tax. It's for
something
important 4
It's something
that helps the
entire com-
munity as well


NATOREY WIGGINS, 24
Entrepreneur, Miami

Of course I
would. As long
as the funds
were going
to help Jack-
son Hospital,
I really don't
see how any-
one wouldn't.
Health care
is a necessity for the poor. It's
hard to see another side to
this. I know times are hard be-
cause of the recession. But that.
means there are going to be
more people without insurance.
Besides; the money would basi-
cally be going to help uninsured


W~iHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU


OPINION


Lo CAL


5 A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009


O n et 4 pk ihSec-oe' fiet ofr


*
Miami-Dade Schools and UTD reach an agreement
Last week an important our 345,000 students. The UTD agreement is just labor organiza-
milestone was achieved that The raises were made possi- one more step toward ensur; tions, helped pr
affects the lives of some of the ble by a special reserve called ing that Miami-Dade County of the jobs that,
school district's most impor- the Employee Protection Fund Public Schools does the right the lower end of t
tant employees--our teach- that was created by the Dis- thing for its employees. After are so important
ers. On Oct. 5, Miami-Dade trict earlier this year to guard facing approximately $1.1 bil- services to our s
County Public Schools and against funding holdbacks lion in total education funding plan is good for


showthatnight.

did not attend the debate was
"Scheliuling Conflict", and the
organizers were informed that
she would not attend.
011 Se t. 24, I spoke with
Spence-Jones's office to con-
firm her attendance and a
staff person informed ine that
it was already on her calendar
and that to date the sponsors
of the debate were unaware of
Spence Jones' absence until
she was a no show that night.
It is also rumored that Com-
missioner Tomas Regalado is
afraid of the issues in the Black
community therefore he has
not made himself available to


he tentative agreement provides a step advance for eligible in-


19988/8710[188Ch0fS10$38,500

from the State of Florida.
The agreement with UTD
also includes a memorandum
oflunderstanding on health in-
surance benefits for the coming
year, offering two open access
plans, one of which is provided
at no cost for employees.


Wou'id you support a tax increase if the funds went to Jackson Hospital?





4A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009


B LAhCKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


Volunteer, Sallie Paisani; Past'Grand Basileus, Ed Braynon; Brother Darvin Johnson; Execu-
tive Director, Joyce Curtis; Brother Garth Reeves; Board Member and Volunteer, Lucy 0. Wil-
liams.


Omega Psi Phi
The Jubilee Center 'of South
Broward has been a lifelike to
homeless and J or poor per-
sons of South Broward County
for over 20 years. The Jubi-
lee Center provides complete
nutritious meals in its Soup
Kitchen and offers a broad
range of services in its Office of
Social Services. -
Its mission: "We provide
emergency resources and re-
lief from hunger and despair."
The Brothers of Sigma Alpha
Chapter kicked off their sup-


port for Jubilee by donating
T-shirts to the center for the
homeless. Brother Stanley Al-
len is spearheading the drive for
Sigma Alpha Chapter of Omega
Psi to become one of the corpo-
rate sponsors of Jubilee's "Walk
against Hunger" on Nov. 22.
Past Grand Basileus Ed
Braynon, Garth Reeves,
Darvin' Johnson and Leon
Clark who is an Oroega and a
Jubilee Board member, volun-
teered in the Soup Kitchen at
Jubilee. The brothers will con-


tinue to volunteer on a monthly
basis.
Other members of the Jubi-
lee Center serving on the board
of directors are Lucius Beard,
Lucy Williams, Rev. Orlando
Addison, Rev. John J. Jarrett
III, Rev. Matthew Faulatich,
Rev. Kiethly Warner, Sarah
Allen, Joyce Burney, Leon
Clark, Sean Chaderton, Peggy
Delaveaux, Tony Moscatel,
Debra Rose, Ron Rose, Ester
Panza, William Bliss, George
McAleese and Cam Trinh.


Brothers ont;h~esrvngl~i ne


:b


help's-feed Broward homeless


Hi care at its best



magicclinics.org




* Accept Medicare/Medicald and most private
insurance plans

* Provide comprehensive patient-centered care

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Suspect arrested m pregnant teen'sdeath


^Tee,,,n sxal asutd nwyto school


Manslaughter conviction for Sherdavia Jenkins' killer


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Forum. addresses disproportionate stimulus distribution


evey,

Police sketch of the suspect
this incident is urged to contact

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Michelle Obama visits Miami


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BLACKS MUST. C:ONTR~OL THEIR OWN DESTJINY


WAR
continued from 1A

at this time to lease the office
space at 6102 N.W. 7th Ave.,
Miami, Fl. Therefore we are re-
turning your check for in the
amount of $1300.00 which was
given as a deposit for first and
last month. The agency is giving
until October 9, 2009 to move
out of 6102 NW 7th Ave."
That letter have prompted
local veterans to stage a pro-
test demonstration against the
MLKEDC Board of Directors,
Miami Commissioner Michelle
Spence-Jones of District 5 and
current board member Billy
Hardemon. .
Make A \Vish Veterans, Inc.,
a not-for-profit 501 (c) 3 orga-
nization, believes that the "sud-
den reversal of its agreement


not have the proper lease," said
Roy. .
According to MLKEDC Chair-
man David Chiverton, he of-
fered the veterans a space until
the board approved them. In a
letter to Fordham, dated Oct.
1, the veterans requested incu-
bator space and help assisting
local veterans. Fordham says
that the veterans did not have
a lease brit that she negotiated
with the board to provide a lease
for them. The lease, which is to
be approved by the board, never
came through.
They were not paying rent ac-
cording to Chiverton; but the
veterans offered to pay $650 per
month. Their offer was denied.
MLKEDC tried to negotiate a
minimum of $2000, assert-
ing that the space was worth
twice as much. Veterans denied


that offer.
"This was not politically moti-
vated," Roy maintains; although
Chiverton and incumbent Spen-
ce-Jones are seeking the Dis-
trict 5 Commission seat.
The reconstruction of Martin
Luther King, Jr. Boulevard calls
for an overhaul says Roy. For ex-
ample, Youth of America, a local
organization stationed at 6102
Northwest Seventh Ayenue, re-
cently had to relocate. "They fell
on hard times," said Roy.
"By cleaning house," Roy
hopes to avoid receiving audits
from Cotinty. "We just got in
good standing with the County,"
said Roy.
Still, more than 200 veter-
ans and their families will stage
a protest at 6102 Northwest
Seventh Ave., at 10 a.m., on
Wednesday, Oct. 14.


with the MLKEDC" was "politi-
cally motivated" by the offices of
Spence-Jones and ,Hardemon.
Buford is calling for their resig-
nations,
"The commissioner wanted the
veterans to endorse her but we
refused. Hardemon has locked
the doors on us on several occa-
sions," he said.
Spence-Jones told The Miami
Times that "she had-nothing to
do with it." She denies involve-
ment in the matter, asserting
that it is not her organization.
She asked, "How am I respon-
sible?"
Hardemon declined to com-
ment on the matter.
Hardemon's younger brother,
Roy, insists the veterar\s were
not "kicked out."
"They were not authorized by
4the board to move in and did


Another important tradition
of the Annual Gala'Is its pres-
tigious awards to outstanding
individuals for lifetime achieve-
ments and contributions to the
betterment of the South Florida
community. The 2009 Hon-
orees are philanthropist and
corporate executive Mr. Jos6
Argamasilla "Tito" Bacardi,
whose company has been a
stalwart and generous
supporter of the Range
Foundation; Miami-
Dade County Com-
missioner, the Hon.
Audrey M. Edmon-
son, for her steadfast
community advocacy
and leadership, and
,-m South Florida broad-
HALIE cast legend Mr. Jer-
NGE ry "Jay" Rushin, Vice
President and General
manager of highly pop-
ular radio stations WEDR-FM

Ju"hian eWHesT o
to the community, especially
the youth..
Ticket prices for the elegant
Black Tie affair, which includes
Open Bar, Dirmer and Perfor-
mance, are $300, $200, and
$150 per person. Proceeds
benefit the M. Athalie Range
Cultural Arts Foundation, Inc.,
a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) tax-
exempt organization. For fur-
ther information, reservations
or advertising in the Souvenir
Program Booklet, please call
305-893-5468.


Honors community contributions
The Fourteenth Annual M.
Athalie Range Musical Celebra-
tion of Life Gala, the much an-
ticipated "Social Event of the
Season," will feature the unique
talents of "Southern Song-
bird" Ms. Connye Florance
in a special multi-media
performance of"Jazz Rhap- a
sody," her tribute in two
acts to African America's
soulful music tradition,
on Sunday, November
8, beginning at 5 p.m.
at the Eden Roc Re-
naissance Beach Re-
sort and Spa, 4525'Col-
lins Avenue, on Miami
Beach. The program,
presented by the M. Ath- AT
alie Range Cultural Arts RA
Foundation, Inc. (MAR-
CAF), and Bacardi U.S.A.,
Inc., continues a vital part of the
Founddon o aswh

American performing artists to
the South Florida community.
Ms. Florance, whose voice,
once described as "velvet and
wine," garnered Black Enter- -
tainmerit Television's (BET)
Jazz Vocalist of the Year award
in 2000, is also an acclaimed
actress who has been nationally
featured in film and television
ad well as on Broa way an in
regional theater productions.
Her appearance is a Solith Flor-
ida first, but promises o be one
of her most memorable.


--


ICrrr,


"She had a name. She named
him Javon. We were planning a
baby shower. We, were excited
about that said her mother
Karen Moore. "She's talented
enough that she printed out
her own invitations and we sent
that out. She bought clothes
for the baby. She was excited
out life
ab .
Police questioned the father
of Stephanie's child but he was
not considered a suspect.
Judge Michael Orlando
scheduled Babbs' next hearing
for oct. 27.


The Miami Times Staff Report

Miramar teen was c arge
Wednesday in the death of s

en at d 1 e nborne h ld
d Babbs' 17
Edwar Jermaine ,
appeared bond court Thurs-
day afternoon and is facmg two
counts ofhomicide in the deaths,
StephanieRabsattandherbaby.
Rabsatt's body was found inside
a red Ford Tattrus. The Taurus
was parked irt the parking lot
of a Miramar Winn-Dixie, 6301
Southwest 41st Street, on Oct.


EDWARD JERMAINE.BABBS
2. She was a student at McFat-
ter Technical Center. She was
approximately six months preg-
nant.


TheMiamiTimesStaffReport

A 14-year-old girl was on her
way to school early Friday morn-
ing. While crossing the street at
Northwest 57* Street and First
Avenue, a man approached her
from behind. The individual
physically forced her to the area
of 61 Northwest 576 Street where
he sexually assaulted her. The
victim attempted to fight off the
suspect, but the suspect held her
at knifepoint,
The subject is described as a
light skinned, Black male, ap-
proximately 5"11, in his 30's,
weighing 210 pounds, with dark

ps H two t een wedng
jeans, short hair and dirty finger-
n .
Anyone with information on


Sherdavia was shot and killed
with an assault rifle three years
ago outside of her house while
playing with her dolls. Sher-
davia was caught in a gunfight
between Darling and Leroy La-
rose, who pleaded guilty earlier
this month and testified agamst
Darling. He is serving seven
years in prison followed by 10
years of probation.
'Although Darling had been
charged with second-degree


murder and attempted second-
degree murder, the jury found
him guilty of the lesser included
charge of manslaughter. Darling
faces up to 30 years in prison
for the manslaughter charge.
The pain is still overwhelming
for the family.
"To be honest, there will never
be closure because we still have
a part of our lives missing. But
we can begid to try to lietal;"
said Jenkins.


The Miami Times StaffReport

Damon Darling was found
guilty of manslaughter for the
killing nine-year-old Sherda-
via Jenkins on Thursday. The
jury deliberated for almost four
hours for over two days then
came to unanimous decision.
" I'm pleased about it. Man-
slaughter is a lesser charge but
still murder," said David Jen-
kins, the father of Sherdavia.


will bring their own workers
with them, even when they do
work in disadvantaged com
unities.

theThee sh ut d tbe clauseum
hire x-amount of people lo-
cally," said Benford.
The news did not surprised
Rev. Leonis A. Quinlan of
Norland United Methodist
Church, but rather confirmed
his suspicions. "I came to
find out what's going on in
the community and I did.
The fraudulent organizations
are literally stealing' peoples'
money. "It's a shame to see;
especially how the elderly are
being treated," he added.


package as a unique oppor-
tunity, but Benford has some
. problems with how it is being
done. "They're not tracking by
ra e up agght shi said

the stimulus funds are going


CENTER


employment."
According to the report,
Liberty City is such a neigh-
borhood.

s IBenford sunmedhup the re
be born in a particular neigh-


projects does not actually
bring relief to those who need

"In any given metro region,"
reads the report, "a handful
of neighborhoods carry the
related burdens of concen-
trated poverty, poor health,
and unsatisfactory educa-
tional outcomes. These neigh-
borhoods are usually racially
and socio-economically iso-
lated from the resources and
services that we all need to
succeed-high performing
schools, primary care phy-
sicians and sustainable


United States First Lady Mi-
chelle Obama will be the special
guest and featured speaker at
the Florida Campus Compact's
(FL| CC) annual Awards Gala
and Luncheon at the National
Historic Landmark Freedom
Tower, located 600 Biscayne
Boulevard, at Miami Dade Col-
lege (MDC), from 12- 2 p.m.,
Thursday, Oct. 15.
. Hosted by MDC, the luncheon
is an annual event that recog-
nizes exceptional service, learn-
ing and engaged scholarship
currently underway all across
Florida.. The winners are those

who marneax the c p m
nity partnerships that enhance
the collegiate experience and


help students become stronger
and more active citizens. These
awards acknowledge the out-
standing work of faculty, stu-
dents, administrators, service
coordinators, AmeriCorps VIS-
TAs, community partners and
others who make substantial
contributions to support en-
gaged scholarship.
"The ultimate goal of Florida
Campus Compact is to develop
educated and active citizens to
sustam our participatory de-
mocracy. Its mission is to pro-
mote Engaged Scholarship,
Community-based research,

Ca o S sc abuser e-learning
unity partnership," said Dr.
. Padr6n.


The Miami Worker's Center views the economic stimulus pack-


boyhood, you're not going to
have the same opportunities."
In Florida, according to the
report, zip code is destiny.
The Miami Worker's Center
views the economic stimulus


to contractors who have ex-
isting relationships with the
government."
In Benford's view, these are
not the companies who are
hurting. Often the companies


. -- - eP -


-



Ran el strong

on health reform

LEWIS
continued from 1A

partisan sniping and biased
criticism from the nations
news media. Mr. Rangel is a
lion of the House who served as
a decorated combat infantry-
man in the Korean War, so he
can take the partisan attacks.
But one is left with the im-
pression that his opponents are
trying to silence a strong, pro-
gressive voice for health care
reform and economic security
for working families. Charlie
Rangel has been a strong voice
for "the little guy" in the halls
of Congress. It is a voice that
needs to be heard now more
than ever.
Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., is a
member of the House Ways and
Means Committee.


- -


*


Exp


. *


* -** * ****


Authorized Signature


Cit


State Zip


A 6 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 14-20 09


Veterans stage protest


Annual Range Gala features


., '<19"
9" A
STEPHANIE RABSATT


SHERDAVIA JENKINS


-~L --~


.
CO fl hted Material
**
Syndicated Content *
* *


Available from Commiercial ~News Providers





7A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009


BLACKS MlUST CONTROI.THI Om ET


b


businesses


biggest


.


Florida's


p~ay


. .



.


We don't think that's nght.

Today's rate structure makes residential customers and small businesses
subsidize a few very large customers.

We've asked the Florida Public Service Commission to change that.

That's why lobbyists for big businesses are attacking F orida
Power & Light Company's rate proposaL


.


-


Here are four facts they don't want you to know:


* FPL's typical residential bill is already the lowest of all 54 utilities
in the state of Florida and below the national average.

* FPL's rate proposal would result in typical bills for residential
customers and small businesses going down, not up.
If you use 1,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity a month, your
bill would go down about $9. That's because a base rate
increase would be more than offset by lower fuel prices and
gains in fuel efficiency.

* Residential customers and small businesses would stop being
forced to subsidize big businesses.

* A base rate adjustment will allow us to continue to make
investments to make the electrical infrastructure stronger,
smarter, cleaner and more efficient and less reliant on any
single source of fueL

Let's stop playing politics with our energy future and stick to the facts.

Visit www.FPL.com/facts


- -


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This advertising is paid for by FPL Group shareholders, not our customers.


u to help


the r


b/1








, ,


I


Visit a branch or start at Chase.com/FL


One family serving this community for 87 consecutive years.


B LACKS MUST CONTR.OL. THEIR OWN DESTIINY


A 8 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 14-20 9


bea naa s shop to tw nanwd











(hague ==>- *== **** *

Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


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"I had a father in my office, just yes-
terday, who was crying; not because he
was unemployed, but because he waS
unable to get paid for his work . ."
-MARLEINE BASTIEN
founder and Executive Director of Haitian Women of Miami


The Miami Times
s announcing our
W CHURCH LISTINGS
By Church Catagory
beginning January 2010
- For more micrmanon contact
our new church assistant,
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theft practices can include; fail-
ure to pay time and a half for
overtime, violating minimum
wage laws, or workers not re-
ceiving their final paychecks.
Often contractors will underbid
on a project; then make the dif-
ference back by cheating work-
ers.
Marleine Bastien, founder
and Executive Director of Hai-
tian Women of Miami (FANM),
has seen the issue firsthand. "I
had a father in my office, just
yesterday, who \vas crying; not
because he was unemployed,
but because he was unable to
get paid for his work," she said.
Accordmg to Bastien. some


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BLACKS M'UST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


tripled
nomic conditions. It was just
exacerbated by the economy,"
heEmmd.10yers themselves are
hurting." Worse, Kateel says that
workers facing wage theft have
few options in Florida. "Gover-
nor Jeb Bush pretty much abol-
ished the State Department of
Labor. So there's very little re-
course," he said. "It's basically
either the US Department of La-
bor or small claims court."
Last year, the Department of
Labor collected $57.5 million in
back wages for 77,000 workers
in industries such as agricul-
ture and garment making. The
year before, it collected $52.7
million. But often undocument-
ed workers are hesitant to face
that kind of scrutiny.
It isn't as simple as just find-
ing another job either. Many
undocumented workers will
stick with jobs when they're not
getting paid because they know
they're going to have trouble
finding another. They simply
hope that the employer will
eventually pay them.
Wage theft has far-reaching
consequences. According to the
most recent United Nations De-
velopment report, roughly 40
percent of income in Haiti was
money sent back by those with
relatives in the United States.
Wage theft has made it even
more difficult for these families
to get even basic health care
and services for themselves, ac-
cording to Kateel.


unscrupulous employers will
take advantage ofan employee's
immigration status in order to
get away with withholding pay,
threatening to report the worker
if they raise a fuss.
"People are very scared to
speak nowadays,".said Bastien.
"Often times they don't even
want to follow through. We try
to refer them to places that can
help them, or call the employers
ourselves."


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com
In this economic recession,
increasing numbers of work-
ers are being denied their wag-
es just when they need them
most. Complaints of wage theft
have risen as the economy has
declined, and Miami -and Mi-
ami's Haitian community are
on the leading
edge. Wage


At South Florida Interfaith
Worker Justice, an organization
that advocates for low-wage
workers and "those victimized
by social injustice," at least 20
people report wage theft each
'week. This represents a three-
fold increase over last year.
Subhash Kateel, a community
organizer with the Florida Im-
migrant Coalition, has noticed
the trend as well. "It's pretty
prevalent in Miami. It's almost
the rule as opposed to an ex-
ception. The thing is that it
happened even duririg good.eco-


what's wrong.


i


S9A `THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009


Wage theft has


Let's keep the health



in health care.


Everybody's talking about health care these days. But what are they doing about it?
At darePlus, we believe the best way to keep costs down is to keep our members healthy.
Sowe encourage the kind of lifestyle that keeps you out of the doctor's office, except
for routine visits. The kind of health care that makes it possible for you to take fewer
medications, rather than more. Health care that
puts the focus on prevention instead of fixing













r


('hurches urged to herraw wourity during hadiday wave


MIAMI TIMES


SECTON BMIAMI, F;LORIDA, OCTOBER '14-20, 2009


~ ----------


The congregation of Apos-
tolic Revival Center invites you
to praise God with the as they
celebrate the 39th Pastoral An-
niversary of Dr. and Mrs. G. S.
Smith. The theme will be 'Rein-
forced to Continue the Battle.'
Services will begin October 20-
27, 7:30 p.m., brightly.
We are praising For His many
blessings and the outpouring of
the Holy Ghost upon this minis-
try. God has blessed Dr. Smith
in his evangelistic endeavors to
establish churches in over 230
churches on four Continen-
tents, including, North, South,
Central America and Africa.
This year we are especially
thankful that God has blessed


us to bring the gospel the Maa-
sai people of Kenya, along with
drilling two water wells that
brought fresh water to several
villages and schools in two re-
gions. The wells have brought
new life and prosperity to these
communities. This is evident in
the establishment of twenty-two
new Maasai churches and tri-
pling of school attendance,
Dr. Smith continues to be a
beacon of hope in the Tri-county
area of South Florida and Guy-
.ana, South America through the
Hope For Today Television Min-
istry. He will be honored in a fel-
lowship dinner at the Hyatt Ho-
tel in Miami on Saturday night.
On last Saturday Dr. Smith


received the Lifetime Christian
Service Award from the People
United to Lead the Struggle for
Equality for his community in-
volvement in the fight to clean
up drug, crime, prostitution,
gambling, violence and unsani-
tary conditions in the Northwest
15 Avenue corridor.
Culmination of celebrations
will be 11 a.m. October 27,
as the citizens of Miami-Dade
County will honor Dr. Smith
with the dedication of Northwest
15 Avenue to be renamed Rever-
end Dr. G. S. Smith Street.
The church is located at 6702
N.W. 15 Avenue, Dr. Gilbert S.
Smith is pastor. Call 305-836-
1224, 305-835-1258.


SIS. G. O. AND DR. G.S. SMITH


The Miami Times


Mak Amen



la ier }May

ig te aterla



Syndicated CElifeat


'om Commercial News Providers


Availat


See the no~rld. change Ihe world


Apostolic Evangelistic celebrates 39th pastoral anniversary






BLAKS USTCONROLTHER ON DESTINY I


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009


4


,,~,


I


C


* on ememe a emes eme man e a


Life in Prison for Minors


.Copyrig ht


Syndicated ont

Available from Comme ia













ited; onJy our belief is. If He could
feed 5000 men, and women and
children besides, who were in an
isolated place with two fish and
five loaves of bread (with twelve
baskets left over), then how im-
possible was it for Him to feed
4000 people with seven loaves of
bread and a few small fish (with
seven baskets left over)?
Pastors and church leaders, if
you have been called by God to
nurture, lead, guide and teach
His sheep, then He will make
sure that you are able to do so.
He is also holding you respon-
sible to do what He has told you
to do. He will provide for you to
provide for them. He has already
proved Himself time and time
again. Why do we so quickly for-
get how awesome and powerful
and willing to bless is our God?


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OwYN DESTINY


told to clean the bathroom did
not clean the bathroom, I did not
hold the child who was assigned
to wash dishes responsible. The
child who was disobedient, and
ignored his assignment was to
blame, and only that child.
Thirdly, the question that the
disciples asked in Luke 8:4 was
quite surprising. They wanted
to know how they could pos-
sibly find enough food to feed
that large amount of people.
This question was surprising be-
cause Jesus had previously feed
a larger amount of people in the
same circumstances! How quick-
ly we forget There is a song that
I adore whose title is "Hell Do
It Again." This song reminds us
that what Jesus did for.us in the
past, He is willing and capable to
do again. God's supply is not lim-


hear what words of wisdom that
He would impart to them. They
left their homes and their du-
ties to hear Him speak to them.
Secondly, in both instances, Je-
sus gave the instructions to His
disciples to feed the congrega-
tion. He recognized that they
sacrificed to be with Him, and
He knew that they were hungry,
so He instructed His followers to
take care of them. Jesus is aware
of what you have given up to fol-
low Him. He knows the friends,
and even family members that
you have had to turn loose, or
spend less time with so that you
can spend more time with Him.
He knows your faithfulness and
your desire to listen to Him, and
glean words of wisdom and love
that only He can release into
your life. He knows that you


are hungry, hurting, lonely, and
needy. He wants to feed you in
every way physically, emotion-
ally, and spiritually.
He has given the task of helping
you to His disciples His Pastors,
teachers, prophets and elders. He
has commissioned them to feed
you and care for you. Some have
been disobedient. Some have ig-
nored you. Some have allowed
you to fall between the cracks,
and sadly enough, some have
even maligned and slandered
you. It's not your fault that those
whom were given the responsi-
bility to nurture you shirked and
failed their responsibility. It's
time to let it go, and let the Lord
take care of them. When my chil-
dren were younger and at home,
they were given various house-
hold chores. If my child who was


Mostlyeveryonehasheardofthe
familiar scriptures in Mark 6: 30-
44. Jesus fed 5000 men includ-
ing the women and children who
were present at His impromptu
service. Not as many remember
the scriptures in Mark 8: 1-8. In
these scriptures, Jesus has again
ministered to a large crowd gath-
ered to hear Him speak. As in the
case of the feeding of the 5000,
this group was also in a remote
location, and again the disciples


are at a loss to
follow Jesus
instructions to
feed the crowd.
There are three
points that I
would like to
share concern-
ing these scrip-
tures. \
First, in both cases the people
sacrificed their time to be .with
Jesus. They were anxious to


Championships will take place at
Hard Rock Live at the Seminole
Hard Rock Hotel & Casino on
Dec. 17-19 .
*****
Miami Northwestern Sr. High
Class of 1965 is. preparing for
their July 8-11, 2010 Reunion.
Classmates are urged to recon-
nect through the contact mfor-
mation listed below, providing
your address, phone, cell & email.
321-733-0958 or 305-299-5549,
reunion6t5@cfl.rr.com
umm
Miami.Jackson Alumns As-
sociation is calling all former
cheerleaders, majorettes, drill
team, dance line, flagettes and
band members for their upcom-
ing Alumm Pep Rally. 305- 804-
5371 or 786-256-2609.
""""
National Investment Devel-
opment (NID) Housing Coun-
seling Aghncy, a HUD approved
organization, is offermg free
Housing and Legal Counseling
for Homeowners at the Experts
Resource Community Center, 9
a.m. 5 p.m., M-F. Call 305-652-
7616 or 786-512-7400 or email:
1green@expertsresources.com
or 10ugreen2@yahoo.com for
appointments.


Cypress" exhibit opening and
premiere screening will be held
at the Deering Estate at Cutler
at 7 p.m., Friday, Oct. 23. South
Florida National Parks Trust,
305-665-4769 or info@southflor-
idaparks.org.
"""**
The Lupus Fund will host a
Global Health Symposium and
Lupus Walk. The symposium
will feature University of Mi-
ami/Jackson Memorial Medical
Center physicians who will be
discussing the effects of these
healthcare issues on Lupus. pa-
tients. The symposium will be
held in the Ira C. Clark Diagnos-
tic Treatment Center, Room 259,
from 10 a.m. to 2 J$.m., Saturday,
Oct. 24. Dianah Hill at 305-336-
9515.
*****
Sunshine Slopers' Ski Club
will have their 20* anniversary
dinner dance at the Polish Amer-
ican Club starting at 7 p.m., Sat-
urday, Oct. 24.
******
Lifting Young Lions Founda-
tion of Excellence (LYLFOE)
is hosting its Fourth Annual
Scholarship Awards Program for
scholarship recipients at Florida
Memorial University on Satur-.


day, Oct. 24. Dr. George Davis,
Jr., 305-790-7196.

n ***** ,
NAACP of Miami-Dade will
host a branch meeting at New
Birth Cathedral in Opa-locka at
7 p.m., Oct. 26. .
****
Jackson Health System will
host its third annual Small.Busi-
ness Vendor Day Workshop at
the Ira C. Clark Diagnostic Treat-
ment Center, from 8:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 29.

******
There will be a charter bus go-
ing to Fort Valley, Ga. for the Fort
Valley State vs. Kentucky State
University Homecoming football
game on Oct. 31. The bus will de-
part from Coconut Grove's Home
Depot Shopping Plaza at 8 p.m.,
Thursday, Oct. 29. RSVP before
10 p.m., Oct. 15. 305-299-4595.
******
Miami Northwestern Senior
High School will hold their 10*
annual College Fair at the Lee R.
Perry Sports Complex, from 6 -
9:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 4.
305-836-0991.
-
***
The fourth annual World Salsa


Saturday, Oct. 17. Lucius King,
305-333-7128.

********
South florida Classical Mu-
Mic Lovers present 2009-2010
Concert Series with "Red Priest"
:30 a.m,- at the St. Martha in the Shores
, Oct. 16. in Miami Shores, at 7:30 p.m.,
954-889- Saturday, Oct. 17.
smcneil@
****
The twenty-seventh annual
Theodore R. Gibson Unity Din-
ductions ner will be held at Jungle Island,
rist Unity at 6 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 18. 305-
B Church 442-9613.
cilityat?
786-346- **^^
Miami-Dade County Com-
mission will join forces with the
County Health Department offer
Race for local residents and citizens the
ld at the opportunity to receive free Flu
owtitown Vaccines. The Flu and Pneumo-
:30 a.m., nia Vaccines will be administered
sit: www. on Tuesday, Oct. 20 at the Dis-
trict North Office located at the
South Dade Government Cen-
ter, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
a Board Thursday, Oct. 22 at the Phicol
an infor- Williams Center in Homestead,
be Home 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 305-234-4938.
p" at the
Baptist ****
from 9 Mt. Hermon A.M.E. Church
rday, Oct. in Miami Gardens will host a
Community Empowerment Fo-
rum on Education: "Identifying
Educational Solutions" at 6:30
shington p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 21. 305-
onduct a 624-7253.
Heritage
4 5:30 """"
17. 305- Miami-Dade State Attorney
7115. Office will present their Seal-
ing and Expungement Progann
at the Bethel Apostolic Church,
ic Inter- froni 4- 7 p.m., Thursday, Oct.
Centurion 22. Call 305-547-0724.
iage Sem-
Oct. 17. """"
he public. The community is invited to
attend Family Reading Night at
Carol City Middle School in the
Media Center at 6:30 p.m., Oct.
shington 22. 305-624-2652.
conduct a
Heritage ""
7 8 p.m., The "Natural World. of Big


Miami-Dade County Health
Department and community
leaders will have a town-hall
meeting at the Little Haiti Health
Center, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.,
Oct. 14. 786-336-1276

*** **
The Children's Home Soci-
ety of Florida (CHS) will hold
its ninth annual Claws for a
Cause dialer at the Joe's Stone
Crab on South Beach at 7 p.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 14. Call 305
755-6500 or visit www.chsfl.
org .


Museum of Contemporary
Arts of North Miami Jiresetits "5
Minutes of Fame" open forum
in which local artists discuss
their work in a comfortable set-
ting, from 7-9 p.m., Wednesday,
Oct. 14. 305-893-6211 or visit:
www.mocanomi.org .

*******
The fourth annual South
Florida Theatre Festival will
take place Oct. 14-26. 954-765-
5831.
******
City of Hialeah will host the
North Miami-Dade Career Re-
sources Expo at the Florida Na-
tional College from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., Friday, Oct. 16.
am.a**
University of Miami School
of Communication will host
a "Principled Journalism and
Government Relations in a New
Era" from 8:15 a.m. 3 p.m.,
Friday, Oct. 16. 305-350-0631.

masse
The City of Miramar pres-
ents our Annual Health and
Wellness Expo which will be
held at the Miramar Multi-Ser-


vice Complex, from 9
12:30 p.m., on Friday
Stephanie McNeil at
2701 or via email:
ci.miramar.fl.us

unan
Eagle Care Pro
present "Crunk for Ch
Explosion" at the IB
ConferenceCenter.Fa
p.m., Friday, Oct. 16.
0021.

me
Susan G. Komen
the Cure will be he
BMyfront Park in D
IVIiami, starting at 7
Saturday, Oct. 17. Vi
komenmiaftl.org

*****
The South Florid
of Realtist will host
native "It's Great to
Homebuyer Worksho
Antioch Missionary
Church of Carol City
a.m. 12 p.m., Satu
17. 305-652-3580.
*****
The Booker T. Wa
Class of 1965 will c
meeting at the African
Cultural Center, from
p.m., Saturday, Oct.
213-0188 or 305-205-

*****
Centurion Apostol
national presents "
Love is in the Air Marr
inar," from 4-7 p.m.,
This event is open to t
305-638-9700.

anna
The Booker '1'. Wa
Class of 1967 will c
meeting at the African
Cultural Center, from


9ene~rdgi Gosnfel, anphzn 2)ebsiy


Zion Hope Missionary Bap-
tist Church will have their
Pastors. Anniversary Celebra-
tion from Oct. 21-25. 786-541-
5687. ,
********
St. John Missionary Baptist
Church annual Unity Day will
be held Oct. 25. 305-372-3877.


Minority Chamber of Com-
merce will be hosting a Holiday
Job Fair at the Dorible Tree Mi-
ami Mart, from 9 a.m. 4 p.m.,
Thursday, Oct. 29. 786-260
1965.
muse
The Revelation Christian
Academy is open for registra-
tion. After-care is from 3-6 p.m.
Call 305-758-5656 or 786-281-
8098.
*****
A Mission With. A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to come fellowship
at 11:15 a.m., on Sundays and
Bible class weekly at 7 p.m.,
Thursday.
*
Redemption M.B. Church is
sponsoring a fundraising break-
fast and yard sale.on Friday and
Saturday. Pastor Willie McCrae,
305-793-7388 or 305-836-
1990. ;
Note:. Calendar itents must be
submitted before 3:30 p.m. on
Monday.


Faith Christian Center will
. celebrate 25 years of ministry,
7:30 p.m. nightly, October 18-
24. Culmination service will
take place at the Doubletree
Hotel at Miami Airport, 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 24. Church of-
fice, 305-253-6814.
*****
The Greater Miami-Baptist
Minister's Wives and Widows
Council will celebrate their 39th
anniversary at Rock of Ages Mis-
sionary Baptist Church at 7:30
p.m., Monday, Oct. 19. Ruby P.
White, 305-638-3279 or Merry
Popping Daycare: merrypop-
pins@att.net
*****
pgggg MISSIOnary Baptist
Church will present "The Power
of Vision Conference: Empower-
ing the Saints While Changing
the World" from Oct. 21-24. Fri-
day night's Gospel Concert will
feature Second Chapter and The
Peace M.B.C. Mass Choir. The
culminating activity is sched-
uled for Saturday at 2 p.m.
with the "Youth Expo" showcas-
ing the talents of our youths in
Gospel Rap, Double Dutch and
Step. Call 305-681-4681.


Neva King Cooper Educa-
tional Center will be celebrat-
ing its 256 anniversary on Oct.
16. 305-910-7819.
******
Word ofTruth Ministries will
present a "Let Them Come: Youth
Standing United for Christ" at
7:30 p.m., Friday, Oct. 16. Pas-
tor Sonja, 786-5978586.
""
Pembroke Park Church of
Christ will hold a job fair, from
9 a.m. 12 p.m., Saturday, Oct.
17. 954-962-9327. .

*** **
Jordan Grove Baptist
Church invites you to their 23rd
church anniversary at 7 a.m.
and 11 a.m., Sunday, Oct. 18.
Jordan Grove will continue their
40-day revival at 7 p.m. nightly
from Oct. 14, 15, 19 and 21.
305-751-9323.
"""**
New Canaan Missionary Bap-
tist Church invites everyone to
join them in worship service
at 11 a.m., Oct.' 18. 754-422-
6722. '


Imtplants can also be used to


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B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 14-2 9


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The Miami Times


SECTION B


National
Breast
Cancer
Awareness
Month


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I


By Sandra J. Charit*e
scharire@miamitimesonline.com
y
The blazing heat and the
overpriced parking fees did not
stop thousands from hitting
the streets of Downtown Mi-
ami to partake in the 25m anni-
versary of the Miami Carnival'
Parade (now called the Miami
-Broward One Carnival) on
Sunday
Miami and Broward Carni-
val last year drew over 20,000
people each with a combining
profit estimated at $700,000
said organizers. The merger of
the two would increase those
numbers, but the economic
impact of having two carnivals
in one day was pointless. Mat-
ter of fact, the emergence of the


I


Miami Dade C ollege rganize


H A I, IA N 'I., FE N


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWVN DESTINY I


Hundreds participate in the Miami-Broward One Carnival Parade held in Downtown Miami on Sunday which celebrated ""E""'ry.'.'"""**.m-
Caribbean cultures.


Thousands celebrate Carnival in Miami


al family and friends turned on
their music and began dancing
to the sound of island music.
"I win never forget where
I came from, said McGray
dancing in the streets. "This is
what it is all about--all Carib-
bean cultures coming together
to celebrate our uniqueness
together through song, dance
and food.
McGray and her fnends spent
$3000 each on their trip simply
to enjoy the Carnival festivities.
In the midst of recession, McG-
ray had no regrets.
Sixty-five-year-old Bahami-
an native Brian Jones usually
attended the Broward Carni-
val since he lives in Pompano
Beach but he didn't mind the
commute to Mi rating our


cultures so why should the
celebration be done in two dif-
ferent places? It never made
sense to me," said Jones.
But Miami resident Carolyn
Bozeman had mixed reviews
about the merger.
There are way too many
people down here this year,
said Bozeman, which is not
necessarily a bad thing but
they jacked up the prices on
parking.
Parkii1g in the Downtown
area began at $10 and soared
to almost $40 at the end of
the day.
Overall, locals and tourists
who were of Haitian, Baha-
mian or Trinidian descent and
so on enjoyed the 2009 Miami
-Broward One Carnival and are


Haitian and Caribbean groups unite


two carnivals brought unity
among the different islands as
people marched the down the
streets in Downtown Miami
and convened at the Bicenten_
nial Park for a spirited compe
tuition between the best Carib-
bean bands and performers.
The unity didn't-prevent rev-
elers from having a good time.
Lauren Joseph, a Haitian_
American, danced to the
sounds of Konpa, a Haitian
musical genre.
"This is what I am talking
about," said Joseph, 18, as she
gyrated her hips in the Down_
town streets.
Kellon McGray, a Trinidad
native, traveled from Boston to
Miami. Even before the parade
began, McGray, 32, and sever-


and other countries in need.
"The purpose of the all-night
event is to celebrate Haitian
culture, raise awareness, and
monetary donations for disad-
vantaged families in Haiti," said
Stuart Williams, an MDC faculty
member who worked closely with
the students who spearheaded
the project. "The funds we raise
will be used to help foster sus-
tainable development initiatives
in the country, which hopefully
will help steer its people toward
increased autonomy."
"All-Nighter" student organiz-
ers have recruited more than
150 student team leaders and
more than 200 actively enrolled
students to volunteer during the
event,
"It is a very exciting and in-
spiring project, and the students
who are organizing it are amaz-
ing," added Williams.
The original "All-Nighter For
The Poor" initiative was started
by FFTP as part of a World Food
Day commemoration this past
summer. In addition to FFTP;
local businesses have offered
to participate in Friday's event;
Panda Express in Kendall has
been contributing 20 percent of
its Thursday evening sales to the
"All-Nighter" and will continue to
do so until October 166. Addi-
tionally, Starbucks will also lend
a hand by serving food and bev-
erages as well as donate all of its
proceeds to the event.


The Miami Times StaffReport
Hundreds of Miami Dade Col-
lege students will spearhead an
"All-Nighter For Haiti" fundrais-
ing event to help in the fight pov-
erty in Haiti beginning at 7 p.m.
on Friday, Oct. 16 until 7 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 17 at the Kendall
Campus.
Student organizers have ral-
lied the college and local com-
munity to spend the night on the
Kendall Campus in an overnight
relief effort to raise awareness
and .funds for underprivileged
families in Haiti.
Food For The Poor (FFTP), an
international charity organiza-
tion based in South Florida, will
partner in the overnight relief. It
is also the largest relief organi-
zation for Latin America and the
Caribbean. The "All-Nighter For
Haiti" fundraiser was inspired by
five MDC students who made it
their mission to help and increase
awareness in the global commu-
nity. With Haiti's close proximity
to South Florida and its current
food crisis, the students settled
on the country hoping to garner
as much support from the com-
munity as possible,
MDC students and faculty par-
ticipating in next week's event
hope to raise at least $20,000
for these anti-poverty projects
in Haiti. Organizers for the event
will be collecting used prescrip-
tion eyeglasses to send to Haiti


Ir AYIYE~N


IY


NAN


WI I A l I


I


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009





Apostolic
Revival (enter I
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order of Services
Wed I..tureasury Proyer
", Opm
Memang sur.ne 110.=
Sun he worship 1 ]Q p rri
bili PFOft? Willilg l 30 pr
En B.ble Study 110 pm .



Ebenezer United
Methodist (hurch
2001 N.W. 35th Street

Order of Serviies
Sunday Mem...g Ser.ne;
? 45 om 11 15 um
Sunday Sdeal 9 45 am
Bble 5rudy luesdov
10 em 8 2 p.m
Prayer Mector.g fue: spm


Mt. (alvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
miliWHIWHailiWmlimim
Order of Services
Mon shru Fri ilson Day Proper
able th.,1, it.ur Ip as
Sunday Wochip 1 II am
Sualay 5theol 9 30 em


ram9mm

St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sunday I 30 and 11 am
WOPhip tentire
9 30 a rn Sunday 5thool
Tue*.day 7 pm B.ble frudy
8 pm Prayer Meelerig




Temple Missionary
Boptist (hurch
1723 N.W.3rd Avenue
155 ilWHIimiWimiWZWIM
Order of Services
Sunday!shool 915om
.Mar..oar..11a
a .. loor
d BilleSrudy hard 630pm
of Quilearh Mbil lry 6 10 pm


Jordan Grove Missionary
Boptist (hurch
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.

Order of Services
Eartr workp lon
tu..day ideal 9 a ex
IIB( 10 05 am
orsh.p II am Wonh.p 4 pm
Merson and B.Ille
lion Tuesday 6 30 pm

mammm

Bible Teaching Seminar
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.
Miami

1 Order of Services
Sunder B.ble Somerior Sam
Sunday Worhep 9 om
Sundrr evening 6 pm pages
ifnd pesonal founseling
Fnday B.bie Semenor a pm


New Birth Baptist [hurch Th~e~ Cahd Ol f Fh Internatiaonl


amewaram

New Vision For (hrist -
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
forly Sunday Worsh.p 130 em
Sunday inhool 9 30 em
Sunday Memirig Worship 11 am
500007 E VEdi@ $Phile 6 pm
Tusday Prayer Meer.ng I30 pm
Wedne.day ishle ired 130 pm



word of Faith
Christion Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
sunds unm.ng aare
e.dy5hool 10am
on
nap
He Bp


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street


Hour oi Prayer 6-30 a [ourl5y misng Worship 7:30 am
Sunday 5thool 9:30 s.m Morning Worship 11 a.m
Youth Ministry 51udy. Wed 7 pm Prayer- Bible Sludy, Wed 7 p.m
N00Hity Allar if0yel. (M-F)
FeedingtheHungIyeveryWednesday.. Il om-l pm
www friendshIDmbamlo ora InendshlODraver idislatilb nut


cornerstonee Bible
Fellowship {hurch
2390 NW 87 Street

Order of Services
Sunday$ sundayworship ila.m.
F ($1 $URd0f
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Mid week Service...7 p.m.
Zhoirliehoursoilhursday


^LCKS MUST' CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


A.M. Cohen Temple Church
of God In Christ and The
Eastern Florida Jurisdiction,
celebrates a living legacy.
Bishop Cohen was ap-
pointed Pastor of The Miami
Temple, now known as A.M.
Cohen Temple, in 1959, af-
ter the demise of his father,
Bishop Amaziah Melvin Co-
hen. .
Bishop Cohen's faithfulness


to the work of the Lord and
his community will be hon-
ored during this celebration.
A congratulatory dinner for
this man of God will be given
6 p.m, Saturday, October 17
at the luxurious Miami Mar-
riott Biscayne Bay.
The culminating celebra-
tion service a salute to Bish-
op Cohen from the South
Florida community, hosted


by Bishop Victor T. Curry Sr.,
6 p.m., Sunday, October 25,
New Birth Baptist Church,
The Cathedral of Faith Inter-
natiohal.
Please join us for this jubilee
celebration as we honor this
great man of God.
For more information, call
305-687-1046 or 305-754-
9268.
Hope to see you there.


Order of Services
SUNDAY: Worship Service
7:30 & 11 o.m.
{hurch School 9:30a.m.
WEDNESDAY
feeling Ministry 12noon
Bible SIndy 7 p.m.
mmamm

Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
milimmimmiliamililm


milim


IK~IZ~~I~IL~


BISHOP JACOB COHEN


Antioch Missionary Baptist
(hurch of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
mimiwWWrmliRiiMililm
Order of Services
G.urrblinday 5thool 8 30 o ru
Sunday Worship Serate 10 on
M.d Week Senice Wednesdry 1
Hour of Powerloon Day Prover
IT pmlp ra
Eening Wordisp 1p m



New shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street
www.nshilohmbe.erg
imiWWiliWWilifipHWWiM
Order of Services
betroom.ngwash.,non
SunChurrh5thool930em
y b (los rn
lues befomshela
Sun 7 pm


Pastor Dennis M. Jackson II to

be installed District Overseer
On Tuesday October 20 at 7 The community is invited to
p.m., at Faith Community Bap- attend as Bishop McKissick will
tist Church, 10401 N.W. 8 Av- render the installation service.
enue, Miami, Pastor Dennis M. Pastor Richard P. Dunn II is Pas-
Jackson. II, will be installed as tor of Faith Community.
District Overseer for Full Gospel
Baptist Church Fellowship under
the leadership of Bishop Paul S.
Morton.
After careful observation, he
was appointed by State Bishop .*
Rudolph McKissick Jr. 1
As District Overseer, Pastor
Jackson will coordinate all mem-
ber churches from Palm.Beach
Countysouthward intheircollec-
tive spiritual growth and develop-
ment. He is presently the Pastor
of New Mt. Moriah Missionary
Baptist Church 6700 N. W. 14 Av- PASTOR DENNIS M. JACKSON II
enue.


m~Z#IY#~:~'~IIZ#lrl#~:l~,l


I (800) 254NBBC


I U_


The Miami Times
IS annOUnCing OUr
CHURCH LISTINGS
----.....
eginning January 2010
>r ormation contact our nets church assistant,
Roker, 305-69-1-6210 ext 102
early, space is 1.mile..l Nc v Pricing


Pembroke Park (hurch of Christ
56th Avenue Ikilywood, FL 33023
aggaggympagg
Order of Services
Sunday. Bible Study 9 a.m. Morning Worship 10 e.m.
Evening Worship 6 pm
WednesdayGeneralBibleStudy 7.30 m
Television Program Sure Foundalion
My33 W8FS/(omcost 3 Solurday 7:30 a.m.
pembrokuperluburthofthrid.com pembral.eparlecodhell oud no


I


Order of Services
sunday unms..gwar.
shiporas11am
500007 I 661 01 9 46 0 m
Thursday Bible Sudy 1p e,
smeals, mu ser.ne




93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W.93rd Street

Order of Services
a ng urphip
,,,an w,,r up -
1 3rd Sunday 6 p.a
iusdayBibleStudylpal
schinu ..mbs up


I(tllllllllla~'~ll~Yn


Order of Services
schasinshoolesoam (50,)
oneswages,11..Is..)
YOUh MGul (4?) 1010410}
I hour before sunset
a.d wed Prayer sense lowed




AND HE SAID UNTO THEM.
GO YE INTO ALL THE.
\\OR R HE
GOSPEl./ ('6 E.
si
JOin the Religious Elite
in Our Church Directory

Karen Franklin at
305-694-6214


I


I ~~~ ^_


s


Hosonna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
imlimmarminum
Order of Services
1 Sunday School 9 45 am
Wonh.p IIom
Bable iludy Thursday I 30 0 e.
. fouth Manarry
Mon Wed 6 pm


s ecivreSf or edrO
Sunday School 9 30 am
Mem.ng Prm5e,/ orship 11 am
first and Th.rd Sunday
evenag worship at 6 pm
Pger Seer.ng & Bible SIndy
luesday lp


Order of Ser vices
Sunday Worship 1e.m.,
11a.m.,7p.m.
SundaySchool9:30am
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p m
Odn9580y Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


Order of Services
ad [adun y hool91 on
sundernes so.hlessadaps
Sunday ledle. Gible thdy 5 p rn
SundayinningWoPhip6pm


5 i nd.hool la
Thurday lam ilble
laudy Proper Meeting $1 [[
Bapw.m ThbilidiOrg
nor Sun lp "


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009


A.M. Cohen Temple celebrates a living legacy


Revival at

Daysprmg
Dayspring Missionary Baptist
Church, 2991 N.W. 62 Street, is
holding a revival beginning Oc-
tober 13 through October 15
7:30 p.m. nightly.
Rev.James'JD'Upshawfrom
Union Spring, Alabama, retired
bus driver for Metro Transit Au-
thority, is the revivalist.


MT. ZION A.M.E. (HUR(H


St. John Baptist (hurch


Logos Baptist Church


Alpha Agape SDA (hurch


3107 5.N.


First Baptist M~issionary


Brownsville





























































































































PUBLIC NOTICE
As a public service to our
community, The Ahami Times
prints weekly obituary notic-
es submitted by area funeral
homes at no charge. These
notices include name of the
deceased, age, place of death,
employment, and date, loca-
tion, and time of services. Ad-
ditional information and photo
may be included for a nominal
charge.The deadline is Monday
at 3:30 p.m.


BLArCKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Richardso
MITCHELL GRAHAM, 46, fork
lifter operator,
died October
7 Service 11
a.m., Thursday,
Ebenezer Unit-
ed Methodist
Church.


DEANDREANDREUPTGROW,
16, student,
died October
10. Service 12
p.m., Thursday
St. John MIs-
sionary Baptist
Church-


BETTY JOHNSON, 59, died Oc-
tober 9. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, Mt. Moriah
Baptist Church.





ERIC ALBREE COLLINS 45,
died October 8.
rvice 2 p.M

Calvary Baptist -
Church A.K.A.
The grandson
of Louise John-
son, formerly of
the Rail Road.
Shop.

MARY. KATO-LEE, 59, cook,
died October 7.
Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.





BISHOP LV ROBERTSON, 91,
retired detec-
tive, died Octo-
ber 5. Service
11 a.rn., Satur-
day, First Bap-
tistwGhurch ofs
Bunche Park.


Wright and Young
MARIA PEREZ, 52, died Octo.
ber 8 at Jackson .
Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Maida
Perez and Jes-
sica Perez; son,
Miguel Perez;
grandchildren,
Catherine Perez, Damian Herrera
Kimberly Perez, Michael Florez,
and Sabastian Cruz. Service 5 -8
p.m., Wednesday, in the chapel.

SAM BANKERS FULLER, 69,
died October
9 Survivors
ir clude: wife,
Gale- Hicks Full-
er; daughters,
Selena and So-
nya Fuller; son,
Darryl Hicks;
daughter, Qui-
ana Terry; sisters, Sarah Fuller
McRae and .Margaret Dale (Jim-
my); brother, Robert Fuller. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday, Memorial
Temple Baptist Church.

ANNA WILSON, 60, died Octo-

nu eSurvi
band, Daniel
Wilson; broth-
ers, Charlie,
Ralph Joseph
and Leonard
Reese; sisters,
Gladys Bowden,
Willie Pearl Lacey, Dorothy Reese,
Alma Jean Brown, Ruthie Elaine
Reese and Joann Pierre. Service
2 p.m., Saturday, Deliverance of
the Tabernacle of Nazarine.

BRUNO A. DELTORO, 71, died
October 1 at Catholic Hospice.
Survivors include: wife, Margarita
DeGarcia. Service was held.
-
GRACIE SHORTER, 86, died
October 9 at Aventura Hospital.
Service was held.

LULA MAE JENKINS, 90, died
October 11 at Westchester Hospi-
to Service was iteld

Grace
ANNETTE HOWARD HOLM-

ratPv1e ff r,
died October
6 at Cleveland
Clinic. Survi-
vors include:
husband, City
of Opa-Locka
Commissioner *
Timothy Holmes, daughter, City of
Opa-Locka, Police Captain Sha-
ron Gallimore (Robert). Viewing
6-8:30 p.m., Friday, Old City Hall
Building, Opa-Locka. Service 1
p.m., Saturday, New Birth Cathe-
dralof Faith.

MATTHEW HATCHER, 23, fur-

teudmOct amite
Service 3 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




LEWIS SANDERSON; 66, died
October 11. Arrangements are in-
complete.

FRITZ PIERRE, 63, died Octo-
ber 7. Service 12 p.m., Saturday,
St. James Catholic Church.


St. Fort's
LISE JEAN PIERRE, 81, dieid
October 6 at North Shore Medical
Center. Arrangements are incom-
plete.


Carey Royal Ram'n
JIMMY LEE KEMP, 43, land-
scaper, died October 2 at home,
Service 2 p.m., Saturday in the
chapel.

MUHAMMAD YUNUS KAZMI,
69, retired, died October 9 at Me-
morial Regional Hospital. Service
was held.

PENNY DAMAS, 87, retired,
died OCtober 10 at home. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

Pax Villa (Broward)
JEAN E. TULLUS, 88, died Oc-
tober 4 at Coral Springs Medical
Center. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Chnstian Life Center.

ROLAND PHILOGENE, 46,
died October 4 at North West Med-
ical Center. Service 10 a.m., Sun-
day, Sinai Seventh Day Adventist
Church.

SAINTILIEN GEFFRARD, 62,
died October 7 at Palm Beach
Gardens Medical Center. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Royal
PASTOR JAMES R. POOLE,
64, senior pas-
tor of True Be-
lievers in Christ
Worship Center,
died October 5.
Visitation 4-9
p.m., Thursday,
in the chapel.
Wake will be
Thursday, 1401 N.W. 196 Street.
Service 1 p.m., Friday, Peaceful
Zion Missionary Baptist Church.
Repast, immediately following the
service, at the church. Interment
12:30 p.m., Monday, South Florida
National Cemetery, 6501 South
State Road 7, Lake Worth.

.JULIA STAFFORD, 79, house-
wife, died Octo-
ber 8. Service
was held. -m







opMrARoVAdi FdOORcD,>b 7. it
4-9 p.m., Friday. Service, 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

MIGUEL LORENZO,70, bus
driver, died, October 4. Service
was hel .d

JERMAINE WILLIAMS, 26, la-
borer, died September 8. Arrange-
ments are incomplete

RUTHA MORGAN, 81, caretak-
er, died September 29. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
FLOSSIE MAE DENHAM COX,
88, died October -
7 at home. Sur-
vivors include:
8 daughters, 14
grandchildren
and 9 great
grandchildren.
Service 1 p.m.,
Wednesday (to-
day), New Fellowship Church.

Maker
FRAZIER KNIGHT, JR 56'
died October
12 at Broward
Medical Center,
Arrangements
are incomplete.


Gregg Mas4 Range M.


Range (Cocon e)
CARMETTA CASH BROWN
RUSSELL, the .
eldest daugh-
ter of the late
GeorgeThadde-
us and Maggie
Chapman Cash,
was born in Mi-
ami on Decem-
ber 13, 1915.
She graduated from Booker T.
Washington High School in 1935.
She lai;er graduated from Florida
A & M College. As an early child-
hood teacher, Carmetta worked at
Paul Laurence Dunbar and West
Dunbar Elementary Schools for
over 33 years. Carmetta was a
life-long member of Christ Episco-
pal Church in Coconut Grove. As
active as she was in her church,
she was just as active in her com-
munity. She was involved in sever-
al organizations such as the Black
Archives, History and Research
Foundation of South Florida, Inc.,
the Theodore R. Gibson Memonal
Fund, Inc., Alpha Pi Chi Sorority,
Inc., and Egelloc Civic and Social
Club. Carmetta entered into larger
life with God on Tuesday, October
6. Survivors include: sons, Per-
I (Ros ynl)dand Paul (K

grandchildren; and a host of other
relatives and friends. Litany Ser-
vice 7 p.m., Friday, Christ Episco-
pal Church. Service 10 a.m., Sat-
urday, Christ Episcopal Church.
Arrangements entrusted to Range
Funeral Home, Coconut Grove-

Nakia Ingra
DAMION RITCHIE 25, detailer,
died October 8 at home. Service 9
a.m., Friday, Merrell United Meth-
odist Church, Lauderdale Lakes,
FL.

JASCELY McKENZIE, 65, re-
tired, died October 9 at Broward
Nursing Home. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, New Life Fellowship
Center, Lauderdale Lakes, FL.

CHRISTOPHER MERCHANT,
28, died October 9. Service 12
p.m., Saturday, Metropolitart Bap-
tist Church, Davie.


Hadley-Davis
ROBERT MASON, 73, respira-
tory therapist,
died October
5 at Jackson
South Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Wednesday (to-
,day), Gould's *
First Church of
The Nazarene.

JORGE LUIS ARROYO, JR.'
22, laborer, died
October 9. Ser-
- vice 11 a.m.,
Thursday in the
chapel.




JAVON T. MARSHALL, 7
months old, died
September 28-
Arrangements
are incomplete-





GLORIA VICTORIA WALKER,
56, hair stylist, died September 26
at Aventura Hospital. Service was
held.

4..
Spence '
DOROTHY ABBERBACH, 77,
housewife, died September 8. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


MARY FRANCIS CHILDS 73
k '
hio me mOact r,
6 Survive
ir clude- hus-
band Roosevelt
d ghterFul heear

Katriena Bullard,
Tabitah Bullard '

Wni e I ull mm ntshoonns,
B. Bullard; sisters, Geneva Collier
and Daisy Adside; brothers, John-
inie W. Revis and Todd Revis; thir
teen grandchildren; a.host of other
relatives and friends. Viewing 4-8

rit i Co e
918-

SHERLON LAVONNE WILSON
51 retired teach- '
e died October
1 Survivors
include: daugh-
te Desiree
Smith sisters
Harriette nes,
Angela Gibson

v ngstChar eers, Willie F. Wil-
son, and Andrew Wilson; a host of
her relativNes anddfrien 4.thV

pel. inal rites and bu ial, Nathaniel
Thomas and Son Funeral Home,
Pelham, Georgia.

LONNIE HAYNES THOMAS aka
"Uncle Lonnie
or "Bubba "
95, died Octo-
ber 9. Survivors
include: sis
ter; Jane Scot
Madi FL.
n ph Rick '
Teomas/Dr. Ed
ward R. Scott, Tallahassee, FL and
Capt. Harry Brown; nieces, Dr. Jac-
quelyn Hartley, Cheryl Thomas Tate
Madison FL and a host of other
grand nieces, and nephews; as
well as additional family and close
friends; Viewing 4-8 p.m., Wednes-
day in the chapel Service 11am.,
Thursday, Mt. Sinai M.B. Church.

CLEO SHRADER MOORE, 95,
retired from

bl c SChou y
died October
11. Survivors
include: nieces,
Dee C. Ander- 7.
son, Dorothy C. ,
Anderson, Betty
J. Smith, Eleaner Lambert, Eliza-
beth Fabrikant, Vanessa Parker,
Willa Newkirk, and Breanna Ander-
son; nephews, Artie Anderson, Ber-
nie L. Anderson, and Melvin Rowe;
cousins, Ross Glass, Michael
Kenny, and Jerry Glass. Viewing
5-8 p.m.,Thursday, Church of the
Open Door. Service 11 a.m., Friday
Church of the Open Door.
.

h oEmOUr aEk e ('HRISTFUL, 73,
died October 8.
Survivor include:
brothers, Har-
old Ross, Larry .
Ross (Maria), '
Willie James
Ross (Ri.Iby) and
Donald Ross;
sister, Barbara Brown; daughter,
Elaine Miller; nine grandchildren;
twenty great-grandchildren. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, New Vision for
Christ.

CHARLES ALEXANDER GAl-
TER, 82, retired
sanitation work-
er, died October

9{udSurvivdrau -
ters, Linda Gai- .
ter, Muriel Gai-
ter, Alicia Gaiter,
and Sandra Gai-
ter; sons, Charles Gaiter Jr., Melton
Gaiter, and Darrion Gaiter; many
grandchildren and great grand-chil-
dren; a host of other relatives and
friends. Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
Temple M.B. Cht.irch.

CAVIN McPHEARSON, 54, auto
painter, died October 8. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

GEORGE BOWE, 62, retired
electrician, died October 7. Final
rites and burial, Nassau Bahamas.


KATRINA ROCHELLE NES-
BITT 'aka'
MAULTSB Y,
38, security
officer for 50
State Security,
died October

iln lud urvi
band, Leander
Nesbitt; mother, Mae Lee Griggs;
sisters and brothers, and a host of
other relatives and friends. View-

i1ng 12:4S ptu a trh h Service
p.m., y ap .



ISAAd edPRESTON DIEUDON-
NE, 2, c-
tober 11. Sur-
vivors include:
parents, Woul-
by Dieudonne
and Margarette
Francis andh

family members
and friends. .Service 2 p.m., Sat-
urday, Emmanuel Baptist Church,
7321 N.E. 2nd Avenue. Interment:
Southern Memorial Park.

ANNA ALLEN, 87, died October
10 at Jdckson Plaza. Viewing 9
a.m., Friday. Service 10 a.m, Fri-
day in the chapel.
,
Poitier
MOISES NARANJO, 63, tech-
nician, died Oc-
tober 7 at home.
Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
Peaceful Zion
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.



BARBARA COLEBROOK, 60,
pharmacyy tech-
nician, died Oc-
tober 9 at home.
Service 11 a.m.'
Saturday, Word
of Truth.


ALPHONSO
m c rka

Jay'S Medical Center,
GREEN, 49, admin- Servicy 3 p.m.,
ied Saturday in the
at chapel.


GEORGE, 6,


Baptist Hospi-
tal. Service 11
a.m., Thursday,
Second Baptist
Church.


REMONIA
istrator, d
October 8


LEVI JONES, 67, attendant,
died October
9 at home. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.


--
-


LOCITA BEAUBRUM, 39, died .
October 8 at
Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.




ELAINE THURSTON, 50, print-
er, died July 29.
Service was
held.






SHALANDA JOHNSON, 33,
home health
care provider,
died September
25. Service was
held.





RICKEY LEE HALL, 38, roofer,
died October 11 at North Shore
Nursing and Rehabilitation Center,
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, Octo-
ber 24 in the chapel.


Range (Homestead)
COREY ONTORIO GAMBLE,
33, died Oct. 9. Service 1:30
p.m., Saturday, St. Paul's Baptist
Church, Homestead.


IRENE WILL)AMS, 72, nurse's
aide, died Octo-
ber 10 at Jack-
son South Com-
munity Hospi-
tal. Service 11

etSaturd
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

DESSIE HUNT, 91, homemaker,
died October
6. Service was
held. .







EVANS C. SMALL, 75, waste
collector, died
October 6. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-

ds on a
tist Church.


117B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009











IYY


VIRGIL BETHEL, 79, died
Oct. 12. Arrangements are
incomplete and entrusted to
Mitchell Funeral Home.

in Memoriam
In loving memory of,


we miss you very much.

o on e a ys.


in MOMOFlam
In loving memory of,



.

.


acknowledges with deepest
appreciation and gratitude the
many comforting messages'
tributes, pr s, visks,

the David F. Davis Memorial
Scholarship Fund.

OliveSpGc o ,
Church of Jesus Christ, Rev.
Antonio Bolden, St. John In-
stitutional Missionary Bap-
tist Church, The Rev. Canon
Richard L. M. Barry, Rector
of The Historic St. Agnes'
Episcopal Church, Booker T.
Washington Alumni Class of
1960, Booker T. Washington
Alumni Association, Booker T-
Washington Alumni Class of
1962, Booker T. Washington
Athletic Association, The City
of Miami Fire Department,
North Dade Middle School,
The Birthday Club, The Dol_
phin Cheerleaders Gang, St.
Agnes oronetHal rAdams

Hewitt Mortuary.
We pray God's blessings on
each of you.
Eunice J. Davis, wife and
the entire Davis family


Honor Your


Loved One With an


In Memorial


(8
,

The Miami Times
.,,


'Ln mammmau


PUBLIC NOTICE
As a public service to our community, The Miami 77mes prints
weekly obituary notices submitted by area funeral homes at no
charge. These notices include name of the deceased, age, place
of death, employment, and date, location, and time of services.
Additional Information and photo may be included for a nominal
charge.Theadksts-Monday at 3:30 p.m.


The Miami Times
is announcing our
CHURCH LISTINGS

, By Church Catagory
..
eginning January 201U
For more information contiet
Our new church assisunt.
grah Roker. c..:+1-l-o2101 or II.12
Ely, space is bmited New Pricing


BLACKS MUST CONTROL TH-EIR OWN DESTINY


Faith
WALTER MASTERSON, 78,
laborer, died October 8. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

E.A. Steve
JUAN CORONA, 64, security
guard, died October 3. Service
11 a.m., Saturday I-fouse of God,
Deerfield, FL.
.--
Pax Vill
JEANIE SALOMON JEAN-
GILLES, 81, doctor, died October
1 at Mt. Sinal Medical Center. Ser-
vice was held.

DIEULA SAMEDI, 69, entrepre-
neur, died October 1 at Sinal Plaza
Nursing Home. Service was held.

CECEL PETIT-FRERE, 60,
contractor, died September 23 at
Jackson Memorial Hospital. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, St. Mary's
Cathedral.

LUCNER CALIXTE, 47, land-
scaper, died October 3 at home.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday Mt. Zion
Evangelical Baptist Church.

FRANCOIS H. MYRTHIL, 74,
carpenter, died October 2 at Aven-
tura Medical Center. Service 10
a.m., Sunday, Tabernacle Seventh
Day Adventist Church.

Paradise
VIOLA HARDY, 94,. died Octo-
ber 8 in E)altimore, MD. Service

le a.m., FSLaturday, House of God,
rrine, .

BRANDON WILLIAMS, JR.,
infant, died, October 4 at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Service was
held.

ANN E. MUNOZ, 81, died Octo-
ber 3 at University of Miami Hospi-
tal. Service was held.


e .




EZELL FINKLEA SR 'Buddy'

re esess oud e s
who extended their kindness dur-
ing our bereavement.
The Finklea family


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


Ra --El .TWWWW'"Y"W SWMI
EVELYN WRIGHT, 68, in- MILTON P. HORNE 85, re-
famous english teacher of tired supervisor-telecommu-
Northwestern died at Aventu- nations for Hospital, died
ra Hospice. Service at Greater October 11.
Friendship M.B. Church in Viewing 2 to 5 p.m., Friday
Clewiston, FL, Saturday the in the chapel. Funeral 7 p.m.,
17th at 11 a.m. Friday at Trinity Cathedral,
She-leaves to mourn a de- 464 N. E. 16 Street.
voted son, Keith; grand, Tyler Arrangements entrusted
and a host of relatives and to Gregg L Mason Funeral
eirf nds. Home.


DI4. LORETTA ROBINSON
10/02/52- 10/14/07

It has been two years ago
since we loss you and we were
deeply sadden by our loss.We
think of you in silence, and we
often speak your name but,
all-we have are memories and
your picture in a frarpe.Your
resting place we visit and we
pt.1t flowers there with care,
but no one knows the heart-
ache; as we turn and leave you
there. Someone so special will
never be forgotten and your
spirit lives within us. You are
forever in our heart.
Mom and family.

in Memorial
In loving memory of,
.


For transportation 786-444-
1110.

In Memorial
In loving memory of,


a


Caird of Thanks


FERDINAND W. GORDON
09/16/32 10/05/04

Years have passed. Days
have too. But there are no
words to explain the pain of
r missing youtheOften we

laughter, and even the tears.
But through it all, the memo-
des we will always hold dear.
We miss you and wish you
were here with us again, so
until we meet, in our hearts
you'll be till the end.
Daddy, we just want to take
this time out to honor you for
being a man of integrity, loy-
We Dvs ways.
From your loving wife, Eslin,
children and grandchildren.


KATRINA


DAVID F. DAVIS


Forever missing youl


YVONNE M. MCDONALD
'NANCY'
04/23/51 -10/14/08

Words cannot express the
loss of you in our lives, but
we trust that you are safe in
Go m remembering your

vision:
Seek truth in order to know
myself better.
Respectful and supportive
of children, parents, siblings
and others-
Strive to leave this world a
better place that it isl
Peace be with you.
Love always,
Mother, Mary. Alice Smith;
son, Robert; grandson, Ma-
lik, brothers and sisters, Carl,
- Kenneth, Lillian, Alice, Joyce,
Steven and Timothy.

|0 MOMOflam
Inlovingmemory of,


OIPE -KING SR


It's been 35 years, we miss
you. Your wife and children.

In Memorial
In loving memory of,
JAMES POITIER
12/24/23 10/16/98
We miss you.
May you rest in peace.
From your loving wife,
Ehzabeth; your children'
grand and great-grandchil-
dren.

Death Notice


JO EP AI E R


N A. HALL. 1


TONY E. FERGUSON


TRAVIS WILLIAM~S,'TRAV'


ROGENIA H. BARKSDALE,
aka 'Dinkey' 51, died October
8. Service 4 p.m., Friday Gene-
sis Funeral Home Chapel, 5749
Pembroke Park Rd., Hollywood.
LEOPOLD DALLAS
Death Notice 6/15/20 12/28/02


RUBEN WRIGHT, 47, died
October 4. Arrangements and
services by Mitchell's Funeral
Home, 501 Fairvilla Rd, Orlan-
do, FL 32808. He is survived by
two sisters Nadine Wright Drew
(Miami) and Felecia Wright
Sanders (Birmingham, AL).


SELVIN8. DALLAS


Grandpa, you are missed`


1RR T~FMI~MITIMF~ nCTnRFRld-7nOnP I


Death ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ et NoieDat oie nMmrimCr o hns ..er


HAI.I.-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, RA.
1900 NORTHWEST 54TH STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142 HFHMORTURARY8@BELLSOUTH.NET
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"
rrGod.cores and we care"












~8~(8fes9arr~bb%


The I's ...


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e


---L ~--~


is inundated with violence, drugs, abandonment and
abuse has helped the students illustrate their pain
and hurt on stage to their peers and sometimes par-
ents.
"This is not a hospital but it is a healing station,"
said PAVAC director Charlette Seward who was in-
strumental in bringing the program to Northwestern.
"There is a lot of pain in the room."
In her youth, Seward dreamed of owning an or-
phanage. After years of becoming the mother to
motherless and father to the fatherless in the PAVAC
program, Seward dreams has come to pass.
Jalessa.calls Seward a "mother" for she is the only
mother that she knows who has clothed, feed and
taken care of her like her own.
Seward has made it her business to make sure the
guys "pull their pants up" and the girls act like young
ladies with no tight clothes or hairstyle that disguise
their youth. Students try to stay on ball to prevent a
trip to Seward's office with the blinds shut.
In addition, for the last 14 years, she has helped
nurture dozens of talented artists who have gone on
to pursue careers in musical theater and production,
choreography, Broadway and film including Tavares
Wilson and Mimi Jimenez.
"I have the kids longer than their parents," said
Seward who spends close to five to eight hours help-
ing the students perfect their craft.
But Seward, the three-time Teacher of the Year at
Northwestern, work is not yet finished.
"Mrs. Seward told me it is okay to be good," said
Please turri to FESTIVAL 3C


By Sandra J. Charit~e


While hundreds of students in Miami-Dade County
will be preparing to re-enter another school year next
August, 16 of the 38 students enrolled in the Miami
Northwestern Senior High's performing and Visual
Arts Center (PAVAC) Drama will be embarking on a
tour in Scotland.
Northwestern was among the 61 schools out of
2100 schools to be chosen for the'Scotland French
Festival. .
"It is a wonderful opportunity," said Jalessa Wil-
son, 17.
The trip is a dream come true for the touring com-
pany comprised of seven seniors, seven juniors, four
sophomores and one freshman in the Liberty City
school.,PAVAC has performed all over the city and
county. Giving tribute to music icons such as Mi-
chael Jackson; but behind the smiles and the danc-
ing, there lays a group of students with stories that
will touch your heart.
"Many people think that we just get on stage and
perform but it is more than that, said senior James
Hicks, a multi-talented artist who originally did not
want to get involved with the program nor attend
Northwestern High. When we go to theatre compe-
titions, a lot of schools knew our name but they don't
know what we go through."
HOME FOR THE HOMELESS
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


FAMU used their brag- 4-tou
ging rights straight-up. Cora
Story: Cookman has lost man
4-straight games, while erho
FAMU has won 4-straight while
games with the big test last
against U of M and BCU ell St
the last Saturday in No- given
member. Jayv
Meanwhile, Har-
court "Sporty Min-
go" Clark parked
his Cadillac on the
side and got out it,
A few minutes later
he moved his vehicle
to a spot he thought
was safer. A few min-
utes later another EDWARDS
Cadillac parked in
the spot and Clark ,
noticed a gentleman sitting vin L
in the driver's side. Having ris,
forgotten that he'd moved Khal
his own car, he went to the.
car and demanded
that the gentle- -
man get out. After
a brief discussion,
Clark remembered
parking his car in
another spot and
apologized for his
aggressiveness.
* * * * THOMPSON
Congratula-
tions to Miami
Central, Miami Northwest- tive
ern, and Booker T. Wash- and
ington for being cited by natio
ESPN Pride Magazine, ac- that
cording to Caleb the
Crosby, statman day,
for Northwest- of th
: ern High. ESPN Dorm
stated that Miami ently
Central's Jeffery sprin
Godfrey, quar- resul
terback, amazed degr
over 84-points
in two playoff Kibb
RGE games, threw for trolli
2 8 t ou chdo w ns meet
and nearly 3,000 men
yards, won the Summer cessa
Accuracy Award with She
500-points, and threw that
17-touchdown passes and/
against Miami Beach 'will b
High, Miami springs, and For
Hialeah High. pleas
Jeremiah Hay, BTW 949-
quarterback threw for gage.


chdowns against
l Gables and that
y again against pow-
use Northwestern
winning over them,
Friday, at Traz Pow-
adium. Credit is also
to Lyndon Trail and
on Wrents as a re-
ceiver and defen-
sive player, respec-
tively.
Terry Bridgewa-
ter's seven touch-
down -passes won
over HML and ESPN
recognized Bridge-
water, Lorenzo
shinholster, Todd
Chandler, Kham-
brel McGee, Cor-
amb, Michalee Har-
Jerome Thomas and
id Marshall.
Hats are off to Coach
Billy Rolle, Earl
Allick, AD, Jeff
Rose, Assistant
AD, LaToya Wil-
liams-Oliver, BM,
and Kathy Torson,
trainer.
* * * * *
Speaking of Bet-
hune-Cookman U.,
Audley Coakley,
alumni representa-
to the trustee board,
John Williams, past
nal president, report
the upscale riot at
university, last Fri-
was ignited by some
e men in Bronson
itory. They appar-
turned on the fire
kler system which
ted in wetting a large
ee of clothing.
President Dr. Trudie
e Reed is now con-
ng the situation by
ing with the young
for understanding and
tion of such pranks.
also informed them
the guilty persons
or employees involved
e dealt with seriously.
updated. information,
e call Coakley at 305-
8874, Rainbow Mort-


Aramark


James Bush III who col-
laborated with Gene Fin-
nie, director, Virginia
Key Beach, Charlayne
W. Thompkins, treasur-
er, Historical Hampton
House, Professor Keith
. Allen Jonathan R. Black,
. Nana Blackman, Attor-
ney Yolanda Cash, Wanda
Collier, Djah Djah, Myron
Davis, Paul Lewis, Caro-
line Lockhart, Ann Meza-
lien, Hasan Shabazz, and
participation from Com-
missioners, Andrey Ed-
monson and Dorrin
Rolle. .
Bush explained
that the center has
been operating since
1975 and has served
thousands of young
people, sometimes
everi more than, one
generation of the
same family. He BE
pointed out that the
center is a corner-
stone of the community, at-
tracting students and, per-
formers from all over the
county, and that hundreds
of graduates from the Cen-
ter have gone on to profes-
sional careers in the arts.
Unlike most other facilities
in the Arts and Culture di-
vision, the Center brings in
enough revenue to cover
its operating costs. At this
writing, progress is being
made not to close but bring
about a favorable solution.
Protestation of keeping
the Center open inspired
Wesli Riy-Ves to compose
a song titled "Yes We Can."
The lyric touches on how
we can make a difference
reflecting on "An Old Rug-
ged Cross", "Genesis ex-
plains your destiny", "The
Lord is My Shepherd", and
Marching on till victory is
won". Call Thompkins and
Dr. Enid C. Pinkney at
305-638-5800 for the com-
plete copy.
* * * * *
Eloise Johnson had a
setbackforthepastmonths,
as she spent sometime in
Vila Maria Nursing Home
recuperating and .regain-
ing her strength. She then
returned to her residence
and was given a brand
new hope for living when'


50-members of The Liberty
Temple of the Improved-Be-
nevolence Protective Elks of
the World converged upon
her surrounds loaded with
surprises.
Firstly, they set up ta-
bles and chairs picnic style
and assimilated a "Fam-
ily Cook Out" to renew her
spirits. The smell of food
did it, while her husband,
Walter, became elated over
that fact he was given a
rest from preparing her
food himself.
Some of the
members demon-
strating their love
for Eloise included
Helen Brown, Pa-
tricia Brown, Bea-
trice Byam, Loret-
ta Coleman, Silque
Cobb, Wriana
Cobb, Marcus, All-
RRY cia Dean, Kenneth
Duncombe, Denise,
Genna Floyd, Al-
ice Harrell, Alice Hanna,
Loretta Holland, Azfalia
Hudson, Felix Haden, Ber-
tha Lankford, Terry Meal-
ing, Sr., Herbert Mealing,
Matthew Mealing, Mary
McCray, silvia Nelson,
Phyllis Patterson, Shana,
and Korean-Yul. .
In additiori, they had
church, sang songs, and
made her laugh. Then,
Edwina Prime presented
her a "money tree",
while the gang served
themselves on chick-
en, macaroni and
cheese, pigeon peas
& rice, dressing, po-
tato salad, corn beef,
cake and punch. Ev-
eryone left filled with
spirit, as well as a full
stomach. GE
* * * * *
Frank Pinkney, John
Carter, Horace McGraw,
Eugene Strachan, John
Williams and others were
in a heavy debate about
the Bethune-Cookman and
FAMU football teams, while
the Cookman side was the
butt of the talk and the


of Trustees, in
presenting ree-
ognition to cor-
porate partners,
such as The Ja-
son Foundation,
Denny's, Inc.,


A majestic salute goes out
to Florida Memorial Univer-
sity for its 130" President's
Scholarship Gala, which 11'as
held last Friday at the opu-
lent Fontainebleau Miami
Beach Resort. More than 500
guests filled the Fontaine
Fleur De Lis Ballroom. Early
arrivals for the cocktail hour
included the impeccable Dr.
Herman W. Dorsett, Sr.,
. Sumner Hutcheson III, and
Vernon Martin, along with
sequin gowns wearers Alma
Brown, Dr. Barbara J. Ed-
wards, Co-Chair, Dr. Gwen-
dolyn, Robinson, Ethel
Gottshaw, Patrice Elmore
and Dr. Bernice R. Smith.
The unseen announcer
brought on CBS4 news an-
chor Jim Berry as emcee
for the gala and toyed with
the audience regarding
the upcoming appearance
of Jason 'Taylor,, founder
and president of the
Jason Taylor and
wife Foundation. He,
then, introduced Rev.
Wendell H. Paris,
Jr., for the invoca-
tion, followed by Mel-
vin White director, .:
and the FMU .Con- TAl
cert Chorale filling
the heart, soul, and
mind singing "Lift Every
Voice and Sing" by broth-
ers James and Rosmond
Johnson to thunderous
applause.
The unseen announcer
also recognized Dr. San-
dra T. .Thompson, Interim
President of FMU, who re-
iterated the mission of the
university, as well as "Keep-
ing the Promipe", the theme
used for the celebration.
Next was the appearance
of County Mayor Carlos Al-
varez, along with Commis-
sioner Barbara Jordan, to
present the proclamation
to the interim president,
followed by remarks from
Charles W. George, presi-
dent, Board of Trusty.
Dr. Edwards, executive
assistant to the president,
joined John W. Ruffin,
Jr., vice chairman, Board


Management Services, LP.,
AT & T, Allied Barton Secu-
rity, GEICO, Ryder System,
The Pepsi Bottling Group,
American Airlines, Baptist
Hospital, Becker & Polia-
koff, Blue Cross and Blue
Shield of Fl., Cisco System,
FPL., Sodexo, Stephen H.
Greenberg Associates,
Weiss Serota He1tinan Pas-
roriza Cole & Boniske, City
of Miami Gardens, Ocean
and Bank United, Turner
Construction and UPS.
The guests listened for
a while and took part in the
delectable salmon and jazz
music by Melton Mustafa
and the Presidential Band,
while Y'Anna Craw"
ley, winner of BET
Sunday's Best fea-
turing Kirk Frank-
lin, Bebe Winans
and Mary MarY
waited to entertain
the people. She let
LOR out her soul and
left the audience
breathless.
Other dignitaries in at-
tendance included Joyce
R. Forchion, Jacklan Al-
exander, Yvonne Ben-
dross, Alphonso Burnside,
Patricia Carter, Dr. Carol
Christian, Dr. Langston
(Trey) Coleman, Rhett
Dalton, Pricilla Dobbs, Dr.
Randy James, Dr. Mary-
Angle Salva-Ramires, Dr*
Rose C. Thevenin, Jerri-
ca Wynn, and Dr. Lorraine
F. Strachan.
* * * * *
The proposed budget
made by County Mayor
Carlos Alvarez to The Afri-
can Heritage Cultural Arts
Center brought out a surge
of community activists to.
prevent the $11 million cut
for the cultural arts in the
2009-10 fiscal year. The
protest was led by Rep.


The South Atlantic Region of Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority held their Cluster I meeting at
Signature Gardens, Sept, 25-26 with the at-
tendance of Kathryn Wilson, Cluster I Coor-
dinator, Ella Springs Jones, South Atlantic
Regional Director, Barbara A. McKinzie, Su-
preme Basileus. Pi Delta Omega was the host
chapter. Rochelle Adger, Cluster I meeting
chairman, Eleanor Chamberlain, Cluster
I meeting co-chairman, Shawna Ferguson
Cleveland, Chapter Basileus. Approxiniately
350 AKA's were present for this Cluster meet-
ing with South Carolina, Ga. and Florida
AKA's in attendance.
* * * * *
Happy belated birthday to Willie Pearl Por-
ter who celebrated her 98th birthday on Oct. 5.
Birthday cards were given to the honoree and
a wonderful surprise was her grand-daughter
Crystal Porter coming in from Los Angeles,
Ca. to join un the grand celebration.
*********
Sister Gayle Sweeting Duncombe also cel-
ebrated her birthday on Oct. 5. She was re-
membered on that day by all of us.
* *** * *
Get well wishes to Marie Kelly-Devoe, Do-
ris McKinney-Pittman, Doretha Payne, -
Mary Dorsaint, Freddie "Jabbo" John-
son, Henry "Sanky" Newbold, Claretha
Grant-Lewis, Julie Clarke, Athenia Kel-
ley, Joyce Gibson-Johnson, Thelma Hy-
ley-Dames and Marjorie Nimmo-Wilcox.
* * * * *
Booker T. Washington Senior High School
Football Team did what our Tornadoes used
to do every Turkey Day (Thanksgiving) beat
Dorsey High School (now Northwestern).
Congratulations to our Tornadoes and coach


Earl Tillman. Sorry, Northwest- *......-
ern and cousin, Billy Rolle. The final score
was BTW 35, Northwestern 28.
* * * * *
Charles "Chuck" Gray was pleasantly sur-
prised by his two daughters, Joy 'and Caro-
lyn, returned home last week to surprise their
dad on his 90* birthday by giving him a won-
derful birthday blast in Richmond Heights at
the Women's Club on Oct. 10. Everett Abney
of Ft. Lauderdale was the speaker. bo you re-
member the National Alliance of Black School
Educators? Among its founders: Chuck Gray,
Mamie Williams, Dr. Johnnie Jones and
Everitt Abney.
* * * * *
In our nation's capital (Washington, D.C.),
the CEO of the National Recreation and Park
Association and other D.C. officials open the
"Marvin Gaye Park" in the northeast park of
the city. Gaye was born and raised in D.C.
* * * * *
Returning home from Florida A & M Uni-
versity for this weekend battle with the Hur-
ricanes were Beq|amin McNamee, Raynal
Sands, and Chaz Wright. Drum majors in-
cluded Jonathan Boyce (assistant head
drum major) from IViarietta, Ga.; Craig Bea-
cham (Oxen Hill, M.D.); Wesley Hemmans
(Orlando, Fl.); Shawn Turner II (Atlanta,
Ga.); Rikki Wills (Miami); Garrett Solomon,
Jr. (Atlanta, Ga.); Howard Smart (Miami);
Devon Marrett (Fr. Lauderdale) and Otis
Clark (Riverdale, Ga.).
Sylvia Sands, Raynal grandmother, had a
sumptuous dinner for her and her roommate.
Daniel Goodmond, Cecily Starr Newbold
and Jasmin Lofton also returned from the
"Hill."


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009


O


~rrr 1 ~Syndirk~cated0~b Conten


START FRIDAY, DETABER 18" AT 1
NO PASSES ACCEPTED





we amens eam amum *** -
eam sha



Trip to Scotland is a rare honor for students geBlvd.


C NC TER MADE FR ESH

/ m L 6 6 a


THE M. ATHALIE RANGE CULTURAL ARTS FOUNDATION, INC.


EDEN Roc RENAISSANCE BEACH RESORT AND SPA
4525 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
Ticket Prices: $150, $200 arid $300
Proceeds benefit the M. Athalie Range Cultural Arts Foundation, Inc.,
a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.
Cocktail Reception, Dinner, Open Bar, Show

For Information and Reservations: 305-893-5468

BACARDI, U.S.A., INc. AMERICAN AIRLINEs AT&T FPL THE MIAMI HERALD
EDEN Roc RENAISSANCE RESORT & $PA MIAMI MARRIOTT BISCAYNE BAY ** MACY'S
THE MIAMI TIMES
This event is made possible by funding fom the Miami-Dade Counts Florida, Cultural Afairs
Department and the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners.


auces Must CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


LII_______~ __


Jackson brothers can't say goodbye


4.


Cherisse plans on pursuing
a career in film, television
or Broadway upon gradua-
tion.
"I love the arts," said
Cherish,
What pleases Seward is
many who graduate do not
stay away from PAVAC.
Northwestern alumna
Deidra Chiverton frequent-
ly attends Seward class to
assist the students in their
performance. After gradu-
ating from Northwestern
in 2006, she attended
American Academy of
Dramatic Arts (AADA) in
New York.
She will soon be on a
national tour for the mu-
sical, Drowsy Chaperone.


FESTIVAL
continued from 10
James who refuses to con
form to the "Avenue" which
is the street life and doing
all the wrong things. "One
of my goals is- to not become
a product of violence occur-
ring around us."
AHEARTFOR HEARTS
An incentive for students
is they receive community
service hours for performing
but their hearts have grown
in the arts.
Cherish James, 17, start-
ed performing in the sixth
grade.
The once quiet student
was uncertain what she


wanted to do in elementary
school, but attending Nor-
land Middle School in Miami
Gardens showed her what
her passion was. With the
help of her teacher Tanisha
Cidel, she fell in love with
the performing arts.
"I fell in love with the en-
vironment," said the bubbly
Cherish about the perform-
ing arts. "I never fell in love
with anything before."
Participating in the arts
and competing in different
shows encouraged Cherise
to pursue the arts at Miami
Northwestern Senior High's
Performing and Visual Arts
Center (PAVAC) program.
Now a senior and presi-
dent of PAVAC drama,


TRIP TO SCOTLAND
Northwestern's PAVAC
now looks forward to
attending the two-week
trip to Scotland. So
far, they are the only
Florida school who
will be attending the
Scotland Festival tour,
accordmg to Kai Green.
The cost per student
will be $5800 and they
are seeking donations'
So far, the group has
received $500 from the
City of Miami mayoral
office. For information
for donating to the trip,
you can contact Charlette
Seward at 305-836-0991
ext. 2326.


and


~"~~ct ~ZTa


honoring
Philanthropist and Corporate Executive
Mr. Josd Argamasilla Bacardi
Miami-Dade County Commissioner
The Hon. Audrey M. Edmonson
and South Florida Broadcast Legend
Mr. Jerry "Jay" Rushin

and featuring
BET Jazz Vocalist of the Year

Ms. Connye Florance
in a Special Performance of
her nationally acclaimed production

'Jazz Rhapsody'


I\


) 3C TH MIA 8M OCTOBER 14-20, 2009


-'Copyag hf


Material


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Ir have to taste It to believe it.











,V ,II 1I1 -- ~- ---


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of Marble, Seeded, or Plain, From the Publix Bakery, 16-or loaf
SAVE UP 70 .50


BLACKS MUSTI CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Adrlenne Arsht Center presents
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAY
A MUSICAL CELEBRATION WITH
GOSPEL AM 1490 WMBM AND JUBILATE, INC.
Back by popular demand! This series of free concerts is in glorious
.celebration of our community's best and brightest gospel choirs and
soloists.
With featured gLiest CeCe Winans, Cooper Temple Church of God in
Christ Mass Choir and the Free Gospel Sundays Mass Choir.
Performance is "sold-out," but there will be a first-come, first-serve line
for walk-ups the day of performance.
4 PM Knight Concert Hall FREE


MIEEEEillia


M


MIAMI CITY BALLET PROGRAM I
Program includes Company B, Allegro Brillante, Tschaikovsky
Pas de Deux and Symphony in Three Movements.
8 PM ZIff Ballet Opera House $19, $29, $59, $69, $85, $169


MIAMI CITY BALLET PROGRAM I
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $19; $29, $59, $69, $85, $169

ANM IA OR HSE MRTOcNA EMY
"BEETHOVEN'S ODE TO JOY"
Michael Tilson Thomas conducts Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 and
selections from Fldello
8 PM Knight Concert Hall
$15.25, $25.25, $54.25, $79.25, $103.25, $154.25
HERNAN GAMBA
Latin American musician Hembn Gamboa presents "The Cuatro of
Venezuela... Four Strings that Unite the Towns of the World.
8 PM Carnival Studio Theater (in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $40


cece winans


Free Aarsonne Arant center soure: Ivionaays ana baturoays at noon, starung at ine an easses tapern nourse away.
No reservations necessary
PRELUDE NEMR
OpensOctober23
FUU.-SEIMCE DWHMG
Ram
9 305.949.6722


puuim:r;oirirsiu


there a few months ago. Going forward
wilfrequire you to let go of every expec-
tation. Lucky numbers 12, 17, 19, 32, 40

SAGITTARIUSt NOV 21- DEC 20

did tdfdee ik ear sthi int tu
As much as you aren't sure why you're
here, you can trust the fact that whether
you see it or not, something incredible
will come from it. Lucky numbers 11, 16'
21, 18, 32

CAPRICORN: DEC 21 JAN 20
As things (evel off you've become
clearer about what you need to do to
cover yourself. Things look simpler now
that you understand where to keep the
emphasis. Let others cover themselves;
you've got work to do. Lucky numbers l5,
19, 21, 33, 38

- AQUARIUS: JAN 21- FEB 20
The last time you were here it looked
a little different. The second time around
you're amazed at how much wiser you
are and how stupid you were to get
sucked in. Thank God you know better
than to'do it again. Lucky numbers 7, 10,
13, 19, 35

PIECES: FEB 21- MARCH 20
Whatever this is, dont make the mis-


Miami City Ba~et


LE0:JULY 21- AUGUST 20
Your need to keep the locus on your-
self would be easier to take if your ego
knew its place. Etiorts to shine will suc-
ceed, but only to the extent that what you
have to share does as much for others
as it does for you. Lucky numbers 11, 15,
19, 26, 32.
,
VIRG0:AUGUST 21- SEP 20
Too many things are about to come
together for you to be getting cold feet.
What's in front of you wouldn't be there
if you couldn't deal with it. Right now that
means telling the truth and taking one
step at a time. Lucky numbers l5,19, 25,
30, 35 .
LIBRA: SEPT 21 OCT 20
Howdid this get to be all about you?
The give and take factor is always an
issue with you. If your definition of fair
comes down to what's. mine is mine and
what's yours is mine, it's time for a re-
view session. Lucky numbers 5, 12, 18,
25, 29


ARIES: MARCH 21- APRIL 20
Too much has come to light for you to
worry about who knows what. It wasn't
your intention to stir up trouble.This is no
time to get weak in the knees. Get behind
the idea that you came here to change
things. Lucky numbers 8, 12, 15, 16, 21
TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
No one expects you to do anything but
what you love. It's you who drives your-
self nuts with responsibility. Playing the
martyr has got to be getting old. Can you
picture yourself taking on a new role?
Lucky numbers 10, 13, 16, 21, 30

GEMINI: MAY 21- JUNE 20
What you didn't think would take off is
going over the top. Part of you is carried
away, but beware: being prone to ex-
tremes, you'd be wise to ride the fine line
between the thrill of it all, and the reality
of it. Lucky numbers 15, 19, 25, 28, 32

CANCER:JUNE 21- JULY 20
IVIaybe it's time for a reality check.
Whatever isn't working is due to break-
down; if you're aware of this, deal with
it sooner rather than later. Nothing will
grow imtil you stop long enougirto nur-
ture it. Lucky numbersl6; 17; 21, 24, 32


Heman Gamboa


talk of thinking that you didnt do the
SCORPIO:0CT 21- NOV 20 right thing. The rightness or wrongness
Too many its, ands, or buts are screw- of things is always relatWe-.and other
ing up your ability to enter into this with people's values rarely apply tquy-of our:
the same level of confidence that was choices. Lucky numbers 12, 15, 19075*8(>


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SAVE UP TO 2.60 .


Prices effective Thursday, October 15 through Wednesday, October 21, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St, Lucle, Indian River,


C 4 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTO 9


******* ** 4 thee eg*
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Copyright
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---I----- 1


THE MIAM TIMES


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ADVERTISING WOM01K


MIAMI AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths
good area. $2000 to move in.
786-399-5403
Rent with Option
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two
baths.$1300 mthly.
1-800-242-0363 ext. 3644
Unfumished Rooms
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI GARDENS
MIRAMAR AREA
Rooms for rent. $500 and up.
Houses for rent. Section 8
welcome. 305-300-7783
786-277-9369
NORTHWEST AREA
Rent the room, enjoy the
house. Central air, washer,
dryer, beautiful kitchen. $400
mthly. 786-663-8028.
Leave message.

I "

HOUBOS
1745 NW 47 STREET
Two bedrooms, huge den,
central air. Try $1900 down
and $595 monthly. FHA. Get
list from 290 N.W. 183 St.
NDJ Realtors 305-655-1700
3361 N.W. 207 STREET
Three bedrooms, central air,
remodeled. $1900 down,
$828 monthly. FHA. Get list
at 290 N.W. 183 Street.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700
.ATTENTION'
Now YouHCan ownaYour

...4 yg...
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty



TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing, and leak
repairs. Call 305-491-4515.

#

BFlOWARD ROUTE"
DRIVERS
We are seeking dnvers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The MiamI Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

COLLECTIONS
Two years experience
required with strong organi-
zational and communication
skills to coordinate collec-
tion process and cash flow.
Fax res3u0me7 8-3617



EarnMups 1 y un-
dercover shoppers needed
to d retail and dinin
es b hments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682

TEACHER NEEDED
with CDA to work in child-
care center. 305-836-1178



Don'tThrow Away Your Old
Records
We Buy Old Records,
s bue o 3 I ule
Reggae, Caribbean, Latin,
Disco, Rap or Bass. Also
DJ Collections! Tell Your
Friends!
786-301-4180.


BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
Renew $60 G and Con-
cealed.Traffic School, four
hours, $28. 786-333-2084
n

BEST PRICES INTOWNIII
.Handyman, carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
laying tiles, bathroom
remodeling. 305-801-5690


ApartmentS



GREAT NEWSII! .

PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
36 0 NW 336th4St.
ami,
A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: $698.00
APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MORE Ill

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COM RC LATEA)
1553 NW 36TH STREET

FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STAR G L9Y7,52009

,
Inurn rat ply.

change


1202 N.W. 61st Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, tiled floors, appliances
available. $750 monthly. Only
senous Individuals, please.
Call786-556-1909
1212 N.W.1 Avenue
$550 MOVE IN. One
bedroom, one bath, $500.
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

1229 N.W. 1 Court
$550MOVEINIOne
bedroom, one bath, 5550,
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

1245 N. W. 58 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$495 per month, all appli-
ances included. Free 19
inch LCD T.V. Call Joel:
786-355-7578

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1261 N.11V. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1306 N.W.61 Street
Two bdrms. renov, security
gate, $600, 954-638-2972
1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One bdrm,
one bath $425. Ms. Shorty
#1
786-2901438
1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080
140 N.W. 13 Street
$525 MOVE IN. Two-bed-
room, one bath $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-
7080 140 S.W. 6 St
*
HOMESTEAD
Two b roornsnone bath.
Call:305-267-9449
1450 N.W.1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath $425.
Two bedrooms one bath.
$525. 305-642-7080
1500 N.W. 69 Terrace
Beautiful one or two bdrms.
Section 8 Welcome. 305-546-
6533
1540 N.W. 1st Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly, $775 move
in,
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly, $975 to
move in. Three bedrooms,
two baths, $725 monthly,
$1100 m in. AH ap-9

Inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1541 N.W.1 Place
Rents reduced for short time
only! One bedroom, $500,
newly remodeled, air, stove,
refrigerator. No Deposit for
Section 81
Call 305-582-5091
1545 NW 8 AVENUE .
Two bedrooms, one bath,
ceramic tale, central air'
carpet, balcony, new
kitchen, appliances, laundry .
machme, quiet, paring.
FREE WATER
Move in today!
786-506-3067


CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same
day approval. For more
. Information/speclais.
www capitairentalagency.
CGm
DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.

nb w kt eba2wstile'
fresh paint, secured parking'
$595-$650. 305-528-7766
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify.Move in
special.One bedroom, one
bath, 5495, two bedrooms'
one bath, $595. Free
water!
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN

BeautifulTn bC rLom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
LAKEFRONT
; APARTMENTS
One and two Dedrooms.
Two months free rent-
Now accepting Section 8.
305-757-4663
Located Near 90th Street
and 27 Avenue
One unfurnished apt. and one
bt ts w er anod ir ne
cluded. Call 305-693-9486
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
One bedroom, central heat
and air, utilities included.
Stove and refrigerator.
305-21,9-0135
N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225

N. MIAMI AREA
One, two and three bdrms
available. 786-316-8373,
305-456-6883,786-234-6382,
305-316-3282
OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Monin FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water-m-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
786-521-7151
305-769-0146

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and 1 Ave.
Studio, $425 monthly.
One bdrm, 5525 monthly
Two bdrms., $625 monthly.
AII appliances included.
FREE 19 Inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578

Condos/Townhouses
21219 N.W. 14 Place
#625 Miami Gardens
Three bdrms, ttvo and half
bath. $1500 a month. First
and security deposit to move
in. Section 8 welcome. Tony
3()5-624-5881


10072 N.W. 12 Avenue
w00 m oy 86- -8b
1023 N.W. 47 STREET
Three bdrms, one bath*
$1300. Studio one bath
$700. Appliances, free wa-
terlelectric. 305-642-7080
1150 N.W. 100 Street
Two bdrmb, one bath, cen-
tral air, den. $1000 monthly,
954-430-0849.
1173 N. W. 51 Ter.
Five bdms, two baths, brand
new. $1956. $2400 to move
in. Section 8. 954-624-5906
1245 N.E.111th Street
Two bedroomiseone bath,
$850 monthly. Section 8 OK.
786-357-8885 Doreen
1274 N.W.55 Street

Ot eb fr7emat eeanwat
$525 monthly. 305-642-7080

Two 130 N.E. 66 Street bath.
$750 monthly, fenced yard,
newly renovated. First, last
and security. 786-308-0436
1456 N.W. 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080
1597 N.W.51 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, to-
tally remodeled. $875 mthly.
954-687-2181
1812 N.W.50 Street
two bdrms, one bath, $1100
monthly, Section 8 OK. 305-
751-6720, 305-525-0619


1756 N.W. 85th Street
$500 moves you in,
Call 786-389-1686.



1863B N.W. 42 Street
Beaumotifl. $60mothl, uatili-
tiesicluded. 763056-7 1457
5291 N.W. 15t StUret
Pivcue ater etance freecabley.
i60mntl. 305-624-3966


313 ..5r Street NE2AeAe
seffcuity. Cal305-751-6232












54227 N.W.7 COURT Ae
Incude water andrelectricity.
$600 monthly y.305-2671-9449
5541 N.W. Mam Couret

.$185 wkly t $6850t monthly.
86 Stret NE2 AvAea



Efciut ency. Call30554-7776
98 St N.W. 301 Avre
pletly furnished, pantry area ,
anda~t lio lcs, iloo s

therougout. Uetil ite and cbe
apinclued. $525 monthly.





$0 ey 305-836-8359

Furnishedl, f utilities icue.
786-267-70186,78069-333338




N THMIAMI AREA
Funsed studiomal, penriate
ut. 20diltie 78ncluded.










13010 N.W. 180 TERR
Free cbledr, air band use of
kitchen. 305-4835-2728

1161 N.W.139t Street
$120 a eekom, $240 t move
in,5 ncudscbecentral air
305-308-2084
13871 NW.lio 30th Aene
$85, i wpeekaly free utltes'
kitche, t baths, one perso.

786-457-2998


SS


MIAMI, FLORID;A, OCTOBER '14-20, 2009


SECTION D


WRY
191 St N.W. 11 Ave. Area
Four bdrms, two baths.
Section OK. 305-754-7776
19473 N.W. 28th Court
Cherry Bay, beautiful four
bedrooms, Fla. room, call
786-267-5859 or 404-296-
5365.
2120 N.W. 89ih Street
Three bedroom, one bath,
$950/month, new bath and
kitchen, Rod 786-290-4625.
2324 NW 85 STREET
Three bedrooms, two.baths,
appliances included. $1200
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
954-430-6264, 305-219-0827
2410 NW 95 STREET
Four bdrms, two new baths,
$1200 monthly, $3000 to
move in. Not Section 8 affili-
ated. Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776
2418 NW 94 STREET
Three bedrooms, new bath,
central air, bars. $1000
monthly, $ 500 trave-in. Not
Tkan Dellerson, Broker
7305-891-6776

Thr 7b8eNrWo sSTtRoE thS,
tchentralh ai $ 0y u rades
Section 8 welcome
305-331-2431
2540 NW 82 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300 mthly. 954-274-6944

Th b2dSr.W3. bdat ene
car garage, air, tiled, Section
8 welcome. 786-258-3130
281 N.E. 57 Street

tedb orTairo cti th
voucher welcome, call 305-
587-0501 or 786-797-7084
3028 NW 8th Road
Broward. Three bedrooms,
one bath. Air, $895.
786-306-4839
3030 NW 163 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath'
fully tiled, central air. $1300,
fbr dna i- 06-1245

3221N.W.11CT.
Nice four bedrooms, two
baths, den, garage. HOPWA,
Section 8. Call 954-392-0070
37 NW 47 TERRACE
Back house for rent in Mid
Town Miami are t Two b8e0d-

o y, water included.
305-915-9944
3900 NW 170 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths,
$1400 mthly. Section 8 ok:-
305-299-3142
404 NW 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
5900 monthly. An applI-
ances included. Free 19
inch LCD TV. Call Joel 786-
355-7578
4513 NW 185 STREET
MIAMI GARDENS
Section 8 OK. Three bed-
rooms, one bath with tile
floors and central air. A beau-
ty. $1365 monthly. Call Joe.
954-849-6793 .

4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-

2 .35 R6F8p3 ic
4915 NW 182 STREET
h rooms, tw60 baths.

505 N.W.130th Street
Four bdrms, two baths, Sec-
tion 8 ok($1500 mthly. Call
305-904-9421.
5173 N.W. 19th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$950 monthly, two months
security required.
305-510-7538.

600 NW 98 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. 954-274-6944
920 N.W. 89th Street
Doll house for rent. $1050
monthly. Section 8 OK. Call
305-439-8430
9405B NW 4 AVENUE
Quaiht one bedroom, cottage
a ss ce ruad air, wat
mthly. 786-514-1771
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths.
central air, tiled, fenced
yard Section 8 OKI $1600
monthly. 305-388-7477
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath.
. $1100 monthly. Call
407-497-8017.
Miami Gardens Area
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, Section 8, HOPWA. 954-
392-0070
N.W. 133 St. and 18 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Call 305-754-7776


WET
1875 NW 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, tiled floors. $900
mntly. Section 8 welcome.
305-331-2431
215-217 N.E. 55th Terr.
One bdrm, one bath.
305-331-4943 305-761-0061
2226 NW 82 ST-
Two bedrooms, one bath
' central air. $1000 mthly.
305-685-9909, 305-776-3857
2257 N.W. 82 ST
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$830. Free Water.
305-642-7080
2267 N.W.102 STREET
Three bdrms, one bath, wa-
ter. $895, 954-496-5530
2425 N.W.104 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1395 mthly, Section 8.OK.
305-75f-6720
2452 N.W.44 STREET
MOVE IN SPECIAL $4251
One bedroom, $550 monthly.
786-877-5358.
247 N. E.77 Street
One bedroom, one bath, re-
frigerator, stove, microwave,
water, parking. $700 monthly
plus sec7u 1Sectio3n38 ok.

3030 N.W.19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.
3418 N.W.11 Avenue
Four bdrms, two baths $1702
monthly, Section 8 OK.
954-624-5906
5505 N.W.5th Court
Two bedrooms., one bath, all
appliances, air, security bars,
$800 a month, first and last.
305-979-3509 after 5:30 p.m.
5801 NW 11 AVENUE
One bedroom. $650 mthly,
r8 6d-61ast3 $600 deposit
6250 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath
$800.TWo bedrooms one
bath $1100. Appliances,
Free WaterlElectric.
305-642-7080
6922 N.W. 2nd Court
Huge two bedrooms, one
bath, central air. Section 8
welcome. 305-490-7033
745 NW 107 STREET
Two bedrooms, air.
786-306-4839
7735 N.W.6 AVE.
Two bedrooms, two baths,
tiled and appliances. Section
8 OK. 786-277-4395
305-624-4395
7749 NW 2 COURT
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700 monthly. All applianc-
es included. Central air, free
19 Inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

7820 N.E. 1 AVENUE
Two bdrms, one bath. $925.
Appliances, free water.
305-642-7080
8143 N.W.5th Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
centra(air, washer/dryer hook
up, $950 a month, call:.
305-984-2162
8451 N.W. 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, water, new
kitchen, air, tile. $700, Not
Section 8 affiliated. $1750
move in. Terry Dellerson, Bro-
ker. 305-891-6776
86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS

Two3 s sb trhmdcueplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
so 9 t t
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bdrms one bath, first,
and security. Section 8 and
HOPWA welcome. .
305-244-6845
MIAMI SHORES AREA
9614 NW 5 AVE
One bedroom, one bath,
fenced yard, like new. $735
monthly. 305-793-0002
NEAR 54 STREET 12 AVE
Th e 1bceedsro n ,0twoob hs,
P Section 8 welcome
Available November 1
305-251-3668
NORTHWEST AREA
One bedroom $650
Twoh m 800 up.
305-757-7067
DESIGN REALTY
y

100 N.W.14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
lomlhand nationwide calling,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1140 N. W.79 Street
One bdrm, one bath, $580.
Free water. Mr. Willie #109
305-642-7080


ME
156 N.E. 82nd Street
One bdrm $650, Two bdrm
$800. No deposit.
786-325-7383
1803 N. W. 1st Court
Move-in-Special, two barm,
one bath, $600 monthly,
$900 to move-in. All ap-
pliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

19305 NE 2 AVE
ON THE LAKE
One bedroom, one bath
786-237-1292
1955 N.W.2 Court
$450 MOVE INI One bed-
room, one bath, $450. 305-
642-7080
1969 N. W. 2 Court
$550 MOVE INI One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air, free
water.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
5475. Call 305-642-7080
2141 N.W.91st Street
One bedroom, one bath,
private driveway, air. $625
monthly.786-663-0234
220 N.W. 16 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$600. Appliances.
305-642-7080
2365 N. W. 97 Street, Rear-B
One bdrm., $620 monthly, first
and last to move in. 305-
691-2703, 786-515-3020
2515 N.W. 52 Street #2
One bedroom, tiled, air, no
appliances. $550 monthly.
$1100 to move in.
954-522-4645
2751 N.W.46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849
2972 N.W. 61 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, 5550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
3301 N.W.51 Street
One bedroom, one bath.$6Q0
moves you in. Appliances in-
cluded. 786-389-1686
3669Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two -
bedrooms 5650, stove, re-
Irigerator, air 305-642-7080
411 N.W. 37 STREET
Studios, $450 monthly. All
appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
448 N.W.7 Street
One bdrm, nice. $425 mtihy.
305-557-1750 a
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699
5200 N.W. 26 AVENUE
Two bedrooms. $600. Refrig-
erator, stove, air. Ask for Spe.
cials. 786-663-8862
5520 S.W. 32nd Street
Pemroke Park Area
Two and one half bedrooms,
one bath, with living room and
washer and dryer connection,
$850 monthly, $1450 move
in. 7 STREET

One bedroom. $680 mthly.
First, last and security.

60203N W. Oenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
d $ 0$48morn t ly, w ne
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699
7001 NW 15 AVENUE
Move-in special One bed-
room. one bath. $399 per
month, 5600 to move in. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD T.V. Call Joel:
786-355-7578

8475 14.E. 2nd Avenue
Onet onnd8two bd 4a7p .6Sec- .
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Ne neW cdomt bdrms'
Call 786-355-5665
ALLAPATTAH AREA
One and two bedrooms one
bath, air. 786-597-3999


Apag@gg 5.


.
RALPH MANRESA
Advertising consultant
305-694-6210, Ext.109

One Family Serving Since 1923
THE LARGEST MINORITY
us AE














, ~30C~


UET HALL

$425 for 13 wedd g i etc.
weeks in pnnt 1290 All Baba
Call: 305-694-6210 (west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
Fax: 305-694-6211 305-796-9558
ins.

Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional, Safe & Confldential Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP

2 2
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT a meeting of
the City of Miami Commission has been scheduled
for Thursday, October 22, 2009, at the City of
Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami,
Florida 33133. A private attorney-client session
will be conducted under the parameters of F.S.
5286.011(8) [2008]. The person chairing the City
of Miami Commission meeting will announce the
commencement of an attorney-client session,
closed to the public, for purposes of discussing the
pending consolidated litigation cases of: Sidney
S. and Danielle Wellman vs. City of Miami, Case
No.: 99-19523 CA (15), consolidated with Nadine
Theodore v. City of Miami, Case No.: 99-28417 CA
(15), pending in the Circuit Court of the 11m Judicial
Circuit in and for Miami-Dade County, Florida, to
which the City is presently a party. This, private
meeting will begin at approximately 2:00 p.m. (or as
soon thereafter as the Commissioners' schedules
permit) and conclude approximately one hour later.
The session will be attended by the members of
the City Commission: Chairman Joe Sanchez,
Angel Gonzalez, Marc Sarnoff, Tomas Regalado,
and Michelle Spence-Jones; the City Manager,
Pedro G. Hemandez; the City Attorney, Julie O.
Bru; Deputy City Attorney, Warren Bittner; Joseph
Serota, Esq., and John J. Quick, Esq. A certified
court reporter will be present to ensure that the
session is fully transcribed and the transcript will
be made public upon the conclusion of the above-
citeds ongoing litigation. At the conclusion of the
attorney-client session, the regular Commission
meeting will be reopened and the person chairing
the Commission meeting will announce the
termination of the attorney-client session.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


invitation to Prequalify to Bid

sor
NEW MARGINS
BALLPARK Hunt / Moss
Construction Managers

Hunt/Moss Construction in conjunction with the
Florida Marlins would like to announce an invita-
tion to prequalify to bid on the below listed Bid
Packages for the construction of the new Florida
Marlins Ballpark'

Firms interested in bidding the bid packages
noted below must prequalify in order to sub-
mit a bid. Prequalification forms can be ob-
tained at www.huntmossJv.com or by con-
tacting Michelle Daniels (mdaniels@mos-,
semail.com) at Hunt/Moss at 305-325-0577.
Prequalification forms will be accepted up un-
til the Prequalification Due Dates listed below.

BID PACKAGES

BP 62 Site Utilitie
Prequalification Due:slmmediately
Bids Due: 10/22/09 at 2:00PM
CSBE %: 20% SBE %: 2% CWP%: 11.5%

BP 67 Site Electrical .
Prequalification Due: Immediately
Bids Due: 10/22/09 at 2:00PM
CSBE %: 100% SBE %: 0% CWP %: 11.5%

Plans and bid packages will be made available to
all prequalified subcontractors. Cost will be sub-
ject to specific bid package issued.
Bid documents can be pu d
9
7920 NW 7* St. Unit 107
Miami, FL 33126
305-262-4920

Sealed bids will be delivered to:

Hunt/Moss Construction Managers
1380 NW 6* St. Unit 1
Miami, FL 33125
305-325-0577

Requirements of the project and bid are as fol-
lows:

* Project must abide by the Responsible Wage
and Benefits Code

* 5% bid bond

* 100% Payment and Performance Bond

* Owner Controlled Insurance Program
* County Sales Tax Savings Program


TH E CARRIE ME E K




REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP)
FOR ACCOUNTING SERVICES

Purpose: This RFP is to contract for Accounting & Financial Services'
with experiencelexpertise in non-profit accounting.
.
Who May Respond: Any business or person with the qualifications to
provide Accounting, Financial, and Tax Advisory Services and Financial Man-
agement Assistance for a non-profit organization, however licensed Certified
Public Accountants will be given preference.

PROPOSALS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 4:30 PM, November 6, 2009
TO: Denise Mincey-Mills
Chief Executive Officer
The Carrie Meek Foundation
1111 Park Centre Blvd. Suite# 202
Miami Gardens, FL 33169





PUBLIC HEA RING
.
The Goveming Board of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MP0) for the MIami Urbanized Area will hold a public heanng
on Thursday, November 19, 2009 at 2:00 p.m. in the County Commission Chambers. Stephen P. Clark Center, 111
NW First Street, Miami, Florida for the purpose of considering the following amendments to the FY 2010-2014 Transportation
improvementProgram:
1. Town of Medley American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Bridge R4trofit Project
This amendment will allow $474,027 of ARRA Surface Transportation Pagram funds, initially allotted to the City of Hiabah
Gardens for roadway improvements (FM 426783-1) to be transferred to the Town of Medley to retrofit the existing NW 116th Way
Bridge over the MIami Canal.
2. City of Hialeah American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Project
This amendment will add a new ARRA project for the City of Hialeah from the remaining allocation to the city from the Surface
Transportation Program (STP) ARRAfunds by the MPO Board on February 20, 2009.
3. Federal Transit Administration (FTA) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)
This amendment will include projects not included in the original grant award for the following municipalities:
Municipality Project Description FTA 5307 Apportionment
City of Coral Gables (FM #427591) Purchase of at least three trolley/shuttle buses $437,423
Town of Cutler Bay (FM #4275801) Purchase of at least two mini-buses $397,126
Tciwn of Golden Beach (FM #4275811) Purchase of bus shelters and enhancements $9,045
City of Miami Beach (FM #4275821) Purchase at least three mini-buses $898,188
City of North Bay Village(FM #4275831) Bus stop enhancements $65,081
Town of Suriside (FM #4275781) Purchase of bus shelters and enhancements $55,291

All interested parties are invited to attend. For copies of the LRTP, TIP, UPWP andlor further information, please contact the MPO
Secretariat, Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW First Street, Suite 920, Miami, Florida 33128, phone: (305) 375-4507; e-mail: mpo@
miamidade.gov; website: www.miamidade.qov/moo. It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to comply with all requirements of the
Americans with Disability Act. For sign language interpretation, please call at least five days advance.

NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT yveb-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address abdve; telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The.School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be flied with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13.
30-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


MIAM I- DA D F EXPRESSWAY AU TH 0 R IT Y


INDUSTRY INFORMATIONAL FORUM


IMPROVEMENTS TO SR 83611-395 CORRIDORS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MD'K) is hosting an Industry Informational Forum (the "Forum") to
present and update interested parties on the status of the Public-Private Partnership Unsolicited Proposal
received by MDX for the improvements of the SR 836/1-395 Corridors between LeJeune Road (NW 42
Avenue) and McArthur Causeway Bridge over the Biscayne Bay in Miami-Dade County, Florida (the "Pro-
posal"). At the Forum, MDX will address the following issues:
* Overview of the Proposal

* Overview of MDX Policy for Receipt, Solicitation, and Evaluation of Public Private Partnership Proposals

* Presentation of the Projects included in the Proposal

* Open issues and Project Funding
* Current Status of the Proposal

* Next Steps
The Forum will take place as follows:

Date: Monday, October 26, 2009
Time: 9:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m (EST)
Location: MDX Headquarter Building
3790 NW 21 Street
Miami, Florida 33142

The Forum will also be webcasted through the MDX website, www.mdxway.com Live broadcasts can only
be viewed with Internet Explorer and Windows Media Player. MDX welcomes and encourages input and
participation from all interested parties. MDX will accept written questions to be addressed at the Forum
(tO the extent practicable) until, Friday, October 16, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. Questions may be sent to the MDX
Procurement Office via e-mailed to hcorderocmdxway.com or fax to 305-637-3281.

Interested parties may register by visiting MDX website, www.mdxway.com, and completing the registration
form available in the main page. Additional information will be provided at the Forum about future opportuni-
ties for potential proposers to schedule 1-on- meetings with the MDX Project Team.

For more information or questions related to the Forum, please call MDX Procurement Office at
305-637-3277 or e-mail hcordero(mdxway.com


0_Q9.-diQ 11/3/2009 Plastic Can Liners
Apre-bidconference
has been scheduled for
Thursday, October 15, 2009
QQB-KKQQ 10/27/2009 Painting and Incidental Work aon1f r AeM ea 5
N.W. 28 Avenue, MIami
Florida 33167. All partlcipat-
ing vendors atre encouraged

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


BLACKS MUSTl CONTROL. THEIR OwIN DESTINY


Copyrighted Material
- -
Syn d icated Conte nt

Available-from Commercial News Providers


.


.


. .


(#0033)01)


D S THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 14-20, 2009










9D THY MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 14-20, 2009


ag

PUBLIC NOTICE
Miami-Dade Public Housing Agency
Update of the Admission and Continued Occupancy Policy,
Public Housing Lease and Community Policies

COMMENT PERIOD and PUBLIC HEARING
Miami-Dade Public.Housing Agency (MDPHA) hereby advertises the
proposed updates for the Admission and Continued Occupancy Policy
(ACOP), Public Housing Dwelling Lease and Community Policies.
30-day Comment Period:10-12to ll-10-09. Send written comments
to Director, MDPHA, 701 NW, 7 Ct., 16 Floor, Miami, FL 33136
Public Hearing: 11/12/09 MDPHA Board Room, 1401 NW 7 St.,
Miami, FL 33125, 4 PM.
For more information visit: www.miamidade.qov/housinq.
MDPHA does not discriminate based on race, sex, color, religion,
marital status, national origin, disability, ancestry, sexual orientation,
age, pregnancy or familial status in the.access to, admissions to, or
employment in housing programs or activities. If you need a sign
language interpreter or materials in accessible formatforthis event, call
786-469-4229 at lease five days in advance. TDD/
TTY users rnay contact the Florida Relay Service at
800-955-8771.



MiamI NICE Announces the Compassion
Capital Fund Demonstration Program
Request for Qualifications (RFQ)
(Miami, Florida) -The City of Miami, Mayor's Office of Faith-based initiatives and Community Outreach, as the
leeid intermediary organization for the Miami NICE (Network for Integration, Compassion & Empowerment)
partnership, is soliciting Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for non-profit Faith-based and Community
Organizations (FBC0s) interested in applying to receive, (a) free technical assistance grants and (b) become
eligible to apply for a Miami NICE capacity-building sub-award grant. AH applicants must attend one of
the mandatory infonnational sessions noted below
Eligible organizations are FBC0s serving Miami-Dade County for two consecutive years in one or more
of the six (6) Compassion Capital Fund priority areas, including: Children and Youth, Ex-offender Re-
entry, Homelessness, Rehabilitation Services for Addicts and/or Prisoners, Elders in Need, Families
Transitioning from Welfare to Work, and Healthy Marriage Initiatives; with a 501(c) 3 status; have an
annual budget of $50,000 to $1,000,000.
*Selected FBC0s may be eligible to receive a non-cash Technical Assistance award valued at $5,000 or
more per recipient
*And eligible to compete for a Miami NICE sutwaward grant from $5,000 to $10,000 (Subject to funds
availability). We anticipate funding at least 20 organizations.
FBC0s that were awarded Miami NICE sub-award are not eligible to apply
Request for Qualification is due no later than 2:00 pm, Friday, November 13, 2009 at City of Miami,
City Hall, Office of the City Clerk, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133.


Project MCC-M-043-A- OPF- Opa-Locka Intersection LeJeune
Road & Curtis Road Improvement .
Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for this project at
Miami-Dade Aviation Department.

This project consists of installing a traffic signal @ Intersection of
N.VV. 42nd Ave and N.W. 142nd Street. The work includes asphalt
paying, curbs and street*gutters, sign erection, traffic signalinstal-
lation, and site preparation and landscaping services: Package "A"
Asphalt, concrete sidewalk & curb, landscaping, and MOT Pack-
age "B" Pavement Markings, Package "C" Removal of existing light
poles, electrical and install new traffic system and signals.
THIS PROJECT (AS A 20% DBE GOAL.
Plans cost: $50.00 Refundable upon return of the plans.

Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Friday, October 23, 2009 @
10:00AM

Bids Due: Thursday, November 5th, 2009 @ 2:00PM
th
Pre-Bid Location: 4200 N.W. 36 Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor, Conf.
Room "F"

For more information, call Ginny Mirabal or J. Caballero
@ 305-876-8444.


S[~!


For more information regarding Miami NICE, visit ww.miaminice-org or contact Careline Romain,
Project Director, Phone: 305-416-1410, Fax: 305-400-5368, Email: cromain@miamigov.com
This solicitation is not subject to the City of Miami "Cone of Silence." in accordance with the American
wth Diudies Act 00990, pens needing speciahmmodahons to padcipam in a session may
contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to
each meeting, or at t(305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3) business days prior to each meeting.
Miami NICE is a unique public/private partnership comprised of the City of Miami, Miami-Dade County,
The ChlIdren's Trust, Center on Nonprofit Effectiveness (C-One), Family and Children Faith Coalition, and
the United Way of Miami-Dade.




NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding


WAIVER OF FORMAL BIDS FOR THE
PROVISION OF CLAIMS ADMINISTRATION
SERVICES

- City Hall 3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida


* ACableMIS
*
*.DUI 8 Tickets
*
*
*.$rintinal Defense
*
Personal lagury
100's of Lawyer






PUBLIC N
A meeting of the Value Adjustment Board
October 19, 2000, 10:00 a.m.. Commissl
ClarkCenter,111N.W.1stStreetMiamlto
I. Convene the 2000 VAB and approve a
ensuingtaxyear.
II. confirmemploymentofspecialmagis
Ill. Discuss and take actions to comply w
Rule,12D-9.013requiringtheVABto
organuational meeting.
IV Such other business as may propedy
A list maintained by the Property Appraiser
havehadtheirapplicationsforexemptioneith
as u 1 1101 eePM
hours (Le. from 8 A.M. to 5 RM. weekdays
in the list are: homestead, Sr. Citizen, wido
religious, chadtable, govemmental, health
source devices, historic propertIes, home
propertIes, labor organization properties,
development(enterprisezone) properties.
Ao io w a pa8la n
will need a record of the proceedings. Suc
verbatimrecordof theproceedingsismade,
upon which the appealisto be based
Americans With Disabi
Anyone with a disability needing
to participate in these proc
375-5641. TDD users may contact us
1-800-955-8771. Note: Sign language Inte
least five (5) days prior to an appointment d
the Clerk's office.
HARVEY RUVI


BLACKS 1MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


. o -
-


- *

a


-
-
a --


OU D NW NEE DT
C N ER RI AA HU
--LL E /

$$ G ET CASH $
* *
Bathroom Kitchen Plumbing eak
Ceiling Damage, Fire Dam
Broken Pipes?


n...asy, center am, sooe-
6-00pm --8-00pm
United Way of Miami-Deae.
3250 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Miams. FL 33129


: Monday, Novenber 2nd, 2009:


Tlimeday, Novenhesr 501, 2009"


. .


cITY OF MIAMIFLORIQA
. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED TO
REGISTERS LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO ENGAGING IN
LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS AND COMMITTEES
OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE APPLICABLE ORDINANCE
IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL),
LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.
Arrests AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
Bankruptcy MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON OCTOBER 22, 2009, AT 9:00A.M., IN ITS
WIHs/Probate CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, THE MIAMI CITY
Blverce/Custally COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED TO THE
REGULAR AGENDA:
s Statewide
A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH
ATTACHMENTS, ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED MIAMI SENIOR
HIGH SCHOOL, A REPEAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, SUBJECT TO ALL
OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT AND STREET COMMITTEE
AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN CITY CODE SECTION 55-
8, AND ACCEPTING THE DEDICATIONS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT;
AUTHORIZlNG AND DIRECTING THE CITY MANAGER AND CITY
OTICE CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT; AND PROVIDING FOR THE
(the "VAB") will be held on Monda'' RECORDATION OF SAID PLAT IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
on Chambers, 2nd floor, Stephen R
considerthefollowing: MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
administrative procedures for the
Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public Works
tratestortaxyear2000. Department, Sulkey and Land Records Section of the Construction Division,
illilfroposed Departmart of Revenue
conductcortainbusinessatits located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular working hours. Phone
305-416-1248.
come before the Board.
of all applicants for exempton who The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
er(a)deniedor(b)whollyorpartially represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views. Should any
eilcjft ,Tri eg I lners person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to
). The types of exemptions included any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim
w(er), disability, educational, Ilterary record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and evidence upon
and care facilities, renewable energy
s for the aged, low-income housing which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).
community centers, and economic
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
onidinraeddeMy nym agehnecador special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
h person may need to ensure that a Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
includingthetestimonyandevidence days prior to the proceeding or at (305)250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.
cities Act of 1990
g a special accommodation
eedings should call (305) Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
via the Florida Relay Service at City Clerk
rpreter services must be requested at
ate. Transportation is act provided by
N, CLERK (#003302)


,
The MiamI City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on October 22, 2009
beginning at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the public's best interest that
the City Commission ratify, approve and confirm the findings qf the City Manager
justifying the waiver of competitive bids and the award of an agreement for
the provision of Workers Compensation Claims Administration Services, and
General, Automobile and Professional Liability Claims Administration Services
to Gallagher Bassett Services Inc.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City
Commission meeting of October 22, 2009 at:
MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with respect
to the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the
City Commission with respect to any matt r to be considered at this meeting,
that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based
(F.S. 286.0105).
in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.
.
Priscilla A. Thompson, "CMC


(#003300)


F lcb,~ Twiutter continues


Copyrighted 1Vaterial


. ~Sy nd


providers












D 01 THE MIAMI TIMES, OC
,


FOR THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 13 19, 2009















INTO HIGDON:c ry sa s -

TH E tant stepping in.at Clark

E Atlanta in midst of con.
traversial firing*

SC STATE AND FAMU BATTLE FOR TOP SPOT IN
MEAC, NATIONAL POLLS; TROUBLE AT CAU


( .---~~1~11_1


UN DE RTHE BAN NER
WHATS GOING ON IN AND AROUND BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS

BAH HURFIRE D, TO SU E CAU:
According to the Atlanta Journal Constitution, fifth-
year Clark Atlanta head football
coach Ted Bahhur, fired last
Tuesday in the midst of a 3-3
start, filed a racial-discrimination
complaint Friday with, the U.S.
Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission charging that CAU
President Carlton Brown and
Athletics Director Tamica Jones
fired him because of the color of
his skin-
cm sports Photo According to the AJC story,
BAHHUR: Ousted Bahhur's attorney, Ed Gadrix,
Clark Atlanta football said they plan to file a federal
coach files complaint' lawsuit when the EEOC investi-
threatens to file racial ation is concluded
discrimination suit. 8 *
Gadrix said Bahhur's petition
before the EEOC documents "a wide series of events that
have taken place that have tried to force him out on racial
grounds.". Babhur is Palestinian. Brown and Jones are
blackEfforts by the BCSP to reach Bahhur, Brown and

Jones were unsuccessful.
Clark Atlanta initially announced the firing in a short-
worded Media Advisory last Tuesday evening saymg
Bahhur was relieved of his duties immediately and was
being replaced by assistant Keith Higdon on an interim
basis. Later Tuesday night the CAU Office of Marketing
and Communications released an official statement of the
firing with a summary of interlin coach Higdon's accom.
plishments along with quotes from Higdon and Brown on
Higdon's new assignment.
The official statement did not outline the reason for
the firing and eluded a statement by Jones of thanks to
Bahhur.
On Thursday, Jones told the AJC in reference to the
firing that "expectations for the team are not W's and L's
as they are that we have a responsibility to cominit to our
young men, as well. That's where we were most lacking."
Bahhur alleges in the AJC story that he was asked
questions in meetings and embarrassed by Brown and
Jones in ways that black coaches were not. Bahhur
reportedly also took exception to Jones' questions about
his commitment to the players. He said graduation rates
I
improved durmg his tenure, estimating that 15 of the
roughly 25 seniors graduared last spring, two more have
since completed requiremelus and an additional two are on
track to complete degree work this spnng.
Bahhur said he has also raised money for renovated
'facilities, including the locker room, weight room and
coaches office.
CAU had* made steady progress towards becoming
a contender ih the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic
Conference during Bahhur's tenure. The Panthers, who
finished 6-5 overall last season, their first winning sea-
som since +@t, were picked to finish fourth in this year's
preseason poll by SIAC coaches. Bahhur's team began
this season with three straight wins.before losing three
straight games. The firing came three days after a 31-13
homecoming loss to Kentucky State.
Bahhur compiled a 20-29 overall record during his
time leading the CAU grid program. Prior to his hiring in
2005, CAU had lost 39 of its last 43 games-
According to the official statement, Higdon has served
for five years as an assistant to Babhur in a variety of roles
including assistant head coach, defensive backs coach,
recruiting coordinator and pro liaison. He has a 15-year
coaching career including a stint at Tuskegee from
to 2004'


around it. Heck, I'm trying to sell tickets here. We're tryhig
to fill our stadium, and they want to see the ball flymg
and scoring, that kind of stuff. I'd like to see both teams
score and it be one ofthose high-scoring affairs where
everybody's on the edge of their seats for the entire game.
That'd be great!"
FAMU second-year head coach Joe Taylor is not so
sure. "SC State has a real strong defense,".said Taylor. "Of
course, everybody knows if you're winning consistently
it's because you're playing defense. Both defense are well
rankedin terms of the stats. Don't see either defense giving
up a lot of points. So, I dont see a shootout in my mind."
In other games involving conference leaders, CIAA
East leader Bowie State (5-2, 4-0 CIAA) hosts St Paul's
(3-3, 2-2) for homecoming. CIAA West leader Fayetteville
State (4-3, 3-1) is at Johnson C. Smith. SIAC leader
Albany State (6-0, 5-0) is at Clark Atlanta (3-3, 2-3).
Alcorn State and Alabama A&M, tied for the SWAC East
lead with 1-1 records, meet at Alcom State.




1. FLORIDA A&M (4-1) Knocked from the unbeaten ranks by
Div. I Miami, 48-16. NEXT: At SC State for MEAC throwdown.
2. SOUTH CAROLINA STATE (4-1)- Beat Norfolk State, 37-10.
NEXt MEAC showdown hosting Florida A&M.
3. PRAIRIE VIEW A&M (3-1) Defeated Alabama State, 24-10.
NEXt Homcoming vs. Miss.Valley State.
4, GRAMBLING STATE (2-3) Whipped Alabama A&M, 41-20.
NEXT: At Alabama State,
5. ALBANY STATE (6-0) Ran past Miles, 24-7. NEXT: At Clark

AtlA BAMA A&M (4-2) Downed by Grambling, 41-20. NEXT:
At Alcom State
7. SHAW (5-2) Done in by turnovers in losing to Fayetteville
State, 29-28. NEXT: At Chowan.
8. SOUTHERN (2-2) Idle. NEXT- Homecoming vs. Ft. Valley
State.
9. MORGAN STATE (4-1) Edged NC A&T, 7-6. NEXT: Hosts
Howard.
10. TUSKEGEE (5-2) Downed Morehouse 30-16. NEXT: Idle.


Details unveiled for Black College F B HOF


I IACKS MUST


CONTROL, THEIR OWN DESTINY


SWACAT


INDEPENDENTS
W L
Langston 5 2
Concordia 3 3
Tennessee State 3 3
W. Va. State 2 4
Savannah State 1 3
N.C.Central 0 6


Texas College 0 6
Cheyney 0 7

O r nB n Sr., RB, Tenn.



eE nekC J
s di vis stem Kentucky
SPECIAL TFAMS Robert Vipond, PK,
Tenn. 8 Kicked a 41-yard field goal vs


SIAC ,
CONF ALL
W L W L
Albany State 5 0 6 0
Tuskegee 5 1 5 2
Fort Valley State 4 2 5 2
Morehouse 3 2 4 2
Miles 3 3 3 4

Benedict 2 3 4 3
Stillman 0 5 1 4
Lane 0 5 0 6

pE J to n, Sc RB, ASU

1 et 26 0

-13 ackes, 2 tor losses a fumble recovery vs.
P AP AMS Christopher Khan Sr, P. TU
- Punted times for 41.4 yard average U
OFFENSIVE LINE Brian Beeler, Jr, DL, KS
-91% grade, no sacks and knockdowns


I ~i~:lr~r*:rr.lllllrcI3llr1.1~Rll;~ill~ I


CIAA 0 n
DIV ALL
5, DIVISION W L W L
Bowie State 4 0 5 2
Virginia Union 3 1 4 3
Eliz. City State 2 2 4 3
Virginia State 2 2 4 3
StPaul's 2 2 3 3

Shaw 2 2 5 2
J. C. Smith 2 2 3 4
St. Augustine's 2 2 2 5
Chowan 3 6
Livingstone 0 4 0 7



K Ct n e Q CS -
vs asu
DE MarCus & p E, SAC 3
LB Gerard Atkinson, Sr. FSU 1 to les in et-
...el.;... :u... st sm ou. FO .na
(f'Cy"'"'ed rD 1
ROOKIE Emmanuel Yeager, Fr, QB, BSU 12
of 22 for 170 yards, 1 TD, 3 ints oil the bench
vs. ECSU.


LUT WILLIAMS ,
BCSP Editor
Since the 2009 season began everybody's been wait-
ing for the South Carolina State/Florida A&M game,
Well, now it'ii here. Saturday in Orangeburg, S.C. at 2 p.m.,
the two most talked abouthighly ranked and talented black
college teams tee it up with a bevy of developments hinging



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15
TV GAMES
Morgan St. vs Howard in Baltimore, MD (ESPNU Llve) 7!30
v.,.m sv. v. un ote a
Alabama State vs. Grambling State in Montgomery, AL 1
West Virginia State vs. Glenvilk State in Institute, WV 1
central State vs. Lincoln (MO) in Wiberforce, OH 1:30
so0.ntra v. central seenomen ournam, so use

orkm na vsCAhany Stn Atlanta, GA 3:30
Jackson State vs. Texas Southem in Jackson, MS 4
Stillman vs. Miles in Tuscaloosa, AL 5
Savannah State vs. Bethune-Cookman in Savannah, GA 5
Tennessee State vs. Murray State in Nashville, TN 6
Chowan vs. Shaw in Murfreesboro, NC 6
UC Devis vs. Winston-Salem State in Davis. CA 6
Michigan vs. Delaware State in Ann Arbor, MI TBA
HOMECOM NGS
Prairie VBw A&M vs. Miss Valley State in Prairie VMw, TX 1
Bowie State vs. Saint Paul's in Bowie, MD 1
Johnson C. Smms vs. Fayetteville State in charlotte, NC 1
Saint Augustine's vs. Livingstone in Raleigh, Ns 1:30
Elizabeth City State vs. Lincoln (PA) in Elizabeth City, NC 1:30
Kentucky State vs. Benedict in Frankfod, KY 1:45
Alcom State vs. Alabama A&M in Alcom State, MS 2
Lane vs. Morehouse in Jackson, TN

v a y t 1 uge, LA 5:30
cLAssics
settle of the say
Norfolk State vs. Hampton in Norfolk, VA 1
Wiregrass FootballClas
Edward Waters vs. Concordia in Dathan. AL 4
TV GAMES ESPN Ma 081 10:3%.m. 2


MEAC an??&&':"so
CONF AU.
W L W L
Florida A&M 2 0 4 1
SC State 2 0 4 1
Morgan State 2 0 4 1
Hampton 2 1 3 2
NCA&TState 1 2 3 3

Bethune-Cookman 1 3 1 4
Howard 0 2 2 3
# W-Salem State 0 0 0 5
# Not eligible for title



,, ,a 8
M Kory oa as Fr., WRil(R, BCU
Mt 40yard FO ..II, I It 151 to ual Wn a
TEAMS Blake Stickson, So, Piop,
SCSU kkde 3 of 3 field goals (39. 30, 32) and
was 5 of 5 Ts vs. NSU, Also averaged 372
LINEMAN RyancaveSr.,RGHAMPTON-92%
grade, S pancakes in win over Howard,


gym motel on cots. We had to ride the bus across country (many still do).
There were four and five-hour practices. So this wasn't just a game for us.
it was a way of life."
A call for nominations will be announced in a few weeks, say orga-
nizers. Any member of the media, college or professional coaches and
players and the general public can make a nomination. Nomination forms
will soon be available at blackcollegefootballhof.org.


BCSPNotes

EDSU's Tillar appointed to'
D2 Football Committee
Elizabeth City State head football coach Waverly Tillar has been
appointed to the NCAA Division II Football Committee, a term of sen ice
that begins immediately and continues through 2013.
Now in his seventh year at the helm of the foot-
of
ball8p r nmn tio nTrx iead hao1 fb ree
coaches Timothy Clifton-Mars Hill, William Maskill-
Midwestern State). Some of the committee members
duties include; participation in weekly regional adviso-
ry committee (rankings) and national committee con-
ference calls beginning iri the month of August through TILLAR
December; serving as an NCAA game representative
at preliminary-round playoff games in November and
December as well as attendance at the Division II Football Championship
in a work-related capacity during the month of December.
Tillar, a two-time CIAA Coach of the Year, was named the head
coach at ECSU in January of 2003. Over the past threb seasons he has led
he Vikings to the best record in school history (9-3, 2006) and appear-
ances in two CIAA Championship games. He also serves as he President
of the CIAA Football Coaches Association.
Clifton, who has been at Mars Hill for 17 years, formerly served as
an assistant coach at Fayetteville State.


DIV ALL
W L W L
1 1 4 2
1 1 1 3
1 1 1 4
1 2 2 3
0 2 3 2


1 1 3 2
3 3


E. DIVISION
Alabama A&M
Alcorn State
Jackson State
Miss. Valley St.
AlabamaState


Southern
arnbl g late


SWACPLAYERS OF THE WEEK .


8 s .DE,
1 fumble recovery retumed 24 yards for TD
NEWCOMER Robatt Joseph, FC, DB, TSU
S E13 ckleMRI
UAPB Good on 2 Held goals (26 42) and both
PATS vs. Jackson State.


SCORES ------

Albany State 31, Miles ?
Alcom State 32, Miss. Valley State 10
App. State 55. NC Central 21
Ark. Pine Bluf20, Jackson State 13, OT
Bacone 35, Texas College 32
Benedict20,Canei5
Bethune-Cookman 9, Delaware State T
Bowie State 37, Eliz. City State 33

ce eNvi 8 2 28
Ft. Valby State 32, Stillman 13
Grambling State 41, Alabama A&M 20
Hampton 37; Howard 0 .
Kentucky State 20, Central State 14


Miaml48,FloridaA&M16
Milletsville 47, Cheyney 36
Morgan State 7, NC A&T 8
NWOkla. State 27, Langston 21
Peru State 16, LinoIn 14
Prairie View 24, Alabama State 10
Rutgers42,TexasSouthem0
St. Augustine's 27, JC Smith 9
St Paul's 18, Virginia state 0

se tet e 7
Tuskegee 30.Morehouse 16
Virginia Union 35, Lincoln 8
Webber Int'I 45, Edward Waters 24
W. Liberty 52, W. Va. State 30


on the outcome.
SCSU and FAMU have identical overall (4-1)
and MEAC (2-0) records headed into their show-
down. Both teams'iosses came against Div. I BCS
opponents. SCSU lost 38-14 to South Carolina two
weeks ago while FAMU lost to #ll Miami, 48-16
Saturday.
They are ranked either first or second in every
black college poll. They are the only FCS black col-
lege teams ranked nationally with SC State 11th and
FAMU22nd in the Sports Network Top 25.
SCSU was picked first and FAMU second in the
preseason MEAC coaches' poll and they are currently
tied atop the MEAC standings with Morgan State
(4-1, 2-0), who hosts Howard (2-3, 0-2) Thursday in
a game to be carried live on ESPNU. ,
So the outcome will determine everything from
national rankings to conference positioning headed
into the final five weeks of the regular season.
FAMU (30.0 ppg.) and SC State (27.6 ppg.) are
the hi hest scoring teams in the MEAC and each has
a slew of individual perfouners at the top of statistical
m
U QB Curtis Pulley leads the league in
passing (198 ypg.) and total offense (272.4 ypg.) with
SCSU QB Malcolm Long second in passing yardS
(173.8 ypg.) and third in total offense. SCSU WRIE
Oliver "Tm" Young leads the MEAC in receptionS
(5.0 .) and receiving yards (69.2-ypg.). FAMU
receivers Isaac West (3.6 rpg., 68.4 ypg.) and Kevin
Elliot (4.2 rpg., 62.2 ypg.) are just behind Young in
both categories. SCSU RB William Ford (76.6 ypg.)
is just ahead of Pulley (74.4 ypg.) in rushing stats.
Though the teams are pretty evenly matched'
head coach Buddy Pough of defending MEAC
champion SC State, says he's like to see anything but
a low-scoring game.
"Ill be honest with you, I hate going to a 7-6
ball game," said a candid Pough. "I don't want to play
m it, I don't want to be a part of it, I don't want to be


By Hal Lamar
Special to Onnidan.com
Former Grambling State University and NFL quarterbacks Doug
Williams and James "Shack" Harris say phone conversations between
the two of them over several years led to the creation of the Black College
Football Hall of Fame.
The announcement was made, officially October 9 amid the lay-
ish surroundings of the Four Seasobs Hotel in midtown Atlanta which
announced that it had signed on as a platinum sponsor of the endeavor
"James and I talk at least 10 times a week and we always found
ourselves talking about football and one of things we always discussed
'
was either it black college national championship game or either a black
college football Hall of Fame," said Williams, currently an executive with
the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers. "That's how this came about."
Williams and Harris have assembled an impressive group of for-
mer athletes, administrators, sportswriters and broadcasters to serve
on the Hall's selection committee. The list of notables include former
Dallas Cowboy General Manager Gil Brandt, former Pittsburgh Steeler
Executive Charles Bailey, ex-New York Giant General Manager Ernie
Accorsi, veteran TV sportscaster Charlie Neal and Ty Miller, sports direc-
tor of the Sheridan Broadcasting Network which annually names an SBN
All America team.
"We want to make sure the selection process for the Hall was fair,
said Harris, the former Jacksonville Jaguars personnel director who now
serves as senior personnel executive with the Detroit Lions. "We wanted
to make sure that people had some knowledge of the players. The group
we selected have written about them, some have scouted tite players and
so they are very familiar with black college football."
The first inductees will be announced February 20 dwing black his-
tory month in promised elaborate ceremonies at the Four Seasons which
will be chaired by former Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young, himself a for.
mer hurdler and swimmer at Howard University
"Shack and I are.not on the committee," Williams emphasized. "W
want to make that clear. This is near and dear to our hearts but 1. do
think it would be fair for either one of us to be on the selection commit-
tee. They have a conference call coming up soon. We won't be anyw ere
,
near the caal.1 will induct eight individuals into the inaugural class, seven

players/and or coaches and one contributor. Initially, the home for the
Hall will be the group's web site, blackcollegefootballhof.org.
Williams is not ruling out a "brick and mortar," building to house the
HOF.at some point in the future. In the meantime, the College Hall of
Fame which is moving to Atlanta from South Bend Indiana has already
committed itself to devoting a wing to the exploits of HBCU athletes.
Harris said the Hall will prove educational for youngsters and au ts
who may not realize the struggles HBCU gridders faced while playing
the game or their contributions to same.
"The history of the players who will be inducted in the Hall is inter-
esting. The early athletes were the best in the country bar none but there
were sacrifices that we had to make. For example, we had to sleep in the


FOUNDERS: Former
black college football
and NFL stars and
current NFL execu-
tives Doug Williams (1.)
and James Harris (r.)
announce the ation

oo II & f Fame
Atlanta last week. The
.
first inductees will be
announced in February,
(Photo by Patsy Lamar)


0241R EBOT 2009


M IEAlC 1 vs. 2! showdown arrives




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